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  1. A Medication Safety Model: A Case Study in Thai Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rattanarojsakul, Phichai; Thawesaengskulthai, Natcha

    2013-01-01

    Reaching zero defects is vital in medication service. Medication error can be reduced if the causes are recognized. The purpose of this study is to search for a conceptual framework of the causes of medication error in Thailand and to examine relationship between these factors and its importance. The study was carried out upon an in-depth case study and survey of hospital personals who were involved in the drug use process. The structured survey was based on Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI) (2008) questionnaires focusing on the important factors that affect the medication safety. Additional questionnaires included content to the context of Thailand's private hospital, validated by five-hospital qualified experts. By correlation Pearson analysis, the result revealed 14 important factors showing a linear relationship with drug administration error except the medication reconciliation. By independent sample t-test, the administration error in the hospital was significantly related to external impact. The multiple regression analysis of the detail of medication administration also indicated the patient identification before administration of medication, detection of the risk of medication adverse effects and assurance of medication administration at the right time, dosage and route were statistically significant at 0.05 level. The major implication of the study is to propose a medication safety model in a Thai private hospital. PMID:23985110

  2. Study of cases of hypertension admitted at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Shrestha, Ananta; Bhattarai, Prabeen; Paudel, Badri

    2004-06-01

    Hundred cases of hypertension admitted to medical ward at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital were studied and analysed. They constituted 9.4% of the total admitted patients in the medical ward. Association of hypertension with other diseases is highlighted. Thirty two percent of these hypertensives were diabetic and 22.0% of hypertensives also had Chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Different types of complications of hypertension seen in the studied subjects are mentioned. Only 19.0% of hypertensives had their blood pressure controlled and the rest were uncontrolled hypertensives. PMID:15449651

  3. Private medical services in the Italian public hospitals: the case for improving HRM.

    PubMed

    De Pietro, Carlo

    2006-08-22

    This study explores how Italian public hospitals can use private medical activities run by their employed physicians as a human resources management (HRM) tool. It is based on field research in two acute-care hospitals and a review of Italian literature and laws. The Italian National Health Service (NHS) allows employed physicians to run private, patient-funded activities ("private beds", surgical operations, hospital outpatient clinics, etc.). Basic regulation is set at the national level, but it can be greatly improved at the hospital level. Private activities, if poorly managed, can damage efficiency, equity, quality of care, and public trust in the NHS. On the other hand, hospitals can also use them as leverage to improve HRM, with special attention to three issues: (1) professional evaluation, development, and training; (2) compensation policies; (3) competition for, and retention of, professionals in short supply. The two case studies presented here show great differences between the two hospitals in terms of regulation and organizational solutions that have been adopted to deal with such activities. However, in both hospitals, private activities do not seem to benefit HRM. Private activities are not systematically considered in compensation policies. Moreover, private revenues are strongly concentrated in a few physicians. Hospitals use very little of the information provided by the private activities to improve knowledge management, career development, or training planning. Finally, hospitals do not use private activities management as a tool for competing in the labor market for health professionals who are in short supply. PMID:16253384

  4. Study of type 2 diabetes mellitus cases at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Devkota, Krishna Chandra; Chhetri, Pramod; Bhattarai, Praveen; Shrestha, Ananta

    2004-12-01

    A total of 110 cases attending diabetic clinic at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital were studied. Associated risk factors and co-morbid conditions were analyzed. Among them 63.6% have systolic BP more than 130 mm of Hg and 24.5% have diastolic BP more than 85 mm of Hg reflecting hypertension as most common co-morbid condition. Various complications of diabetes in studied subjects are highlighted. Eighty percent of patients have fasting blood sugar more than 110 mg% and 93.0% have post-prandial blood sugar more than 140 mg% reflecting poor overall glycemic control despite the use of medication. PMID:16295737

  5. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  6. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  7. The Intricate Relationship Between a Medical School and a Teaching Hospital: A Case Study in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mubuuke, Aloysius Gonzaga; Businge, Francis; Mukule, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between medical schools and teaching hospitals is full of opportunities but also challenges even though they have complementary goals that could enhance each other. Although medical schools and teaching hospitals may face some similar challenges around the world, there could be context-specific observations that differ in resource-rich versus resource-limited settings. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that are perceived to have influenced the relationship between a medical school and a teaching hospital in Uganda, a resource-limited setting. Methods This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study in which key informant individual interviews were conducted with senior administrators and senior staff members of the Mulago Hospital and Makerere University Medical School. The interviews explored factors perceived to have favoured the working relationship between the two institutions, challenges faced and likely future opportunities. Both quantitative and qualitative data were generated. Thematic analysis was used with the qualitative data. Results Respondents reported a strained relationship between the two institutions, with unfavourable factors far outweighing the favourable factors influencing the relationship. Key negative reported factors included having different administrative set-ups, limited opportunities to share funds and to forge research collaborations, unexploited potential of sharing human resources to address staff shortages, as well as a lack of a memorandum of understanding between the two institutions. Discussion This study identifies barriers in the existing relationship between a teaching hospital and medical college in a resource-poor country. It proposes a collaborative model, rather than competitive model, for the two institutions that may work in both resource-limited and resource-rich settings. PMID:25758388

  8. Medication use as a risk factor for inpatient falls in an acute care hospital: a case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Hideki; Imakyure, Osamu; Matsumoto, Junichi; Egawa, Takashi; Jiang, Ying; Hirakawa, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Yanagawa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The present study aimed to evaluate the associations between medication use and falls and to identify high risk medications that acted as a trigger for the onset of falls in an acute care hospital setting. METHODS We applied a case-crossover design wherein cases served as their own controls and comparisons were made within each participant. The 3-day period (days 0 to −2) and the 3-day periods (days −6 to −8, days −9 to −11 and days −12 to −14) before the fall event were defined as the case period and the control periods, respectively. Exposures to medications were compared between the case and control periods. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the onset of falls with respect to medication use were computed using conditional logistic regression analyses. RESULTS A total of 349 inpatients who fell during their hospitalization were recorded on incident report forms between March 2003 and August 2005. The initial use of antihypertensive, antiparkinsonian, anti-anxiety and hypnotic agents as medication classes was significantly associated with an increased risk of falls, and these ORs (95% CI) were 8.42 (3.12, 22.72), 4.18 (1.75, 10.02), 3.25 (1.62, 6.50) and 2.44 (1.32, 4.51), respectively. The initial use of candesartan, etizolam, biperiden and zopiclone was also identified as a potential risk factor for falls. CONCLUSIONS Medical professionals should be aware of the possibility that starting a new medication such as an antihypertensive agent, including candesartan, and antiparkinsonian, anti-anxiety and hypnotic agents, may act as a trigger for the onset of a fall. PMID:20573090

  9. Supporting management of medical equipment for inpatient service in public hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Vallejos, Guido E

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of medical equipment availability in the short and long term. The work is divided in two parts. The first part is an analysis of the medical equipment inventory for the institution of study. We consider the replacement, maintenance, and reinforcement of the available medical equipment by considering local guidelines and surveying clinical personnel appreciation. The resulting recommendation is to upgrade the current equipment inventory if necessary. The second part considered a demand analysis in the short and medium term. We predicted the future demand with a 5-year horizon using Holt-Winters models. Inventory analysis showed that 27% of the medical equipment in stock was not functional. Due to this poor performance result we suggested that the hospital gradually addresses this situation by replacing 29 non-functional equipment items, reinforcing stock with 40 new items, and adding 11 items not available in the inventory but suggested by the national guidelines. The results suggest that general medicine inpatient demand has a tendency to increase within the time e.g. for general medicine inpatient service the highest increment is obtained by respiratory (12%, RMSE=8%) and genitourinary diseases (20%, RMSE=9%). This increment did not involve any further upgrading of the proposed inventory. PMID:24109833

  10. [Investigation of the hepatitis E virus seroprevalence in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aydın, Nesibe Nur; Ergünay, Koray; Karagül, Aydan; Pınar, Ahmet; Us, Dürdal

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), classified in Hepeviridae family, Hepevirus genus, is a non-enveloped virus with icosahedral capsid containing single-stranded positive sense RNA genome. HEV infections may be asymptomatic especially in children, however it may present as fulminant hepatitis in pregnant women, as well as chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. There are four well-known genotypes of HEV that infect humans and many mammalian species. Genotype 1 and 2 are frequently responsible for water-borne infections transmitted by fecal-oral way in developing countries, while genotype 3 and 4 cause zoonotic infections in developed countries. Turkey is considered as an endemic country with a total seroprevalence rate of 6.3% for normal population, showing significant variation (0-73%) according to the regions and study groups. The aims of this study were to investigate the HEV seropositivity in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital (HUMFH), to evaluate the results according to the demographic features of patients, and to determine the current HEV seroprevalence in our region, contributing seroepidemiological data in Turkey. A total of 1043 serum samples (514 female, 529 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 38.03) obtained from 327 blood donors (32 female, 295 male; age range: 19-59 years, mean age: 31.1) who were admitted to HUMFH Blood Center, and 716 sera (482 female, 234 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 41.7) that were sent to HUMFH Central Laboratory from various outpatient/inpatient clinics, between November 2012 to November 2013, were included in the study. The presence of HEV-IgG antibodies in serum samples was detected by a commercial ELISA method (Euroimmun, Germany), and the presence of HEV-IgM antibodies was also investigated in the sera with IgG-positive results. The overall HEV-IgG seropositivity rate was determined as 4.4% (46/1043), and the seropositivity rates for blood donors and in/outpatients were as 0.92% (3

  11. Etiology of Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Study of 50 Cases in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khan, J A; Siddque, M A; Haque, M N; Kundu, S C; Ahmed, M U; Bhuiyan, A S

    2015-07-01

    This cross sectional observational study was done in the Department of ENT & Head-Neck Surgery, Mymensingh Medical College, Bangladesh from January 2013 to July 2014. Fifty (50) cases of carcinoma larynx were purposively selected. Clinically diagnosed cases of carcinoma larynx and histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma were included. Among 50 cases age ranged from 35-75 years with an average age of 58.1 years. Maximum patients were in 5th and 6th decades with male-female ratio 16:1. Most of the patient (78%) came from rural areas and came from low socio-economic condition (58%); maximum patients were cultivator (42%) & illiterate (50%). Smoking was the commonest (64%) personal habit. The other common personal habits were chewing of Betel nut & leaf (44%) and chewing of Tobacco (36%). Most of them have more than one habit. PMID:26329945

  12. Case-control study of exposure to medication and the risk of injurious falls requiring hospitalization among nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Mustard, C A; Mayer, T

    1997-04-15

    The association between injurious falls requiring hospitalization and selected classes of medications was examined in a case-control study of nursing home residents. Information for this study was obtained exclusively from four computerized administrative databases. Over the period from April 1987 to March 1992, a total of 1,560 first injurious falls occurred to 14,744 residents of Manitoba, Canada, nursing homes who were eligible for inclusion in the study. An injurious fall was defined as an injury consequent to a fall that resulted in admission to the hospital for treatment. Medication use was ascertained from prescription information contained in computerized dispensing records from community pharmacies. Three series of single controls were pair-matched to each case, implementing increasing stringent matching on age, sex, level of dependency, duration of residence, and the presence of up to five chronic disorders. Estimates of relative odds obtained from the most stringently matched case-control series identified two medication classes in which a prescription dispensed in the previous 30 days was associated with an elevated risk of injurious fall: antipsychotic agents (odds ratio = 1.31, 95 percent confidence interval 1.06-1.61) and anxiolytics/sedatives/ hypnotics (odds ratio = 1.35, 95 percent confidence interval 1.09-1.68). An unexpected protective effect was associated with the use inotropic agents (odds ratio = 0.69, 95 percent confidence interval 0.54-0.89). These results support the hypothesis that psychotropic medications are an independent risk factor for injurious falls in nursing home settings. PMID:9126000

  13. [Forensic medical diagnostics of intoxication with certain poisonous mushrooms in the case of the lethal outcome in a hospital].

    PubMed

    Zaraf'aynts, G N

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with a view to improving forensic medical diagnostics of intoxication with poisonous mushrooms in the cases of patients' death in a hospital. A total of 15 protocols of forensic medical examination of the corpses of the people who had died from acute poisoning were available for the analysis. The deathly toxins were amanitin and muscarine contained in various combinations in the death cap (Amanita phalloides) and the early false morels (Gyromitra esculenta and G. gigas). The main poisoning season in the former case was May and in the latter case August and September (93.4%). The mortality rate in the case of group intoxication (such cases accounted for 40% of the total) amounted to 28.6%. 40% of the deceased subjects consumed mushrooms together with alcohol. The poisoning caused the development of either phalloidin- or gyromitrin-intoxication syndromes (after consumption of Amanita phalloides and Gyromitra esculenta respectively). It is emphasized that the forensic medical experts must substantiate the diagnosis of poisoning with mushroom toxins based on the results of the chemical-toxicological and/or forensic chemical investigations. The relevant materials taken from the victim or the corpse should be dispatched for analysis not only within the first day but also on days 2-4 after intoxication. The mycological and genetic analysis must include the detection and identification of mushroom microparticles and spores in the smears from the oral cavity, vomiting matter, wash water, gastric and intestinal contents. In addition, the macro- and microscopic morphological signs, clinical data (major syndromes, results of laboratory studies, methods of treatment) should be taken into consideration as well as the time (season) of mushroom gathering, simultaneous poisoning in a group of people, and other pertinent information. PMID:27030094

  14. Direct Medical Cost of Influenza-Related Hospitalizations among Severe Acute Respiratory Infections Cases in Three Provinces in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Gao, Lidong; Li, Zhong; Feng, Ao; Jin, Hui; Wang, Shiyuan; Su, Qiru; Xu, Zhen; Feng, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza-related hospitalizations impose a considerable economic and social burden. This study aimed to better understand the economic burden of influenza-related hospitalizations among patients in China in different age and risk categories. Methods Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations between December 2009 and June 2011 from three hospitals participating in the Chinese Severe Acute Respiratory Infections (SARI) sentinel surveillance system were included in this study. Hospital billing data were collected from each hospital’s Hospital Information System (HIS) and divided into five cost categories. Demographic and clinical information was collected from medical records. Mean (range) and median (interquartile range [IQR]) costs were calculated and compared among children (≤15 years), adults (16–64 years) and elderly (≥65 years) groups. Factors influencing cost were analyzed. Results A total of 106 laboratory-confirmed influenza-related hospitalizations were identified, 60% of which were children. The mean (range) direct medical cost was $1,797 ($80–$27,545) for all hospitalizations, and the median (IQR) direct medical cost was $231 ($164), $854 ($890), and $2,263 ($7,803) for children, adults, and elderly, respectively. Therapeutics and diagnostics were the two largest components of direct medical cost, comprising 57% and 23%, respectively. Cost of physician services was the lowest at less than 1%. Conclusion Direct medical cost of influenza-related hospitalizations imposes a heavy burden on patients and their families in China. Further study is needed to provide more comprehensive evidence on the economic burden of influenza. Our study highlights the need to increase vaccination rate and develop targeted national preventive strategies. PMID:23717485

  15. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Omid; Dorosti, Hesam; Talebzadeh, Alireza; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014–2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively). Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran. PMID:27429924

  16. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university.

    PubMed

    Barati, Omid; Dorosti, Hesam; Talebzadeh, Alireza; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014-2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively). Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran. PMID:27429924

  17. A case series of acquired haemophilia in a Malaysian hospital: unpredictably rare medical emergency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chiou Perng; Khalid, Bahariah Bt

    2015-10-01

    Acquired haemophilia (AH) is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by the presence of acquired inhibitors against Factor VIII causing disruption of coagulation cascade. It has no known genetic inheritance, and diagnosis remains a challenge. The peculiar presentations are later age of onset as acute pain in weight-bearing joints and spontaneous muscle haematoma with isolated prolonged activated partial thrombin time (APTT). Prevalence is 1 per million per year affecting both genders equally where blood product transfusion is seen in almost 87% of cases. The direct cause of AH is still unknown, and autoimmune dysregulation has been postulated, which predisposes to the development of the factor inhibitors. Being extremely rare, we are reporting two consecutive patients diagnosed by unusual bleeding episodes with isolated prolonged APTT due to Factor VIII inhibitors. AH deserves a special mention as high index of suspicion is required. More studies are required to provide better guidance in diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:26568837

  18. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction. PMID:27273960

  19. Economic regulation and hospital behavior: the effects on medical staff organization and hospital-physician relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Morrisey, M A; Conrad, D A

    1985-01-01

    New forms of payment, growing competition, the continued evolution of multiunit hospital systems, and associated forces are redefining the fundamental relationship between hospitals and physicians. As part of a larger theory of organizational response to the environment, the effects of these external forces on hospital-medical staff organization were examined using both cross-sectional data and data collected at two points in time. Findings suggest that regulation and competition, at least up to 1982, have had relatively little direct effect on hospital medical staff organization. Rather, changes in medical staff organization are more strongly associated with hospital case mix and with structural characteristics involving membership in a multiunit system, size, ownership, and location. The pervasive effect of case mix and the consistent effect of multiunit system involvement support the need for policymakers to give these factors particular attention in considering how hospitals and their medical staffs might respond to future regulatory and/or competitive approaches. PMID:3936822

  20. Hospital Contracts: Important Issues for Medical Groups.

    PubMed

    Rosolio, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with hospitals and outpatient medical facilities have always been an important part of the business model for private medical practices. As healthcare delivery to patients has evolved in the United States (much of it driven by the new government mandates, regulations, and the Affordable Care Act), the delivery of such services is becoming more and more centered on the hospital or institutional setting, thus making contractual relationships with hospitals even more important for medical practices. As a natural outgrowth of this relationship, attention to hospital contracts is becoming more important. PMID:27039636

  1. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  2. Medication errors during hospital drug rounds.

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, K W; Jenkins, D B; Noyce, P R; Barber, N D

    1995-01-01

    Objective--To determine the nature and rate of drug administration errors in one National Health Service hospital. Design--Covert observational survey be tween January and April 1993 of drug rounds with intervention to stop drug administration errors reaching the patient. Setting--Two medical, two surgical, and two medicine for the elderly wards in a former district general hospital, now a NHS trust hospital. Subjects--37 Nurses performing routine single nurse drug rounds. Main measures--Drug administration errors recorded by trained observers. Results--Seventy four drug rounds were observed in which 115 errors occurred during 3312 drug administrations. The overall error rate was 3.5% (95% confidence interval 2.9% to 4.1%). Errors owing to omissions, because the drug had not been supplied or located or the prescription had not been seen, accounted for most (68%, 78) of the errors. Wrong doses accounted for 15% (17) errors, four of which were greater than the prescribed dose. The dose was given within two hours of the time indicated by the prescriber in 98.2% of cases. Conclusion--The observed rate of drug administration errors is too high. It might be reduced by a multidisciplinary review of practices in prescribing, supply, and administration of drugs. PMID:10156392

  3. Variation between Hospitals with Regard to Diagnostic Practice, Coding Accuracy, and Case-Mix. A Retrospective Validation Study of Administrative Data versus Medical Records for Estimating 30-Day Mortality after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Skyrud, Katrine Damgaard; Lindman, Anja Schou

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of patient administrative data (PAS) for calculating 30-day mortality after hip fracture as a quality indicator, by a retrospective study of medical records. Methods We used PAS data from all Norwegian hospitals (2005–2009), merged with vital status from the National Registry, to calculate 30-day case-mix adjusted mortality for each hospital (n = 51). We used stratified sampling to establish a representative sample of both hospitals and cases. The hospitals were stratified according to high, low and medium mortality of which 4, 3, and 5 hospitals were sampled, respectively. Within hospitals, cases were sampled stratified according to year of admission, age, length of stay, and vital 30-day status (alive/dead). The final study sample included 1043 cases from 11 hospitals. Clinical information was abstracted from the medical records. Diagnostic and clinical information from the medical records and PAS were used to define definite and probable hip fracture. We used logistic regression analysis in order to estimate systematic between-hospital variation in unmeasured confounding. Finally, to study the consequences of unmeasured confounding for identifying mortality outlier hospitals, a sensitivity analysis was performed. Results The estimated overall positive predictive value was 95.9% for definite and 99.7% for definite or probable hip fracture, with no statistically significant differences between hospitals. The standard deviation of the additional, systematic hospital bias in mortality estimates was 0.044 on the logistic scale. The effect of unmeasured confounding on outlier detection was small to moderate, noticeable only for large hospital volumes. Conclusions This study showed that PAS data are adequate for identifying cases of hip fracture, and the effect of unmeasured case mix variation was small. In conclusion, PAS data are adequate for calculating 30-day mortality after hip-fracture as a quality

  4. Estimating the Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness against Medically Attended Influenza in Clinical Settings: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study with a Rapid Diagnostic Test in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Motoi; Yoshimine, Hiroyuki; Harada, Yoshitaka; Tsuchiya, Naho; Shimada, Ikumi; Ariyoshi, Koya; Inoue, Kenichiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) studies are usually conducted by specialized agencies and require time and resources. The objective of this study was to estimate the influenza VE against medically attended influenza using a test-negative case-control design with rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDT) in a clinical setting. Methods A prospective study was conducted at a community hospital in Nagasaki, western Japan during the 2010/11 influenza season. All outpatients aged 15 years and older with influenza-like illnesses (ILI) who had undergone RIDT were enrolled. A test-negative case-control design was applied to estimate the VEs: the cases were ILI patients with positive RIDT results and the controls were ILI patients with negative RIDT results. Information on patient characteristics, including vaccination histories, was collected using questionnaires and medical records. Results Between December 2010 and April 2011, 526 ILI patients were tested with RIDT, and 476 were eligible for the analysis. The overall VE estimate against medically attended influenza was 47.6%, after adjusting for the patients' age groups, presence of chronic conditions, month of visit, and smoking and alcohol use. The seasonal influenza vaccine reduced the risk of medically attended influenza by 60.9% for patients less than 50 years of age, but a significant reduction was not observed for patients 50 years of age and older. A sensitivity analysis provided similar figures. Conclusion The test-negative case-control study using RIDT provided moderate influenza VE consistent with other reports. Utilizing the commonly used RIDT to estimate VE provides rapid assessment of VE; however, it may require validation with more specific endpoint. PMID:23326324

  5. Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

  6. Assessing risk of hospital readmissions for improving medical practice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Parimal; Smith, L Douglas; Woeltje, Keith F

    2016-09-01

    We compare statistical approaches for predicting the likelihood that individual patients will require readmission to hospital within 30 days of their discharge and for setting quality-control standards in that regard. Logistic regression, neural networks and decision trees are found to have comparable discriminating power when applied to cases that were not used to calibrate the respective models. Significant factors for predicting likelihood of readmission are the patient's medical condition upon admission and discharge, length (days) of the hospital visit, care rendered during the hospital stay, size and role of the medical facility, the type of medical insurance, and the environment into which the patient is discharged. Separately constructed models for major medical specialties (Surgery/Gynecology, Cardiorespiratory, Cardiovascular, Neurology, and Medicine) can improve the ability to identify high-risk patients for possible intervention, while consolidated models (with indicator variables for the specialties) can serve well for assessing overall quality of care. PMID:25876516

  7. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, William; Vasquez, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  8. Replacing the academic medical center's teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Reves, J G; Smith, Stuart; Greenberg, Ray; Johnson, Donald

    2005-11-01

    Addressing the need for updated teaching hospital facilities is one of the most significant issues that an academic medical center faces. The authors describe the process they underwent in deciding to build a new facility at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Initial issues included whether or not the teaching hospital would continue to play a role in clinical education and whether to replace or renovate the existing facility. Once the decision to build was reached, MUSC had to choose between an on-campus or distant site for the new hospital and determine what the function of the old hospital would be. The authors examine these questions and discuss the factors involved in different stages of decision making, in order to provide the academic medicine community guidance in negotiating similar situations. Open communication within MUSC and with the greater community was a key component of the success of the enterprise to date. The authors argue that decisions concerning site, size, and focus of the hospital must be made by developing university-wide and community consensus among many different constituencies. The most important elements in the success at MUSC were having unified leadership, incorporating constituent input, engaging an external consultant, remaining unfazed by unanticipated challenges, and adhering to a realistic, aggressive timetable. The authors share their strategies for identifying and successfully managing these complex and potentially divisive aspects of building a new teaching hospital. PMID:16249296

  9. [The revised system of hospitalization for medical care and protection].

