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Sample records for hospitalized persons united

  1. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria–associated Lung Disease in Hospitalized Persons, United States, 1998–2005

    PubMed Central

    Billinger, Megan E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Viboud, Cecile; Montes de Oca, Ruben; Steiner, Claudia; Holland, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and trends of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM)–associated hospitalizations in the United States were estimated using national hospital discharge data. Records were extracted for all persons with a pulmonary NTM International Classification of Diseases code (031.0) hospitalized in the 11 states with continuous data available from 1998 through 2005. Prevalence was calculated using US census data. Pulmonary NTM hospitalizations (031.0) increased significantly with age among both sexes: relative prevalence for persons 70–79 years of age compared with those 40–49 years of age was 15/100,000 for women (9.4 vs. 0.6) and 9/100,000 for men (7.6 vs. 0.83). Annual prevalence increased significantly among men and women in Florida (3.2%/year and 6.5%/year, respectively) and among women in New York (4.6%/year) with no significant changes in California. The prevalence of pulmonary NTM–associated hospitalizations is increasing in selected geographic areas of the United States. PMID:19861046

  2. Quality and Innovations for Caring Hospitalized Older Persons in the Unites States

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Won; Kim, Sun Jung; Geng, Yan; Shin, Hyun Phil; Nakagawa, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Older persons are occasionally acutely ill and their hospitalizations frequently end up with complications and adverse outcomes. Medicare from U.S. federal government’s payment resource for older persons is facing financial strain. Medicare highlights both cost-saving and high quality of care while older persons are hospitalized. Several health policy changes were initiated to achieve Medicare’s goals. In response to Medicare’s health policy changes, U.S. hospital environments have been changed and these resulted in hospital quality measurements’ improvement. American seniors are facing the challenges during and around their hospital care. Several innovative measures are suggested to overcome these challenges. PMID:24490116

  3. Increase in nonhepatic diagnoses among persons with hepatitis C hospitalized for any cause, United States, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Tong, X; Spradling, P R

    2015-11-01

    Although persons with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may experience nonhepatic illnesses, little is known about the frequency of and trends in such conditions in a population-based sample of HCV-infected persons. Using hospitalization data collected during 2004-2011 from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we examined trends in comorbidities among all hospitalizations that included either a principal or secondary HCV diagnostic code (i.e., HCV was not necessarily the cause for hospitalization). We also compared comorbidities among all persons aged 45-64 years hospitalized with and without principal or secondary HCV diagnostic codes. The estimated number of hospitalizations among persons with HCV infection increased from 850,490 in 2004-2005 to 1,178,633 in 2010-2011; mean age at hospitalization was 50 years in 2004-2005 and 52.5 years in 2010-2011. There were significant increases in the prevalence of most medical and psychiatric comorbidities; the largest were for lipid disorders, chronic kidney disease and obesity. Among HCV-infected aged 45-64 persons hospitalized for any cause, the prevalence of alcohol /substance abuse, mental disorders, chronic kidney disease, pneumonia, hepatitis B virus infection and HIV infection were significantly higher than those aged 45-64 persons hospitalized without HCV infection (P < 0.001 for all). The prevalence of cryoglobulinaemia, vasculitis, nephrotic syndrome or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and porphyria cutanea tarda among hospitalizations with HCV infection was consistently low during the study period (i.e., <0.5%). The increase we observed in nonhepatic comorbidities associated with a high risk of HCV-related complications has important implications for the current HCV treatment recommendations in a greatly expanded treatment population. PMID:25894392

  4. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  5. Leptospirosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 1998–2009

    PubMed Central

    Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Steiner, Claudia; Guerra, Marta A.

    2014-01-01

    A small percentage of persons with leptospirosis, a reemerging zoonosis, experience severe complications that require hospitalization. The number of leptospirosis cases in the United States is unknown. Thus, to estimate the hospitalization rate for this disease, we analyzed US hospital discharge records for 1998–2009 for the total US population by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. During that time, the average annual rate of leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations was 0.6 hospitalizations/1,000,000 population. Leptospirosis-associated hospitalization rates were higher for persons >20 years of age and for male patients. For leptospirosis-associated hospitalizations, the average age of patients at admission was lower, the average length of stay for patients was longer, and hospital charges were higher than those for nonleptospirosis infectious disease–associated hospitalizations. Educating clinicians on the signs and symptoms of leptospirosis may result in earlier diagnosis and treatment and, thereby, reduced disease severity and hospitalization costs. PMID:25076111

  6. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Waldron, R L; Danielson, R A; Shultz, H E; Eckert, D E; Hendricks, K O

    1981-05-01

    "Freestanding" radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit. PMID:6784538

  7. Personal health among midlife women hospital employees.

    PubMed

    Angard, N; Chez, R A; Young, C

    1998-12-01

    We hypothesized that women employees working in a hospital environment would be particularly attuned to aspects of personal health, well-being, and disease prevention. We performed an observational study at a local hospital, offering free assessments in its outpatient women's wellness screening program to women employees aged 39-60 years. Data from the first 60 women to enroll in the program are presented as a test of our hypothesis. Undiagnosed hypertension, abnormal lipid profiles, glucose intolerance, alcohol abuse, abnormal cervical cytology, breast masses, depression, or combinations of these were found in 49 of the 60 women. Twenty-one women were obese. Most women with abnormal findings did not follow specific personalized recommendations for remedial follow-up, including referral to a specialist. An important percentage of midlife women employees at this hospital exhibited unhealthful personal behaviors, had unrecognized disease, and did not use recommended health screening practices. The data emphasize the benefit for employees who participate in medical facility worksite health promotion programs. PMID:9929862

  8. Information for managers in hospitals: representing maternity unit statistics graphically.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A; Mugford, M; Stilwell, J A

    1987-01-01

    Staff who organise and run maternity units contribute many statistics to their health authority but do not find it easy to obtain information about their unit from these statistics. Data that are collected routinely, however, can be used to provide each unit with a graphical profile of its activity and resources. The method described here was derived from the personality profiles used by psychologists and allows staff in one unit to assess the outcome, activity, and use of resources in their unit in relation to similar units, to explain some of the differences when these occur, or to highlight potential problems. Examples are taken from a study of maternity units in the West Midlands. It is concluded that the technique can indicate potential problems and usefully be adopted by those who monitor maternity care in districts or hospitals. PMID:3105784

  9. Hospital readmission from a transitional care unit.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Tyler, Denice; Helms, Lelia B; Hanson, Kathleen S; Sparbel, Kathleen J H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize patients readmitted to the hospital during a stay in a transitional care unit (TCUT). Typically, readmitted patients were females, widowed, with 8 medical diagnoses, and taking 12 different medications. Readmission from the TCU occurred within 7 days as a result of a newly developed problem. Most patients did not return home after readmission from the TCU. Understanding high-risk patients' characteristics that lead to costly hospital readmission during a stay in the TCU can assist clinicians and healthcare providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and help facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues. PMID:15686074

  10. 31 CFR 500.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person within the United States. 500... Definitions § 500.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term, person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  11. 31 CFR 515.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person within the United States. 515... Definitions § 515.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  12. Personal characteristics and back injury among hospital nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Owen, B D; Damron, C F

    1984-12-01

    Since back injury is the largest workman's compensation claim in most industries, the relationship between selected personal characteristics and back injury in hospital nursing personnel were studied. The sample included 64 female nursing personnel, half back injured and half not. Demographic: Workers were more likely to be back injured if they were older, worked longer on nursing units requiring frequent lifting, had family members with back problems, and had family members whose back problems began at an early age. Physical: The back injured had less muscle flexibility, less keen proprioception, and greater unequal leg length. Life style: Back injured were more vulnerable to frustration and stress overload (overstimulation), smoked more cigarettes, spent fewer hours exercising, and rated their physical condition lower. The variables with the greatest discriminatory power to predict back injury were a sense of overload, muscle flexibility, proprioception, family history of back problems, difference in leg length, years of risk in nursing practice, and smoking. PMID:6570060

  13. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section... General Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any United States... States, or any person in the United States....

  14. Aspects of Fear of Personal Death, Levels of Awareness, and Professional Affiliation among Dialysis Unit Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Lea; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined expressions of fear of personal death among physicians, nurses, and social workers working in hospital dialysis units. Results indicated no differences in fear of personal death between 71 dialysis personnel and 68 other hospital personnel serving as controls. Physicians had lowest scores of fear of personal death followed by nurses and…

  15. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section... General Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen or national, permanent resident alien, juridical person organized under the laws of the...

  16. 31 CFR 560.314 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person. 560.314 Section... § 560.314 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or...

  17. 31 CFR 560.314 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person. 560.314 Section... § 560.314 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or...

  18. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  19. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes...

  20. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes of sections...

  1. 31 CFR 103.39 - Person outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person outside the United States. 103... Person outside the United States. For the purposes of this subpart, a remittance or transfer of funds, or... the United States, shall be deemed to be a remittance or transfer to a person outside the...

  2. Hospital librarianship in the United States: at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Diane G.; Chastain-Warheit, Christine C.; Easterby-Gannett, Sharon; Chayes, Marion C.; Long, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines recent developments in hospital librarianship in the United States, including the current status of hospital-based clinical library services. Several examples of hospital library services are presented that demonstrate some characteristics of struggling and thriving services. The implications of the informationist concept are considered. The continuation of the hospital librarian's primary role in support of patient care is explored, as core competencies are reexamined for relevancy in the new millennium. PMID:11838458

  3. Kawasaki syndrome hospitalizations and associated costs in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Ermias D.; Holman, Robert C.; Maddox, Ryan A.; Foster, David A.; Schonberger, Lawrence B.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiologic characteristics of patients hospitalized with Kawasaki syndrome (KS) and estimate associated costs in the United States, using a large national hospital discharge dataset. METHODS: Hospitalization discharge records with KS for 1997 through 1999 for U.S. residents <18 years of age were selected from Solucient's hospital discharge records. These records are collected from most of the self-governing children's hospitals and approximately one-third of short-term, non-federal general hospitals in the United States. RESULTS: A total of 7,431 hospital discharges with a KS diagnosis were identified; 2,270 of the discharges were in 1997, 2,700 in 1998, and 2,461 in 1999. Boys comprised 60.0% of the discharges, and 76.4% of discharges were among children ages <5 years. For the 44 states and the District of Columbia with at least one hospital reporting KS, the average annual KS hospitalization rate was 10.2 per 100,000 children ages <5 years. The KS hospitalization rate for boys (12.0 per 100,000) was higher than that for girls (8.3 per 100,000) (risk ratio 1.45; 95% confidence interval 1.37, 1.52). Extrapolation to the U.S. population showed an estimated average annual KS hospitalization rate of 21.6. The median KS hospitalization cost for children <5 years of age during the study period was $6,169 US dollars. CONCLUSIONS: The KS hospitalization rate was consistent with that of previous U.S. studies, although the extrapolated rate may be an overestimation. The median hospitalization cost for KS was higher than that for respiratory syncytial virus-associated bronchiolitis and diarrheal diseases. Large hospitalization datasets can be used to monitor the occurrence of KS in the United States. PMID:12941859

  4. Length of stay and hospital readmission for persons with disabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Ottenbacher, K J; Smith, P M; Illig, S B; Fiedler, R C; Granger, C V

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Length of stay (LOS) and hospital readmission for persons receiving medical rehabilitation were examined. METHODS: A total of 96,473 patient records (1994-1998) were analyzed. Mean age of patients was 68.97 years; 61% were female and 83% were non-Hispanic White. RESULTS: A decrease in LOS of 6.07 days (SD = 3.23) and increase in hospital readmission were found across all impairment groups (P < .001). Readmission increases ranged from 6.7% for amputations to 1.4% for orthopedic conditions. LOS was longer (2.1 days) for readmitted patients (P < .01). Age was not a significant predictor of rehospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding variables associated with rehospitalization is important as prospective payment systems are introduced for postacute care. PMID:11111267

  5. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  6. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (<5% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6). PMID:26866729

  7. Personality disorders in a Swedish peacekeeping unit.

    PubMed

    Michel, Per-Olof; Lundin, Tom; Larsson, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the incidence of personality disorders and their consequences among peacekeepers. Moreover, most studies are follow-up studies in which, if at all, personality traits are screened for after the soldiers have left their service abroad. The aim of this paper was to study personality disorders in a longitudinal perspective. The method used was to screen the personnel in a Swedish mechanized battalion serving in Bosnia from March until October 1996 on four occasions: before deployment, immediately after deployment, 6 months after deployment and 1 year after deployment. Serving in the battalion were 724 individuals of whom 516 took part in the survey. The screening instrument used was the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). The result shows that the rate of personality disorders were on the same level, or a little bit lower, than in the general population. Moreover, personality disorders were related to impaired general mental health and to reported traumatic experiences. Personality disorders also seemed to contribute to poor mental health 1 year after returning home from a mission abroad. The implications of these results for the future selection of peacekeepers are discussed. PMID:16195111

  8. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  9. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  10. Temporal Trends in Hospitalization for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Sunil K; Wruck, Lisa; Quibrera, Miguel; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Loehr, Laura R; Chang, Patricia P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Wright, Jacqueline; Heiss, Gerardo; Coresh, Josef

    2016-03-01

    Estimates of the numbers and rates of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) hospitalization are central to understanding health-care utilization and efforts to improve patient care. We comprehensively estimated the frequency, rate, and trends of ADHF hospitalization in the United States. Based on Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study surveillance adjudicating 12,450 eligible hospitalizations during 2005-2010, we developed prediction models for ADHF separately for 3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 428 discharge diagnosis groups: 428 primary, 428 nonprimary, or 428 absent. We applied the models to data from the National Inpatient Sample (11.5 million hospitalizations of persons aged ≥55 years with eligible ICD-9-CM codes), an all-payer, 20% probability sample of US community hospitals. The average estimated number of ADHF hospitalizations per year was 1.76 million (428 primary, 0.80 million; 428 nonprimary, 0.83 million; 428 absent, 0.13 million). During 1998-2004, the rate of ADHF hospitalization increased by 2.0%/year (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 2.5) versus a 1.4%/year (95% CI: 0.8, 2.1) increase in code 428 primary hospitalizations (P < 0.001). In contrast, during 2005-2011, numbers of ADHF hospitalizations were stable (-0.5%/year; 95% CI: -1.4, 0.3), while the numbers of 428-primary hospitalizations decreased by -1.5%/year (95% CI: -2.2, -0.8) (P for contrast = 0.03). In conclusion, the estimated number of hospitalizations with ADHF is approximately 2 times higher than the number of hospitalizations with ICD-9-CM code 428 in the primary position. The trend increased more steeply prior to 2005 and was relatively flat after 2005. PMID:26895710

  11. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Cordula; Merten, Hanneke; Zwaan, Laura; Lubberding, Sanne; Timmermans, Danielle; Smits, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more detailed insight into unit-specific safety issues. The aim of our study was to gain insight into types and causes of patient safety incidents in hospital units and to explore differences between unit types. Design Prospective observational study. Setting 10 emergency medicine units, 10 internal medicine units and 10 general surgery units in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands participated. Patient safety incidents were reported by healthcare providers. Reports were analysed with root cause analysis. The results were compared between the 3 unit types. Results A total of 2028 incidents were reported in an average reporting period of 8 weeks per unit. More than half had some consequences for patients, such as a prolonged hospital stay or longer waiting time, and a small number resulted in patient harm. Significant differences in incident types and causes were found between unit types. Emergency units reported more incidents related to collaboration, whereas surgical and internal medicine units reported more incidents related to medication use. The distribution of root causes of surgical and emergency medicine units showed more mutual similarities than those of internal medicine units. Conclusions Comparable incidents and causes have been found in all units, but there were also differences between units and unit types. Unit-based incident reporting gives specific information and therefore makes improvements easier. We conclude that unit-based incident reporting has an added value besides hospital-wide or national reporting systems that already exist in various countries. PMID:27329443

  12. Paying the Hospital: Foreign Lessons For the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, William A.

    1983-01-01

    This special report synthesizes the findings of a Health Care Financing Administration grant which allowed the author to analyze hospital finance in six foreign countries and in the United States. The author identified the principal problems facing hospital owners, carriers, and governments in the United States, and he conducted lengthy field work abroad to learn how each country dealt with the same problems. One set of the author's conclusions makes more clear issues that are debated in the United States, such as the meaning of “cost-based reimbursement” and “prospective reimbursement”. Some of the author's findings show the difficulty of implementing policies often proposed in the United States, such as incentive reimbursement schemes. Other findings of the author show the conditions necessary for cost containment, such as strong representation of consumers and firm political will by government. PMID:10310003

  13. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 510.311 United States...

  14. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001). PMID:21529411

  15. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study. PMID:24894404

  16. Personal response systems in the United States.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, C

    1992-01-01

    In summation, although Personal Response Systems are relatively new in the marketplace they have made tremendous inroads over the past fifteen years. The next decade presents some difficult problems for this country in terms of its aging population and the delivery of quality, cost effective health care to all who need it. In light of these problems, the PRS industry can offer viable solutions-solutions for the U.S. health care system in helping to control and reduce the cost of health care delivery; solutions for industry in attempting to meet their employee health care needs; solutions for families who are coping with the strains of eldercare; and most important, solutions for many people who, regardless of age, could not live independently without a Personal Response System. PMID:10126442

  17. Unit-based interprofessional leadership models in six US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher S; King, Emmanuel; Stein, Jason; Robinson, Edmondo; Salameh, Mohammad; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The landscape of hospital-based care has shifted to place greater emphasis on improving quality and delivering value. In response, hospitals and healthcare organizations must reassess their strategies to improve care delivery in their facilities and beyond. Although these institutional goals may be defined at the executive level, implementation takes place at local sites of care. To lead these efforts, hospitals need to appoint effective leaders at the frontlines. Hospitalists are well poised to take on the role of the local clinical care improvement leader based on their experiences as direct frontline caregivers and their integral roles in hospital-wide quality and safety initiatives. A unit-based leadership model consisting of a medical director paired with a nurse manager has been implemented in several hospitals to function as an effector arm in response to the changing landscape of inpatient care. We provide an overview of this new model of leadership and describe the experiences of 6 hospitals that have implemented it. PMID:24799385

  18. Sudden Death in Hospital after Discharge from Coronary Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Peter; Sloman, Graeme

    1971-01-01

    In a group of 339 patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in a coronary care unit, 273 left the unit while improving and were expected to leave hospital alive; 23 had a cardiac arrest or died suddenly while still in hospital—17 died immediately or after temporary resuscitation and six were resuscitated to leave hospital alive. Ventricular fibrillation was found in 13 of the 20 patients attended by the cardiac arrest team. The incidents were scattered from the 4th to the 24th day after the onset of infarction. Risk factors in these “late sudden death” patients were compared with the 250 patients who left the unit while improving and did not die or suffer cardiac arrest. The patients susceptible to late sudden death were characterized early in their hospital course by the findings of severe, predominantly anterior infarction, left ventricular failure, persistent sinus tachycardia, and frequent ventricular arrhythmias. It is suggested that such patients be chosen for prolonged observation in a second-stage coronary care unit. PMID:5113015

  19. Designing Environments for Handicapped Persons: The Evaluation of Play Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hursh, Daniel E.; House, Diane J.

    1983-01-01

    Evaluation of Play Unit for the Severely Handicaped (PUSH) designed for the living room of a residential area used by 16 severely retarded multiply handicapped persons revealed that the impact of the unit was individualized and diverse, and that the responsiveness of the environemt's components appeared to be important. (CL)

  20. Sickle cell hospital unit: a disease-specific model.

    PubMed

    Adams-Graves, Patricia; Ostric, Elizabeth J; Martin, Mary; Richardson, Pat; Lewis, James B

    2008-01-01

    American urban hospitals often serve large populations of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Those hospitals that choose to implement an adult SCD-specific inpatient unit have the opportunity to acquire multiple operational benefits. Such units may ultimately reduce patient morbidity and mortality; improve timely access to quality medical care in a cost-effective manner; reduce overcrowding in the emergency department; and increase patient, family, physician, and payer satisfaction. SCD is a serious, painful, genetic blood disorder that affects a growing population of adults in the United States. A single mistake in the gene that codes for hemoglobin causes crescent-shaped red blood cells that are sticky, are stiff, and have a short life span. These cells cause blockages, tremendous pain brought on by lack of oxygen in the muscles, organ damage, stroke, and problems with infections. The cells' short life span often results in anemia. The unpredictable pain event-sickle cell disease with crisis-is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department and for hospital admission. For many SCD patients, the emergency department process and the general, overly conservative approach to pain relief lead to a delay in treatment and prolong needless suffering. Regional Medical Center at Memphis (Tennessee) established an SCD unit and developed an inpatient care delivery model that decreases the burden of caring for SCD patients on its busy emergency department, improves SCD patients' satisfaction and access to timely quality care, and reduces the needless pain and suffering of SCD patients. This SCD model may be replicated in large urban hospitals with a daily SCD patient census of five or more. PMID:18856136

  1. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  2. 31 CFR 589.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 589.312 Section 589.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS...

  4. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  5. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 539.313 Section 539.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE...

  6. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 539.313 Section 539.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE...

  7. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  8. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  9. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 539.313 Section 539.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE...

  10. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 539.313 Section 539.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE...

  11. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 539.313 Section 539.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  12. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION...

  13. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  14. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  15. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  16. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  17. 31 CFR 558.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 558.311 Section 558.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOUTH SUDAN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 545.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 545.315 Section 545.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  19. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 552.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 552.311 Section 552.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 552.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 552.311 Section 552.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY YEMEN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL...

  8. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  10. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  11. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 594.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 594.315 Section 594.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  14. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  16. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.311...

  17. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 562.311...

  18. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  19. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 593.313 Section 593.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES...

  1. 31 CFR 549.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 549.312 Section 549.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 549.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 549.312 Section 549.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 549.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 549.312 Section 549.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 549.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 549.312 Section 549.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEBANON SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  10. Personality and personal projects: linking big five and PAC units of analysis.

    PubMed

    Little, B R; Lecci, L; Watkinson, B

    1992-06-01

    This article examines the relationships between classical trait units as represented by the five-factor model (e.g., Digman, 1990) and personal action construct (PAC) units as measured by Personal Projects Analysis (Little, 1983). One hundred and forty-seven students were administered the NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1985) and two components of Personal Projects methodology during their first term in university. Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were related to problematic and positive project systems, respectively, with these effects generalizing across the academic and interpersonal project domains. Extraversion and Agreeableness were also associated with positive evaluations of personal projects, particularly in the interpersonal domain. Openness was distinctively linked with project initiation and value congruency. We suggest theoretical and applied implications of using PAC methods to expand and refine the classical trait research agenda. PMID:1635052

  11. Challenges in Hospital-Associated Infection Management: A Unit Perspective.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining a successful unit-based continuous quality improvement program for managing hospital-associated infections is a huge challenge and an overwhelming task. It requires strong organizational support and unit leadership, human and fiscal resources, time, and a dedicated and motivated nursing staff. A great deal of effort goes into implementing, monitoring, reporting, and evaluating quality improvement initiatives and can lead to significant frustration on the part of the leadership team and nursing staff when quality improvement efforts fail to produce the desired results. Each initiative presents its own unique set of challenges; however, common issues influence all initiatives. These common issues include organization and unit culture, current clinical practice guidelines being used to drive the initiatives, performance discrepancies on the part of nursing staff, availability of resources including equipment and supplies, monitoring of the data, and conflicting quality improvement priorities. PMID:26200734

  12. Decommissioning of a 60Co unit and estimation of personal doses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K H; Lin, J P; Liu, M T; Chu, T C

    2003-01-01

    Chang-hua Christian Hospital needs to uninstall the 60Co unit. The mode of this 60Co teletherapy unit is SHIMADZU RTGS-10. The original lead head was taken as the source container of this 60Co unit. The source head was dismantled and put into the prepared wooden box, after the source was sealed. This study describes the planning and dismantling of the retirement and transport of the 60Co unit, and personal doses measured during the procedure. This work estimates the doses of radiation received by exposed workers during the dismantling of the machine. The workers received doses of approximately 53 microSv. This study shows that the original lead head can be used as the source container of this 60Co unit. The 60Co machine was smoothly dismantled and transported by conscientious and careful workers, using planned and controlled radiation protection, following the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) rule. PMID:14653329

  13. A person-time analysis of hospital activity among cancer survivors in England

    PubMed Central

    Maddams, J; Utley, M; Møller, H

    2011-01-01

    Background: There are around 2 million cancer survivors in the UK. This study describes the inpatient and day case hospital activity among the population of cancer survivors in England. This is one measure of the burden of cancer on the individual and the health service. Methods: The national cancer registry data set for England (1990–2006) is linked to the NHS Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database. Cohorts of survivors were defined as those people recorded in the cancer registry data with a diagnosis of breast, colorectal, lung or prostate cancer before 2007. The person-time of prevalence in 2006 for each cohort of survivors was calculated according to the cancer type, sex, age and time since diagnosis. The corresponding HES episodes of care in 2006 were used to calculate the person-time of admitted hospital care for each cohort of survivors. The average proportion of time spent in hospital by survivors in each cohort was calculated as the summed person-time of hospital activity divided by the summed person-time of prevalence. The analysis was conducted separately for cancer-related episodes and non-cancer-related episodes. Results: Lung cancer survivors had the highest intensity of cancer-related hospital activity. For all cancers, cancer-related hospital activity was highest in the first year following diagnosis. Breast and prostate cancer survivors had peaks of cancer-related hospital activity in the relatively young and relatively old age groups. The proportion of time spent in hospital for non-cancer-related care was much lower than that for cancer-related care and increased gradually with age but was generally constant regardless of time since diagnosis. Conclusion: The person-time approach used in this study is more revealing than a simple enumeration of cancer survivors and hospital admissions. Hospital activity among cancer survivors is highest soon after diagnosis. The effect of age on the amount of hospital activity is different for each type of

  14. The federal government's use of Title VI and Medicare to racially integrate hospitals in the United States, 1963 through 1967.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    1997-01-01

    Explicit discrimination against minorities existed in the 1960s in hospital patient admissions and physician and nurse staff appointments. With passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with Medicare legislation in 1965, civil rights advocates within the federal government had both a legislative mandate to guarantee equal access to programs funded by the federal government in Title VI and a federal program that affected every hospital in the country in Medicare. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the Medicare hospital certification program was a major determinant in the racial integration of hospitals throughout the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with individuals involved in hospital and health care policy in the 1950s and 1960s. Other primary resources include archival and personal manuscripts, government documents, newspapers, and periodicals. PMID:9366643

  15. Hospitalization for esophageal achalasia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Lidor, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the outcome of different treatments in patients admitted for esophageal achalasia in the United States. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 8-year period (2003-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia were divided into 3 groups based on their treatment: (1) Group 1: patients who underwent Heller myotomy during their hospital stay; (2) Group 2: patients who underwent esophagectomy; and (3) Group 3: patients not undergoing surgical treatment. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and total hospital charges. RESULTS: Among 27141 patients admitted with achalasia, nearly half (48.5%) underwent Heller myotomy, 2.5% underwent esophagectomy and 49.0% had endoscopic or other treatment. Patients in group 1 were younger, healthier, and had the lowest mortality when compared with the other two groups. Group 2 had the highest LOS and hospital charges among all groups. Group 3 had the highest mortality (1.2%, P < 0.001) and the lowest home discharge rate (78.8%) when compared to the other groups. The most frequently performed procedures among group 3 were esophageal dilatation (25.9%) and injection (13.3%). Among patients who died in this group the most common associated morbidities included acute respiratory failure, sepsis and aspiration pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Surgery for achalasia carries exceedingly low mortality in the modern era; however, in complicated patients, even less invasive treatments are burdened by significant mortality and morbidity. PMID:26421106

  16. Non-Work-Related Use of Personal Mobile Phones by Hospital Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. Methods In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. Results The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. Conclusions This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends. PMID:25586982

  17. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  18. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  19. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  20. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  1. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  2. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  3. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001-2012.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001-2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  4. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001–2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  5. Ensemble-based methods for forecasting census in hospital units

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to accurately forecast census counts in hospital departments has considerable implications for hospital resource allocation. In recent years several different methods have been proposed forecasting census counts, however many of these approaches do not use available patient-specific information. Methods In this paper we present an ensemble-based methodology for forecasting the census under a framework that simultaneously incorporates both (i) arrival trends over time and (ii) patient-specific baseline and time-varying information. The proposed model for predicting census has three components, namely: current census count, number of daily arrivals and number of daily departures. To model the number of daily arrivals, we use a seasonality adjusted Poisson Autoregressive (PAR) model where the parameter estimates are obtained via conditional maximum likelihood. The number of daily departures is predicted by modeling the probability of departure from the census using logistic regression models that are adjusted for the amount of time spent in the census and incorporate both patient-specific baseline and time varying patient-specific covariate information. We illustrate our approach using neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) data collected at Women & Infants Hospital, Providence RI, which consists of 1001 consecutive NICU admissions between April 1st 2008 and March 31st 2009. Results Our results demonstrate statistically significant improved prediction accuracy for 3, 5, and 7 day census forecasts and increased precision of our forecasting model compared to a forecasting approach that ignores patient-specific information. Conclusions Forecasting models that utilize patient-specific baseline and time-varying information make the most of data typically available and have the capacity to substantially improve census forecasts. PMID:23721123

  6. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  7. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  8. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  9. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  10. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  11. The significance of services in a psychiatric hospital for family members of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2015-03-01

    Hospitalization of persons with mental illness may cause their family members to experience multiple stressors that stem from the hospitalization as well as from the duties of helping him or her. However, providing support services in psychiatric hospitals for family members has received only limited attention. To change this situation, mental health professionals in a psychiatric hospital in Israel developed an innovative family-centered practice model, the Family Members' Support and Consultation (FMSC) service center. We examined the significance to family members of the services they received from the FMSC service center in a study that included 20 caregivers. Ten participated in 2 focus groups of 5 participants each; 10 were interviewed personally. We implemented a thematic analysis to analyze the data. According to the participants, the staff of the FMSC service center provided support services that helped them cope with the stressors and difficulties they experienced within the context of the psychiatric hospital. The participants emphasized the significance of the immediacy and accessibility of support provided, as well as the positive effects of systemic interventions aimed at changing the relationships between family members and systems in the psychiatric hospital. Our findings show the importance of integrating a service that focuses on the needs of family members of persons with mental illness within a psychiatric hospital. PMID:25485823

  12. 78 FR 53478 - Proposed Information Collection; United States Park Police Personal History Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; United States Park Police Personal History Statement... Police Personal History Statement) to collect detailed personal history information from applicants... information, including financial data and residence history. Selective Service information and military...

  13. Epidemiology of Abusive Abdominal Trauma Hospitalizations in United States Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia; Dischinger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To estimate the incidence of abusive abdominal trauma (AAT) hospitalizations among US children age 0-9 years. (2) To identify demographic characteristics of children at highest risk for AAT. Design: Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, national hospitalization database. Setting: Hospitalization data from the 2003 and 2006…

  14. Hospitalization for Congestive Heart Failure: United States, 2000-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... care, health care utilization, National Hospital Discharge Survey Did the number and age distribution of patients hospitalized ... those aged 65–74 and 75–84 decreased. Did the rate of hospitalization for CHF change from ...

  15. 42 CFR 412.25 - Excluded hospital units: Common requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient Operating Costs and... the governing body or chief executive officer of the hospital in which it is located, and it...

  16. 22 CFR 72.26 - Vesting of personal estate in United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vesting of personal estate in United States. 72... PROPERTY AND ESTATES DEATHS AND ESTATES Personal Estates of Deceased United States Citizens and Nationals § 72.26 Vesting of personal estate in United States. (a) If no claimant with a legal right to...

  17. 42 CFR 412.130 - Retroactive adjustments for incorrectly excluded hospitals and units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat during that cost reporting period, if the inpatient population actually treated in the hospital during that cost reporting period did not meet the... under § 412.29(c) regarding the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat in that unit...

  18. Hospital Utilization among Persons with an Intellectual Disability, Ontario, Canada, 1995-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Robert S.; Hunter, Duncan; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that persons with an intellectual disability consume a disproportionate amount of hospital services. Policy changes in Ontario in the 1970s and 1980s made it necessary for community health services to accommodate this population that formerly received most of its medical care in the institutions where they lived.…

  19. Identifying Risk Factors for the Prediction of Hospital Readmission among Older Persons with Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Renee Annette

    Older persons (55 years and older) with cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for hospital readmission when compared to other subgroups of our population. This issue presents an economic problem, a concern for the quality and type of care provided, and an urgent need to implement innovative strategies designed to reduce the rising cost of…

  20. Working Models of Attachment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents: Relation to Psychopathology and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    This study examined the role of attachment in adolescent psychopathology among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Subjects consisted of 60 adolescents and 27 of their mothers. Measures included the Adult Attachment Interview classification for both the adolescents and their mothers, and a battery of diagnostic and personality assessment of…

  1. Emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and physician visits among elderly African American persons.

    PubMed

    Bazargan, M; Bazargan, S; Baker, R S

    1998-02-01

    This study uses a theoretical model of health services utilization to examine (a) emergency department utilization, (b) hospital admissions, and (c) office-based physician visits among a sample of 998 low-income elderly African American persons. Poisson Regression analysis was used to estimate the parameters specified in the Andersen behavioral model. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (a) a greater frequency of emergency room visits among respondents with a lower level of accessibility to physician services, (b) a lack of a significant relationship between some chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart problems and the frequency of office-based physician visits, (c) a greater number of hospital admissions among insured persons, and (d) a significant impact of the health locus of control indexes on all three types of health care utilization. The results of this study challenge the assumption that hospital and emergency use are the results of nondiscretionary behavior. PMID:9499651

  2. Prehospital and hospital delays after stroke onset--United States, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2007-05-18

    Each year approximately 700,000 persons in the United States have a new or recurrent stroke; of these persons, 15%-30% become permanently disabled, and 20% require institutionalization during the first 3 months after the stroke. The severity of stroke-related disability can be reduced if timely and appropriate treatment is received. Patients with ischemic stroke may be eligible for treatment with intravenous thrombolytic (i.e., tissue plasminogen activator [t-PA]) therapy within 3 hours of symptom onset. Receipt of this treatment usually requires patients to recognize stroke symptoms and receive prompt transport to a hospital emergency department (ED), where timely evaluation and brain imaging (i.e., computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) can take place. For patients eligible for t-PA, evidence suggests that the earlier patients are treated after the onset of symptoms the greater the likelihood of a more favorable outcome. In 2001, Congress established the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry to measure and track the quality of care provided to acute stroke patients. To assess prehospital delays from onset of stroke symptoms to ED arrival and hospital delays from ED arrival to receipt of brain imaging, CDC analyzed data from the four states participating in the national stroke registry. The results of that analysis indicated that fewer than half (48.0%) of stroke patients for whom onset data were available arrived at the ED within 2 hours of symptom onset, and prehospital delays were shorter for persons transported to the ED by ambulance (i.e., emergency medical services) than for persons who did not receive ambulance transport. The interval between ED arrival and brain imaging also was significantly reduced for those arriving by ambulance. More extensive public education is needed regarding early recognition of stroke and the urgency of telephoning 9-1-1 to receive ambulance transport. Shortening prehospital and hospital delays will increase

  3. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  4. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  5. A goal-oriented limited-duration approach for borderline personality disorder during brief inpatient hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Siefert, Caleb J

    2012-12-01

    As part of their overall care, patients with borderline personality disorder may require inpatient hospitalization for containment and stabilization in the context of severe distress, increased risk for self-harm, or after self-harming acts. Though data suggests that such patients are frequently hospitalized, the benefits of brief hospitalizations can sometimes be questionable. In some cases, the hospitalization environment may increase patient distress. Additionally, frequent serial hospitalizations can disrupt or sidetrack longer-term outpatient treatments. The present paper presents a Goal-Oriented Limited-Duration Borderline Personality Disorder Inpatient Treatment approach. The approach integrates elements from many other expert-based approaches for working in brief hospital settings and centers on the creation of a preadmission treatment agreement with a planned discharge date. This agreement involves clear goals for treatment and specifies how staff will be involved. Establishing a discharge date early in treatment allows staff to immediately begin working with feelings of rejection or abandonment. At discharge, recommendations are made and criteria for future admissions are set forth. This paper provides a description of the approach, information to consider in determining appropriateness, discussion of methods for clarifying goals, review of the discharge planning approach, and several examples of clinician-patient exchanges. This paper concludes with a case example in which the approach was used and discussions of future directions and potential benefits and limitations of the approach. PMID:22181025

  6. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  7. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  8. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  9. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  10. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  11. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  12. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty-three patients hospitalized in the other wards for a variety of reasons were selected as the adjusted control group. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Personality Inventory, 3rd version (MCMI-III) was used to assess the personality profiles. Results. The majority of the suicide attempters were low-level graduates (67.8% versus 47.1%, OR = 2.36). 79.7% of the suicide attempters were suffering from at least one maladaptive personality profile. The most common maladaptive personality profiles among the suicide attempters were depressive personality disorder (40.7%) and histrionic personality disorder (32.2%). Among the syndromes the most common ones were anxiety clinical syndrome (23.7%) and major depression (23.7%). Conclusion. Major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive personality disorder are among the predicators of first suicide attempts for the patients hospitalized in the public hospital due to the medicine poisoning. PMID:27433491

  13. Patterns of Inequality. Unit 3, The Philosophy of Equality and Inequality. Unit 4, Personal Inequality as an Ideological Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hookham, Maurice; Holloway, Clive

    Open University course units are presented on the philosophy of equality and inequality (Unit 3) and on personal inequality as an ideological concept (Unit 4). The substance of Unit 3 consists of extracts from the writings of eight philosophers. The role of the philosopher in forming legitimatizing ideologies is also illustrated. The eight…

  14. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 535.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  15. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a)......

  16. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  17. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 535.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  18. 31 CFR 500.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 500.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term, person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, includes: (a)......

  19. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 535.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  20. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  1. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  2. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 535.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  3. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 535.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a)......

  4. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of... CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. The term person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States includes: (a) Any......

  5. 22 CFR 72.26 - Vesting of personal estate in United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vesting of personal estate in United States. 72.26 Section 72.26 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PROTECTION AND WELFARE OF AMERICANS, THEIR PROPERTY AND ESTATES DEATHS AND ESTATES Personal Estates of Deceased United States Citizens and Nationals § 72.26 Vesting of personal estate in...

  6. Influence of indoor air quality and personal factors on the sick building syndrome (SBS) in Swedish geriatric hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, K; Norbäck, D; Akselsson, R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Sick building syndrome (SBS) involves symptoms such as irritation to the eyes, skin, and upper airways, headache, and fatigue. The relations between such symptoms and both personal and environmental factors were studied in 225 female hospital workers, working in eight hospital units in the south of Sweden. METHODS--Symptoms of SBS and personal factors were measured by means of a standardised self administered questionnaire. The technical investigation comprised a building survey and measurements of room temperature, supply air temperature, air humidity, and exhaust air flow. RESULTS--The prevalence of symptoms differed from one unit to another. The mean value of weekly complaints of fatigue was 30%, of eye irritation 23%, and of dry facial skin 34%. Eye irritation was related to work stress, self reported exposure to static electricity, and was also more common in buildings with a high ventilation flow and a high noise level (55 dB(A)) from the ventilation system. Nasal symptoms were related to asthma and hay fever only. Throat symptoms were more common in smokers, subjects with asthma or hay fever, new buildings, and in buildings with a high ventilation flow. Facial skin irritation was related to a lack of control of the work conditions, and was more common in new buildings, and buildings with a high ventilation flow and ventilation noise. General symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, were related to current smoking, asthma or hay fever, work dissatisfaction, and static electricity. CONCLUSION--As the prevalence of symptoms was high, there is a need to improve the indoor environment as well as the psychosocial environment in hospitals. These improvements could include a reduction of ventilation noise, minimised smoking, and improvements in the psychosocial climate. Further research is needed to identify indoor climatic factors that cause the increased prevalence of symptoms of SBS in new buildings. PMID:7735389

  7. [The weighted health care unit: a new tool for hospital budgeting].

    PubMed

    Bestard Perelló, J J; Sevilla Pérez, F; Corella Monzón, I; Elola Somoza, J

    1993-01-01

    Hospital budgets must be based on estimated workload in order to fairly distribute available financial resources. A tool to measure hospital production is need to achieve this aim. We present in this article the results of a study on hospital cost which was carried out to design a new unit for measuring intermediate hospital products: the Weighted Health Care Unit (Unidad Ponderada Asistencial: UPA). Thereafter we use multiple regression to find out structure, services and activity variables which explain the variations in expenses per UPA among 64 hospitals of INSALUD. Significant variables include: doctors per hospital bed, hospital staff (sanitary personnel except doctors plus administrative assistants) per bed, hospital size (less than 200 beds), ICU beds percentage, oncology service, UPAs per bed average length of stay. These variables, along with interactions between them, explain 91.4% of the variance of expenses per UPA. The UPA and statistical modeling allow a better understanding of hospital expenses and can be very useful in coordinating budgets to hospital activity taking into account the different characteristics of each hospital. PMID:8169037

  8. Massage with aromatherapy: effectiveness on anxiety of users with personality disorders in psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Thiago da Silva; Braga, Eliana Mara

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness of aromatherapy massage using the essential oils (0.5%) of Lavandula angustifolia and Pelargonium graveolens for anxiety reduction in patients with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. METHOD Uncontrolled clinical trial with 50 subjects submitted to six massages with aromatherapy, performed on alternate days, on the cervical and the posterior thoracic regions. Vital data (heart and respiratory rate) were collected before and after each session and an anxiety scale (Trait Anxiety Inventory-State) was applied at the beginning and end of the intervention. The results were statistically analyzed with the chi square test and paired t test. RESULTS There was a statistically significant decrease (p < 0.001) of the heart and respiratory mean rates after each intervention session, as well as in the inventory score. CONCLUSION Aromatherapy has demonstrated effectiveness in anxiety relief, considering the decrease of heart and respiratory rates in patients diagnosed with personality disorders during psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:26107706

  9. Testing family-centered, function-focused care in hospitalized persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Marie; Chippendale, Tracy; Resnick, Barbara; Galvin, James E

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Hospital-acquired disability causes decreased quality of life for patients with dementia and family caregivers, and increased societal costs. Materials & methods A comparative, repeated measures study tested the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the family-centered, function-focused care intervention (Fam-FFC) in dyads of hospitalized, medical patients with dementia and family caregivers (FCGs). Results The intervention group demonstrated better activities of daily living and walking performance, and less severity/duration of delirium and hospital readmissions, but no significant differences in gait/balance. FCGs showed increased preparedness for caregiving and less anxiety but no significant differences in depression, strain and mutuality. Conclusion Fam-FFC presents a possible pathway to meeting the Triple Aim of improved patient care, improved patient health and reduced costs for persons with dementia. PMID:26107319

  10. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  11. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002-2011(1).

    PubMed

    Wuerth, Brandon A; Bonnewell, John P; Wiemken, Timothy L; Arnold, Forest W

    2016-09-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  12. U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  13. Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurring out-of-hospital, by race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, 1990–2012 NOTE: Non- ... in 1990; these states did not report Hispanic origin on their birth certificates for these years. SOURCE: ...

  14. Rural Residents Who Are Hospitalized in Rural and Urban Hospitals: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Care Statistics. References Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. Area Resource File (ARF). 2012. Moscovice I, Stensland J. Rural hospitals: Trends, challenges, and a future research and policy analysis agenda. J Rural Health ...

  15. Hospital restructuring stressors, support, and nursing staff perceptions of unit functioning.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ronald J

    2005-01-01

    Hospital restructuring and downsizing have taken place in most developed countries during the past 10 years. A small but growing body of research findings has identified aspects of these changes that serve as sources of stress for nursing staff during these transitions as well as organizational initiatives that facilitate those transitions. This study reports results from a longitudinal study of hospital restructuring and downsizing on nursing staff perceptions of hospital functioning. Data were collected in November 1996 and again in November 1999 from hospital-based nursing staff using questionnaires. The findings showed moderate but statistically significant relationships between restructuring stressors and organizational support in 1996 and perceptions of hospital functioning in 1999. Nursing staff reporting higher levels of restructuring stressors and lower hospital support in 1996 indicated more negative perceptions of unit and hospital functioning in 1999. PMID:15825816

  16. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  17. Healthcare resource utilization and epidemiology of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations, United States, 2000.

    PubMed

    Shields, Brenda J; Comstock, R Dawn; Fernandez, Soledad A; Xiang, Huiyun; Smith, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and financial burden of burn-associated hospitalizations for children younger than 18 years in the United States. Retrospective data analysis of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations was done using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database for 2000. An estimated 10,000 children younger than 18 years were hospitalized for burn-associated injuries in the United States in 2000. These children spent an estimated 66,200 days in the hospital with associated hospital charges equal to USD 211,772,700. Total charges and length of stay for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations in the United States during 2000 were associated with degree of burn, percentage of total body surface area burned, child's age, region of the United States, hospital location, and hospital type. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be nonwhite, be hospitalized for burns, and burn their hands/wrists, compared with children 3 to 17 years of age. Male children in both age groups were more likely to be hospitalized for burns than female children. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be burned by hot liquids/vapors and contact with hot substances/objects, while children 3 to 17 years were more likely to be burned by fire/flames. This study is the first national study on healthcare resource utilization for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations to utilize the KID database. Burns are a major source of pediatric morbidity and are associated with significant national healthcare resource utilization annually. Future burn prevention efforts should emphasize implementing passive injury prevention strategies, especially for young children who are nonwhite and live in low-income communities. PMID:17925649

  18. Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jhung, Michael A.; Davidson, Heidi; McIntyre, Anne; Gregg, William J.; Dasgupta, Sharoda; D’Mello, Tiffany; White, Victoria; Fowlkes, Ashley; Brammer, Lynnette; Finelli, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jhung et al. (2011) Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 321–327. Background  To augment established influenza surveillance systems in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists implemented the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity (AHDRA) in August 2009. The AHDRA was designed to meet increased demands for timely and detailed information describing illness severity during the 2009 H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) pandemic response. Objectives  We describe the implementation of AHDRA and provide preliminary results from this new surveillance activity. Methods  All 50 US states were asked to report influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths to AHDRA each week using either a laboratory‐confirmed or syndromic surveillance definition. Aggregate counts were used to calculate age‐specific weekly and cumulative rates per 100 000, and laboratory‐confirmed reports were used to estimate the age distribution of pH1N1 influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths. Results  From August 30, 2009, through April 6, 2010, AHDRA identified 41 689 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated hospitalizations and 2096 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated deaths. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity rates peaked earlier than hospitalization and death rates seen in previous influenza seasons with other surveillance systems, and the age distribution of cases revealed a tendency for hospitalizations and deaths to occur in persons <65 years for age. Conclusions  Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity laboratory‐confirmed reports provided important information during the 2009 pandemic response. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting

  19. Development and Validation of a Web-Based Survey on the Use of Personal Communication Devices by Hospital Registered Nurses: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. Objective No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. Methods A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. Results The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation

  20. Firearm-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; French, Clare; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Dennis L; Galea, Sandro

    2014-02-01

    Most firearm-related injuries are nonfatal and require hospitalization. Using data on 3,257,720 hospitalizations from the National Hospital Discharge Survey (2000-2010), we determined overall and cause-, gender-, and race-specific trends in firearm-related hospitalization (FRH) and determinants of in-hospital firearm mortality. Types of FRH evaluated, according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, E-diagnostic codes, were accident (codes E922.0-E922.3, E922.8, and E922.9), assault (codes E965.0-E965.4), attempted suicide (codes E955.0-E955.4), legal intervention (code E970), undetermined intent (codes E985.0-E985.3), and war (code E991). A moderate reduction in FRH rates was observed from 2000 to 2011: from 62 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 57 per 100,000 (P-trend = 0.0016). The majority of FRHs were due to assault (P-trend = 0.19) or accident (P-trend = 0.32) and showed no significant reduction in rates over time, whereas rates for 14% of all FRHs-those due to attempted suicide (P-trend = 0.002) and undetermined intent (P-trend = 0.0029)-declined moderately. Moderate declines were observed among both blacks (from 213.1 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 164.4 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.049) and whites (from 38.4 FRHs per 100,000 hospitalizations to 32.2 per 100,000; P-trend = 0.031). The decline was significant only among men (effect size = 0.9, P-trend = 0.004). In conclusion, the reduction in FRH was driven by a reduction in self-inflicted and undetermined injuries. FRH rates were 6-fold greater among blacks than among whites and 14-fold greater in men than in women throughout the period. PMID:24148708

  1. The behavioral medicine unit: a community hospital model for inpatient treatment of adolescent depression.

    PubMed

    Greydanus, D E; Porter, J; Rypma, C B; Heuer, T; Granberg, A; Ruch, R

    1986-12-01

    This article describes one community hospital's response to the overwhelming needs of adolescents in central Iowa. It is based on the premise that many youths who have severe depression do not effectively respond to various outpatient counseling measures, and are in need of some type of inpatient treatment. Most such programs are locked psychiatric units run by child or adolescent psychiatrists. In our case, those wards already in existence are filled to capacity and cannot respond to outside needs. Placing these youth on traditional medical adolescent wards does not work, since medical staff are usually not geared to deal with the many, ever-changing mental health needs of these patients. Thus, we developed an unlocked adolescent inpatient unit with a pediatrician experienced in adolescent medicine as medical director; moreover, the program extensively utilizes psychologists, nurse-counselors, social worker-family therapists, recreation therapists, and other specialists. This program is a way for physicians trained in adolescent medicine and other appropriate persons to contribute to the complex health needs of youth; it is preferable to do this rather than send all depressed teenagers away by referrals, as seems to happen in some cases. It is also an important way for physicians and other specialists to demonstrate their expertise--both the Society for Adolescent Medicine and American Academy of Pediatrics have advocated such a demonstration--and to give physicians important training in the medical and mental health care needs of youth. Finally, the Spectrum Unit program provides a meaningful way for the primary care physician to be involved in the inpatient treatment of depressed adolescent patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3602650

  2. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Facilitation by a United States person. 538.407 Section 538.407 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... action by a U.S. person that assists or supports trading activity with Sudan by any person....

  3. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Facilitation by a United States person. 538.407 Section 538.407 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... action by a U.S. person that assists or supports trading activity with Sudan by any person....

  4. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Facilitation by a United States person. 538.407 Section 538.407 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... action by a U.S. person that assists or supports trading activity with Sudan by any person....

  5. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Facilitation by a United States person. 538.407 Section 538.407 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... action by a U.S. person that assists or supports trading activity with Sudan by any person....

  6. Organizational Effects on Patient Satisfaction in Hospital Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Cynthia Thornton; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics and patients’ satisfaction with nursing care in hospitals. Background Although patient satisfaction has been widely researched, our understanding of the relationship between hospital context and nursing unit structure and their impact on patient satisfaction is limited. Methods The data source for this study was the Outcomes Research in Nursing Administration Project, a multi-site organizational study to investigate relationships among nurse staffing, organizational context and structure and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 2720 patients and 3718 RNs in 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Results Greater availability of nursing unit support services and higher levels of work engagement were associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Older age, better health status and better symptom management were also associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Conclusions Organizational factors in hospitals and nursing units, particularly support services on the nursing unit and mechanisms that foster nurses’ work engagement and effective symptom management, are important influences on patient satisfaction. PMID:19423987

  7. Chinese International Students' Personal and Sociocultural Stressors in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2013-01-01

    To date, no empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the personal and sociocultural stressors of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examined what the most stressful aspects of their personal and social lives in the United States are, how they characterize their stress, and what conditions…

  8. 26 CFR 301.7505-1 - Sale of personal property acquired by the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to make deposits to secure the performance of their agreements. Any such deposit, but not more than... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sale of personal property acquired by the... Actions by the United States § 301.7505-1 Sale of personal property acquired by the United States....

  9. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad. 319.2 Section 319.2 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.2 Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad. (a) Eligibility. To be...

  10. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad. 319.2 Section 319.2 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.2 Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad. (a) Eligibility. To be...

  11. Nursing care quality: comparison of unit-hired, hospital float pool, and agency nurses.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, A; Havens, D S

    1996-07-01

    As fiscal constraints and hospital downsizing become driving forces in the health care arena, nurse administrators are challenged to satisfy fluctuating staffing needs while ensuring high-quality care. Hospital in-house nurses and agency nurses are two solutions often used to supplement unit staffing. The article reports a study that examined the quality of care administered on one unit by unit-hired, float pool, and agency nurses through a comparison of the groups' documentation on nine clinical quality indicators. Findings suggested significant differences among the three groups on these indicators. Implications for nurse administrators are discussed. PMID:8783546

  12. Factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for acute heart failure in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeian, Boback; Sharma, Puza P.; Yu, Tzy-Chyi; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little contemporary data are available that describe differences in acute heart failure (AHF) hospitalization expenditures as a function of patient and hospital characteristics, especially from a population-based investigation. This study aimed to evaluate factors associated with variations in hospital expenditures for AHF in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional analysis using discharge data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, was conducted. Discharges with primary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, diagnosis codes for AHF in adults were included. Costs were estimated by converting Nationwide Inpatient Sample charge data using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Cost-to-Charge Ratio File. Discharges with highest (≥80th percentile) versus lowest (≤20th percentile) costs were compared for patient characteristics, hospital characteristics, utilization of procedures, and outcomes. Results Of the estimated 1 million AHF hospital discharges, the mean cost estimates were $10,775 per episode. Younger age, higher percentage of obesity, atrial fibrillation, pulmonary disease, fluid/electrolyte disturbances, renal insufficiency, and greater number of cardiac/noncardiac procedures were observed in stays with highest versus lowest costs. Highest-cost discharges were more likely to be observed in urban and teaching hospitals. Highest-cost AHF discharges also had 5 times longer length of stay, were 9 times more costly, and had higher in-hospital mortality (5.6% vs 3.5%) compared with discharges with lowest costs (all P < .001). Conclusions Acute heart failure hospitalizations are costly. Expenditures vary markedly among AHF hospitalizations in the United States, with substantial differences in patient and hospital characteristics, procedures, and in-hospital outcomes among discharges with highest compared with lowest costs. PMID:25641538

  13. Adverse Outcomes After Hospitalization and Delirium in Persons With Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Tamara G.; Jones, Richard N.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Tommet, Douglas; Gross, Alden L.; Habtemariam, Daniel; Schmitt, Eva; Yap, Liang; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitalization, frequently complicated by delirium, can be a life-changing event for patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Objective To determine risks for institutionalization, cognitive decline, or death associated with hospitalization and delirium in patients with AD. Design Prospective cohort enrolled between 1991 and 2006 into the Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (MADRC) patient registry. Setting Community-based. Participants 771 persons aged 65 years or older with a clinical diagnosis of AD. Measurements Hospitalization, delirium, death, and institutionalization were identified through administrative databases. Cognitive decline was defined as a decrease of 4 or more points on the Blessed Information-Memory-Concentration test score. Multivariate analysis was used to calculate adjusted relative risks (RRs). Results Of 771 participants with AD, 367 (48%) were hospitalized and 194 (25%) developed delirium. Hospitalized patients who did not have delirium had an increased risk for death (adjusted RR, 4.7 [95% CI, 1.9 to 11.6]) and institutionalization (adjusted RR, 6.9 [CI, 4.0 to 11.7]). With delirium, risk for death (adjusted RR, 5.4 [CI, 2.3 to 12.5]) and institutionalization (adjusted RR, 9.3 [CI, 5.5 to 15.7]) increased further. With hospitalization and delirium, the adjusted RR for cognitive decline for patients with AD was 1.6 (CI, 1.2 to 2.3). Among hospitalized patients with AD, 21% of the incidences of cognitive decline, 15% of institutionalization, and 6% of deaths were associated with delirium. Limitations Cognitive outcome was missing in 291 patients. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the effect of missing data, and a composite outcome was used to decrease the effect of missing data. Conclusion Approximately 1 in 8 hospitalized patients with AD who develop delirium will have at least 1 adverse outcome, including death, institutionalization, or cognitive decline, associated with delirium. Delirium prevention may

  14. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33). In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout. PMID:27478835

  15. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shin Yuh; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33). In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout. PMID:27478835

  16. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital pain management across the United States: A national study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Holcombe, Randall F

    2016-07-01

    Satisfactory pain management of hospitalized patients remains a national unmet need for the United States. Although prior research indicates that inpatient pain management may be improving nationally, not all populations of patients rate pain management as equally satisfactory. County-level predictors, such as demographics and population density, and hospital-level predictors (eg, hospital-bed number), are understudied determinants of pain management patient satisfaction. We created a multivariate regression model of pain management patient satisfaction scores as indicated by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey results based on county and hospital level predictors. Number of hospital beds (β = -0.16), percent foreign-born (β = -0.16), and population density (β = -0.08) most strongly predicted unfavorable ratings, whereas African American (β = 0.23), white (β= 0.23), and younger population (β = 0.08) most strongly predicted favorable ratings. Greater attention should be placed on pain management in larger hospitals that serve foreign-born patients in population-dense areas. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:498-501. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26970075

  17. United States Department of Justice findings letters in psychiatric hospital CRIPA cases: an aid or a distraction?

    PubMed

    Geller, Jeffrey; Lee, Leilani

    2013-01-01

    The Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act (CRIPA) of 1980 allows the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) to investigate and file lawsuits against certain institutions, including state and county psychiatric hospitals, where individuals within may face unconstitutional conditions. Subsequent to an investigation and before negotiations or litigation, the state is provided a Findings Letter generated by the DOJ that generally contains recommended remedial measures. It has never been determined to what extent a Findings Letter provides a state with a recommendation specific to the institution for corrective action before the state enters into negotiations with the DOJ. Three study groups were derived from a sample of 15 Findings Letters written to states concerning their psychiatric hospitals between 2003 and 2009. The individual recommended remedial measures, labeled texts of interest (TOI), were identified, and the degree of overlap among the Findings Letters was determined. To a surprising degree, TOIs overlapped to various extents, from exact copies of text to paraphrased versions, in Findings Letters written between 2003 and 2009 to different states and for multiple state hospitals in the same state. The recommended remedial measures provided in the DOJ's Findings Letters are not specific to each state hospital's deficiencies. The Findings Letters offer limited guidance to the state on how to remedy the deficiencies before negotiating with the DOJ. This lack of specificity causes inefficient and delayed remediation of unconstitutional conditions and other deficiencies in care and treatment in psychiatric hospitals. While the current process most often leads to improvements in state hospitals, it is a costly, inefficient remedy, despite the possibility of alternative remedial processes of less expensive and equal or greater effectiveness. PMID:23771930

  18. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  19. Trends in pediatric pulmonary hypertension–related hospitalizations in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Matthew A.; Morales, David L. S.; Gerald, Ken; Hanna, Brian D.; Mallory, George B.; Rossano, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are few data on the epidemiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH)–related hospitalizations in children in the United States. Our aim was to determine hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges pertaining to PH-related hospitalizations and also the effects of codiagnoses and comorbidities. A retrospective review of the Kids’ Inpatient Database during the years 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 was analyzed for patients ≤20 years of age with a diagnosis of PH by ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes, along with associated diagnoses and comorbidities. Descriptive statistics, including Rao-Scott χ2, ANOVA, and logistic regression models, were utilized on weighted values with survey analysis procedures. The number of PH-related hospital admissions is rising, from an estimated 7,331 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,556–9,106) in 2000 to 10,792 (95% CI: 8,568–13,016) in 2009. While infant age and congenital heart disease were most commonly associated with PH-related hospitalizations, they were not associated with mortality. Overall mortality for PH-related hospitalizations was greater than that for hospitalizations not associated with PH, 5.7% versus 0.4% (odds ratio: 16.22 [95% CI: 14.78%–17.8%], P < 0.001), but mortality is decreasing over time. Sepsis, respiratory failure, acute renal failure, hepatic insufficiency, arrhythmias, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are associated with mortality. The number of PH-related hospitalizations is increasing in the United States. The demographics of PH in this study are evolving. Despite the increasing prevalence, mortality is improving. PMID:26064460

  20. [Tasks performed by nurses at inpatient units in a training hospital].

    PubMed

    Costa, Rita de Almeida; Shimizu, Helena Eri

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze tasks performed by nurses at inpatient units in a large general hospital in Brasilia, Federal District, which also functions as a training hospital. A quantitative, exploratory, descriptive study was carried out and involved a total of 612 hours of direct observation of the activities performed by 18 nurses at the General Medicine, Surgical, Pediatric and Maternity units. The tasks observed were classified as: administration, nursing care delivery, education and related to information system. Nurses dedicate a large part of their time to administrative tasks, followed by tasks related to nursing care delivery and information system, performing almost no educative tasks. PMID:16308621

  1. Sexual and reproductive health of persons aged 10-24 years - United States, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Lorrie; MacKay, Andrea P; Brown, Kathryn; Harrier, Sara; Ventura, Stephanie J; Kann, Laura; Rangel, Maria; Berman, Stuart; Dittus, Patricia; Liddon, Nicole; Markowitz, Lauri; Sternberg, Maya; Weinstock, Hillard; David-Ferdon, Corinne; Ryan, George

    2009-07-17

    This report presents data for 2002-2007 concerning the sexual and reproductive health of persons aged 10-24 years in the United States. Data were compiled from the National Vital Statistics System and multiple surveys and surveillance systems that monitor sexual and reproductive health outcomes into a single reference report that makes this information more easily accessible to policy makers, researchers, and program providers who are working to improve the reproductive health of young persons in the United States. The report addresses three primary topics: 1) current levels of risk behavior and health outcomes; 2) disparities by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and geographic residence; and 3) trends over time. The data presented in this report indicate that many young persons in the United States engage in sexual risk behavior and experience negative reproductive health outcomes. In 2004, approximately 745,000 pregnancies occurred among U.S. females aged <20 years. In 2006, approximately 22,000 adolescents and young adults aged 10-24 years in 33 states were living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), and approximately 1 million adolescents and young adults aged 10-24 years were reported to have chlamydia, gonorrhea, or syphilis. One-quarter of females aged 15-19 years and 45% of those aged 20-24 years had evidence of infection with human papillomavirus during 2003-2004, and approximately 105,000 females aged 10--24 years visited a hospital emergency department (ED) for a nonfatal sexual assault injury during 2004-2006. Although risks tend to increase with age, persons in the youngest age group (youths aged 10--14 years) also are affected. For example, among persons aged 10-14 years, 16,000 females became pregnant in 2004, nearly 18,000 males and females were reported to have sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in 2006, and 27,500 females visited a hospital ED because of a nonfatal sexual assault injury during 2004

  2. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects. PMID:23823398

  3. Hospitalization frequency and charges for neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Seth E; Flecker, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003-2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20-44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  4. Hospitalization Frequency and Charges for Neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    Flecker, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003–2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20–44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  5. The relationship between hospital unit culture and nurses' quality of work life.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Blair D; Zammuto, Raymond F; Goodman, Eric A

    2002-01-01

    Turnover rates for hospital nurses have been increasing in recent years, which is partially a result of increasing pressure on nurses from higher productivity expectations in a managed care environment. Improving nurse retention is a difficult challenge to managers since the bureaucratic cultural norm of hospitals, with its hierarchical structures, rules, and regulations, and heavy emphasis on measurement of outcomes and costs, may not be the culture most conducive to enhancing nurses' job satisfaction and commitment. Accordingly, this study investigates the relationships between unit organizational culture and several important job-related variables for nurse retention in the labor and delivery units of seven hospitals. Data analysis shows that unit organizational culture does affect nurses' quality of work life factors and that human relations cultural values are positively related to organizational commitment, job involvement, empowerment, and job satisfaction, and negatively related to intent to turnover. These findings suggest that although increasing recruitment of nurses and improved compensation and benefits strategies may offset hospital nurse shortages in the short term, improving quality of work life may be a more practical and long-term approach to improving hospital nurse retention. PMID:11836962

  6. Factors Affecting Code Status in a University Hospital Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoy, Lauren Jodi; Sherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors collected data on diagnosis, hospital course, and end-of-life preparedness in patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) with "full code" status (defined as receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation), compared with those who didn't. Differences were analyzed using binary and stepwise logistic regression. They found…

  7. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  8. Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Schmeltz, Michael T; Petkova, Elisaveta P; Gamble, Janet L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how heat waves affect morbidity and mortality, as well as the associated economic costs, is essential for characterizing the human health impacts of extreme heat under a changing climate. Only a handful of studies have examined healthcare costs associated with exposures to high temperatures. This research explores costs associated with hospitalizations for heat-related illness (HRI) in the United States using the 2001 to 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Descriptive statistics of patient data for HRI hospitalizations were examined and costs of hospitalizations were reported using the all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio. Costs were examined using a log-gamma model with patient and hospital characteristics included as fixed effects. Adjusted mean costs were then compared across racial groups. The mean costs of HRI hospitalizations were higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared to Whites, who accounted for almost 65% of all HRI hospitalizations. Observed differences in costs based on income, insurance, and gender were also significant. These results suggest that these populations are suffering disproportionately from health inequity, thus, they could shoulder greater disease and financial burdens due to climate change. These findings may have important implications in understanding the economic impact public health planning and interventions will have on preventing hospitalizations related to extreme heat. PMID:27618079

  9. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit of an emergency hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Maristela Kapitski; de Morais, Teresa Márcia Nascimento; Trevisani, Deny Munari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the oral health status of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Methods Clinical assessment of the oral cavity was performed in 35 patients at two time-points (up to 48 hours after admission and 72 hours after the first assessment) and recorded in data collection forms. The following data were collected: plaque index, condition of the mucosa, presence or absence of dental prosthesis, number of teeth present, and tongue coating index. Results The prevalence of nosocomial infection was 22% (eight patients), with 50% respiratory tract infections. All patients exhibited oral biofilm, and 20 (57%) showed biofilm visible to the naked eye; tongue coating was present on more than two thirds of the tongue in 24 patients (69%) and was thick in most cases. A significant increase in plaque index (p=0.007) occurred after 72 hours, although the tongue coating index was p<0.001 regarding the area and p=0.5 regarding the thickness. Conclusion The plaque and tongue coating indices increased with the length of hospital stay at the intensive care unit. PMID:25607267

  10. Heat, Heat Waves, and Hospital Admissions among the Elderly in the United States, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heat-wave frequency, intensity, and duration are increasing with global climate change. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well documented, but less is known regarding associations with hospital admissions. Objectives: Our goal was to determine associations between moderate and extreme heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions for nonaccidental causes among Medicare beneficiaries ≥ 65 years of age in 114 cities across five U.S. climate zones. Methods: We used Medicare inpatient billing records and city-specific data on temperature, humidity, and ozone from 1992 through 2006 in a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate the association between hospitalization and moderate [90th percentile of apparent temperature (AT)] and extreme (99th percentile of AT) heat and heat waves (AT above the 95th percentile over 2–8 days). In sensitivity analyses, we additionally considered confounding by ozone and holidays, different temperature metrics, and alternate models of the exposure–response relationship. Results: Associations between moderate heat and hospital admissions were minimal, but extreme heat was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 4%) increase in all-cause hospital admissions over the subsequent 8 days. In cause-specific analyses, extreme heat was associated with increased hospitalizations for renal (15%; 95% CI: 9%, 21%) and respiratory (4%; 95% CI: 2%, 7%) diseases, but not for cardiovascular diseases. An added heat-wave effect was observed for renal and respiratory admissions. Conclusion: Extreme heat is associated with increased hospital admissions, particularly for renal causes, among the elderly in the United States. Citation: Gronlund CJ, Zanobetti A, Schwartz JD, Wellenius GA, O’Neill MS. 2014. Heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions among the elderly in the United States, 1992–2006. Environ Health Perspect 122:1187–1192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206132 PMID:24905551

  11. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D.K.; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. Results: The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care. PMID:27377508

  12. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  13. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  14. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  15. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  16. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  17. The evolution of an acute care hospital unit to a DRG-exempt rehabilitation unit. A preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Parfenchuck, T A; Parziale, J R; Liberman, J R; Butcher, R P; Ahern, D K

    1990-02-01

    The Health Care Financing Administration's decision to adopt a prospective based payment system has caused many institutions to implement new policies and practices. A recent area of interest for many hospitals has been the creation of diagnosis-related group (DRG) exempt units to maximize reimbursement practices. We analyzed changes which occurred when an eight bed acute care stroke unit (SU) was converted to a DRG exempt eight bed rehabilitation unit (RU). The time period involved was 1 1/2 months before and 1 1/2 months after the transition occurred. Analysis of data from the pre- and posttransition periods revealed that: (1) length of stay increased significantly from 11.7 to 15.3 days (P less than 0.001); (2) functional independence measure (FIM) score improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for RU patients (0.84/day) than for SU patients (0.39/day); (3) disposition to home v other facilities increased significantly from 50 to 81% (P less than 0.05); (4) the overall occupancy increased from 94 to 100% and all beds were filled with rehabilitation patients; (5) the proportion of patients with Medicare as their primary insurer was comparable before (64%) and after (67%) unit conversion; (6) gross income from rehabilitation patients increased by 43%. Indirect savings via reduction of acute hospital length of stay for Medicare patients increased total income from operation of this unit. We conclude that patients on the RU stayed longer, had greater daily improvements in functional status, and were more likely to be discharged to home. This appears to be due to a more efficient use of rehabilitation beds and a concomitant overall improvement in reimbursement to the hospital.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2105736

  18. Housing as an intervention on hospital use: access among chronically homeless persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Parker, David

    2010-12-01

    A study examining demographics and hospital utilization for chronically homeless persons with disabilities was conducted at pre-housing enrollment and at 6 months post-housing. Of the 20 participants, 70% (n = 14) were Black American and 30% (n = 6) were White; 100% (n = 20) were non-Hispanic; 90% (n = 18) were men; 40% (n = 8) were veterans; Median years since last permanent housing and total homelessness were 7 and 10.5 respectively. The following increases were observed: employment (0 to 1); income (20%, n = 4 to 35%, n = 7); primary care (25%, n = 5 to 95%, n = 19); and mental health service use (25%, n = 5 to 60%, n = 12). Known disabilities included HIV (15%, n = 3); hepatitis C (45%, n = 9); mental illness (60%, n = 12) and substance abuse (80%, n = 16) with 45% (n = 9) dually diagnosed. Over the course of the study, Emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalization use decreased. While these differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.14 and p = 0.31, respectively), they translate to an estimated $250,208 savings. PMID:21125341

  19. Acinetobacter infections prevalence and frequency of the antibiotics resistance: comparative study of intensive care units versus other hospital units

    PubMed Central

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Frikh, Mohammed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Bssaibis, Fatna; Belefquih, Bouchra; Maleb, Adil; Dahraoui, Souhail; Belyamani, Lahcen; Bait, Abdelouahed; Haimeur, Charki; Louzi, Lhoussain; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to determine the Acinetobacter sp clinical isolates frequency and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern by comparing results obtained from the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to that of other units at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Methods This is a retrospective study over a 2-years period where we collected all clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp obtained from samples for infection diagnosis performed on hospitalized patients between 2012 to 2014. Results During the study period, 441 clinical and non-repetitive isolates of Acinetobacter sp were collected representing 6.94% of all bacterial clinical isolates (n = 6352) and 9.6% of Gram negative rods (n = 4569). More than a half of the isolates were from the ICUs and were obtained from 293 infected patients of which 65, 2% (191 cases) were males (sex ratio = 1.9) and the median age was 56 years (interquartile range: 42-68 years). Acinetobacter clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples (44.67%) followed by blood cultures (14.51%). The resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin / tazobactam, imipenem, amikacin, tobramycin, netilmicin, rifampicin and colistin was respectively 87%, 86%, 79%, 76%; 52%, 43%, 33% 32% and 1.7%. The difference in resistance between the ICUs and the other units was statistically significant (p <0.05) except for colistin, tetracycline and rifampicin. Conclusion This paper shows that solving the problem of prevalence and high rate of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infection which represents a therapeutic impasse, requires the control of the hospital environment and optimizing hands hygiene and antibiotics use in the hospital. PMID:27347280

  20. Evaluation of intoxicated patients hospitalized in a newly-opened level two pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Güngörer, Vildan; Yisldırım, Nurdan Kökten

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to retrospectively examine the demographic and etiological characteristics, prognosis and length of stay in intensive care unit of intoxicated patients hospitalized in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun. Material and Methods: The study retrospectively examined the records of patients hospitalized between 14th March 2014 and 14th March 2015 in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun with respect to age, gender, cause of poisoning, time of emergency department admission, length of hospitalization and prognosis. Results: Of 82 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, 29 (35.3%) were male and 53 (64.6%) were female. The mean age of the male and female patients was 7.89±6.3 years and 11.2±5.7 years, respectively and the mean age of the study group was 10.04±6.1. Twenthy one (39,6%) of the female patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and 32 (60.4%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. Twenthy (68.9%) of the male patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and nine (31.1%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. The cause of poisoning was drug intoxication (antidepressants, antibiotics, painkillers and other drugs) in 64 patients (78%) and the remaining 18 patients (22%) were admitted to hospital for other causes (rat poison, mushroom, carbonmonoxide, scorpion stings, bonzai and pesticides). Thirthy eight (46.3%) of all the patients used such substances for suicidal purpose. Thirthy three (62.2%) of these were female and 32 were at the age group of 14–18 years. Fourty (48.7%) of the patients who ingested medication ingested one drug, while 24 (29.2%) ingested multiple drugs. Antidepressants were found to be the most commonly used drugs (31.2%). The mean hospital admission time was 3.41±2 hours and the mean time of intensive care unit stay was 2.89±1.04 days. No mortality was recorded. Thirthy patients (36.5%) were referred

  1. The Creation of a Biocontainment Unit at a Tertiary Care Hospital. The Johns Hopkins Medicine Experience.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Brian T; Kelen, Gabor D; Brower, Roy G; Bova, Gregory; Ernst, Neysa; Reimers, Mallory; Langlotz, Ronald; Gimburg, Anatoly; Iati, Michael; Smith, Christopher; MacConnell, Sally; James, Hailey; Lewin, John J; Trexler, Polly; Black, Meredith A; Lynch, Chelsea; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A; Sokoll, Lori J; Carroll, Karen C; Parish, Nicole M; Dionne, Kim; Biddison, Elizabeth L D; Gwon, Howard S; Sauer, Lauren; Hill, Peter; Newton, Scott M; Garrett, Margaret R; Miller, Redonda G; Perl, Trish M; Maragakis, Lisa L

    2016-05-01

    In response to the 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine created a biocontainment unit to care for patients infected with Ebola virus and other high-consequence pathogens. The unit team examined published literature and guidelines, visited two existing U.S. biocontainment units, and contacted national and international experts to inform the design of the physical structure and patient care activities of the unit. The resulting four-bed unit allows for unidirectional flow of providers and materials and has ample space for donning and doffing personal protective equipment. The air-handling system allows treatment of diseases spread by contact, droplet, or airborne routes of transmission. An onsite laboratory and an autoclave waste management system minimize the transport of infectious materials out of the unit. The unit is staffed by self-selected nurses, providers, and support staff with pediatric and adult capabilities. A telecommunications system allows other providers and family members to interact with patients and staff remotely. A full-time nurse educator is responsible for staff training, including quarterly exercises and competency assessment in the donning and doffing of personal protective equipment. The creation of the Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit required the highest level of multidisciplinary collaboration. When not used for clinical care and training, the unit will be a site for research and innovation in highly infectious diseases. The lessons learned from the design process can inform a new research agenda focused on the care of patients in a biocontainment environment. PMID:27057583

  2. Establishing a Personal Health Record System in an Academic Hospital: One Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hyun Jung; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyunyoung; Lee, Kiheon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sarah; Park, Hwayeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) are web based tools that help people to access and manage their personalized medical information. Although needs for PHR are increasing, current serviced PHRs are unsatisfactory and researches on them remain limited. The purpose of this study is to show the process of developing Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH)'s own PHR system and to analyze consumer's use pattern after providing PHR service. Methods Task force team was organized to decide service range and set the program. They made the system available on both mobile application and internet web page. The study enrolled PHR consumers who assessed PHR system between June 2013 and June 2014. We analyzed the total number of users on a monthly basis and the using pattern according to each component. Results The PHR service named Health4U has been provided from June 2013. Every patient who visited SNUBH could register Health4U service and view their medical data. The PHR user has been increasing, especially they tend to approach via one way of either web page or mobile application. The most frequently used service is to check laboratory test result. Conclusion For paradigm shift toward patient-centered care, there is a growing interest in PHR. This study about experience of establishing and servicing the Health4U would contribute to development of interconnected PHR. PMID:26019761

  3. Personal Economic and Financial Security. Unit 7: A Core Curriculum of Related Instruction for Apprentices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    The personal economic and financial security unit is presented to assist apprentices to acquire a general knowledge of how to maintain economic security and stability. The unit consists of six modules: (1) Fair Labor Standards Act: minimum wages and maximum hours, (2) unemployment insurance: payments for the unemployed worker, (3) workmen's…

  4. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.1 Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. (a) Eligibility. To be eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen...