    PubMed

    Fukuo, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    The Act to Partially Amend the Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled was passed on June 13, 2013. Major amendments regarding hospitalization for medical care and protection include the points listed below. The guardianship system will be abolished. Consent by a guardian will no longer be required in the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection. In the case of hospitalization for medical care and protection, the administrators of the psychiatric hospital are required to obtain the consent of one of the following persons: spouse, person with parental authority, person responsible for support, legal custodian, or curator. If no qualified person is available, consent must be obtained from the mayor, etc. of the municipality. The following three obligations are imposed on psychiatric hospital administrators. (1) Assignment of a person, such as a psychiatric social worker, to provide guidance and counseling to patients hospitalized for medical care and protection regarding their postdischarge living environment. (2) Collaboration with community support entities that consult with and provide information as necessary to the person hospitalized, their spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. (3) Organizational improvements to promote hospital discharge. With regard to requests for discharge, the revised law stipulates that, in addition to the person hospitalized with a mental disorder, others who may file a request for discharge with the psychiatric review board include: the person's spouse, a person with parental authority, a person responsible for support, or their legal custodian or curator. If none of the above persons are available, or if none of them are able to express their wishes, the mayor, etc. of the municipality having jurisdiction over the place of residence of the person hospitalized may request a discharge. In order to promote transition to life in the

  10. Recent outbreak of cutaneous anthrax in Bangladesh: clinico-demographic profile and treatment outcome of cases attended at Rajshahi Medical College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human cutaneous anthrax results from skin exposure to B. anthracis, primarily due to occupational exposure. Bangladesh has experienced a number of outbreaks of cutaneous anthrax in recent years. The last episode occurred from April to August, 2011 and created mass havoc due to its dreadful clinical outcome and socio-cultural consequences. We report here the clinico-demographic profile and treatment outcome of 15 cutaneous anthrax cases attended at the Dermatology Outpatient Department of Rajshahi Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh between April and August, 2011 with an aim to create awareness for early case detection and management. Findings Anthrax was suspected primarily based on cutaneous manifestations of typical non-tender ulcer with black eschar, with or without oedema, and a history of butchering, or dressing/washing of cattle/goat or their meat. Diagnosis was established by demonstration of large gram-positive rods, typically resembling B. anthracis under light microscope where possible and also by ascertaining therapeutic success. The mean age of cases was 21.4 years (ranging from 3 to 46 years), 7 (46.7%) being males and 8 (53.3%) females. The majority of cases were from lower middle socioeconomic status. Types of exposures included butchering (20%), contact with raw meat (46.7%), and live animals (33.3%). Malignant pustule was present in upper extremity, both extremities, face, and trunk at frequencies of 11 (73.3%), 2 (13.3%), 1 (6.7%) and 1 (6.7%) respectively. Eight (53.3%) patients presented with fever, 7 (46.7%) had localized oedema and 5 (33.3%) had regional lymphadenopathy. Anthrax was confirmed in 13 (86.7%) cases by demonstration of gram-positive rods. All cases were cured with 2 months oral ciprofloxacin combined with flucoxacillin for 2 weeks. Conclusions We present the findings from this series of cases to reinforce the criteria for clinical diagnosis and to urge prompt therapeutic measures to treat cutaneous anthrax

  11. Evaluation of hospital medication inventory policies.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Marek; Mooney, Ed; Chen, Shi-Jie Gary; Mazur, Lukasz M

    2014-09-01

    As supply chain costs constitute a large portion of hospitals' operating expenses and with $27.7 billion spent by the US hospitals on drugs alone in 2009, improving medication inventory management provides a great opportunity to decrease the cost of healthcare. This study investigates different management approaches for a system consisting of one central storage location, the main pharmacy, and multiple dispensing machines located in each department. Each medication has a specific unit cost, availability from suppliers, criticality level, and expiration date. Event-driven simulation is used to evaluate the performance of several inventory policies based on the total cost and patient safety (service level) under various arrangements of the system defined by the number of drugs and departments, and drugs' criticality, availability, and expiration levels. Our results show that policies that incorporate drug characteristics in ordering decisions can address the tradeoff between patient safety and cost. Indeed, this study shows that such policies can result in higher patient safety and lower overall cost when compared to traditional approaches. Additional insights from this study allow for better understanding of the medication inventory system's dynamics and suggest several directions for future research in this topic. Findings of this study can be applied to help hospital pharmacies with managing their inventory. PMID:24014095

  12. Population Aging and the Determinants of Healthcare Expenditures: The Case of Hospital, Medical and Pharmaceutical Care in British Columbia, 1996 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    There is a gap between rhetoric and reality concerning healthcare expenditures and population aging: although decades-old research suggests otherwise, there is widespread belief that the sustainability of the healthcare system is under serious threat owing to population aging. To shed new empirical light on this old debate, we used population-based administrative data to quantify recent trends and determinants of expenditure on hospital, medical and pharmaceutical care in British Columbia. We modelled changes in inflation-adjusted expenditure per capita between 1996 and 2006 as a function of two demographic factors (population aging and changes in age-specific mortality rates) and three non-demographic factors (age-specific rates of use of care, quantities of care per user and inflation-adjusted costs per unit of care). We found that population aging contributed less than 1% per year to spending on medical, hospital and pharmaceutical care. Moreover, changes in age-specific mortality rates actually reduced hospital expenditure by —0.3% per year. Based on forecasts through 2036, we found that the future effects of population aging on healthcare spending will continue to be small. We therefore conclude that population aging has exerted, and will continue to exert, only modest pressures on medical, hospital and pharmaceutical costs in Canada. As indicated by the specific non-demographic cost drivers computed in our study, the critical determinants of expenditure on healthcare stem from non-demographic factors over which practitioners, policy makers and patients have discretion. PMID:22851987

  13. Poisonings at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Singh, P M; Bharati, U; Dhungel, S

    2011-09-01

    Poisoning is an increasingly common social problem in Nepal. Studies on poisoning in semi urban areas of Nepal are minimal. Here we, present a prospective study of poisoning in semi urban area of capital, Kathmandu lasting for six years duration. Altogether there were 354 cases of various poisoning, admitted in Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from Baisakh 2062 (April 16, 2005) to Chaitra 2067 (April 15, 2011). Male: Female ratio was 135:219 (1:1.6) and Age +/- SD was age 29.3 +/- 13.8 years. Age group (20-29 years) comprised of 138 patients (38.9% followed by < 20 years age group (92, 25.9%). Brahman/ chhetri (150, 42.4%) and Mongolian (146, 41.2%) ethnic groups were the main sufferers of poisoning, followed by newars (41, 11.6%) patients. Deliberate self harm was the cause for poisoning in maximum number of patients (156, 44.1%), followed by depression (64, 18.1%) and accidental poisoning (42, 11.9%). Organophosphorus (152, 42.9%), medicines (71, 20.1%), and rodenticide poisoning (38, 10.7%) were common poisons. Metacid (Methyl parathion) (46, 15.5%) was the most popular brand of poisoning agent used in Nepal for suicidal purpose. The over all mortality rate of poisoning in general was 7.1% with organophosphorus poisoning topping the list (19, 12.5%). We also present mad honey poisonings in a small group of 9 (3.2%) patients with M:F 8:1, age 26.5 +/- 8.8 years. Due precaution should be undertaken during their management as some of them may go into cardiopulmonary arrest and should not be considered benign when more than 5 tablespoonful wild honey is consumed. PMID:22808816

  14. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further

  15. [Minor emergency cases in big hospitals].

    PubMed

    Streuli, Rolf A

    2015-01-01

    Our hospitals are suffering from an increasing run of "minor emergency cases". Those are simple medical or surgical ailments that could be taken care of by a general practitioner's office in a competent and cost efficient way. Because of the ever growing problem of a shortage of general practitioners, those patients are directly going to the emergency room of our hospitals, where they are usually seen by a young and yet unexperienced doctor, who is ordering an expensive battery of tests even for minor troubles of his or her wellbeing. It was shown that emergency room crowding has a negative impact on the quality of patient care. The establishment of an office run by a general practitioner within the hospital emergency room may result in a certain relief of the situation. PMID:25533247

  16. Medical hospitalizations in prostate cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Gnanaraj, Jerome; Balakrishnan, Shobana; Umar, Zarish; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Pavlovich, Christian P; Wright, Scott M; Khaliq, Waseem

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to explore the context and reasons for medical hospitalizations among prostate cancer survivors and to study their relationship with obesity and the type of prostate cancer treatment. A retrospective review of medical records was performed at an academic institution for male patients aged 40 years and older who were diagnosed and/or treated for prostate cancer 2 years prior to the study's observation period from January 2008 to December 2010. Unpaired t test, ANOVA, and Chi-square tests were used to compare patients' characteristics, admission types, and medical comorbidities by body mass index (BMI) and prostate cancer treatment. Mean age for the study population was 76 years (SD = 9.2). Two hundred and forty-five prostate cancer survivors were stratified into two groups: non-obese (BMI < 30 kg/m(2)) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). The study population's characteristics analyzed by BMI were similar including Gleason score, presence of metastatic disease and genitourinary-related side effects. Only 13 % of admissions were for complaints related to their genitourinary system. Neither the specific treatment that the patients had received for their prostate cancer, nor obesity was associated with the reasons for their medical admission. Survivorship after having a diagnosis of prostate cancer is often lengthy, and these men are at risk of being hospitalized, as they get older. From this inquiry, it has become clear that neither body mass index nor prior therapy is associated with specific admission characteristics, and only a minority of such admissions was directly related to prostate cancer or the genitourinary tract. PMID:27324503

  17. Health Care Practices for Medical Textiles in Government Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akubue, B. N.; Anikweze, G. U.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the health care practices for medical textiles in government hospitals Enugu State, Nigeria. Specifically, the study determined the availability and maintenance of medical textiles in government hospitals in Enugu State, Nigeria. A sample of 1200 hospital personnel were studied. One thousand two hundred…

  18. Violent Behavior among hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ochitill, H N; Krieger, M

    1982-02-01

    To characterize violent behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients, we reviewed documented violent incidents at the San Francisco General Hospital during a two-year period. Twenty-nine incidents of verbal and physical violence occurred. One patient was gravely ill and three were delirious. All the incidents were associated with increased levels of tension and loss of impulse control. In most cases, contention with the staff regarding pain medication or ward regulations was a precipitating event. Of the 28 patients with mental disorders, 19 were substance abusers, six had organic brain syndrome, tw had neurosis, and one had schizophrenia. The findings suggest that physicians should be more sensitive to patient characteristics and to the situational characteristics of the violent incident. Explicit measures that anticipate and reduce violent behavior are reviewed. PMID:7058353

  19. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  20. Changes in AIDS case reporting after hospital site visits.

    PubMed Central

    Fife, D; McAnaney, J; Rahman, M A

    1991-01-01

    In an effort to improve AIDS case reporting, site visits (meetings with hospital staff to encourage reporting) were made to all Philadelphia hospitals. Comparisons of hospitals visited during a 7-week period with hospitals not visited during that period indicated that the site visits were followed by a marked increase in case reports. No similar increase was observed at the comparison hospitals. The increased reporting was accompanied by an increased lag time from diagnosis to report, suggesting that the additional reports at visited hospitals were the result of the identification of previously missed cases rather than a speedup of reporting. Cases reported after the visits were more likely to have white-collar occupations or private medical insurance than were those reported before the visits. PMID:1746665

  1. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  2. Integrating medical specialists and hospitals. The growing relevance of collective organisation of medical specialists for Dutch hospital governance.

    PubMed

    Scholten, G R M; van der Grinten, T E D

    2002-11-01

    The policy of the Dutch government (now enshrined in legislation) aims at the integration of medical specialists in hospitals and seeks to end the economic and organisational autonomy of the medical specialist. This article suggests that this policy has also acted as an incentive for medical specialists to develop local strategies that often diverge. Medical specialists are pursuing strategies that aim to strengthen their collective power within the hospital organisation while at the same time consolidating their entrepreneurial status. Medical staff governance has consequently become a key factor in hospital governance. PMID:12354408

  3. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical treatment and... GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of the... other specific duty to which they have been assigned shall be entitled to the same hospital treatment...

  4. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  5. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  6. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  7. 33 CFR 5.59 - Medical treatment and hospitalization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical treatment and hospitalization. 5.59 Section 5.59 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.59 Medical treatment and hospitalization. When any member of...

  8. [Distinguished medical students of Boji Hospital in Guangzhou (1855 - 1900)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Z

    1999-07-01

    Guangzhou Boji Hospital (The Canton Hospital) was the most famous western medical hospital established in 1835. John G. Kerr, an American doctor with the Presbyterian Mission, was the founder of the hosptial. He became the director of Boji Hospital in 1855 and worked there for 44 years. Chen Mengnan, Kang Guangren, Sun Yatsen (Zhongshan), Zheng Shiliang, Zhang Zhujun and Shi Jingran were medical students of Boji Hospital in this period. They had made important contributions to China during the rapid changing society of the late Qing dynasty. PMID:11624103

  9. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    MedlinePlus

    ... your medicine. This prescription goes to the hospital pharmacy. The hospital pharmacist reads and fills the prescription. ... The pharmacy may receive some prescriptions by computer (electronic) and some that are handwritten. Electronic prescriptions are easier to ...

  10. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  11. Predictors of medication errors among elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Picone, Debra Matsen; Titler, Marita G; Dochterman, Joanne; Shever, Leah; Kim, Taikyoung; Abramowitz, Paul; Kanak, Mary; Qin, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors are a serious safety concern and most errors are preventable. A retrospective study design was employed to describe medication errors experienced during 10187 hospitalizations of elderly patients admitted to a Midwest teaching hospital between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001 and to determine the factors predictive of medication errors. The model considered patient characteristics, clinical conditions, interventions, and nursing unit characteristics. The dependent variable, medication error, was measured using a voluntary incident reporting system. There were 861 medication errors; 96% may have been preventable. Most errors were omissions errors (48.8%) and the source was administration (54%) or transcription errors (38%). Variables associated with a medication error included unique number of medications (polypharmacy), patient gender and race, RN staffing changes, medical and nursing interventions, and specific pharmacological agents. Further validation of this explanatory model and focused interventions may help decrease the incidence of medication errors. PMID:18305099

  12. Knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Medication errors are the most common types of medical errors in hospitals and leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge of healthcare professionals about medication errors in hospitals. Settings and Design: A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to randomly selected healthcare professionals in eight hospitals in Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Subjects and Methods: An 18-item survey was designed and comprised questions on demographic data, knowledge of medication errors, availability of reporting systems in hospitals, attitudes toward error reporting, causes of medication errors. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software Version 17. Results: A total of 323 of healthcare professionals completed the questionnaire with 64.6% response rate of 138 (42.72%) physicians, 34 (10.53%) pharmacists, and 151 (46.75%) nurses. A majority of the participants had a good knowledge about medication errors concept and their dangers on patients. Only 68.7% of them were aware of reporting systems in hospitals. Healthcare professionals revealed that there was no clear mechanism available for reporting of errors in most hospitals. Prescribing (46.5%) and administration (29%) errors were the main causes of errors. The most frequently encountered medication errors were anti-hypertensives, antidiabetics, antibiotics, digoxin, and insulin. Conclusions: This study revealed differences in the awareness among healthcare professionals toward medication errors in hospitals. The poor knowledge about medication errors emphasized the urgent necessity to adopt appropriate measures to raise awareness about medication errors in Saudi hospitals. PMID:27330261

  13. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised. PMID:22451705

  14. Medication Use in the Transition from Hospital to Home

    PubMed Central

    Cua, Yvette M.; Kripalani, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    After hospital discharge, correct understanding and use of medications are key components of patient safety. The current discharge process does not provide adequate fail-safes to ensure quality post-discharge care. This often leads to preventable medication errors as well as non-adherence. Several barriers to successful discharge counseling, including use of medical jargon, lack of educational and administrative resources, time constraints, and low health literacy, contribute to ineffective communication between hospital physicians and patients. Other obstacles include inaccurate or incomplete documentation of the medication history, lack of social support, financial constraints, and poor transfer of information to outpatient physicians. Solutions to improve medication use in the transition period after hospital discharge require effective communication with patients through the use of easily understood language, highlighting key information, and ensuring patient comprehension through the “teach back” technique. More timely communication with outpatient physicians in addition to a more comprehensive transfer of information further facilitate the transition home. Finally, a systematic process of medication reconciliation also aids in decreasing the incidence of medication errors. Hospital-based physicians who attend to key details in the process of discharging patients can have a profound impact on improving medication adherence, avoiding medication errors, and decreasing adverse outcomes in the post-discharge period. PMID:18327350

  15. Why Medical Case Reports?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Medicine is built up of single cases. Individual patients—single cases—are the essence of what medicine deals with. Every patient is important, and every case can be a lesson. Clinician, researcher, and epidemiologist Alvan Feinstein said, “In caring for patients, clinicians constantly perform experiments. During a single week of active practice, a busy clinician conducts more experiments than most of his laboratory colleagues do in a year.”1 Medicine stretches between the intertwined poles of being developed in the laboratories of the pharmaceutical industry and in the clinical practice of the “clinical champions”—the innovative clinician, therapist, nurse, or midwife. While the laboratory testing route (pharmacology, quality assessment, phase I-IV trials) is well established, what about the significant clinical observations? How can they be presented scientifically? PMID:24278793

  16. Continuing Medical Education: Linking the Community Hospital and the Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Phil R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A group of community hospitals has been linked to the University of Southern California School of Medicine in a continuing medical education network. An educational development team based at the school helps community hospital physicians identify educational needs and develop responses using local and medical school experts as faculty. (Author/JMD)

  17. Maximizing Financial Resources in Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Terry S.

    1979-01-01

    The University of California at Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital created a healthier environment with inexpensive business procedures. Reported are: removal of billing responsibilities from faculty, separation of discharge functions from receptionist's functions, billing system/medical records system, and use of credit cards and…

  18. [Assessment of medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital].

    PubMed

    Al-Khatib, I A; Khatib, R A

    2006-01-01

    We studied medical waste management in a Palestinian hospital in the West Bank and the role of municipality in this management. In general, "good management practices" were inadequate; there was insufficient separation between hazardous and non-hazardous wastes, an absence of necessary rules and regulations for the collection of wastes from the hospital wards and the on-site transport to a temporary storage location inside and outside the hospital and inadequate waste treatment and disposal of hospital wastes along with municipal garbage. Moreover, training of personnel was lacking and protective equipment and measures for staff were not available. No special landfills for hazardous wastes were found within the municipality. PMID:17037705

  19. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  20. Detecting medication errors: analysis based on a hospital's incident reports.

    PubMed

    Härkänen, Marja; Turunen, Hannele; Saano, Susanna; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse how medication incidents are detected in different phases of the medication process. The study design is a retrospective register study. The material was collected from one university hospital's web-based incident reporting database in Finland. In 2010, 1617 incident reports were made, 671 of those were medication incidents and analysed in this study. Statistical methods were used to analyse the material. Results were reported using frequencies and percentages. Twenty-one percent of all medication incidents were detected during documenting or reading the documents. One-sixth of medication incidents were detected during medicating the patients, and approximately one-tenth were detected during verifying of the medicines. It is important to learn how to break the chain of medication errors as early as possible. Findings showed that for nurses, the ability to concentrate on documenting and medicating the patient is essential. PMID:24256158

  1. Tune v. Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia directed the removal of life support from a 71-year-old terminally ill cancer patient at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The court held that competent adult patients who are in federal medical facilities and who are afflicted with terminal illnesses have a right to decide for themselves whether to allow their lives to be prolonged by artificial means, including the right to demand the withdrawal of life support already begun. Societal concern for the prevention of suicide was not involved because permission was being sought merely to allow nature to take its course. PMID:11648165

  2. [Pre-hospital medicine and medical control system in Japan].

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Seizan

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to treat the patient from the site of the emergency to raise a lifesaving rate of the patient. As a prime example would be out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Once you start the treatment after hospital arrival, cardiac arrest patient can't be life-saving. It is necessary to start the chest compression, etc. from the site of the emergency. Medical care to be carried out on the scene of emergency is the pre-hospital care. In recent years, improvement of the pre-hospital care is remarkable in Japan. It is because of that the quantity and quality of the emergency life-saving technician are being enhanced. And also doctor-helicopter system have been enhanced. Medical control is a critical component of the improvement. PMID:26915258

  3. [Desirable medical technologists in a community support hospital].