  5. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.1 Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. (a) Eligibility. To be eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen...

  6. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.1 Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. (a) Eligibility. To be eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen...

  7. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.1 Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. (a) Eligibility. To be eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen...

  8. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 319.1 Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. (a) Eligibility. To be eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen...

  9. Hospital Use by Children in the United States and Canada. Comparative International Vital and Health Statistics Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Lola Jean; McCarthy, Eileen

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a statistical study of hospital use by children in the United States and Canada designed to determine why the hospital discharge rate of children in the United States is lower than many other Western industrialized nations, although the discharge rate for the general U.S. population is higher. Several reasons for the lower…

  10. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  11. A Time Study of Physicians’ Work in a German University Eye Hospital to Estimate Unit Costs

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jan; McCrone, Paul; Patel, Anita; Auber, Gerd; Reinhard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Technical efficiency of hospital services is debated since performance has been heterogeneous. Staff time represents the main resource in patient care and its inappropriate allocation has been identified as a key factor of inefficiency. The aim of this study was to analyse the utilisation of physicians’ work time stratified by staff groups, tasks and places of work. A further aim was to use these data to estimate resource use per unit of output. Methods A self-reporting work-sampling study was carried during 14-days at a University Eye Hospital. Staff costs of physicians per unit of output were calculated at the wards, the operating rooms and the outpatient unit. Results Forty per cent of total work time was spent in contact with the patient. Thirty per cent was spent with documentation tasks. Time spent with documentation tasks declined monotonically with increasing seniority of staff. Unit costs were 56 € per patient day at the wards, 77 € and 20 € per intervention at the operating rooms for inpatients and outpatients, respectively, and 33 € per contact at the outpatient unit. Substantial differences in resources directly dedicated to the patient were found between these locations. Conclusion The presented data provide unprecedented units costs in inpatient Ophthalmology. Future research should focus on analysing factors that influence differences in time allocation, such as types of patients, organisation of care processes and composition of staff. PMID:25803022

  12. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student’s t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Results Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Conclusion Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals. PMID:26465244

  13. The Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service--the Girton and Newnham Unit, 1915-1918.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E; Parry, C

    2014-01-01

    The Scottish Women's Hospitals for Foreign Service were established shortly after the outbreak of the First World War. Opportunities were limited for medical women prior to the war and during it they were unable to obtain a commission in the Royal Army Medical Corps, hence the formation of these voluntary all-women units. The Girton and Newnham Unit, under the leadership of Dr L McIlroy, served with distinction in France, Serbia and Greece, demonstrating clinical competence in the management of the emergency medical and surgical problems associated with warfare, areas usually off-limits to women doctors. They were severely tested but showed endurance and resilience in the running of their hospital in the most difficult of conditions. PMID:25516907

  14. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  15. Comparison of Unit-Level Patient Turnover Measures in Acute Care Hospital Settings.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Hye; Dunton, Nancy; Blegen, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    High patient turnover is a critical factor increasing nursing workload. Despite the growing number of studies on patient turnover, no consensus about how to measure turnover has been achieved. This study was designed to assess the correlation among patient turnover measures commonly used in recent studies and to examine the degree of agreement among the measures for classifying units with different levels of patient turnover. Using unit-level data collected for this study from 292 units in 88 hospitals participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators®, we compared four patient turnover measures: the inverse of length of stay (1/LOS), admissions, discharges, and transfers per daily census (ADTC), ADTC with short-stay adjustment, and the number of ADTs and short-stay patients divided by the total number of treated patients, or Unit Activity Index (UAI). We assessed the measures' agreement on turnover quartile classifications, using percent agreement and Cohen's kappa statistic (weighted and unweighted). Pearson correlation coefficients also were calculated. ADTC with or without adjustment for short-stay patients had high correlations and substantial agreement with the measure of 1/LOS (κ = .62 to .91; r = .90 to .95). The UAI measure required data less commonly collected by participating hospital units and showed only moderate correlations and fair agreement with the other measures (κ = .23 to .39; r = .41 to .45). The UAI may not be comparable and interchangeable with other patient turnover measures when data are obtained from multiple units and hospitals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26998744

  16. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  17. [Potential uses of AP-DRG to describe the health care profile in hospital units].

    PubMed

    Noronha, Marina Ferreira de; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia

    2004-01-01

    The All Patient Diagnosis Related Groups (AP-DRG) provide a classification system for general hospital inpatients, aggregating hospitalizations based on resource use and clinical criteria. The different versions of the AP-DRG have been applied to inpatient care management and reimbursement. This paper aimed to describe the classification and explore the potential for generating information on inpatient care management based on data from the Ribeirão Preto region (Sao Paulo State, Brazil) in 1997, including public, private, and charity hospitals. We compared average length of stay related to DRGs in the Ribeirão Preto region and the United States. Using the relative cost weights of the AP-DRGs constructed for New York State, we verified the profile of inpatient care provided by 30 hospitals in the Ribeirão Preto region, and reimbursement for hospital care provided to patients referred from other municipalities and covered by the Unified National Health System (SUS). Our findings indicate the applicability of the classification to inform the decision-making process on inpatient care regionalization and organization in levels of complexity, as well as for improvement of inpatient care monitoring and reimbursement. PMID:15608938

  18. Implementation of a Personal Fitness Unit Using the Personalized System of Instruction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Steven; Hannon, James C.; Colquitt, Gavin; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Newton, Maria; Shaw, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Levels of physical activity and health-related fitness (HRF) are decreasing among adolescents in the United States. Several interventions have been implemented to reverse this downtrend. Traditionally, physical educators incorporate a direct instruction (DI) strategy, with teaching potentially leading students to disengage during class. An…

  19. 22 CFR 51.43 - Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Persons born outside the United States applying... NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.43 Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) General. A person born outside...

  20. 22 CFR 51.43 - Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Persons born outside the United States applying... NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.43 Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) General. A person born outside...

  1. 22 CFR 51.43 - Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Persons born outside the United States applying... NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.43 Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) General. A person born outside...

  2. 22 CFR 51.43 - Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Persons born outside the United States applying... NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.43 Persons born outside the United States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) General. A person born outside...

  3. Controlling hospital readmission of elderly persons living at home: a risk factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, F R; Brickner, P W; Conley, L; Conroy, M

    1991-01-01

    A large proportion of hospital stays stem from rapid readmission of elderly patients. These patients represent high cost users of inpatient care. Intervention in the hospital admission-readmission cycle may serve the interests of patients and payors alike. Data collected through comprehensive geriatric assessment can be useful in identifying those patients at high risk of readmission and who might benefit from more intensive in-hospital or post hospital attention. However, risk factors for readmission are largely unknown. We conducted a prospective study of elderly patients admitted to a metropolitan teaching hospital medical service and assessed by a geriatric team, to increase our knowledge of the factors associated with hospital readmissions. The most powerful predictor of hospital readmission within 6 months proved to be prior hospitalization. Attempts to reduce rehospitalizations in elderly patients must focus on those with prior recent hospitalizations. PMID:10115077

  4. Hilton's Rest and Pain, Guy's Hospital personalities and Guy's South African rugby connection.

    PubMed

    Dubovsky, H

    1997-07-01

    Guy's Hospital occupies a unique position in medical history. John Hilton (1805-1879), as anatomist, physiologist, morbid anatomist and surgeon in his classic Rest and Pain, published in 1863 (reissued in 1950), formulated principles for the diagnostic significance of pain and the value of rest in healing. An array of personalities graced Guy's Medical School in that era. The triumvirate of Richard Bright (1789-1858). Thomas Addison (1793-1860) and Thomas Hodgkin (1798-1866) contemporaneously discovered the diseases that bear their names. Sir Astley Cooper, a leading surgeon of his day (1768-1841), performed the first amputation of the hip joint before the era of anaesthesia. John Keats (1795-1821) qualified as a surgeon at Guy's but, realising his unsuitability of temperament, became a leading English poet. This change of direction caused him anguish and suffering, mainly because of the rejection of his poetry; tuberculosis led to his death in Rome, where he is buried. Guy's Medical School also allowed South Africans to enter as rugby players before the 1920s, when they were required to qualify overseas. PMID:9259729

  5. Access, quality, and costs of care at physician owned hospitals in the United States: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Orav, E John; Jena, Anupam B; Dudzinski, David M; Le, Sidney T; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare physician owned hospitals (POHs) with non-POHs on metrics around patient populations, quality of care, costs, and payments. Design Observational study. Setting Acute care hospitals in 95 hospital referral regions in the United States, 2010. Participants 2186 US acute care hospitals (219 POHs and 1967 non-POHs). Main outcome measures Proportions of patients using Medicaid and those from ethnic and racial minority groups; hospital performance on patient experience metrics, care processes, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, and readmission rates; costs of care; care payments; and Medicare market share. Results The 219 POHs were more often small (<100 beds), for profit, and in urban areas. 120 of these POHs were general (non-specialty) hospitals. Compared with patients from non-POHs, those from POHs were younger (77.4 v 78.4 years, P<0.001), less likely to be admitted through an emergency department (23.2% v. 29.0%, P<0.001), equally likely to be black (5.1% v 5.5%, P=0.85) or to use Medicaid (14.9% v 15.4%, P=0.75), and had similar numbers of chronic diseases and predicted mortality scores. POHs and non-POHs performed similarly on patient experience scores, processes of care, risk adjusted 30 day mortality, 30 day readmission rates, costs, and payments for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and pneumonia. Conclusion Although POHs may treat slightly healthier patients, they do not seem to systematically select more profitable or less disadvantaged patients or to provide lower value care. PMID:26333819

  6. Leadership-organizational culture relationship in nursing units of acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus; Pinto-Zipp, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    The phenomena of leadership and organizational culture (OC) has been defined as the driving forces in the success or failure of an organization. Today, nurse managers must demonstrate leadership behaviors or styles that are appropriate for the constantly changing, complex, and turbulent health care delivery system. In this study, researchers explored the relationship between nurse managers' leadership styles and OC of nursing units within an acute care hospital that had achieved excellent organizational performance as demonstrated by a consistent increase in patient satisfaction ratings. The data from this study support that transformational and transactional contingent reward leaderships as nurse manager leadership styles that are associated with nursing unit OC that have the ability to balance the dynamics of flexibility and stability within their nursing units and are essential for maintaining organizational effectiveness. It is essential for first-line nursing leaders to acquire knowledge and skills on organizational cultural competence. PMID:18389837

  7. Implementation of a large-scale hospital information infrastructure for multi-unit health-care services.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Dong Keun; Kim, Jung C; Park, Youn Jung; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in demand for high quality medical services, the need for an innovative hospital information system has become essential. An improved system has been implemented in all hospital units of the Yonsei University Health System. Interoperability between multi-units required appropriate hardware infrastructure and software architecture. This large-scale hospital information system encompassed PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications Systems), EMR (Electronic Medical Records) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). It involved two tertiary hospitals and 50 community hospitals. The monthly data production rate by the integrated hospital information system is about 1.8 TByte and the total quantity of data produced so far is about 60 TByte. Large scale information exchange and sharing will be particularly useful for telemedicine applications. PMID:18430292

  8. Possible risk factors associated with burn wound colonization in burn units of Gaza strip hospitals, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al Laham, N A; Elmanama, A A; Tayh, G A

    2013-06-30

    The epidemiological pattern and risk factors of burns and burn infections varies widely in different parts of the world. This study aims to determine the epidemiologic pattern of burn injuries and possible risk factors associated with burn infections in burn units of Gaza strip hospitals. A total of 118 patients were included in the study. The data collected included: patient age and gender, the causes, site, degree, and TBSA of the burns, as well as surgical operations, length of hospital stay, and microbiological profile of samples collected from patients, the environment, and from health care staff. Pediatric and adult patients accounted for 72% and 28% respectively. 58.5% of all patients were male and 41.5% were female. The most common etiological factors in children were scalding, while in adults these were open fire and flammable liquids. The mean TBSA was 12% with a range from 1-90%. Second and third degree burns accounted for 78% and 22% respectively. The area of the body most often affected was the torso (39%), followed by the lower limb (29.7%), and upper limb (17.8%). The predominant microorganisms isolated from burn wounds were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter spp. and Staphylococcus spp. The study showed the highest risk groups to be children and males, and enabled us to identify possible risk factors that can help in future efforts toward prevention and minimizing nosocomial infections in burn units of Gaza strip hospitals. PMID:24133399

  9. Improving referrals to the Liaison service at the Royal United Hospital in Bath

    PubMed Central

    Gomes-Pinto, Alister; Kuzminskyte, Ruta; Wooding, Katie; Asplin, Katherine; Ewins, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatry liaison services provide the interface between mental and physical health in the acute medical hospital, however there can be logistical and operational difficulties to overcome. This quality improvement project aimed to improve the timeliness of referrals to a liaison service from an acute hospital through simple interventions of a newsletter, email to staff, and a pilot including attending post-take ward rounds on the Medical Assessment Unit (MAU) of the hospital. This resulted in a faster referral process to liaison as well as improved staff satisfaction with the liaison service, both of which will have a positive benefit on the clinical management of patients and the patients experience in hospital. There was a significant improvement in overall staff satisfaction with the referral pathway, appropriateness of referrals and working hours of the Mental Health Liaison Team - increasing from 14% at baseline to 100% at the end of the study. Referral outcomes also showed a considerable improvement, with the percentage of junior doctors successfully able to locate the referral form increasing from 60% at baseline to 100%. PMID:26734414

  10. Alcohol-Related Diagnoses and All-Cause Hospitalization Among HIV-Infected and Uninfected Patients: A Longitudinal Analysis of United States Veterans from 1997 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Rentsch, Christopher; Tate, Janet P; Akgün, Kathleen M; Crystal, Stephen; Wang, Karen H; Ryan Greysen, S; Wang, Emily A; Bryant, Kendall J; Fiellin, David A; Justice, Amy C; Rimland, David

    2016-03-01

    Individuals with HIV infection are living substantially longer on antiretroviral therapy, but hospitalization rates continue to be relatively high. We do not know how overall or diagnosis-specific hospitalization rates compare between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals or what conditions may drive hospitalization trends. Hospitalization rates among United States Veterans were calculated and stratified by HIV serostatus and principal diagnosis disease category. Because alcohol-related diagnoses (ARD) appeared to have a disproportional effect, we further stratified our calculations by ARD history. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to assess the relative risk of hospitalization controlling for demographic and other comorbidity variables. From 1997 to 2011, 46,428 HIV-infected and 93,997 uninfected patients were followed for 1,497,536 person-years. Overall hospitalization rates decreased among HIV-infected and uninfected patients. However, cardiovascular and renal insufficiency admissions increased for all groups while gastrointestinal and liver, endocrine, neurologic, and non-AIDS cancer admissions increased among those with an alcohol-related diagnosis. After multivariable adjustment, HIV-infected individuals with an ARD had the highest risk of hospitalization (hazard ratio 3.24, 95 % CI 3.00, 3.49) compared to those free of HIV infection and without an ARD. Still, HIV alone also conferred increased risk (HR 2.08, 95 % CI 2.04, 2.13). While decreasing overall, risk of all-cause hospitalization remains higher among HIV-infected than uninfected individuals and is strongly influenced by the presence of an ARD. PMID:25711299

  11. Determining Family Needs on an Oncology Hospital Unit Using Interview, Art, and Survey.

    PubMed

    Catlin, Anita; Ford, Marilee; Maloney, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    A movement worldwide, and specifically new to our hospital, is the implementation of Patient- and Family-Centered Care. We were unsure, however, what the needs were of our patients' families. This triangulated study, on a 28-bed oncology unit, studied family members at the bedside. We asked family members what their needs were in a three-step process (open-ended interview, use of the Draw a Bridge art therapy technique, and the Family Inventory of Needs survey). Nineteen interviews revealed needs for physical comfort, emotional support, cultural sensitivity, recognition of help provided by family members and improved pain management. Art therapy revealed the stress of caregiving and helped to uncover unmet needs for interviewers to explore. The FIN identified that care at home after discharge was a major worry. Knowledge of family members' needs while a loved one is in the hospital allows for planning and provision of modalities to assist them in their caregiving. PMID:25862492

  12. 31 CFR 585.506 - Payments of obligations to persons within the United States authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Policy § 585.506 Payments of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. (a) The transfer... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... the Blocked Assets Division, Office of Foreign Assets Control, U.S. Treasury Department,...

  13. 27 CFR 70.182 - Disposition of personal property acquired by the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... secure the performance of their agreements. Any such deposit, but not more than $200, shall be retained... § 70.182 Disposition of personal property acquired by the United States. (a) Sale—(1) In general. Any... accordance with instructions issued by the appropriate TTB officer. (2) Time, place, manner and terms of...

  14. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  15. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  16. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  17. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  18. Implementation of Personal Response Units in Very Large Lecture Classes: Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, John

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on a large scale implementation of personal response units in three introductory science courses at the University of Western Ontario in Canada. An online survey of students was conducted to gather their perceptions on the uses of the devices, triangulated by participant observation of the classes and email interviews with the…

  19. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facilitation by a United States person. 538.407 Section 538.407 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SUDANESE SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Interpretations § 538.407 Facilitation by...

  20. Task-Contingent Conscientiousness as a Unit of Personality at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minbashian, Amirali; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the viability of incorporating task-contingent units into the study of personality at work, using conscientiousness as an illustrative example. We used experience-sampling data from 123 managers to show that (a) momentary conscientiousness at work is contingent on the difficulty and urgency demands of the tasks people…

  1. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-Huan; Li, Gang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation.A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured.A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The "overall perceptions of safety" (48.1% vs 40.4%, P < 0.001) and "frequency of events reported" (63.7% vs 60.7%, P = 0.001) of surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P < 0.001) of surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess "patient safety grade" to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events.Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital. PMID:26166083

  2. Trends in Prevalence of Diabetes Among Delivery Hospitalizations, United States, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Bardenheier, Barbara; Elixhauser, Anne; Geiss, Linda S.; Gregg, Edward

    2015-01-01

    To describe recent trends in prevalence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) (i.e., type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among delivery hospitalizations in the United States. Data on delivery hospitalizations from 1993 through 2009 were obtained from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Diagnosis-Related Group codes were used to identify deliveries and diagnosis codes on presence of diabetes. Rates of hospitalizations with diabetes were calculated per 100 deliveries by type of diabetes, hospital geographic region, patient’s age, degree of urbanicity of patient’s residence, categorized median household income for patient’s ZIP Code, expected primary payer, and type of delivery. From 1993 to 2009, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes per 100 deliveries increased from 0.62 to 0.90 for PDM (trend p < 0.001) and from 3.09 to 5.57 for GDM (trend p < 0.001). In 2009, correlates of PDM at delivery included older age [40–44 vs. 15–24: odds ratio 6.45 (95 % CI 5.27–7.88)], Medicaid/Medicare versus private payment sources [1.77 (95 % CI 1.59–1.98)], patient’s ZIP Code with a median household income in bottom quartile versus other quartiles [1.54 (95 % CI 1.41, 1.69)], and C-section versus vaginal delivery [3.36 (95 % CI 3.10–3.64)]. Correlates of GDM at delivery were similar. Among U.S. delivery hospitalizations, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. In 2009, the prevalence of diabetes was higher among women in older age groups, living in ZIP codes with lower household incomes, or with public insurance. PMID:24996952

  3. Trends in prevalence of diabetes among delivery hospitalizations, United States, 1993-2009.

    PubMed

    Correa, Adolfo; Bardenheier, Barbara; Elixhauser, Anne; Geiss, Linda S; Gregg, Edward

    2015-03-01

    To describe recent trends in prevalence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus (PDM) (i.e., type 1 or type 2 diabetes) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among delivery hospitalizations in the United States. Data on delivery hospitalizations from 1993 through 2009 were obtained from the Health Care Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Diagnosis-Related Group codes were used to identify deliveries and diagnosis codes on presence of diabetes. Rates of hospitalizations with diabetes were calculated per 100 deliveries by type of diabetes, hospital geographic region, patient's age, degree of urbanicity of patient's residence, categorized median household income for patient's ZIP Code, expected primary payer, and type of delivery. From 1993 to 2009, age-standardized prevalence of diabetes per 100 deliveries increased from 0.62 to 0.90 for PDM (trend p < 0.001) and from 3.09 to 5.57 for GDM (trend p < 0.001). In 2009, correlates of PDM at delivery included older age [40-44 vs. 15-24: odds ratio 6.45 (95 % CI 5.27-7.88)], Medicaid/Medicare versus private payment sources [1.77 (95 % CI 1.59-1.98)], patient's ZIP Code with a median household income in bottom quartile versus other quartiles [1.54 (95 % CI 1.41, 1.69)], and C-section versus vaginal delivery [3.36 (95 % CI 3.10-3.64)]. Correlates of GDM at delivery were similar. Among U.S. delivery hospitalizations, the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. In 2009, the prevalence of diabetes was higher among women in older age groups, living in ZIP codes with lower household incomes, or with public insurance. PMID:24996952

  4. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  5. Professional Culture and Personality Traits of Hospital Pharmacists across Canada: A Fundamental First Step in Developing Effective Knowledge Translation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Meagen; Hall, Kevin W; Bussières, Jean-François; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the value of pharmacists’ interventions in the care of patients is strong and continues to grow, but the rate at which these new practice opportunities are being integrated into daily practice has not kept pace. The knowledge translation literature suggests that before effective change strategies can be implemented, a better understanding of the current environment must be obtained. Two important factors within the practice environment are the professional culture and personality traits of group members. Objective: To gain insight, at a national level, into the culture of hospital pharmacy, using the Organizational Culture Profile, and into hospital pharmacists’ personality traits, using the Big Five Inventory. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of hospital pharmacists from across Canada was conducted intermittently over the period August 2012 to September 2013. The online survey contained questions about demographic characteristics and practice setting, as well as questions from the Organizational Culture Profile and Big Five Inventory. The survey link was distributed directly to hospital pharmacists or made available through provincial monthly newsletters. All data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Results: In total, 401 surveys were returned. Descriptive analyses from the Organizational Culture Profile revealed that most respondents perceived value in the factors of supportiveness, competitiveness, and stability. Descriptive analyses from the Big Five Inventory revealed that respondents may have been more likely to exhibit behaviours in line with the trait of conscientiousness. Several significant subgroup differences were noted in relation to levels of education, regions of practice within Canada, years in practice, and proportion of time spent conducting clinical duties. Conclusions: The results from this survey provide preliminary insight into the professional culture and personality traits of Canadian hospital

  6. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  7. Paranoid symptoms in patients on a general hospital psychiatric unit. Implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Schwab, P J

    1978-03-01

    Paranoid symptoms were found in 40% of patients admitted to a university general hospital psychiatric unit during a ten-month period. Fifty-eight percent of this group had frank paranoid delusions, while the rest had ideas of reference or generalized suspiciousness. Only one half of those who had paranoid delusions had paranoid schizophrenia. A significant number had affective disorders or organic brain disorder. Ideas of reference and suspiciousness were found in many patients who were not psychotic. The therapeutic implications of these findings are reported in three patients who were inadequately treated for affective disorders because the presence of paranoid symptomatology had led to an incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:727891

  8. Multidisciplinary team malfunctioning on a state hospital unit: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E A; Ruiz, P; Langrod, J

    1980-01-01

    The use of multidisciplinary teams in the care of psychiatric patients can be countertherapeutic unless attention is paid to the dynamics of team functioning. The authors present a case study of team malfunctioning on an inpatient unit in a state hospital that resulted from staff's role confusion and insecurity. Patient care was relegated to second place as major interpersonal conflicts among the staff were played out along ethnic and cultural lines. Resolution of the conflicts required identifying their source, clarifying staff roles, and initiating a special inservice training program focused primarily on the needs of paraprofessional staff. PMID:7353821

  9. Economic Evaluation of a General Hospital Unit for Older People with Delirium and Dementia (TEAM Randomised Controlled Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Tanajewski, Lukasz; Franklin, Matthew; Gkountouras, Georgios; Berdunov, Vladislav; Harwood, Rowan H.; Goldberg, Sarah E.; Bradshaw, Lucy E.; Gladman, John R. F.; Elliott, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background One in three hospital acute medical admissions is of an older person with cognitive impairment. Their outcomes are poor and the quality of their care in hospital has been criticised. A specialist unit to care for older people with delirium and dementia (the Medical and Mental Health Unit, MMHU) was developed and then tested in a randomised controlled trial where it delivered significantly higher quality of, and satisfaction with, care, but no significant benefits in terms of health status outcomes at three months. Objective To examine the cost-effectiveness of the MMHU for older people with delirium and dementia in general hospitals, compared with standard care. Methods Six hundred participants aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified on admission as cognitively impaired, were randomised to the MMHU or to standard care on acute geriatric or general medical wards. Cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, at 3-month follow-up, was assessed in trial-based economic evaluation (599/600 participants, intervention: 309). Multiple imputation and complete-case sample analyses were employed to deal with missing QALY data (55%). Results The total adjusted health and social care costs, including direct costs of the intervention, at 3 months was £7714 and £7862 for MMHU and standard care groups, respectively (difference -£149 (95% confidence interval [CI]: -298, 4)). The difference in QALYs gained was 0.001 (95% CI: -0.006, 0.008). The probability that the intervention was dominant was 58%, and the probability that it was cost-saving with QALY loss was 39%. At £20,000/QALY threshold, the probability of cost-effectiveness was 94%, falling to 59% when cost-saving QALY loss cases were excluded. Conclusions The MMHU was strongly cost-effective using usual criteria, although considerably less so when the less acceptable situation with QALY loss and cost savings were excluded. Nevertheless, this model of care is worthy of further evaluation

  10. Blood culture isolates from children admitted to Medical Unit III, Yangon Children's Hospital, 1998.

    PubMed

    Shwe, Than Nu; Nyein, Mar Mar; Yi, Wut; Mon, Aung

    2002-12-01

    A one year study (August 1998-July 1999) of bacteremia in febrile children was carried out in the Medical Unit (III), Yangon Children's Hospital (YCH), Myanmar, to determine: (1) the bacteria responsible for fever of five days or more in children; (2) the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of these bacteria. Children aged one month to 12 years who had fever for five days or more and who did not receive antibiotics within the first 48 hours irrespective of the diagnosis were included in this study. A total of 120 patients fulfilled the criteria. Bacteria could be isolated from 65 cases (54.2%). The commonest organism isolated was Salmonella typhi (43.1%). Others included Escherichia coli (12.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7.7%); Streptococcus, Shigella, Diplococcus, Klebsiella and Acinetobacter were also isolated. The Salmonella typhi were resistant to conventional antibiotics (ampicillin, amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, and co-trimoxazole); however, they were sensitive to amikacin, netilmicin, nalidixic acid, and cephalothin. A cluster of enteric fever cases from Mingalartaungnyunt township was noticed and was reported to the Directorate of Health. Changes in the incidence and etiology of bacteremia in hospitals are well documented. Sentinel surveys of bacteremia in major hospitals should be carried out in order to detect the changing patterns of bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity; such surveys will be of great help in establishing local antibiotic policies. PMID:12757224

  11. Evaluation of hospital-wide computerised decision support in an intensive care unit: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Santucci, W; Day, R O; Baysari, M T

    2016-07-01

    We conducted an observational study with interviews in a 12-bed general/neurological intensive care unit (ICU) at a teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, to determine whether hospital-wide computerised decision support (CDS) embedded in an electronic prescribing system is used and perceived as useful by doctors in an ICU setting. Twenty doctors were shadowed by the observer while on ward rounds (33.6 hours) and non-ward rounds (28 hours) in the ICU. These doctors were also interviewed to explore views of CDS. We found that computerised alerts were triggered frequently in the ICU (n=166, in 59% of orders), less than half of the alerts were read by doctors and only four alerts resulted in a medication order being changed. Pre-written orders were utilised frequently, however reference material was rarely accessed. Interviews with doctors revealed a willingness to use CDS features; however the primary barrier to use was lack of customisation for the ICU setting. Doctors working in the ICU triggered a high number of alerts when prescribing, 40% more alerts than doctors working on general wards of the same hospital. Certain procedures in place in the ICU (e.g. daily microbiology ward rounds) made many alerts redundant in this setting. Lack of customisation for the ICU led to dissatisfaction with CDS and infrequent use of some CDS features. PMID:27456183

  12. Risk Factors for Fall-Related Injuries Leading to Hospitalization Among Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rekha M; Kutty, V Raman

    2016-01-01

    This study intended to identify the risk factors for injurious falls that led to hospitalization of older persons living in the community. A hospital-based unmatched incident case-control study was done among 251 cases and 250 controls admitted at a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Mean age of cases was 71.6 ± 9.13 years and that of controls was 67.02 ± 6.17 years. Hip fractures were the predominant injury following falls. Falls were mostly a result of intrinsic causes. After adjusting for other variabes, the risk factors for all injuries were age above 70 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.46-3.46), previous fall history (OR = 2.76; 95% CI = 1.08-7.08), impaired vision (OR = 4.49; 95% CI = 2.77-7.30), not living with spouse (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.31-2.97), door thresholds (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.01-2.29), and slippery floor (OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.31-4.32). The risk factors for hip fractures and other injuries were identified separately. Fall prevention strategies among older persons are warranted in Kerala. PMID:26463576

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important correlate of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals (B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation was associated directly with self-harm (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients. PMID:26581019

  14. Drug Utilization Study in Medical Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sharonjeet; Rajagopalan, Sujit; Bhalla, Ashish; Pandhi, Promila; Malhotra, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To generate data on the drug utilization pattern and cost of drug treatment and to determine the rationality of prescriptions. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted in the medical emergency unit of our hospital. Patient case records were reviewed to extract data on the pattern of drug use. Cost of drug treatment for the emergency visit was calculated by referring to the cost mentioned in Monthly Index of Medical Specialties and the rationality of prescriptions was evaluated using WHO core indicators of drug utilization. Results. 1100 case records were reviewed. Majority of patients received proton pump inhibitors followed by multivitamins. The median cost per prescription was 119.23$ (7.32$–7663.46$). Majority (49.9%) of drug cost was driven by antibiotics alone. An average of 4.9 drugs was prescribed per prescription. There were 14.89% encounters with antibiotics. 75.17% of the drugs were given as injectables and only 29.27% of the drugs were prescribed as generics. Conclusion. There is need to rationalize the drug therapy in terms of increasing prescribing of drugs by generic name and to avoid overuse of PPIs and multivitamins in emergency unit. Also the hospital pharmacy should be encouraged to procure more cost effective alternative antibiotics in future. PMID:24883208

  15. 31 CFR 538.508 - Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. 538.508 Section 538.508 Money and... Licensing Policy § 538.508 Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the..., solely for the purpose of payment of obligations of the Government of Sudan to persons or accounts...

  16. 31 CFR 538.508 - Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. 538.508 Section 538.508 Money and... Licensing Policy § 538.508 Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the..., solely for the purpose of payment of obligations of the Government of Sudan to persons or accounts...

  17. 31 CFR 538.508 - Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. 538.508 Section 538.508 Money and... Licensing Policy § 538.508 Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the..., solely for the purpose of payment of obligations of the Government of Sudan to persons or accounts...

  18. 31 CFR 538.508 - Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. 538.508 Section 538.508 Money and... Licensing Policy § 538.508 Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the..., solely for the purpose of payment of obligations of the Government of Sudan to persons or accounts...

  19. 31 CFR 538.508 - Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sudan of obligations to persons within the United States authorized. 538.508 Section 538.508 Money and... Licensing Policy § 538.508 Certain payments by the Government of Sudan of obligations to persons within the..., solely for the purpose of payment of obligations of the Government of Sudan to persons or accounts...