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Recently, there have been marked advances in the technological strategies employed in medical examinations. The educational concept to nurture highly capable medical technologists is considered to be a priority issue by not only educators but also employers, even though the medical educational levels have markedly improved in every college and university. It is commonly acknowledged that the results of any examination in the clinical laboratory should be accurate and fed back to medical doctors as soon as possible. The business outline of medical technologists in our hospital is becoming more extensive because we act as a core hospital in the area, and so knowledge regarding many kinds of chemical and transfusion examinations is required in operations performed around the clock. Furthermore, medical doctors, clerical workers, nurses, and volunteers comprise a team of sophisticated workers in our hospital. To accomplish our daily work, character traits such as accuracy, honesty, perseverance, and ability to follow instruction manuals, are the most fundamental and valuable. To nurture a highly career-oriented medical technologist, we propose that the following should be focused on: self-responsibility, reduction of malpractices, economic profitability, brainstorming, education of subsequent generations, and the spirit of cooperativeness and reconciliation. Additionally, it is another basic requirement of competent medical technologists to learn to adapt to laboratory-based changes in their work throughout their career. In conclusion, how to adapt to any social demand and learn strategies in any era should be taught in college or university as well as after graduation because each hospital and institute has a different philosophy and requirements of newcomers. It is important for medical technologists and doctors to develop flexible ways of thinking, although we sometimes might accede to traditional ways. PMID:18709992

  4. Medical practice, procedure manuals and the standardisation of hospital death.

    PubMed

    Hadders, Hans

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines how death is managed in a larger regional hospital within the Norwegian health-care. The central focus of my paper concerns variations in how healthcare personnel enact death and handle the dead patient. Over several decades, modern standardised hospital death has come under critique in the western world. Such critique has resulted in changes in the standardisation of hospital deaths within Norwegian health-care. In the wake of the hospice movement and with greater focus on palliative care, doors have gradually been opened and relatives of the deceased are now more often invited to participate. I explore how the medical practice around death along with the procedure manual of post-mortem care at Trondheim University Hospital has changed. I argue that in the late-modern context, standardisation of hospital death is a multidimensional affair, embedded in a far more comprehensive framework than the depersonalized medico-legal. In the late-modern Norwegian hospital, interdisciplinary negotiation and co-operation has allowed a number of different agendas to co-exist, without any ensuing loss of the medical power holder's authority to broker death. I follow Mol's notion of praxiographic orientation of the actor-network approach while exploring this medical practice. PMID:19228301

  5. The Impact of Medical Tourism on Thai Private Hospital Management: Informing Hospital Policy

    PubMed Central

    James, Paul TJ

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this paper is to help consolidate and understand management perceptions and experiences of a targeted group (n=7) of Vice-Presidents of international Private Thai hospitals in Bangkok regarding medical tourism impacts. Methods: The method adopted uses a small-scale qualitative inquiry. Examines the on-going development and service management factors which contribute to the establishment and strengthening of relationships between international patients and hospital medical services provision. Develops a qualitative model that attempts to conceptualise the findings from a diverse range of management views into a framework of main (8) - Hospital Management; Hospital Processes; Hospital Technology; Quality Related; Communications; Personnel; Financial; and Patients; and consequent sub-themes (22). Results: Outcomes from small-scale qualitative inquiries cannot by design be taken outside of its topical arena. This inevitably indicates that more research of this kind needs to be carried out to understand this field more effectively. The evidence suggests that Private Thai hospital management have established views about what constitutes the impact of medical tourism on hospital policies and practices when hospital staff interact with international patients. Conclusions: As the private health service sector in Thailand continues to grow, future research is needed to help hospitals provide appropriate service patterns and appropriate medical products/services that meet international patient needs and aspirations. Highlights the increasing importance of the international consumer in Thailand’s health industry. This study provides insights of private health service providers in Bangkok by helping to understand more effectively health service quality environments, subsequent service provision, and the integrated development and impacts of new medical technology. PMID:22980119

  6. Changes in Hospital Competitive Strategy: A New Medical Arms Race?

    PubMed Central

    Devers, Kelly J; Brewster, Linda R; Casalino, Lawrence P

    2003-01-01

    Objective To describe changes in hospitals' competitive strategies, specifically the relative emphasis placed on strategies for competing along price and nonprice (i.e., service, amenities, perceived quality) dimensions, and the reasons for any observed shifts. Methods This study uses data gathered through the Community Tracking Study site visits, a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of 12 U.S. communities. Research teams visited each of these communities every two years since 1996 and conducted between 50 to 90 semistructured interviews. Additional information on hospital competition and strategy was gathered from secondary data. Principal Findings We found that hospitals' strategic emphasis changed significantly between 1996–1997 and 2000–2001. In the mid-1990s, hospitals primarily competed on price through “wholesale” strategies (i.e., providing services attractive to managed care plans). By 2000–2001, nonprice competition was becoming increasingly important and hospitals were reviving “retail” strategies (i.e., providing services attractive to individual physicians and the patients they serve). Three major factors explain this shift in hospital strategy: less than anticipated selective contracting and capitated payment; the freeing up of hospital resources previously devoted to horizontal and vertical integration strategies; and, the emergence and growth of new competitors. Conclusion Renewed emphasis on nonprice competition and retail strategies, and the service mimicking and one-upmanship that result, suggest that a new medical arms race is emerging. However, there are important differences between the medical arms race today and the one that occurred in the 1970s and early 1980s: the hospital market is more concentrated and price competition remains relatively important. The development of a new medical arms race has significant research and policy implications. PMID:12650375

  7. Introduction of Ambulatory Medical Training in a Veterans Administration Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciato, Dennis A.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of a continuity of a care clinic in a highly subspecialized Veterans Administration internal medicine training program for postgraduate medical students is described, with focus on resolving problems created by the idiosyncratic administrative features and resource limitations of the hospital. (Author/JMD)

  8. Medical Foster Care: An Alternative to Long-Term Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Patricia H.; Whitworth, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a program model, Medical Foster Care, which uses registered nurses as foster parents who work closely with biological parents of abused and neglected children with acute health problems. The program reunites families, improves parenting skills, and saves money in long-term hospitalization. (Author/BB)

  9. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): An automated hospital information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Simmons, P. B.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    An automated hospital information system that handles all data related to patient-care activities is described. The description is designed to serve as a manual for potential users, nontechnical medical personnel who may use the system. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  10. Cat Flea Infestation in a Hospital: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Norhayati, Moktar; Lee, Yin Yin

    2012-01-01

    Cat flea bite in humans results in extremely pruritic skin lesions. It has been reported to occur among those living in domiciliary accommodation. However, nosocomial infestation with cat flea has not been reported. We hereby report a case of nosocomial infestation of cat flea in a hospital facility. Identification of the parasite, its appropriate eradication, and adequate medical management of the patients resulted in a satisfactory outcome. PMID:22451739

  11. Trends in small hospital medical services in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the medical services provided in small hospitals in Ontario in 1995 with those provided in 1988. DESIGN: Mailed survey questionnaire. SETTING: Small hospitals in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Chiefs of Staff of the hospitals. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hospital size and location; numbers of physicians; availability of obstetric, anesthesia, and general surgery services; and other medical services available. The 1995 questionnaire was identical to the 1988 one, except for addition of questions on midwives and deletion of the detailed emergency medicine section. RESULTS: Sixty hospitals responded in both years. In these hospitals, there were significantly fewer acute care beds and births in 1995 than in 1988. Availability of general anesthesia and general surgery was significantly reduced, although general anesthesia was administered and general surgeries were performed more often. There were significantly fewer GP anesthetists and significantly fewer family physicians who attended births, although there were slightly more family physicians overall. There were fewer specialists. CONCLUSION: These are negative trends, particularly for women giving birth and patients needing emergency surgery in rural Ontario. PMID:9805165

  12. [New initiatives to improve medication safety in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Otero López, María José

    2004-01-01

    Medication errors constitute a significant public health problem and are recognised as such nowadays among healthcare professionals, societies, authorities and international organizations. This has led to seeking and implementing effective practices focused on improving medication use safety. This article briefly describes some of the most recent initiatives promoted to prevent medication errors in the hospital setting. These safety improvement initiatives are based upon progressively developing an institutional culture of safety and on establishing practices designed to reduce errors or detect them in time, thus avoiding adverse effects to patients. Among these recent initiatives are the safety practices approved by the National Quality Forum, and the National Patient Safety Goals that the Joint Commission on Healthcare Accreditation has required since 2003. Also mentioned are several strategies that have been offered to facilitate the application of these practices, among which are the Pathways to Medication Safely, the development of collaborative projects among hospitals and organizations of experts, and the inclusion of a medication safety specialist in hospitals as a support figure overseeing the application of safety measures. Finally, the challenges inherent in putting these preventive measures into real patient's care are discussed. The barriers confronting this step must obviously be faced if improvements in patient safety are truly to be achieved. PMID:15293954

  13. Case-based medical informatics

    PubMed Central

    Pantazi, Stefan V; Arocha, José F; Moehr, Jochen R

    2004-01-01

    Background The "applied" nature distinguishes applied sciences from theoretical sciences. To emphasize this distinction, we begin with a general, meta-level overview of the scientific endeavor. We introduce the knowledge spectrum and four interconnected modalities of knowledge. In addition to the traditional differentiation between implicit and explicit knowledge we outline the concepts of general and individual knowledge. We connect general knowledge with the "frame problem," a fundamental issue of artificial intelligence, and individual knowledge with another important paradigm of artificial intelligence, case-based reasoning, a method of individual knowledge processing that aims at solving new problems based on the solutions to similar past problems. We outline the fundamental differences between Medical Informatics and theoretical sciences and propose that Medical Informatics research should advance individual knowledge processing (case-based reasoning) and that natural language processing research is an important step towards this goal that may have ethical implications for patient-centered health medicine. Discussion We focus on fundamental aspects of decision-making, which connect human expertise with individual knowledge processing. We continue with a knowledge spectrum perspective on biomedical knowledge and conclude that case-based reasoning is the paradigm that can advance towards personalized healthcare and that can enable the education of patients and providers. We center the discussion on formal methods of knowledge representation around the frame problem. We propose a context-dependent view on the notion of "meaning" and advocate the need for case-based reasoning research and natural language processing. In the context of memory based knowledge processing, pattern recognition, comparison and analogy-making, we conclude that while humans seem to naturally support the case-based reasoning paradigm (memory of past experiences of problem-solving and

  14. Health Literacy and Medication Understanding among Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marvanova, Marketa; Roumie, Christianne L.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Cawthon, Courtney; Schnipper J., Jeffrey L.; Kripalani, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients’ ability to accurately report their pre-admission medications is a vital aspect of medication reconciliation and may affect subsequent medication adherence and safety. Little is known about predictors of pre-admission medication understanding. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of patients at 2 hospitals using a novel Medication Understanding Questionnaire (MUQ). MUQ scores range from 0 to 3 and test knowledge of the medication purpose, dose, and frequency. We used multivariable ordinal regression to determine predictors of higher MUQ scores. Results Among the 790 eligible patients, the median age was 61 (interquartile range [IQR] 52, 71), 21% had marginal or inadequate health literacy, and the median number of medications was 8 (IQR 5, 11). Median MUQ score was 2.5 (IQR 2.2, 2.8). Patients with marginal or inadequate health literacy had a lower odds of understanding their medications (odds ratio [OR]=0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.84; p=0.0001; and OR=0.49; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.78; p=0.0001; respectively), compared to patients with adequate health literacy. Higher number of prescription medications was associated with lower MUQ scores (OR=0.52; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.75; for those using 6 medications vs 1; p=0.0019), as was impaired cognitive function (OR=0.57; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.86; p=0.001). Conclusions Lower health literacy, lower cognitive function, and higher number of medications each were independently associated with less understanding of the pre-admission medication regimen. Clinicians should be aware of these factors when considering the accuracy of patient-reported medication regimens and counseling patients about safe and effective medication use. PMID:22042745

  15. Workload and environmental factors in hospital medication errors.

    PubMed

    Roseman, C; Booker, J M

    1995-01-01

    Nine hospital workload factors and seasonal changes in daylight and darkness were examined over a 5-year period in relation to nurse medication errors at a medical center in Anchorage, Alaska. Three workload factors, along with darkness, were found to be significant predictors of the risk of medication error. Errors increased with the number of patient days per month (OR/250 patient days = 1.61) and the number of shifts worked by temporary nursing staff (OR/10 shifts = 1.15); errors decreased with more overtime worked by permanent nursing staff members (OR/10 shifts = .85). Medication errors were 95% more likely in midwinter than in the fall, but the effect of increasing darkness was strongest; a 2-month delay was found between the level of darkness and the rate of errors. More than half of all medication errors occurred during the first 3 months of the year. PMID:7624233

  16. Implementation of Single Source Based Hospital Information System for the Catholic Medical Center Affiliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyoung; Choi, Ran; Lee, Jonghyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this research is to introduce the unique approach of the Catholic Medical Center (CMC) integrate network hospitals with organizational and technical methodologies adopted for seamless implementation. Methods The Catholic Medical Center has developed a new hospital information system to connect network hospitals and adopted new information technology architecture which uses single source for multiple distributed hospital systems. Results The hospital information system of the CMC was developed to integrate network hospitals adopting new system development principles; one source, one route and one management. This information architecture has reduced the cost for system development and operation, and has enhanced the efficiency of the management process. Conclusions Integrating network hospital through information system was not simple; it was much more complicated than single organization implementation. We are still looking for more efficient communication channel and decision making process, and also believe that our new system architecture will be able to improve CMC health care system and provide much better quality of health care service to patients and customers. PMID:21818432

  17. Medication errors in family practice, in hospitals and after discharge from the hospital: an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Thousands of medical errors are occurring daily in physician's offices, in hospitals, and even upon discharge from the hospital, leading to unnecessary injury and death and costing billions of dollars. We have a systems approach that has been proven to be tried and true in aviation, nuclear energy and many other industrial settings. Being honest when medical mistakes occur, reporting them to national clearing house, objectively searching for root causes, avoiding the fixing of arbitrary blame, and then, where possible, implementing safeguards to minimize the occurrence of future mistakes, is the best way to enhance patient safety. But until the medical establishment takes medical errors and patient safety more seriously, and until the general public rises up in protest, it is up to the state and federal governments to take the lead in protecting the lives of innocent Americans by creating a public policy. PMID:15301199

  18. Drug-related problems among medical ward patients in Jimma university specialized hospital, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bereket Molla; Daba, Daniel; Habte, Belete

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The increasing number of available drugs and drug users, as well as more complex drug regimens led to more side effects and drug interactions and complicates follow-up. The objective of this study was to assess drug-related problems (DRPs) and associated factors in hospitalized patients. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study design was employed. The study was conducted in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Jimma, located in the south west of Addis Ababa. All patients who were admitted to the medical ward from February 2011 to March 2011 were included in the study. Data on sociodemographic variables, past medical history, drug history, current diagnosis, current medications, vital signs, and relevant laboratory data were collected using semi-structured questionnaire and data collection forms which were filling through patient interview and card review. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 for windows. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, Chi-square, and logistic regression were utilized. Findings: Out of 257 study participants, 189 (73.5%) had DRPs and a total of 316 DRPs were identified. From the six classes of DRPs studied, 103 (32.6%) cases related to untreated indication or need additional drug therapy, and 49 (15.5%) cases related to high medication dosage. Unnecessary drug therapy in 49 (15.5%) cases, low medication dosage in 44 (13.9%) cases, and ineffective drug therapy in 42 (13.3%) cases were the other classes of problems identified. Noncompliance in 31 (9.8%) cases was the least prevalent DRP. Independent factors which predicted the occurrence of DRPs in the study population were sex, age, polypharmacy, and clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions. The prevalence of DRPs was substantially high (73.5%). Conclusion: Drug-related problems are common among medical ward patients. Indication-related problems, untreated indication and unnecessary drug therapy were the most common types of DRPs among patients of our

  19. Noncompliance pattern due to medication errors at a Teaching Hospital in Srikot, India

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Heenopama; Thawani, Vijay; Raina, Rangeel Singh; Kothiyal, Gitanjali; Chakarabarty, Mrinmoy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the medication errors leading to noncompliance in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital of a teaching institution from Srikot, Garhwal, Uttarakhand to analyze the medication errors in 500 indoor prescriptions from medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and ENT departments over five months and 100 outdoor patients of medicine department. Results: Medication error rate for indoor patients was found to be 22.4 % and 11.4% for outdoor patients as against the standard acceptable error rate 3%. Maximum errors were observed in the indoor prescriptions of the surgery department accounting for 44 errors followed by medicine 32 and gynecology 25 in the 500 cases studied leading to faulty administration of medicines. Conclusion: Many medication errors were noted which go against the practice of rational therapeutics. Such studies can be directed to usher in the rational use of medicines for increasing compliance and therapeutic benefits. PMID:23833376

  20. Creating accountable care organizations: the extended hospital medical staff.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Elliott S; Staiger, Douglas O; Bynum, Julie P W; Gottlieb, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Many current policies and approaches to performance measurement and payment reform focus on individual providers; they risk reinforcing the fragmented care and lack of coordination experienced by patients with serious illness. In this paper we show that Medicare beneficiaries receive most of their care from relatively coherent local delivery systems comprising physicians and the hospitals where they work or admit their patients. Efforts to create accountable care organizations at this level--the extended hospital medical staff--deserve consideration as a potential means of improving the quality and lowering the cost of care. PMID:17148490

  1. Relevance of the electronic computer to hospital medical records*

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    During the past 30 years an “information explosion” has completely changed patterns of illness. Unit files of individual patients have become so large that they are increasingly difficult both to store physically and to assimilate mentally. We have reached a communications barriers which poses a major threat to the efficient practice of clinical medicine. At the same time a new kind of machine, the electronic digital computer, which was invented only 26 years ago, has already come to dominate large areas of military, scientific, commercial, and industrial activity. Its supremacy rests on its ability to perform any data procedure automatically and incredibly quickly. Computers are being employed in clinical medicine in hospitals for various purposes. They can act as arithmetic calculators, they can process and analyse output from recording devices, and they can make possible the automation of various machine systems. However, in the field of case records their role is much less well defined, for here the organization of data as a preliminary to computer input is the real stumbling-block. Data banks of retrospective selected clinical information have been in operation in some centres for a number of years. Attempts are now being made to design computerized “total information systems” to replace conventional paper records, and the possibility of automated diagnosis is being seriously discussed. In my view, however, the medical profession is in danger of being dazzled by optimistic claims about the usefulness of computers in case record processing. The solution to the present problems of record storage and handling is very simple, and does not involve computerization. PMID:4898564

  2. Mental hospital reform in Asia: the case of Yuli Veterans Hospital, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Yuan; Huang, Ai-Ling; Minas, Harry; Cohen, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Background Yuli Veterans Hospital (YVH) has been the largest mental hospital for the patients with chronic and severe mental illness in Taiwan for the past 50 years. While this hospital used to be a symbol of hopelessness among patients and their families and an unspoken shame among Taiwan psychiatry and mental health circles it now represents an example of how an old, custodial hospital can be transformed into a very different institution. In this case study we will describe the features of this transformation, which, over the past 20 years, has aimed to help extended stay inpatients with severe mental illness to integrate into the local community of Yuli even though it is not their original home. Methods Using historical documents and oral narratives from Yuli inhabitants, workers and patients of YVH, we will offer a case study of the Yuli model. Results There are four main components of the Yuli model: holistic medical support, vocational rehabilitation, case management, and the residential program. The four components help patients recover two essential features of their lives: vocational life and ordinary daily routines. As the process of recovery evolves, patients gradually regain inner stability, dignity, self-confidence, and a sense of control. The four components are critical to rebuild the structure and order of life of the patients and are indispensable and interdependent parts of one service package. They operate simultaneously to benefit the patients to the greatest degree possible. Discussion There are many challenges to the further development and financial viability of the model of services developed at YVH. There are also important questions concerning the replicability of the Yuli model in other sociocultural and service system contexts. Conclusion This case study reveals the possibility of transforming a custodial mental hospital into a hospital providing high quality care. Hospital and community are not in opposition. They are part of a

  3. [College education of medical technologists serving in highly specialized hospitals].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Nobuo

    2008-07-01

    Medical Technologists (MTs) who serve in the clinical laboratories of highly specialized hospitals (HSP) are required to operate highly advanced medical technology and to develop and evaluate highly advanced reagents or devices, and therefore require specialized training. Furthermore, MTs in some care units or diagnostic facilities of HSP are required to develop and maintain highly advanced medical skills. MTs who serve in HSP are called advanced specialized MTs, so-called Clinical Laboratory Scientists (CLS), and should be distinguished from specialized MTs and MTs. At present, the division of MTs is not officially accepted; however, the number of MTs with master's degrees will increase in the near future, and therefore it will be necessary for the educational association of MTs to qualify CLS as an official title. To develop the skills necessary to become a CLS before graduation, students participate in a number of programs, i.e., freshman seminars and medical team training, advanced field courses, clinical training (fourth grade), and laboratory research (fourth grade). We feel that laboratory research is the most important tool in the education of CLS, because the research process is the same as repeating the cycle: plan, do, evaluate, and discuss. The educational staff represent another important factor in the education of CLS, and they have long clinical careers and strong research directions. Finally, the Division of Medical Technology of the School of Health Sciences, Department of Laboratory Medicine of Shinshu University School of Medicine and Shinshu University Hospital cooperate in the education of MT and CLS. PMID:18709994

  4. Elevations U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Medical Officer in Charge Residence, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. Group practices and hospital affiliation of medical practices.

    PubMed

    Unland, J

    1993-03-01

    Federal reimbursement systems, state constitutional amendments, and fiscal responsibilities are driving physicians and hospitals into alliances that were unheard of a decade ago. How those alliances are established is critical to the success of those new affiliations. James Unland explores several forms of physician groups and physician-hospital alliances. The "Group Practice Without Walls," "The Mutual Service Corporation" and others are explored in this article. In a world of changing health-care programs, Unland states there is a middle ground where group-practice ownership and control are shared. The exact type of structure, ownership, and control will depend upon many factors. Unland makes a point-by-point evaluation of a hospital-group alliance that integrates numerous medical practices into a single operational entity. PMID:10124626

  6. Implementing electronic medication management at an Australian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Day, Richard O; Roffe, David J; Richardson, Katrina L; Baysari, Melissa T; Brennan, Nicholas J; Beveridge, Sandy; Melocco, Teresa; Ainge, John; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2011-11-01

    We describe the implementation of an electronic medication management system (eMMS) in an Australian teaching hospital, to inform future similar exercises. The success of eMMS implementation depends on: a positive workplace culture (leadership, teamwork and clinician ownership); acceptance of the major impact on work practices by all staff; timely system response to user feedback; training and support for clinicians; a usable system; adequate decision support. PMID:22060071

  7. On the measurement of hospital case mix.

    PubMed

    Klastorin, T D; Watts, C A

    1980-06-01

    This article discusses a number of issues related to the measurement of hospital diagnostic case mix. We initially examine a number of previous attempts to measure case mix based on surrogate measures (e.g., facilities and services) and information from predetermined discharge-classification systems. Since a number of researchers have attempted to reduce diagnostic classification data into a single-valued (i.e., scalar) case mix index, we then discuss a number of concepts and assumptions implicit in the construction of such indices. Among these assumptions is the property of functional homogeneity; this property and a methodology baed on Q-type factor analysis for testing for the presence of this property are defined. In order to illustrate the use of the methodology, it is applied to data from 153 hospitals in downstate New York. PMID:7401716

  8. Automated Communication Tools and Computer-Based Medication Reconciliation to Decrease Hospital Discharge Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth J; Handler, Steven M; Kapoor, Wishwa N; Martich, G Daniel; Reddy, Vivek K; Clark, Sunday

    2016-07-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of automated primary care physician (PCP) communication and patient safety tools, including computerized discharge medication reconciliation, on discharge medication errors and posthospitalization patient outcomes, using a pre-post quasi-experimental study design, in hospitalized medical patients with ≥2 comorbidities and ≥5 chronic medications, at a single center. The primary outcome was discharge medication errors, compared before and after rollout of these tools. Secondary outcomes were 30-day rehospitalization, emergency department visit, and PCP follow-up visit rates. This study found that discharge medication errors were lower post intervention (odds ratio = 0.57; 95% confidence interval = 0.44-0.74; P < .001). Clinically important errors, with the potential for serious or life-threatening harm, and 30-day patient outcomes were not significantly different between study periods. Thus, automated health system-based communication and patient safety tools, including computerized discharge medication reconciliation, decreased hospital discharge medication errors in medically complex patients. PMID:25753453

  9. A Retrospective Analysis of Direct Medical Cost and Cost of Drug Therapy in Hospitalized Patients at Private Hospital in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Kumbar, Shivaprasad Kalakappa

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacoeconomics is analytical tool to know cost of hospitalization and its effect on health care system and society. In India, apart from the government health services, private sector also play big role to provide health care services. Objective To study the direct medical cost and cost of drug therapy in hospitalized patients at private hospital. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted at private hospital in a metro city of Western India. Total 400 patients’ billing records were selected randomly for a period from 01/01/2013 to 31/12/2014. Data were collected from medical record of hospital with permission of medical director of hospital. Patients’ demographic profile age, sex, diagnosis and various costs like ICU charge, ventilator charge, diagnostic charge, etc. were noted in previously formed case record form. Data were analysed by Z, x2 and unpaired t-test. Result Patients were divided into less than 45 years and more than 45 year age group. They were divided into medical and surgical patients according to their admission in medical or surgical ward. Mortality, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, patients on ventilator were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients. Direct medical cost, ward bed charge, ICU bed charge, ventilator charge and cost of drug therapy per patient were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients while operation theatre and procedural charge were significantly (p<0.05) higher in surgical patients. Cost of fibrinolytics, anticoagulants, cardiovascular drugs were significantly (p<0.05) higher in medical patients. Cost of antimicrobials, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), antiemetics, analgesics, were significantly (p<0.05) higher in surgical patients. Conclusion Ward bed charge, ICU bed charge, ventilator charge accounted more than one third cost of direct medical cost in all the patients. Cost of drug therapy was one fourth of direct medical cost. Antimicrobials cost accounted 33% of cost

  10. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... veteran is receiving contract nursing home care and requires emergency treatment in non-VA facilities... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services...

  11. Pharmacist Staffing, Technology Use, and Implementation of Medication Safety Practices in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira S.; Davidson, Gestur

    2006-01-01

    Context: Medication safety is clearly an important quality issue for rural hospitals. However, rural hospitals face special challenges implementing medication safety practices in terms of their staffing and financial and technical resources. Purpose: This study assessed the capacity of small rural hospitals to implement medication safety…

  12. From Closet to Library in the Community Hospital: Remodeling a Hospital Medical Library

    PubMed Central

    Duva, Alice M.