  20. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Related Hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011): Rates, Co-Occurring Illnesses, Suicidal Ideation/Self-Harm, and Hospital Charges.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Banta, Jim E; Sonne, Janet L; Przekop, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011). Over this period, there were an estimated 1,477,944 hospitalizations (915,591 women) with either a primary (reason for hospitalization) or secondary PTSD diagnosis. Population-based hospitalization rates rose from 2002 to 2011; women in the age range of 20 to 44 years had the highest rates and the steepest rise. Most of the hospitalizations for men and women younger than 45 years had been assigned a primary diagnosis of mental illness (including PTSD). Mood and substance use disorders were among the most commonly co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses with PTSD. Suicidal ideation/suicide attempts declined with increasing age. The strongest predictor of this criterion was mood disorder, and its importance as a predictor increased as people aged. Total inflation-adjusted charges for all PTSD-related hospitalizations were $34.9 billion, with 36% being for hospitalizations where a mental illness (including PTSD) was the primary diagnosis. PMID:26588079

  1. Nutrition Screening and Assessment in Hospitalized Patients: A Survey of Current Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vihas; Romano, Michelle; Corkins, Mark R; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Earthman, Carrie; Malone, Ainsley; Miller, Sarah; Sabino, Kim; Wooley, Jennifer; Guenter, Peggi

    2014-07-01

    Background: The Joint Commission has mandated universal screening and assessment of hospitalized patients for malnutrition since 1995. Although various validated and nonvalidated tools are available, implementation of this mandate has not been well characterized. We report results of a survey of hospital-based professionals in the United States describing their perspective on the current range of nutrition screening and assessment practices as well as associated gaps in knowledge. Methods and Materials: Data from a 2012-2013 cross-sectional, web-based survey targeting members of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and the Society of Hospital Medicine were collected with non-hospital-based members excluded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Survey data from 1777 unique email addresses are included in this report. A majority of respondents were dietitians, nearly half were A.S.P.E.N. members, and 69.4% reported caring for a mix of adult and pediatric patients. Most respondents answered affirmatively about nutrition screening being performed in alignment with The Joint Commission mandate, but only 50% were familiar with the 2012 Consensus Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/A.S.P.E.N. on adult malnutrition. In most cases, nurses were primarily responsible for nutrition screening, while dietitians had primary responsibility for assessment. No one specific assessment tool or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was identified as being used a majority of the time in assessing or coding a patient for malnutrition. Conclusions: The survey findings affirmed compliance with accreditation standards in completing a nutrition screen within 24 hours of admission, and most hospitals appear to have a process to perform a nutrition assessment once a screen is completed. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in both use of tools and

  2. Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in a Neonatal Unit of a Greek Tertiary Hospital: Clinical Characteristics and Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Koukou, Dimitra; Chatzichristou, Panagiota; Trimis, Georgios; Siahanidou, Tania; Skiathitou, Anna-Venetia; Koutouzis, Emmanouil I.; Syrogiannopoulos, George A.; Lourida, Athanasia; Michos, Athanasios G.; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus (RV) infection in neonatal age can be mild or even asymptomatic. Several studies have reported that RV is responsible for 31%-87% of pediatric nosocomial diarrhea and causes gastroenteritis outbreaks in pediatric and neonatal units. Objectives Study clinical characteristics, genotypes and risk factors of RV infection in neonatal age. Methods A prospective study was conducted from April 2009 till April 2013 in the neonatal special care unit of the largest tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece. Fecal samples and epidemiological data were collected from each neonate with gastrointestinal symptoms. RV antigen was detected with a rapid immunochromatography test. RV positive samples were further genotyped with RT PCR and sequencing using specific VP7 and VP4 primers. Results Positive for RV were 126/415 samples (30.4%). Mean age of onset was 18 days. Seventy four cases (58%) were hospital acquired. Seasonality of RV infection did not differ significantly throughout the year with the exception of 4 outbreaks. Genotypes found during the study period were G4P[8] (58.7%), G1P[8] (14.7%), G12P[8] (9.3%), G3P[8] (9.3%), G12P[6] (5.3%), G9P[8] (1.3%) and G2P[4] (1.3%). RV cases presented with: diarrhea (81%), vomiting (26.2%), fever (34.9%), dehydration (28.6%), feeding intolerance (39.7%), weight loss (54%), whilst 19% of cases were asymptomatic. Comparing community with hospital acquired cases differences in clinical manifestations were found. Conclusions Significant incidence of nosocomially transmitted RV infection in neonatal age including asymptomatic illness exists. Genotypes causing nosocomial outbreaks are not different from community strains. Circulating vaccines can be effective in prevention of nosocomial RV infection through herd immunity. PMID:26214830

  3. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  4. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  5. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  6. Cluster of Ebola cases among Liberian and U.S. health care workers in an Ebola treatment unit and adjacent hospital -- Liberia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Hunter, Jennifer C; Pillai, Satish K; Arwady, M Allison; Ayscue, Patrick; Matanock, Almea; Monroe, Ben; Schafer, Ilana J; Nyenswah, Tolbert G; De Cock, Kevin M

    2014-10-17

    The ongoing Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, like previous Ebola outbreaks, has been characterized by amplification in health care settings and increased risk for health care workers (HCWs), who often do not have access to appropriate personal protective equipment. In many locations, Ebola treatment units (ETUs) have been established to optimize care of patients with Ebola while maintaining infection control procedures to prevent transmission of Ebola virus. These ETUs are considered essential to containment of the epidemic. In July 2014, CDC assisted the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Liberia in investigating a cluster of five Ebola cases among HCWs who became ill while working in an ETU, an adjacent general hospital, or both. No common source of exposure or chain of transmission was identified. However, multiple opportunities existed for transmission of Ebola virus to HCWs, including exposure to patients with undetected Ebola in the hospital, inadequate use of personal protective equipment during cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces in the hospital, and potential transmission from an ill HCW to another HCW. No evidence was found of a previously unrecognized mode of transmission. Prevention recommendations included reinforcement of existing infection control guidance for both ETUs and general medical care settings, including measures to prevent cross-transmission in co-located facilities. PMID:25321070

  7. Factors Associated with Review Board Dispositions following Re-hospitalization among Discharged Persons found Not Criminally Responsible.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Catherine M; Nicholls, Tonia L; Charette, Yanick; Seto, Michael C; Crocker, Anne G

    2016-03-01

    In the Canadian forensic mental health system, a person found Not Criminally Responsible on account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD) and given a conditional discharge returns to the community while remaining under the jurisdiction of a provincial/territorial Review Board. However, the individual can be re-hospitalized while on conditional discharge, for reasons such as substance use, violation of conditions, or violence. We investigated whether being re-hospitalized has an impact on the factors associated with the subsequent Review Board disposition. Persons found NCRMD from the three largest Canadian provinces who were conditionally discharged at least once during the observation period were included in the sample (N = 1,367). These individuals were involved in 2,920 disposition hearings; nearly one-third of patients (30%) were re-hospitalized after having been conditionally discharged by the Review Board. The factors examined included the scales of the Historical Clinical Risk Management-20 and salient behavior that occurred since the previous hearing, such as substance use or violence. The greater presence of clinical items resulted in a greater likelihood of a hospital detention decision at the next hearing. The effect was larger for the re-hospitalized group than for the group who successfully remained in the community since the last hearing. The results suggest that dynamic factors, specifically indicators of mental health, are heavily weighted by the Review Boards, consistent with the literature on imminent risk and in line with the NCRMD legislation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27041680

  8. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  9. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. PMID:21159414

  10. Correlates of Hospitalization for Methadone-Maintained Persons with Physical Health Problems

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Compton, Peggy; Cohen, Allan; Marfisee, Mary; Shoptaw, Steven; Greengold, Barbara; de Castro, Viviana; Reaves, Mashid; Hasson, Albert; George, Daniel; Leake, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional study (n = 190) examined correlates of hospitalization for physical health problems among methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clients with a history of alcohol abuse. The study was derived from baseline data collected for a longitudinal trial assessing the effect of motivational interviewing among alcohol-abusing adults undergoing MMT. The sample included clients who were 18–55 years of age, abusing alcohol, and receiving MMT from five large methadone maintenance clinics in the Los Angeles area. A structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Correlates of hospitalization in logistic regression analysis included lack of social support, recent victimization, age of first alcohol use, chronic severe pain in the previous six months, not having children, and ethnicity. Identification of hospitalization risk factors among alcohol-abusing MMT clients is a first step to developing risk-reducing interventions designed to lower hospitalization rates in this population. PMID:19129517

  11. Organizational Justice: Personality Traits or Emotional Intelligence? An Empirical Study in an Italian Hospital Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of personality traits and emotional intelligence in relation to organizational justice. The Organizational Justice Scale, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form, and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory were administered to 384 Italian nurses. The emotional intelligence…

  12. Homicide rates among persons aged 10-24 years - United States, 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-07-12

    Homicide disproportionately affects persons aged 10-24 years in the United States and consistently ranks in the top three leading causes of death in this age group, resulting in approximately 4,800 deaths and an estimated $9 billion in lost productivity and medical costs in 2010. To investigate trends in homicide among persons aged 10-24 years for the period 1981-2010, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data on deaths caused by homicide of persons in this age group and examined trends by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and mechanism of injury. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that homicide rates varied substantially during the study period, with a sharp rise from 1985 to 1993 followed by a decline that has slowed since 1999. During the period 2000-2010, rates declined for all groups, although the decline was significantly slower for males compared with females and for blacks compared with Hispanics and persons of other racial/ethnic groups. By mechanism of injury, the decline for firearm homicides from 2000 to 2010 was significantly slower than for nonfirearm homicides. The homicide rate among persons aged 10-24 years in 2010 was 7.5 per 100,000, the lowest in the 30-year study period. Primary prevention strategies remain critical, particularly among groups at increased risk for homicide. PMID:23842443

  13. Falls Among Persons Aged ≥65 Years With and Without Severe Vision Impairment - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Crews, John E; Chou, Chiu-Fung; Stevens, Judy A; Saaddine, Jinan B

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, an estimated 2.8 million persons aged ≥65 years in the United States reported severe vision impairment* defined as being blind or having severe difficulty seeing, even with eyeglasses. Good vision is important for maintaining balance as well as for identifying low-contrast hazards, estimating distances, and discerning spatial relationships. Conversely, having poor vision increases the risk for falls (1,2). Falls among older adults are common and can cause serious injuries, disabilities, and premature death (1,3). To date, no state-level investigations have examined the annual prevalence of falls among persons with and without severe vision impairment. CDC analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to estimate the state-specific annual prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years with and without self-reported severe vision impairment. Overall, 46.7% of persons with, and 27.7% of older adults without, self-reported severe vision impairment reported having fallen during the previous year. The state-specific annual prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years with severe vision impairment ranged from 30.8% (Hawaii) to 59.1% (California). In contrast, the prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years without severe vision impairment ranged from 20.4% (Hawaii) to 32.4% (Alaska). Developing fall-prevention interventions intended for persons with severe vision impairment will help states manage the impact of vision impairment and falls on health care resources, and can inform state-specific fall prevention initiatives. PMID:27148832

  14. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  15. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  16. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  17. Evaluation of PACS at Hammersmith Hospital: assessment of radiology department performance in the intensive care unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Stirling; Weatherburn, Gwyneth C.; Taylor, Joanne; Buxton, Martin J.

    1993-09-01

    The hospital-wide PACS installation at Hammersmith Hospital is the subject of an independent technology evaluation exercise. This paper focuses on one aspect of the evaluation: the assessment of the impact of PACS on the performance of the radiology department in the intensive care unit (ICU). A quasi-experimental before and after research design has been adopted and initial baseline measurements have been undertaken of the time intervals between the various events from the radiograph request to the initiation of a subsequent clinical action. The results presented suggest that the radiology department at Hammersmith is currently performing well with an interval of about 10 minutes from the radiograph being taken to it being available for viewing in the ICU for non-routine radiographs (taken after 11.00 and before 9.00). The main findings from this study to date relate to the appropriateness of the research methods used, given the disappointing response rates for specific variables, and thus the potential for bias in the results obtained.

  18. Evaluation of an intensive care unit in a teaching hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Adu-Gyamfi, Y; al-Ghassab, G; al-Suleiman, S A; al-Sibai, M H; Wosornu, L

    1992-01-01

    Intensive Care Units (ICU) in general hospitals have become a standard requirement in tertiary care centres. However, the appropriateness of their use is not widely known. We have used the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System (TISS) to evaluate a multidisciplinary ICU in a teaching hospital in Saudi Arabia. The average occupancy rate was 79%, the nurse: patient ratio was 1:1.4, duration of stay 4.1 +/- 3.5 days, and mortality was 1.4%. The distribution of severity of illness was as follows: Classes I & II, 82%, and Classes III & IV, 18%. The average TISS points were: daily per patient 15.1 +/- 2.7 (range 11.5-21.7), total per day 125.6 +/- 38.2 (range 35-211), and patient points per nurse was 21.1. We conclude that, although less than 20% of patients required unique ICU services, the use of our ICU was appropriate to the current medical and manpower training needs of the community it was designed to serve, but the basis of nurses' complaints of overwork remains to be determined. PMID:1399373

  19. [Analysis of antibiotics as a curative measure in four hospital units].

    PubMed

    Ennigrou, Samir; Gaddas, Mehdi; Kacem, Mohamed Ali Ben Hadj; Ali, Cherif; Ghedira, Selma; Mediouni, Mongi; Najah, Nabil; Nacef, Taoufik; Ben Redjeb, Saida; Zouari, Béchir

    2006-09-01

    In order to analyse the methods of curative prescription of antibiotics in four units of hospitalization of the hospital Charles Nicolle of Tunis, a descriptive study of prescriptions was carried out during the first five months of year 2001. On the whole, 165 prescriptions delivered to patients were included in the study. The average age of the patients was 44 years, the sex ratio of 1.45 and the average duration of 15.1 days. Approximately two thirds of the initially probabilist prescriptions were not documented secondarily. Those secondarily documented (n = 51) were essentially related to nosocomial pneumonias and septicaemias (29 and 10 prescriptions). The two germs most frequently isolated during nosocomial pneumonias were Acinetobacter baumannii and, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17 and 8 strains). Only imipenem, netilmicin and colistin remain active on A. baumannii. The bitherapy was the most used treatment (87.5%). It was generally an association beta-lactamin-aminosid (52.9%). The average cost of a documented prescription varied from 943,6 to 1184,9 TD (Tunisian Dinars) according as the prescription were secondarily documented or not. PMID:17263202

  20. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  1. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  2. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  3. Is ophthalmology evidence based? A clinical audit of the emergency unit of a regional eye hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lai, T Y Y; Wong, V W Y; Leung, G M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the proportion of interventions that are evidence based in the acute care unit of a regional eye hospital. Methods: A prospective clinical audit was carried out at Hong Kong Eye Hospital in July 2002 to investigate the extent to which ophthalmic practices were evidence based. The major diagnosis and intervention provided were identified through chart review. A corresponding literature search using Medline and the Cochrane Library was performed to assess the degree to which each intervention was based on current, best evidence. Each diagnosis intervention pair was accordingly analysed and graded. The level of best, current evidence supporting each intervention was graded and analysed. Results: A total of 274 consecutive consultation episodes were examined. 22 cases were excluded since no diagnosis or intervention was made during the consultation. 108 (42.9%) patient interventions were found to be based on evidence from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomised controlled trials (RCT). Evidence from prospective or retrospective observational studies supported the interventions in 86 (34.1%) patients. In 58 (23.0%) cases, no evidence or opposing evidence was found regarding the intervention. The proportion of evidence based on RCT or systematic reviews was higher for surgical interventions compared with non-surgical interventions (p=0.007). The proportion of interventions based on RCT or systematic reviews was higher for specialist ophthalmologists than trainee ophthalmologists (p=0.021). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the majority of interventions in the ophthalmic unit were evidence based and comparable to the experience of other specialties. PMID:12642295

  4. The probability distribution of attendance to hospital emergency units for school students in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mona Hassan Ahmed; Zaghloul, Ashraf Ahmed; Mokhtar, Samiha Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a retrospective study designed to examine the assumption that emergency arrivals at the Sporting Students' Hospital in Alexandria follow a Poisson distribution. Data about all arrivals at the emergency room (ER) for the year, 2000 (43076 arrivals) was extracted from the records of the emergency department and classified by age, sex, school, reason for visit, date and time of visit. Data analysis revealed that 12.9% of the total arrivals indicated hospital admission either to the inpatient units (12.5%) or the ICU (0.4%). Goodness of fit test showed that admissions to the ICU fit the Poisson distribution but those admitted to the inpatient units did not follow the assumed distribution. However the latter group did not fit exactly the normal distribution which indicated that deviance from the Poisson is due to the large mean non-elective admissions (14.74% per day). Hence the Poisson assumption is not excluded as the inpatient emergency admissions are still randomly distributed and independent. Univariate and multivariate Poisson regression of the daily emergency admissions gave another clue to the goodness of fit of emergency admissions to the Poisson process. Regression analysis showed significantly higher loge number of emergency admissions among the age group 12 or more, male students, medical conditions in contrast to injuries, governmental schools, and at 04:00-11:59 pm in contrast to midnight to 07:59 am. Results of the present study indicated the random nature of demand for emergency admission which affects use of bed stock. A prospective study of these admissions on daily basis is needed. PMID:16922150

  5. Molecular evidence of person-to-person transmission of a pigmented strain of Corynebacterium striatum in intensive care units.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, R B; Nowowiejski, D J; Warren, J J; Finn, D J; Coyle, M B

    1994-01-01

    During a 14-month period, a unique strain of Corynebacterium striatum that produces a diffusible brown pigment was isolated from purulent sputa of nine patients and from nonrespiratory sites of two additional patients. Seven nonpigmented clinical isolates from the same period and three reference strains of C. striatum were compared with the brown isolates. Most patients had multiple sputum cultures with no coryneforms before the brown strain emerged, suggesting that the organism was hospital acquired. DNA restriction fragment patterns and Southern hybridization with the att site probe of Corynebacterium diphtheriae indicated that the brown isolates were a single strain which was distinct from the heterogeneous nonpigmented strains. A common source for the brown C. striatum was not recognized, although all of these patients were located in two adjoining intensive care units. All of the brown isolates, three of the nonpigmented clinical isolates, and two reference strains had positive CAMP reactions with Staphylococcus aureus, which has not been reported for C. striatum prior to this study. Images PMID:7907342

  6. Air pollution and hospital admissions for ischemic heart disease in persons with congestive heart failure or arrhythmia.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Jennifer K; Tager, Ira B; Lurmann, Fred; Segal, Mark; Quesenberry, Charles P; Lugg, Marlene M; Shan, Jun; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K

    2002-01-01

    We examined whether ischemic heart disease (IHD) hospital admissions were associated with air pollutants in those with and without secondary diagnoses of arrhythmia (ARR) or congestive heart failure (CHF). We assessed the occurrence of increased vulnerability among persons with these conditions to daily variations in ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, or particulate matter less than or equal to 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The study population consisted of members of a large health maintenance organization residing in the South Coast Air Basin of California from 1988 to 1995. After adjustment for day of week, study year, and smoothing splines for day of study, temperature, and relative humidity, CO and NO2 were both associated with admissions with the greatest effects for CO. A 1-ppm increase in 8-hr average CO was associated with a 3.60% [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.62-5.63%] increase in same-day IHD admissions in persons with a secondary diagnosis of CHF, a 2.99% (95% CI, 1.80-4.19%) increase in persons with a secondary diagnosis of ARR, and a 1.62% (95% CI, 0.65-2.59%) increase in IHD admissions in persons without either secondary diagnosis. Air pollution was most strongly associated with myocardial infarction hospital admissions. The vulnerability of the secondary CHF subgroup may be due to a greater prevalence of myocardial infarction primary diagnoses and not the modifying effect of CHF. This study suggests that people with IHD and accompanying CHF and/or ARR constitute a sensitive subgroup in relation to the effects of criteria ambient air pollutants associated with motor vehicle combustion. PMID:12460805

  7. Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Adlhoch, Cornelia; Wadl, Maria; Behnke, Michael; Peña Diaz, Luis Alberto; Clausmeyer, Jörg; Eckmanns, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Adlhoch et al. (2012) Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e162–e168. Objectives  The pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 (PI) was introduced to Germany in April 2009. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) implemented a nationwide voluntary hospital sentinel surveillance for to assess the burden and severity of PI. Setting  Three modules were offered: a hospital module collected aggregated data from all hospital units on admissions and fatalities with and without PI; an intensive care module data on admissions, patient‐days, and ventilated patient‐days with and without PI; and a case‐based module retrieved clinical patient data of PI cases. A in‐patient with a PCR confirmation was defined as a PI case. Descriptive, trend, uni‐, and multivariable analysis were performed. Results  Between week 49/2009 and 13/2010, the hospitals reported 103 (0·07%) PI cases among 159 181 admissions and 59/16 728 (0·35%) PI‐related admissions in intensive care units (ICUs). The weekly average incidence decreased in hospitals by 21·5% and in ICUs by 19·2%. In ICUs, 1848/85 559 (2·2%) patient‐days were PI‐related, 94·8% of those with mechanical ventilation. Case‐based data on 43 recovered and 16 fatal PI cases were reported. Among recovered, 61% were admitted to ICUs, 51% were mechanically ventilated, and 16% received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All fatal cases were admitted to ICUs and received mechanical ventilation, 75% ECMO. Fatal outcome was rather associated with complications than with underlying medical conditions. Conclusion  The surveillance started shortly after the PI peak, which explains the small number of PI cases. The burden of PI disease was low, but higher in ICUs with a high proportion of severe cases needing ventilation and ECMO treatment. A continuous

  8. Trauma admissions to the Intensive care unit at a reference hospital in Northwestern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma has been reported to be a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization worldwide and consumes a significant amount of the health care budget. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and treatment outcome of major trauma patients admitted into our ICU and to identify predictors of outcome. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2010, a descriptive prospective study of all trauma admissions to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania was conducted. Results A total of 312 cases of major trauma were admitted in the ICU, representing 37.1% of the total ICU admissions. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 5.5:1. Their median age was 27 years. Trauma admissions were almost exclusively emergencies (95.2%) and came mainly from the Accident and Emergency (60.6%) and Operating room (23.4%). Road traffic crash (RTC) was the most common cause of injuries affecting 70.8% of patients. Two hundred fourteen patients (68.6%) required surgical intervention. The overall ICU length of stay (LOS) for all trauma patients ranged from 1 to 59 days (median = 8 days). The median ICU length of hospital stay (LOS) for survivors and non-survivors were 8 and 5 days respectively. (P = 0.002). Mortality rate was 32.7%. Mortality rate of trauma patients was significantly higher than that of all ICU admissions (32.7% vs. 18.8%, P = 0.0012). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, multiple injuries, severe head injuries and burns were responsible for a longer mean ICU stay (P < 0.001) whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, injury severity core >16, prolonged duration of loss of consciousness, delayed ICU admission (0.028), the need for ventilatory support and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan significantly influenced mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Trauma resulting from road traffic crashes is a

  9. Perceived participation, experiences from persons with spinal cord injury in their transition period from hospital to home.

    PubMed

    Van de Veldea, Dominique; Bracke, Piet; Van Hove, Geert; Josephsson, Staffan; Vanderstraeten, Guy

    2010-12-01

    It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualization and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the 'person perceived participation' in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). On the basis of the 'grounded theory' approach, in-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 SCI patients from a rehabilitation cohort in their transition period from hospital to home, to gain an insider perspective on the concept of participation. Results identified three different categories of participation: social participation, occupational participation and socio occupational participation. The participants conceptualize participation as a set of values, including experiencing free choice to perform activities, performing according to the person's identity, experiencing personal growth, belonging by experiencing trust and security, feeling validated, having a sense of control, experiencing a sense of importance and finding equal identities. In conclusion, from a client perspective, participation is a complex,multidimensional construct and can be considered asa dyad between the individual's social interactions and his specific activities performed. Participation was not experienced by the SCI patients as an objective way of performing activities within a societal context or as frequencies of activities performed, but rather as an internal process of negotiation that seemed to be based on balancing personal and societal values. PMID:20679902

  10. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  11. Quality Service Analysis and Improvement of Pharmacy Unit of XYZ Hospital Using Value Stream Analysis Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonny; Nasution, Januar

    2013-06-01

    Value stream mapping is a tool which is needed to let the business leader of XYZ Hospital to see what is actually happening in its business process that have caused longer lead time for self-produced medicines in its pharmacy unit. This problem has triggered many complaints filed by patients. After deploying this tool, the team has come up with the fact that in processing the medicine, pharmacy unit does not have any storage and capsule packing tool and this condition has caused many wasting times in its process. Therefore, the team has proposed to the business leader to procure the required tools in order to shorten its process. This research has resulted in shortened lead time from 45 minutes to 30 minutes as required by the government through Indonesian health ministry with increased %VA (valued added activity) or Process Cycle Efficiency (PCE) from 66% to 68% (considered lean because it is upper than required 30%). This result has proved that the process effectiveness has been increase by the improvement.

  12. Trends in Outcome and Hospitalization Cost among Adult Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Hussam A.; Al-Qudah, Zaid A.; Khan, Hafiz M. R.; Farhad, Khosro; Ji, Andrew Bo-Hua; Souayah, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction New treatments for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) have been introduced and are expected to improve patients’ overall outcomes. We assessed the impact of new therapeutic strategies on outcome and cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States. Methods Patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 2006–2007 were listed using the Nationwide Inpatient Survey database. We determined the rates of occurrence, hospitalization outcomes, and mean hospital charges for all patients. We further analyzed these variables in the ventilated and nonventilated patients. Results We identified 386,043 patients with AIS admitted in the United States in 1993–1994 and 749,766 patients in 2006–2007. The length of hospitalization was significantly higher in 1993–1994 compared with 2006–2007: 6.9 ± 4.2 days versus 4.66 ± 3 days, respectively. In-hospital mortality rate was 8.9% in 1993–1994 and 5.6% in 2006–2007 (P < 0.0001). There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 ($21,916 ± $14,117 versus $9,646 ± $5,727). The length of hospitalization was significantly shorter in 2006–2007 in nonventilated patients. There was a significant increase in mean hospital charges in 2006–2007 compared with 1993–1994 in both ventilated ($81,528 ± $64,526 versus $25,143 ± $17,172, P<0.0001) and nonventilated patients ($21,085 ± $13,042 versus $10,000 ± $6,300, P<0.0001). The mortality rate was significantly lower in 2006–2007 in both subgroups: 46.5% versus 59.8% in ventilated patients and 4.2% versus 8.2% in nonventilated patients (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Our study suggests that new therapeutic strategies have improved outcomes and increased cost of hospitalization among adult patients with AIS in the United States over a period of 13 years. The hospitalization cost was significantly higher in the ventilated and nonventilated patients in 2006–2007, which may

  13. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  14. [Burnout in healthcare professionals: a study carried out in the Nephrology Unit of San Raffaele Hospital].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Maria Monica; Delli Zotti, Giulia Bruna; Rossi, Claudia; Sarno, Lucio; Spotti, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is a work stress syndrome caused by a prolonged contact with users which present physical and emotional suffering. C. Maslach, one of the main authors, refers that this syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal skills. However, the researches done within the Nephrology and Dialysis Departments on this phenomenon are still few in the literature, despite the peculiar characteristics of the care relationship that develops between caregivers and patients on dialysis treatment. The present study aims to highlight the importance of assessing the levels of burnout and strategies of adaptation to stress (coping) in healthcare workers of Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, so that their psychological well-being could be preserved, preventing the possibility of a progressive deterioration of the care relationship with the patient. The implementation of psychological training courses for healthcare workers seems to be a useful tool aimed at the prevention and management of the burnout syndrome. PMID:26252267

  15. Systems for rapidly detecting and treating persons with ebola virus disease--United States.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Lisa M; Jamieson, Denise J; Jernigan, John A; Van Beneden, Chris A; Kosmos, Christine; Harvey, Melissa Cole; Pietz, Harald; Bertolli, Jeanne; Perz, Joseph F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Halpin, Alison Sheehan-Laufer; Daley, W Randolph; Pesik, Nicki; Margolis, Gregg S; Tumpey, Abbigail; Tappero, Jordan; Damon, Inger

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), CDC, other U.S. government agencies, the World Health Organization (WHO), and international partners are taking multiple steps to respond to the current Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa to reduce its toll there and to reduce the chances of international spread. At the same time, CDC and HHS are working to ensure that persons who have a risk factor for exposure to Ebola and who develop symptoms while in the United States are rapidly identified and isolated, and safely receive treatment. HHS and CDC have actively worked with state and local public health authorities and other partners to accelerate health care preparedness to care for persons under investigation (PUI) for Ebola or with confirmed Ebola. This report describes some of these efforts and their impact. PMID:25742383

  16. Novel exposure units for at-home personalized testing of electromagnetic sensibility.

    PubMed

    Huss, Anke; Murbach, Manuel; van Moorselaar, Imke; Kuster, Niels; van Strien, Rob; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Slottje, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental studies on electromagnetic hypersensitivity have been criticized regarding inflexibility of choice of exposure and of study locations. We developed and tested novel portable exposure units that can generate different output levels of various extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF; 50 Hz field plus harmonics) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Testing was done with a group of healthy volunteers (n = 25 for 5 ELF-MF and n = 25 for 5 RF-EMF signals) to assess if units were indeed able to produce double-blind exposure conditions. Results substantiated that double-blind conditions were met; on average participants scored 50.6% of conditions correct on the ELF-MF, and 50.0% on the RF-EMF unit, which corresponds to guessing probability. No cues as to exposure conditions were reported. We aim to use these units in a future experiment with subjects who wish to test their personal hypothesis of being able to sense or experience when being exposed to EMF. The new units allow for a high degree of flexibility regarding choice of applied electromagnetic signal, output power level and location (at home or another environment of subjects' choosing). PMID:26661464

  17. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  18. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii) to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46%) showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%), than in aggression toward other people (20%). A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%), followed by depression (16%) and personality disorders (14%), and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge), while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge) and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge). Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%). Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self-reported compliance

  19. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  20. 26 CFR 1.6038-3 - Information returns required of certain United States persons with respect to controlled foreign...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... December 23, 2002, see § 1.6038-3(j) in effect prior to the amendments made by T.D. 9033 (see 26 CFR part 1... year. On January 1, 2001, US, a United States person with the calendar year as its tax year... persons acquire directly or constructively any other interests in FPS during FPS's 2001 tax year. US...

  1. 8 CFR 319.4 - Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating information. 319.4 Section 319.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY...

  2. 8 CFR 319.4 - Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating information. 319.4 Section 319.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS SPECIAL CLASSES OF PERSONS WHO MAY...

  3. United States Biological Survey: A compendium of its history, personalities, impacts, and conflicts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2016-01-01

    In 1885, a small three-person unit was created in the U.S. Department of Agriculture to gather and analyze information on bird migrations. Originally called the Section of Economic Ornithology, over the next 55 years this unit underwent three name changes and accumulated ever-increasing responsibilities for the nation’s faunal resources. Transferred to the Department of the Interior in 1939, this agency was merged with the Bureau of Fisheries in 1940 to create the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The following account details the chronology, directorship, and growth of the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey up to its renovation as the FWS. This account also profiles some employees of the Biological Survey.

  4. A survey on oral care practices for ventilator-assisted patients in intensive care units in 3A hospitals of mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xing; Xie, Huixu; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xuedong; Shi, Zongdao

    2015-12-01

    Oral hygiene is a critical element of patient care, particularly among patients who need ventilator-assisted equipment. The objective of this study was to explore the current status of oral care practices, attitudes, education and knowledge among intensive care unit (ICU) nurses caring for ventilator-assisted patients in 3A hospitals in mainland China. To achieve this aim, an 18-item self-assessment questionnaire was mailed to head ICU nurses in 189 Grade 3A hospitals. Additional data were collected through in-person interviews at 38 ICUs throughout Sichuan, Shanxi, Jiangsu provinces, as well as Chongqing and Beijing. We found that most ICUs conducted oral examinations at patient admission, and that this care was largely provided by nurses. The most common oral care methods were foam swabs and mouth rinse containing antibiotics or disinfectants. Although the majority of ICUs provided continuing training for oral care, and most training was conducted by head nurses, the content and scope of training were not consistent among the hospitals in the study. The most popular sources of oral care knowledge were academic journals, Internet and professional books. Overall, it is clear that an evidence-based oral care standard manual is urgently needed for oral practice in ICUs in mainland China. PMID:24689526

  5. Hospital malnutrition and inflammatory response in critically ill children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Critical illness has a major impact on the nutritional status of both children and adults. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of hospital malnutrition at a pediatric tertiary intensive care unit (PICU). Serum concentrations of IL-6 in subgroups of well-nourished and malnou...

  6. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  7. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... purposes of the reporting requirement of 5 U.S.C. 801. List of Subjects in 28 CFR Part 43 Claims, Health... Department of Justice. * * * * * Dated: February 23, 2010. Eric H. Holder, Jr., Attorney General. BILLING... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United...

  8. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards. PMID:22788975

  9. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  10. [Medical care of wounded persons with maxillofacial pathology in Main military hospital during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Trukhanov, E V; Kozlov, S V; Gorbulenko, V B

    2009-10-01

    There was marked work of dental unit of the Main military hospital during the Great Patriotic War, including during evacuation in Gor'ky. Insertion of modern methods of immobilization of fragments of jaws and well organized succession to 1944 permitted to decrease the quantity of operations of traumatic osteomyelitis and increase the quantity of plastic operations. Owing to using of new materials (stainless steel, plastics) and to insertion of antibiotics, the period after 1946 is characterized by increased capabilities of effectuating of plastic operations and treatment of jaw breakups. PMID:20017372

  11. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  12. Etiology and outcomes for patients infected with HIV in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiang; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Yingxiu; Tian, Yunfei; Su, Wenjing; Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Wei; Han, Ning; Yang, Di; Zhao, Hongxin

    2015-03-01

    Although the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program (NFATP) has resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of AIDS-defining illnesses in China, severe complications in patients infected with HIV may require aggressive treatment and critical care support. The objective for this study was to investigate the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units in Ditan Hospital, China. The evaluation of the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units was conducted using the clinical data from 122 patients infected with HIV (129 occasions) admitted to the Beijing Ditan hospital from January 1, 2009, to October 1, 2013. Over the five-year study period, 129 occasions occurred for 122 patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units. Respiratory failure was the most common condition (53.4%) among the 129 occasions analyzed. This was followed by pneumothorax (12.4%), infectious shock (8.5%), neurological problems (8.5%), renal failure (7.8%), post-operative complications and trauma (5.4%), coronary heart disease (3.1%), adverse effects of HAART (3.1%), lymphoma (2.4%), and liver failure (0.8%). Mortality in intensive care units was 64.5% while in-hospital mortality was 65.9%. The strongest protective predictor for in-hospital mortality was earlier admission to an intensive care unit (OR = 0.050, CI = 0.020-0.126, P < 0.001). Respiratory failure was the most common condition in patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units, and the outcome for the patients was poor. Mortality was negatively associated with earlier admission to an intensive care unit, but was not associated with HAART. PMID:25154318

  13. Adult age differences in personality traits in the United States and the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; McCrae, R R; Costa, P T

    1998-11-01

    Life experiences for corresponding age cohorts in the United States (US) and the People's Republic of China (PRC) have been dramatically different. If cohort effects account for cross-sectional age differences in mean levels of personality traits, different patterns of age differences should be seen in samples from the US and the PRC. The present study examined scores on scales from the California Psychological Inventory (CPI; Gough, 1987) in US (N = 348, age = 19-92 years) and PRC (N = 2,093, age = 18-67 years) samples. Very similar patterns of age correlations were seen. To compare results to other cross-cultural studies, CPI scales were interpreted in terms of the Five-Factor Model (FFM) of personality; an FFM Age-Relatedness Index based on American data accurately predicted CPI age correlations not only in the US but also in the PRC sample. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that there are universal intrinsic maturational changes in personality. PMID:9826970

  14. Nonfatal bathroom injuries among persons aged ≥15 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-06-10

    In 2008, approximately 21.8 million persons aged ≥15 years sustained nonfatal, unintentional injuries, resulting in approximately $67.3 billion in lifetime medical costs. Information about where injuries occur is limited, but bathrooms commonly are believed to be a particularly hazardous location. To investigate this assumption, CDC analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of emergency departments (EDs) to describe the incidence and circumstances of nonfatal injuries in bathrooms (in any setting) among persons aged ≥15 years in the United States. This report describes the results of that investigation, which found that, based on 3,339 cases documented in the 2008 National Electronic Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) database, an estimated 234,094 nonfatal bathroom injuries were treated in U.S. EDs. Injury rates increased with age, and most injuries (81.1%) were caused by falls. All persons, but especially older adults, should be aware of bathroom activities that are associated with a high risk for injury and of environmental modifications that might reduce that risk. PMID:21659980

  15. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-03-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation.

  16. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n = 5,363) and second-generation (n = 4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n = 24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States. PMID:25223256

  17. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; Van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-01-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation. PMID:25797885

  18. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit.

    PubMed

    Symonds, E M; Cook, M M; McQuaig, S M; Ulrich, R M; Schenck, R O; Lukasik, J O; Van Vleet, E S; Breitbart, M

    2015-01-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation. PMID:25797885

  19. Childhood autoimmune hepatitis in a paediatric unit of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Low, Jia Ming; Tan, Michelle; Garcia, Agatha; Aw, Marion; Quak, Seng Hock

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although childhood autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) has been extensively investigated in the West, data on AIH in the East is lacking. We aimed to investigate AIH’s clinical, biochemical and histological features, as well as its outcomes, in one of Singapore’s two major paediatric units. METHODS This was a retrospective study of children diagnosed with AIH in the paediatric unit of National University Hospital, Singapore, over the last 12 years. Children with de novo AIH after liver transplantation were excluded. The demographic and clinical features of the patients, and their laboratory, treatment and clinical outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS This study comprised ten patients (six females, four males), with a median age of 5.1 (range 2.1–13.8) years at diagnosis. Five patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Seven patients had type 1 AIH, and three had autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC) and IBD; none had type 2 AIH. The median level of aspartate aminotransferase at diagnosis was 183 (range 45–2,649) U/L. Prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day was prescribed at diagnosis for eight patients. Two patients were lost to follow-up and were treated symptomatically when they re-presented with end-stage liver disease. Azathioprine or mycophenolate mofetil was prescribed after 3–7 months of treatment. Normalisation of aminotransferase levels took an average of 5.3 (range 1–39) months. CONCLUSION AIH is a rare but important cause of liver pathology. Children in this region with elevated aminotransferases or unexplained hepatomegaly should be screened for AIH. PMID:25630319

  20. Bacteriological Quality of Treated Water and Dialysate in Haemodialysis Unit of A Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Indumathi, V A; Gurudev, K C; Naik, Shalini Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Haemodialysis is one of the treatment modalities for patients suffering from end stage renal disease (ESRD). Dialysis patients are exposed to large volumes of water for production of dialysis fluids. Treated water and dialysate come in direct contact with the patient’s bloodstream. Such patients suffer from abnormalities of the immune system, making them more susceptible to infections. Microbial contamination of the treated water and dialysate can lead to biofilm formation and release of endotoxins in Haemodialysis system. These can give rise to pyrogenic reactions in the short term and β2 amyloidosis, atherosclerosis, and increased mortality in the long term. Aim To assess the bacteriological quality of treated water and dialysate used in the Haemodialysis unit of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of records of treated water and dialysate samples sent to the Microbiology laboratory for analysis of bacteriological contamination of the water used in haemodialysis treatment from January 2013 to June 2014 was conducted. The acceptable limits for treated water and dialysate were taken as <200 CFU/ml and < 2000 CFU/ml respectively as per Government of India Guidelines for Maintenance Haemodialysis. Results Thirty six samples of treated water and 394 samples of dialysate were analysed for bacteriological contamination. 4 out of 36 (11.1%) samples of treated water and 44 out of 394 dialysate samples (11.2%) showed unacceptable bacteriological growth. Conclusion Regular and continual monitoring of the disinfection protocol of the water distribution system in haemodialysis unit is necessary to get good microbiological quality of treated water and dialysate fluid. PMID:26557519

  1. Treatment and diagnostic accuracy of neurosyphilis at Boston City Hospital's Neurological Unit, 1930-1979.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Diana; Vilensky, Joel A; Robertson, Wendy M; Berger, Joseph

    2012-03-15

    The twentieth century was marked with frequent advances in the treatment and diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Once considered one of the most serious human diseases, neurosyphilis was paramount to a death sentence often preceded by agonizing pain and/or diminishing mental capacities. Since the introduction of penicillin in 1943, however, the prevalence of neurosyphilis has declined dramatically and the prognosis of the few still affected has been greatly improved. We examined patient records from Boston City Hospital's (BCH) Neurologic Unit from 1930 to 1979 to obtain primary data on treatment modalities for neurosyphilis during this period, with particular attention to the use of malarial therapy. We also evaluated these same records to determine whether the "great imitator" moniker that was applied to neurosyphilis may have in part been due to systematic errors in diagnostic criteria and false positive tests. The BCH neurologists used all available treatment compounds, including arsenicals, bismuth, iodides, malaria, and typhoid. The data also suggest that the wide diversity of symptoms attributed to neurosyphilis was probably accurate. PMID:22129939

  2. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  3. [Generating health elicits illness? The contradictions of work performed in emergency care units of public hospitals].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Iana Vasconcelos Moreira; Russo, Gláucia Helena Araújo; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2015-10-01

    In general terms, health is influenced and generated by the interaction of biological, social, economic, political and cultural factors. From this standpoint, the scope of this paper was to analyze the relationship between working in emergency care units of public hospitals and the health/sickness of the professionals who work in them. It involved a quantitative and qualitative survey, in which 240 health professionals (doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, dentists, nutritionists, audiologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists) filled out a questionnaire. All the results acknowledged the importance of work to ensure favorable conditions for good health. However, they highlighted its deleterious physical and mental effects on workers, which included stress, lack of a healthy life-style, high blood pressure and musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and sleep disorders. It is therefore important to tackle this reality in order to enhance the health of professionals and, consequently, the quality of care provided to the user, since illnesses among health workers are strongly linked to the existing health model in society. PMID:26465845

  4. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). Materials and Methods: We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. Results: The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps Conclusion: Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended. PMID:26600701

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in central intensive care unit in Kosova Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Raka, Lul; Kalenć, Smilja; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Katić, Stjepan; Sijak, Dubravko; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Zoutman, Dick; Jaka, Arbëresha

    2009-12-01

    Infections caused by bacteria of genus Acinetobacter pose a significant health care challenge worldwide. Information on molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreaks caused by Acinetobacter species in Kosova is lacking. The present investigation was carried out to enlight molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii in the Central Intensive Care Unit (CICU) of a University hospital in Kosova using pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). During March - July 2006, A. baumannii was isolated from 30 patients, of whom 22 were infected and 8 were colonised. Twenty patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia, one patient had meningitis, and two had coinfection with bloodstream infection and surgical site infection. The most common diagnoses upon admission to the ICU were politrauma and cerebral hemorrhage. Bacterial isolates were most frequently recovered from endotracheal aspirate (86.7%). First isolation occurred, on average, on day 8 following admission (range 1-26 days). Genotype analysis of A. baumannii isolates identified nine distinct PFGE patterns, with predominance of PFGE clone E represented by isolates from 9 patients. Eight strains were resistant to carbapenems. The genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii was high, indicating cross-transmission within the ICU setting. These results emphasize the need for measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of A. baumannii in ICU. PMID:20464330

  6. Seasonality of Admissions for Mania: Results From a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit in Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bipolar disorder is affected by variables that modulate circadian rhythm, including seasonal variations. There is evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions of mania in various geographical settings, though its timing varies by region and climate. Variables such as age and gender have been shown to affect seasonality in some studies. Methodology: Data on monthly admission patterns for mania at a general hospital psychiatry unit in Pondicherry, India, were collected for 4 years (2010–2013) and analyzed for seasonality and seasonal peaks. The effects of age and gender were analyzed separately. Results: There was overall evidence of a seasonal pattern of admissions for mania (P < .01, Friedman test for seasonality), with a peak beginning during the rainy season and ending before summer (P < .0.1, Ratchet circular scan test). Male sex (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) and age > 25 years (P < .005, Ratchet circular scan test) were specifically associated with this seasonal peak. Discussion: The effect of seasons on mania is complex and is modulated by a variety of variables. Our study is consistent with earlier research findings: a greater degree of seasonality for mania in men. It is possible that climatic and individual variables interact to determine seasonal patterns in bipolar disorder in a given setting. PMID:26644962

  7. Colistin use in pediatric intensive care unit for severe nosocomial infections: experience of an university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of colistin therapy in pediatric patients with severe nosocomial infections in pediatric intensive care unit. Methods The medical records of patients treated with colistin at a 200-bed university children hospital were reviewed. Result Thirty-one patients (male/female = 22/9; median age, 3 years; range, 3 months-17 years) received forty-one courses of colistin. The average dose of colistin was 4.9 ± 0.5 mg/kg/day and average treatment duration was 19.8 ± 10.3 days. Three patients who received concomitant nephrotoxic agent with colistin developed nephrotoxicity. Colistin treatment was well tolerated in other patients, and neurotoxicity was not seen in any patient. Favourable outcome was achieved in 28 (68.3%) episodes. Twelve patients died during the colistin therapy. Six of these patients died because of primary underlying disease. The infection-related mortality rate was found 14.6% in this study. Conclusion In our study, colistin therapy was found to be acceptable treatment option for the severe pediatric nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria. However, the use of concomitant nephrotoxic drugs with colistin must be avoided and renal function test should be closely monitored. PMID:24199612

  8. Perception of intensive care unit stressors in Malaysian Federal Territory hospitals.

    PubMed

    Soh, Kim Lam; Soh, Kim Geok; Ahmad, Zaiton; Abdul Raman, Rosna; Japar, Salimah

    2008-12-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a therapeutic place for monitoring critically ill patients. However, it is a stressful area for the patients and it is causing them great anxiety. Previous studies have identified three groups of stressors in ICU namely; physical, psychological and environmental. The aims of this study were to determine the ICU stressors as experienced by patients and to determine the level of stressors felt by patients in ICU. A cross sectional study was done on 70 patients from two tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. A face-to-face interview with structured questionnaire was used for patients. Data collection occurred from 15 December 2006 to 31 January 2007. The five major ICU stressors perceived by patients were pain, being stuck with needles, boredom, missing their spouses and being too hot/cold. The ICU physical stressors were the major items ranked by post ICU patients. The findings from this study provided a set of baseline information to the health care providers, particularly ICU nurses in Malaysia, with which to provide better care for the patients in ICU. PMID:19117504

  9. Potential drug-drug interactions in cardiothoracic intensive care unit of a pulmonary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Farzanegan, Behrooz; Alehashem, Maryam; Bastani, Marjan; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2015-02-01

    Little is known about clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in respiratory settings. DDIs are more likely to occur in critically ill patients due to complex pharmacotherapy regimens and organ dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of potential DDIs (pDDIs) occurring in cardiothoracic intensive care unit (ICU) of a pulmonary hospital. A prospective observational study was conducted for 6 months. All pDDIs for admitted patients in cardiothoracic ICU were identified with Lexi-Interact program and assessed by a clinical pharmacologist. The interacting drugs, reliability, mechanisms, potential outcomes, and clinical management were evaluated for severe and contraindicated interactions. The study included 195 patients. Lung cancer (14.9%) was the most common diagnosis followed by tracheal stenosis (14.3%). The rate of pDDIs was 720.5/100 patients. Interactions were more commonly observed in transplant patients. 17.7% of pDDIs were considered as severe and contraindicated interactions. Metabolism (54.8%) and additive (24.2%) interactions were the most frequent mechanisms leading to pDDIs, and azole antifungals and fluoroquinolones were the main drug classes involved. The pattern of pDDIs in cardiothoracic ICU differs from other ICU settings. Specialized epidemiological knowledge of drug interactions may help clinical practitioners to reduce the risk of adverse drug events. PMID:25369984

  10. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) Primary evidence of birth in the United States. A person born in the United States generally must submit a birth certificate. The birth certificate must show the full name of the applicant, the applicant's place and date of birth, the full name of...

  11. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) Primary evidence of birth in the United States. A person born in the United States generally must submit a birth certificate. The birth certificate must show the full name of the applicant, the applicant's place and date of birth, the full name of...

  12. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) Primary evidence of birth in the United States. A person born in the United States generally must submit a birth certificate. The birth certificate must show the full name of the applicant, the applicant's place and date of birth, the full name of...

  13. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) Primary evidence of birth in the United States. A person born in the United States generally must submit a birth certificate. The birth certificate must show the full name of the applicant, the applicant's place and date of birth, the full name of...

  14. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... States applying for a passport for the first time. (a) Primary evidence of birth in the United States. A person born in the United States generally must submit a birth certificate. The birth certificate must show the full name of the applicant, the applicant's place and date of birth, the full name of...

  15. Elaboration of leadership and culture in high-performing nursing units of hospitals as perceived by staff nurses.

    PubMed

    Casida, Jesus M; Crane, Patrick C; Walker, Tara L; Wargo, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    The leadership-culture phenomenon, a known explanatory construct for organizational performance, is understudied in nursing. Building on our previous work, we further addressed this knowledge gap through explorations of demographics and hospital variables which may have a significant influence on staff nurses' (SNs) perceptions of their nurse managers' (NMs) leadership and nursing unit culture. Furthermore, we explored the extent to which the NMs' leadership predicted specific cultures which typify nursing unit effectiveness. Using dissertation data provided by278 SNs, we found that SNs educated at the baccalaureate level or higher had favorable perceptions of their nursing unit performance and viewed their NMs' leadership differently than the SNs with diploma or associate degrees. The frequent portrayals of transformational (TFL) leadership behaviors (e.g., visionary) by the NMs were paramount in shaping culture traits which exemplify high performance outcomes. TFL leaders were more likely to shape unit cultures which are flexible and adaptive to the environmental challenges within and outside the nursing unit. Thus, the type of NMs' leadership and unit culture may provide an added value in explaining the performance level in patient care units which consequently affects the overall hospital/organizational outcomes. Implications for research and leadership practices are presented. PMID:23556327

  16. The patients' library movement: an overview of early efforts in the United States to establish organized libraries for hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Panella, N M

    1996-01-01

    The patients' library movement in the United States, a dynamic, cohesive drive begun and sustained by librarians and physicians, strove to promote placement of organized libraries for patients in hospitals. It took shape in the early years of this century, evolving from its proponents' deeply held conviction that books and reading foster the rehabilitation of sick people. The American Library Association's World War I service to hospitalized military personnel dramatically reinforced the conviction; the post-World War I institution of public library extension services to general hospitals explicitly reflected it. Enormous energy was infused into the patients' library movement. Throughout the first half of this century, there were sustained efforts not only to establish organized libraries for hospitalized people but also to expand and systematically study bibliotherapy and to shape patients' librarianship as a professional specialty. The movement's achievements include the establishment of patients' library committees within national and international associations; impetus for development of academic programs to train patients' librarians; and publication, from 1944 through 1970, of successive sets of standards for hospital patients' libraries. The first of these remain the first standards written and issued by a professional library association for a hospital library. PMID:8938330

  17. Hospitalizations and Deaths Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 1999–2005

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili; Smith, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, are a major cause of illness and death and impose serious economic costs on patients and hospitals. However, the recent magnitude and trend of these infections have not been reported. We used national hospitalization and resistance data to estimate the annual number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with S. aureus and MRSA from 1999 through 2005. During this period, the estimated number of S. aureus–related hospitalizations increased 62%, from 294,570 to 477,927, and the estimated number of MRSA-related hospitalizations more than doubled, from 127,036 to 278,203. Our findings suggest that S. aureus and MRSA should be considered a national priority for disease control. PMID:18258033

  18. Change in sense of coherence (SOC) and symptoms of depression among old non-demented persons 12 months after hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Engedal, Knut; Selbaek, Geir

    2013-01-01

    We studied whether SOC of older adults (≥65 years) without cognitive impairment had changed 1-year after medical hospitalization (T2) and to examine what factors were associated with the change. At baseline (T1) and (T2), the 13-item version of the SOC scale assessed coping, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale assessed symptoms of depression and anxiety. The cognitive state was assessed by means of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). Physical health was measured with the Charlson Index and functional status with Lawton and Brody's scales for physical self-maintenance (PSMS) and the instrumental activities of daily living (I-ADL). In all, 97 (51 men) persons with a mean age of 75.3 (SD 6.3) years and Mini Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) score of 28.0 (SD 1.6) participated. The SOC improved significantly from baseline to 1-year later (mean 76.5, SD 11.4 vs. mean 79.1, SD 9.1, p≤0.01). Improved SOC was associated with a low SOC at baseline and living without assistance during the study period. The prevalence of depression (HAD-D≥8) and the mean depression (HAD-D) score did not change between the first and second data collection (HAD-D≥8: 3.1% vs. 4.1% and HAD-D score: mean 1.8, SD 2.3 vs. mean 2.4, SD 2.4). However, an improved SOC and reduced anxiety symptoms at the second time point were associated with reduced HAD-D. The mean SOC improved 1-year after hospitalization. The symptoms of depression did not change, but reduction of symptoms of depression at the second time point was associated with improved SOC. PMID:23149225

  19. Factors associated with hospitalization risk among community living middle aged and older persons: Results from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Jenny; Fransson, Eleonor I; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Reynolds, Chandra A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dahl Aslan, Anna K

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) describe and compare individual characteristics of hospitalized and not hospitalized community living persons, and (2) to determine factors that are associated with hospitalization risk over time. We conducted a prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). A total of 772 Swedes (mean age at baseline 69.7 years, range 46-103, 59.8% females) answered a postal questionnaire about physical and psychological health, personality and socioeconomic factors. During nine years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Results show that 484 persons (63%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases (25%) and tumors (22%). Cox proportional hazard regression models controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher age (HR=1.02, p<0.001) and more support from relatives (HR=1.09, p=0.028) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization, while marital status (unmarried (HR=0.75, p=0.033) and widow/widower (HR=0.69, p<0.001)) and support from friends (HR=0.93, p=0.029) were associated with lower risk of hospitalization. Social factors were important for hospitalization risk even when medical factors were controlled for in the analyses. Number of diseases was not a risk in the final regression model. Hospitalization risk was also different for women and men and within different age groups. We believe that these results might be used in future interventions targeting health care utilization. PMID:27281475

  20. Comparing Safety Climate between Two Populations of Hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Sara J; Hartmann, Christine W; Hanchate, Amresh; Zhao, Shibei; Meterko, Mark; Shokeen, Priti; Lin, Shoutzu; Gaba, David M; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare safety climate between diverse U.S. hospitals and Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals, and to explore the factors influencing climate in each setting. Data Sources Primary data from surveys of hospital personnel; secondary data from the American Hospital Association's 2004 Annual Survey of Hospitals. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 69 U.S. and 30 VA hospitals. Data Collection For each sample, hierarchical linear models used safety-climate scores as the dependent variable and respondent and facility characteristics as independent variables. Regression-based Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition examined differences in effects of model characteristics on safety climate between the U.S. and VA samples. Principal Findings The range in safety climate among U.S. and VA hospitals overlapped substantially. Characteristics of individuals influenced safety climate consistently across settings. Working in southern and urban facilities corresponded with worse safety climate among VA employees and better safety climate in the U.S. sample. Decomposition results predicted 1.4 percentage points better safety climate in U.S. than in VA hospitals: −0.77 attributable to sample-characteristic differences and 2.2 due to differential effects of sample characteristics. Conclusions Results suggest that safety climate is linked more to efforts of individual hospitals than to participation in a nationally integrated system or measured characteristics of workers and facilities. PMID:19619250

  1. Characterization of patients treated by rehabilitation service after establishing of an acute stroke unit in a Brazilian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luvizutto, Gustavo José; Gameiro, Mônica de Oliveira Orsi; Schelp, Arthur Oscar; Braga, Gabriel Pereira; Ribeiro, Priscila Watson; Bazan, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study aimed to characterize patients treated by rehabilitation section after establishment of an acute stroke unit. [Subjects and Methods] Medical consultation records of individuals with ischemic stroke were studied retrospectively, excluding individuals with hemorrhagic stroke, thrombolysis, previous Modified Rankin Scale ≥ 1, prior stroke, structural bone deformities, associated neurological disease, and prior cognitive deficit. The data evaluated were age, gender, etiology, localization, treatment received, ictus onset, hospitalization time, discharge date, and date of first evaluation at the rehabilitation center. The Modified Rankin Scale in 90 days after ictus was utilized to measure functional incapacity with the individuals divided into two groups, before and after acute stroke unit implementation (2010). Functional incapacity was compared between before and after acute stroke unit implementation by the Mann-Whitney test, χ2 test and Fisher’s exact test. [Results] The medical records of 170 patients were evaluated. In the group evaluated after 2010, the patients were significantly older and presented a shorter time between hospitalization and discharge, shorter time until the first evaluation in rehabilitation, and increased percentage of mild incapacity (Modified Rankin Scale = 0 to 2). [Conclusion] After acute stroke unit implementation, the patients treated in the rehabilitation section presented a shorter hospitalization time and rehabilitation delay and less functional incapacity. PMID:26355915

  2. The significance of professional roles in collaboration on patients' transitions from hospital to home via an intermediate unit.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Anne-Kari; Steihaug, Sissel

    2014-06-01

    The increasing complexity of the healthcare system and of patients' conditions, as well as resource limitations, calls for collaboration between professionals and institutions. The objective of this study was to explore the significance of professional roles in collaboration on patients' transitions from hospital to home via an intermediate care unit. We studied collaboration in the intermediate unit and between healthcare providers in the unit, a hospital and four municipalities in the hospital catchment area. Data were drawn from interviews with thirty-eight healthcare providers within specialist and primary health care and from observations in six multidisciplinary meetings, six report meetings and four discharge meetings in the unit. Transcripts of interviews and observations were analysed using a method of systematic text condensation. The results show that collaboration inside the intermediate unit and between the healthcare institutions was primarily 'a nursing matter'. Collaboration among the nurses was generally good. Except for the physician, all the healthcare providers experienced the collaboration in the unit as unidisciplinary rather than interprofessional. Although they wanted to collaborate interprofessionally, they were unable to do so in practice. The unit's physiotherapists and occupational therapists found themselves to be excluded from the nurses' community of practice, while the physician experienced the collaboration as excellent. The findings indicate that healthcare providers have different understandings of interprofessional collaboration and that in certain situations, they consider interprofessional collaboration to be an inappropriate working method. Interprofessional collaboration can promote a learning environment among healthcare providers. To achieve better interprofessional collaboration, it is probably necessary to create mutual understandings of interprofessionality and to reach an agreement on the situations in which it is an

  3. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections in intensive care units at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Keten, Derya; Aktas, Firdevs; Guzel Tunccan, Ozlem; Dizbay, Murat; Kalkanci, Ayse; Biter, Gülsah; Keten, Hamit Sirri

    2014-01-01

    In this study, urinary catheter utilization rates, the causative agents for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and their antimicrobial susceptibilities in intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009 were investigated at Gazi university hospital. We aimed to determine the causative agents and risk factors for CAUTIs, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the pathogens; and also sensitivities of Candida spp. to antifungal agents with Microdilution and E-test. The most common etiological agents of CAUTIs were Candida spp. (34.7%). The most frequently isolated Candida spp. was C.albicans (52.4%). All C. albicans spp. were sensitive to fluconazole. Microdilution, used as a reference method to determine the sensitivity to antifungal agents, was compared with E test. E test was found to be sufficient to analyze sensitivity to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole, but inappropriate for itraconazole. E.coli and Klebsiella spp. were found to be causative agents for CAUTI in 20.6% and 9.9% of cases respectively. Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated in 14% and 8.2% of the cases, respectively. All E.coli and Klebsiella strains were found sensitive to carbapenems. Carbapenem sensitivity was found in 47.1% and 30% of the cases infected with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains, respectively. According to our results, fluconazole therapy seems to be an appropriate choice for the treatment of CAUTIs caused by C.albicans. Third and fourth generation cephalosporins should not be used for empirical treatment because of the high prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase production among E.coli and Klebsiella isolates. PMID:25428675

  4. [Stress level assessment of the nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-García, C; Ríos-Rísquez, M I; Martínez-Hurtado, R; Noguera-Villaescusa, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the work stress level among nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital and to analyse its relationship with the various sociodemographic and working variables of the studied sample. A study was designed using a quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional approach. The target population of the study was the nursing staff selected by non-random sampling. The instrument used was the Job Content Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 20. The mean, ranges and standard deviation for each of the variables were calculated. A bivariate analysis was also performed on the social and occupational variables of the sample. The participation rate was 80.90% (N=89). The mean of the Social support dimension was 3.13±0.397, for the Psychological demands at work dimension it was 3.10±0.384, with a mean of 2.96±0.436 being obtained for the Control over the work dimension. In the analysis of sociodemographic and work variables of the sample, only the professional category was significant, with nurses recording higher values in perception of job demands and control over their work compared to nursing assistants. In conclusion, there is a moderate perception of work stress in the analysed group of professionals. Among the sources of stress in the workplace was the low control in decision-making by practitioners, as well as the need to continually learn new things. On the other hand, the support received from colleagues is valued positively by the sample. PMID:27267958

  5. Faxing ECGs from peripheral hospitals to Tertiary Paediatric Cardiology Units- Is it Safe and Sustainable?

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Sam; Skinner, Greg; Morgan, Gareth J

    2014-01-01

    Intoduction Recent local involvement with the United Kingdom“Safe and Sustainable review of paediatric cardiology services” has highlighted the need for development of clinical networks and improvement of the communication infrastructure within and between teams. One common communication between peripheral and tertiary hospitals is facsimile transfer of electrocardiograms. The quality of fax transmission can be variable, raising concerns regarding the quality of the received image, accuracy of the diagnosis and appropriateness of the resultant advice. Methods We performed a systematic quality evaluation of faxed ECGs to determine whether they should be replaced on the basis of patient safety and information governance. A sample of 50 ECGs was selected from over 300 which had been faxed to our tertiary department. These were scored according to a structured system leading to a 10 point Likert scale, assessing technical quality and the ability to make a clinically relevant assessment of the information. Results Only 1 from 50 faxed ECGs fulfilled all 9 objective criteria set. Heart rate and quadrant of the QRS axis were only identifiable in 10%. Comparing the faxed ECGs with the rating given to an original ECG confirmed a significant difference in the interpretability of faxed and original ECGs (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study suggests that faxed ECGs do not provide consistent, accurate diagnostic information. It suggests that this currently widespread practice should be considered as a potential patient safety issue within developing paediatric cardiology networks. We would recommend that faxing of ECGs be replaced with scanning of ECGs, transmitted via secure email. PMID:24757263

  6. Colonoscopy at a combined district general hospital and specialist endoscopy unit: lessons from 505 consecutive examinations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Gibson, Siwan; Thapar, Catherine; Shah, Syed G; Saunders, Brian P

    2002-01-01

    Provisional reports from the Intercollegiate British Society of Gastroenterology National Colonoscopy audit show completion rates of 57-77% for the procedure and poor levels of training and supervision. We prospectively audited all aspects of colonoscopy performed at a combined district general hospital and specialist endoscopy unit. Details of referral, examination, endoscopist, complications and follow-up were recorded and patients were sent questionnaires for long-term follow-up. 505 patients (246 male) underwent colonoscopy by 27 different endoscopists. Their median age was 57 years (range 13-92) and 93% were outpatients. 64% patients were symptomatic and 36% were having surveillance or follow-up colonoscopy. The overall caecal intubation rate was 93%, with little difference between surgeons, physicians and experienced trainees (89%, 92%, 94%) and specialist endoscopists (98%). In only one case was an inexperienced trainee (<100 procedures) unsupervised. Pain scores estimated by the endoscopist were well matched with those given by the patient—medians 29 and 26 (maximum 100) respectively. Median satisfaction score was 96 (maximum 100). Polyp pick-up rate was 26.9% and there were 11 new cancers. 16 (3%) minor immediate complications were recorded—5 oversedation, 6 vasovagal attacks, 3 polypectomy haemorrhages and 2 mucosal injuries (neither requiring treatment). 3 patients died within 6 months of follow-up but no death was colonoscopy related. Completion rates in this setting were adequate for all endoscopists studied. Patient satisfaction with the procedure was high and very few immediate or long-term complications were encountered. PMID:11934910

  7. Exploring the impacts of personal factors on self-leadership in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ugurluoglu, Ozgur; Saygılı, Meltem; Ozer, Ozlem; Santas, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Self-leadership may be defined as a self-effecting process that individuals experience by maintaining the motivation they require for fulfilling their roles and duties. The self-leadership process comprises three key strategies: behaviour-oriented strategies, natural reward strategies and constructive thought pattern strategies. What is intended herein is to inquire about the implementation of self-leadership within organisations and to examine the effects of such variables as age, gender, total terms of employment, marital status and education on self-leadership strategies. The primary data collection instrument was a survey distributed to 450 personnel working at a state hospital in Kırıkkale, Turkey, and feedback thereto was received from 308 (68.4%) of those surveyed. As a result of the findings taken from the analyses, age, total terms of employment and receipt of education in leadership affect the use of self-leadership strategies. Although age and total terms of employment display a negative-directional correlation with the self-leadership strategies, female employees and those who receive education in leadership are more inclined towards self-leadership strategies. PMID:23737405

  8. The effect of the social organization of work on the voluntary turnover rate of hospital nurses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J R; Alexander, J A; Nuchols, B A

    1992-06-01

    In light of current concerns over nursing shortages and productivity, voluntary turnover among hospital nurses in the United States has assumed renewed importance as a managerial issue. This study examines the thesis that the social organization of work in hospitals is an important determinant of the voluntary turnover rate among registered nurses. This perspective differs from previous work in this area in that both turnover and its determinants are conceptualized at the organizational rather than individual level, thus opening the way for administrative intervention to reduce turnover. The conceptual model is tested using multiple regression techniques on a sample of 435 hospitals. Results suggest that organizational characteristics and environmental conditions are important contributors to turnover. Organizational characteristics are stronger predictors of turnover than are economic factors. PMID:1529379

  9. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices. PMID:27056750

  10. icuARM-II: improving the reliability of personalized risk prediction in pediatric intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Chanani, Nikhil; Maher, Kevin; Wang

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians in intensive care units (ICUs) rely on standardized scores as risk prediction models to predict a patient’s vulnerability to life-threatening events. Conventional Current scales calculate scores from a fixed set of conditions collected within a specific time window. However, modern monitoring technologies generate complex, temporal, and multimodal patient data that conventional prediction models scales cannot fully utilize. Thus, a more sophisticated model is needed to tailor individual characteristics and incorporate multiple temporal modalities for a personalized risk prediction. Furthermore, most scales models focus on adult patients. To address this needdeficiency, we propose a newly designed ICU risk prediction system, called icuARM-II, using a large-scaled pediatric ICU database from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. This novel database contains clinical data collected in 5,739 ICU visits from 4,975 patients. We propose a temporal association rule mining framework giving clinicians a potential to perform predict risks prediction based on all available patient conditions without being restricted by a fixed observation window. We also develop a new metric that can rigidly assesses the reliability of all all generated association rules. In addition, the icuARM-II features an interactive user interface. Using the icuARM-II, our results demonstrated showed a use case of short-term mortality prediction using lab testing results, which demonstrated a potential new solution for reliable ICU risk prediction using personalized clinical data in a previously neglected population.

  11. 42 CFR 412.130 - Retroactive adjustments for incorrectly excluded hospitals and units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... part regarding the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat during that cost reporting period, if the inpatient population actually treated in the hospital during that cost reporting period did... October 1, 1991, based on a certification under § 412.30(a) regarding the inpatient population...

  12. Trends in venous thromboembolism among pregnancy-related hospitalizations, United States, 1994-2009

    PubMed Central

    Ghaji, Nafisa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Tepper, Naomi; Hooper, William C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate national trends in the rate of pregnancy-related hospitalizations for venous thromboembolism (VTE) from 1994-2009 and to estimate the prevalence of comorbid conditions among these hospitalizations. STUDY DESIGN An estimated 64,413,973 pregnancy-related hospitalizations among women 15-44 years old were identified in the 1994-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Trends in VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations were evaluated with the use of variance-weighted least squares regression. Chi-square tests were used to assess changes in prevalence of demographics and comorbid conditions, and multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the likelihood of VTE during the study period after adjustment for comorbid conditions. Antepartum, delivery, and postpartum hospitalizations were evaluated separately and reported in 4-year increments. RESULTS From 1994-2009, there was a 14% increase in the rate of overall VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations; antepartum and postpartum hospitalizations with VTE increased by 17% and 47%, respectively. Between 1994-1997 and 2006-2009, the prevalence of hypertension and obesity doubled among all VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations; significant increases in diabetes mellitus and heart disease were also noted. A temporal increase in the likelihood of a VTE diagnosis in pregnancy was observed for antepartum hospitalizations from 2006-2009 when compared with 1994-1997 (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.48–1.78). CONCLUSION There has been an upward trend in VTE-associated pregnancy hospitalizations from 1994-2009 with concomitant increases in comorbid conditions. Clinicians should have a heightened awareness of the risk of VTE among pregnant women, particularly among those with comorbid conditions, and should have a low threshold for evaluation in women with symptoms or signs of VTE. PMID:23810274

  13. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals. PMID:23839016

  14. Parameters influencing in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized in intensive cardiac care unit: is there an influence of anemia and iron deficiency?

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Sawicki, Robert; Kiluk, Izabela; Baranicz, Malgorzata; Stepek, Tomasz; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and prognostic value of anemia as well as of the iron status in non-selected patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU). 392 patients (mean age 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women), 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure, and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders were consecutively, prospectively assessed. The biomarkers of iron status-serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and transferrin saturation (TSAT) together with standard clinical, biochemical and echocardiographic variables-were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 3.8% (15 patients). The prevalences of anemia (according to WHO criteria), and iron deficiency (ID) were 64 and 63%, respectively. The level of biomarkers of iron status, but not anemia, was lower in patients who died (p < 0.05). Anemia was less frequent in patients with ACS as compared to the remaining ICCU population (p = 0.019). The analysis by logistic regression indicated the highest risk of death for age [odds ratio (OD) 1.38, 95% CI 1.27-1.55], SIC (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94), TIBC (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.98), left ventricle ejection fraction (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77-0.93), as well as hospitalization for non-ACS (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.14-0.46), (p < 0.05). The risk of death during hospitalization tended to increase with decreasing levels of TIBC (p = 0.49), as well as with the absence of ACS (p = 0.54). The incidence of anemia and ID in heterogeneous ICCU patients is high. Parameters of the iron status, but not anemia per se, independently influence in-hospital mortality. The prevalence of anemia is higher in non-ACS patients, and tends to worsen the prognosis. PMID:25502592

  15. Impact of Age and Sex on Outcomes and Hospital Cost of Acute Asthma in the United States, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Teague, W. Gerald; Koroukian, Siran M.; Schlitz, Nicholas K.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Busse, William B.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Israel, Elliot; Wenzel, Sally E.; Holguin, Fernando; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, asthma is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and economic burden, with significant gender and racial disparities. However, little attention has been given to the independent role of age on lifetime asthma severity and hospitalization. We aimed to assess the effect of age, gender, race and ethnicity on indicators of asthma severity including asthma related hospitalization, mortality, hospital cost, and the rate of respiratory failure. Methods We analyzed the 2011 and 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- National Inpatient Sample (NIS). We validated and extended those results using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP; 2002–2011) database. Severe asthma was prospectively defined using the stringent American Thoracic Society (ATS) definition. Results Hospitalization for asthma was reported in 372,685 encounters in 2012 and 368,528 in 2011. The yearly aggregate cost exceeded $2 billion. There were distinct bimodal distributions for hospitalization age, with an initial peak at 5 years and a second at 50 years. Likewise, this bimodal age distribution of patients with severe asthma was identified using SARP. Males comprised the majority of individuals in the first peak, but women in the second. Aggregate hospital cost mirrored the bimodal peak distribution. The probability of respiratory failure increased with age until the age of 60, after which it continued to increase in men, but not in women. Conclusions Severe asthma is primarily a disease of young boys and middle age women. Greater understanding of the biology of lung aging and influence of sex hormones will allow us to plan for targeted interventions during these times in order to reduce the personal and societal burdens of asthma. PMID:27294365

  16. Abrupt Decline in Tuberculosis among Foreign-Born Persons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brian J; Winston, Carla A; Liu, Yecai; France, Anne Marie; Cain, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    While the number of reported tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States has declined over the past two decades, TB morbidity among foreign-born persons has remained persistently elevated. A recent unexpected decline in reported TB cases among foreign-born persons beginning in 2007 provided an opportunity to examine contributing factors and inform future TB control strategies. We investigated the relative influence of three factors on the decline: 1) changes in the size of the foreign-born population through immigration and emigration, 2) changes in distribution of country of origin among foreign-born persons, and 3) changes in the TB case rates among foreign-born subpopulations. Using data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the American Community Survey, we examined TB case counts, TB case rates, and population estimates, stratified by years since U.S. entry and country of origin. Regression modeling was used to assess statistically significant changes in trend. Among foreign-born recent entrants (<3 years since U.S. entry), we found a 39.5% decline (-1,013 cases) beginning in 2007 (P<0.05 compared to 2000-2007) and ending in 2011 (P<0.05 compared to 2011-2014). Among recent entrants from Mexico, 80.7% of the decline was attributable to a decrease in population, while the declines among recent entrants from the Philippines, India, Vietnam, and China were almost exclusively (95.5%-100%) the result of decreases in TB case rates. Among foreign-born non-recent entrants (≥3 years since U.S. entry), we found an 8.9% decline (-443 cases) that resulted entirely (100%) from a decrease in the TB case rate. Both recent and non-recent entrants contributed to the decline in TB cases; factors contributing to the decline among recent entrants varied by country of origin. Strategies that impact both recent and non-recent entrants (e.g., investment in overseas TB control) as well as those that focus on non-recent entrants (e.g., expanded targeted

  17. Abrupt Decline in Tuberculosis among Foreign-Born Persons in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brian J.; Winston, Carla A.; Liu, Yecai; France, Anne Marie; Cain, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    While the number of reported tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States has declined over the past two decades, TB morbidity among foreign-born persons has remained persistently elevated. A recent unexpected decline in reported TB cases among foreign-born persons beginning in 2007 provided an opportunity to examine contributing factors and inform future TB control strategies. We investigated the relative influence of three factors on the decline: 1) changes in the size of the foreign-born population through immigration and emigration, 2) changes in distribution of country of origin among foreign-born persons, and 3) changes in the TB case rates among foreign-born subpopulations. Using data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the American Community Survey, we examined TB case counts, TB case rates, and population estimates, stratified by years since U.S. entry and country of origin. Regression modeling was used to assess statistically significant changes in trend. Among foreign-born recent entrants (<3 years since U.S. entry), we found a 39.5% decline (-1,013 cases) beginning in 2007 (P<0.05 compared to 2000–2007) and ending in 2011 (P<0.05 compared to 2011–2014). Among recent entrants from Mexico, 80.7% of the decline was attributable to a decrease in population, while the declines among recent entrants from the Philippines, India, Vietnam, and China were almost exclusively (95.5%–100%) the result of decreases in TB case rates. Among foreign-born non-recent entrants (≥3 years since U.S. entry), we found an 8.9% decline (-443 cases) that resulted entirely (100%) from a decrease in the TB case rate. Both recent and non-recent entrants contributed to the decline in TB cases; factors contributing to the decline among recent entrants varied by country of origin. Strategies that impact both recent and non-recent entrants (e.g., investment in overseas TB control) as well as those that focus on non-recent entrants (e.g., expanded targeted

  18. Implementation of the ABCDE Bundle to Improve Patient Outcomes in the Intensive Care Unit in a Rural Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kram, Stacey L; DiBartolo, Mary C; Hinderer, Katherine; Jones, Ruth Ann

    2015-01-01

    The ABCDE bundle is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach to optimizing patient outcomes in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). The ABCDE bundle incorporates awakening, breathing, coordination, delirium monitoring and management, and early mobility to minimize potentially deleterious effects of prolonged hospitalization, including the development of delirium. Health care organizations that implement the ABCDE bundle have improved patient outcomes such as decreased ICU and hospital lengths of stay, decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, decreased prevalence and duration of delirium, and decreased health care costs. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to implement the ABCDE bundle in a six-bed general adult ICU of a rural community hospital. Implementation of the bundle decreased average patient hospital length of stay by 1.8 days, reduced length of mechanical ventilation by an average of 1 day, and established a baseline delirium prevalence of 19% over a 3-month time period. The results of this project indicate that the ABCDE bundle can be implemented in rural, community-based hospitals and provides a safe, cost-effective method for enhancing ICU patient outcomes. PMID:26244238

  19. Innovative solutions: Standardized concentrations facilitate the use of continuous infusions for pediatric intensive care unit nurses at a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Roman, Noemi

    2005-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit at a community hospital successfully implemented the use of standardized concentrations. The process included deciding the standardized concentrations, use of titration charts, and integration of smart pump technology. Since the implementation of standardized concentrations, there has been no signal or sentinel events reported. It is safe and efficacious to use standardized concentrations combined with smart pump technology and abandon the use of the rule of 6 in the pediatric population. PMID:16327513

  20. A Multicenter Pragmatic Interrupted Time Series Analysis of Chlorhexidine Gluconate Bathing in Community Hospital Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Dicks, Kristen V; Lofgren, Eric; Lewis, Sarah S; Moehring, Rebekah W; Sexton, Daniel J; Anderson, Deverick J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether daily chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) bathing of intensive care unit (ICU) patients leads to a decrease in hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), particularly infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). DESIGN Interrupted time series analysis. SETTING The study included 33 community hospitals participating in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network from January 2008 through December 2013. PARTICIPANTS All ICU patients at study hospitals during the study period. METHODS Of the 33 hospitals, 17 hospitals implemented CHG bathing during the study period, and 16 hospitals that did not perform CHG bathing served as controls. Primary pre-specified outcomes included ICU central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), primary bloodstream infections (BSI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). MRSA and VRE HAIs were also evaluated. RESULTS Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) bathing was associated with a significant downward trend in incidence rates of ICU CLABSI (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), ICU primary BSI (IRR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), VRE CLABSIs (IRR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.97-0.98), and all combined VRE infections (IRR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-1.00). No significant trend in MRSA infection incidence rates was identified prior to or following the implementation of CHG bathing. CONCLUSIONS In this multicenter, real-world analysis of the impact of CHG bathing, hospitals that implemented CHG bathing attained a decrease in ICU CLABSIs, ICU primary BSIs, and VRE CLABSIs. CHG bathing did not affect rates of specific or overall infections due to MRSA. Our findings support daily CHG bathing of ICU patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:791-797. PMID:26861417

  1. Seasonal Changes in Hospital Admissions for Pulmonary Embolism in Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo (from the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network).