    1971-01-01

    Halifax District Hospital's Medical Library, Daytona Beach, Florida was altered from two dingy rooms to a modern, well-equipped Medical Library twice its former size by its maintenance men in six months time, with the help of the librarian's sketches and an architect student from the junior college to draw the plans. A complete renovation was done, eighteen-inch walls between rooms being demolished, plumbing, ceiling, and windows removed. These were all replaced with walnut-paneled walls, special 125 candle-power lighted ceiling, retractable shelves, more shelves for periodicals and books, wall-to-wall carpeting and fashionable decor. New furniture, tape recorders, and TWX were made possible by a Medical Library Resource Grant. The official opening was six months from the first day of renovation, with ribbon cutting, guests, hospital personnel, and a reporter from the newspaper to take pictures for an article about the most modern medical library in Volusia County. The new Medical Library is in the “core” of the Medical Education Department with space for five years growth. PMID:5542918

  13. From closet to library in the community hospital: remodeling a hospital medical library.

    PubMed

    Duva, A M

    1971-01-01

    Halifax District Hospital's Medical Library, Daytona Beach, Florida was altered from two dingy rooms to a modern, well-equipped Medical Library twice its former size by its maintenance men in six months time, with the help of the librarian's sketches and an architect student from the junior college to draw the plans.A complete renovation was done, eighteen-inch walls between rooms being demolished, plumbing, ceiling, and windows removed. These were all replaced with walnut-paneled walls, special 125 candle-power lighted ceiling, retractable shelves, more shelves for periodicals and books, wall-to-wall carpeting and fashionable decor. New furniture, tape recorders, and TWX were made possible by a Medical Library Resource Grant. The official opening was six months from the first day of renovation, with ribbon cutting, guests, hospital personnel, and a reporter from the newspaper to take pictures for an article about the most modern medical library in Volusia County. The new Medical Library is in the "core" of the Medical Education Department with space for five years growth. PMID:5542918

  14. Maritime radio-medical services: the Singapore General Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Fatimah; Anantharaman, Venkataraman

    2002-07-01

    Medical care for the sick and injured on a variety of sea-faring vessels throughout the world represents a challenging area of medical care. The scope is extremely broad and unique in terms of the problems encountered at sea, logistical difficulties in assessment and treatment of patients, as well as the provision of definitive care. The problems of sparse resources availability, great distances, isolation, communications, accessibility, and weather are also very real. In Singapore, radio-medical advice was first coordinated by the Port Health Authority. In 1980, the accident and emergency department at Singapore General Hospital took over this responsibility. This report analyzes 2,320 calls received over a period of 21 years (January 1980 to December 2000). It highlights the common consultations, modes of communications, treatment and management prescribed, training requirements, as well as the challenges for the future. PMID:12098185

  15. Impact of pharmacy-led medication reconciliation on medication errors during transition in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lillian; Mosley, Juan; Lott, Sonia; Cyr, Ernie; Amin, Raid; Everton, Emily; Islami, Abdullah; Phan, Linh; Komolafe, Opeyemi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess if the pharmacy department should be more involved in the medication reconciliation process to assist in the reduction of medication errors that occur during transition of care points in the hospital setting. Methods: This was an observational prospective cohort study at a 531-bed hospital in Pensacola, FL from June 1, 2014 to August 31, 2014. Patients were included in the study if they had health insurance and were taking five or more medications. Patients with congestive heart failure were excluded from the study. Student pharmacists collected and evaluated medication histories obtained from patients’ community pharmacies, and directed patient interviews. Primary care providers were only contacted on an as needed basis. The information collected was presented to the clinical pharmacist, where interventions were made utilizing clinical judgment. Results: During the three month study, 1045 home medications were reviewed by student pharmacist. Of these, 290 discrepancies were discovered (27.8%; p=0.02). The most common medication discrepancy found was dose optimization (45.5%). The remaining discrepancies included: added therapy (27.6%), other (15.2%), and discontinued therapy (11.7%). Pharmacists made 143 interventions based on clinical judgment (49.3%; p=0.04). Conclusion: Involvement of pharmacy personnel during the medication reconciliation process can be an essential component in reducing medical errors. With the addition of the pharmacy department during the admission process, accuracy, cost savings, and patient safety across all phases and transition points of care were achieved. PMID:26759617

  16. Informed consent from patients participating in medical education: a survey from a university hospital in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Medical students at the University of the West Indies receive clinical training by passing through a series of hospital rotations at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Many of these patients are unaware that medical students may be involved in their care. We performed this study to determine patient awareness and their willingness to participate in research and teaching activities. Findings All consecutive patients admitted to the UHWI between May 1, 2006 and May 29, 2006 who required elective or emergency surgical procedures were prospectively identified These patients were interviewed using a standardised pre-tested questionnaire about their knowledge and willingness to have medical students participate in the delivery of their hospital care. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 12.0. There were 83 (39.5%) males and 127 (60.5%) females interviewed. The patients were unaware of the grade of the medical professional performing their interview/examination at admission in 157 (74.8%) cases or the grade of medical professional performing their operations in 101 (48.1%) cases. Only 14 (6.7%) patients were specifically asked to allow medical students to be present during their clinical evaluation and care. When specifically asked, 1 patient declined. Had they been asked, 196 (93.3%) patients would have voluntarily allowed medical student involvement. Only 90 (42.9%) patients were made aware that they were admitted to an academic centre with research interests. Only 6 (6.7%) patients declined. Had they been asked, 84 (93.3%) patients would be willing to participate in teaching or research projects. Conclusions As medical educators, we are responsible to adhere to ethical and legal guidelines when we interact with patients. It is apparent that there is urgent need for policy development at the UWI to guide clinicians and students on their interactions with patients. PMID:20003471

  17. Medical Device-Associated Candida Infections in a Rural Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of India

    PubMed Central

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Saini, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Health care associated infections (HCAIs) add incrementally to the morbidity, mortality, and cost expected of the patient's underlying diseases alone. Approximately, about half all cases of HCAIs are associated with medical devices. As Candida medical device-associated infection is highly drug resistant and can lead to serious life-threatening complications, there is a need of continuous surveillance of these infections to initiate preventive and corrective measures. The present study was conducted at a rural tertiary care hospital of India with an aim to evaluate the rate of medical device-associated Candida infections. Three commonly encountered medical device-associated infections (MDAI), catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CA-UTI), intravascular catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), were targeted. The overall rate of MDAI in our hospital was 2.1 per 1000 device days. The rate of Candida related CA-UTI and CR-BSI was noted as 1.0 and 0.3, respectively. Untiring efforts taken by team members of Hospital Acquired Infection Control Committee along with maintenance of meticulous hygiene of the hospital and wards may explain the low MDAI rates in our institute. The present surveillance helped us for systematic generation of institutional data regarding MDAI with special reference to role of Candida spp. PMID:26904115

  18. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. Results: We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. Conclusion: With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary. PMID:26759575

  19. Teaching hospital planning: a case study and the need for reform.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher K; Smith, Harry

    2010-08-16

    Academic teaching hospitals and their networks can best serve patients and other stakeholders by achieving critical mass and scope of clinical services, teaching and research. Successful hospital reconfigurations are associated with a convincing case and majority clinician buy-in. The inscrutable political decision to relocate services away from a major teaching hospital campus and into a merged Queensland Children's Hospital was determined without broad stakeholder consultation or a transparent and accountable business case. This compromised process poses a significant and enduring risk to patient care and Queensland's paediatric, perinatal, adolescent and obstetric academic teaching hospital services. As the proposed major stakeholder in Australia's public hospitals and medical workforce training, the federal government should review this decision using an effective methodology incorporating relevant criteria. National guidelines are needed to ensure best practice in the future planning and auditing of major health care projects. The medical profession is responsible for ensuring that health care policy complies with reliable evidence and good practice. PMID:20712545

  20. Telephone survey of hospital staff knowledge of medical device surveillance in a Paris hospital.

    PubMed

    Mazeau, Valérie; Grenier-Sennelier, Catherine; Paturel, Denys Xavier; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Vidal-Trecan, Gwenaëlle

    2004-12-01

    Reporting of incidents or near incidents because of medical devices in French hospitals relies on procedures following European and national guidelines. The authors intend to evaluate hospital staff knowledge on these surveillance procedures as a marker of appropriate application. A telephone survey is conducted on a sample of Paris University hospital staff (n = 327) using a structured questionnaire. Two-hundred sixteen persons completed the questionnaire. The response rate was lower among physicians, especially surgeons paid on an hourly basis. Rates of correct answers were different according to age, seniority, job, and department categories. Physicians and nurses correctly answered questions on theoretical knowledge more often than the other job categories. However, on questions dealing with actual practice conditions, correct answers depended more on age and seniority with a U-shaped distribution (minimum rates in intermediate categories of age and seniority). PMID:15492050

  1. [Resolution of medical complaints by arbitration. Analysis of 140 cases].

    PubMed

    Valle-González, A

    2000-01-01

    The author studied 140 complex medical complaints handled by an Alternative Disputes Resolution Institution (CONAMED), between June 1996 and December 1999. There were 79 females and 61 males, cases originated in public hospitals 93 (66.4%) and private hospitals or practitioners 47 (33.6%). Several cases were treated sequentially in both types of institutions. The medical specialties involved were in frequency order: Neurosurgery, General Surgery, Gyn-Ob, Anesthesiology, Traumatology and Orthopedics, Oncology, Emergency, and 22 others. The causes of complaints were: Surgical treatment, Medical treatment, Diagnosis, Anesthesia, and mixed causes. There were 59 deaths, 43 anatomic or functional loses, disability or sequelae; and 34 recoveries. CONAMED delivered 27 arbitration verdicts, 94 expert opinions asked by prosecutors or human rights organizations, and 1 technical advice to medical authorities. Some resolutions included more than one case. More than half of physicians involved were found not guilty of malpractice. Even though the main CONAMED purpose is to improve the quality of Medical Care acting as The Health Ombudsman, its performance may be on behalf of medical practitioners. PMID:10992645

  2. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  3. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  4. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  5. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  6. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reasons enumerated in 38 CFR 17.47(i)(2). (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 1724) Enrollment Provisions and Medical... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries §...

  7. Implementation of vertical clinical pharmacist service on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Celina Setsuko; Mancio, Cassio Massashi; Pioner, Micheline da Costa; Alves, Fabricia Aparecida de Lima; Lira, Andreia Ramos; da Silva, João Severino; Ferracini, Fábio Teixeira; Borges, Wladimir Mendes; Guerra, João Carlos de Campos; Laselva, Claudia Regina

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the vertical clinical pharmacist service's interventions in prevention of venous thromboembolism. Methods: This prospective study was done at a private hospital. From January to May 2012, the clinical pharmacist evaluated medical patients without prophylaxis for thromboembolism. If the patient fulfilled criteria for thromboembolism and did not have contraindications, the clinical pharmacist suggested inclusion of pharmacologic agents and/or mechanical methods for venous thromboembolism prevention. In addition, the appropriate dose, route of administration, duplicity and replacement of the drug were suggested. Results: We evaluated 9,000 hospitalized medical patients and carried out 77 pharmaceutical interventions. A total of 71 cases (92.21%) adhered to treatment so that non-adherence occurred in 6 cases (7.79%). In 25 cases pharmacologic agents were included and in 20 cases mechanical prophylaxis. Dose adjustments, route, frequency, duplicity and replacement made up 32 cases. Conclusion: The vertical clinical pharmacist service included the prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism and promotion of appropriate use of medicines in the hospital. PMID:24728242

  8. Hospital solid waste management practices in Limpopo Province, South Africa: A case study of two hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Nemathaga, Felicia; Maringa, Sally; Chimuka, Luke

    2008-07-01

    The shortcomings in the management practices of hospital solid waste in Limpopo Province of South Africa were studied by looking at two hospitals as case studies. Apart from field surveys, the generated hospital waste was weighed to compute the generation rates and was followed through various management practices to the final disposal. The findings revealed a major policy implementation gap between the national government and the hospitals. While modern practices such as landfill and incineration are used, their daily operations were not carried according to minimum standards. Incinerator ash is openly dumped and wastes are burned on landfills instead of being covered with soil. The incinerators used are also not environmentally friendly as they use old technology. The findings further revealed that there is no proper separation of wastes according to their classification as demanded by the national government. The mean percentage composition of the waste was found in the following decreasing order: general waste (60.74%) > medical waste (30.32%) > sharps (8.94%). The mean generation rates were found to be 0.60 kg per patient per day.

  9. Diffusion of Electronic Medical Record Based Public Hospital Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Won; Kim, Seong Min; An, Chang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the adoption behavior of a newly developed Electronic Medical Record (EMR)-based information system (IS) at three public hospitals in Korea with a focus on doctors and nurses. Methods User satisfaction scores from four performance layers were analyzed before and two times after the newly develop system was introduced to evaluate the adoption process of the IS with Rogers' diffusion theory. Results The 'intention to use' scores, the most important indicator for determining whether or not to adopt the IS in Rogers' confirmation stage for doctors, were very high in the third survey (4.21). In addition, the scores for 'reduced medication errors', which is the key indicator for evaluating the success of the IS, increased in the third survey for both doctors and nurses. The factors influencing 'intention to use' with a high odds ratio (>1.5) were the 'frequency of attendance of user training sessions', 'mandatory use of system', 'reduced medication errors', and 'reduced medical record documentation time' for both doctors and nurses. Conclusions These findings show that the new EMR-based IS was well accepted by doctors. Both doctors and nurses also positively considered the effects of the new IS on their clinical environments. PMID:26279954

  10. Evaluation of Unpreparedness When Issuing Copies of Medical Records in Tertiary Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Myong-Mo; Seo, Sun-Won; Park, Woo-Sung; Kim, Yoon; Kim, Sung-Soo; Choi, Eun-Mi; Park, Jong; Park, Il-Soon

    2010-01-01

    Objectives As a baseline study to aid in the development of proper policy, we investigated the current condition of unpreparedness of documents required when issuing copies of medical records and related factors. Methods The study was comprised of 7,203 cases in which copies of medical records were issued from July 1st, 2007 through June 30th, 2008 to 5 tertiary referral hospitals. Data from these hospitals was collected using their established electronic databases and included study variables such as unpreparedness of the required documents as a dependent variable and putative covariates. Results The rate of unpreparedness of required documents was 14.9%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the following factors as being related to the high rate of unpreparedness: patient age (older patients had a higher rate), issuance channels (on admission > via out-patient clinic), type of applicant (others such as family members > for oneself > insurers), type of original medical record (utilization records on admission > other records), issuance purpose (for providing insurer > medical use), residential area of applicant (Seoul > Honam province and Jeju), and number of copied documents (more documents gave a lower rate). The rate of unpreparedness differed significantly among the hospitals; suggesting that they may have followed their own conventional protocols rather than legal procedures in some cases. Conclusions The study results showed that the level of compliance to the required legal procedure was high, but that problems occurred in assuring the safety of the medical information. A proper legislative approach is therefore required to balance the security of and access to medical information. PMID:21818431

  11. Individual and hospital-specific factors influencing medical graduates' time to medical specialization.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Karl-Arne; Hagen, Terje P

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies of gender differences in relation to medical specialization have focused more on social variables than hospital-specific factors. In a multivariate analysis with extended Cox regression, we used register data for socio-demographic variables (gender, family and having a child born during the study period) together with hospital-specific variables (the amount of supervision available, efficiency pressure and the type of teaching hospital) to study the concurrent effect of these variables on specialty qualification among all 2474 Norwegian residents who began specialization in 1999-2001. We followed the residents until 2010. A lower proportion of women qualified for a specialty in the study period (67.9% compared with 78.7% of men, p < 0.001), and they took on average six months longer than men did to complete the specialization qualification (p < 0.01). Fewer women than men entered specialties providing emergency services and those with longer working hours, and women worked shorter hours than men in all specialties. Hospital factors were significant predictors for the timely attainment of specialization: working at university hospitals (regional) or central hospitals was associated with a reduction in the time taken to complete the specialization, whereas an increased patient load and less supervision had the opposite effect. Multivariate analysis showed that the smaller proportion of women who qualified for a specialty was explained principally by childbirth and by the number of children aged under 18 years. PMID:24161102

  12. The Role of Hospital Inpatients in Supporting Medication Safety: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Sara; Jheeta, Seetal; Husson, Fran; Lloyd, Jill; Taylor, Alex; Boucher, Charles; Jacklin, Ann; Bischler, Anna; Norton, Christine; Hayles, Rob; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Background Inpatient medication errors are a significant concern. An approach not yet widely studied is to facilitate greater involvement of inpatients with their medication. At the same time, electronic prescribing is becoming increasingly prevalent in the hospital setting. In this study we aimed to explore hospital inpatients’ involvement with medication safety-related behaviours, facilitators and barriers to this involvement, and the impact of electronic prescribing. Methods We conducted ethnographic observations and interviews in two UK hospital organisations, one with established electronic prescribing and one that changed from paper to electronic prescribing during our study. Researchers and lay volunteers observed nurses’ medication administration rounds, pharmacists’ ward rounds, doctor-led ward rounds and drug history taking. We also conducted interviews with healthcare professionals, patients and carers. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Observation notes and transcripts were coded thematically. Results Paper or electronic medication records were shown to patients in only 4 (2%) of 247 cases. However, where they were available during patient-healthcare professional interactions, healthcare professionals often viewed them in order to inform patients about their medicines and answer any questions. Interprofessional discussions about medicines seemed more likely to happen in front of the patient where paper or electronic drug charts were available near the bedside. Patients and carers had more access to paper-based drug charts than electronic equivalents. However, interviews and observations suggest there are potentially more significant factors that affect patient involvement with their inpatient medication. These include patient and healthcare professional beliefs concerning patient involvement, the way in which healthcare professionals operate as a team, and the underlying culture. Conclusion Patients appear to have more access to

  13. Hospital adoption of medical technology: an empirical test of alternative models.

    PubMed Central

    Teplensky, J. D.; Pauly, M. V.; Kimberly, J. R.; Hillman, A. L.; Schwartz, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines hospital motivations to acquire new medical technology, an issue of considerable policy relevance: in this case, whether, when, and why hospitals acquire a new capital-intensive medical technology, magnetic resonance imaging equipment (MRI). STUDY DESIGN. We review three common explanations for medical technology adoption: profit maximization, technological preeminence, and clinical excellence, and incorporate them into a composite model, controlling for regulatory differences, market structures, and organizational characteristics. All four models are then tested using Cox regressions. DATA SOURCES. The study is based on an initial sample of 637 hospitals in the continental United States that owned or leased an MRI unit as of 31 December 1988, plus nonadopters. Due to missing data the final sample consisted of 507 hospitals. The data, drawn from two telephone surveys, are supplemented by the AHA Survey, census data, and industry and academic sources. PRINCIPAL FINDING. Statistically, the three individual models account for roughly comparable amounts of variance in past adoption behavior. On the basis of explanatory power and parsimony, however, the technology model is "best." Although the composite model is statistically better than any of the individual models, it does not add much more explanatory power adjusting for the number of variables added. CONCLUSIONS. The composite model identified the importance a hospital attached to being a technological leader, its clinical requirements, and the change in revenues it associated with the adoption of MRI as the major determinants of adoption behavior. We conclude that a hospital's adoption behavior is strongly linked to its strategic orientation. PMID:7649751

  14. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  15. [Medical-hospital material management and the working process in a public hospital].

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simone Domingues; Haddad, Maria do Carmo Lourenço; Dellaroza, Mara Solange Gomes; Costa, Daniele Bernardi da; Miranda, Juranda Maia de

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an exploratory-descriptive study structured in a qualitative approach. The main objective was to identify the perception of medical-hospital materials on the work process of professionals in a medium complexity public hospital. Information has been collected using the research question: How does the materials management process influence work process? The report analysis has identified five different categories: lack of autonomy in the choice of materials, lack of maintenance of equipment, bureaucracy in the purchasing process, poor quality and absence of professional involvement in the materials management. It is concluded that the materials management is focused on the nursing direction, which requires greater involvement of other professionals in the materials choice used to reduce the weakness in that process. PMID:22911419

  16. Multimedia medical case authorship and simulator program.

    PubMed

    Berger, R G; Boxwala, A

    1995-01-01

    For the last several years, third and fourth year medical students rotating on the rheumatology/immunology service at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have been using a laptop computer as a teaching adjunct to their formal training in rheumatology. The laptop contains diagnostic programs, reference management and clinical note generation facilities, remote medline access, and most recently, multimedia case simulations. These simulations have been created by the use of a case authoring and simulation system which is presented in this demonstration. The program is divided into simulator and designer modules and uses graphics and sound to portray such data as physical examination findings, blood smears, radiographs, heart sounds, etc. The simulator module includes diagnostic sections with feedback to the student as well as robust patient management trees with an occasional circuitous route for patient outcome. The student receives a numerical score based on deviations from the correct path and optimal cost as designated by the case designer. The system simulates complete management of a patient from the first encounter until treatment is complete. During each encounter, a student obtains the patient's history, physical examination findings, orders tests and reviews their results, makes a differential diagnosis, and treats the patient. The patient's progress and further treatment options at any time are dependent on the treatment option selected by the student at an earlier stage. Students are given the costs of ancillary tests and hospitalization before they order them. Words or phrases can be marked as hypertext and the student can get more information about the marked words by a mouse click. The designer interface of the program creates the clinical case by prompts and requests for information from the designer who needs no programming skills. The designer is almost always an expert faculty member who bases the simulated case on a real patient

  17. Potential cardiac arrest – an observational study of pre-hospital medical response

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Hunskaar, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A previous study showed that Norwegian GPs on call attended around 40% of out-of-hospital medical emergencies. We wanted to investigate the alarms of prehospital medical resources and the doctors' responses in situations of potential cardiac arrests. Design and setting A three-month prospective data collection was undertaken from three emergency medical communication centres, covering a population of 816,000 residents. From all emergency medical events, a sub-group of patients who received resuscitation, or who were later pronounced dead at site, was selected for further analysis. Results 5,105 medical emergencies involving 5,180 patients were included, of which 193 met the inclusion criteria. The GP on call was alarmed in 59 %, and an anaesthesiologist in 43 % of the cases. When alarmed, a GP attended in 84 % and an anaesthesiologist in 87 % of the cases. Among the patients who died, the GP on call was alarmed most frequently. Conclusion Events involving patients in need of resuscitation are rare, but medical response in the form of the attendance of prehospital personnel is significant. Norwegian GPs have a higher call-out rate for patients in severe situations where resuscitation was an option of treatment, compared with other “red-response” situations. Key pointsThis study investigates alarms of and call-outs among GPs and anaesthesiologists on call, in the most acute clinical situations:Medical emergencies involving patients in need of resuscitation were rare.The health care contribution by pre-hospital personnel being called out was significant.Compared with other acute situations, the GP had a higher attendance rate to patients in life-threatening situations. PMID:27092724

  18. Patient Perceptions of Provider and Hospital Factors Associated With New Medication Communication.

    PubMed

    Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Haase, Joan E; Boyer, Kiersten; Carpenter, Janet S

    2016-09-01

    This research examined provider and hospital factors associated with patients' perceptions of how often explanations of new medications were "always" given to them, using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. HCAHPS results were obtained for October 2012 to September 2013, from 3,420 hospitals and combined with a Magnet-designated hospital listing. Multiple regression examined correlates of new medication communication, including health care provider factors (perceptions of nurse and physician communication) and health care system factors (magnet designation, hospital ownership, hospital type, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers). Nurse and physician communication was strongly associated with new medication communication (r = .819, p < .001; r = .722, p < .001, respectively). Multivariable correlates included nurse communication (p < .001), physician communication (p < .001), hospital ownership, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers. There was a significant relationship between patients' perceptions of nurse and physician communication and the explanations they had received about their new medications during hospitalization. PMID:27106879

  19. Medical Subject Headings and medical terminology: an analysis of terminology used in hospital charts.

    PubMed

    Masarie, F E; Miller, R A

    1987-04-01

    Terminology used by health professionals in everyday written discourse was compared with terminology in a standardized medical vocabulary, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Fifty written hospital charts were selected at random and analyzed by a computer program that identified MeSH terms in the charts. The charts were analyzed against two related MeSH vocabularies--one containing MeSH terms and one containing both MeSH terms and backwards cross-reference terms. When small words such as articles and prepositions were disregarded, approximately 50% of the words in a medical chart were found to be MeSH-related terminology. In addition, about 40% of MeSH-related words in the charts were either MeSH terms or backwards cross-reference terms. PMID:3297223

  20. 38 CFR 17.52 - Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. 17.52 Section 17.52 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Public Or Private Hospitals § 17.52 Hospital care and medical services in non-VA facilities. (a) When...

  1. Medication review and transitions of care: a case report of a decade-old medication error.

    PubMed

    Comer, Rachel; Lizer, Mitsi

    2015-03-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian male with a 25-year history of paranoid schizophrenia was brought to the emergency department because of violence toward the staff in his nursing facility. He was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was admitted to the behavioral health unit for medication stabilization. History included a five-year state psychiatric hospital admission and nursing facility placement. Because of poor cognitive function, the patient was unable to corroborate medication history, so the pharmacy student on rotation performed an in-depth chart review. The review revealed a transcription error in 2003 deleting amantadine 100 mg twice daily and adding amiodarone 100 mg twice daily. Subsequent hospitalization resulted in another transcription error increasing the amiodarone to 200 mg twice daily. All electrocardiograms conducted were negative for atrial fibrillation. Once detected, the consulted cardiologist discontinued the amiodarone, and the primary care provider was notified via letter and discharge papers. An admission four months later revealed that the nursing facility restarted the amiodarone. Amiodarone was discontinued and the facility was again notified. This case reviews how a 10-year-old medication error went undetected in the electronic medical records through numerous medication reconciliations, but was uncovered when a single comprehensive medication review was conducted. PMID:25760662

  2. Interactive Videodisc Case Studies for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Harless, William G.; Zier, Marcia A.; Duncan, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The TIME Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is using interactive videodisc, microprocessor and voice recognition technology to create patient simulations for use in the training of medical students. These interactive case studies embody dramatic, lifelike portrayals of the social and medical conditions of a patient and allow uncued, verbal intervention by the student for independent clinical decisions.

  3. Medical Eschatologies: The Christian Spirit of Hospital Protocol.

    PubMed

    Langford, Jean M

    2016-01-01

    If much has been written of the forms of bodiliness reinforced by hospitals, less attention has been paid to the medicalization of the soul. The medical management of death institutionalizes divisions between body and soul, and matter and spirit, infusing end-of-life care with latent Christian theological presumptions. The invisibility of these presumptions is partly sustained by projecting religiosity on those who endorse other cosmologies, while retaining for medicine a mask of secular science. Stories of conflict with non-Christian patients force these presumptions into visibility, suggesting alternative ethics of care and mourning rooted in other understandings. In this article, I explore one such story. Considering the story as an allegory for how matter and spirit figure in contemporary postmortem disciplines, I suggest that it exposes both the operation of a taboo against mixing material and spiritual agendas, and an assumption that appropriate mourning is oriented toward symbolic homage, rather than concern for the material welfare of the dead. PMID:26507791

  4. Case report of a medication error

    PubMed Central

    Naunton, Mark; Nor, Kowsar; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Thomas, Jackson; Kosari, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The World Health Organisation recognizes confusing drug names as one of the most common causes of medication errors. Other factors include spelling, phonetic, or packaging similarities. Case presentation: We presented a case report of an inadvertent administration of a non-ocular pharmaceutical product (Novasone® lotion) into the eye of an octogenarian individual, and briefly reviewed the relevant literature. Discussion: We discussed prevention strategies to avoid similar ophthalmic medication errors. PMID:27428216

  5. Assessing Reliability of Medical Record Reviews for the Detection of Hospital Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Minsu; Lee, Sang-il; Jo, Min-Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Seon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability of medical record review for the detection of hospital adverse events. Methods: We conducted two stages retrospective medical records review of a random sample of 96 patients from one acute-care general hospital. The first stage was an explicit patient record review by two nurses to detect the presence of 41 screening criteria (SC). The second stage was an implicit structured review by two physicians to identify the occurrence of adverse events from the positive cases on the SC. The inter-rater reliability of two nurses and that of two physicians were assessed. The intra-rater reliability was also evaluated by using test-retest method at approximately two weeks later. Results: In 84.2% of the patient medical records, the nurses agreed as to the necessity for the second stage review (kappa, 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 to 0.83). In 93.0% of the patient medical records screened by nurses, the physicians agreed about the absence or presence of adverse events (kappa, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.97). When assessing intra-rater reliability, the kappa indices of two nurses were 0.54 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.77) and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.87), whereas those of two physicians were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.62 to 1.00) and 0.37 (95% CI, -0.16 to 0.89). Conclusions: In this study, the medical record review for detecting adverse events showed intermediate to good level of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. Well organized training program for reviewers and clearly defining SC are required to get more reliable results in the hospital adverse event study. PMID:26429290

  6. Initiation of a medical toxicology consult service at a tertiary care children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GEORGE SAM; MONTE, ANDREW; HATTEN, BENJAMIN; BRENT, JEFFREY; BUCHANAN, JENNIE; HEARD, KENNON J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, only 10% of board-certified medical toxicologists are pediatricians. Yet over half of poison center calls involve children < 6 years, poisoning continues to be a common pediatric diagnosis and bedside toxicology consultation is not common at children’s hospitals. In collaboration with executive staff from Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, regional poison center, and our toxicology fellowship, we established a toxicology consulting service at our tertiary-care children’s hospital. There were 139 consultations, and the service generated 13 consultations in the first month; median of 11 consultations per month thereafter (range 8–16). The service increased pediatric cases seen by the fellowship program from 30 to 94. The transition to a consult service required a culture change. Historically, call center advice was the mainstay of consulting practice and the medical staff was not accustomed to the availability of bedside medical toxicology consultations. However, after promotion of the service and full attending and fellowship coverage, consultations increased. In collaboration with toxicologists from different departments, a consultation service can be rapidly established. The service filled a clinical need that was disproportionately utilized for high acuity patients, immediately utilized by the medical staff and provided a robust pediatric population for the toxicology fellowship. PMID:25686099

  7. Initiation of a medical toxicology consult service at a tertiary care children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, George Sam; Monte, Andrew; Hatten, Benjamin; Brent, Jeffrey; Buchanan, Jennie; Heard, Kennon J

    2015-05-01

    Currently, only 10% of board-certified medical toxicologists are pediatricians. Yet over half of poison center calls involve children < 6 years, poisoning continues to be a common pediatric diagnosis and bedside toxicology consultation is not common at children's hospitals. In collaboration with executive staff from Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, regional poison center, and our toxicology fellowship, we established a toxicology consulting service at our tertiary-care children's hospital. There were 139 consultations, and the service generated 13 consultations in the first month; median of 11 consultations per month thereafter (range 8-16). The service increased pediatric cases seen by the fellowship program from 30 to 94. The transition to a consult service required a culture change. Historically, call center advice was the mainstay of consulting practice and the medical staff was not accustomed to the availability of bedside medical toxicology consultations. However, after promotion of the service and full attending and fellowship coverage, consultations increased. In collaboration with toxicologists from different departments, a consultation service can be rapidly established. The service filled a clinical need that was disproportionately utilized for high acuity patients, immediately utilized by the medical staff and provided a robust pediatric population for the toxicology fellowship. PMID:25686099

  8. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals. PMID:19042532

  9. [Issues related to national university medical schools: focusing on the low wages of university hospital physicians].

    PubMed

    Takamuku, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    University hospitals, bringing together the three divisions of education, research, and clinical medicine, could be said to represent the pinnacle of medicine. However, when compared with physicians working at public and private hospitals, physicians working at university hospitals and medical schools face extremely poor conditions. This is because physicians at national university hospitals are considered to be "educators." Meanwhile, even after the privatization of national hospitals, physicians working for these institutions continue to be perceived as "medical practitioners." A situation may arise in which physicians working at university hospitals-performing top-level medical work while also being involved with university and postgraduate education, as well as research-might leave their posts because they are unable to live on their current salaries, especially in comparison with physicians working at national hospitals, who focus solely on medical care. This situation would be a great loss for Japan. This potential loss can be prevented by amending the classification of physicians at national university hospitals from "educators" to "medical practitioners." In order to accomplish this, the Japan Medical Association, upon increasing its membership and achieving growth, should act as a mediator in negotiations between national university hospitals, medical schools, and the government. PMID:25842820

  10. 38 CFR 3.358 - Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical treatment, examinations or vocational... Special Purposes § 3.358 Compensation for disability or death from hospitalization, medical or surgical... disability resulting from a disease or injury or aggravation of an existing disease or injury suffered as...

  11. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  12. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  13. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  14. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  15. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities...

  16. Hospital Libraries; A Method for Surveying for the Ohio Valley Regional Medical Program. A Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzi, Nancy

    The Regional Medical Libraries and Regional Medical Programs are making efforts to improve access to the scholarly record of medicine to all health professionals through hospital and other clinical environments. This working paper furnishes an explanation of: (1) the background and preparation of hospital library survey forms used by the Ohio…

  17. Innovative medical devices and hospital decision making: a study comparing the views of hospital pharmacists and physicians.

    PubMed

    Billaux, Mathilde; Borget, Isabelle; Prognon, Patrice; Pineau, Judith; Martelli, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Many university hospitals have developed local health technology assessment processes to guide informed decisions about new medical devices. However, little is known about stakeholders' perceptions and assessment of innovative devices. Herein, we investigated the perceptions regarding innovative medical devices of their chief users (physicians and surgeons), as well as those of hospital pharmacists, because they are responsible for the purchase and management of sterile medical devices. We noted the evaluation criteria used to assess and select new medical devices and suggestions for improving local health technology assessment processes indicated by the interviewees. Methods We randomly selected 18 physicians and surgeons (nine each) and 18 hospital pharmacists from 18 French university hospitals. Semistructured interviews were conducted between October 2012 and August 2013. Responses were coded separately by two researchers. Results Physicians and surgeons frequently described innovative medical devices as 'new', 'safe' and 'effective', whereas hospital pharmacists focused more on economic considerations and considered real innovative devices to be those for which no equivalent could be found on the market. No significant difference in evaluation criteria was found between these groups of professionals. Finally, hospital pharmacists considered the management of conflicts of interests in local health technology assessment processes to be an issue, whereas physicians and surgeons did not. Conclusions The present study highlights differences in perceptions related to professional affiliation. The findings suggest several ways in which current practices for local health technology assessment in French university hospitals could be improved and studied. What is known about the topic? Hospitals are faced with ever-growing demands for innovative and costly medical devices. To help hospital management deal with technology acquisition issues, hospital

  18. Medical information system in hospital emergency departments' organizational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dumont, V; Rousseau, A

    2002-01-01

    The study reported in this article examines the implementation of the same software in 3 emergency departments from different Belgian hospitals. It was experienced and perceived very differently as a failure or a success by the units' staff. The software integrates different functionalities, which can be chosen and customized by some members of the units themselves. We will look at the three processes of implementation to find out different plausible explanation for their 'failure or success'. Our approach is developed through the qualitative methodology of case studies. The translation theory is presented as a renewal way of thinking the perceived 'successful or failed' implementation of a new information system and a guide for new project in emergency department. PMID:15058415

  19. Hazards of Hospitalization: Hospitalists and Geriatricians Educating Medical Students about Delirium and Falls in Geriatric Inpatients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Valerie J.; Clark, Nancy S.; Medina-Walpole, Annette; McCann, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Geriatric patients are at increased risk for complications from delirium or falls during hospitalization. Medical education, however, generally places little emphasis on the hazards of hospitalization for older inpatients. Geriatricians conducted a faculty development workshop for hospitalists about the hazards of hospitalization for geriatric…

  20. Medical staff contracting: legal issues in physician-hospital arrangements.

    PubMed

    Caesar, N B

    1993-01-01

    This article--the third in a series analyzing the physician-hospital contracting process from the physician's perspective--addresses the legal issues involved in physician-hospital arrangements, including those arising under federal and state illegal remuneration, antitrust, and tax laws. New applications of these issues to physician-hospital organizations and practice management/practice acquisitions by hospitals are also addressed, as well as other recent hospital efforts to maximize the benefits to be gained from the physician-hospital relationship. PMID:10128459

  1. [Main types of activity of specialists of medical and preventive profile in military hospitals].

    PubMed

    Akimkin, V G; Azarov, I I; Volynkov, I O; Bobylev, V A

    2015-09-01

    Infection prevention in medical organizations is an essential task to ensure quality of medical care and create a safe environment for patients and medical staff. The main task of a specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is to maintain sanitary and epidemiological safety and control fulfillment of a complex of preventive measures. To achieve these goals specialists monitor epidemiological and microbiological fulfilment of the implementation and effectiveness of preventive measures, which allow to except infection entry to the hospital and possible carrying out beyond the hospital, occurrence and spread of disease. An obligatory activity of the specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is a scientific and methodical work. The authors propose adoption of preventive structural subdivisions to the state largest diversified military hospitals. PMID:26827514

  2. Hospital Information System Support for the Medical Decision Maker

    PubMed Central

    Mishelevich, David J.; Atkinson, Jack B.; Noland, Robert L.; Eisenberg, Jerry R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the early stages in migration toward a comprehensive, on-line Hospital Information System with emphasis placed on the needs of the physician and other Medical Decision Makers. Such systems will properly put the computing power where it belongs: in the hands of the user, to the decision being made, to enhance health professional productivity and cost effectiveness. Thus we are evolving to such feedback to the physician in multiple dimensions, whether previous orders and/or results, patient profiles, cost of item ordered, potential drug-drug and drug-laboratory test interactions, potential duplicate examinations, or other information are involved. Considerations for systems which can potentially meet these needs are outlined. Specific examples of characteristics of the IBM Patient Care System {PCS} are presented as a prototypical model. Critical components are the presence of relevant data and the human-engineered, user-cordial access to that data. Coverage is given to multiple existing and potential sources of clinically-significant data whether manual or automated instrument input are involved.

  3. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications. PMID:25231139

  4. Comparison of advance medical directive inquiry and documentation for hospital inpatients in three medical services: implications for policy changes.

    PubMed

    Anunobi, Echezona; Detweiler, Mark B; Sethi, Roopa; Thomas, Reena; Lutgens, Brian; Detweiler, Jonna G

    2015-01-01

    Following the introduction of the Patient Self-Determination Act of 1990, the Veterans Health Administration developed its own advance medical directive (AMD) policy, which most recently states that documentation is mandatory for all hospital patients in all settings. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of AMD documentation at a local Veterans Affairs Medical Center. AMD documentation was compared among three inpatient services: surgery, medicine, and psychiatry. Retrospective in nature, 594 inpatient cases were compared. Results revealed that, overall, the rate of AMD documentation was 37.7%. AMD documentation on surgery was statistically more frequent (45.6%) than for either medicine (33.2%) or psychiatry (34.5%). The difference between the numbers of days to AMD documentation for all three services was not statistically significant. While there was no statistically significant difference across gender, Caucasians had AMDs documented more frequently than African Americans (p < .001). Logistic regression reveals that social worker and physician intervention, not patient-specific variables, are the primary predictors of AMD incidence. Policy makers may need to consider the realities of hospital care, especially in emergency settings, and be more specific in the steps of implementation of the policy in the evenings, weekends, and holidays. True adherence to policy implementation may require hospital administrators to increase staff and educational efforts so that the concept of AMD communication and documentation is completely explained to all staff and patients. Policy should include an electronic record reminder that is renewed every 3 years and provisions for accommodating patients who arrive on weekends and holidays, with special awareness of the particular communication needs of minority groups. The study conclusions are that further inquiry is needed to understand these policy nuances to enable the Veterans Affairs Administration to

  5. Pattern of Dermatophytes in Patients Attend in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Monwar, S; Hossain, M A; Mahmud, M C; Paul, S K; Nasreen, S A; Joly, S N; Begum, H; Abdullah, S A; Haque, N; Sarkar, S R

    2015-10-01

    Dermatophytosis is a common fungal disease which involves the keratinized tissue. This is an attempt to observe the spectrum of dermatophytes among the clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis attending the outpatient department of Dermatology and Venereology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh during the period of July 2013 to December 2014. Two hundred thirty (230) clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis were subjected in this study. Sixty three cases (27.39%) were positive for fungus in direct microscopy while 53(23.04%) were culture positive. Among the clinical types tinea unguium was the most common followed by tinea corporis. Dermatophytosis was more common in the age group of 21-30 years. The male to female ratio was 1.53:1. Trichophyton rubrum 44(83.04%) was found common etiological dermatophyte species followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes 5(9.43%) and Epidermophyton floccosum 4(7.55%). PMID:26620004

  6. Hospital ownership and medical services: market mix, spillover effects, and nonprofit objectives.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals operate in markets with varied demographic, competitive, and ownership characteristics, yet research on ownership tends to examine hospitals in isolation. Here we examine three hospital ownership types -- nonprofit, for-profit, and government -- and their spillover effects. We estimate the effects of for-profit market share in two ways, on the provision of medical services and on operating margins at the three types of hospitals. We find that nonprofit hospitals' medical service provision systematically varies by market mix. We find no significant effect of market mix on the operating margins of nonprofit hospitals, but find that for-profit hospitals have higher margins in markets with more for-profits. These results fit best with theories in which hospitals maximize their own output. PMID:19781802

  7. Hospitalizations of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however,…

  8. New journals for publishing medical case reports.

    PubMed

    Akers, Katherine G

    2016-04-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or "predatory" publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers. PMID:27076803

  9. New journals for publishing medical case reports

    PubMed Central

    Akers, Katherine G.

    2016-01-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or “predatory” publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers. PMID:27076803

  10. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa in a General Hospital: A Case Vignette of a Multi-Disciplinary General Hospital-Based Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronenberg, J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes anorexia nervosa as condition variable in etiology and resistant to treatment, which may lead to mortality in 5% of treated cases. Notes that efforts have been made for treating disorder in nonstigmatizing medical units outside psychiatric hospitals. Describes, through presentation of short case vignette, advantages of treating…

  11. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Binit N.; Patel, Tejas K.; Barvaliya, Manish J; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer's criteria (2012) and PRISCUS list (2010). Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females) were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer's criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3%) patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%), alprazolam (9%), diazepam (8%), digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%), and diclofenac (3.7%) were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug–disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06%) patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients. PMID:25276629

  12. Adverse Events in Affiliated Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Siamian, Hasan; Nezhad, Ayyob Barzegar; Asghari, Zoleleykha; Kabirzadeh, Azar

    2014-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the hospital environment, its structure faces with multiple hazards. The risks whether by providing the care and whether by hospital environment endanger patients, relatives and care providers. Therefore, a more accurate reporting and analysis of the report by focusing on access to preventative methods is essential. In this study, hospitals' adverse event that has sent by affiliated hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences to deputy for treatment has studied. PMID:24944536

  13. Changes in Admissions, Length of Stay, and Discharge Diagnoses at a Major University-Affiliated Teaching Hospital: Implications for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosevear, G. Craig; Gary, Nancy E.

    1989-01-01

    A study of changes in hospital care suggests that for medical students and residents to be exposed to the same case mix of clinical disorders seen in the hospital in 1980, they must have experience in the ambulatory setting. (Author/MSE)

  14. Hospital choice by rural medicare beneficiaries: does hospital ownership matter?--a Colorado case.

    PubMed

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung

    2006-01-01

    About 45 percent of rural patients in Colorado bypassed their local rural hospitals during the 1990s. The effect of this phenomenon is a reduction in occupancy rates and a decrease in the competitiveness of rural hospitals, thereby ultimately causing rural hospitals to close and adversely affecting the communities that they were designed to serve. This study tests whether hospital ownership affects hospital choice by patients after controlling for institutional and individual dimensions. A conditional logistic regression is used to analyze Colorado Inpatient Discharge Data (CIDD) on 85,529 patients in addition to hospital data. Rural Medicare beneficiaries are influenced to choose a particular hospital by a combination of hospital characteristics (the number of beds, the number of services, accreditation, ownership type, and distance from patient residence) and patient characteristics (medical condition, age, gender, race, and total charge for services). Increasing rural hospitals' survivability, collaborating with other rural hospitals, expanding the number of available services, making strategic alliance with other providers are possible strategies that may help ward off encroachment by urban competitors. PMID:16583743

  15. Companion Cases in a Large Urban Medical Examiner's Office.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Njiwaji, Chantel; Sung, LokMan

    2015-12-01

    Companion death cases, as defined in this study, include 2 or more deaths that occur at the same location or 1 death at a specific location combined with 1 or more individuals transported from that same location to a hospital where death was pronounced within 1 hour of arrival. These types of cases can have multiple causes and manners of death. The Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office conducted a retrospective study of companion death cases that came into the office from mid 2007 to the end of 2014. The purpose of the study was to identify and examine patterns of companion death cases in a large urban area that would assist future companion death case investigations. Three hundred fifty deaths were found to be companion cases, including 135 pairs (2 connected deaths in the same location), 20 trios, and 5 quartets. Approximately 49% of companion case deaths were homicides. Approximately 30% of companion case deaths were traumatic accidental deaths. Around 14% of companion case deaths that were from the same scene location had different manners of death, including suicide, homicide, natural, and indeterminate. The remainder of companion death cases were either drug related or natural. Through this study, we have identified a pattern to these companion death cases and have concluded that it is important to conduct a thorough medicolegal death investigation of such cases to establish and elucidate the true circumstances surrounding these deaths. PMID:26332646

  16. Drug Utilization Study in Medical Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Care Hospital in North India

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sharonjeet; Rajagopalan, Sujit; Bhalla, Ashish; Pandhi, Promila; Malhotra, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To generate data on the drug utilization pattern and cost of drug treatment and to determine the rationality of prescriptions. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted in the medical emergency unit of our hospital. Patient case records were reviewed to extract data on the pattern of drug use. Cost of drug treatment for the emergency visit was calculated by referring to the cost mentioned in Monthly Index of Medical Specialties and the rationality of prescriptions was evaluated using WHO core indicators of drug utilization. Results. 1100 case records were reviewed. Majority of patients received proton pump inhibitors followed by multivitamins. The median cost per prescription was 119.23$ (7.32$–7663.46$). Majority (49.9%) of drug cost was driven by antibiotics alone. An average of 4.9 drugs was prescribed per prescription. There were 14.89% encounters with antibiotics. 75.17% of the drugs were given as injectables and only 29.27% of the drugs were prescribed as generics. Conclusion. There is need to rationalize the drug therapy in terms of increasing prescribing of drugs by generic name and to avoid overuse of PPIs and multivitamins in emergency unit. Also the hospital pharmacy should be encouraged to procure more cost effective alternative antibiotics in future. PMID:24883208

  17. Medical Record Clerk Training Program, Course of Study; Student Manual: For Medical Record Personnel in Small Rural Hospitals in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Arlington, VA. Div. of Health Resources.

    The manual provides major topics, objectives, activities and, procedures, references and materials, and assignments for the training program. The topics covered are hospital organization and community role, organization and management of a medical records department, international classification of diseases and operations, medical terminology,…

  18. Blood culture isolates from children admitted to Medical Unit III, Yangon Children's Hospital, 1998.

    PubMed

    Shwe, Than Nu; Nyein, Mar Mar; Yi, Wut; Mon, Aung

    2002-12-01

    A one year study (August 1998-July 1999) of bacteremia in febrile children was carried out in the Medical Unit (III), Yangon Children's Hospital (YCH), Myanmar, to determine: (1) the bacteria responsible for fever of five days or more in children; (2) the antibiotic sensitivity pattern of these bacteria. Children aged one month to 12 years who had fever for five days or more and who did not receive antibiotics within the first 48 hours irrespective of the diagnosis were included in this study. A total of 120 patients fulfilled the criteria. Bacteria could be isolated from 65 cases (54.2%). The commonest organism isolated was Salmonella typhi (43.1%). Others included Escherichia coli (12.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (7.7%); Streptococcus, Shigella, Diplococcus, Klebsiella and Acinetobacter were also isolated. The Salmonella typhi were resistant to conventional antibiotics (ampicillin, amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, and co-trimoxazole); however, they were sensitive to amikacin, netilmicin, nalidixic acid, and cephalothin. A cluster of enteric fever cases from Mingalartaungnyunt township was noticed and was reported to the Directorate of Health. Changes in the incidence and etiology of bacteremia in hospitals are well documented. Sentinel surveys of bacteremia in major hospitals should be carried out in order to detect the changing patterns of bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity; such surveys will be of great help in establishing local antibiotic policies. PMID:12757224

  19. Seriously clowning: Medical clowning interaction with children undergoing invasive examinations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tener, Dafna; Ofir, Shoshi; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Franco, Nessia L; On, Avi

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative study examined the subjective experience of children undergoing an invasive examination in the hospital when accompanied by a medical clown. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine such children and nine of their accompanying parents. The children were patients in two outpatient departments (Pediatric Gastroenterology and a Center for the Sexually Abused) in a hospital in Israel. Interviews were coded thematically using an Atlas.ti software program. Analysis of the interviews indicated that the intervention of the clown positively changed the children's perceptions of the hospital, of experiencing the examination, and of their life narrative. Medical clowns thus appear to be a central, meaningful, and therapeutic source for children undergoing invasive examinations in hospital, as well as for their parents. Therefore, it may be advisable to incorporate medical clowns as an integral part of medical teams performing invasive procedures and to include the clowns in all stages of the hospital visit. PMID:27123686

  20. Competing for Medi-Cal business: why hospitals did, and did not, get contracts.

    PubMed

    Brown, E R; Cousineau, M R; Price, W T

    1985-01-01

    Although we cannot yet judge the broad consequences of Medi-Cal selective contracting, we can assess the outcome of the contracting process and the role that competition and other factors played in that process. In this study of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of hospitals in Los Angeles County that bid for Medi-Cal contracts, we analyzed the factors that were important determinants of whether or not hospitals received contracts. We found that hospital dependence on Medi-Cal inpatient revenues was most strongly associated with winning a contract and the presence of a teaching program next most strongly related. We discuss the relative importance of hospital need for a contract and the Medi-Cal special negotiator's desire to include certain hospitals in the program, and conclude with a discussion of our study's implications for competition and regulation methods in Medicaid cost containment strategies. PMID:2931367

  1. Medical Graduates, Tertiary Hospitals, and Burnout: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Justin M.; Pinto, Nigel; Hanson, Martin; Meehan, Ashlea; Moore, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Burnout among junior doctors can affect patient care. We conducted a longitudinal cohort study designed to explore the incidence of burnout in medical interns and to examine the changes in burnout during the course of the intern year. Methods: Interns were recruited at two tertiary hospitals in Brisbane, Australia (n=180). Participants completed surveys at four time points during their internship year. All interns (100%) completed the baseline survey during their orientation. Response rates were 85%, 88%, and 79%, respectively, at 5-week, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Results: Interns reported high levels of personal and work-related burnout throughout the year that peaked at 6 months with mean scores of 42.53 and 41.81, respectively. Increases of 5.1 points (confidence interval [CI] 2.5,7.7; P=0.0001) and 3.5 points (CI 1.3,5.6; P=0.0015) were seen at 6 months for personal and work-related burnout, respectively. The mean score for patient-related burnout at 12 months was 25.57, and this number had increased significantly by 5.8 points (CI 3.2,8.5; P<0.0001) throughout the year. Correlation with demographic variables (age, sex) were found. The total incidence of burnout was 55.9%. Conclusion: Our study showed that burnout is a common problem among interns. The high incidence of burnout demonstrates the need for appropriate strategies to prevent adverse effects on doctors' quality of life and on the quality of care patients receive. PMID:27046399

  2. ERP implementation in hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Divya; Garg, Poonam

    2012-01-01

    In a competitive healthcare sector, hospitals have to focus on their processes in order to deliver high-quality care while at the same time reducing costs. Many hospitals have decided to adopt one or another Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system to improve their businesses, but implementing an ERP system can be a demanding endeavour. The systems are so difficult to implement that some are successful; many have failed, causing multimillion dollar losses. The challenge of ERP solutions lie in implementation because they are complex, time consuming and expensive too. This paper describes the various process workflows and phases of ERP implementation at Fortis Hospital Cunningham Road, Bangalore, India. This knowledge will provide valuable insights for the researchers and practitioners to understand the different process workflows and to make informed decisions when implementing ERP in any hospital. PMID:23079029

  3. Additional funding mechanisms for Public Hospitals in Greece: the case of Chania Mental Health Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the long term lease of public hospital owned land could be an additional financing mechanism for Greek public (mental) health hospitals. Methods We performed a financial analysis of the official 2008 data of a case - study hospital (Mental Health Hospital of Chania). We used a capital budgeting approach to investigate whether value is created for the public hospital by engaging its assets in a project for the development of a private renal dialysis Unit. Results The development of the private unit in hospital owned land is a good investment decision, as it generates high project Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. When the project commences generating operating cash flows, nearly €400.000 will be paid annually to the Mental Health Hospital of Chania as rent, thereby gradually decreasing the annual deficit of the hospital. Conclusions Revenue generated from the long term lease of public hospital land is crucial to gradually eliminate hospital deficit. The Ministry of Health should encourage similar forms of Public Private Partnerships in order to ensure the sustainability of public (mental) hospitals. PMID:21067580

  4. [Facilitations for medical education should be taken into consideration when designing new hospitals].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Termansen, Anne-Mette Bang; Rasmussen, Naja Lynge; Laugesen, Toke Bie; Topperzer, Martha Krogh; Jensen, Kurt Stig; Hansen, Mette Marie Friis; Ottesen, Bent

    2016-04-18

    Based on trends in medical education and in patient management we discuss how new hospitals can be designed to focus on healthcare education. Hospitals have a major commitment and responsibility in the education of all kinds of undergraduate and postgraduate healthcare professionals, and this calls for dedicated environments. New hospitals must be designed not only for patient management, but also for healthcare education. This article is written by a multidisciplinary group and includes experiences within hospital management, medical education, implementation and architecture. PMID:27094634

  5. Cost of Hospitalization for Foodborne Diarrhea: A Case Study from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Van Minh; Tran, Tuan Anh; Ha, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Viet Hung

    2015-11-01

    Vietnam is undergoing a rapid social and economic developments resulting in speedy urbanization, changes in methods for animal production, food marketing systems, and food consumption habits. These changes will have major impacts on human exposures to food poisoning. The present case study aimed to estimate hospitalization costs of foodborne diarrhea cases in selected health facilities in Vietnam. This is a facility-based cost-of-illness study conducted in seven health facilities in Northern Vietnam. All suspect cases of foodborne diarrhea, as diagnosed by doctors, who admitted to the studied health facilities during June-August, 2013 were selected. Costs associated with hospitalization for foodborne diseases were estimated from societal perspective using retrospective approach. We included direct and indirect costs of hospitalization of foodborne diarrhea cases. During the study period, 87 foodborne diarrhea cases were included. On average, the costs per treatment episode and per hospitalization day for foodborne diarrhea case were US$ 106.9 and US$ 33.6 respectively. Indirect cost (costs of times to patient, their relatives due to the patient's illness) made up the largest share (51.3%). Direct medical costs accounted for 33.8%; direct non-medical costs (patient and their relatives) represented 14.9%. Cost levels and compositions varied by level of health facilities. More attentions should be paid on prevention, control of foodborne diarrhea cases in Vietnam. Ensuring safety of food depends on efforts of everyone involved in food chain continuum, from production, processing, and transport to consumption. PMID:26617452

  6. Adult Day Care and Medical and Hospital Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Blandford, Audrey A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined effect of adult day care (ADC) on utilization of health care practitioner and inpatient hospital services. Data from three separate ADC studies revealed that, when operative for some time, ADC may result in dramatic decreases in hospital inpatient stays. Findings warrant further research. (Author/NB)

  7. Associations of mental, and medical illnesses with against medical advice discharges: the National Hospital Discharge Survey, 1988-2006.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Rima; Freels, Sally; Mullner, Ross

    2013-03-01

    This study examined the association of mental and medical illnesses with the odds for leaving against medical advice (AMA) in a national sample of adult patients who left general hospitals between 1988 and 2006. Leaving AMA was first examined as a function of year and mental illness. Multiple logistic regression analysis was then used to adjust for patient and hospital characteristics when associating mental and major medical diagnoses with AMA discharges. The results indicated that leaving AMA was most strongly associated with mental health problems. However, the impact of mental illness was attenuated after adjusting for medical illnesses, patient and hospital characteristics. The strongest predictors of AMA discharge included being self-pay, having Medicaid insurance, being young and male, and the regional location of the hospital (Northeast). When substance abuse conditions were excluded from the mental illness discharge diagnoses, mental illness had lower odds for leaving AMA. The results may be of value to clinicians, and hospital administrators in helping to profile and target patients at risk for treatment-compliance problems. Prospective primary data collection that would include patient, physician, and hospital variables is recommended. PMID:22057857

  8. The case of the unhealthy hospital.

    PubMed

    Kovner, A R

    1991-01-01

    On a cold March morning, Bruce Reid, Blake Memorial Hospital's new CEO, visited the Lorris housing project clinic, one of six off-site clinics operated by Blake Memorial. He was not encouraged by what he saw: peeling paint, leaking pipes, and cramped conditions. When he asked Renée Dawson, the clinic's primary care physician, how she endured the conditions, she just stared at him. "What are my options?" she asked. That was a good question. Blake Memorial was in poor financial health, due to rising costs and stagnating revenue. The hospital's quality of care was also a major problem. In addition, the clinics were losing over $250,000 a year. As Reid worked on Blake Memorial's 1992 budget, he saw he would have to cut some services in order to fund others. One of the services he was considering cutting was the clinic program. But there were a number of conflicting forces that Reid had to consider. On the political front, the recently appointed commissioner of health services said she would challenge Blake Memorial's tax-exempt status if Reid dismantled the clinics. Within the hospital were two warring factions. One wanted more high-tech services for the hospital and favored closing the clinics. "Instead of clinics, we should have a shuttle bus from the housing projects to the hospital," one doctor suggested. The other faction wanted to expand the clinics. "Wherever the service is most needed, that is where the hospital should be," argued the clinics' director. Reid must decide what to cut and what to keep. But to do so, he must first settle on Blake Memorial's long-term mission.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10113910

  9. Medication supply chain management through implementation of a hospital pharmacy computerized inventory program in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Michelle R.; Rudis, Maria I.; Wilson, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, St. Luke Hospital was built to help manage the mass casualties and subsequent cholera epidemic. A major problem faced by the hospital system was the lack of an available and sustainable supply of medications. Long-term viability of the hospital system depended largely on developing an uninterrupted medication supply chain. Objective We hypothesized that the implementation of a new Pharmacy Computerized Inventory Program (PCIP) would optimize medication availability and decrease medication shortages. Design We conducted the research by examining how medications were being utilized and distributed before and after the implementation of PCIP. We measured the number of documented medication transactions in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 as well as user logins to determine if a computerized inventory system would be beneficial in providing a sustainable, long-term solution to their medication management needs. Results The PCIP incorporated drug ordering, filling the drug requests, distribution, and dispensing of the medications in multiple settings; inventory of currently shelved medications; and graphic reporting of ‘real-time’ medication usage. During the PCIP initiation and establishment periods, the number of medication transactions increased from 219.6 to 359.5 (p=0.055), respectively, and the mean logins per day increased from 24.3 to 31.5, p<0.0001, respectively. The PCIP allows the hospital staff to identify and order medications with a critically low supply as well as track usage for future medication needs. The pharmacy and nursing staff found the PCIP to be efficient and a significant improvement in their medication utilization. Conclusions An efficient, customizable, and cost-sensitive PCIP can improve drug inventory management in a simplified and sustainable manner within a resource-constrained hospital. PMID:25623613

  10. Assessing the operating efficiencies of teaching hospitals by an enhancement of the AHA/AAMC method. American Hospital Association/Association of American Medical Colleges.

    PubMed

    Morey, R C; Retzlaff-Roberts, D L; Fine, D J; Loree, S W

    2000-01-01

    In the ongoing effort to control costs, comparisons among hospitals' efficiency levels, if valid, can help identify "best practices" across institutions and uncover situations that need corrective intervention. The authors present an extension of the "adjusted cost per equivalent discharge" approach, which incorporates case-mix-severity differences, regional labor cost differentials, and inpatient/outpatient mix, but does not take into account such factors as the differences in hospital sizes, extents of the teaching mission, or quality of care delivered. The alternative approach yields information that suggests where an institution's total operating costs might be reduced with no change in any of the hospital's outputs or operating environment, through comparison with a "peer group" of other hospitals, matched according to the subject hospital's number of beds, the quality of care the hospital delivers, the extent of medical education carried out, the level of case-mix-adjusted discharges, and outpatient activities. A difficulty with this approach (as with others) is that measurement of some of the additional facets (e.g., quality of care) is still evolving, so its main contribution at this time is to provide a construct and method capable of incorporating these important added considerations. Hospital rankings achieved by applying the current and alternative approaches to a real set of teaching hospitals operating in FY 1987 are compared. While the rankings produced by the two approaches are loosely similar, the authors show that some significant differences do appear and can be at least partially explained by the incorporation of the additional factors mentioned above. PMID:10667873

  11. [The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals. PMID:22379772

  12. The politics of local hospital reform: a case study of hospital reorganization following the 2002 Norwegian hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Norwegian hospital reform of 2002 was an attempt to make restructuring of hospitals easier by removing politicians from the decision-making processes. To facilitate changes seen as necessary but politically difficult, the central state took over ownership of the hospitals and stripped the county politicians of what had been their main responsibility for decades. This meant that decisions regarding hospital structure and organization were now being taken by professional administrators and not by politically elected representatives. The question raised here is whether this has had any effect on the speed of restructuring of the hospital sector. Method The empirical part is a case study of the restructuring process in Innlandet Hospital Trust (IHT), which was one of the largest enterprise established after the hospital reform and where the vision for restructuring was clearly set. Different sources of qualitative data are used in the analysis. These include interviews with key actors, observational data and document studies. Results The analysis demonstrates how the new professional leaders at first acted in accordance with the intentions of the hospital reform, but soon chose to avoid the more ambitious plans for restructuring the hospital structure and in fact reintroduced local politics into the decision-making process. The analysis further illustrates how local networks and engagement of political representatives from all levels of government complicated the decision-making process surrounding local structural reforms. Local political representatives teamed up with other actors and created powerful networks. At the same time, national politicians had incentives to involve themselves in the processes as supporters of the status quo. Conclusion Because of the incentives that faced political actors and the controversial nature of major hospital reforms, the removal of local politicians and the centralization of ownership did not necessarily facilitate

  13. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  14. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  15. Software engineering in medical informatics: the academic hospital as learning environment.

    PubMed

    Prins, H; Cornet, R; van den Berg, F M; van der Togt, R; Abu-Hanna, A

    2002-01-01

    In 2001, the revised course Software Engineering has been implemented in the Medical Informatics curriculum at the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This 13 weeks, full-time course consists of three parts: internship, theory and project. All parts are provided in problem-oriented manner with special attention for relevant skills such as project management, documentation and presentation. During the internship, students observe how health care professionals at several hospital wards work and how information supply is organized. In the theory part, students study concepts and methods of software engineering by means of case descriptions and self-directed learning. During the project, they apply their acquired knowledge to an observed, clinical information problem and complete several stages of the software engineering process. Evaluation by inquiry showed that, compared to other courses, students spent more time, and distributed their time more evenly, during the whole period of the course. In conjunction with theory, a combination of internship and project in a hospital seems to provide a surplus value compared to a practical in a computer laboratory. The integration of software theory, clinical practice and problem-based approach, contributed to the enthusiastic, intensive and realistic way students learned in this important topic that might be chosen as a future profession. PMID:15460769

  16. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  17. ERISA preemption. Colleton Regional Hospital v. MRS Medical Review Systems Inc.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    ERISA preempts state law claims brought by hospitals against medical utilization review firm including claims of tortious interference with contracts, defamation, unfair trade practices, bad faith refusal to pay claims and improper claims practices. PMID:10184694

  18. Medication Practices at Center Of Hospital and Nursing Home Proposals: Discharge and Pharmacy Requirements to Change.

    PubMed

    Barlas, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Rules proposed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services would change discharge policies at hospitals and long-term care facilities and update conditions of participation with a focus on medication reconciliation and pharmacist responsibilities. PMID:27069341

  19. Associated Roles of Perioperative Medical Directors and Anesthesia: Hospital Agreements for Operating Room Management.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H

    2015-12-01

    As reviewed previously, decision making can be made systematically shortly before the day of surgery based on reducing the hours of overutilized operating room (OR) time and tardiness of case starts (i.e., patient waiting). We subsequently considered in 2008 that such decision making depends on rational anesthesia-hospital agreements specifying anesthesia staffing. Since that prior study, there has been a substantial increase in understanding of the timing of decision making to reduce overutilized OR time. Most decisions substantively influencing overutilized OR time are those made within 1 workday before the day of surgery and on the day of surgery, because only then are ORs sufficiently full that case scheduling and staff assignment decisions affect overutilized OR time. Consequently, anesthesiologists can easily be engaged in such decisions, because generally they must be involved to ensure that the corresponding anesthesia staff assignments are appropriate. Despite this, at hospitals with >8 hours of OR time used daily in each OR, computerized recommendations are superior to intuition because of cognitive biases. Decisions need to be made by a Perioperative Medical Director who has knowledge of the principles of perioperative managerial decision making published in the scientific literature rather than by a committee lacking this competency. Education in the scientific literature, and when different analytical methods should be used, is important. The addition that we make in this article is to show that an agreement between an anesthesia group and a hospital can both reduce overutilized OR time and patient waiting: The anesthesia group and hospital will ensure, hourly, that, when there are case(s) waiting to start, the number of ORs in use for each service will be at least the number that maximizes the efficiency of use of OR time. Neither the anesthesia group nor the hospital will be expected to run more than that number of ORs without mutual agreement

  20. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  1. Pattern and Trend of Morbidity in the Infectious Disease Ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Moumita; Chaudhuri, Sudip Banik; Ishore, Kaushik; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In spite of experiencing a large decline in the spread and burden of infectious diseases, the Global Burden of Disease Project suggests that about 30% of the disease burden in India is attributable to infections. The hospital data constitute a basic and primary source of information for continuous follow up of this changing pattern of morbidity and mortality. Aim To identify the pattern and trend of different infectious diseases among admissions in the Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of inpatient hospital database over 5 years period (January 2008 – December 2012) of Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Results Among 3277 admissions in the Infectious Disease ward during 2008-12, diarrhoeal diseases (84.3%) were most common. The highest mortality was recorded for rabies cases (83.9%), followed by tetanus (32.6%) and diphtheria (27.3%). The majority cases of diphtheria (78.9%) and measles (53.1%) belonged to below 9 years age. Except the year 2010, there was a gradual rise in admissions from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion Review of hospital records provided information regarding the pattern of diseases but no definite trend among admissions in the infectious diseases ward. PMID:26674374

  2. Wiring a medical school and teaching hospital for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, N M; Lee, J C K; Cheng, D; Chui, C

    2002-06-01

    The planning and installation of a telemedicine system for communication within a teaching hospital and its academic and hospital units with a capacity for accommodation of up to 400 video-stations is described. The system is intended for improving the communication between patients and health professionals, and between the health professionals themselves. It also provides the basis for improving pre-graduate teaching, especially problem-based learning, and all aspects of postgraduate teaching. PMID:12052428

  3. Wiring a medical school and teaching hospital for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, N M; Lee, J C; Cheng, D; Chui, C

    2001-05-01

    The planning and installation of a telemedicine system for communication within a teaching hospital and its academic and hospital units with a capacity for accommodation of up to 400 video-stations is described. The system is intended for improving the communication between patients and health professionals, and between the health professionals themselves. It also provides the basis for improving pre-graduate teaching, especially problem-based learning, and all aspects of postgraduate teaching. PMID:11311677

  4. Pharmacological Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism Among Hospitalized Patients With Acute Medical Illness: An Electronic Medical Records Study.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Marc; Liu, Xianchen; Phatak, Hemant; Qi, Rong; Teal, Evgenia; Nisi, Daniel; Liu, Larry Z; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Patients hospitalized with acute medical illness have an elevated risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). American College of Chest Physicians guidelines list various chronic illnesses, sepsis, advanced age, history of VTE, and immobility as risk factors and recommend prophylactic anticoagulation using fondaparinux, low-molecular weight heparin, or low-dose unfractionated heparin. The objectives of this study were to examine pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE among hospitalized medically ill patients and to assess demographic and clinical correlates related to VTE prophylaxis. A retrospective (1999-2010) electronic medical records study included patients aged 40 years and older hospitalized for at least 3 days, with significant medical illness or with a VTE hospitalization 30-365 days before admission. Each patient's first qualifying hospitalization was analyzed. Exclusions were if VTE treatment was started within 1 day of admission, or if warfarin (and not heparin or enoxaparin) was used. Prophylaxis was defined if the first inpatient dose of subcutaneous heparin or enoxaparin was at prophylaxis levels (lower than treatment levels). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with VTE prophylaxis. Among 12,980 patients, 22.1% received prophylaxis (11.8% with enoxaparin, 10.3% with heparin). VTE prophylaxis was positively associated with year of hospitalization, subcutaneous heparin in the month before admission, aspirin, self-pay status, age, and sepsis. VTE prophylaxis was negatively associated with smoking, alcohol, warfarin in the past 30 days, and primary diagnoses of stroke, infectious disease, or inflammatory bowel disease. Pharmacological VTE prophylaxis has increased significantly over the past 12 years but is still largely underused in patients hospitalized with acute medical illness. Multiple demographic, behavioral, and clinical factors are associated with inpatient VTE prophylaxis. PMID:26720163

  5. [Advocacy and early discharge under the new system of hospitalization for medical care and protection].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    The Act on Mental Health and Welfare for the Mentally Disabled was partially amended during the 183rd ordinary session of the Diet, on June 13, 2013. The revision abolished the system of guardianship that had long imposed conflicting roles on families of people with mental disorders. Various issues and concerns remain, however, including the requirement that consent for hospitalization be provided by a family member. Many people who need involuntary hospitalization find themselves in situations where it is difficult to continue living in the community. At the time of hospital admission, along with a medical examination, it is necessary to assess the patient's support system in the community and ascertain whether "hospitalization for medical care and protection" is, in fact, the only option. When hospitalization for medical care and protection is determined to be unavoidable, treatment and planning focused on early discharge and the patient's return to life in the community should be initiated immediately after hospitalization. Actual patient outcomes clearly indicate that early discharge is often the result when medical institutions collaborate and network with multidisciplinary teams and community support workers immediately after hospitalization. It is hoped that the amended law will have a practical impact that will result in similar outcomes throughout the nation in the future. At the same' time, it is crucial to expand staffing in medical institutions, foster a culture of team treatment, and promote the creation of better community mental health systems that include housing, social resources, and family support. PMID:24864564

  6. The liability of the hospital librarian. Why you need a professional medical librarian.

    PubMed

    Herin, N J

    1991-01-01

    Would you hire a cashier instead of a qualified accountant to manage your hospital's financial department? Certainly not--the stakes are too high. The same test holds for your hospital library: Besides running the risk of possible liability and embarrassment for your hospital, hiring an untrained person to manage your library would not serve the best interests of your medical staff and--most importantly--your patients. PMID:10114806

  7. Strengthening physician relationships. Improving service to medical practices helps hospitals meet patients' needs.

    PubMed

    Rezac, P J

    1991-03-01

    In 1983 Sacred Heart Hospital, Yankton, SD, launched a medical staff-based marketing plan. Initial research focused on discovering service-area referring physicians' perceptions and level of utilization of Sacred Heart and its medical staff. The plan's ultimate goal was to strengthen relationships with referring physicians and thus improve the hospital's ability to deliver high-quality healthcare to those in its service area. Physicians were asked to indicate how important certain attributes were in choosing a medical specialist and a referral hospital. Among the attributes they most often cited as "very important" in choice of a specialist were specialist's reputation, patient's previous satisfaction, communication with a referring physician, and patient's preference. For choosing a referral hospital the most frequently cited attributes were availability of latest technology and equipment, hospital's reputation, patient's previous satisfaction, and patient's preference. The study also gathered information on physicians' utilization of and satisfaction with a variety of Sacred Heart services. As a result of the study, the hospital implemented a seven-part strategy to increase referring physicians' satisfaction with and utilization of the hospital and its medical staff. A follow-up study five years later revealed a 6.7 percent increase in the number of service-area physicians who referred patients to Sacred Heart and a 14.2 percent increase in the number of physicians who were "very satisfied" with the hospital's services. The consumer study revealed that high-quality professional services and highly personalized services were very important to patients. PMID:10109226

  8. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of participation: Special... stated by the patient and/or others significantly involved. (4) The social service records,...

  9. Abusive Head Trauma in Young Children: Characteristics and Medical Charges in a Hospitalized Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettaro, L.; Berger, R. P.; Songer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presenting characteristics, hospital course, and hospital charges associated with hospital admissions for head trauma in young children at a regional pediatric trauma center, and to examine whether these factors differ among abused and non-abused subjects. Method: Comparative case series study involving a retrospective…

  10. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  11. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety. PMID:26643076

  12. Attitudes and knowledge about case mix reform among hospital staff in Australia.

    PubMed

    Degeling, P; Black, D; Palmer, G; Walters, J

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of a national survey of staff in acute care hospitals about their knowledge of case mix and their attitudes towards it. Our findings suggest that, despite the range and scope of activities that have been pursued under the Australian Casemix Development Program (ACDP), knowledge of case mix among acute care hospital staff remains patchy. The evidence also shows that significant aspects of the DRG classification system and the uses to which it can be put are not accepted by many hospital staff, particularly medical staff. The paper concludes with a discussion of what some of these findings imply for future activity on case mix reform. PMID:10162519

  13. 78 FR 21631 - Fiscal Year 2013 Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... BUDGET Fiscal Year 2013 Cost of Hospital and Medical Care Treatment Furnished by the Department of Defense Medical Treatment Facilities; Certain Rates Regarding Recovery From Tortiously Liable Third... the cost of inpatient medical services furnished by military treatment facilities through...

  14. The distance to community medical care and the likelihood of hospitalization: is closer always better?

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, D C; Fisher, E; Stukel, T A; Chang, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the influence that distance from residence to the nearest hospital had on the likelihood of hospitalization and mortality. METHODS: Hospitalizations were studied for Maine. New Hampshire, and Vermont during 1989 (adults) and for 1985 through 1989 (children) and for mortality (1989) in Medicare enrollees. RESULTS: After other known predictors of hospitalization (age, sex, bed supply, median household income, rural residence, academic medical center, and presence of nursing home patients) were controlled for, the adjusted rate ratio of medical hospitalization for residents living more than 30 minutes away was 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82, 0.88) for adults and 0.78 (95% CI = 0.74, 0.81) for children, compared with those living in a zip code with a hospital. Similar effects were seen for the four most common diagnosis-related groups for both adults and children. The likelihood of hospitalization for conditions usually requiring hospitalization and for mortality in the elderly did not differ by distance. CONCLUSIONS: Distance to the hospital exerts an important influence on hospitalization rates that is unlikely to be explained by illness rates. PMID:9240104

  15. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  16. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  17. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  18. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  19. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... evacuation service (HEMES). 135.271 Section 135.271 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... 24-consecutive hour period of a HEMES assignment, unless an emergency medical evacuation operation...

  20. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical services and hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contract Cost Principles and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical...

  1. Indo-Chinese Refugee Physician ECFMG Review Course. Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahnemann Medical Coll. and Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.

    A report is presented on a special review seminar for Vietnamese physicians preparing for the July 1976 Educational Council for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) examination. The 4-month review course was offered to 73 physicians at Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Participants were assigned to 10 small sections for English classes, and…

  2. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices regarding Whole Body Donation among Medical Professionals in a Hospital in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballala, Kirthinath; Shetty, Avinash; Malpe, Surekha Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary body donation has become an important source of cadavers for anatomical study and education. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) regarding whole body donation among medical professionals in a medical institute in India. A cross sectional study was conducted at Kasturba Hospital, Manipal,…

  3. Medication error detection in two major teaching hospitals: What are the types of errors?

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, Fatemeh; Zargarzadeh, Amir H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing number of reports on medication errors and relevant subsequent damages, especially in medical centers has become a growing concern for patient safety in recent decades. Patient safety and in particular, medication safety is a major concern and challenge for health care professionals around the world. Our prospective study was designed to detect prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administering medication errors in two major university hospitals. Materials and Methods: After choosing 20 similar hospital wards in two large teaching hospitals in the city of Isfahan, Iran, the sequence was randomly selected. Diagrams for drug distribution were drawn by the help of pharmacy directors. Direct observation technique was chosen as the method for detecting the errors. A total of 50 doses were studied in each ward to detect prescribing, transcribing and administering errors in each ward. The dispensing error was studied on 1000 doses dispensed in each hospital pharmacy. Results: A total of 8162 number of doses of medications were studied during the four stages, of which 8000 were complete data to be analyzed. 73% of prescribing orders were incomplete and did not have all six parameters (name, dosage form, dose and measuring unit, administration route, and intervals of administration). We found 15% transcribing errors. One-third of administration of medications on average was erroneous in both hospitals. Dispensing errors ranged between 1.4% and 2.2%. Conclusion: Although prescribing and administrating compromise most of the medication errors, improvements are needed in all four stages with regard to medication errors. Clear guidelines must be written and executed in both hospitals to reduce the incidence of medication errors. PMID:25364360

  4. Workload Impact of Medical Subspecialties in the Teaching Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Peenen, Hubert J.

    1973-01-01

    This paper documents, using a single test as a model, the significant increase in clinical laboratory workload which occurred in a university hospital when strong sections of nephrology, hematology-oncology, and immunology-rheumatology were added to the department of medicine. (Author)

  5. Analysis of Forensic Autopsy in 120 Cases of Medical Disputes Among Different Levels of Institutional Settings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Sheng; Ye, Guang-Hua; Fan, Yan-Yan; Li, Xing-Biao; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Han, Jun-Ge; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Deng, Miao-Wu; Li, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medical science, the causes of death can sometimes only be determined by pathologists after a complete autopsy. Few studies have investigated the importance of forensic autopsy in medically disputed cases among different levels of institutional settings. Our study aimed to analyze forensic autopsy in 120 cases of medical disputes among five levels of institutional settings between 2001 and 2012 in Wenzhou, China. The results showed an overall concordance rate of 55%. Of the 39% of clinically missed diagnosis, cardiovascular pathology comprises 55.32%, while respiratory pathology accounts for the remaining 44. 68%. Factors that increase the likelihood of missed diagnoses were private clinics, community settings, and county hospitals. These results support that autopsy remains an important tool in establishing causes of death in medically disputed case, which may directly determine or exclude the fault of medical care and therefore in helping in resolving these cases. PMID:25929602

  6. The development of medical record services in Hong Kong public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fung, V

    1994-12-01

    Medical record service in Hong Kong public hospitals have been developing at different levels. Since 1992, various improvements in medical record services have been carried out in public hospitals, e.g. professional management, record storage, organized medical records, computerization, completion of discharge summaries, and the introduction of a more precise coding system. The aim of the reform is to provide timely, accurate, organized and meaningful clinical information for end-users. Evolving from this reform, work has been started on developing Patient Related Groups and Specialty Clinical Information Systems. PMID:10142476

  7. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  8. Evaluation of STAT medication ordering process in a community hospital

    PubMed Central

    Walsh., Kim; Schwartz., Barbara

    Background: In most health care facilities, problems related to delays in STAT medication order processing time are of common concern. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate processing time for STAT orders at Kimball Medical Center. Methods: All STAT orders were reviewed to determine processing time; order processing time was also stratified by physician order entry (physician entered (PE) orders vs. non-physician entered (NPE) orders). Collected data included medication ordered, indication, time ordered, time verified by pharmacist, time sent from pharmacy, and time charted as given to the patient. Results: A total of 502 STAT orders were reviewed and 389 orders were included for analysis. Overall, median time was 29 minutes, IQR 16–63; p<0.0001.). The time needed to process NPE orders was significantly less than that needed for PE orders (median 27 vs. 34 minutes; p=0.026). In terms of NPE orders, the median total time required to process STAT orders for medications available in the Automated Dispensing Devices (ADM) was within 30 minutes, while that required to process orders for medications not available in the ADM was significantly greater than 30 minutes. For PE orders, the median total time required to process orders for medications available in the ADM (i.e., not requiring pharmacy involvement) was significantly greater than 30 minutes. [Median time = 34 minutes (p<0.001)]. Conclusion: We conclude that STAT order processing time may be improved by increasing the availability of medications in ADM, and pharmacy involvement in the verification process. PMID:27382418

  9. A proposed framework to improve the safety of medical devices in a Canadian hospital context

    PubMed Central

    Polisena, Julie; Jutai, Jeffrey; Chreyh, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Medical devices are used to monitor, replace, or modify anatomy or physiological processes. They are important health care innovations that enable effective treatment using less invasive techniques, and they improve health care delivery and patient outcomes. Devices can also introduce risk of harm to patients. Our objective was to propose a surveillance system framework to improve the safety associated with the use of medical devices in a hospital. Materials and methods The proposed medical device surveillance system incorporates multiple components to accurately document and assess the appropriate actions to reduce the risk of incidents, adverse events, and patient harm. The assumptions on which the framework is based are highlighted. The surveillance system was designed from the perspective of a tertiary teaching hospital that includes dedicated hospital staff whose mandate is to provide safe patient care to inpatients and outpatients and biomedical engineering services. Results The main components of the surveillance system would include an adverse medical device events database, a medical device/equipment library, education and training, and an open communication and feedback strategy. Close linkages among these components and with external medical device/equipment networks to the hospital must be established and maintained. A feedback mechanism on medical device-related incidents, as well as implementation and evaluation strategies for the surveillance system are described to ensure a seamless transition and a high satisfactory level among the hospital staff. The direct cost items of the proposed surveillance system for consideration, and its potential benefits are outlined. Conclusion The effectiveness of the proposed medical device surveillance system framework can be measured after it has been implemented in a Canadian hospital facility. PMID:24876796

  10. Medication Adherence and the Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Newly Prescribed Antihypertensive Medications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyeun; Shin, Dong Wook; Yun, Jae Moon; Hwang, Yunji; Park, Sue K; Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, BeLong

    2016-03-01

    The importance of adherence to antihypertensive treatments for the prevention of cardiovascular disease has not been well elucidated. This study evaluated the effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on specific cardiovascular disease mortality (ischemic heart disease [IHD], cerebral hemorrhage, and cerebral infarction). Our study used data from a 3% sample cohort that was randomly extracted from enrollees of Korean National Health Insurance. Study subjects were aged ≥20 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, and started newly prescribed antihypertensive medication in 2003 to 2004. Adherence to antihypertensive medication was estimated as the cumulative medication adherence. Subjects were divided into good (cumulative medication adherence, ≥80%), intermediate (cumulative medication adherence, 50%-80%), and poor (cumulative medication adherence, <50%) adherence groups. We used time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association between medication adherence and health outcomes. Among 33 728 eligible subjects, 670 (1.99%) died of coronary heart disease or stroke during follow-up. Patients with poor medication adherence had worse mortality from IHD (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.31; P for trend=0.005), cerebral hemorrhage (hazard ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-3.77; P for trend=0.004), and cerebral infarction (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.96; P for trend=0.003) than those with good adherence. The estimated hazard ratios of hospitalization for cardiovascular disease were consistent with the mortality end point. Poor medication adherence was associated with higher mortality and a greater risk of hospitalization for specific cardiovascular diseases, emphasizing the importance of a monitoring system and strategies to improve medication adherence in clinical practice. PMID:26865198

  11. Hospitals and plastics. Dioxin prevention and medical waste incinerators.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, J; McCally, M; Orris, P; Weinberg, J

    1996-01-01

    CHLORINATED DIOXINS and related compounds are extremely potent toxic substances, producing effects in humans and animals at extremely low doses. Because these compounds are persistent in the environment and accumulate in the food chain, they are now distributed globally, and every member of the human population is exposed to them, primarily through the food supply and mothers' milk. An emerging body of information suggests that dioxin contamination has reached a level that may pose a large-scale, long-term public health risk. Of particular concern are dioxin's effects on reproduction, development, immune system function, and carcinogenesis. Medical waste incineration is a major source of dioxins. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic, as the dominant source of organically bound chlorine in the medical waste stream, is the primary cause of "iatrogenic" dioxin produced by the incineration of medical wastes. Health professionals have a responsibility to work to reduce dioxin exposure from medical sources. Health care institutions should implement policies to reduce the use of PVC plastics, thus achieving major reductions in medically related dioxin formation. Images p298-a p299-a p300-a p301-a p305-a p307-a p310-a PMID:8711095

  12. Hospitals and plastics. Dioxin prevention and medical waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Thornton, J; McCally, M; Orris, P; Weinberg, J

    1996-01-01

    CHLORINATED DIOXINS and related compounds are extremely potent toxic substances, producing effects in humans and animals at extremely low doses. Because these compounds are persistent in the environment and accumulate in the food chain, they are now distributed globally, and every member of the human population is exposed to them, primarily through the food supply and mothers' milk. An emerging body of information suggests that dioxin contamination has reached a level that may pose a large-scale, long-term public health risk. Of particular concern are dioxin's effects on reproduction, development, immune system function, and carcinogenesis. Medical waste incineration is a major source of dioxins. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic, as the dominant source of organically bound chlorine in the medical waste stream, is the primary cause of "iatrogenic" dioxin produced by the incineration of medical wastes. Health professionals have a responsibility to work to reduce dioxin exposure from medical sources. Health care institutions should implement policies to reduce the use of PVC plastics, thus achieving major reductions in medically related dioxin formation. PMID:8711095

  13. [Management of the patient with COPD: home case or hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Aubert, John-David

    2013-05-01

    Acute exacerbation of COPD is one of the most common causes of hospital admission in patients affected with this disease. In most cases, consideration of differential diagnoses and assessment of important comorbidities will allow to make the decision whether or not the patient needs to be hospitalized. A decision to hospitalize will be based on specific symptoms and signs, as well on the patient's history. Contrary to bronchial asthma, a systematic action plan strategy is lacking for COPD. However, a disease management plan involving all the health care providers may have the potential to improve the patient's well being and to decrease costs related to these exacerbations. PMID:23644245

  14. Integrating cancer rehabilitation into medical care at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Grabois, M

    2001-08-15

    In spite of national health care legislative and model program initiatives, cancer rehabilitation has not kept pace with rehabilitation for patients with other medical problems. This article discusses, from a historical perspective, unsuccessful health care legislation related to cancer and problems in establishing and expanding cancer rehabilitation programs. The attempts to establish a cancer rehabilitation program at the Texas Medical Center and the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center are reviewed. Lessons learned over past 40 years and strategies for maintaining the success of a cancer rehabilitation program are discussed. PMID:11519034

  15. [The "quality of life" concept in medical students and postgraduate residents in a university hospital].

    PubMed

    González, N; Padilla, J; Rodríguez, E; Esteva, M; Ruiz, M; Tomarelli, R; Espejo, B; Granados, I; Zarelli, F; Chung, L; Cordido, G

    2000-12-01

    We investigated the quality of life's concept and its uses by both residents and interns as well as last year medical students in the University Hospital in Caracas (HUC). A random sample by strata, without replacement of 123 persons, completed a self administered questionnaire which included a set of closed questions and one of open questions related to the quality of life's concept. The mean age was 29 years for both sexes (3.55 standard deviation or SD). There was not a statistically significant difference between males and females. More than 50% read about quality of life in either newspapers, journals and fiction literature. There was no difference among the groups (p = 0.25). Only 68% had heard in a different sort of academical institution the term "quality of life" such as in the school of medicine, highschool or in some discussion groups with no differences among the groups (p = 0.15). However, there was no agreement as from whom and where they learned about quality of life (p < 0.001). Although everybody considered that the quality of life was an important element in medical actions such as diagnostic or therapeutics, its importance was reduced for diagnosis compared to treatment (p < 0.0001). All the elements that were considered as part of the concept were also considered as important, regardless of the group and was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The open question analysis showed that the non-medical definitions represent 85.15% of the group, 50% out of them included terms of potentiality or condition. Among the elements included in the definition was the social in 27.65%, psychological in 23.53% and, the economical in 12.35% of the questionnaires. The great majority of the "quality of life" definitions did not include a clearly defined subject and in many cases it was exclusively related to ill persons. Finally, there is an informal and not well oriented form of learning about "quality of life" in residents, interns and last year medical

  16. Effective physician credentialing. Properly monitoring medical staffs can protect hospitals from liability.

    PubMed

    Blaes, S M; Knight, G E

    1990-11-01

    Healthcare facilities today are finding themselves increasingly liable in malpractice suits if they have hired incompetent physicians or allowed them to remain on the medical staff. Thus appropriate processes for physician credentialing are important. The hospital medical staff has the authority to evaluate medical staff membership status and clinical privileges and to take disciplinary and corrective action. If the medical staff fails to do its job, however, the hospital governing board is responsible for making sure the credentialing process is carried out properly. The same rules apply to the reapplication process. The hospital must associate its credentialing process with its prevailing concern for high-quality patient care and document that ideal. Preservation of market share and elimination of competition must never enter into the credentialing process. Well-framed hospital bylaws will help provide protection from liability, if they are followed correctly. If a hospital deviates from its bylaws when processing an application or granting clinical privileges, it risks a lawsuit. Congress has passed the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986-an act that not only protects patients from incompetent practitioners but also can help limit facility's risk of liability by requiring facilities and third-party payers to report any adverse actions taken against physicians. The National Practitioner Data Bank is an information clearing-house opened in September 1990 that hospitals must use to report and obtain professional information about physicians. PMID:10107456

  17. Needlestick injury among medical personnel in Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y W; Hassim, I Noor

    2007-03-01

    Needlestick injury has been recognized as one of the occupational hazards which results in transmission of bloodborne pathogens. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 136 health care workers in the Accident and Emergency Department of two teaching hospitals from August to November 2003 to determine the prevalence of cases and episodes of needlestick injury. In addition, this study also assessed the level of knowledge of blood-borne diseases and Universal Precautions, risk perception on the practice of Universal Precautions and to find out factors contributing to needlestick injury. Prevalence of needlestick injury among the health care workers in the two hospitals were found to be 31.6% (N = 43) and 52.9% (N = 87) respectively. Among different job categories, medical assistants appeared to face the highest risk of needlestick injury. Factors associated with needlestick injury included shorter tenure in one's job (p < 0.05). Findings of this study support the hypothesis that health care workers are at risk of needlestick injury while performing procedures on patients. Therefore, comprehensive infection control strategies should be applied to effectively reduce the risk of needlestick injury. PMID:17682562

  18. Uncompensated hospital care for pregnancy and childbirth cases.

    PubMed Central

    Zollinger, T W; Saywell, R M; Chu, D K

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The large number of medically indigent patients in the United States is a major concern to policymakers and may be due to recent increases in the number of uninsured people. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that affect the amount of unpaid hospital charges for services provided to pregnant women. METHODS: Individual and hospital data were collected on a representative set of 235 pregnancy and childbirth patients with unpaid hospital charges from 28 hospitals in the state of Indiana. RESULTS: Most of these patients did not have insurance coverage (63.8%), yet the majority were employed in the public or private sector (72.3%). Over half (55.5%) of the total uncompensated care amount for this group was from the $1000 to 2499 debt category. The median charge for these patients was $1468, of which the typical hospital was able to collect only 25.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the belief that any national effort to expand the availability of health insurance coverage to women through increased employment will not totally eliminate the uncompensated care problem. The findings also indicate that rural hospitals face the uncompensated care problem mainly because a significant portion of rural patients are without adequate health insurance coverage. PMID:1853993

  19. The medical waste audit. A framework for hospitals to appraise options and financial implications.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, J

    1992-03-01

    The generation, handling, and disposal of medical wastes involve virtually every department in the hospital. To enhance coordination, managers must comprehensively describe the total system and specify the roles of key functions and individuals. Hospitals produce about 77 percent of the approximately 500,000 tons of regulated medical waste produced annually in the United States. The amount produced by different hospitals varies, primarily because of differences in "waste-management practices." The Environmental Protection Agency is trying to develop a greater understanding of the types of medical wastes that are infectious, methods of transmission, and the likelihood of transmission in the handling and disposal of waste within the hospital environment. To ensure that medical waste is being handled and treated in the most cost-effective manner and with the least health risk to employees and the community, hospital administrators must undertake a comprehensive appraisal of the activities associated with the generation, handling, and disposal processes. A "medical waste audit" requires the following steps: Generation profile to identify origination points, categories or types of waste, and associated generation rates. Inventory of handling practices, including existing regulations, procedures and protocols, training programs, definitions regarding waste segregation, and documentation. Review of current disposal practices and existing and developing alternatives. Cost analysis PMID:10116509

  20. Cardiac Arrest and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case of Medical Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Tokunbo; Okudo, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient clinical data from patients is a major cause of errors in medical diagnostics. In an attempt to make a diagnosis, initial clinical information provided to the physician may be overly relied on as the only information required in making diagnosis leading to anchoring. Failure to rely on differential diagnoses in spite of new signs and symptoms or rethinking of initial hypothesis may lead to fixation on a certain diagnosis, which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In the event that there is an anchoring heuristic, like in our patient, it is important to consider differential diagnoses; however, it is not wrong to rely on some form of anchor. We report a case of a 62-year-old male with a history of multiple medical conditions and a history of acetaminophen overdose who presented to the hospital with large amounts of coffee ground emesis. He was subsequently transferred to the liver transplant center on discovery that he was in fulminant hepatic failure and died two days later in spite of aggressive medical treatment. PMID:27366152

  1. A Proposed Research Program for Hospital-Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Paul

    1967-01-01

    This proposal for a federal government program of health services research, written in spring of 1966, played a key role in development of the National Center for Health Services Research and Development, announced by the President early this year. The paper points to the lack of economic incentives for development of cost-saving innovations for hospitals compared to incentives to develop innovations improving the quality of care. It indicates the analytic procedure which, if followed, would lead to an efficient program of research, and points out several aspects of the analysis that are critical requirements for its successful application. PMID:4964151

  2. Effects of medication adherence on hospitalizations and healthcare costs in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Thoopputra, Thitaporn; Patanaprateep, Oraluck; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the impacts of medication adherence on hospitalization and direct healthcare cost in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18–65 years who visited a University hospital and received antipsychotics from April 2011 to October 2011 were included. Propensity score–adjusted logistic regression was used to determine the impacts of medication adherence on schizophrenia-related and all-cause hospitalizations. Results: A total of 582 patients were included. Three out of 224 patients (1.3%) were hospitalized with schizophrenia in optimal adherence group, while 10 of 140 (7.1%) were hospitalized in under-adherence group, and 7 of 218 (3.2%) were hospitalized in over-adherence group. Based on propensity score–adjusted multivariate logistic regression, the adjusted odds ratio was 5.86 (95% confidence interval = 1.53–22.50) for schizophrenia-related hospitalization and 8.04 (95% confidence interval = 2.20–29.40) for all-cause hospitalization. The average annual direct healthcare costs in patients with optimal adherence, under-adherence, and over-adherence were US$371 ± US$836, US$386 ± US$734, and US$508 ± US$2168, respectively. Conclusion: An initiation of interventions to maintain optimal adherence in patients with schizophrenia would significantly impact the healthcare system. PMID:27026801

  3. Adjusted hospital death rates: a potential screen for quality of medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, R W; Brook, R H; Rogers, W H

    1987-01-01

    Increased economic pressure on hospitals has accelerated the need to develop a screening tool for identifying hospitals that potentially provide poor quality care. Based upon data from 93 hospitals and 205,000 admissions, we used a multiple regression model to adjust the hospitals crude death rate. The adjustment process used age, origin of patient from the emergency department or nursing home, and a hospital case mix index based on DRGs (diagnostic related groups). Before adjustment, hospital death rates ranged from 0.3 to 5.8 per 100 admissions. After adjustment, hospital death ratios ranged from 0.36 to 1.36 per 100 (actual death rate divided by predicted death rate). Eleven hospitals (12 per cent) were identified where the actual death rate exceeded the predicted death rate by more than two standard deviations. In nine hospitals (10 per cent), the predicted death rate exceeded the actual death rate by a similar statistical margin. The 11 hospitals with higher than predicted death rates may provide inadequate quality of care or have uniquely ill patient populations. The adjusted death rate model needs to be validated and generalized before it can be used routinely to screen hospitals. However, the remaining large differences in observed versus predicted death rates lead us to believe that important differences in hospital performance may exist. PMID:3113272

  4. Hospital consultations and jurisdiction over patients: consequences for the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeyoung

    2014-05-01

    Advances in biomedical technologies and the increased specialisation of the medical profession have made collaborations among specialty physicians integral to care delivery. As physicians increasingly must share patients, how does this shape the jurisdiction that physicians hold? The sociological literature has extensively documented inter-professional jurisdictional claims and conflicts to maintain the professional power of physicians in relation to allied occupational groups. However, less is known of intra-professional avoidance and resolution of conflict over jurisdiction. This case study considers how jurisdictions are shared, maintained and challenged in a single profession. Drawing from ethnographic and interview data collected from September 2010 to October 2012 on the internal medicine service of a teaching hospital in the USA, I demonstrate the variation in jurisdictional conflicts that emerge between internal medicine and other specialties during the consultation process. Ignoring shared jurisdictions and refusing to accept jurisdiction of patients generate disputes among the principal medical and specialist teams. These disputes ensue due to blurred boundaries dividing the various specialties. To avoid conflicts, internal medicine physicians adopt strategies behind the scenes to facilitate smooth consultations. PMID:24963531

  5. How to shape positive relationships in medical practices and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sotile, W M; Sotile, M O

    1999-01-01

    Managing workplace conflict is one of the most important, stressful, and time-consuming tasks faced by today's medical leaders. Poorly managed workplace conflict can alienate patients, demoralize staff, increase turnover, damage relationships with valued referral sources and third party carriers concerned about patient satisfaction, and lead medical practices to costly "corporate divorces." Physician executives cannot solve the problems caused by disruptive doctors simply by bolstering their own conflict management skills or by policing offenders. The larger contexts within which inappropriate workplace behavior occurs must also be assessed and addressed. The true leadership challenge is to intervene in ways that help to foster a "culture" of appropriate interpersonal dynamics throughout your organization. This requires learning to think and to intervene systematically. PMID:10557487

  6. Group medical practice-an alternative to hospital oligopoly.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W I

    1970-03-01

    The aim of this article is to provoke dialogue and to initiate change. Costs of health care are alarming. Our inability to respond effectively to the demand for total health care is frustrating. Some drastic changes are required. This article, the first of a series that will enquire into our present methods for providing health care, suggests that in group medical practice some satisfactory solutions may be found. PMID:20468486

  7. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  8. [Iatrogenic meningitis after diagnosis lumbar puncture: 3 cases reports in the paediatric Children's Hospital of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Smaoui, H; Hariga, D; Hajji, N; Bouziri, A; Ben Jaballah, N; Barsaoui, S; Bousnina, S; Sammoud, A; Kechrid, A

    2011-02-01

    We have collected cases of iatrogenic meningitis managed in the Children's Hospital of Tunis, between January 1998 and December 2006. Clinical information about each patient were collected, all bacterial samples were investigated in the microbiology laboratory of the hospital. Bacterial isolates were identified according to conventional criteria. In the interval under study, we recorded three cases of iatrogenic meningitis after lumbar puncture. Two cases occurred in newborn admitted for suspicion of neonatal infection and one in a 2-month-old infant admitted for exploration of hyperpyretic convulsion. In all patients, the initial cerebrospinal fluid was normal. All patients developed symptoms of acute meningitis within 72 hours after lumbar puncture; the second cerebrospinal fluid was, then, typical for purulent meningitis. The causal agents isolated in the three cases were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Serratia marcescens, all resistant to beta-lactams by extended spectrum beta-lactamase production. The use of quinolones was required in all cases. Different complications were recorded: hydrocephalus and brain abscess in one case, respiratory and hemodynamic failure managed in the intensive care unit in the second, and brain hygroma in the third case. This study shows high morbidity of iatrogenic meningitis. Simple aseptic precautions undertaken before the procedure of lumbar puncture can prevent such cases. The urgent need for increasing the awareness among medical personnel in hospitals of developing countries cannot be overemphasized. PMID:21103965

  9. Confirming delivery: understanding the role of the hospitalized patient in medication administration safety.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Marilyn T; Heilemann, MarySue V; MacKinnon, Neil J; Lang, Ariella; Gregory, David; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Fillatre, Theresa

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to gain an understanding of current patient involvement in medication administration safety from the perspectives of both patients and nursing staff members. Administering medication is taken for granted and therefore suited to the development of theory to enhance its understanding. We conducted a constructivist, grounded theory study involving 24 patients and 26 nursing staff members and found that patients had the role of confirming delivery in the administration of medication. Confirming delivery was characterized by three interdependent subprocesses: engaging in the medication administration process, being "half out of it" (patient mental status), and perceiving time. We believe that ours is one of the first qualitative studies on the role of hospitalized patients in administering medication. Medication administration and nursing care systems, as well as patient mental status, impose limitations on patient involvement in safe medication administration. PMID:24598773

  10. Physician practice style and rates of hospitalization for chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Komaromy, M; Lurie, N; Osmond, D; Vranizan, K; Keane, D; Bindman, A B

    1996-06-01

    Hospitalization rates for chronic medical conditions vary across small areas and are associated inversely with community income. The authors studied whether variation in hospitalization rates can be attributed to differences in physician practice style. Using census and hospital discharge data, hospitalization rates were calculated for asthma, congestive heart failure, and diabetes in 40 medical service areas in California. The authors surveyed a random sample of 1,530 emergency physicians, general internists, and family and general practitioners in these areas, and measured clinical admission threshold by asking physicians whether they would hospitalize patients presented in 15 vignettes of graded severity. The authors measured social admission predisposition by asking how physicians' admission decisions would be influenced by social characteristics that increase patients' vulnerability to illness, including homelessness and drug use; 1,090 physicians responded (71%). There was significant variation across areas in both the clinical (P < 0.0001) and social (P < 0.001) admission scores. Variation in hospitalization rates correlated with physicians' clinical (r = .34, P = 0.03) and social (r = .36, P = 0.02) admission scores. However, in a multiple linear regression analysis that included community sociodemographic factors, physician practice style was not associated significantly with hospitalization rates. Physician practice style varies across areas, but does not explain variation in admission rates for chronic medical conditions after adjusting for community sociodemographic factors. Using methods such as practice guidelines or utilization review to re-set physicians' threshold for admission may not be effective in reducing hospitalizations for chronic medical conditions. PMID:8656725

  11. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs. PMID:23427696

  12. Safe Medical Devices Act: management guidance for hospital compliance with the new FDA requirements.

    PubMed

    Alder, H C

    1993-10-01

    The Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-629) was signed by President George Bush almost three years ago on November 28, 1990. The law expanded the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) authority to regulate medical devices and grew out of congressional concerns about the FDA's ability to quickly learn when a medical device caused an adverse patient event, and to ensure that hazardous devices are removed from hospitals and other health care facilities in a timely manner. The Safe Medical Devices Act is an extension of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, which imposed production, distribution, and sales rules on medical device manufacturers. It gives the FDA the legal authority to directly regulate the use of medical devices in health care facilities. Among the Safe Medical Devices Act's provisions are specific requirements for hospitals, health professionals, and other users of medical devices to report patient incidents involving medical devices to the manufacturer and to the FDA if a device caused or contributed to a serious injury, death, or other "adverse experience." Adverse experiences are defined by the FDA to include concussions, fractures, burns, temporary paralysis, and temporary loss of sight, hearing, or smell. Hospitals have been required to comply with this provision of the law, called user reporting, since 1991. Hospitals are also required to participate in tracking certain medical devices whose failure could result in a serious adverse health outcome. The law requires distributors and manufacturers of specific devices to adopt a method for device tracking. Hospitals are required to cooperate with and provide device manufacturers with information about patients with permanently implantable devices and life-sustaining and life-supporting devices used outside device user facilities. The law also gives the FDA the authority to designate other devices subject to tracking if the agency determines such tracking is warranted to preserve the

  13. Allergic Reaction to Drugs—A Survey on Hospital Practices of Soliciting Medical Information from Newly Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Don Harper

    1964-01-01

    The matter of allergic reaction to drugs is causing serious medicolegal problems in hospitals to both physicians and hospitals. This survey seeks to alert the medical profession and hospitals to the problem, what is being done to cope with it in some hospitals, and to emphasize that the duty to make necessary inquiries belongs primarily to the medical profession. The form described at the end of this report is a suggestion and is not intended to be reproduced and used in all instances. The medical staff and administration of each hospital should develop a form that is appropriate for its use. PMID:14179533

  14. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: Case of smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Methods Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up) were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Results Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Conclusions Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during implementation may provide insight

  15. A study of hospital and medical libraries in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed Central

    al-Ogla, S

    1998-01-01

    The study reported examined the status of hospital libraries, their sponsoring organizations, their staff, the academic qualifications of the head of the library, collection size, available space, buildings, and services. The study was limited to the hospitals with libraries for staff in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. The data were collected through questionnaires sent to a sample of fifteen hospitals with medical libraries. Twelve libraries responded. This is the first study of its kind in Saudi Arabia, and it is hoped that similar surveys will be done covering the whole kingdom. PMID:9549013

  16. Concomitants of perceived trust in hospital and medical services following Hurricane Sandy.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Goodwin, Robin; Palgi, Yuval; Kaniasty, Krzysztof; Crawford, Marsha Zibalese; Weinberger, Aviva; Hamama-Raz, Yaira

    2014-12-30

    The relationship between factors associated with perceived trust in hospital and medical services in the aftermath of a natural disaster is understudied. An online sample of 1000 people mainly from affected states was surveyed after Hurricane Sandy. Participants completed a survey which included disaster related questions and PTSD symptoms. Logistic regression revealed a significant association between perceived trust in hospital services to education, subjective well-being, being scared for the life of a loved one and perceived trust in emergency services. These findings may emphasis the positive association between maintaining active hospital services and mental health among the general population during crisis. PMID:25223254

  17. Patients Discharged Against Medical Advice from a Psychiatric Hospital in Iran: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhmoonesi, Fatemeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Pazhuheshgar, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Self- discharged patients are at high risk for readmission and ultimately higher cost for care. We intended to find the proportion of patients who leave hospital against medical advice and explore some of their characteristics. Methods: This prospective study of discharge against medical advice was conducted in psychiatric wards of Zare hospital in Iran, 2011. A psychologist recorded some information on a checklist based on the documented information about the patient who wanted to leave against medical advice. The psychologist interviewed these patients and recorded the reasons for discharge against medical advice. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables. Results: The rate of premature discharge was 34.4%. Compared to patients with regular discharges, patients with premature discharge were significantly more likely to be male, self-employed, to have co morbid substance abuse and first admission and positive family history of psychiatric disorder. Disappearance of symptoms was the most frequent reason for premature discharge. Conclusion: The 34.4% rate of premature discharge observed in our study is higher than rate reported in other studies. One possible explanation is our teaching hospital serves a low-income urban area and most patients had low socioeconomic status. Further studies are needed to compare teaching and non-teaching hospital about the rate of premature discharge and the reasons of patients who want to leave against medical advice. PMID:24762365

  18. Marketing hand hygiene in hospitals--a case study.

    PubMed

    Gopal Rao, G; Jeanes, A; Osman, M; Aylott, C; Green, J

    2002-01-01

    Hand hygiene of healthcare workers is frequently poor despite the efforts of infection control teams to promote hand decontamination as the most important method to prevent transmission of hospital-acquired infections. In this case study, we describe how principles of societal marketing were applied to improve hand hygiene. Pre-marketing analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to implementation; attention to product, price, promotion and placement; and post-marketing 'customer' surveys were the essential components of the marketing strategy and its implementation. Placement of an alcohol-based gel decontaminant (Spirigel) at the bedside of every patient was widely welcomed in the hospital, and has played a major role in improving hand hygiene of healthcare workers. In the twelve months following the implementation, the decontaminant was used at least 440,000 times. The cost of purchasing the decontaminant was approximately 5000 pounds sterling. Following the introduction of Spirigel, there was a consistent reduction in the proportion of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in each of the quarters of 2000-2001 compared with 1999-2000. In the period 1999-2000, nearly 50% of the MRSA were hospital acquired compared with 39% in 2000-2001. Similarly, the average incidence of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) decreased in each of the quarters in 2000-2001 following the introduction of Spirigel. During this period, there was an average incidence of 9.5 cases of CDAD/1000 admissions compared with 11.5 cases of CDAD/1000 admissions in 1999-2000. This represents a 17.4% reduction in the incidence of CDAD. However, this reduction was not statistically significant (P=0.2). Our case study demonstrates that principles of societal marketing methods can be used effectively to promote and sustain hand hygiene in hospitals. Improvement in hand hygiene will lead to considerable reduction in hospital

  19. The case for medical marijuana in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Maa, Edward; Figi, Paige

    2014-06-01

    Charlotte, a little girl with SCN1A-confirmed Dravet syndrome, was recently featured in a special that aired on CNN. Through exhaustive personal research and assistance from a Colorado-based medical marijuana group (Realm of Caring), Charlotte's mother started adjunctive therapy with a high concentration cannabidiol/Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (CBD:THC) strain of cannabis, now known as Charlotte's Web. This extract, slowly titrated over weeks and given in conjunction with her existing antiepileptic drug regimen, reduced Charlotte's seizure frequency from nearly 50 convulsive seizures per day to now 2-3 nocturnal convulsions per month. This effect has persisted for the last 20 months, and Charlotte has been successfully weaned from her other antiepileptic drugs. We briefly review some of the history, preclinical and clinical data, and controversies surrounding the use of medical marijuana for the treatment of epilepsy, and make a case that the desire to isolate and treat with pharmaceutical grade compounds from cannabis (specifically CBD) may be inferior to therapy with whole plant extracts. Much more needs to be learned about the mechanisms of antiepileptic activity of the phytocannabinoids and other constituents of Cannabis sativa. PMID:24854149

  20. A model approach to sharing electronic medical records between and within the state hospitals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Güler, I; Müldür, S

    2001-11-01

    It has always been a research interest to solve hospital management problems with systematic approach by using modern management tools. Almost all the Hospital Information System (HIS) software packages in Turkey keep track of local transactions in administrative activities and material flow. In state hospitals in Turkey, very little medical information is processed and most of the records are still kept manually and archived on papers. In this paper, a cost-effective, flexible and easy-to-use Hospital Information System model is proposed in order to give better diagnostic and treatment services. It is also demonstrated that this model makes it possible to exchange information between and within the hospitals over Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) network. User needs are taken into consideration during model development and the benefits of model implementation to the hospital administration are stated. According to the model proposed in this paper, only a single health care record number (HCRN) is required for a patient to access all her/his medical records stored in different locations, from any state hospital in Turkey. PMID:11604155

  1. Preventing medication errors in hospitals through a systems approach and technological innovation: a prescription for 2010.

    PubMed

    Crane, Jacquelyn; Crane, Frederick G

    2006-01-01

    Medication errors in hospital settings are considered both widespread and costly to the American healthcare system; yet, it is tractable to available solutions. This article offers a novel prescription for the problem that could be implemented by 2010. It consists of a systems approach--failure mode effects analysis (FMEA)--in combination with emerging technologies, such as a decision support system (DDS) with integrated real-time medical informatics, electronic medical records (EMR), computer physician order entry (CPOE), bar coding, automated dispensing machines (ADM), and robotics. Cost and benefit analysis reveals that this proposed integrated solution will radically reduce medication errors in hospitals and save the lives of thousands of Americans who frequent such facilities on an annual basis, as well as reduce healthcare costs. PMID:17131715

  2. Telemedicine activity at a Canadian university medical school and its teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aires, L M; Finley, J P

    2000-01-01

    Dalhousie University Medical School and its teaching hospitals have been providing clinical telemedicine services since 1987. The object of the present study was to assess the extent and growth of telemedicine at the medical school and teaching hospitals, as well as to evaluate the obstacles to its deployment. This was achieved by conducting structured personal interviews with telemedicine providers. Twenty telemedicine programmes were identified, of which 15 were operational and five were being planned. The number of established telemedicine projects had doubled in the six months preceding the study. A wide variety of telemedicine services were provided, ranging from clinical consultations in a number of medical specialties to patient education, grand rounds and continuing medical education. These services were provided to sites in a wide area in the Maritime region and internationally. The three most important obstacles to the implementation of telemedicine were a lack of knowledge about telemedicine (80% of respondents), time constraints (75%) and funding (70%). PMID:10824388

  3. Studying the Rate and Causes of Discharge Against Medical Advice in Hospitals Affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirzad Asadollah Pour; Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Farahabbadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Zamanfar, Daniel; Fallah, Mohammad; Abokheily, Mohammad Asadi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Discharge against medical advice from the hospital is an important issue from point of view of treatment management, health costs as well as the side effects of treatment stop on patients and their accompanying. Therefore, health managers and planners should consider the predisposing factors that change patient’s mind in this regard. Since, there has been no study to carefully assess the rate and causes of self-discharge in this province, so this study is aimed to fill this gap. Methods and Materials: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 6 months period, from 23 July 2010 till 20 January 2011 in all public hospitals of Mazandaran province. A form was set out for data collection and those patients willing to self-discharge were asked to participate in the study. Patients’ demographic information was filled using their medical record and by the help of department personnel. Furthermore, the form was completed by parents for patients over 18 year-old or by the help of first-rank relative for those having psychiatric disorders or anybody who wasn’t able to complete the form. In order to identify the causes of self-discharge, 18 variables were determined which were categorized in three general items and five main groups. Data were entered into the SPSS15 and were analyzed using descriptive statistics indices. Results: According to the results, 94441 were discharged from the university hospitals which 7967 patients (8.4 %) of them were self-discharged during the 6 month study period. Regarding admission type, 269 (3.3 %), (54.5 %) were admitted into the hospital by pre-determined appointment and as usual patients, respectively, and the rest were admitted by emergency department. Also, 31.4%(2504) were hospitalized in surgery ward, 63% (5026) in medical ward, 4.6% (374) in intensive care unit (ICU) and the rest were hospitalized in the psychiatric ward. The most important reasons for self-discharge were related to: 1-factors

  4. Eating disorder emergencies: understanding the medical complexities of the hospitalized eating disordered patient.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Martina M

    2004-12-01

    Eating disorders are maladaptive eating behaviors that typically develop in adolescence and early adulthood. Psychiatric maladies and comorbid conditions, especially insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, frequently co-exist with eating disorders. Serious medical complications affecting all organs and tissues can develop and result in numerous emergent hospitalizations. This article reviews the pathophysiologies of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and orthorexia nervosa and discusses the complexities associated with the treatment of medical complications seen in these patients. PMID:15571940

  5. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  6. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Faizan; Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  7. Medical psychology services in dutch general hospitals: state of the art developments and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Soons, Paul; Denollet, Johan

    2009-06-01

    In this article an overview is presented of the emergence of medical psychology in the care of somatically ill patients. The situation in the Netherlands can be considered as prototypical. For 60 years, clinical psychologists have been working in general, teaching and academic hospitals. Nowadays, they are an integrated non-medical specialism working in the medical setting of hospitals in the Netherlands, and are a full-member of the medical board. This paper discusses several topics: the position of the general hospital in the health care system in the Netherlands, the emergence of medical psychology in Dutch hospitals, the role of the professional association of medical psychologists, and the characteristics of patients seen by clinical psychologists. Following the discussion about the situation of medical psychology in other countries, recommendations are formulated for the further development of medical psychology in the Netherlands as well as in other countries. PMID:19266269

  8. [Work-satisfaction and Health of Hospital Nursing and Medical Personnel].

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Werner, S

    2002-04-01

    The implementation of new service demands and increasing rationalisation measures exercise stress and pressure on medical and nursing personnel in German hospitals. However, their satisfaction and health are important quality criteria in the ranking of a hospital. Basing on the introduction of a new tool, an inquiry was conducted among the medical and nursing personnel of two hospitals (A and B) in respect of the quality of their working conditions. The scope of the questionnaires covered the nature and kind of the work, opportunities of professional success, management of co-operation and conflicts, physical and structural obstacles to smooth working as well as the management of quality. Finally, a scale of complaints and a burn-out scale served to assess the personnel's subjective health situation. The questionnaire was submitted in hospital A between November 1999 and February 2000 to a total of 39 doctors (58 % compliance) and 84 nursing personnel (47 % compliance) of the specialist departments concerned with internal medicine, rheumatology, urology, general and accident surgery. In hospital B the questionnaire was completed between March and July 2001 by a total of 40 doctors (54 %) and 91 nursing personnel (68 %) of two departments of internal medicine, surgery, neurosurgery and gynaecology. Comparable to other studies, the nursing personnel in both the hospitals rated the working conditions more negatively than the medical personnel. The differences, however, are more of a quantitative (number of frequency of problems) than of a qualitative nature (type or kind of problems). With both groups, problems connected with structural difficulties in working and with quality management were by far most important while the nursing personnel also underlined physical stress. Individual health condition were also classified more negatively by the nursing personnel than by the doctors, and the overall physical complaints of the nursing personnel were generally greater

  9. [The military-medical commission FSI "1586th Military Hospital", Russian Ministry of Defence--90 years].

    PubMed

    Andronenkov, I A; Rybakov, O A; Makhson, I P

    2012-02-01

    The military-medical commission FSI "1586th Military Hospital" of the Ministry of Defense undertakes a significant part of the activities of the entire military medical expertise in the Armed Forces. The commission covers the territory of the Central and Volga Federal Districs (19 subordinate entities of the Russian Federation). Currently, the committee consists of three functional departments: recruitment examination and acquisition of military schools, separation of military and military service examination, and examination of the medical department, flight and selection of specialists. A significant component in the military-medical commission is inspection of flight and flight-lift Air Force, for which the commission has a staff department of medical-flight examination, in which medical examination of pilots is carried out (annually--about 500 people). PMID:22558856

  10. Incorporating linked healthcare claims to improve confounding control in a study of in-hospital medication use

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Jessica M; Eddings, Wesley; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Rassen, Jeremy A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Premier Perspective hospital billing database provides a promising data source for studies of inpatient medication use. However, in-hospital recording of confounders is limited, and incorporating linked healthcare claims data available for a subset of the cohort may improve confounding control. We investigated methods capable of adjusting for confounders measured in a subset, including complete case analysis, multiple imputation of missing data, and propensity score (PS) calibration. Methods Methods were implemented in an example study of adults in Premier undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in 2004-2008 and exposed to either bivalirudin or heparin. In a subset of patients enrolled in UnitedHealth for at least 90 days before hospitalization, additional confounders were assessed from healthcare claims, including comorbidities, prior medication use, and service use intensity. Diagnostics for each method were evaluated, and methods were compared with respect to the estimates and confidence intervals of treatment effects on repeat PCI, bleeding, and in-hospital death. Results Of 210,268 patients in the hospital-based cohort, 3,240 (1.5%) had linked healthcare claims. This subset was younger and healthier than the overall study population. The linked subset was too small for complete case evaluation of 2 of the 3 outcomes of interest. Multiple imputation and PS calibration did not meaningfully impact treatment effect estimates and associated confidence intervals. Conclusions Despite more than 98% missingness on 24 variables, PS calibration and multiple imputation incorporated confounders from healthcare claims without major increases in estimate uncertainty. Additional research is needed to determine the relative bias of these methods. PMID:25935198