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-15

    Although several studies have shown the relation between temperature/atmospheric pressure and pulmonary embolism (PE), their results are inconsistent. Furthermore, diurnal temperature range (DTR) and diurnal pressure range (DPR) were not fully evaluated for their associations with hospital admissions for PE. Study subjects comprised cases of 1,148 PE treated at institutions belonging to the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network from January 2005 to December 2012. Patient data were combined with a variety of daily local climate parameters obtained from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Every 1°C increase in the DTR at lag0 corresponded to an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (odds ratio [OR] 1.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003 to 1.070). In the cooler season (November to April), an increase of 1 hPa (barometric pressure) in the DPR at lag4 and lag5 was associated with an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (OR 1.042, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.077 and OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.914 to 0.992, respectively). An increase in the PE hospitalization rate was seen only in the cool season. Using a metropolitan database, we showed that DTR and DPR have different impacts on hospital admissions for PE. In conclusion, we found that an increase in the DTR increases the PE hospitalization rate, especially during the cooler season. The impact of DTR and DPR on PE incidence and related hospitalizations needs to be further evaluated. PMID:26602077

  2. Participant action research with bedside nurses to identify NANDA-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, and Nursing Outcomes Classification categories for hospitalized persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Minthorn, Crista; Lunney, Margaret

    2012-05-01

    Experienced bedside nurses identified 14 nursing diagnoses, 78 interventions, and 76 health outcomes for hospitalized persons with diabetes. Using these terms, the nursing department revised the standards of care and the electronic health record. Nurses' engagement in generating knowledge translated to increased interest in research. This methodology is recommended for other agencies. PMID:22542253

  3. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  4. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Michael D; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-07-01

    To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months-17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1-5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  5. Job satisfaction and turnover intent among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2016-08-01

    Feelings of job satisfaction and turnover intentions among social workers affect work quality for both social workers and the people for whom they provide services. Existing literature on job satisfaction among hospital social workers is limited, and is overly focused on issues of compensation. There is job satisfaction research with hospital nurses available for comparison. Other informative social work research on job satisfaction and turnover exists in mental health and generally, across settings. Research on turnover intent in social work is primarily from child welfare settings and may not generalize. The literature notes gaps and contradictions about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intent. Using a large national dataset of hospital social workers, this research clarifies and fills gaps regarding hospital social workers, and explores how Herzberg's theory of work can clarify the difference between sources of job dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. Findings include hospital social workers reporting high job satisfaction and that demographics do not contribute to the predictive models. The findings do support centralized social work departments and variety in the job functions of hospital social workers, and are consistent with the theoretical framework. PMID:27322030

  6. Evidence of person-to-person transmission of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus in a hematology unit.

    PubMed

    Moore, Catherine; Galiano, Monica; Lackenby, Angie; Abdelrahman, Tamer; Barnes, Rosemary; Evans, Meirion R; Fegan, Christopher; Froude, Susannah; Hastings, Mark; Knapper, Steven; Litt, Emma; Price, Nicola; Salmon, Roland; Temple, Mark; Davies, Eleri

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first confirmed person-to-person transmission of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus that occurred in a hematology unit in the United Kingdom. Eleven cases of (H1N1) 2009 virus infection were identified, of which, ten were related as shown by sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes. H275Y analysis demonstrated that 8 of 10 case patients had oseltamivir-resistant virus, with 4 of 8 case patients infected by direct transmission of resistant virus. Zanamivir should be considered as first-line therapy for influenza in patients with lymphopenic hematological conditions and uptake of influenza vaccination encouraged to further reduce the number of susceptible individuals. PMID:21148492

  7. Measurement of personal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Palausky, M.A.; Counts, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    A study of personal exposure of non-smokers to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) has been conducted in 16 cities in the United States. Individual participants wear one of two personal sampling pumps, one each at work and away-from-work. Samples of breathing zone air analyzed for both particle- and vapor-phase markers of ETS. In addition, prior- and post-exposure saliva samples are collected, in order that smoking status can be assessed through cotinine levels. The distribution of subjects among smoking and non-smoking workplaces and homes is such that ca. 54% of the participants worked and lived in non-smoking situations. A comparison of the demographic distribution of the sample population with that of the US non-smoking population indicates that the sample population is more female and of higher socioeconomic status. Subjects living and working with smokers are more highly exposed to ETS than those subjects who live and work in predominantly ETS-free environments. However, even the smoke exposures of subjects living and working in smoking venues are low relative to area concentrations of ETS reported in previous studies. It is clear that in general (not considering cell designation), ETS exposure is inversely correlated with household income. Additional data analysis has indicated that although participants perceive their greatest exposures to ETS to occur in the workplace, in fact, exposure to ETS when living with a smoker is demonstrably greater than that received in a smoking workplace, on an individual basis, correlation between salivary cotinine levels and ETS nicotine exposure was non-existent. However, there appears to be significant correlation between the two parameters when participants with measurable exposures are segregated into groups of 25.

  8. Underreporting of Driver Alcohol Involvement in United States Police and Hospital Records: Capture-Recapture Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J.; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J.; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006–2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA’s General Estimates System. Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  9. Underreporting of driver alcohol involvement in United States police and hospital records: capture-recapture estimates.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ted R; Gibson, Rekaya; Zaloshnja, Eduard; Blincoe, Lawrence J; Kindelberger, John; Strashny, Alexander; Thomas, Andrea; Ho, Shiu; Bauer, Michael; Sperry, Sarah; Peng, Justin; Singleton, Mike; Smith, Tracy J; Zhang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes what portion of US nonfatal crashes are alcohol-involved and how well police and hospitals detect involvement. A capture recapture model estimated alcohol involvement from levels detected by police and hospitals and the extent of detection overlap. We analyzed 550,933 Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System driver records from 2006-2008 police crash report censuses probabilistically linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department (ED) discharge censuses for CT, KY (admissions only), MD, NE, NY, SC, and UT. We computed national estimates from NHTSA's General Estimates System.Nationally an estimated 7.5% of drivers in nonfatal crashes and 12.9% of nonfatal crashes were alcohol-involved. (Crashes often involve multiple drivers but rarely are two alcohol-involved.) Police correctly identified an estimated 32% of alcohol-involved drivers in non-fatal crashes including 48% in injury crashes. Excluding KY, police in the six states reported 47% of alcohol involvement for cases treated in EDs and released and 39% for admitted cases. In contrast, hospitals reported 28% of involvement for ED cases and 51% for admitted cases. Underreporting varied widely between states. Police reported alcohol involvement for 44% of those who hospitals reported were alcohol-involved, while hospitals reported alcohol involvement for 33% of those who police reported were alcohol-involved. Police alcohol reporting completeness rose with police-reported driver injury severity. At least one system reported 62% of alcohol involvement. Police and hospitals need to communicate better about alcohol involvement. Despite the proven effectiveness of brief alcohol intervention, EDs rarely detect, much less intervene with crash-involved drinking drivers. Both police and EDs particularly need to assess alcohol involvement in minor injury better. PMID:23169120

  10. Hospitalization cost after spine surgery in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive model of hospitalization costs after spine surgery. Several initiatives have been put in place to minimize healthcare expenditures but there are limited data on the magnitude of the contribution of procedure-specific drivers of cost. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 672,591 patients who underwent spine surgery and were registered in the National Inpatient Sample from 2005-2010. The cohort underwent 1:1 randomization to create derivation and validation subsamples. Regression techniques were used for the creation of a parsimonious predictive model of total hospitalization cost after spine surgery. Included were 356,783 patients (53.1%) who underwent fusions, and 315,808 (46.9%) non-fusion surgeries. The median hospitalization cost was $14,202 (interquartile range $4772-23,632). Common drivers of cost identified in the multivariate analysis included the length of stay, number of admission diagnoses and procedures, hospital size and region, patient income, fusion surgery, acute renal failure, sex, and coagulopathy. The model was validated in an independent cohort and demonstrated a final coefficient of determination that was very similar to the initial model. The predicted and observed values in the validation cohort demonstrated good correlations. This national study quantified the magnitude of significant drivers of hospitalization cost after spine surgery. We developed a predictive model that can be utilized as an adjunct in the cost containment debate and the creation of data driven policies. PMID:26183305

  11. The quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a selected hospital in the Kavango region.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, A; Small, L F; vd Merwe, T; Mueyu, U

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a hospital in the Kavango region of Namibia. The study was prompted by repeated media reports over the radio. Commentators and listeners expressed concern over the seeming lack of adequate hygienic measures, specifically with regard to patient care. To objectively quantify and describe the extent of this problem, a single objective was stated, namely to measure the quality of nursing care with regard to patient hygiene. A descriptive survey design was chosen to explore and describe the problem. A check-list was developed to observe thirty patients (the total population) over a period of one week. The results indicated that certain aspects of hygienic care needed improvement. These aspects (parts) were the care of male patient's beards; perineal care; and mouth care. Other aspects of care were indirectly negatively influenced due to incomplete record keeping. On completion of the study recommendations were made with regard to in-service education, management and research. PMID:15777033

  12. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC) to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1) was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC). The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763) or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393). The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic and Canadian data sets

  13. Epidemiology of Enterococcus faecalis urinary tract infection in a teaching hospital in London, United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L M; Duke, B; Urwin, G; Guiney, M

    1992-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a frequent cause of urinary tract infection in hospitalized patients. Recent reports have suggested that the organism may frequently be acquired by cross-infection from other patients. In this study, we used total DNA restriction patterns to type 135 urine isolates of E. faecalis from four sets of patients. Isolates were placed into types (all bands identical) and into groups (most bands identical). Most isolates were discriminated by the typing method, and the results suggested that direct cross-infection occurred rarely if at all. However, two groups of clonally related isolates occurred frequently in the urine specimens and also in feces from hospital-associated patients and were often associated with antibiotic resistance. Isolates from these two groups were found less frequently in feces from people not associated with the hospital. Images PMID:1500498

  14. 31 CFR 500.518 - Payments for living, traveling, and similar personal expenses in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... similar personal expenses in the United States. 500.518 Section 500.518 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing...

  15. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information returns required of United States... 31, 1962. 1.6038-2 Section 1.6038-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... foreign corporation. A person in control of a corporation which, in turn, owns more than 50 percent of...

  16. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Information returns required of United States... 31, 1962. 1.6038-2 Section 1.6038-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... foreign corporation. A person in control of a corporation which, in turn, owns more than 50 percent of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Information returns required of United States... 31, 1962. 1.6038-2 Section 1.6038-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... foreign corporation. A person in control of a corporation which, in turn, owns more than 50 percent of...

  18. Project CHOICE: #119. A Career Unit for Grades 3 and 4. Restaurants. (Community and Personal Services Occupations Career Cluster).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This teaching unit, Restaurants, is one in a series of career guides developed by Project CHOICE (Children Have Options in Career Education) to provide the classroom teacher with a source of career-related activities linking third and fourth grade elementary classroom experiences with the world of work. Part of the Community and Personal Services…

  19. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Students' Preferences for Lecturers' Personalities in Britain, Malaysia and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Maakip, Ismail; Ahmad, Sharani; Hudani, Nurul; Voo, Peter S. K.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Garwood, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    This study examined students' preferences for lecturers' personalities on three continents. Two-hundred and 35 university students in Malaysia, 347 university students in Britain and 139 university students in the United States provided ratings of 30 desirable and undesirable lecturer trait characteristics, which were coded into an internally…

  20. 26 CFR 1.6038-3 - Information returns required of certain United States persons with respect to controlled foreign...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... December 23, 2002, see § 1.6038-3(j) in effect prior to the amendments made by T.D. 9033 (see 26 CFR part 1...,” containing the information described in paragraph (g) of this section. (2) Controlling ten-percent partners... section) a United States person owned a ten-percent or greater interest in the partnership while...

  1. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods of certain foreign corporations beginning after December 31, 1962. 1.6038-2 Section 1.6038-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX...

  2. 26 CFR 1.6038-3 - Information returns required of certain United States persons with respect to controlled foreign...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Information returns required of certain United States persons with respect to controlled foreign partnerships (CFPs). 1.6038-3 Section 1.6038-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns §...

  3. Access to Education in Africa: Responding to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chataika, Tsitsi; Mckenzie, Judith Anne; Swart, Estelle; Lyner-Cleophas, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities mandates that disabled people should have full rights to education in inclusive settings. However, to ensure that educational polices and settings are designed to meet this criterion seems challenging to African countries that have ratified this Convention. This…

  4. 8 CFR 319.4 - Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... employment; (g) Be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the... section 319(c)(1) of the Act; (b) Reside in the United States pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent... States at the time of naturalization; (f) Declare in good faith, upon......

  5. 8 CFR 319.4 - Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... employment; (g) Be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the... section 319(c)(1) of the Act; (b) Reside in the United States pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent... States at the time of naturalization; (f) Declare in good faith, upon......

  6. 8 CFR 319.4 - Persons continuously employed for 5 years by United States organizations engaged in disseminating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... employment; (g) Be a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the... section 319(c)(1) of the Act; (b) Reside in the United States pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent... States at the time of naturalization; (f) Declare in good faith, upon......

  7. Libraries in the United States and the International Year of Disabled Persons: Highlights of the Year--1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Phyllis I., Comp.

    In response to the United Nations' declaration of 1981 as the International Year of Disabled Persons (IYDP), the Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) of the American Library Association (ALA) set up an IYDP committee to carry out the objectives of the year. This document, based on state library reports and other…

  8. 26 CFR 1.956-3T - Certain trade or service receivables acquired from United States persons (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain trade or service receivables acquired... Corporations § 1.956-3T Certain trade or service receivables acquired from United States persons (temporary... includes any trade or service receivable if the trade or service receivable is acquired (directly...

  9. Hospital Website Rankings in the United States: Expanding Benchmarks and Standards for Effective Consumer Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Ford, Eric W; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Background Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increased the roles hospitals and health systems play in care delivery and led to a wave of consolidation of medical groups and hospitals. As such, the traditional patient interaction with an independent medical provider is becoming far less common, replaced by frequent interactions with integrated medical groups and health systems. It is thus increasingly important for these organizations to have an effective social media presence. Moreover, in the age of the informed consumer, patients desire a readily accessible, electronic interface to initiate contact, making a well-designed website and social media strategy critical features of the modern health care organization. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the Web presence of hospitals and their health systems on five dimensions: accessibility, content, marketing, technology, and usability. In addition, an overall ranking was calculated to identify the top 100 hospital and health system websites. Methods A total of 2407 unique Web domains covering 2785 hospital facilities or their parent organizations were identified and matched against the 2009 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey. This is a four-fold improvement in prior research and represents what the authors believe to be a census assessment of the online presence of US hospitals and their health systems. Each of the five dimensions was investigated with an automated content analysis using a suite of tools. Scores on the dimensions are reported on a range from 0 to 10, with a higher score on any given dimension representing better comparative performance. Rankings on each dimension and an average ranking are provided for the top 100 hospitals. Results The mean score on the usability dimension, meant to rate overall website quality, was 5.16 (SD 1.43), with the highest score of 8 shared by only 5 hospitals. Mean scores on other dimensions were between 4.43 (SD 2

  10. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  11. A comparison of two stress-reduction treatments for mothers of neonates hospitalized in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cobiella, C W; Mabe, P A; Forehand, R L

    1990-01-01

    Thirty mothers of preterm infants requiring neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization were assigned randomly to one of three groups to assess differences in treatment effectiveness of facilitating parental adaptation to the NICU stresses. Groups consisted of: (a) a treatment group receiving videotape training in active problem-focused coping strategies; (b) a treatment group receiving videotape training in emotion-focused strategies to help manage anxiety; and (c) a control group receiving promotional information about the hospital and the NICU. On pretreatment measures most of the mothers exhibited little distress, a finding unlike those for the majority of NICU studies. On posttreatment follow-up both the problem-focused and emotion-focused treatment groups were significantly less anxious than the controls and lower levels of depression were observed for the emotion-focused group. Findings suggest that the coping interventions examined were cost efficient and appear promising in facilitating mothers' coping with NICU stresses. PMID:10104960

  12. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way.

    PubMed

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R S

    2015-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  13. [Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure. PMID:24448938

  14. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    PubMed Central

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  15. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  16. The practice of defensive medicine among hospital doctors in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Defensive medicine is defined as a doctor’s deviation from standard practice to reduce or prevent complaints or criticism. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of the practice of defensive medicine in the UK among hospital doctors and the factors affecting it. Methods A quantitative study was designed, with a detailed seventeen point questionnaire. Defensive medicine practice was assessed and tested against four factors age, gender, specialty and grade. Three hundred hospital doctors from three UK hospitals received the questionnaire. Results Two hundred and four (68%) out of 300 hospital doctors responded to the survey. Seventy eight percent reported practicing one form or another of defensive medicine. Ordering unnecessary tests is the commonest form of defensive medicine reported by 59% of the respondents. This is followed by unnecessary referral to other specialties (55%). While only 9% of the sampled doctors would refuse to treat high risk patients, double this number would avoid high risks procedures all together (21%). A linear regression module has shown that only senior grade was associated with less practice of defensive medicine. Conclusion Defensive medical practice is common among the doctors who responded to the survey. Senior grade is associated with less practice of defensive medicine. PMID:24168064

  17. Intensive Care Unit Utilization and Interhospital Transfers As Potential Indicators of Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ward, Marcia; Miller, Thomas; Ohsfeldt, Robert; Jaana, Mirou; Lei, Yang; Tracy, Roger; Schneider, John

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining meaningful information from statistically valid and reliable measures of the quality of care for disease-specific care provided in small rural hospitals is limited by small numbers of cases and different definitive care capacities. An alternative approach may be to aggregate and analyze patient services that reflect more generalized care…

  18. Recognition and Prevention of Hospital-Associated Enteric Infections in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Linda D.; Dubberke, Erik R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To review the causes and extent of hospital-associated infectious diarrhea and associated risks in the general hospital ward and ICU, to compare microorganisms with similar symptoms in order to aid in recognition that will lead to timely and appropriate treatment and control measures, and to propose infection prevention protocols that could decrease human process errors in the ICU. Design Literature review describing epidemiology, comparison of microbial characteristics for potential hospital-associated enteric pathogens, diagnosis, and prevention, especially if important in the ICU, and particularly in regard to Clostridium difficile. Results Enteric organisms that most commonly cause hospital-associated infectious diarrhea in acute care settings and the ICU are C. difficile, rotavirus, and norovirus, although others may also be important, particularly in developing countries. Conclusions In order to successfully recognize and control infectious diarrhea in the ICU, intensivists should be aware that epidemiology, risks and prevention measures may differ between these microorganisms. In addition, intensivists should be ready to implement systems changes related to notification, isolation precautions and prevention and environmental cleaning in the ICU. PMID:20647790

  19. Thrombolytic treatment for myocardial infarction: an examination of practice in 39 United Kingdom hospitals. Myocardial Infarction Audit Group.

    PubMed Central

    Birkhead, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine use of thrombolytic drugs for myocardial infarction and use of contraindications to treatment in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: Observational study, based on a continuing audit. SETTING: 39 hospitals in the United Kingdom. PATIENTS: 30,029 patients admitted between November 1992 and June 1995 with suspected myocardial infarction. RESULTS: Of 13,628 patients with a final diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction 10,316 (75.7%) were considered eligible for thrombolytic treatment on the basis of typical cardiographic changes or new left bundle branch block. Of these, 8139 (59.7%) were diagnosed at admission to hospital and 6991 (85.9%) were administered thrombolytic drugs; 14.1% were considered too late for treatment or had a clinical contraindication. In 2177 patients (16% of 13,628)-thrombolytic treatment was given in the absence of contraindications and after the diagnosis of infarction had been confirmed by further electrocardiographic evidence. A further 591 (4.3%) with a final diagnosis of definite infarction without typical cardiographic changes also received thrombolytic treatment as did 1018 patients without a final diagnosis of definite infarction. In total, 9459 of 13,628 patients (71.6%) received thrombolytic treatment. The range of use of treatment between hospitals for a final diagnosis of infarction was 49.1-85.4%. This variation reflected differences in the frequency with which a diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction was made at admission, and the subsequent use of clinical contraindications to thrombolytic treatment. CONCLUSIONS: 75.7% of patients with a final diagnosis of definite myocardial infarction were eligible for thrombolytic treatment on the basis of cardiographic changes. Differences between hospitals in the frequency with which a diagnosis of infarction was made on admission, and differences in subsequent use of thrombolytic drugs, results in wide variation in treatment rates. Differences in use of thrombolytic

  20. Performance of Bedside Diagnostic Ultrasound in an Ebola Isolation Unit: The Emory University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Courtney C.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Vanairsdale, Sharon; Kandiah, Prem; Klopman, Matthew A.; Ribner, Bruce S.; Tridandapani, Srini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with Ebola virus disease, a contagious and potentially lethal infection, are now being treated in specialized units in the United States. We describe Emory University's initial experience, current operating procedures, and ongoing planning with diagnostic ultrasound in the isolation unit. CONCLUSION Ultrasound use has been limited to date. Future planning considerations include deciding what types of ultrasound studies will be performed, which personnel will acquire the images, and which ultrasound machine will be used. PMID:25730332

  1. Adverse events caused by potential drug-drug interactions in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Mariana Macedo; da Silva, Lidiane Ayres; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Silvério, Marcelo Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of potential drug-drug interactions in an intensive care unit of a hospital, focusing on antimicrobial drugs. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed electronic prescriptions of patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a teaching hospital between January 1 and March 31, 2014 and assessed potential drug-drug interactions associated with antimicrobial drugs. Antimicrobial drug consumption levels were expressed in daily doses per 100 patient-days. The search and classification of the interactions were based on the Micromedex® system. Results The daily prescriptions of 82 patients were analyzed, totaling 656 prescriptions. Antimicrobial drugs represented 25% of all prescription drugs, with meropenem, vancomycin and ceftriaxone being the most prescribed medications. According to the approach of daily dose per 100 patient-days, the most commonly used antimicrobial drugs were cefepime, meropenem, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. The mean number of interactions per patient was 2.6. Among the interactions, 51% were classified as contraindicated or significantly severe. Highly significant interactions (clinical value 1 and 2) were observed with a prevalence of 98%. Conclusion The current study demonstrated that antimicrobial drugs are frequently prescribed in intensive care units and present a very high number of potential drug-drug interactions, with most of them being considered highly significant. PMID:26761473

  2. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  3. A comparison of outcomes among hospital survivors with and without severe comorbidity admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; McConigley, R; Leslie, G D; Dobbs, G J; Phillips, M; Davies, H; Aoun, S

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of patients with severe comorbidity discharged from Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This project aimed to determine the effects of an ICU stay for patients with severe comorbidity by comparing 1) quality of life (QOL), 2) the symptom profile of hospital survivors and 3) health service use after hospital discharge for patients admitted to ICU with and without severe comorbidity. A case-control study was used. Patients with severe comorbidity were matched to a contemporaneous cohort of ICU patients by age and severity of illness. Assessment tools were the Medical Outcome Study 36-item short-form and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaires for QOL and the Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom distress. A proportional odds assumption was performed using an ordinal regression model. The difference in QOL outcome was the dependent variable for each pair. Health service use after discharge from ICU was monitored with patient diaries. Patients aged 18+ years admitted to an ICU in a metropolitan teaching hospital between 2011 and 2012 were included. We recruited 30 cases and 30 controls. QOL improved over the six months after hospital discharge for patients with and without severe comorbidity (P <0.01) within the groups but there was no difference found between the groups (P >0.3). There was no difference in symptoms or health service use between patients with and without severe comorbidity. ICU admission for people with severe comorbidity can be appropriate to stabilise the patient's condition and is likely to be followed by some overall improvement over the six months after hospital discharge. PMID:25735690

  4. The Main Etiologies of Acute Kidney Injury in the Newborns Hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Hossein Emad; Sabzehei, Mohammad Kazem; Rasuli, Bahman; Torabian, Saadat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most common diseases among the newborns hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), which is usually resulted from predisposing factors including sepsis, hypovolemia, asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), and heart failure. The goal of this study was to assess main etiologies, relevant risk factors, and early outcome of neonatal AKI. Materials and Methods: In a cross- sectional study, 49 consecutive neonates hospitalized in NICU of Besat hospital with diagnosis of AKI from October 2009 to October 2011 were investigated through census sampling method. AKI was diagnosed based on urine output and serum creatinine levels. Results: The prevalence of AKI was 1.54% (49 out of 3166 newborns hospitalized in NICU) with the female: male was 7:1. Thirty-nine patients (79.5%) were full-term neonates. Oliguria was observed in 38 (77.5%) patients. Sepsis was the most common predisposing factor for AKI in 77.5% of patients (n = 38) accompanied with the highest mortality rate among other factors (30.5%). Other leading causes of AKI included hypovolemia secondary to dehydration, followed by hypoxia secondary to RDS, patent ductus arteriosus, posterior urethral valve, asphyxia, and renal venous thrombosis. A positive relationship was observed between neonates' age, sex, urine output, and also between serum creatinine levels with initiation of dialysis. The mortality rate among the newborns hospitalized with AKI was 36.7%. Eighteen (36.7%) newborns were treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) of whom 10 patients (55.6%) died, 31 patients were managed conservatively of whom five neonate died (25.9%). Discussion: Prognosis of AKI in the oliguric neonates requiring PD is very poor. It is thus recommended to prevent AKI by predicting and rapid diagnosis of AKI in patients with potential risk factors and also by early and effective treatment of such factors in individuals with AKI. PMID:25024976

  5. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomies at a District General Hospital in United Kingdom: 10-Year Review of Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chester, J.; Sidhu, P.; Sharma, S.; Israfil-Bayli, F.

    2016-01-01

    Peripartum haemorrhage is an obstetric emergency which requires effective and timely management. A retrospective analysis was conducted at a single centre district hospital, over a 10-year period to describe factors that would lead to a peripartum hysterectomy. We sought to establish intraoperative and postoperative risks and review outcomes and complications associated with the procedure. A total of 29 cases (incidence 0.8 per 1000) were reviewed over 2001–2011. The mean parity was 1.8 and the mean maternal age was 33 years. Uterine atony was the most common indication for hysterectomy (12/29) followed by placenta praevia and accreta (4/29 and 5/29 cases, resp.). The commonest postoperative complications were sepsis and paralytic ileus. EPH most commonly occurs due to uterine atony but remains difficult to predict. Hospitals should continue to have robust systems and the necessary resources available to perform EPH where clinically indicated. PMID:27190690

  6. Evidence of person-to-person transmission within a family cluster of novel coronavirus infections, United Kingdom, February 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection was diagnosed in an adult male in the United Kingdom with severe respiratory illness, who had travelled to Pakistan and Saudi Arabia 10 days before symptom onset. Contact tracing identified two secondary cases among family members without recent travel: one developed severe respiratory illness and died, the other an influenza-like illness. No other severe cases were identified or nCoV detected in respiratory samples among 135 contacts followed for 10 days. PMID:23517868

  7. Personal Health Record Use in the United States: Forecasting Future Adoption Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) offer a tremendous opportunity to generate consumer support in pursing the triple aim of reducing costs, increasing access, and improving care quality. Moreover, surveys in the United States indicate that consumers want Web-based access to their medical records. However, concerns that consumers’ low health information literacy levels and physicians’ resistance to sharing notes will limit PHRs’ utility to a relatively small portion of the population have reduced both the product innovation and policy imperatives. Objective The purpose of our study was 3-fold: first, to report on US consumers’ current level of PHR activity; second, to describe the roles of imitation and innovation influence factors in determining PHR adoption rates; and third, to forecast future PHR diffusion uptake among US consumers under 3 scenarios. Methods We used secondary data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) of US citizens for the survey years 2008, 2011, and 2013. Applying technology diffusion theory and Bass modeling, we evaluated 3 future PHR adoption scenarios by varying the introduction dates. Results All models displayed the characteristic diffusion S-curve indicating that the PHR technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration ahead of meaningful use goals. The best-performing model indicates that PHR adoption will exceed 75% by 2020. Therefore, the meaningful use program targets for PHR adoption are below the rates likely to occur without an intervention. Conclusions The promise of improved care quality and cost savings through better consumer engagement prompted the US Institute of Medicine to call for universal PHR adoption in 1999. The PHR products available as of 2014 are likely to meet and exceed meaningful use stage 3 targets before 2020 without any incentive. Therefore, more ambitious uptake and functionality availability should be incorporated into future goals. PMID:27030105

  8. [Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibilities and VISA-VRSA rates among MRSA strains isolated from hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals in seven provinces of Turkey].

    PubMed

    Cesur, Salih; Irmak, Hasan; Simşek, Hüsniye; Cöplü, Nilay; Kılıç, Hasan; Arslan, Uğur; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Baysan, Betil Ozhak; Gülay, Zeynep; Hoşoğlu, Salih; Berktaş, Mustafa; Gencer, Serap; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan; Esen, Berrin; Karabiber, Nihal; Aydın, Faruk; Yalçın, Ata Nevzat

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and vancomycin intermediate susceptible S.aureus (VISA) strains were present among methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients hospitalised at intensive care units (ICU) of hospitals located at different regions of Turkey and to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of teicoplanin, linezolid, tigecycline, quinupristin-dalfopristin and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs for the treatment of MRSA infections. A total of 260 MRSA clinical strains (isolated from 113 lower respiratory tract, 90 blood, 24 wound, 17 catheter, 13 nasal swabs, two urine and one CSF sample) were collected from nine health-care centers in eight provinces [Ankara (n= 52), Konya (n= 49), Antalya (n= 40), Istanbul (n= 7), Izmir (37), Diyarbakir (n= 15), Van (n= 12), Trabzon (n= 48)] selected as representatives of the seven different geographical regions of Turkey. Methicillin resistance was determined by cefoxitin disk diffusion in the hospitals where the strains were isolated and confirmed by oxacillin salt agar screening at the Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency. Screening for VISA and VRSA was conducted using the agar screening test and E-test. Susceptibility of the MRSA strains to other antibiotics was also determined by E-test method. None of the 260 MRSA strains were determined to be VRSA or VISA. All were susceptible to teicoplanin and linezolid, and susceptibility rates to daptomycin, tigecycline and quinupristin-dalfopristin were 99.6%, 96.9%, and 95%, respectively. Absence of VISA and VRSA among the MRSA strains surveyed currently seemed hopeful, however, continuous surveillance is necessary. In order to prevent the development of VISA and VRSA strains the use of linezolid, tigecycline, quinupristin-dalfopristin and daptomycin should be encouraged as alternative agents of treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:22951647

  9. Control of infection with multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in a hospital renal unit: the value of plasmid characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C. S.; Barrett, S. P.; Threlfall, E. J.; Cheasty, T.

    1995-01-01

    An outbreak of infections due to multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria took place over a period of approximately 18 months in a renal unit. Strains of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were involved, and a variety of antibiotic resistances was encountered. Closely related plasmids encoding resistance to aztreonam, ceftazidime and piperacillin, possibly derived from an archetypal plasmid of 105 kb were found in the majority of isolates examined. After limiting the use of aztreonam the incidence of new patient isolates of multiple-resistant organisms was greatly reduced. This study demonstrated how molecular studies can contribute to the control of an outbreak situation in a hospital unit by providing an impetus to reduce the use of specific antibiotics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641839

  10. [Outbreak of hospital infection, due to members of the Klebsielleae tribe, in an intensive care unit for infants].

    PubMed

    Albesa, I; Eraso, A J; Frigerio, C I; Lubetkin, A M

    1980-01-01

    At the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Provincial Regional Hospital, in Río Cuarto, Argentina, nearly all hospitalized infants showed clinical symptoms of septicaemia and gastroenteritis. Neither Salmonella nor Shigella were found in the stool cultures, but Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated as predominant flora. Three haemocultures displayed K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae; the other three developed only E. cloacae. Since the infants came from different places and it was possible to isolate members of the Klebsielleae tribe from all of them, a hospital infection was suspected. Searching for the infectious source, K. pneumoniae was detected in the water bath used to keep the feeding-bottles at 37 degrees C. To clarify the existence of any relationship between the strains isolated from patients and from the water bath, several characteristics were compared: biotypes, haemolityc activity, antibiotic sensibility patterns, and pathogenicity, assessed as lethal dose 50%. Identical results were found for the biochemical tests of all the strains belonging to the same species. The antibiotic sensibility patterns and LD 50% showed quite similar values. All bacteria displayed haemolityc activity for rabbit and lamb erythrocytes. It could be considered that the septicaemia had an intestinal origin, and that the infection spread was due to the contamination of the water bath where the feeding bottles were kept. PMID:6755552

  11. The Power of Advance Care Planning in Promoting Hospice and Out-of-Hospital Death in a Dialysis Unit

    PubMed Central

    Weaner, Barbara B.; Long, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite mortality rates that exceed those of most cancers, hospice remains underutilized in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis and nearly half of all dialysis patients die in the hospital. Objective: To review the impact of advance care planning on withdrawal from dialysis, use of hospice, and location of death. Design: Retrospective review. Setting: A rural outpatient dialysis unit. Participants: Former dialysis patients who died over a 5-year period. Exposure: Advance care planning, the use of physician orders for life-sustaining therapy program (POLST). Main Outcome and Measure: Use of hospice among patients withdrawing from dialysis, location of death. Results: Advance care planning was associated with a low incidence of in-hospital death and among those who withdrew, a high use of hospice. Conclusions and Relevance: Comprehensive and systematic advance care planning among patients with ESRD on dialysis promotes greater hospice utilization and may facilitate the chance that death will occur out of hospital. PMID:25006866

  12. The institutional response to mental disorder in Ireland: censuses of Irish asylums, psychiatric hospitals and units 1844-2014.

    PubMed

    Walsh, D; Daly, A; Moran, R

    2016-08-01

    Before the eighteenth century, there was limited response to the problem of psychiatric illness in Ireland as in many other countries. The asylums of the 1820s and 1830s were no sooner opened than they were overcrowded. A second wave of asylum building commenced in the second half of the nineteenth century continuing up to the early twentieth century. In 1966, the Report of the Commission on Mental Illness noted that the rate of psychiatric beds in Ireland per 1,000 was one of the highest in the world. The report called for a change in the policy of caring for the mentally ill in psychiatric hospitals to more community-based settings and in psychiatric units located in general hospital settings, along with a call for more research into mental illness. The result of the latter was the establishment of the first census of psychiatric patients resident in psychiatric hospitals. Thus began fifty years of census reporting and the subsequent establishment of the National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS). PMID:26667467

  13. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  14. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  15. 22 CFR 124.13 - Procurement by United States persons in foreign countries (offshore procurement).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... agency of the U.S. Government; and (b) The technical data of U.S.-origin to be used in the foreign... data to any other person except subcontractors within the same country; and (3) Prohibits the... foreign persons in the approved country for manufacture of equipment for delivery pursuant to the...

  16. [Predictive factors of mortality of the burnt persons: study on 221 adults hospitalized between 2004 and 2009].

    PubMed

    Elkafssaoui, S; Hami, H; Mrabet, M; Bouaiti, E; Tourabi, K; Quyou, A; Soulaymani, A; Ihrai, H

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study is the evaluation of the predictive factors of mortality to a troop of Moroccan grown-up serious burnt persons. Variables analyzed in the study are: the age, the sex, the localization of the burn, the degree of burn, indicates Total Body Surface Area (TBSA), indicate Unit of Standard Burn (UBS) and the indication of leases, sepsis and the medical histories (tobacco, diabetes). Factors associated significantly to a mortality raised at the burned patients were the female genital organ, the localization of the burn at the level of the head, the sepsis, one TBSA greater or equal to 20%, an UBS greater or equal to 200 and an indication of leases greater or equal to 75. Other factors such as the age, the degree of burn and the histories did not show a significant difference. An evaluation and a good knowledge of factors associated to a high risk of death allow an adequate coverage of this category of patients. PMID:22542367

  17. A prospective observational study assessing the outcome of Sepsis in intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, Peshawar

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Arslan Rahat; Hussain, Arshad; Ali, Iftikhar; Samad, Abdul; Ali Shah, Syed Tajammul; Yousef, Muhammad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The current study aims to explore the factors associated with outcome among patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, Northwest General Hospital and Research Centre, Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out at intensive care unit of our hospital from February 2014 to October 2015. Data was collected using a structured format and statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20®. Regression model was applied to identify the factors contributing to the outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock. P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the patients meeting the criteria of this study were male 147 (54.9%) with a mean age of 54.8. The most common source of sepsis was lung infections (42.2%) followed by urinary tract infections (18.7%), soft tissue infections (6.3%) abdominal infections (6%) and in 6.3% patients the source remained unknown. Further analysis has revealed that increase in number of days of hospitalization was observed to be slightly associated with the outcome of the treatment (1.086 [1.002 – 1.178], 0.046). Moreover, the risk of mortality was the higher among the patients with septic shock 22.161[10.055 – 48.840], and having respiratory, kidney and central nervous system complications. Overall it is seen that septic shock alone was found responsible to cause death among 32.0% of the patients (Model 1: R2 0.32, p=0.000), and upon involvement of the organ complications the risk of mortality was observed to 42.0%. Conclusion: Chances of recovery were poor among the patients with septic shock. Moreover, those patients having respiratory and urinary tract infection are least likely to survive. PMID:27375715

  18. Incidences and sociodemographics of specific congenital heart diseases in the United States of America: an evaluation of hospital discharge diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Egbe, Alexander; Uppu, Santosh; Stroustrup, Annemarie; Lee, Simon; Ho, Deborah; Srivastava, Shubhika

    2014-08-01

    Current estimates of the incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) are derived from small clinical studies and metaanalyses. For the true incidence of CHD in the United States of America to be estimated, a single large representative population must be analyzed. All the data in this study were derived from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. The study determined the overall and lesion-specific incidences of CHD diagnoses among all birth hospitalizations in 2008, stratified by race, gender, socioeconomic status, and hospital geographic location. The study identified 13,093 CHD diagnoses among 1,204,887 birth hospitalizations, yielding an incidence of 10.8 per 1,000, with a predominance of mild lesions and septal defects. Atrial septal defect (ASD) and pulmonic stenosis were more common among females, whereas aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and d-transposition of great arteries were more common among males. No racial difference was observed in the overall CHD incidence. However, isolated patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and ventricular septal defects (VSDs) were more common among Caucasians, whereas ASDs were more common among Hispanics. The incidences of CHD diagnoses were similar for all socioeconomic classes except the lowest socioeconomic class, which had a significantly lower CHD incidence. There was no geographic or seasonal variation in CHD incidence. This study demonstrated the incidence of echocardiographically confirmed CHD diagnosis to be 10.8 per 1,000 live births, marked by a high proportion of mild cardiac lesions and isolated PDAs. The high incidence of isolated PDAs in this study may be explained by the inclusion of only CHD diagnoses during birth hospitalization. PMID:24563074

  19. Hospitalization for total hip replacement among inpatients aged 45 and over: United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Monica L; Palso, Kathleen; Bercovitz, Anita

    2015-02-01

     Total hip replacement, in which both the head of the femur and its socket are replaced, is done to restore movement to hips damaged by osteoarthritis, late-stage degenerative bone and cartilage disease, or other injuries and disease (1). The number of total hip replacements is expected to increase over the next few decades (2). National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data show trends and estimates of the number and rate of total hip replacements and average length of stay among inpatients aged 45 and over. PMID:25714040

  20. Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities. PMID:25057407

  1. Career Education Program: Geneva Area City Schools. [Grade 3 Units: Money and Banking, Weather, The Hospital Emergency Room, and Let's Go to Town].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    Four curriculum units for the third grade level focus on: (1) weather station jobs and the weather prediction system; (2) hospital emergency room workers and the room's function; (3) bank workers and the banking industry; and (4) various urban workers. Behavioral objectives linking the units focus on increasing students' awareness of and…

  2. Design and evaluation of electronic briefs of neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani hospital, Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirnia, Kayvan; Samad Soltani, Taha; Rezaei, Mnouchehr; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Piri, Zakieh

    2014-09-01

    More than 9 million neonatal deaths are reported through out the world each year happening in the early weeks of life most of which relate to developing countries. Thus it is very important to present a better way to keep the infants healthy which could be possible by accessing accurate information at any time required during hospitalization of infants. Therefore the required data should be collected, stored and analyzed before which is best possible by using computer. The main objective of this research is enabling researchers and clinicians quick access to the data of the babies admitted in NICU. This study involves the stage of developing a system design and its implementation following the evaluation of the electronic records which is done in a query form. By defining the neccessary terminology and designing a data model, the database and user interface are developed by using a programing language and data base tools. Finally, the system has been evaluated by user satisfaction showing to be about 85% As a result we suggest the hospitals take serious in buying the suitable technology for the NICU ward along with teaching the staffs how to work with it. PMID:25168989

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of community- and hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from United States Hospitals: results from the AWARE Ceftaroline Surveillance Program (2012-2014).

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-09-01

    Among 8437 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 143 medical centers in the United States (2012-2014), 7116 and 1321 were reported as community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) MRSA, respectively. CA-/HA-MRSA were most often isolated from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSI; 68.4/26.9%), pneumonia (13.7/49.0%) and bacteremia (10.0/17.7%). Overall, susceptibility rates were generally lower among HA-MRSA compared to CA-MRSA strains, especially for clindamycin (44.6 vs. 66.1%) and levofloxacin (21.4 vs. 35.5%). Also, susceptibility rates were lower for these two compounds among isolates from pneumonia compared to SSSI and bacteremia. Ceftaroline was broadly active against 98.0% of CA-MRSA and 94.3% of HA-MRSA (MIC50/90, 1μg/mL for both; no resistant isolate) overall, with little variation among infection type subsets. PMID:27394637

  4. The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom: a socioecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Gosling, Samuel D; Potter, Jeff

    2013-07-01

    In recent years the topic of entrepreneurship has become a major focus in the social sciences, with renewed interest in the links between personality and entrepreneurship. Taking a socioecological perspective to psychology, which emphasizes the role of social habitats and their interactions with mind and behavior, we investigated regional variation in and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone Big Five profile. Specifically, we analyzed personality data collected from over half a million U.S. residents (N = 619,397) as well as public archival data on state-level entrepreneurial activity (i.e., business-creation and self-employment rates). Results revealed that an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile is regionally clustered. This geographical distribution corresponds to the pattern that can be observed when mapping entrepreneurial activity across the United States. Indeed, the state-level correlation (N = 51) between an entrepreneurial personality structure and entrepreneurial activity was positive in direction, substantial in magnitude, and robust even when controlling for regional economic prosperity. These correlations persisted at the level of U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (N = 15) and were replicated in independent German (N = 19,842; 14 regions) and British (N = 15,617; 12 regions) samples. In contrast to these profile-based analyses, an analysis linking the individual Big Five dimensions to regional measures of entrepreneurial activity did not yield consistent findings. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for interdisciplinary theory development and practical applications. PMID:23586410

  5. Long-term PM2.5 Exposure and Neurological Hospital Admissions in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Schwartz, Joel D.; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Melly, Steven J.; Wang, Yun; Dominici, Francesca; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term exposure to fine particles (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) has been consistently linked to heart and lung disease. Recently, there has been increased interest in examining the effects of air pollution on the nervous system, with evidence showing potentially harmful effects on neurodegeneration. Objective Our objective was to assess the potential impact of long-term PM2.5 exposure on event time, defined as time to first admission for dementia, Alzheimer’s (AD), or Parkinson’s (PD) diseases in an elderly population across the northeastern United States. Methods We estimated the effects of PM2.5 on first hospital admission for dementia, AD, and PD among all Medicare enrollees ≥ 65 years in 50 northeastern U.S. cities (1999–2010). For each outcome, we first ran a Cox proportional hazards model for each city, adjusting for prior cardiopulmonary-related hospitalizations and year, and stratified by follow-up time, age, sex, and race. We then pooled the city-specific estimates by employing a random effects meta-regression. Results We followed approximately 9.8 million subjects and observed significant associations of long-term PM2.5 city-wide exposure with all three outcomes. Specifically, we estimated a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.11) for dementia, an HR of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.19) for AD, and an HR of 1.08 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.12) for PD admissions per 1-μg/m3 increase in annual PM2.5 concentrations. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between long-term exposure to PM2.5 and time to first hospitalization for common neurodegenerative diseases. We found strong evidence of association for all three outcomes. Our findings provide the basis for further studies, as the implications of such exposures could be crucial to public health. Citation Kioumourtzoglou MA, Schwartz JD, Weisskopf MG, Melly SJ, Wang Y, Dominici F, Zanobetti A. 2016. Long-term PM2.5 exposure and neurological

  6. Bortezomib Inpatient Prescribing Practices in Free-Standing Children's Hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Seif, Alix E.; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung Vera; Bagatell, Rochelle; Fisher, Brian T.; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study is a pharmacoepidemiologic description of pediatric bortezomib use. Exposure was identified through billing codes in patients admitted to US children’s hospitals that participated with the Pediatric Health Information System between 2004 and 2013. Associated information on underlying diseases, demographics, institutional use, mortality, and physician type was collected. Exposure to bortezomib was identified in 314 patients. Hematologist/Oncologists prescribed half of the bortezomib used. Use increased during the study period. Inpatient volume was positively correlated with bortezomib utilization. Bortezomib use in pediatrics is increasing for a variety of diseases. Variation in use exists across institutions. Further studies are needed to characterize bortezomib’s efficacy in pediatric diseases. PMID:26978062

  7. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L.; Winston, Carla A.; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, “OTH”. Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response. PMID:26392850

  8. Coding of Electronic Laboratory Reports for Biosurveillance, Selected United States Hospitals, 2011.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Sanjaya; Burrer, Sherry L; Winston, Carla A; Dey, Achintya; Ajani, Umed; Groseclose, Samuel L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electronic laboratory reporting has been promoted as a public health priority. The Office of the U.S. National Coordinator for Health Information Technology has endorsed two coding systems: Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for laboratory test orders and Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for test results. Materials and Methods We examined LOINC and SNOMED CT code use in electronic laboratory data reported in 2011 by 63 non-federal hospitals to BioSense electronic syndromic surveillance system. We analyzed the frequencies, characteristics, and code concepts of test orders and results. Results A total of 14,028,774 laboratory test orders or results were reported. No test orders used SNOMED CT codes. To describe test orders, 77% used a LOINC code, 17% had no value, and 6% had a non-informative value, "OTH". Thirty-three percent (33%) of test results had missing or non-informative codes. For test results with at least one informative value, 91.8% had only LOINC codes, 0.7% had only SNOMED codes, and 7.4% had both. Of 108 SNOMED CT codes reported without LOINC codes, 45% could be matched to at least one LOINC code. Conclusion Missing or non-informative codes comprised almost a quarter of laboratory test orders and a third of test results reported to BioSense by non-federal hospitals. Use of LOINC codes for laboratory test results was more common than use of SNOMED CT. Complete and standardized coding could improve the usefulness of laboratory data for public health surveillance and response. PMID:26392850

  9. Application of the Beers Criteria to Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospital Inpatient Units

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, Heather; MacAulay, Stacey; Irvine-Meek, Janice; Murray, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Beers criteria were developed to help in identifying potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for elderly patients. These medications are often associated with adverse events and limited effectiveness in older adults. Patients awaiting an alternate level of care (ALC patients) are those who no longer require acute care hospital services and are waiting for placement elsewhere. They are often elderly, have complex medication regimens, and are at high risk of adverse events. At the time of this study no studies had applied the Beers criteria to ALC patients in Canadian hospitals. Objectives: To determine the proportion of ALC patients receiving PIMs and the proportion experiencing selected PIM-related adverse events. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ALC patients 65 years of age or older was performed to identify PIMs and the occurrence of selected adverse events (specifically central nervous system [CNS] events, falls, bradycardia, hypoglycemia, seizures, insomnia, gastrointestinal bleeding, and urinary tract infections). A logistic regression model with a random intercept for each patient was constructed to estimate odds ratios and probabilities of adverse events. Results: Fifty-two ALC patients were included in the study. Of these, 48 (92%) were taking a PIM. Of the 922 adverse events evaluated, 407 (44.1%) were associated with a regularly scheduled PIM. Among patients who were taking regularly scheduled PIMs, there was a significantly increased probability of an adverse CNS event and of a fall (p < 0.001 for both). The most common PIM medication classes were first-generation antihistamines (24 [46%] of the 52 patients), antipsychotics (21 patients [40%]), short-acting benzodiazepines (15 patients [29%]), and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (14 patients [27%]). Conclusions: A high proportion of ALC patients were taking PIMs and experienced an adverse event that may have been related to these drugs. These findings suggest that the ALC

  10. 005. History of the recently established bronchoscopy unit of the pulmonology clinic of lamia’s general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Manos, Emmanouil; Gkika, Dimitrs; Kolovos, Dimitrios; Giannakou, Georgia; Pathiaki, Eirini; Mavromati, Evagelia; Divani, Smaroula; Vardouli, Anna; Tsiligrou, Vaina; Karkanis, Konstantinos; Angel, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Bronchoscopy Unit of General Hospital of Lamia provides the necessity of six counties in Thessalia and Central Greece. The first bronchoscopy was performed during Christmas of 2012 while from the opening (February 14th, 2014), the unit is presenting an increasing activity (in number and variety of medical practice). Methods From December 21st in 2012 to September 15th in 2014, were performed 158 bronchoscopic examinations in 152 patients (hospitalized and outpatients), 130 men and 28 women, with an average age 72.4 (29 to 89) years old. There were accomplished 80 biopsies (bronchial, transbronchial), 83 brushing, collected 57 cultures for common bacteria and 86 for och-bacilli (acid-fast microscopy in 12), 20 conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA), two transbronchial biopsies, seven BAL, 25 bronchial toilets in elderly patients and were removed two foreign bodies (one bone segment surrounding by granulomatous tissue and one segment of animal bowel-“kokoretsi”). Results We observed gradual increase of the incoming patients [Quarterly: 5(1st-3rd/2013), 14(4th-6th/2013), 17(7th-9th/2013), 21(10th-12th/2013), 32(1st-3rd/2014), 38(4th-6th/2014), 31(6th-Middle 9th/2014)]. There were diagnosed 70 cases of lung cancer in 93 patients (75.3%) {12 small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), 57 non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) [28 squamous, 25 adenocarcinomas, one combo (adeno- and squamous carcinoma), one BAC και two suspicious samples for cancer]}. 49/49 were diagnosed in evident endobronchial lesion (100%) and 21/44 in non-revealing bronchoscopy (47.8%). Biopsy confirmed diagnosis in 52/93, brushing in 31/93, ΤΒΝΑ alone in 4/8 while washing alone in 3/93 patients. Five cases of active tuberculosis were diagnosed (4 M. Τuberculosis, 1 M. Smegmatis), two cases of sarcoidosis, one metastatic (uroepithelial) carcinoma, four cases of granulomatic tissue, one lipoid pneumonia, one sarcomatoid carcinoma of the lung, while the cultures isolated

  11. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  12. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  13. Impact of clinical pharmacy services in a short stay unit of a hospital emergency department in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Hani; Al Anany, Rasha; Elmalik, Ashraf; Saad, Mohammad; Prabhu, Kirti; Al-Tamimi, Haleema; Salah, Salem Abu; Cameron, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Background The presence of a clinical pharmacist in a hospital's Emergency Department (ED) is important to decrease the potential for medication errors. To our knowledge, no previous studies have been conducted to evaluate the impact of implementing clinical pharmacy services in the ED in Qatar. Objective To characterize the contributions of clinical pharmacists in a short stay unit of ED in order to implement and scale-up the service to all ED areas in the future. Methods A retrospective study conducted for 7 months in the ED of Hamad General Hospital, Qatar. The intervention recommendations were made by clinical pharmacists to the physician in charge during medical rounds. Results A total of 824 documented pharmacist recommendations were analyzed. The interventions included the following: Providing information to the physician (24.4 %) and recommending medication discontinuation (22.0 %), dose adjustment (19.3 %), medication addition (16.0 %), changes in frequency of medications (7.6 %), medication resumption (5.7 %), and patient education (5.0 %). Conclusion Clinical pharmacists in the ED studied play an important role in patient care. PMID:27033505

  14. Neonatal bacteriemia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit (NICU) at Beasat Hospital, Sanandaj, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Parvin; Kalantar, Enayatollah; Bahmani, Nasrin; Fatemi, Adel; Naseri, Nima; Ghotbi, Nahid; Naseri, Mohammad Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteremia continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates. There is scarce data on neonatal bacteremia in among Iranian neonates. In this study, we determined neonatal bacteremia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit at Beasat hospital, Sanandaj, Iran. During one year, all neonates admitted to the NICU were evaluated. Staphylococcal isolates were subjected to determine the prevalence of MRS and mecA gene. A total of 355 blood cultures from suspected cases of sepsis were processed, of which 27 (7.6%) were positive for bacterial growth. Of the 27 isolates, 20 (74%) were Staphylococcus spp as the leading cause of bacteremia. The incidence of Gram negative bacteria was 04 (14.8%). The isolated bacteria were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Maximum resistance among Staphylococcus spp was against Penicillin, and Ampicillin. In our study, the isolated bacteria were 7.5 % Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin sensitive. Oxacillin disk diffusion and PCR screened 35% and 30% mec a positive Staphylococcus spp. The spectrum of neonatal bacteremia as seen in NICU at Beasat hospital confirmed the importance of pathogens such as Staphylococcus spp. Penicillin, Ampicillin and Cotrimoxazol resistance was high in theses isolates with high mecA gene carriage, probably due to antibiotic selection. PMID:24902012

  15. Nosocomial infections and risk factors in the intensive care unit of a teaching and research hospital: A prospecive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Oznur; Batirel, Ayse; Ozer, Serdar; Čolakoğlu, Serhan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the incidence, risk factors and etiology of nosocomial infections (NIs) in the intensive care unit (ICU) of our hospital in order to improve our infection control policies. Material/Methods A 1-year prospective cohort study of nosocomial infection (NI) surveillance was conducted in our ICU in 2008. Results Out of 1134 patients hospitalized in the ICU for a period of 6257 days, 115 patients acquired a total of 135 NIs distributed as follows: 36.3% bacteremia, 30.4% ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), 18.5% catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 7.4% central-line infection, 5.9% cutaneous infection, and 1.3% meningitis. The incidence rate of NI was 21.6 in 1000 patient-days, and the rate of NI was 25.6%. Length of ICU stay, central venous catheterisation, mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy were statistically significant risk factors for NI. Of all NI, 112 (83%) were microbiologically-confirmed and 68.8% of the isolates were Gram-negative, 27.6% were Gram-positive, and 3.6% were fungi. 23 (17%) were clinically-defined infections. The most frequently isolated organism was P. aeruginosa (25%), followed by S. aureus (21.4%), E. coli (18.7%) and A. baumannii (16.9%). Conclusions The bloodstream was the most common site and Gram-negatives were the most commonly reported causes of ICU infections. PMID:21525819

  16. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-065-1578, United Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota. [Ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for ethylene-oxide at United Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota in January, 1985. The survey was requested by the management to determine if using ethylene-oxide for sterilization purposes posed a health risk. All employees (number not specified) in the central supply department were interviewed. These concentrations originated from an old sterilizer. The sterilizer was not normally used, but was operated on the day of the survey to stimulate a worst-case situation. None of the workers had any medical complaints. The author concludes that a health hazard due to ethylene-oxide does not exist at the facility. He recommends not using the old sterilizer until it has been refurbished and conducting periodic monitoring for ethylene/oxide with an infrared analyzer.

  17. Attribution of Foodborne Illnesses, Hospitalizations, and Deaths to Food Commodities by using Outbreak Data, United States, 1998–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hoekstra, Robert M.; Ayers, Tracy; Tauxe, Robert V.; Braden, Christopher R.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Griffin, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, >9 million foodborne illnesses are estimated to be caused by major pathogens acquired in the United States. Preventing these illnesses is challenging because resources are limited and linking individual illnesses to a particular food is rarely possible except during an outbreak. We developed a method of attributing illnesses to food commodities that uses data from outbreaks associated with both simple and complex foods. Using data from outbreak-associated illnesses for 1998–2008, we estimated annual US foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths attributable to each of 17 food commodities. We attributed 46% of illnesses to produce and found that more deaths were attributed to poultry than to any other commodity. To the extent that these estimates reflect the commodities causing all foodborne illness, they indicate that efforts are particularly needed to prevent contamination of produce and poultry. Methods to incorporate data from other sources are needed to improve attribution estimates for some commodities and agents. PMID:23622497

  18. [The Onco-hematology clinical research unit at the Geneva University Hospital: example of a fruitful public-private partners].

    PubMed

    Ackermann-Zare, M; Ancrenaz, V; Blazek, N; Brun, C; Gani, D; Grandjean, N; Marti-Klay, F; Trembleau, C; Wasem, J; Mach, N

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of the molecular deregulation leading to carcinogenesis allows the development of numerous novel targeted therapeutic candidates. Clinical research in oncology is a critical step to evaluate in a thorough manner the safety and efficacy of these innovative compounds. During the last four years the fruitful partnership between the Geneva University Hospitals and the Dr. Henri Dubois-Ferriere Dinu Lipatti Foundation lead to a dedicated clinical research unit for cancer patients with a staff of ten people. Since 2010, more than 300 patients were enrolled in more than 70 distinct clinical trials evaluating novel therapies for both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Interestingly, classical cytostatic drugs now represent only a small fraction of the new anti-cancer therapies in the pipeline. PMID:24941687

  19. Design of an Innovative Information System for the Intensive Care Unit in a Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tsoromokos, Dimitrios; Tsaloukidis, Nikolaos; Dermatis, Zacharias; Gozadinos, Filippos; Lazakidou, Athina

    2016-01-01

    The health sector is increasingly focused on the use of Communication Technology (ICT) Information and Communication. New technologies which introduced in health, should lead to lower cost of procedures, saving employees' working time and immediate and secure data storages for easy future search or meta-analysis. The DPP4ICU application which presented in this document, allows at the Intensive Care Unit's nurses (ICU) to enter directly the handwritten accountability, in the Organization Information System. Through this application is accelerated the proper completion of a document and is improved data quality. The application provides the ability to authorized users to exchange information with an automated manner. PMID:27350492

  20. Characterization of Nasal and Blood Culture Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Patients in United States Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Tickler, Isabella A.; Goering, Richard V.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mediavilla, José R.; Persing, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 299 nares and 194 blood isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), each recovered from a unique patient, were collected from 23 U.S. hospitals from May 2009 to March 2010. All isolates underwent spa and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing; a subset of 84 isolates was typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI. Seventy-six spa types were observed among the isolates. Overall, for nasal isolates, spa type t002-SCCmec type II (USA100) was the most common strain type (37% of isolates), while among blood isolates, spa type t008-SCCmec type IV (USA300) was the most common (39%). However, the proportion of all USA100 and USA300 isolates varied by United States census region. Nasal isolates were more resistant to tobramycin and clindamycin than blood isolates (55.9% and 48.8% of isolates versus 36.6% and 39.7%, respectively; for both, P < 0.05). The USA300 isolates were largely resistant to fluoroquinolones. High-level mupirocin resistance was low among all spa types (<5%). SCCmec types III and VIII, which are rare in the United States, were observed along with several unusual PFGE types, including CMRSA9, EMRSA15, and the PFGE profile associated with sequence type 239 (ST239) isolates. Typing data from this convenience sample suggest that in U.S. hospitalized patients, USA100 isolates of multiple spa types, while still common in the nares, have been replaced by USA300 isolates as the predominant MRSA strain type in positive blood cultures. PMID:22155818

  1. Hospitalization and Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella Outbreaks, 1984–2002

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Katherine D.; Ovitt, Jessa; Barrett, Timothy J.; Medalla, Felicita; Angulo, Frederick J.

    2005-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the health consequences of antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella strains associated with outbreaks. Among 32 outbreaks occurring in the United States from 1984 to 2002, 22% of 13,286 persons in 10 Salmonella-resistant outbreaks were hospitalized, compared with 8% of 2,194 persons in 22 outbreaks caused by pansusceptible Salmonella strains (p<0.01). PMID:15963293

  2. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be present in......

  3. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be present in......

  4. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be present in......

  5. Differential Time Trends of Outcomes and Costs of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospitalizations by ST Elevation and Type of Intervention in the United States, 2001–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Takehiro; Hasegawa, Kohei; Kobayashi, Yasuki; Takahashi, Osamu; Fukui, Tsuguya; Tsugawa, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known whether time trends of in‐hospital mortality and costs of care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) differ by type of AMI (ST‐elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] vs. non‐ST‐elevation [NSTEMI]) and by the intervention received (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG], or no intervention) in the United States. Methods and Results We conducted a serial cross‐sectional study of all hospitalizations for AMI aged 30 years or older using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2001–2011 (1 456 154 discharges; a weighted estimate of 7 135 592 discharges). Hospitalizations were stratified by type of AMI and intervention, and the time trends of in‐hospital mortality and hospital costs were examined for each combination of the AMI type and intervention, after adjusting for both patient‐ and hospital‐level characteristics. Compared with 2001, adjusted in‐hospital mortality improved significantly for NSTEMI patients in 2011, regardless of the intervention received (PCI odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% CI 0.56 to 0.83; CABG OR 0.57, 0.45 to 0.72; without intervention OR 0.61, 0.57 to 0.65). As for STEMI, a decline in adjusted in‐hospital mortality was significant for those who underwent PCI (OR 0.83; 0.73 to 0.94); however, no significant improvement was observed for those who received CABG or without intervention. Hospital costs per hospitalization increased significantly for patients who underwent intervention, but not for those without intervention. Conclusions In the United States, the decrease in in‐hospital mortality and the increase in costs differed by the AMI type and the intervention received. These non‐uniform trends may be informative for designing effective health policies to reduce the health and economic burdens of AMI. PMID:25801759

  6. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  8. Emergency Department Visits by Persons Aged 65 and Over: United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... made by persons aged 65 and over, and did the visit rate increase with age? In 2009– ... adults were made by nursing home residents, and did this percentage vary by age? In 2009–2010, ...

  9. Effects of Personality on Executive Career Success in the United States and Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, John W.; Boswell, Wendy R.

    2001-01-01

    The NEO Personality Inventory and intrinsic and extrinsic career success measures were completed by 1,885 U.S. and 1,871 European executives. Neuroticism was associated with lower extrinsic success for U.S. executives, extroversion with higher extrinsic success for European executives. Extroversion was related positively and neuroticism negatively…

  10. Academic, Personal and Social Problems of Afghan and Iranian Students in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payind, Mohammad Alam

    1979-01-01

    Questionnaires or interviews were completed by 120 Afghan and 125 Iranian students enrolled in American universities, concerning their academic, personal, and social problems. Data were analyzed according to nationality, sex, age, marital status, major, duration of stay in U.S., financial sponsorship, and undergraduate v graduate student status.…

  11. Health-Risk Behaviors among Persons Aged 12-21 Years: United States, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    Noting that health-risk behaviors among youth may result in immediate health problems or extend into adulthood and increase risk for chronic diseases, this report examines the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among a nationally representative sample of persons aged 12 to 21 years and presents age group comparisons of the most important…

  12. Regulatory, policy and quality update for venous thromboembolism and stroke in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Charles E

    2012-10-01

    Stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have a large impact on the United States (US) healthcare system. It is estimated that up to 1.7million new and recurrent stroke and VTE events are occurring in the US on an annual basis with the combined cost approaching over $200billion per year. A significant amount of stroke and VTE are preventable from appropriate antithrombotic use in at-risk patients and the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services, the Joint Commission, the National Quality Forum and other key quality and regulatory entities have prioritized minimizing the impact of morbidity, mortality and avoidable costs related to these diseases. This review provides a brief history, overview, and update for the development of quality measures, quality systems, and regulatory and policy changes as related to stroke and VTE within the US healthcare system. PMID:22841661

  13. State laws, syringe exchange, and HIV among persons who inject drugs in the United States: History and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Bramson, Heidi; Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; Nugent, Ann; Guardino, Vivian; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Hodel, Derek

    2015-05-01

    In 1981, when acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was first observed among persons who inject drugs, almost all US states had laws criminalizing the possession and distribution of needles and syringes for injecting illicit drugs. We reviewed changes to these laws to permit 'syringe exchanges' and the provision of public funding for such programs. Most of the changes in law occurred during the 1990s, 5-10 years later than in many other countries. Public funding of syringe exchanges is associated with lower rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, greater numbers of syringes distributed (a possible causal mechanism), and greater numbers of health and social services provided. Experience in the United states may prove useful in other countries: state, provincial, and local governments may need to move ahead of central governments in addressing HIV infection among persons who inject drugs. PMID:25590514

  14. The roles of users personal characteristics and organisational support in the attitude towards using ERP systems in a Spanish public hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Bartual-Sopena, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise resources planning (ERP) systems enable central and integrative control over all processes throughout an organisation by ensuring one data entry point and the use of a common database. T his paper analyses the attitude of healthcare personnel towards the use of an ERP system in a Spanish public hospital, identifying influencing factors. This research is based on a regression analysis of latent variables using the optimisation technique of partial least squares. We propose a research model including possible relationships among different constructs using the technology acceptance model. Our results show that the personal characteristics of potential users are key factors in explaining attitude towards using ERP systems. PMID:23640919

  15. Picnic in the Park--Humanizing an Aging Unit in a Personal Health Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaeta, Michael J.

    1979-01-01

    The unit on an aging program described is designed to provide students with an accurate knowledge base of the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging as well as with experiences to sensitize them to the realities of aging. (JMF)

  16. Liver surgery in Italy. Criteria to identify the hospital units and the tertiary referral centers entitled to perform it.

    PubMed

    Torzilli, Guido; Viganò, Luca; Giuliante, Felice; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-06-01

    During the last decades, liver surgery had an extraordinary evolution and diffusion thanks to a drastic reduction of operative mortality and morbidity rates. A debate is ongoing about the need for centralization of liver resections in tertiary referral centers. Robust evidences showed that complex surgical procedures have lower mortality rates when performed in high-volume centers. The present expert group reviewed the literature data and proposed guidelines to identify surgical units that should be entitled to perform liver surgery in Italy. Three separate types of requirements were identified. First, the hospital requirements that include the following criteria: (1) a hospital of 1st level according to the Italian law; (2) the presence of a dedicated hepatobiliary or hepatobiliopancreatic unit or a team dedicated to liver surgery into a general surgery unit; (3) the mandatory presence of oncology, hepatology, radiology, interventional radiology, digestive endoscopy, intensive care, and pathology units; (4) the availability of a liver transplant team into the hospital or into another hospital within an established partnership; (5) a periodic multidisciplinary meeting. Second, the volume requirements: the unit has to perform more than 20 liver resections per year for malignant liver diseases with a 90-day mortality rate < 3 %. Finally, the organization requirements: the presence of specific diagnostic-therapeutic flowcharts for liver diseases. PMID:27294278

  17. Associations of PM2.5 Constituents and Sources with Hospital Admissions: Analysis of Four Counties in Connecticut and Massachusetts (USA) for Persons ≥ 65 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Ebisu, Keita; Leaderer, Brian P.; Gent, Janneane F.; Lee, Hyung Joo; Koutrakis, Petros; Wang, Yun; Dominici, Francesca; Peng, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between short-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospital admissions. The chemical composition of particles varies across locations and time periods. Identifying the most harmful constituents and sources is an important health and regulatory concern. Objectives: We examined pollutant sources for associations with risk of hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory causes. Methods: We obtained PM2.5 filter samples for four counties in Connecticut and Massachusetts and analyzed them for PM2.5 elements. Source apportionment was used to estimate daily PM2.5 contributions from sources (traffic, road dust, oil combustion, and sea salt as well as a regional source representing coal combustion and other sources). Associations between daily PM2.5 constituents and sources and risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations for the Medicare population (> 333,000 persons ≥ 65 years of age) were estimated with time-series analyses (August 2000–February 2004). Results: PM2.5 total mass and PM2.5 road dust contribution were associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations, as were the PM2.5 constituents calcium, black carbon, vanadium, and zinc. For respiratory hospitalizations, associations were observed with PM2.5 road dust, and sea salt as well as aluminum, calcium, chlorine, black carbon, nickel, silicon, titanium, and vanadium. Effect estimates were generally robust to adjustment by co-pollutants of other constituents. An interquartile range increase in same-day PM2.5 road dust (1.71 μg/m3) was associated with a 2.11% (95% CI: 1.09, 3.15%) and 3.47% (95% CI: 2.03, 4.94%) increase in cardiovascular and respiratory admissions, respectively. Conclusions: Our results suggest some particle sources and constituents are more harmful than others and that in this Connecticut/Massachusetts region the most harmful particles include black carbon, calcium, and road dust PM2.5. Citation: Bell ML, Ebisu K

  18. Quality Implementation in Health Physics Unit, Cosenza Hospital. Accreditation Program as Quality Improvement instrument.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, M; Siciliano, R

    2016-01-01

    Achieving high levels of quality in healthcare, which could be measurable, is increasingly important at present and is dictated by the radical changes of the welfare system imposed today by the well known economic constraints. However, even in the ongoing legislation, the practices concerning the verification and review of the quality of health care has had a major impact in the galaxy of Health. On the one hand, the citizen is developing an awareness of the possibilities of choice (Empowerment) between a plurality of providers of healthcare services, on the other hand providers themselves are obliged, within the logic of a global market, to retrain their offers to respond satisfactorily to the needs of citizens. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how the adoption of Operational Procedures, following the granting of a certificate of accreditation to the Unit of Medical Physics, has changed the approach to the work on the part of health workers, in the direction of a dynamic quality improvement. PMID:27479767

  19. Characterization of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care products in hospital effluent and waste water influent/effluent by direct-injection LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago S; Murphy, Mark; Mendola, Nicholas; Wong, Virginia; Carlson, Doreen; Waring, Linda

    2015-06-15

    Two USEPA Regional Laboratories developed direct-injection LC/MS/MS methods to measure Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in water matrices. Combined, the laboratories were prepared to analyze 185 PPCPs (with 74 overlapping) belonging to more than 20 therapeutical categories with reporting limits at low part-per-trillion. In partnership with Suffolk County in NY, the laboratories conducted PPCP analysis on 72 samples belonging to 4 Water Systems (WS). Samples were collected at different stages of the WS (hospital effluents, WWTP influents/effluents) to assess PPCP relevance in hospital discharges, impact on WWTP performance and potential ecological risk posed by analytes not eliminated during treatment. Major findings include: a) acceptable accuracy between the two laboratories for most overlapping PPCPs with better agreement for higher concentrations; b) the measurement of PPCPs throughout all investigated WS with total PPCP concentrations ranging between 324 and 965 μg L(-1) for hospital effluent, 259 and 573 μg L(-1) for WWTP influent and 19 and 118 μg L(-1) for WWTP effluent; c) the variable contribution of hospital effluents to the PPCP loads into the WWTP influents (contribution ranging between 1% (WS-2) and 59% (WS-3); d) the PPCP load reduction after treatment for all WS reaching more than 95% for WS using activated sludge processes (WS-2 and WS-4), with inflow above 6500 m(3) d(-1), and having a lower percentage of hospital effluent in the WWTP influent; e) the relevance of four therapeutical categories for the PPCP load in WWTP effluents (analgesics, antidiabetics, antiepileptics and psychoanaleptics); and f) the risk quotients calculated using screening-level Predicted Non Effect Concentration indicate that WWTP effluents contain 33 PPCPs with potential medium to high ecological risk. To our knowledge no other monitoring investigation published in the scientific literature uses direct-injection methods to cover as many PPCPs and

  20. Emergency and surgery services of primary hospitals in the United Republic of Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Hillary; Kibatala, P; Magoda, A; Saguti, G; Noel, L; Groth, S; Mwakyusa, D H; Cherian, M

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to evaluate the capacity of first-referral health facilities in Tanzania to perform basic surgical procedures. The intent was to assist in planning strategies for universal access to life-saving and disability-preventing surgical services. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting First-referral health facilities in the United Republic of Tanzania. Participants 48 health facilities. Measures The WHO Tool for Situational Analysis to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care was employed to capture a health facility's capacity to perform basic surgical (including obstetrics and trauma) and anaesthesia interventions by investigating four categories of data: infrastructure, human resources, interventions available and equipment. The tool queried the availability of eight types of care providers, 35 surgical interventions and 67 items of equipment. Results The 48 facilities surveyed served 18.6 million residents (46% of the population). Supplies for basic airway management were inconsistently available. Only 42% had consistent access to oxygen, and only six functioning pulse oximeters were located in all facilities surveyed. 37.5% of facilities reported both consistent running water and electricity. While very basic interventions (suturing, wound debridement, incision and drainage) were provided in nearly all facilities, more advanced life-saving procedures including chest tube thoracostomy (30/48), open fracture management (29/48) and caesarean section delivery (32/48) were not consistently available. Conclusions Based on the results in this WHO country survey, significant gaps exist in the capacity for emergency and essential surgical services in Tanzania including deficits in human resources, essential equipment and infrastructure. The information in this survey will provide a foundation for evidence-based decisions in country-level policy regarding the allocation of resources and provision of emergency and essential surgical

  1. 26 CFR 1.989(c)-1 - Transition rules for certain branches of United States persons using a net worth method of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... States persons using a net worth method of accounting for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1987... certain branches of United States persons using a net worth method of accounting for taxable years... that used a net worth method of accounting for their last taxable year beginning before January 1,...

  2. 26 CFR 1.989(c)-1 - Transition rules for certain branches of United States persons using a net worth method of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... States persons using a net worth method of accounting for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1987... rules for certain branches of United States persons using a net worth method of accounting for taxable...) and that used a net worth method of accounting for their last taxable year beginning before January...

  3. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows…

  4. Risk of Hospitalized Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Persons Randomized to Diuretic, ACE-Inhibitor, or Calcium-Channel Blocker in ALLHAT

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, William; Piller, Linda B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Whittle, Jeffrey; Jafri, Syed Z.A.; Ford, Charles E.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Furberg, Curt D.; Grimm, Richard H.; Alderman, Michael H.; Davis, Barry R.; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium channel-blockers (CCB) are an important class of medication useful in the treatment of hypertension. Several observational studies have suggested an association between CCB therapy and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Using administrative databases, we re-examined in a post-hoc analysis whether the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants randomized to the calcium-channel blocker amlodipine had a greater risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal bleeding (a pre-specified outcome) compared to those randomized to the diuretic chlorthalidone or the ACE-inhibitor lisinopril. Participants randomized to chlorthalidone did not have a reduced risk for gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations compared to participants randomized to amlodipine (HR, 1.09, 95% CI 0.92-1.28). Those randomized to lisinopril were at increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding compared those randomized to chlorthalidone (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.00-1.36). In a post-hoc comparison, participants assigned lisinopril therapy had a higher risk of hospitalized gastrointestinal hemorrhage (HR,1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.51) versus those assigned to amlodipine. In-study use of atenolol prior to first gastrointestinal hemorrhage was related to a lower incidence of GI bleeding (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.83). In conclusion, hypertensive patients on amlodipine do not have an increased risk of GI bleeding hospitalizations compared to those on either chlorthalidone or lisinopril. PMID:24283598

  5. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Among Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maureen H; Benitez, Alvaro J; Cross, Kristen E; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The molecular characteristics of M pneumoniae detected in patients hospitalized with CAP in the United States are poorly described. Methods.  We performed molecular characterization of M pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children and adults hospitalized with CAP in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, including P1 typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and macrolide susceptibility genotyping. Results.  Of 216 M pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive specimens, 40 (18.5%) were obtained from adults and 176 (81.5%) from children. P1 type distribution differed between adults (64% type 1 and 36% type 2) and children (84% type 1, 13% type 2, and 3% variant) (P < .05) and among sites (P < .01). Significant differences in the proportions of MLVA types 4/5/7/2 and 3/5/6/2 were also observed by age group (P < .01) and site (P < .01). A macrolide-resistant genotype was identified in 7 (3.5%) specimens, 5 of which were from patients who had recently received macrolide therapy. No significant differences in clinical characteristics were identified among patients with various strain types or between macrolide-resistant and -sensitive M pneumoniae infections. Conclusions.  The P1 type 1 genotype and MLVA type 4/5/7/2 predominated, but there were differences between children and adults and among sites. Macrolide resistance was rare. Differences in strain types did not appear to be associated with differences in clinical outcomes. Whole genome sequencing of M pneumoniae may help identify better ways to characterize strains. PMID:26284257

  6. Epidemiology and molecular characterisation of metallo-β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a university hospital Intensive Care Unit in Greece.

    PubMed

    Koratzanis, Evangelos; Souli, Maria; Galani, Irene; Chryssouli, Zoi; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Giamarellou, Helen

    2011-11-01

    The molecular epidemiology of VIM-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the beginning of an epidemic in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a university hospital in Athens, Greece, was studied. All Gram-negative organisms isolated from March 2004 to November 2005 positive for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production were submitted to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing, to repetitive sequence-based PCR (Rep-PCR) for molecular typing, and to S1 nuclease digestion for plasmid DNA characterisation. Conjugation experiments and isoelectric focusing were performed to identify co-existing β-lactamases. Amongst 23 patients, 12 suffered one or more clinical infections. Eighty-two isolates representing one isolate per clone, source and ICU patient were studied, including Klebsiella pneumoniae (77), Enterobacter cloacae (2), Citrobacter freundii (1) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2). High clonal diversity was detected amongst the K. pneumoniae, with 10 distinct clones identified. Conjugation was successful in 54.5% of K. pneumoniae, and five different-sized plasmids were detected. All K. pneumoniae and both E. cloacae isolates shared the same bla(VIM-1)-containing class 1 integron structure also carrying aacA7, dhfrI and aadA1 gene cassettes. The C. freundii isolate carried a different integron that included bla(VIM-1) and aac(6')-IIc. Both P. aeruginosa isolates were positive for bla(VIM-2). It was not possible to identify specific clones with the potential to cause clinical infections. In conclusion, a multiclonal cluster of MBL-producers was responsible for the first cases of colonisation and/or infection in the ICU. A single integron structure, common in Greek hospitals, efficiently disseminated between clones and species, suggesting that the epidemic was mainly the result of successful horizontal transfer of mobile genetic material rather than the result of horizontal transfer of one or a few clones. PMID:21873034

  7. Medication errors in an internal intensive care unit of a large teaching hospital: a direct observation study.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Delfani, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Medication errors account for about 78% of serious medical errors in intensive care unit (ICU). So far no study has been performed in Iran to evaluate all type of possible medication errors in ICU. Therefore the objective of this study was to reveal the frequency, type and consequences of all type of errors in an ICU of a large teaching hospital. The prospective observational study was conducted in an 11 bed internal ICU of a university hospital in Shiraz. In each shift all processes that were performed on one selected patient was observed and recorded by a trained pharmacist. Observer would intervene only if medication error would cause substantial harm. The data was evaluated and then were entered in a form that was designed for this purpose. The study continued for 38 shifts. During this period, a total of 442 errors per 5785 opportunities for errors (7.6%) occurred. Of those, there were 9.8% administration errors, 6.8% prescribing errors, 3.3% transcription errors and, 2.3% dispensing errors. Totally 45 interventions were made, 40% of interventions result in the correction of errors. The most common causes of errors were observed to be: rule violations, slip and memory lapses and lack of drug knowledge. According to our results, the rate of errors is alarming and requires implementation of a serious solution. Since our system lacks a well-organize detection and reporting mechanism, there is no means for preventing errors in the first place. Hence, as the first step we must implement a system where errors are routinely detected and reported. PMID:22837122

  8. Racial/Ethnic Specific Trends in Pediatric Firearm-Related Hospitalizations in the United States, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    Kalesan, Bindu; Dabic, Stefan; Vasan, Sowmya; Stylianos, Steven; Galea, Sandro

    2016-05-01

    Objectives To determine the temporal patterns and the difference in trends by race/ethnicity of pediatric firearm hospitalizations (FH) among those aged 15 years or younger in the United States. Methods Data on pediatric FH was retrieved from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 1998 and 2011 (n = 16,998,470) using external cause of injury codes (E-codes) of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical modification, (assault: E9650-E9654, unintentional: E9220-E9224, E9228, and E9229, suicide: E9550-E9554, E9556, and E9559, undetermined: E9850-E9854, and E9856 and legal: E970). Meta-regression was used to determine the significance of temporal trends. Survey logistic regression adjusted for survey year was used to examine association of pediatric FH with social and demographic characteristics. Results An annual reduction of 1.07 per 100,000 hospitalizations (p-trend = 0.011) was observed between 1998 and 2011. There was reduction in rate of unintentional-FH (p-trend = 0.013), suicide-FH (p-trend = 0.029), and undetermined-FH (p-trend = 0.002), but not assault-FH (p-trend = 0.18). A decline in rates of FH was observed among whites (p-trend = 0.021) and Hispanics (p-trend = 0.03) while an increase in rates of assault-FH was observed among black children. All other intents and all other racial/ethnic groups showed declining rates during this interval. Conclusions There was an overall decline in rates of pediatric FHs in this time period driven by a decline in unintentional-FHs. However there was an increase in assault FH among black children during this same time period. PMID:26645619

  9. Prognosis of tetanus patients in the intensive care unit of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo

    PubMed Central

    Muteya, Michel Manika; Kabey, Alain Kabey a; Lubanga, Théophile Muyumba; Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo Tambwe a

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is still a public health problem in developing countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo. The objective of this study was to determine the prognosis of patients with tetanus admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo. This is a descriptive study which collected information from registers and medical records of patients admitted for tetanus in the ICU of Jason Sendwe Hospital, between January 2005 and December 2009. We calculated the parameters of position, dispersion as well as frequencies. We used the test of independent association of prognosis (death versus survival). Tetanus constituted 2.1% of admissions in the ICU during the 5-year period. The average age of patients was 39.38 ± 17; majority of patients were males (95.5%). The majority of patients lived the townships of Kampemba (27.3%), Kenya (22.7%), and Annexe (18.2%). All patients presented the generalized form of the infection. The door of entry was detectable in 71.5% of cases, localized mainly to the lower limbs (61.9%). The average length of stay was 11.29 ± 11.39 days. Mortality was observed in 52.4% of cases. This mortality was statistically significant in patients aged mrore than 40 years (p=0.029) but not not related to the length of stay (p=0.080) nor the location of point of entry(p=0.28). In our environment the prognosis of tetanus remains severe. This disease is still frequent in the city of Lubumbashi; sensibilisation of population on preventive strategies as well as setting up appropriate structures for better management of cases is required. PMID:23717709

  10. Improving Mental Status Questionnaire (MSQ) completion on admission to the Acute Surgical Receiving Unit (ASRU), Ninewells Hospital, Dundee

    PubMed Central

    Okwemba, Sylvia; Copeland, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is common yet poorly identified in the UK. Early recognition is a key prognostic factor; delay here being associated with: increased mortality, increased morbidity, prolonged hospital stay, long term disability, and increased risk of developing dementia. Improvement in the diagnosis and management of delirium has scope to improve patient care, clinical outcomes, and ultimately an improved patient experience. As patients aged ≥75 years are at an increased risk of developing delirium, we focused the improvement project to this age group. The baseline data demonstrated that the average ≥75 year-old patient admitted to the Acute Surgical Receiving Unit (ASRU) at Ninewells Hospital had 5.4 out of 12 predisposing and precipitating risk factors for delirium; thus there was great potential for delirium to develop in these patients. During the analysis of the baseline data it became clear that we could not go ahead and implement the initial proposed improvement as the completion of the mental status questionnaire (MSQ) was inconsistent and low at 14.99%. Completion of the MSQ is vital in establishing any cognitive deficit at admission, and for providing a baseline for the continuing admission. As a consequence of this, we had to shift the main aim of the improvement project from improving the identification, diagnosis, and management of delirium, to improving the completion rate of the MSQ in our target age group. Consultations with members of the admission team were held to determine ways of improving the MSQ completion rate. It became clear that the completion of the MSQ relied on clinical staff remembering all 10 questions that constitute the test. The main intervention to facilitate improvement involved affixing a sticker with all 10 questions of the MSQ within the admissions document. The main aim was to increase the percentage of cognitive screening by the Mental State Questionnaire (MSQ) to 95% in patients aged ≥75 on admission to ASRU at Ninewells

  11. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  12. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  13. 28 CFR 43.2 - Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.2 Obligations of persons receiving care and treatment. (a) In the discretion of the Department or Agency concerned, any person... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Obligations of persons receiving care...

  14. Literary Reflections on Personal and Social Change. A Language Arts Unit for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prial, Kimberley C.; And Others

    This unit of study involves high ability intermediate-grade students interacting with literature while enhancing reading comprehension and textual analysis skills. Students read literature and engage in shared inquiry to develop an awareness about the nature and importance of change, particularly as it affects people in various circumstances,…

  15. Choices & Careers; Free to Choose: Being a Special Person - Unit for Adults. Leaders Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Cathaleen; Thompson, Marian

    This leaders' guide is for use in group sessions or individual meetings with parents of girls participating in the Choices & Careers: Free to Choose program. It is based upon units the girls study, including "The Outside You,""Your Money,""Food and You,""Alcoholism,""Coping with Parents," and "Life Span Planning." Each section of the document…

  16. Directory of Agencies Serving Blind Persons in the United States. Fifteenth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Foundation for the Blind, New York, NY.

    The directory lists agencies serving the blind in the United States. Services are presented for each state and are categorized as either statewide services (primarily under governmental auspices) or local services. Statewide services are further organized according to type: aid to the blind, educational services, library services, vocational…

  17. Person Response Functions and the Definition of Units in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Perkins, Aminah F.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry (this issue) has written a thought-provoking piece on the interpretation of item discrimination parameters as scale units in item response theory. One of the key features of his work is the description of an item response theory (IRT) model that he calls the logistic measurement function that combines aspects of two traditions in IRT that…

  18. Personal Safety. Cooperative Occupational Education, Unit 18. Instructor Material and Student Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This unit, one in a series of packets of teacher and student materials for cooperative occupational education (COE) designed for special needs students, stresses to students the importance of taking care of themselves by maintaining good health, avoiding accidents, and making wise choices about the use of drugs and alcohol. The instructor material…

  19. Preschool Education in China and the United States: A Personal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Yanhui; Richey, Dean

    2007-01-01

    In this article the preschool education in China and the United States are compared, based on the factors that influence the preschool education in each country as well as the characteristics of the preschool education in each culture. The preschool education in both countries has its strengths and weaknesses, which result from their respective…

  20. Persons of Spanish Origin in the United States: March 1985 (Advance Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Population Reports, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This brief report presents preliminary data on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of people of Spanish origin in the United States. The data were collected by the Census Bureau in a supplement to the March 1985 Current Population Survey (CPS), which used independent postcensal estimates on Hispanics. The Hispanic population has…

  1. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Incidence, Risk Factors and Outcome in Paediatric Intensive Care Units at Cairo University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Yasmine S.; Ibrahiem, Sally K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a major cause of hospital morbidity, mortality and increased health care costs. Although the epidemiology, pathogenesis and outcome of VAP are well described in adults; few data exist regarding VAP in paediatric patients, especially in developing countries. Aim To determine the incidence, risk factors and outcome of VAP in two Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) at Cairo University Hospital. Materials and Methods A total of 427 patients who received Mechanical Ventilation (MV) were included in this prospective study during the period from September 2014 till September 2015. Patients were observed daily till VAP occurrence, discharge from the unit or death, whichever came first. Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory results, radiographic and microbiological reports were recorded for all patients. Results Nearly 31% patients developed VAP among the entire cohort. The incidence density was 21.3 per 1000 ventilator days. The most frequently isolated organisms from VAP patients were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (47.7%), Acinetobacter (18.2%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (14.4%). VAP patients were significantly younger than non-VAP ones. The incidence of VAP in comatose patients and those with MOSF was significantly higher. Prior antibiotic use for > 48 h before MV, supine body positioning and reintubation were significantly associated with VAP. On multiple logistic regression analysis, MOSF; prior antibiotic use > 48h; reintubation; coma; and age remained independent predictors of VAP. Mortality rate among the VAP group was significantly higher compared to the non-VAP one (68.2% vs. 48.5%, p<0.001). Survival curve analysis showed a shorter median survival time in VAP patients. Conclusion Identification of risk factors and outcome of VAP in PICUs may help in reducing the incidence and improving patients’ outcomes. The incidence of VAP in this study was relatively high. The most

  2. Treatment of Gastric Adenocarcinoma May Differ Among Hospital Types in the United States, a Report from the National Cancer Data Base

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Greer; Patel-Parekh, Lina; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Donohue, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The concept that complex surgical procedures should be performed at high-volume centers to improve surgical morbidity and mortality is becoming widely accepted. We wanted to determine if there were differences in the treatment of patients with gastric cancer between community cancer centers and teaching hospitals in the United States. Data from the 2001 Gastric Cancer Patient Care Evaluation Study of the National Cancer Data Base comprising 6,047 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma treated at 691 hospitals were assessed. The mean number of patients treated was larger at teaching hospitals (14/year) when compared to community centers (5–9/year) (p < 0.05). The utilization of laparoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography were significantly more common at teaching centers (p < 0.01). Pathologic assessment of greater than 15 nodes was documented in 31% of specimen at community hospitals and 38% at teaching hospitals (p < 0.01). Adjusted for cancer stage, chemotherapy and radiation therapy were utilized with equal frequency at all types of treatment centers. The 30-day postoperative mortality was lowest at teaching hospitals (5.5%) and highest at community hospitals (9.9%) (p < 0.01). These data support previous publications demonstrating that patients with diseases requiring specialized treatment have lower operative mortality when treated at high-volume centers. PMID:17436123

  3. The path to modernity: a personal testimony to the restructuring of the Department of Dermatology, Vargas Hospital, Caracas, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Kerdel-Vegas, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1950s and early1960s, there was a concerted effort to modernize teaching, training, and patient care in the Vargas Hospital of Caracas, Venezuela. The above included the development of research in the frame of postgraduate training. This effort was to be helped by USA funds and institutions but could only be achieved by the work of Venezuelans, sharing a vision of progress. Dermatology spearheaded this initiative, and the fruit of this was the exponential development of Venezuelan Dermatology and the creation of the National Institute of Dermatology on the grounds of the Vargas Hospital. The purpose of this contribution is to review these events that happened more than half a century ago from my own perspective. I sincerely hope that these lines could serve as an inspiration to the younger generations that toil today under less-than-favorable conditions. PMID:24559570

  4. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care. PMID:17244509

  5. 75 FR 1396 - The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ..., Salons C, D and E, 620 Perry Pkwy., Gaithersburg, MD. Contact Person: Tracy Phillips, Center for Devices.../phone line to learn about possible modifications before coming to the meeting. Agenda: On March 5, 2010, the committee will discuss and make recommendations regarding clinical risks and benefits of...

  6. Perceived Participation, Experiences from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Their Transition Period from Hospital to Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Velde, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualization and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the "person perceived participation" in…

  7. A Comparison of the Six Principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of the United States and the Persons with Disability Act of Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumuni, Samad Dimbie

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the six principles of IDEIA of the United States and the Persons with Disability Act of Ghana with the view to determining their similarities and differences. Recommendations were made with the ultimate aim of exploring the need for change in the special education delivery systems in the United States and Ghana. The comparative…

  8. Postnatal demoralisation among women admitted to a hospital mother-baby unit: validation of a psychometric measure.

    PubMed

    Bobevski, I; Rowe, H; Clarke, D M; McKenzie, D P; Fisher, J

    2015-12-01

    Demoralisation is a psychological state characterised by experiences of distress and sadness, helplessness, subjective incompetence and hopelessness, in the context of a stressful situation. Experiences of demoralisation may be particularly relevant to women who have recently given birth, who can feel incompetent, isolated and helpless. The psychometric properties of the Demoralisation Scale among women in the postnatal period participating in a clinical program were examined. Women admitted with their infants to a hospital mother-baby unit in Australia for five nights were recruited consecutively (N = 209) and assessed at admission and discharge. The Demoralisation Scale was perceived as relevant and exhibited high reliability, acceptable construct validity and good sensitivity to change. The mean demoralisation score was high (M = 30.9, SD = 15.5) and associated with negative experiences of motherhood and functional impairment, independent of depression and anxiety symptoms. Mean demoralisation decreased significantly after program completion (M = 18.4, SD = 12.4). More participants showed a significant improvement in demoralisation (57.5 %) than in depression (34.8 %) and anxiety (9.8 %) symptoms. Demoralisation can provide a useful framework for understanding and measuring the experiences of women participating in postnatal clinical programs and in directing treatment towards helping women to acquire the necessary caregiving skills and increasing parental efficacy. The Demoralisation Scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing intervention effects. PMID:25520260

  9. Airway accidents in critical care unit: A 3-year retrospective study in a Public Teaching Hospital of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sugata; Singh, Shipti Shradha; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Choudhury, Sourav Das

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although tracheal tubes are essential devices to control and protect airway in a critical care unit (CCU), they are not free from complications. Aims: To document the incidence and nature of airway accidents in the CCU of a government teaching hospital in Eastern India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all airway accidents in a 5-bedded (medical and surgical) CCU. The number, types, timing, and severity of airway accidents were analyzed. Results: The total accident rate was 19 in 233 intubated and/or tracheostomized patients over 1657 tube days (TDs) during 3 years. Fourteen occurred in 232 endotracheally intubated patients over 1075 endotracheal tube (ETT) days, and five occurred in 44 tracheostomized patients over 580 tracheostomy TDs. Fifteen accidents were due to blocked tubes. Rest four were unplanned extubations (UEs), all being accidental extubations. All blockages occurred during night shifts and all UEs during day shifts. Five accidents were mild, the rest moderate. No major accident led to cardiorespiratory arrest or death. All blockages occurred after 7th day of intubation. The outcome of accidents were more favorable in tracheostomy group compared to ETT group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of airway accidents was 8.2 accidents per 100 patients. Blockages were the most common accidents followed by UEs. Ten out of the 15 blockages and all 4 UEs were in endotracheally intubated patients. Tracheostomized patients had 5 blockages and no UEs. PMID:27076709

  10. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Patients of Intensive Care Unit in China: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Biao; Cong, Wei; Li, Zhi-Tao; Bi, Xiao-Gang; Xian, Ying; Wang, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Zhang, Kou-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in 394 patients of intensive care unit (ICU) in a hospital between April 2010 and March 2012 and analyze the association between T. gondii infection and ICU patients according to the species of disease. Toxoplasma serology was evaluated by ELISA method using a commercially available kit. Data of patients were obtained from the patients, informants, and medical examination records. Seventy-four (18.78%) of 394 patients were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies demonstrating latent infection. Of these, the highest T. gondii seroprevalence was found in the age group of 31–45 years (27.45%), and the lowest was found in the age group of <30 years (12.5%). In addition, females (21.6%) had a higher seroprevalence than males (18.36%). With respect to the species of disease, the patients with kidney diseases (57.14%), lung diseases (27.84%), and brain diseases (24%) had high T. gondii seroprevalence. The present study represents the first survey of T. gondii seroprevalence in ICU patients in China, revealing an 18.78% seropositivity. Considering the particularities of ICU patients, molecular identification, genetic characterization, and diagnosis of T. gondii should be considered in future study. PMID:25961046

  11. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in urine cultures: Antibiotic susceptibility trends over a decade at a tertiary hospital in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Papa, Nathan; Aliyu, Sani H.; Dev, Harveer; Al-Hayek, Samih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infection and vancomycin-resistant strains are more difficult to treat. The purpose of this surveillance program was to assess the prevalence of and determine the risk factors for vancomycin resistance in adults among urinary isolates of Enterococcus sp. and to detail the antibiotic susceptibility profile, which can be used to guide empirical treatment. Materials and Methods From 2005 to 2014 we retrospectively reviewed 5,528 positive Enterococcus sp. urine cultures recorded in a computerized laboratory results database at a tertiary teaching hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Results Of these cultures, 542 (9.8%) were vancomycin resistant. No longitudinal trend was observed in the proportion of vancomycin-resistant strains over the course of the study. We observed emerging resistance to nitrofurantoin with rates climbing from near zero to 40%. Ampicillin resistance fluctuated between 50% and 90%. Low resistance was observed for linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Female sex and inpatient status were identified as risk factors for vancomycin resistance. Conclusions The incidence of vancomycin resistance among urinary isolates was stable over the last decade. Although resistance to nitrofurantoin has increased, it still serves as an appropriate first choice in uncomplicated urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. PMID:26981595

  12. Microbial isolates in open fractures seen in the accident and emergency unit of a teaching hospital in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Alonge, T O; Ogunlade, S O; Salawu, S A; Fashina, A N

    2002-01-01

    In this prospective study, superficial and deep swabs of all open fractures seen at the accident and emergency unit of our hospital between January and June 2000 were taken (before wound debridement was done or anitibiotics commenced). Routine microscopy, culture and sensitivities for aerobic and anaerobic organisms were carried out on these specimens. The organisms were cultured and identified using standard techniques and the antibiotic sensitivity testing was carried out using the disc diffusion method of Stokes. Within six hours of injury, single-organism isolates were commonly found whilst after 48 hours a mixed or poly-microbial organism load were isolated. In 90% of the positive isolates, the organisms isolated form the superficial and the deep swabs were the same. The antibiotic sensitivity pattern of all the isolates shows that pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were more effective compared to cefuroxime and amoxycillin which had substantial resistance to most of the isolates. 41 fractures were followed to union and 4 (9.7%) developed osteomyelitis. PMID:12665270

  13. Effectiveness of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery in a tertiary university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing demand on hospitalisation, either due to elective activity from the waiting lists or due to emergency admissions coming from the Emergency Department (ED), requires looking for strategies that lead to effective bed management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a surgery admission unit for major elective surgery patients who were admitted for same-day surgery. Methods We included all patients admitted for elective surgery in a university tertiary hospital between the 1st of September and the 31st of December 2006, as well as those admitted during the same period of 2008, after the introduction of the Surgery Admission Unit. The main outcome parameters were global length of stay, pre-surgery length of stay, proportion of patients admitted the same day of the surgery and number of cancellations. Differences between the two periods were evaluated by the T-test and Chi-square test. Significance at P < 0.05 was assumed throughout. Results We included 6,053 patients, 3,003 during 2006 and 3,050 patients during 2008. Global length of stay was 6.2 days (IC 95%:6.4-6) in 2006 and 5.5 days (IC 95%:5.8-5.2) in 2008 (p < 0.005). Pre-surgery length of stay was reduced from 0.46 days (IC 95%:0.44-0.48) in 2006 to 0.29 days (IC 95%:0.27-0.31) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The proportion of patients admitted for same-day surgery was 67% (IC 95%:69%-65%) in 2006 and 76% (IC 95%:78%-74%) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The number of cancelled interventions due to insufficient preparation was 31 patients in 2006 and 7 patients in 2008. Conclusions The implementation of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery has proved to be an effective strategy for improving bed management. It has enabled an improvement in the proportion of patients admitted on the same day as surgery and a shorter length of stay. PMID:20096114

  14. Impact of surveillance of hospital-acquired infections on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in intensive care units: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The preventive impact of hospital-acquired infection (HAI) surveillance is difficult to assess. Our objective was to investigate the effect of HAI surveillance disruption on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) incidence. Methods A quasi-experimental study with an intervention group and a control group was conducted between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2010 in two intensive care units (ICUs) of a university hospital that participated in a national HAI surveillance network. Surveillance was interrupted during the year 2007 in unit A (intervention group) and was continuous in unit B (control group). Period 1 (pre-test period) comprised patients hospitalized during 2004 to 2006, and period 2 (post-test period) involved patients hospitalized during 2008 to 2010. Patients hospitalized ≥48 hours and intubated during their stay were included. Multivariate Poisson regression was fitted to ascertain the influence of surveillance disruption. Results A total of 2,771 patients, accounting for 19,848 intubation-days at risk, were studied; 307 had VAP. The VAP attack rate increased in unit A from 7.8% during period 1 to 17.1% during period 2 (P <0.001); in unit B, it was 7.2% and 11.2% for the two periods respectively (P = 0.17). Adjusted VAP incidence rose in unit A after surveillance disruption (incidence rate ratio = 2.17, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 4.47, P = 0.036), independently of VAP trend; no change was observed in unit B. All-cause mortality and length of stay increased (P = 0.028 and P = 0.038, respectively) in unit A between periods 1 and 2. In unit B, no change in mortality was observed (P = 0.22), while length of stay decreased between periods 1 and 2 (P = 0.002). Conclusions VAP incidence, length of stay and all-cause mortality rose after HAI surveillance disruption in ICU, which suggests a specific effect of HAI surveillance on VAP prevention and reinforces the role of data feedback and counselling as a mechanism to facilitate performance

  15. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform. PMID:22323233

  16. A Personal Journal Account of the Monrovia Medical Unit in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Reed, Paul

    2015-10-01

    On September 16, 2014, President Obama, speaking from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia, declared the Ebola epidemic in West Africa a national security priority and laid out the US government's plan for contributing to and helping to lead the international response. There were, and remain, several facets to the US government's efforts to help control the epidemic, including the commitment to provide a facility and staffing in Liberia that would ensure access to a high level of quality care for any Liberian or international health care workers who may, themselves, become infected and ill with Ebola. That facility came to be known as the Monrovia Medical Unit and is staffed by officers of the US Public Health Service. The following pages are excerpts from the journal I kept during my time at the Monrovia Medical Unit, which I hope will relate some elements of the concerted effort that took place that led to this arm of the US government response being established. PMID:25881799

  17. Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants on pneumonia and influenza hospitalization and mortality in all age groups in the United States.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lone; Taylor, Robert J; Young-Xu, Yinong; Haber, Michael; May, Larissa; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    A seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduced in the United States in 2000 has been shown to reduce invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and adults through induction of herd immunity. We assessed the impact of infant immunization on pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and mortality in all age groups using Health Care Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases (SID) for 1996 to 2006 from 10 states; SID contain 100% samples of ICD9-coded hospitalization data for the selected states. Compared to a 1996-1997 through 1998-1999 baseline, by the 2005-2006 season, both IPD and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations and deaths had decreased substantially in all age groups, including a 47% (95% confidence interval [CI], 38 to 54%) reduction in nonbacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (ICD9 code 481 with no codes indicating IPD) in infants <2 years old and a 54% reduction (CI, 53 to 56%) in adults ≥65 years of age. A model developed to calculate the total burden of pneumococcal pneumonia prevented by infant PCV7 vaccination in the United States from 2000 to 2006 estimated a reduction of 788,838 (CI, 695,406 to 875,476) hospitalizations for pneumococcal pneumonia. Ninety percent of the reduction in model-attributed pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations occurred through herd immunity among adults 18 years old and older; similar proportions were found in pneumococcal disease mortality prevented by the vaccine. In the first seasons after PCV introduction, when there were substantial state differences in coverage among <5-year-olds, states with greater coverage had significantly fewer influenza-associated pneumonia hospitalizations among children, suggesting that PCV7 use also reduces influenza-attributable pneumonia hospitalizations. PMID:21264063

  18. Provision of group psychoeducation for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment – a cross-sectional survey of acute care hospitals in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depressive disorders are often recurrent and place a high burden on patients and their relatives. Psychoeducational groups for relatives may reduce relatives’ burden, help prevent relapses in patients, and are recommended by the German “National Disease Management Guideline Unipolar Depression”. Since there is limited knowledge on the provision of psychoeducational groups for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment, we conducted a survey among acute care hospitals in Germany. Methods We conducted a two-step cross-sectional survey. Step I consisted of a questionnaire asking the heads of all psychiatric/psychosomatic acute care hospitals in Germany (N = 512) whether psychoeducational groups for relatives were provided within depression treatment, and if not, the reasons for not implementing them. In group offering hospitals the person responsible for conducting psychoeducational groups received a detailed questionnaire on intervention characteristics (step II). We performed descriptive data analysis. Results The response rate was 50.2% (N = 257) in step I and 58.4% in step II (N = 45). 35.4% of the responding hospitals offered psychoeducational groups for relatives of patients with depressive disorders. According to the estimates of the respondents, relatives of about one in five patients took part in psychoeducational groups in 2011. Groups were mostly provided by two moderators (62.2%) as continuous groups (77.8%), without patients’ participation (77.8%), with up to ten participants (65.9%), consisting of four or fewer sessions (51.5%) which lasted between one and one and a half hours each (77.8%). The moderators in charge were mostly psychologists (43.9%) or physicians (26.8%). Approximately one third used published manuals. Reasons for not conducting such psychoeducational groups were lack of manpower (60.1%), time (44.9%) and financial constraints (24.1%). 25.3% mentioned adequate concepts of intervention as a

  19. National Trends in Pulmonary Embolism Hospitalization Rates and Outcomes for Adults Aged ≥65 Years in the United States (1999 to 2010).

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Bikdeli, Behnood; Wang, Yun; Kim, Nancy; Curtis, Jeptha P; Desai, Mayur M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about national trends of pulmonary embolism (PE) hospitalizations and outcomes in older adults in the context of recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 100% Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized from 1999 to 2010 with a principal discharge diagnosis code for PE. The adjusted PE hospitalization rate increased from 129/100,000 person-years in 1999 to 302/100,000 person-years in 2010, a relative increase of 134% (p <0.001). Black patients had the highest rate of increase (174 to 548/100,000 person-years) among all age, gender, and race categories. The mean (standard deviation) length of hospital stay decreased from 7.6 (5.7) days in 1999 to 5.8 (4.4) days in 2010, and the proportion of patients discharged to home decreased from 51.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.5 to 51.6) to 44.1% (95% CI 43.7 to 44.6), whereas more patients were discharged with home health care and to skilled nursing facilities. The in-hospital mortality rate decreased from 8.3% (95% CI 8.0 to 8.6) in 1999 to 4.4% (95% CI 4.2 to 4.5) in 2010, as did adjusted 30-day (from 12.3% [95% CI 11.9 to 12.6] to 9.1% [95% CI 8.5 to 9.7]) and 6-month mortality rates (from 23.0% [95% CI 22.5 to 23.4] to 19.6% [95% CI 18.8 to 20.5]). There were no significant racial differences in mortality rates by 2010. There was no change in the adjusted 30-day all-cause readmission rate from 1999 to 2010. In conclusion, PE hospitalization rates increased substantially from 1999 to 2010, with a higher rate for black patients. All mortality rates decreased but remained high. The increase in hospitalization rates and continued high mortality and readmission rates confirm the significant burden of PE for older adults. PMID:26409636

  20. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical