Science.gov

Sample records for host cell kinomes

  1. Malaria: targeting parasite and host cell kinomes.

    PubMed

    Doerig, Christian; Abdi, Abdirahman; Bland, Nicholas; Eschenlauer, Sylvain; Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Fennell, Clare; Halbert, Jean; Holland, Zoe; Nivez, Marie-Paule; Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Sicard, Audrey; Reininger, Luc

    2010-03-01

    Malaria still remains one of the deadliest infectious diseases, and has a tremendous morbidity and mortality impact in the developing world. The propensity of the parasites to develop drug resistance, and the relative reluctance of the pharmaceutical industry to invest massively in the developments of drugs that would offer only limited marketing prospects, are major issues in antimalarial drug discovery. Protein kinases (PKs) have become a major family of targets for drug discovery research in a number of disease contexts, which has generated considerable resources such as kinase-directed libraries and high throughput kinase inhibition assays. The phylogenetic distance between malaria parasites and their human host translates into important divergences in their respective kinomes, and most Plasmodium kinases display atypical properties (as compared to mammalian PKs) that can be exploited towards selective inhibition. Here, we discuss the taxon-specific kinases possessed by malaria parasites, and give an overview of target PKs that have been validated by reverse genetics, either in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum or in the rodent model Plasmodium berghei. We also briefly allude to the possibility of attacking Plasmodium through the inhibition of human PKs that are required for survival of this obligatory intracellular parasite, and which are targets for other human diseases. PMID:19840874

  2. Chemical interrogation of malarial host and parasite kinomes

    PubMed Central

    Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Magalhães, Andreia D.; Kato, Nobutaka; Sanschagrin, Paul C.; Wang, Jinhua; Zhou, Wenjun; Miduturu, Chandrasekhar V.; Mazitschek, Ralph; Sliz, Piotr; Mota, Maria M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria, an infectious disease caused by eukaryotic parasites from the genus Plasmodium, afflicts hundreds of millions of people every year. Both the parasite and its host utilize protein kinases to regulate essential cellular processes. Bioinformatic analyses of parasite genomes predict at least 65 protein kinases, but their biological functions and therapeutic potential are largely unknown. We profiled 1,358 small molecule kinase inhibitors to evaluate the role of both the human and malaria kinomes in Plasmodium infection of liver cells, the parasites’ obligatory but transient developmental stage that precedes the symptomatic blood stage. The screen identified several small molecules that inhibit parasite load in liver cells, some with nanomolar efficacy, and each compound was subsequently assessed for activity against blood stage malaria. Most of the screening hits inhibited both liver and blood stage malaria parasites, which have dissimilar gene expression profiles and infect different host cells. Evaluation of existing kinase activity profiling data for the library members suggests several kinases are essential to malaria parasites, including cyclin-dependent kinases, glycogen synthase kinases, and phosphoinositide-3-kinases. CDK inhibitors were found to bind to Plasmodium protein kinase 5, but it is likely that these compounds target multiple parasite kinases. The dual stage inhibition of the identified kinase inhibitors makes them useful chemical probes and promising starting points for antimalarial development. PMID:25111632

  3. Characterization of the Host Response to Pichinde Virus Infection in the Syrian Golden Hamster by Species-Specific Kinome Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Falcinelli, Shane; Gowen, Brian B.; Trost, Brett; Napper, Scott; Kusalik, Anthony; Johnson, Reed F.; Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Jahrling, Peter B.; Kindrachuk, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Syrian golden hamster has been increasingly used to study viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) pathogenesis and countermeasure efficacy. As VHFs are a global health concern, well-characterized animal models are essential for both the development of therapeutics and vaccines as well as for increasing our understanding of the molecular events that underlie viral pathogenesis. However, the paucity of reagents or platforms that are available for studying hamsters at a molecular level limits the ability to extract biological information from this important animal model. As such, there is a need to develop platforms/technologies for characterizing host responses of hamsters at a molecular level. To this end, we developed hamster-specific kinome peptide arrays to characterize the molecular host response of the Syrian golden hamster. After validating the functionality of the arrays using immune agonists of defined signaling mechanisms (lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), we characterized the host response in a hamster model of VHF based on Pichinde virus (PICV1) infection by performing temporal kinome analysis of lung tissue. Our analysis revealed key roles for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL) responses, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in the response to PICV infection. These findings were validated through phosphorylation-specific Western blot analysis. Overall, we have demonstrated that hamster-specific kinome arrays are a robust tool for characterizing the species-specific molecular host response in a VHF model. Further, our results provide key insights into the hamster host response to PICV infection and will inform future studies with high-consequence VHF pathogens. PMID:25573744

  4. Characterization of the host response to pichinde virus infection in the Syrian golden hamster by species-specific kinome analysis.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Shane; Gowen, Brian B; Trost, Brett; Napper, Scott; Kusalik, Anthony; Johnson, Reed F; Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Jahrling, Peter B; Kindrachuk, Jason

    2015-03-01

    The Syrian golden hamster has been increasingly used to study viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) pathogenesis and countermeasure efficacy. As VHFs are a global health concern, well-characterized animal models are essential for both the development of therapeutics and vaccines as well as for increasing our understanding of the molecular events that underlie viral pathogenesis. However, the paucity of reagents or platforms that are available for studying hamsters at a molecular level limits the ability to extract biological information from this important animal model. As such, there is a need to develop platforms/technologies for characterizing host responses of hamsters at a molecular level. To this end, we developed hamster-specific kinome peptide arrays to characterize the molecular host response of the Syrian golden hamster. After validating the functionality of the arrays using immune agonists of defined signaling mechanisms (lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), we characterized the host response in a hamster model of VHF based on Pichinde virus (PICV(1)) infection by performing temporal kinome analysis of lung tissue. Our analysis revealed key roles for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL) responses, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) signaling, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in the response to PICV infection. These findings were validated through phosphorylation-specific Western blot analysis. Overall, we have demonstrated that hamster-specific kinome arrays are a robust tool for characterizing the species-specific molecular host response in a VHF model. Further, our results provide key insights into the hamster host response to PICV infection and will inform future studies with high-consequence VHF pathogens. PMID:25573744

  5. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A.; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  6. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network.

    PubMed

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  7. High Throughput Kinomic Profiling of Human Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Identifies Kinase Activity Dependent Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amitkumar; Welaya, Karim; Chen, Dongquan; Duarte, Christine W.; Ghatalia, Pooja; Arafat, Waleed; Madan, Ankit; Sudarshan, Sunil; Naik, Gurudatta; Grizzle, William E.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of kinase-targeted agents in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CC-RCC), comprehensive kinase activity evaluation (kinomic profiling) of these tumors is lacking. Thus, kinomic profiling of CC-RCC may assist in devising a classification system associated with clinical outcomes, and help identify potential therapeutic targets. Fresh frozen CC-RCC tumor lysates from 41 clinically annotated patients who had localized disease at diagnosis were kinomically profiled using the PamStation®12 high-content phospho-peptide substrate microarray system (PamGene International). Twelve of these patients also had matched normal kidneys available that were also profiled. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and supervised comparisons based on tumor vs. normal kidney and clinical outcome (tumor recurrence) were performed and coupled with advanced network modeling and upstream kinase prediction methods. Unsupervised clustering analysis of localized CC-RCC tumors identified 3 major kinomic groups associated with inflammation (A), translation initiation (B), and immune response and cell adhesions (C) processes. Potential driver kinases implicated include PFTAIRE (PFTK1), PKG1, and SRC, which were identified in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Of the 9 patients who had tumor recurrence, only one was found in Group B. Supervised analysis showed decreased kinase activity of CDK1 and RSK1-4 substrates in those which progressed compared to others. Twelve tumors with matching normal renal tissue implicated increased PIM’s and MAPKAPK’s in tumors compared to adjacent normal renal tissue. As such, comprehensive kinase profiling of CC-RCC tumors could provide a functional classification strategy for patients with localized disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26406598

  8. First Insight into the Kinome of Human Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Sebastian; Probst-Kepper, Michael; Reinl, Tobias; Jeron, Andreas; Huehn, Jochen; Schraven, Burkhart; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs). Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR), more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression. PMID:22815858

  9. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kogut, Michael H.; Swaggerty, Christina L.; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4–14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  10. Chicken-Specific Kinome Array Reveals that Salmonella enterica Serovar Enteritidis Modulates Host Immune Signaling Pathways in the Cecum to Establish a Persistence Infection.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Swaggerty, Christina L; Byrd, James Allen; Selvaraj, Ramesh; Arsenault, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induces an early, short-lived pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The underlying mechanisms that control this persistent colonization of the ceca of chickens by Salmonella are only beginning to be elucidated. We hypothesize that alteration of host signaling pathways mediate the induction of a tolerance response. Using chicken-specific kinomic immune peptide arrays and quantitative RT-PCR of infected cecal tissue, we have previously evaluated the development of disease tolerance in chickens infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) in a persistent infection model (4-14 days post infection). Here, we have further outlined the induction of an tolerance defense strategy in the cecum of chickens infected with S. Enteritidis beginning around four days post-primary infection. The response is characterized by alterations in the activation of T cell signaling mediated by the dephosphorylation of phospholipase c-γ1 (PLCG1) that inhibits NF-κB signaling and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) signaling and blockage of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production through the disruption of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway (dephosphorylation of JAK2, JAK3, and STAT4). Further, we measured a significant down-regulation reduction in IFN-γ mRNA expression. These studies, combined with our previous findings, describe global phenotypic changes in the avian cecum of Salmonella Enteritidis-infected chickens that decreases the host responsiveness resulting in the establishment of persistent colonization. The identified tissue protein kinases also represent potential targets for future antimicrobial compounds for decreasing Salmonella loads in the intestines of food animals before going to market. PMID:27472318

  11. Violacein Induces Death of Resistant Leukaemia Cells via Kinome Reprogramming, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Golgi Apparatus Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Milani, Renato; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Justo, Giselle Z.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Duran, Nelson; Diks, Sander H.; Spek, C. Arnold; Ferreira, Carmen V.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.

    2012-01-01

    It is now generally recognised that different modes of programmed cell death (PCD) are intimately linked to the cancerous process. However, the mechanism of PCD involved in cancer chemoprevention is much less clear and may be different between types of chemopreventive agents and tumour cell types involved. Therefore, from a pharmacological view, it is crucial during the earlier steps of drug development to define the cellular specificity of the candidate as well as its capacity to bypass dysfunctional tumoral signalling pathways providing insensitivity to death stimuli. Studying the cytotoxic effects of violacein, an antibiotic dihydro-indolone synthesised by an Amazon river Chromobacterium, we observed that death induced in CD34+/c-Kit+/P-glycoprotein+/MRP1+ TF1 leukaemia progenitor cells is not mediated by apoptosis and/or autophagy, since biomarkers of both types of cell death were not significantly affected by this compound. To clarify the working mechanism of violacein, we performed kinome profiling using peptide arrays to yield comprehensive descriptions of cellular kinase activities. Pro-death activity of violacein is actually carried out by inhibition of calpain and DAPK1 and activation of PKA, AKT and PDK, followed by structural changes caused by endoplasmic reticulum stress and Golgi apparatus collapse, leading to cellular demise. Our results demonstrate that violacein induces kinome reprogramming, overcoming death signaling dysfunctions of intrinsically resistant human leukaemia cells. PMID:23071514

  12. Genome-wide identification and comprehensive analyses of the kinomes in four pathogenic microsporidia species.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Hao, Youjin; Wang, Linling; Xiang, Heng; Zhou, Zeyang

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia have attracted considerable attention because they infect a wide range of hosts, from invertebrates to vertebrates, and cause serious human diseases and major economic losses in the livestock industry. There are no prospective drugs to counteract this pathogen. Eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) play a central role in regulating many essential cellular processes and are therefore potential drug targets. In this study, a comprehensive summary and comparative analysis of the protein kinases in four microsporidia—Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae—was performed. The results show that there are 34 ePKs and 4 atypical protein kinases (aPKs) in E. bieneusi, 29 ePKs and 6 aPKs in E. cuniculi, 41 ePKs and 5 aPKs in N. bombycis, and 27 ePKs and 4 aPKs in N. ceranae. These data support the previous conclusion that the microsporidian kinome is the smallest eukaryotic kinome. Microsporidian kinomes contain only serine-threonine kinases and do not contain receptor-like and tyrosine kinases. Many of the kinases related to nutrient and energy signaling and the stress response have been lost in microsporidian kinomes. However, cell cycle-, development- and growth-related kinases, which are important to parasites, are well conserved. This reduction of the microsporidian kinome is in good agreement with genome compaction, but kinome density is negatively correlated with proteome size. Furthermore, the protein kinases in each microsporidian genome are under strong purifying selection pressure. No remarkable differences in kinase family classification, domain features, gain and/or loss, and selective pressure were observed in these four species. Although microsporidia adapt to different host types, the coevolution of microsporidia and their hosts was not clearly reflected in the protein kinases. Overall, this study enriches and updates the microsporidian protein kinase database and may provide valuable information and

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and Comprehensive Analyses of the Kinomes in Four Pathogenic Microsporidia Species

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hao, Youjin; Wang, Linling; Xiang, Heng; Zhou, Zeyang

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia have attracted considerable attention because they infect a wide range of hosts, from invertebrates to vertebrates, and cause serious human diseases and major economic losses in the livestock industry. There are no prospective drugs to counteract this pathogen. Eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) play a central role in regulating many essential cellular processes and are therefore potential drug targets. In this study, a comprehensive summary and comparative analysis of the protein kinases in four microsporidia–Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Nosema bombycis and Nosema ceranae–was performed. The results show that there are 34 ePKs and 4 atypical protein kinases (aPKs) in E. bieneusi, 29 ePKs and 6 aPKs in E. cuniculi, 41 ePKs and 5 aPKs in N. bombycis, and 27 ePKs and 4 aPKs in N. ceranae. These data support the previous conclusion that the microsporidian kinome is the smallest eukaryotic kinome. Microsporidian kinomes contain only serine-threonine kinases and do not contain receptor-like and tyrosine kinases. Many of the kinases related to nutrient and energy signaling and the stress response have been lost in microsporidian kinomes. However, cell cycle-, development- and growth-related kinases, which are important to parasites, are well conserved. This reduction of the microsporidian kinome is in good agreement with genome compaction, but kinome density is negatively correlated with proteome size. Furthermore, the protein kinases in each microsporidian genome are under strong purifying selection pressure. No remarkable differences in kinase family classification, domain features, gain and/or loss, and selective pressure were observed in these four species. Although microsporidia adapt to different host types, the coevolution of microsporidia and their hosts was not clearly reflected in the protein kinases. Overall, this study enriches and updates the microsporidian protein kinase database and may provide valuable information and

  14. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  15. Divergent immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection correlate with kinome responses at the site of intestinal infection.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  16. The Cryptosporidium parvum Kinome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hundreds of millions of people are infected with cryptosporidiosis annually, with immunocompromised individuals suffering debilitating symptoms and children in socioeconomically challenged regions at risk of repeated infections. There is currently no effective drug available. In order to facilitate the pursuit of anti-cryptosporidiosis targets and compounds, our study spans the classification of the Cryptosporidium parvum kinome and the structural and biochemical characterization of representatives from the CDPK family and a MAP kinase. Results The C. parvum kinome comprises over 70 members, some of which may be promising drug targets. These C. parvum protein kinases include members in the AGC, Atypical, CaMK, CK1, CMGC, and TKL groups; however, almost 35% could only be classified as OPK (other protein kinases). In addition, about 25% of the kinases identified did not have any known orthologues outside of Cryptosporidium spp. Comparison of specific kinases with their Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii orthologues revealed some distinct characteristics within the C. parvum kinome, including potential targets and opportunities for drug design. Structural and biochemical analysis of 4 representatives of the CaMK group and a MAP kinase confirms features that may be exploited in inhibitor design. Indeed, screening CpCDPK1 against a library of kinase inhibitors yielded a set of the pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives (PP1-derivatives) with IC50 values of < 10 nM. The binding of a PP1-derivative is further described by an inhibitor-bound crystal structure of CpCDPK1. In addition, structural analysis of CpCDPK4 identified an unprecedented Zn-finger within the CDPK kinase domain that may have implications for its regulation. Conclusions Identification and comparison of the C. parvum protein kinases against other parasitic kinases shows how orthologue- and family-based research can be used to facilitate characterization of promising drug targets and the search

  17. Chemical interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2013-05-17

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium-throughput screening, as indicated by its Z'-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches toward the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  18. Kinome-wide shRNA Screen Identifies the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase AXL as a Key Regulator for Mesenchymal Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Peng; Phillips, Emma; Kim, Sung-Hak; Taylor, David; Hielscher, Thomas; Puccio, Laura; Hjelmeland, Anita B.; Lichter, Peter; Nakano, Ichiro; Goidts, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma is a highly lethal cancer for which novel therapeutics are urgently needed. Two distinct subtypes of glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs) were recently identified: mesenchymal (MES) and proneural (PN). To identify mechanisms to target the more aggressive MES GSCs, we combined transcriptomic expression analysis and kinome-wide short hairpin RNA screening of MES and PN GSCs. In comparison to PN GSCs, we found significant upregulation and phosphorylation of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL in MES GSCs. Knockdown of AXL significantly decreased MES GSC self-renewal capacity in vitro and inhibited the growth of glioblastoma patient-derived xenografts. Moreover, inhibition of AXL with shRNA or pharmacologic inhibitors also increased cell death significantly more in MES GSCs. Clinically, AXL expression was elevated in the MES GBM subtype and significantly correlated with poor prognosis in multiple cancers. In conclusion, we identified AXL as a potential molecular target for novel approaches to treat glioblastoma and other solid cancers. PMID:25921812

  19. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  20. The Tyrosine Kinome Dictates Breast Cancer Heterogeneity and Therapeutic Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jacqueline R; Siegel, Peter M; Ursini-Siegel, Josie

    2016-09-01

    Phospho-tyrosine signaling networks control numerous biological processes including cellular differentiation, cell growth and survival, motility, and invasion. Aberrant regulation of the tyrosine kinome is a hallmark of malignancy and influences all stages of breast cancer progression, from initiation to the development of metastatic disease. The success of specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors strongly validates the clinical relevance of tyrosine phosphorylation networks in breast cancer pathology. However, a significant degree of redundancy exists within the tyrosine kinome. Numerous receptor and cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases converge on a core set of signaling regulators, including adaptor proteins and tyrosine phosphatases, to amplify pro-tumorigenic signal transduction pathways. Mutational activation, amplification, or overexpression of one or more components of the tyrosine kinome represents key contributing events responsible for the tumor heterogeneity that is observed in breast cancers. It is this molecular heterogeneity that has become the most significant barrier to durable clinical responses due to the development of therapeutic resistance. This review focuses on recent literature that supports a prominent role for specific components of the tyrosine kinome in the emergence of unique breast cancer subtypes and in shaping breast cancer plasticity, sensitivity to targeted therapies, and the eventual emergence of acquired resistance. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1971-1990, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27392311

  1. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods.

  2. Chicken-specific kinome array reveals that Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis modulates host immune signaling pathways in the cecum to establish a persistence infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica induce an early, short-lived, pro-inflammatory response in chickens that is asymptomatic of clinical disease and results in a persistent colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that transmits infections to naïve hosts via fecal shedding of bacteria. The und...

  3. Host cells and cell banking.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Glyn N; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy based on the use of viral vectors is entirely dependent on the use of animal cell lines, mainly of mammalian origin, but also of insect origin. As for any biotechnology product for clinical use, viral -vectors have to be produced with cells derived from an extensively characterized cell bank to maintain the appropriate standard for assuring the lowest risk for the patients to be treated. Although many different cell types and lines have been used for the production of viral vectors, HEK293 cells or their derivatives have been extensively used for production of different vector types: adenovirus, oncorectrovirus, lentivirus, and AAV vectors, because of their easy handling and the possibility to grow them adherently in serum-containing medium as well as in suspension in serum-free culture medium. Despite this, these cells are not necessarily the best for the production of a given viral vector, and there are many other cell lines with significant advantages including superior growth and/or production characteristics, which have been tested and also used for the production of clinical vector batches. This chapter presents basic -considerations concerning the characterization of cell banks, in the first part, and, in the second part, practically all cell lines (at least when public information was available) established and developed for the production of the most important viral vectors (adenoviral, oncoretroviral, lentiviral, AAV, baculovirus). PMID:21590393

  4. The kinome 'at large' in cancer.

    PubMed

    Fleuren, Emmy D G; Zhang, Luxi; Wu, Jianmin; Daly, Roger J

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, rapid advances in genomics, proteomics and functional genomics technologies that enable in-depth interrogation of cancer genomes and proteomes and high-throughput analysis of gene function have enabled characterization of the kinome 'at large' in human cancers, providing crucial insights into how members of the protein kinase superfamily are dysregulated in malignancy, the context-dependent functional role of specific kinases in cancer and how kinome remodelling modulates sensitivity to anticancer drugs. The power of these complementary approaches, and the insights gained from them, form the basis of this Analysis article. PMID:26822576

  5. Functional Analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans Kinome

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Osmani, Aysha H.; Andrews, Peter; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungi are an ecologically important group of organisms which also have important industrial applications but devastating effects as pathogens and agents of food spoilage. Protein kinases have been implicated in the regulation of virtually all biological processes but how they regulate filamentous fungal specific processes is not understood. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has long been utilized as a powerful molecular genetic system and recent technical advances have made systematic approaches to study large gene sets possible. To enhance A. nidulans functional genomics we have created gene deletion constructs for 9851 genes representing 93.3% of the encoding genome. To illustrate the utility of these constructs, and advance the understanding of fungal kinases, we have systematically generated deletion strains for 128 A. nidulans kinases including expanded groups of 15 histidine kinases, 7 SRPK (serine-arginine protein kinases) kinases and an interesting group of 11 filamentous fungal specific kinases. We defined the terminal phenotype of 23 of the 25 essential kinases by heterokaryon rescue and identified phenotypes for 43 of the 103 non-essential kinases. Uncovered phenotypes ranged from almost no growth for a small number of essential kinases implicated in processes such as ribosomal biosynthesis, to conditional defects in response to cellular stresses. The data provide experimental evidence that previously uncharacterized kinases function in the septation initiation network, the cell wall integrity and the morphogenesis Orb6 kinase signaling pathways, as well as in pathways regulating vesicular trafficking, sexual development and secondary metabolism. Finally, we identify ChkC as a third effector kinase functioning in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. The identification of many previously unknown functions for kinases through the functional analysis of the A. nidulans kinome illustrates the utility of the A. nidulans gene

  6. Knockdown of the C. elegans Kinome identifies Kinases required for normal protein Homeostasis, Mitochondrial network structure, and Sarcomere structure in muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kinases are important signalling molecules for modulating cellular processes and major targets of drug discovery programs. However, functional information for roughly half the human kinome is lacking. We conducted three kinome wide, >90%, RNAi screens and epistasis testing of some identified kinases against known intramuscular signalling systems to increase the functional annotation of the C. elegans kinome and expand our understanding of kinome influence upon muscle protein degradation. Results 96 kinases were identified as required for normal protein homeostasis, 74 for normal mitochondrial networks and 50 for normal sarcomere structure. Knockdown of kinases required only for normal protein homeostasis and/or mitochondrial structure was significantly less likely to produce a developmental or behavioural phenotype than knockdown of kinases required for normal sarcomere structure and/or other sub-cellular processes. Lastly, assessment of kinases for which knockdown produced muscle protein degradation against the known regulatory pathways in C. elegans muscle revealed that close to half of kinase knockdowns activated autophagy in a MAPK dependent fashion. Conclusions Roughly 40% of kinases studied, 159 of 397, are important in establishing or maintaining muscle cell health, with most required for both. For kinases where decreased expression triggers protein degradation, autophagy is most commonly activated. These results increase the annotation of the C. elegans kinome to roughly 75% and enable future kinome research. As 33% of kinases identified have orthologues expressed in human muscle, our results also enable testing of whether identified kinases function similarly in maintaining human muscle homeostasis. PMID:24060339

  7. Stable Phenotypic Changes of the Host T Cells Are Essential to the Long-Term Stability of Latent HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Seu, Lillian; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Anderson, Joshua C.; Davies, Elizabeth; Wolschendorf, Frank; Willey, Christopher D.; Saag, Michael S.; Goepfert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in the CD4+ memory T cell population prevents viral eradication with current antiretroviral therapy. It has been demonstrated that homeostatic T cell proliferation and clonal expansion of latently infected T cells due to viral integration into specific genes contribute to this extraordinary reservoir stability. Nevertheless, given the constant exposure of the memory T cell population to specific antigen or bystander activation, this reservoir stability seems remarkable, unless it is assumed that latent HIV-1 resides exclusively in memory T cells that recognize rare antigens. Another explanation for the stability of the reservoir could be that the latent HIV-1 reservoir is associated with an unresponsive T cell phenotype. We demonstrate here that host cells of latent HIV-1 infection events were functionally altered in ways that are consistent with the idea of an anergic, unresponsive T cell phenotype. Manipulations that induced or mimicked an anergic T cell state promoted latent HIV-1 infection. Kinome analysis data reflected this altered host cell phenotype at a system-wide level and revealed how the stable kinase activity changes networked to stabilize latent HIV-1 infection. Protein-protein interaction networks generated from kinome data could further be used to guide targeted genetic or pharmacological manipulations that alter the stability of latent HIV-1 infection. In summary, our data demonstrate that stable changes to the signal transduction and transcription factor network of latently HIV-1 infected host cells are essential to the ability of HIV-1 to establish and maintain latent HIV-1 infection status. IMPORTANCE The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir allows the infection to persist for the lifetime of a patient, despite completely suppressive antiretroviral therapy. This extreme reservoir stability is somewhat surprising, since the latently HIV-1 infected CD4+ memory T cells that

  8. Resistance to BET Bromodomain Inhibitors Is Mediated by Kinome Reprogramming in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurimchak, Alison M; Shelton, Claude; Duncan, Kelly E; Johnson, Katherine J; Brown, Jennifer; O'Brien, Shane; Gabbasov, Rashid; Fink, Lauren S; Li, Yuesheng; Lounsbury, Nicole; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne E; Connolly, Denise C; Chernoff, Jonathan; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Duncan, James S

    2016-08-01

    Small-molecule BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETis) are actively being pursued in clinical trials for the treatment of a variety of cancers, but the mechanisms of resistance to BETis remain poorly understood. Using a mass spectrometry approach that globally measures kinase signaling at the proteomic level, we evaluated the response of the kinome to targeted BETi treatment in a panel of BRD4-dependent ovarian carcinoma (OC) cell lines. Despite initial inhibitory effects of BETi, OC cells acquired resistance following sustained treatment with the BETi JQ1. Through application of multiplexed inhibitor beads (MIBs) and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BETi resistance is mediated by adaptive kinome reprogramming, where activation of compensatory pro-survival kinase networks overcomes BET protein inhibition. Furthermore, drug combinations blocking these kinases may prevent or delay the development of drug resistance and enhance the efficacy of BETi therapy. PMID:27452461

  9. Penetration of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Dinah; e Melo, J. Castro; Chou, D.

    1974-01-01

    Electron microscopy reveals that, in Bdellovibrio infection, after the formation of a passage pore in the host cell wall, the differentiated parasite penetration pole is associated with the host protoplast. This firm contact persists throughout the parasite penetration and after this process is completed. In penetrated hosts this contact is also apparent by phase microscopy. The association between the walls of the parasite and the host at the passage pore, on the other hand, is transient. Bdellovibrio do not penetrate hosts whose protoplast and cell walls are separated by plasmolysis, or in which the membrane-wall relationship is affected by low turgor pressure. It is concluded, therefore, that for penetration to occur it is essential that the host protoplast be within reach of the parasite, so that a firm contact can be established between them. A penetration mechanism is proposed that is effected by forces generated by fluxes of water and solutes due to structural changes in the infected host envelope. These forces cause a differential expansion of the host protoplast and cell wall and their separation from each other around the entry site, while the parasite remains firmly anchored to the host protoplast. Consequently, the parasite ends up enclosed in the expanded host periplasm. The actual entry, therefore, is a passive act of the parasite. Images PMID:4208138

  10. A comparison of the chicken and turkey proteomes and phosphoproteomes in the development of poultry-specific immuno-metabolism kinome peptide arrays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of species-specific peptide arrays for the study of animal kinomes has a proven track record of success. This technique has been used in a variety of species for the study of host-pathogen interactions and metabolism. Species-specific peptide arrays have been designed previously for use wi...

  11. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Samuel, James E.

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host, and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without its hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH, and contains degradative enzymes, and reactive oxygen species resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, like Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  12. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Di Russo Case, Elizabeth; Samuel, James E

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without their hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH and contains degradative enzymes and reactive oxygen species, resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, such as Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia, escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  13. Cell-host, LINE and environment

    PubMed Central

    Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements -1 (LINEs, L1s) are retroelements occupying almost 17% of the human genome. L1 retrotransposition can cause deleterious effects on the host-cell and it is generally inhibited by suppressive mechanisms, but it can occur in some specific cells during early development as well as in some tumor cells and in the presence of several environmental factors. In a recent publication we reported that extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field can affect L1 retrotransposition in neuroblastoma cells. In this commentary we discuss the interaction between environment and L1 activity in the light of the new emerging paradigm of host-LINE relationship. PMID:23734298

  14. Functional kinomics identifies candidate therapeutic targets in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Russell; Xu, Chang; Kao, Michael; Annis, James; Lerma, Luisa Angelica; Schaupp, Christopher M.; Gurley, Kay E.; Jang, In Sock; Biktasova, Asel; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Margolin, Adam A.; Grandori, Carla; Kemp, Christopher J.; Méndez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To identify novel therapeutic drug targets for p53 mutant head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Experimental Design RNAi kinome viability screens were performed on HNSCC cells including autologous pairs from primary tumor and recurrent/metastatic lesions, and in parallel on murine squamous cell carcinoma (MSCC) cells derived from tumors of inbred mice bearing germline mutations in Trp53, and p53 regulatory genes: Atm, Prkdc, and p19Arf. Cross-species analysis of cell lines stratified by p53 mutational status and metastatic phenotype was utilized to select 38 kinase targets. Both primary and secondary RNAi validation assays were performed on additional HNSCC cell lines to credential these kinase targets utilizing multiple phenotypic endpoints. Kinase targets were also examined via chemical inhibition utilizing a panel of kinase inhibitors. A preclinical study was conducted on the WEE1 kinase inhibitor, MK-1775. Results Our functional kinomics approach identified novel survival kinases in HNSCC involved in G2/M cell cycle checkpoint, SFK, PI3K and FAK pathways. RNAi mediated knockdown and chemical inhibition of the WEE1 kinase with a specific inhibitor, MK-1775, had a significant effect on both viability and apoptosis. Sensitivity to the MK-1775 kinase inhibitor is in part determined by p53 mutational status, and due to unscheduled mitotic entry. MK-1775 displays single-agent activity and potentiates the efficacy of cisplatin in a p53 mutant HNSCC xenograft model. Conclusions WEE1 kinase is a potential therapeutic drug target for HNSCC. This study supports the application of a functional kinomics strategy to identify novel therapeutic targets for cancer. PMID:25125259

  15. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  16. Peptide Arrays for Kinome Analysis of Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Joanna; Van Wyk, Brenden; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Arsenault, Ryan; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip John; Napper, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism for both the transfer of intracellular information and the initiation of cellular responses. Within human medicine, considerable emphasis is placed on understanding and controlling the enzymes (kinases) that are responsible for catalyzing these modifications. This is evident in the prominent use of kinase inhibitors as drugs as well as the trend to understand complex biology and identify biomarkers via characterizations of global kinase (kinome) activity. Despite the demonstrated value of focusing on kinome activity, the application of this perspective to livestock has been restricted by the absence of appropriate research tools. In this review, we discuss the development of software platforms that facilitate the development and application of species-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis of livestock. Examples of the application of kinomic approaches to a number of priority species (cattle, pigs, and chickens) in a number of biological contexts (infections, biomarker discovery, and food quality) are presented as are emerging trends for kinome analysis of livestock. PMID:26664912

  17. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Stroehlein, Andreas J; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Chang, Bill C H; Sternberg, Paul W; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  18. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Stroehlein, Andreas J.; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Chang, Bill C. H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  19. An evolutionary perspective on the kinome of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Talevich, Eric; Tobin, Andrew B; Kannan, Natarajan; Doerig, Christian

    2012-09-19

    Malaria parasites belong to an ancient lineage that diverged very early from the main branch of eukaryotes. The approximately 90-member plasmodial kinome includes a majority of eukaryotic protein kinases that clearly cluster within the AGC, CMGC, TKL, CaMK and CK1 groups found in yeast, plants and mammals, testifying to the ancient ancestry of these families. However, several hundred millions years of independent evolution, and the specific pressures brought about by first a photosynthetic and then a parasitic lifestyle, led to the emergence of unique features in the plasmodial kinome. These include taxon-restricted kinase families, and unique peculiarities of individual enzymes even when they have homologues in other eukaryotes. Here, we merge essential aspects of all three malaria-related communications that were presented at the Evolution of Protein Phosphorylation meeting, and propose an integrated discussion of the specific features of the parasite's kinome and phosphoproteome. PMID:22889911

  20. Interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Host Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lalitha; Ahlbrand, Sarah; Briken, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has coevolved with humans for tens of thousands of years. It is thus highly adapted to its human host and has evolved multiple mechanisms to manipulate host immune responses to its advantage. One central host pathogen interaction modality is host cell death pathways. Host cell apoptosis is associated with a protective response to Mtb infection, whereas a necrotic response favors the pathogen. Consistently, Mtb inhibits host cell apoptosis signaling but promotes induction of programmed necrosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in Mtb-mediated host cell death manipulation, the consequences for host immunity, and the potential for therapeutic and preventive approaches will be discussed. PMID:24968864

  1. Parasite calcineurin regulates host cell recognition and attachment by apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Aditya S.; Saha, Sudeshna; Engelberg, Klemens; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Coleman, Bradley I.; Kosber, Aziz L.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Ganter, Markus; Espy, Nicole; Gilberger, Tim W.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Apicomplexans invade a variety of metazoan host cells through mechanisms involving host cell receptor engagement and secretion of parasite factors to facilitate cellular attachment. We find that the parasite homolog of calcineurin, a calcium-regulated phosphatase complex central to signal transduction in eukaryotes, also contributes to host cell invasion by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related Toxoplasma gondii. Using reverse genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we determine that calcineurin critically regulates and stabilizes attachment of extracellular P. falciparum to host erythrocytes before intracellular entry and has similar functions in host cell engagement by T. gondii. Calcineurin-mediated Plasmodium invasion is strongly associated with host receptors required for host cell recognition and calcineurin function distinguishes this form of receptor-mediated attachment from a second mode of host-parasite adhesion independent of host receptors. This specific role of calcineurin in coordinating physical interactions with host cells highlights an ancestral mechanism for parasitism used by apicomplexans. PMID:26118996

  2. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  3. Concepts of papillomavirus entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Papillomaviruses enter basal cells of stratified epithelia. Assembly of new virions occurs in infected cells during terminal differentiation. This unique biology is reflected in the mechanism of entry. Extracellularly, the interaction of nonenveloped capsids with several host cell proteins, after binding, results in discrete conformational changes. Asynchronous internalization occurs over several hours by an endocytic mechanism related to, but distinct from macropinocytosis. Intracellular trafficking leads virions through the endosomal system, and from late endosomes to the trans-Golgi-network, before nuclear delivery. Here, we discuss the existing data with the aim to synthesize an integrated model of the stepwise process of entry, thereby highlighting key open questions. Additionally, we relate data from experiments with cultured cells to in vivo results. PMID:24525291

  4. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  5. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Vuorenpää, Anne; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jørgensen, Trine N; Gether, Ulrik

    2016-09-01

    The high affinity transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, play a key role in controlling monoaminergic neurotransmission. It is believed that the transporters (DAT, NET and SERT, respectively) are subject to tight regulation by the cellular signaling machinery to maintain monoaminergic homeostasis. Kinases constitute a pivotal role in cellular signaling, however, the regulation of monoamine transporters by the entire ensemble of kinases is unknown. Here, we perform a whole human kinome RNA interference screen to identify novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated in monoamine transporter regulation, such as Protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), were validated with a new set of siRNAs in a secondary screen. In this screen we assessed both changes in uptake and surface expression leading to selection of 11 kinases for further evaluation in HEK 293 cells transiently expressing DAT, SERT or NET. Subsequently, three kinases; salt inducible kinase 3 (SIK3), cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PKA C-α) and protein kinase X-linked (PrKX); were selected for additional exploration in catecholaminergic CATH.a differentiated cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and

  6. Chicken-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis: Flight for the flightless

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kinomics, the study of kinase enzymes within an organism, is a rapidly growing field of proteomics. The use of high-throughput technology to study the kinome has enabled researchers to conduct studies of the global signaling environment within an organism. The problem arises when researchers inter...

  7. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  8. Salmonella – At Home in the Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Malik-Kale, Preeti; Jolly, Carrie E.; Lathrop, Stephanie; Winfree, Seth; Luterbach, Courtney; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic “trigger”-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on cohorts of effector proteins translocated into host cells by two type III secretion systems (T3SS), although T3SS-independent mechanisms of entry may be important for invasion of certain host cell types. Recent studies into the intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella have provided new insights into the mechanisms used by this pathogen to modulate its intracellular environment. Here we discuss current knowledge of Salmonella-host interactions including invasion and establishment of an intracellular niche within the host. PMID:21687432

  9. Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Nancy L.; Lin, Chi-Iou; Du, Jinyan; Whang, Edward E.; Ito, Hiromichi; Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T.

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation

  10. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  11. The Annotation of Both Human and Mouse Kinomes in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot

    PubMed Central

    Quintaje, Silvia Braconi; Orchard, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Biomolecule phosphorylation by protein kinases is a fundamental cell signaling process in all living cells. Following the comprehensive cataloguing of the protein kinase complement of the human genome (Manning, G., Whyte, D. B., Martinez, R., Hunter, T., and Sudarsanam, S. (2002) The protein kinase complement of the human genome. Science 298, 1912–1934), this review will detail the state-of-the-art human and mouse kinase proteomes as provided in the UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot protein knowledgebase. The sequences of the 480 classical and up to 24 atypical protein kinases now believed to exist in the human genome and 484 classical and up to 24 atypical kinases within the mouse genome have been reviewed and, where necessary, revised. Extensive annotation has been added to each entry. In an era when a wealth of new databases is emerging on the Internet, UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot makes available to the scientific community the most up-to-date and in-depth annotation of these proteins with access to additional external resources linked from within each entry. Incorrect sequence annotations resulting from errors and artifacts have been eliminated. Each entry will be constantly reviewed and updated as new information becomes available with the orthologous enzymes in related species being annotated in a parallel effort and complete kinomes being completed as sequences become available. This ensures that the mammalian kinomes available from UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot are of a consistently high standard with each separate entry acting both as a valuable information resource and a central portal to a wealth of further detail via extensive cross-referencing. PMID:18436524

  12. Interaction of chlamydiae and host cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, J W

    1991-01-01

    The obligately intracellular bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, which is only remotely related to other eubacterial genera, cause many diseases of humans, nonhuman mammals, and birds. Interaction of chlamydiae with host cells in vitro has been studied as a model of infection in natural hosts and as an example of the adaptation of an organism to an unusual environment, the inside of another living cell. Among the novel adaptations made by chlamydiae have been the substitution of disulfide-bond-cross-linked polypeptides for peptidoglycans and the use of host-generated nucleotide triphosphates as sources of metabolic energy. The effect of contact between chlamydiae and host cells in culture varies from no effect at all to rapid destruction of either chlamydiae or host cells. When successful infection occurs, it is usually followed by production of large numbers of progeny and destruction of host cells. However, host cells containing chlamydiae sometimes continue to divide, with or without overt signs of infection, and chlamydiae may persist indefinitely in cell cultures. Some of the many factors that influence the outcome of chlamydia-host cell interaction are kind of chlamydiae, kind of host cells, mode of chlamydial entry, nutritional adequacy of the culture medium, presence of antimicrobial agents, and presence of immune cells and soluble immune factors. General characteristics of chlamydial multiplication in cells of their natural hosts are reproduced in established cell lines, but reproduction in vitro of the subtle differences in chlamydial behavior responsible for the individuality of the different chlamydial diseases will require better in vitro models. PMID:2030670

  13. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  14. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori Ann; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2016-08-23

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  15. Mechanistic Parameterization of the Kinomic Signal in Peptide Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dussaq, Alex; Anderson, Joshua C; Willey, Christopher D; Almeida, Jonas S

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a role in every cellular process involved in tumorigenesis ranging from proliferation, migration, and protein synthesis to DNA repair. While genetic sequencing has identified most kinases in the human genome, it does not describe the ‘kinome’ at the level of activity of kinases against their substrate targets. An attempt to address that limitation and give researchers a more direct view of cellular kinase activity is found in the PamGene PamChip® system, which records and compares the phosphorylation of 144 tyrosine or serine/threonine peptides as they are phosphorylated by cellular kinases. Accordingly, the kinetics of this time dependent kinomic signal needs to be well understood in order to transduce a parameter set into an accurate and meaningful mathematical model. Here we report the analysis and mathematical modeling of kinomic time series, which achieves a more accurate description of the accumulation of phosphorylated product than the current model, which assumes first order enzyme-substrate kinetics. Reproducibility of the proposed solution was of particular attention. Specifically, the non-linear parameterization procedure is delivered as a public open source web application where kinomic time series can be accurately decomposed into the model’s two parameter values measuring phosphorylation rate and capacity. The ability to deliver model parameterization entirely as a client side web application is an important result on its own given increasing scientific preoccupation with reproducibility. There is also no need for a potentially transitory and opaque server-side component maintained by the authors, nor of exchanging potentially sensitive data as part of the model parameterization process since the code is transferred to the browser client where it can be inspected and executed. PMID:27601856

  16. Characterization of the novel broad-spectrum kinase inhibitor CTx-0294885 as an affinity reagent for mass spectrometry-based kinome profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luxi; Holmes, Ian P; Hochgräfe, Falko; Walker, Scott R; Ali, Naveid A; Humphrey, Emily S; Wu, Jianmin; de Silva, Melanie; Kersten, Wilhelmus J A; Connor, Theresa; Falk, Hendrik; Allan, Lynda; Street, Ian P; Bentley, John D; Pilling, Patricia A; Monahan, Brendon J; Peat, Thomas S; Daly, Roger J

    2013-07-01

    Kinase enrichment utilizing broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors enables the identification of large proportions of the expressed kinome by mass spectrometry. However, the existing inhibitors are still inadequate in covering the entire kinome. Here, we identified a novel bisanilino pyrimidine, CTx-0294885, exhibiting inhibitory activity against a broad range of kinases in vitro, and further developed it into a Sepharose-supported kinase capture reagent. Use of a quantitative proteomics approach confirmed the selectivity of CTx-0294885-bound beads for kinase enrichment. Large-scale CTx-0294885-based affinity purification followed by LC-MS/MS led to the identification of 235 protein kinases from MDA-MB-231 cells, including all members of the AKT family that had not been previously detected by other broad-spectrum kinase inhibitors. Addition of CTx-0294885 to a mixture of three kinase inhibitors commonly used for kinase-enrichment increased the number of kinase identifications to 261, representing the largest kinome coverage from a single cell line reported to date. Coupling phosphopeptide enrichment with affinity purification using the four inhibitors enabled the identification of 799 high-confidence phosphosites on 183 kinases, ∼10% of which were localized to the activation loop, and included previously unreported phosphosites on BMP2K, MELK, HIPK2, and PRKDC. Therefore, CTx-0294885 represents a powerful new reagent for analysis of kinome signaling networks that may facilitate development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium ( http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org ) via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier PXD000239. PMID:23692254

  17. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR. PMID:26598709

  18. Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Tissot, Tazzio; Arnal, Audrey; Jacqueline, Camille; Poulin, Robert; Lefèvre, Thierry; Mery, Frédéric; Renaud, François; Roche, Benjamin; Massol, François; Salzet, Michel; Ewald, Paul; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, underappreciated. Here, we review and discuss what can be regarded as cases of host manipulation in the context of cancer development and progression. We elaborate on how acknowledging the applicability of these principles can offer novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. The manipulation of host phenotype by cancer cells is one more reason to adopt a Darwinian approach in cancer research. PMID:26849295

  19. Control of Host Cell Phosphorylation by Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most frequent modifications in intracellular signaling and is implicated in many processes ranging from transcriptional control to signal transduction in innate immunity. Many pathogens modulate host cell phosphorylation pathways to promote growth and establish an infectious disease. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila targets and exploits the host phosphorylation system throughout the infection cycle as part of its strategy to establish an environment beneficial for replication. Key to this manipulation is the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates bacterial proteins into the host cytosol that can act directly on phosphorylation cascades. This review will focus on the different stages of L. pneumophila infection, in which host kinases and phosphatases contribute to infection of the host cell and promote intracellular survival of the pathogen. This includes the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases during phagocytosis as well as the role of phosphoinositide metabolism during the establishment of the replication vacuole. Furthermore, L. pneumophila infection modulates the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, two signaling pathways that are central to the host innate immune response and involved in regulation of host cell survival. Therefore, L. pneumophila infection manipulates host cell signal transduction by phosphorylation at multiple levels. PMID:21747787

  20. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  1. Process of Bipolaris sorghicola invasion of host cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, C; Ge, T T; He, X L; Huang, Y H; Xu, Z L; Zhang, D Y; Shao, H B; Guo, S W

    2016-01-01

    Target leaf spot is a sorghum leaf disease caused by Bipolaris sorghicola, a species of fungus with a global distribution. In this study, we investigated the process by which B. sorghicola invades cells of barley, onion, Arabidopsis thaliana species, and sorghum. The results showed that within 8 h of coming into contact with host cells, the hyphal ends of B. sorghicola expand and form a uniform infective penetration pegbolt-like structure; a primary infection mycelium can be formed inside host cells within 24 h after contact, which can infect closed cells after 48 h. A mycelium can grow within the gap between cells and form infective hyphae. The pathogen infection process was the same in different host cells. B. sorghicola can affect root cells through soil infection, indicating that it may also have characteristics of soil-borne pathogens. PMID:26985945

  2. Malaria Sporozoites Traverse Host Cells within Transient Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Risco-Castillo, Veronica; Topçu, Selma; Marinach, Carine; Manzoni, Giulia; Bigorgne, Amélie E; Briquet, Sylvie; Baudin, Xavier; Lebrun, Maryse; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier

    2015-11-11

    Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the host skin by Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites migrate from the dermis to the liver, where they invade hepatocytes through a moving junction (MJ) to form a replicative parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Malaria sporozoites need to traverse cells during progression through host tissues, a process requiring parasite perforin-like protein 1 (PLP1). We find that sporozoites traverse cells inside transient vacuoles that precede PV formation. Sporozoites initially invade cells inside transient vacuoles by an active MJ-independent process that does not require vacuole membrane remodeling or release of parasite secretory organelles typically involved in invasion. Sporozoites use pH sensing and PLP1 to exit these vacuoles and avoid degradation by host lysosomes. Next, parasites enter the MJ-dependent PV, which has a different membrane composition, precluding lysosome fusion. The malaria parasite has thus evolved different strategies to evade host cell defense and establish an intracellular niche for replication. PMID:26607162

  3. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taek Soon; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method of producing an isoprenyl alkanoate in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a straight-chain fatty acid, such as an alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) or lipase, under a suitable condition so that the isoprenyl alkanoate is produced.

  4. Recruitment of Host Progenitor Cells in Rat Liver Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhaoli; Zhang, Xiuying; Locke, Jayme E.; Zheng, Qizhi; Tachibana, Shingo; Diehl, Anna Mae; Williams, George Melville

    2015-01-01

    Despite MHC incompatibility, Lewis to DA rat liver transplants survive indefinitely without immunosuppression, and the studies we report sought the mechanism(s) responsible for this. At one year most of the liver reacted positively to host anti-DA antibody. When small (50%) grafts were transplanted, recruitment was more rapid as most of the organ assumed the host phenotype at 3 months. After transplantation the Y-chromosome was detected in the hepatocytes of XX to XY grafts by both in-situ hybridization and PCR. Further, livers from transgenic Lewis rats carrying strong GFP markers lost the marker with time after transplantation to DA, GFP− hosts. Few liver cells contained the Y chromosome in syngeneic XX to XY liver grafts or when the hosts of Lewis XX to DA XY allografts were treated with cyclosporine A (CsA) 10mgs/kg/day. This dosage also impeded enlargement of the liver at ten days. Using GFP+ XX Lewis donors transplanted to GFP− XY DA hosts, we found little Y DNA in GFP+ cells at 10 days. Host derived OV-6 and c-kit positive, albumen positive cells were present at 3-10 days, but cells with the CD34 marker were less common and some clearly still had the donor phenotype at ten days. CXCR-4 positive cells increased with time and were abundant at 1 month after transplantation. We conclude: 1. extra-hepatic cells can differentiate into liver tissues; 2. regenerative stimuli accelerate stem cell recruitment; 3. both regeneration and recruitment are impeded by CsA immunosuppression, and 4. donor GFP positive cells contained little host Y-chromosome after transplantation suggesting that cell fusion was uncommon and, therefore, unlikely to be the mechanism leading to the changes in genotype and phenotype we observed. PMID:18972402

  5. Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Nans, Andrea; Ford, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains a significant public health burden worldwide. A critical early event during infection is chlamydial entry into non-phagocytic host epithelial cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, C. trachomatis uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. These effectors trigger bacterial uptake and promote bacterial survival and replication within the host cell. In this review, we highlight recent cryo-electron tomography that has provided striking insights into the initial interactions between Chlamydia and its host. We describe the polarised structure of extracellular C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EBs), and the supramolecular organisation of T3SS complexes on the EB surface, in addition to the changes in host and pathogen architecture that accompany bacterial internalisation and EB encapsulation into early intracellular vacuoles. Finally, we consider the implications for further understanding the mechanism of C. trachomatis entry and how this might relate to those of other bacteria and viruses. PMID:26320027

  6. Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Nans, Andrea; Ford, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains a significant public health burden worldwide. A critical early event during infection is chlamydial entry into non-phagocytic host epithelial cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, C. trachomatis uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. These effectors trigger bacterial uptake and promote bacterial survival and replication within the host cell. In this review, we highlight recent cryo-electron tomography that has provided striking insights into the initial interactions between Chlamydia and its host. We describe the polarised structure of extracellular C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EBs), and the supramolecular organisation of T3SS complexes on the EB surface, in addition to the changes in host and pathogen architecture that accompany bacterial internalisation and EB encapsulation into early intracellular vacuoles. Finally, we consider the implications for further understanding the mechanism of C. trachomatis entry and how this might relate to those of other bacteria and viruses. PMID:26320027

  7. Cryptosporidia: epicellular parasites embraced by the host cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Valigurová, Andrea; Jirků, Miloslav; Koudela, Bretislav; Gelnar, Milan; Modrý, David; Slapeta, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The ultrastructure of two gastric cryptosporidia, Cryptosporidium muris from experimentally infected rodents (Mastomys natalensis) and Cryptosporidium sp. 'toad' from naturally infected toads (Duttaphrynus melanostictus), was studied using electron microscopy. Observations presented herein allowed us to map ultrastructural aspects of the cryptosporidian invasion process and the origin of a parasitophorous sac. Invading parasites attach to the host cell, followed by gradual envelopment, with the host's cell membrane folds, eventually forming the parasitophorous sac. Cryptosporidian developmental stages remain epicellular during the entire life cycle. The parasite development is illustrated in detail using high resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy. This provides a new insight into the ultrastructural detail of host-parasite interactions and species-specific differences manifested in frequency of detachment of the parasitophorous sac, radial folds of the parasitophorous sac and stem-formation of the parasitised host cell. PMID:18158154

  8. Host Cell Factors in Filovirus Entry: Novel Players, New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Kaup, Franziska; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Filoviruses cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with high case-fatality rates. The cellular factors exploited by filoviruses for their spread constitute potential targets for intervention, but are incompletely defined. The viral glycoprotein (GP) mediates filovirus entry into host cells. Recent studies revealed important insights into the host cell molecules engaged by GP for cellular entry. The binding of GP to cellular lectins was found to concentrate virions onto susceptible cells and might contribute to the early and sustained infection of macrophages and dendritic cells, important viral targets. Tyrosine kinase receptors were shown to promote macropinocytic uptake of filoviruses into a subset of susceptible cells without binding to GP, while interactions between GP and human T cell Ig mucin 1 (TIM-1) might contribute to filovirus infection of mucosal epithelial cells. Moreover, GP engagement of the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 was demonstrated to be essential for GP-mediated fusion of the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Finally, mutagenic and structural analyses defined GP domains which interact with these host cell factors. Here, we will review the recent progress in elucidating the molecular interactions underlying filovirus entry and discuss their implications for our understanding of the viral cell tropism. PMID:23342362

  9. Crosstalk between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Bappaditya; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    The successful establishment and maintenance of a bacterial infection depends on the pathogen’s ability to subvert the host cell’s defense response and successfully survive, proliferate, or persist within the infected cell. To circumvent host defense systems, bacterial pathogens produce a variety of virulence factors that potentiate bacterial adherence and invasion and usurp host cell signaling cascades that regulate intracellular microbial survival and trafficking. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, probably one of the most successful pathogens on earth, has coexisted with humanity for centuries, and this intimate and persistent connection between these two organisms suggests that the pathogen has evolved extensive mechanisms to evade the human immune system at multiple levels. While some of these mechanisms are mediated by factors released by M. tuberculosis, others rely on host components that are hijacked to prevent the generation of an effective immune response thus benefiting the survival of M. tuberculosis within the host cell. Here, we describe several of these mechanisms, with an emphasis on the cyclic nucleotide signaling and subversion of host responses that occur at the intracellular level when tubercle bacilli encounter macrophages, a cell that becomes a safe-house for M. tuberculosis although it is specialized to kill most microbes. PMID:25303934

  10. Ehrlichia's molecular tricks to manipulate their host cells.

    PubMed

    Moumène, Amal; Meyer, Damien F

    2016-03-01

    Ehrlichia is a large genus of obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several emerging infectious diseases in humans and are pathogenic on rodents, ruminants, and dogs. Ehrlichia spp. invade and replicate either in endothelial cells, white blood cells, or within midgut cells and salivary glands of their vector ticks. In this review, we discuss the insights that functional studies are providing on how this group of bacteria exploits their host by subverting host innate immunity and hijacking cellular processes. PMID:26617397

  11. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    PubMed

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes. PMID:25840458

  12. Kinome-wide Decoding of Network-Attacking Mutations Rewiring Cancer Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M.; Simpson, Craig D.; Longden, James; Miller, Chad J.; Lou, Hua Jane; Perryman, Lara; Cox, Thomas R.; Zivanovic, Nevena; Palmeri, Antonio; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Erler, Janine T.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Linding, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network rewiring, and the genesis and extinction of phosphorylation sites. We developed a computational platform (ReKINect) to identify NAMs and systematically interpreted the exomes and quantitative (phospho-)proteomes of five ovarian cancer cell lines and the global cancer genome repository. We identified and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks. PMID:26388441

  13. Kinome-wide decoding of network-attacking mutations rewiring cancer signaling.

    PubMed

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M; Simpson, Craig D; Longden, James; Miller, Chad J; Lou, Hua Jane; Perryman, Lara; Cox, Thomas R; Zivanovic, Nevena; Palmeri, Antonio; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Erler, Janine T; Turk, Benjamin E; Linding, Rune

    2015-09-24

    Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network rewiring, and the genesis and extinction of phosphorylation sites. We developed a computational platform (ReKINect) to identify NAMs and systematically interpreted the exomes and quantitative (phospho-)proteomes of five ovarian cancer cell lines and the global cancer genome repository. We identified and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks. PMID:26388441

  14. Interactions of Histophilus somni with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Behling-Kelly, Erica; Rivera-Rivas, Jose; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Histophilus somni resides as part of the normal microflora in the upper respiratory tract of healthy cattle. From this site, the organism can make its way into the lower respiratory tract, where it is one of the important bacterial agents of the respiratory disease complex. If H. somni cells disseminate to the bloodstream, they frequently result in thrombus formation. A series of in vitro investigations have examined potential mechanisms that might contribute to such thrombus formation. Earlier work showed that H. somni can stimulate some bovine endothelial cells to undergo apoptosis. More recent studies indicate that H. somni stimulates endothelial cell tissue factor activity and disrupts intercellular junctions. The net effect is to enhance procoagulant activity on the endothelium surface and to make the endothelial monolayer more permeable to molecules, leukocytes, and perhaps H. somni cells. H. somni also activates bovine platelets, which also can enhance tissue factor activity on the endothelium surface. When exposed to H. somni, bovine neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes form extracellular traps in vitro. Ongoing research is investigating how the interplay among endothelial cells, platelets, and leukocytes might contribute to the thrombus formation seen in infected cattle. PMID:26728064

  15. The Toxoplasma gondii Rhoptry Kinome Is Essential for Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Guevara, Rebekah B.; Falla, Alejandra; Hortua Triana, Miryam Andrea; Sun, Yanbo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT    Ingestion of the obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes an acute infection that leads to chronic infection of the host. To facilitate the acute phase of the infection, T. gondii manipulates the host response by secreting rhoptry organelle proteins (ROPs) into host cells during its invasion. A few key ROP proteins with signatures of kinases or pseudokinases (ROPKs) act as virulence factors that enhance parasite survival against host gamma interferon-stimulated innate immunity. However, the roles of these and other ROPK proteins in establishing chronic infection have not been tested. Here, we deleted 26 ROPK gene loci encoding 31 unique ROPK proteins of type II T. gondii and show that numerous ROPK proteins influence the development of chronic infection. Cyst burdens were increased in the Δrop16 knockout strain or moderately reduced in 11 ROPK knockout strains. In contrast, deletion of ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35, or ROP38/29/19 (ROP38, ROP29, and ROP19) severely reduced cyst burdens. Δrop5 and Δrop18 knockout strains were less resistant to host immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and exhibited >100-fold-reduced virulence. ROP18 kinase activity and association with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane were necessary for resistance to host IRGs. The Δrop17 strain exhibited a >12-fold defect in virulence; however, virulence was not affected in the Δrop35 or Δrop38/29/19 strain. Resistance to host IRGs was not affected in the Δrop17, Δrop35, or Δrop38/29/19 strain. Collectively, these findings provide the first definitive evidence that the type II T. gondii ROPK proteome functions as virulence factors and facilitates additional mechanisms of host manipulation that are essential for chronic infection and transmission of T. gondii. PMID:27165797

  16. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  17. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Elisabeth O; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Hagedorn, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  18. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Elisabeth O.; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  19. Host cell proteases: critical determinants of coronavirus tropism and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a large group of enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a wide range of avian and mammalian species, including humans. The emergence of deadly human coronaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have bolstered research in these viral and often zoonotic pathogens. While coronavirus cell and tissue tropism, host range, and pathogenesis are initially controlled by interactions between the spike envelope glycoprotein and host cell receptor, it is becoming increasingly apparent that proteolytic activation of spike by host cell proteases also plays a critical role. Coronavirus spike proteins are the main determinant of entry as they possess both receptor binding and fusion functions. Whereas binding to the host cell receptor is an essential first step in establishing infection, the proteolytic activation step is often critical for the fusion function of spike, as it allows for controlled release of the fusion peptide into target cellular membranes. Coronaviruses have evolved multiple strategies for proteolytic activation of spike, and a large number of host proteases have been shown to proteolytically process the spike protein. These include, but are not limited to, endosomal cathepsins, cell surface transmembrane protease/serine (TMPRSS) proteases, furin, and trypsin. This review focuses on the diversity of strategies coronaviruses have evolved to proteolytically activate their fusion protein during spike protein biosynthesis and the critical entry step of their life cycle, and highlights important findings on how proteolytic activation of coronavirus spike influences tissue and cell tropism, host range and pathogenicity. PMID:25445340

  20. Host cell infiltration into PDT-treated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Dougherty, Graeme J.; Chaplin, David J.

    1992-06-01

    C3H mice bearing SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) 24 hours after receiving Photofrin (25 mg/kg, i.v.). Single cell suspensions obtained by the enzymatic digestion of tumors excised either 30 minutes or 4 hours after PDT were analyzed for the content of host immune cells and colony forming ability of malignant cells. The results were compared to the data obtained with non-treated tumors. It is shown that there is a marked increase in the content of cells expressing Mac-1 (monocytes/macrophages or granulocytes) in the tumor 30 minutes post PDT, while a high level of other leucocytes are found within the tumors by 4 hours after PDT. As elaborated in Discussion, the infiltration rate of host immune cells, dying of malignant tumor cells, and yet unknown death rate of host cells originally present in PDT treated tumor occurring concomitantly during this time period complicates this analysis. The results of this study suggest a massive infiltration of macrophages and other leucocytes in PDT treated SCCVII tumor, supporting the suggestion that a potent immune reaction is one of the main characteristics of PDT action in solid tumors. It remains to be determined to what extent is the activity of tumor infiltrating immune cells responsible for its eradication by PDT.

  1. Induction of tissue- and stressor-specific kinomic responses in chickens exposed to hot and cold stresses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defining cellular responses at the level of global cellular kinase (kinome) activity is a powerful approach for deciphering complex biology and identifying biomarkers. Here, we report the development of a chicken-specific peptide array and its application to characterize kinome responses within the...

  2. Immunometabolism and the Kinome Peptide Array: A New Perspective and Tool for the Study of Gut Health

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Ryan J.; Kogut, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Immunometabolism is a relatively new research perspective, focusing on both metabolism and immunology and the cross-talk between these biological processes. Immunometabolism can be considered from two perspectives; 1) the role that immune cells play in organ metabolism and metabolic disease, and 2) the metabolic processes that occur within immune cells and how they affect overall immunity. The gut may be the prototypical organ of immunometabolism. The gut is the site of nutrient absorption and is a major, if not the major, immune organ. We also describe the integration of kinomics and the species-specific peptide array to the study of the gut. This unique immunometabolic tool combined with the unique immunometabolic nature of the gut provides significant research potential to many animal health applications. PMID:26664971

  3. Comparative analysis of the human and zebrafish kinomes: focus on the development of kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarchak, Nathan; Tariq, Rehan; Striker, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Targeting kinases with semi-selective kinase inhibitors is one of the most successful drug development strategies of the 21st century. Zebrafish have become an increasingly useful model for pharmaceutical development. Water-soluble compounds can be screened for zebrafish phenotypes in a high throughput format against a living vertebrate, and cell-signaling events can be imaged in transparent living fish. Despite zebrafish being a more relevant model than more distantly related systems such as the well-annotated kinome of yeast and drosophila, there is no comparative analysis of the human and zebrafish kinome. Furthermore most approved kinase inhibitors, often called ‘DFG in’ ATP competitive inhibitors, act on conserved active site residues in the kinase. Since the active site residues can be identified by examining the primary sequence, primary sequence identity can be a rough guide as to whether a particular inhibitor will have activity against another kinase. There is a need to evaluate the utility of zebrafish as a drug development model for active site inhibitors of kinases. Here we offer a systematic comparison of the catalytic domains of classical human kinases with the catalytic domains of all annotated zebrafish kinases. We found a high degree of identity between the catalytic domains of most human kinases and their zebrafish homologs, and we ranked 504 human kinase catalytic domains by order of similarity. We found only 23 human kinases with no easily recognizable homologous zebrafish catalytic domain. On the other hand we found 78 zebrafish kinase catalytic domains with no close human counterpart. These ‘additional kinase active sites’ could represent potential mediators of zebrafish toxicity that may not be relevant to human kinase inhibitors. We used two clinically approved human kinase inhibitors, one targeting a highly homologous target and one targeting a lesser homologous target, and we compared the known human kinase target structures with

  4. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B.; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  5. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  6. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  7. Lipid Exchange between Borrelia burgdorferi and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Jameson T.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; LaRocca, Timothy J.; Coleman, James L.; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, has cholesterol and cholesterol-glycolipids that are essential for bacterial fitness, are antigenic, and could be important in mediating interactions with cells of the eukaryotic host. We show that the spirochetes can acquire cholesterol from plasma membranes of epithelial cells. In addition, through fluorescent and confocal microscopy combined with biochemical approaches, we demonstrated that B. burgdorferi labeled with the fluorescent cholesterol analog BODIPY-cholesterol or 3H-labeled cholesterol transfer both cholesterol and cholesterol-glycolipids to HeLa cells. The transfer occurs through two different mechanisms, by direct contact between the bacteria and eukaryotic cell and/or through release of outer membrane vesicles. Thus, two-way lipid exchange between spirochetes and host cells can occur. This lipid exchange could be an important process that contributes to the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. PMID:23326230

  8. The minimal kinome of Giardia lamblia illuminates early kinase evolution and unique parasite biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The major human intestinal pathogen Giardia lamblia is a very early branching eukaryote with a minimal genome of broad evolutionary and biological interest. Results To explore early kinase evolution and regulation of Giardia biology, we cataloged the kinomes of three sequenced strains. Comparison with published kinomes and those of the excavates Trichomonas vaginalis and Leishmania major shows that Giardia's 80 core kinases constitute the smallest known core kinome of any eukaryote that can be grown in pure culture, reflecting both its early origin and secondary gene loss. Kinase losses in DNA repair, mitochondrial function, transcription, splicing, and stress response reflect this reduced genome, while the presence of other kinases helps define the kinome of the last common eukaryotic ancestor. Immunofluorescence analysis shows abundant phospho-staining in trophozoites, with phosphotyrosine abundant in the nuclei and phosphothreonine and phosphoserine in distinct cytoskeletal organelles. The Nek kinase family has been massively expanded, accounting for 198 of the 278 protein kinases in Giardia. Most Neks are catalytically inactive, have very divergent sequences and undergo extensive duplication and loss between strains. Many Neks are highly induced during development. We localized four catalytically active Neks to distinct parts of the cytoskeleton and one inactive Nek to the cytoplasm. Conclusions The reduced kinome of Giardia sheds new light on early kinase evolution, and its highly divergent sequences add to the definition of individual kinase families as well as offering specific drug targets. Giardia's massive Nek expansion may reflect its distinctive lifestyle, biphasic life cycle and complex cytoskeleton. PMID:21787419

  9. Kinomic exploration of temozolomide and radiation resistance in Glioblastoma multiforme xenolines

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Duarte, Christine W.; Welaya, Karim; Rohrbach, Timothy D.; Bredel, Markus; Yang, Eddy S.; Choradia, Nirmal; Thottassery, Jaideep V.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Bonner, James A.; Willey, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most common and deadly primary brain malignancy, particularly due to temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation (RT) resistance. To better understand resistance mechanisms, we examined global kinase activity (kinomic profiling) in both treatment sensitive and resistant human GBM patient-derived xenografts (PDX or “xenolines”). Materials and Methods Thirteen orthotopically-implanted xenolines were examined including 8 with known RT sensitivity/resistance, while 5 TMZ resistant xenolines were generated through serial TMZ treatment in vivo. Tumors were harvested, prepared as total protein lysates, and kinomically analyzed on a PamStation®12 high-throughput microarray platform with subsequent upstream kinase prediction and network modeling. Results Kinomic profiles indicated elevated tyrosine kinase activity associated with the radiation resistance phenotype, including FAK and FGFR1. Furthermore, network modeling showed VEGFR1/2 and c-Raf hubs could be involved. Analysis of acquired TMZ resistance revealed more kinomic variability among TMZ resistant tumors. Two of the five tumors displayed significantly altered kinase activity in the TMZ resistant xenolines and network modeling indicated PKC, JAK1, PI3K, CDK2, and VEGFR as potential mediators of this resistance. Conclusions GBM xenolines provide a phenotypic model for GBM drug response and resistance that when paired with kinomic profiling identified targetable pathways to inherent (radiation) or acquired (TMZ) resistance. PMID:24813092

  10. Toxoplasma Co-opts Host Cells It Does Not Invade

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Anita A.; Dietrich, Hans K.; Christian, David A.; Melehani, Jason H.; Shastri, Anjali J.; Hunter, Christopher A.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Like many intracellular microbes, the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii injects effector proteins into cells it invades. One group of these effector proteins is injected from specialized organelles called the rhoptries, which have previously been described to discharge their contents only during successful invasion of a host cell. In this report, using several reporter systems, we show that in vitro the parasite injects rhoptry proteins into cells it does not productively invade and that the rhoptry effector proteins can manipulate the uninfected cell in a similar manner to infected cells. In addition, as one of the reporter systems uses a rhoptry:Cre recombinase fusion protein, we show that in Cre-reporter mice infected with an encysting Toxoplasma-Cre strain, uninfected-injected cells, which could be derived from aborted invasion or cell-intrinsic killing after invasion, are actually more common than infected-injected cells, especially in the mouse brain, where Toxoplasma encysts and persists. This phenomenon has important implications for how Toxoplasma globally affects its host and opens a new avenue for how other intracellular microbes may similarly manipulate the host environment at large. PMID:22910631

  11. Toxoplasma co-opts host cells it does not invade.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Anita A; Dietrich, Hans K; Christian, David A; Melehani, Jason H; Shastri, Anjali J; Hunter, Christopher A; Boothroyd, John C

    2012-01-01

    Like many intracellular microbes, the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii injects effector proteins into cells it invades. One group of these effector proteins is injected from specialized organelles called the rhoptries, which have previously been described to discharge their contents only during successful invasion of a host cell. In this report, using several reporter systems, we show that in vitro the parasite injects rhoptry proteins into cells it does not productively invade and that the rhoptry effector proteins can manipulate the uninfected cell in a similar manner to infected cells. In addition, as one of the reporter systems uses a rhoptry:Cre recombinase fusion protein, we show that in Cre-reporter mice infected with an encysting Toxoplasma-Cre strain, uninfected-injected cells, which could be derived from aborted invasion or cell-intrinsic killing after invasion, are actually more common than infected-injected cells, especially in the mouse brain, where Toxoplasma encysts and persists. This phenomenon has important implications for how Toxoplasma globally affects its host and opens a new avenue for how other intracellular microbes may similarly manipulate the host environment at large. PMID:22910631

  12. Viral Genome Tethering to Host Cell Chromatin: Cause and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Inci; Schelhaas, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Viruses are small infectious agents that replicate in cells of a host organism and that evolved to use cellular machineries for all stages of the viral life cycle. Here, we critically assess current knowledge on a particular mechanism of persisting viruses, namely, how they tether their genomes to host chromatin, and what consequences arise from this process. A group of persisting DNA viruses, i.e. gamma-herpesviruses and papillomaviruses (PV), uses this tethering strategy to maintain their genomes in the nuclei during cell division. Thus, these viruses face the challenge of viral genome loss during mitosis, as they are transported with the host chromosomes to the nascent daughter nuclei. Incidentally, another group of viruses, certain retroviruses and PV, have adopted this tethering strategy to deliver their genomes into the nuclei of dividing cells during cell entry. By exploiting a phase in the cell cycle when the nuclear envelope is disassembled, viruses bypass the need to engage with the nuclear import machinery. Recent reports suggest that tethering may induce severe cellular consequences that involve activation of mitotic checkpoints, causing missegregation of host chromosomes and genomic instability, which may contribute to cancer. PMID:26787361

  13. Plasmodium species: master renovators of their host cells.

    PubMed

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Gilson, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, have developed elaborate strategies that they use to survive and thrive within different intracellular environments. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite is a master renovator of its erythrocyte host cell, and the changes in cell morphology and function that are induced by the parasite promote survival and contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria. In this Review, we discuss how Plasmodium parasites use the protein trafficking motif Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), protease-mediated polypeptide processing, a novel translocon termed the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) and exomembranous structures to export hundreds of proteins to discrete subcellular locations in the host erythrocytes, which enables the parasite to gain access to vital nutrients and to evade the immune defence mechanisms of the host. PMID:27374802

  14. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Charlotte H.; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S. Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine. PMID:27185791

  15. Host Cell Factors Involved in the Life Cycle of FMDV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), like other RNA viruses, recruits various host cell factors to assist in translation and replication of the virus genome. While FMDV translation has been extensively investigated, much remains unknown regarding replication of the positive-sense RNA genome. In thi...

  16. An Atlas of the Human Kinome Reveals the Mutational Landscape Underlying Dysregulated Phosphorylation Cascades in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Olow, Aleksandra; Chen, Zhongzhong; Niedner, R Hannes; Wolf, Denise M; Yau, Christina; Pankov, Aleksandr; Lee, Evelyn Pei Rong; Brown-Swigart, Lamorna; van 't Veer, Laura J; Coppé, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Kinase inhibitors are used widely to treat various cancers, but adaptive reprogramming of kinase cascades and activation of feedback loop mechanisms often contribute to therapeutic resistance. Determining comprehensive, accurate maps of kinase circuits may therefore help elucidate mechanisms of response and resistance to kinase inhibitor therapies. In this study, we identified and validated phosphorylatable target sites across human cell and tissue types to generate PhosphoAtlas, a map of 1,733 functionally interconnected proteins comprising the human phospho-reactome. A systematic curation approach was used to distill protein phosphorylation data cross-referenced from 38 public resources. We demonstrated how a catalog of 2,617 stringently verified heptameric peptide regions at the catalytic interface of kinases and substrates could expose mutations that recurrently perturb specific phospho-hubs. In silico mapping of 2,896 nonsynonymous tumor variants identified from thousands of tumor tissues also revealed that normal and aberrant catalytic interactions co-occur frequently, showing how tumors systematically hijack, as well as spare, particular subnetworks. Overall, our work provides an important new resource for interrogating the human tumor kinome to strategically identify therapeutically actionable kinase networks that drive tumorigenesis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1733-45. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26921330

  17. Novel EPHB4 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Mutations and Kinomic Pathway Analysis in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Benjamin D.; Carol Tan, Yi-Hung; Kanteti, Rajani S.; Liu, Ren; Gayed, Matthew J.; Vokes, Everett E.; Ferguson, Mark K.; John Iafrate, A.; Gill, Parkash S.; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer outcomes remain poor despite the identification of several potential therapeutic targets. The EPHB4 receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) has recently emerged as an oncogenic factor in many cancers, including lung cancer. Mutations of EPHB4 in lung cancers have previously been identified, though their significance remains unknown. Here, we report the identification of novel EPHB4 mutations that lead to putative structural alterations as well as increased cellular proliferation and motility. We also conducted a bioinformatic analysis of these mutations to demonstrate that they are mutually exclusive from other common RTK variants in lung cancer, that they correspond to analogous sites of other RTKs’ variations in cancers, and that they are predicted to be oncogenic based on biochemical, evolutionary, and domain-function constraints. Finally, we show that EPHB4 mutations can induce broad changes in the kinome signature of lung cancer cells. Taken together, these data illuminate the role of EPHB4 in lung cancer and further identify EPHB4 as a potentially important therapeutic target. PMID:26073592

  18. Virus and Host Mechanics Support Membrane Penetration and Cell Entry.

    PubMed

    Greber, Urs F

    2016-04-01

    Viruses are quasi-inert macromolecular assemblies. Their metastable conformation changes during entry into cells, when chemical and mechanical host cues expose viral membrane-interacting proteins. This leads to membrane rupture or fusion and genome uncoating. Importantly, virions tune their physical properties and enhance penetration and uncoating. For example, influenza virus softens at low pH to uncoat. The stiffness and pressure of adenovirus control uncoating and membrane penetration. Virus and host mechanics thus present new opportunities for antiviral therapy. PMID:26842477

  19. Necroptosis: The Trojan horse in cell autonomous antiviral host defense.

    PubMed

    Mocarski, Edward S; Guo, Hongyan; Kaiser, William J

    2015-05-01

    Herpesviruses suppress cell death to assure sustained infection in their natural hosts. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes suppressors of apoptosis as well as M45-encoded viral inhibitor of RIP activation (vIRA) to block RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM)-signaling and recruitment of RIP3 (also called RIPK3), to prevent necroptosis. MCMV and human cytomegalovirus encode a viral inhibitor of caspase (Casp)8 activation to block apoptosis, an activity that unleashes necroptosis. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)1 and HSV2 incorporate both RHIM and Casp8 suppression strategies within UL39-encoded ICP6 and ICP10, respectively, which are herpesvirus-conserved homologs of MCMV M45. Both HSV proteins sensitize human cells to necroptosis by blocking Casp8 activity while preventing RHIM-dependent RIP3 activation and death. In mouse cells, HSV1 ICP6 interacts with RIP3 and, surprisingly, drives necroptosis. Thus, herpesviruses have illuminated the contribution of necoptosis to host defense in the natural host as well as its potential to restrict cross-species infections in nonnatural hosts. PMID:25819165

  20. Initial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardiau, Marjorie; Szalo, Mihai; Mainil, Jacques G.

    2010-01-01

    Initial adherence to host cells is the first step of the infection of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains. The importance of this step in the infection resides in the fact that (1) adherence is the first contact between bacteria and intestinal cells without which the other steps cannot occur and (2) adherence is the basis of host specificity for a lot of pathogens. This review describes the initial adhesins of the EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains. During the last few years, several new adhesins and putative colonisation factors have been described, especially in EHEC strains. Only a few adhesins (BfpA, AF/R1, AF/R2, Ral, F18 adhesins) appear to be host and pathotype specific. The others are found in more than one species and/or pathotype (EPEC, EHEC, VTEC). Initial adherence of EPEC, EHEC and VTEC strains to host cells is probably mediated by multiple mechanisms. PMID:20423697

  1. The tomato kinome and the tomato kinase library ORFeome: novel resources for the study of kinases and signal transduction in tomato and solanaceae species.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra K; Calviño, Mauricio; Brauer, Elizabeth K; Fernandez-Pozo, Noe; Strickler, Susan; Yalamanchili, Roopa; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aoki, Koh; Shibata, Daisuke; Stratmann, Johannes W; Popescu, George V; Mueller, Lukas A; Popescu, Sorina C

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase-driven phosphorylation constitutes the core of cellular signaling. Kinase components of signal transduction pathways are often targeted for inactivation by pathogens. The study of kinases and immune signal transduction in the model crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) would benefit from the availability of community-wide resources for large scale and systems-level experimentation. Here, we defined the tomato kinome and performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of the tomato kinome and 15 other plant species. We constructed a tomato kinase library (TOKN 1.0) of over 300 full-length open reading frames (ORF) cloned into a recombination-based vector. We developed a high-throughput pipeline to isolate and transform tomato protoplasts. A subset of the TOKN 1.0 library kinases were expressed in planta, were purified, and were used to generate a functional tomato protein microarray. All resources created were utilized to test known and novel associations between tomato kinases and Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effectors in a large-scale format. Bsk7 was identified as a component of the plant immune response and a candidate effector target. These resources will enable comprehensive investigations of signaling pathways and host-pathogen interactions in tomato and other Solanaceae spp. PMID:24047240

  2. Host-Cell Survival and Death During Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Songmin; Pettengill, Matthew; Ojcius, David M.; Häcker, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Different Chlamydia trachomatis strains are responsible for prevalent bacterial sexually-transmitted disease and represent the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Factors that predispose individuals to disease and mechanisms by which chlamydiae cause inflammation and tissue damage remain unclear. Results from recent studies indicate that prolonged survival and subsequent death of infected cells and their effect on immune effector cells during chlamydial infection may be important in determining the outcome. Survival of infected cells is favored at early times of infection through inhibition of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Death at later times displays features of both apoptosis and necrosis, but pro-apoptotic caspases are not involved. Most studies on chlamydial modulation of host-cell death until now have been performed in cell lines. The consequences for pathogenesis and the immune response will require animal models of chlamydial infection, preferably mice with targeted deletions of genes that play a role in cell survival and death. PMID:18843378

  3. Host cell kinases and the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Lupberger, Joachim; Doerig, Christian; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection relies on virus-host interactions with human hepatocytes, a context in which host cell kinases play critical roles in every step of the HCV life cycle. During viral entry, cellular kinases, including EGFR, EphA2 and PKA, regulate the localization of host HCV entry factors and induce receptor complex assembly. Following virion internalization, viral genomes replicate on endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranous webs. The formation of membranous webs depends on interactions between the HCV NS5a protein and PI4KIIIα. The phosphorylation status of NS5a, regulated by PI4KIIIα, CKI and other kinases, also acts as a molecular switch to virion assembly, which takes place on lipid droplets. The formation of lipid droplets is enhanced by HCV activation of IKKα. In view of the multiple crucial steps in the viral life cycle that are mediated by host cell kinases, these enzymes also represent complementary targets for antiviral therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. PMID:25896387

  4. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  5. Dual Analysis of the Murine Cytomegalovirus and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveal New Aspects of the Virus-Host Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Juranic Lisnic, Vanda; Babic Cac, Marina; Lisnic, Berislav; Trsan, Tihana; Mefferd, Adam; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Cook, Charles H.; Jonjic, Stipan; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq). We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus-associated diseases. PMID:24086132

  6. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  7. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis. PMID:26621912

  8. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  9. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  10. Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Disrupts Host Cell Cytokinesis to Enhance Its Growth in Multinuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, He Song; Sin, Alex T-W; Poirier, Mathieu B; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections, disrupts cytokinesis and causes significant multinucleation in host cells. Here, we demonstrate that multinuclear cells that result from unsuccessful cell division contain significantly higher Golgi content, an important source of lipids for chlamydiae. Using immunofluorescence and fluorescent live cell imaging, we show that C. trachomatis in multinuclear cells indeed intercept Golgi-derived lipid faster than in mononuclear cells. Moreover, multinuclear cells enhance C. trachomatis inclusion growth and infectious particle formation. Together, these results indicate that C. trachomatis robustly position inclusions to the cell equator to disrupt host cell division in order to acquire host Golgi-derived lipids more quickly in multinucleated progeny cells. PMID:26084267

  11. Baculovirus Infection Influences Host Protein Expression in Two Established Insect Cell Lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified host proteins that changed in response to host cell susceptibility to baculovirus infection. We used three baculovirus–host cell systems utilizing two cell lines derived from pupal ovaries, Hz-AM1 (from Helicoverpa zea) and Hv-AM1 (from Heliothis virescens). Hv-AM1 cells are permissive...

  12. Bacterial-induced cell reprogramming to stem cell-like cells: new premise in host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Samuel; Rambukkana, Anura

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a myriad of strategies to alter host tissue cell functions for bacterial advantage during infection. Recent advances revealed a fusion of infection biology with stem cell biology by demonstrating developmental reprogramming of lineage committed host glial cells to progenitor/stem cell-like cells by an intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Acquisition of migratory and immunomodulatory properties of such reprogrammed cells provides an added advantage for promoting bacterial spread. This presents a previously unseen sophistication of cell manipulation by hijacking the genomic plasticity of host cells by a human bacterial pathogen. The rationale for such extreme fate conversion of host cells may be directly linked to the exceedingly passive obligate life style of M. leprae with a degraded genome and host cell dependence for both bacterial survival and dissemination, particularly the use of host-derived stem cell-like cells as a vehicle for spreading infection without being detected by immune cells. Thus, this unexpected link between cell reprogramming and infection opens up a new premise in host-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, such bacterial ingenuity could also be harnessed for developing natural ways of reprogramming host cells for repairing damaged tissues from infection, injury and diseases. PMID:25541240

  13. Functional analysis of the kinome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As in many other eukaryotes, protein kinases play major regulatory roles in filamentous fungi. Although the genomes of numerous plant pathogenic fungi have been sequenced, systematic characterization of their kinomes has not been reported. The wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum has 116 putative ...

  14. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  15. Ureaplasma parvum infection alters filamin a dynamics in host cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ureaplasmas are among the most common bacteria isolated from the human urogenital tract. Ureaplasmas can produce asymptomatic infections or disease characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory response. Most investigations have focused on elucidating the pathogenic potential of Ureaplasma species, but little attention has been paid to understanding the mechanisms by which these organisms are capable of establishing asymptomatic infection. Methods We employed differential proteome profiling of bladder tissues from rats experimentally infected with U. parvum in order to identify host cell processes perturbed by colonization with the microbe. Tissues were grouped into four categories: sham inoculated controls, animals that spontaneously cleared infection, asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI), and complicated UTI. One protein that was perturbed by infection (filamin A) was used to further elucidate the mechanism of U. parvum-induced disruption in human benign prostate cells (BPH-1). BPH-1 cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and ELISA. Results Bladder tissue from animals actively colonized with U. parvum displayed significant alterations in actin binding proteins (profilin 1, vinculin, α actinin, and filamin A) that regulate both actin polymerization and cell cytoskeletal function pertaining to focal adhesion formation and signal transduction (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.004; ANOVA, P < 0.02). This phenomenon was independent of clinical profile (asymptomatic vs. complicated UTI). We selected filamin A as a target for additional studies. In the BPH-1 model, we confirmed that U. parvum perturbed the regulation of filamin A. Specifically, infected BPH-1 cells exhibited a significant increase in filamin A phosphorylated at serine2152 (P ≤ 0.01), which correlated with impaired proteolysis of the protein and its normal intracellular distribution. Conclusion Filamin A dynamics were perturbed in both models of infection

  16. Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Suppress Host Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Gesteira, Tarsis Ferreira; Hascall, Vincent; Kao, Winston

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UMSCs) have unique immunosuppressive properties enabling them to evade host rejection and making them valuable tools for cell therapy. We previously showed that human UMSCs survive xenograft transplantation and successfully correct the corneal clouding defects associated with the mouse model for the congenital metabolic disorder mucopolysaccharidosis VII. However, the precise mechanism by which UMSCs suppress the immune system remains elusive. This study aimed to determine the key components involved in the ability of the UMSCs to modulate the inflammatory system and to identify the inflammatory cells that are regulated by the UMSCs. Our results show that human UMSCs transplanted into the mouse stroma 24 h after an alkali burn suppress the severe inflammatory response and enable the recovery of corneal transparency within 2 weeks. Furthermore, we demonstrated in vitro that UMSCs inhibit the adhesion and invasion of inflammatory cells and also the polarization of M1 macrophages. UMSCs also induced the maturation of T-regulatory cells and led to inflammatory cell death. Moreover, UMSCs exposed to inflammatory cells synthesize a rich extracellular glycocalyx composed of the chondroitin sulfate-proteoglycan versican bound to a heavy chain (HC)-modified hyaluronan (HA) matrix (HC-HA). This matrix also contains TNFα-stimulated gene 6 (TSG6), the enzyme that transfers HCs to HA, and pentraxin-3, which further stabilizes the matrix. Our results, both in vivo and in vitro, show that this glycocalyx confers the ability for UMSCs to survive the host immune system and to regulate the inflammatory cells. PMID:24986866

  17. PIIKA 2: an expanded, web-based platform for analysis of kinome microarray data.

    PubMed

    Trost, Brett; Kindrachuk, Jason; Määttänen, Pekka; Napper, Scott; Kusalik, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Kinome microarrays are comprised of peptides that act as phosphorylation targets for protein kinases. This platform is growing in popularity due to its ability to measure phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling in a high-throughput manner. While software for analyzing data from DNA microarrays has also been used for kinome arrays, differences between the two technologies and associated biologies previously led us to develop Platform for Intelligent, Integrated Kinome Analysis (PIIKA), a software tool customized for the analysis of data from kinome arrays. Here, we report the development of PIIKA 2, a significantly improved version with new features and improvements in the areas of clustering, statistical analysis, and data visualization. Among other additions to the original PIIKA, PIIKA 2 now allows the user to: evaluate statistically how well groups of samples cluster together; identify sets of peptides that have consistent phosphorylation patterns among groups of samples; perform hierarchical clustering analysis with bootstrapping; view false negative probabilities and positive and negative predictive values for t-tests between pairs of samples; easily assess experimental reproducibility; and visualize the data using volcano plots, scatterplots, and interactive three-dimensional principal component analyses. Also new in PIIKA 2 is a web-based interface, which allows users unfamiliar with command-line tools to easily provide input and download the results. Collectively, the additions and improvements described here enhance both the breadth and depth of analyses available, simplify the user interface, and make the software an even more valuable tool for the analysis of kinome microarray data. Both the web-based and stand-alone versions of PIIKA 2 can be accessed via http://saphire.usask.ca. PMID:24312246

  18. Identifying Francisella tularensis Genes Required for Growth in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, J.; Steele, S.; Miller, C.; Lovullo, E.; Taft-Benz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram-negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cells, including, but not limited to, macrophages and epithelial cells. We developed a luminescence reporter system to facilitate a large-scale transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes required for growth in macrophage and epithelial cell lines. We screened 7,454 individual mutants, 269 of which exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Transposon insertions in the 269 growth-defective strains mapped to 68 different genes. FTT_0924, a gene of unknown function but highly conserved among Francisella species, was identified in this screen to be defective for intracellular growth within both macrophage and epithelial cell lines. FTT_0924 was required for full Schu S4 virulence in a murine pulmonary infection model. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant bacterial membrane is permeable when replicating in hypotonic solution and within macrophages, resulting in strongly reduced viability. The permeability and reduced viability were rescued when the mutant was grown in a hypertonic solution, indicating that FTT_0924 is required for resisting osmotic stress. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant was also significantly more sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics than Schu S4. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that FTT_0924 is required for maintaining peptidoglycan integrity and virulence. PMID:25987704

  19. HIV-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hameed, Enass A; Ji, Hong; Shata, Mohamed Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a member of the Retroviridae family, is a positive-sense, enveloped RNA virus. HIV, the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has two major types, HIV-1 and HIV-2 In HIV-infected cells the single stranded viral RNA genome is reverse transcribed and the double-stranded viral DNA integrates into the cellular DNA, forming a provirus. The proviral HIV genome is controlled by the host epigenetic regulatory machinery. Cellular epigenetic regulators control HIV latency and reactivation by affecting the chromatin state in the vicinity of the viral promoter located to the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence. In turn, distinct HIV proteins affect the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of the host cells. HIV-1 infection of CD4(+) T cells in vitro upregulated DNMT activity and induced hypermethylation of distinct cellular promoters. In contrast, in the colon mucosa and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected patients demethylation of the FOXP3 promoter was observed, possibly due to the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. For a curative therapy of HIV infected individuals and AIDS patients, a combination of antiretroviral drugs with epigenetic modifying compounds have been suggested for the reactivation of latent HIV-1 genomes. These epigenetic drugs include histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI), histone methyltransferase inhibitors (HMTI), histone demethylase inhibitors, and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTI). PMID:26659262

  20. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle. PMID:27180572

  1. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  2. Accessibility of host cell lineages to medaka stem cells depends on genetic background and irradiation of recipient embryos.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ni; Li, Mingyou; Zeng, Zhiqiang; Yi, Meisheng; Deng, Jiaorong; Gui, Jianfang; Winkler, Christoph; Schartl, Manfred; Hong, Yunhan

    2010-04-01

    Chimera formation is a powerful tool for analyzing pluripotency in vivo. It has been widely accepted that host cell lineages are generally accessible to embryonic stem (ES) cells with the actual contribution depending solely on the intrinsic pluripotency of transplanted donor cells. Here, we show in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes) that the host accessibility to ES cell contribution exhibits dramatic differences. Specifically, of three albino host strains tested (i (1) , i (3) and af), only strain i (1) generated pigmented chimeras. Strikingly, this accessibility is completely lost in i (1) but acquired in i (3) after host gamma-irradiation. Host irradiation also differentially affected ES cell contribution to somatic organs and gonad. Therefore, the accessibility of various host cell lineages can vary considerably depending on host strains and cell lineages as well as on irradiation. Our findings underscore the importance of host genotypes for interpreting donor cell pluripotency and for improving ES-derived chimera production. PMID:20238480

  3. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase inactivation by the host cell.

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa-Ron, A; Rogel, A; Hanski, E

    1989-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis produces a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) which acts as a toxin capable of penetrating eukaryotic cells and generating high levels of intracellular cyclic AMP. Transfer of target cells into B. pertussis AC-free medium leads to a rapid decay in the intracellular AC activity, implying that the invasive enzyme is unstable in the host cytoplasm. We report here that treatment of human lymphocytes with a glycolysis inhibitor and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation completely blocked the intracellular inactivation of B. pertussis AC. Lymphocyte lysates inactivated all forms of B. pertussis AC in the presence of exogenous ATP. This inactivation was associated with degradation of an 125I-labelled 200 kDa form of B. pertussis AC. It appears that ATP is required for the proteolytic pathway, but not as an energy source, since non-hydrolysable ATP analogues supported inactivation and complete degradation of the enzyme. The possibility that binding of ATP to B. pertussis AC renders it susceptible to degradation by the host cell protease is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2554887

  4. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  5. The interactions of intracellular Protista and their host cells, with special reference to heterotrophic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L H

    1979-04-11

    Intracellular genera are found in all the major groups of Protista, but are particularly common among the dinoflagellates, trypanosomatid zooflagellates and suctorian ciliates; the Sporozoa are nearly all intracellular at some stage of their life, and the Microspora entirely so. Intracellular forms can dwell in the nucleus, within phagosomal or other vacuoles or may lie free in the hyaloplasm of their host cells. Organisms tend to select their hosts from a restricted taxonomic range although there are some notable exceptions. There is also great variation in the types of host cell inhabited. There are various reasons for both host and cell selectivity including recognition phenomena at the cell surfaces. Invasion of host cells is usually preceded by surface interactions with the invader. Some organisms depend upon phagocytosis for entry, but others induce host cells to engulf them by non-phagocytic means or invade by microinjection through the host plasma membrane. Protista avoid lysosomal destruction by their resistance to enzyme attack, by surrounding themselves with lysosome-inhibiting vacuoles, by escaping from the phagosomal system into the hyaloplasm and by choosing host cells which lack lysosomes. Nutrition of intracellular heterotrophic organisms involves some degree of competition with the host cell's metabolism as well as erosion of host cell cytoplasm. In Plasmodium infections, red cells are made more permeable to required nutrients by the action of the parasite on the host cell membrane. The parasite is often dependent upon the host cell for complex nutrients which it cannot synthesize for itself. Intracellular forms often profoundly modify the structure and metabolism of the host cell or interfere with its growth and multiplication. This may result in the final lysis of the host cell at the end of the intracellular phase or before the infection of other cells. Certain types of intracellular organisms may have arisen initially as forms attached to the

  6. Langerhans' cells are depleted in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Aractingi, S; Gluckman, E; Dauge-Geffroy, M C; Le Goué, C; Flahaut, A; Dubertret, L; Carosella, E

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To measure Langerhans' cells in skin of patients treated by bone marrow transplantation who developed chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD); to determine whether the reduction in Langerhans' cells resulted directly from the GvHD or from other factors, such as the immunosuppressive regimens used in bone marrow transplant patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Lesional and nonlesional skin specimens from nine patients with lichen planus-like lesions and three patients with sclerodermoid lesions were studied. Control skin specimens were taken from three patients undergoing breast reduction surgery. The number of Langerhans' cells/mm2 and the area of Langerhans' cells as a percentage of total epidermis were measured by counting cells labelled with antihuman CD1a. RESULTS: A significant reduction in Langerhans' cell area and number were found in specimens with lesions (area 3.5%; number 507/mm2) compared with specimens without lesions (8.42%; 2375/mm2). In contrast, Langerhans' cell area and number in skin without lesions were similar to controls (10.26%; 2968/mm2). CONCLUSIONS: Langerhans' cells were significantly reduced in skin with lesions of chronic GvHD but not in skin without lesions from the same patient, suggesting that the reduction is a direct consequence of GvHD and not linked to immunosuppressive drugs or late effects of conditioning regimens. In long term bone marrow transplant recipients, Langerhans' cells are derived mainly from the donor cells; therefore, this result suggests the occurrence of autoreactive phenomenon in chronic GvHD. Images PMID:9215146

  7. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  8. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Graft‐Versus‐Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mjösberg, J.

    2015-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are lymphocytes lacking rearranged antigen receptors such as those expressed by T and B cells. ILC are important effector and regulatory cells of the innate immune system, controlling lymphoid organogenesis, tissue inflammation, and homeostasis. The family of ILC consists of cytotoxic NK cells and the more recently described noncytotoxic group 1, 2, and 3 ILC. The classification of noncytotoxic ILC—in many aspects—mirrors that of T helper cells, which is based on the expression of master transcription factors and signature cytokines specific for each subset. The IL‐22 producing RORγt+ ILC3 subset was recently found to be critical in the prevention of intestinal graft‐versus‐host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) via strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier. In this review, we summarize the current view of the immunological functions of human noncytotoxic ILC subsets and discuss the potentially beneficial features of IL‐22 producing ILC3 in improving allo‐HCT efficacy by attenuating susceptibility to GVHD. In addition, we explore the possibility of other ILC subsets playing a role in GVHD. PMID:26228632

  9. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  10. Distinct host cell proteins incorporated by SIV replicating in CD4+ T Cells from natural disease resistant versus non-natural disease susceptible hosts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enveloped viruses including the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replicating within host cells acquire host proteins upon egress from the host cells. A number of studies have catalogued such host proteins, and a few have documented the potential positive and negative biological functions of such host proteins. The studies conducted herein utilized proteomic analysis to identify differences in the spectrum of host proteins acquired by a single source of SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys and disease susceptible rhesus macaques. Results While a total of 202 host derived proteins were present in viral preparations from CD4+ T cells from both species, there were 4 host-derived proteins that consistently and uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from rhesus macaques but not sooty mangabeys; and, similarly, 28 host-derived proteins that uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from sooty mangabeys, but not rhesus macaques. Of interest was the finding that of the 4 proteins uniquely present in SIV preparations from rhesus macaques was a 26 S protease subunit 7 (MSS1) that was shown to enhance HIV-1 'tat" mediated transactivation. Among the 28 proteins found in SIV preparations from sooty mangabeys included several molecules associated with immune function such as CD2, CD3ε, TLR4, TLR9 and TNFR and a bioactive form of IL-13. Conclusions The finding of 4 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease susceptible rhesus macaques and 28 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys provide the foundation for determining the potential role of each of these unique host-derived proteins in contributing to the polarized clinical outcome in these 2 species of nonhuman primates. PMID:21162735

  11. Chlamydial Lytic Exit from Host Cells Is Plasmid Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; Starr, Tregei; Song, Lihua; Carlson, John H.; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Beare, Paul A.; Whitmire, William M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is a globally important human pathogen. The chlamydial plasmid is an attenuating virulence factor, but the molecular basis for attenuation is not understood. Chlamydiae replicate within a membrane-bound vacuole termed an inclusion, where they undergo a biphasic developmental growth cycle and differentiate from noninfectious into infectious organisms. Late in the developmental cycle, the fragile chlamydia-laden inclusion retains its integrity by surrounding itself with scaffolds of host cytoskeletal proteins. The ability of chlamydiae to developmentally free themselves from this cytoskeleton network is a fundamental virulence trait of the pathogen. Here, we show that plasmidless chlamydiae are incapable of disrupting their cytoskeletal entrapment and remain intracellular as stable mature inclusions that support high numbers of infectious organisms. By using deletion mutants of the eight plasmid-carried genes (Δpgp1 to Δpgp8), we show that Pgp4, a transcriptional regulator of multiple chromosomal genes, is required for exit. Exit of chlamydiae is dependent on protein synthesis and is inhibited by the compound C1, an inhibitor of the type III secretion system (T3S). Exit of plasmid-free and Δpgp4 organisms, which failed to lyse infected cells, was rescued by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Our findings describe a genetic mechanism of chlamydial exit from host cells that is dependent on an unknown pgp4-regulated chromosomal T3S effector gene. PMID:26556273

  12. Bacterium-Generated Nitric Oxide Hijacks Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling and Modulates the Host Cell Cycle In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mocca, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells, nitric oxide (NO·) is an important signal molecule with concentration-dependent and often controversial functions of promoting cell survival and inducing cell death. An inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in various mammalian cells produces higher levels of NO· from l-arginine upon infections to eliminate pathogens. In this study, we reveal novel pathogenic roles of NO· generated by bacteria in bacterium-host cell cocultures using Moraxella catarrhalis, a respiratory tract disease-causing bacterium, as a biological producer of NO·. We recently demonstrated that M. catarrhalis cells that express the nitrite reductase (AniA protein) can produce NO· by reducing nitrite. Our study suggests that, in the presence of pathophysiological levels of nitrite, this opportunistic pathogen hijacks host cell signaling and modulates host gene expression through its ability to produce NO· from nitrite. Bacterium-generated NO· significantly increases the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and modulates the expression of apoptotic proteins, therefore triggering host cell programmed death partially through TNF-α signaling. Furthermore, our study reveals that bacterium-generated NO· stalls host cell division and directly results in the death of dividing cells by reducing the levels of an essential regulator of cell division. This study provides unique insight into why NO· may exert more severe cytotoxic effects on fast growing cells, providing an important molecular basis for NO·-mediated pathogenesis in infections and possible therapeutic applications of NO·-releasing molecules in tumorigenesis. This study strongly suggests that bacterium-generated NO· can play important pathogenic roles during infections. PMID:22636782

  13. Effective delivery of chemotherapeutic nanoparticles by depleting host Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Yusuke; Oda, Tatsuya; Yamada, Keiichi; Hashimoto, Shinji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Ryoko; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2012-11-15

    Although chemotherapeutic nanoparticles would confer various advantages, the majority of administrated nanoparticles are known to be spoiled by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Intending to more effectively deliver therapeutic nanoparticles to target regions in vivo, host RES, especially Kupffer cells in the liver, have been depleted ahead of drug administration. To demonstrate this hypothesis, clodronate liposomes were preinjected into BALB/c nude mice for depletion of Kupffer cells 2 days before, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) at the doses of 1.25, 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg was administered. As a result, doxorubicin accumulation in the liver was decreased from 36 to 26% injected dose/organ by the Kupffer cells depletion, and consequently, the plasma concentration of doxorubicin was significantly enhanced threefold (from 11 to 33 μg/mL) on day 1 at 1.25 mg/kg-dose group. Doxorubicin accumulation in the tumor was increased from 0.78 to 3.0 μg/g-tissue on day 3, and tumor growth inhibition by Doxil was significantly boosted (tumor volumes from 751 to 482 mm(3) on day 24) by the Kupffer cells depletion. In conclusion, Kupffer cells depletion by clodronate liposomes enhanced the plasma concentration and antitumor effects of Doxil, and would be widely applicable for various clinical cancer chemotherapies using nanoparticles. PMID:22362271

  14. Mast cell tryptases and chymases in inflammation and host defense

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Tryptases and chymases are the major proteins stored and secreted by mast cells. The types, amounts and properties of these serine peptidases vary by mast cell subtype, tissue, and mammal of origin. Membrane-anchored γ-tryptases are tryptic, prostasin-like, type I peptidases that remain membrane-attached upon release and act locally. Soluble tryptases, including their close relatives, mastins, form inhibitor-resistant oligomers that act more remotely. Befitting their greater destructive potential, chymases are quickly inhibited after release, although some gain protection by associating with proteoglycans. Most chymase-like enzymes, including mast cell cathepsin G, hydrolyze chymotryptic substrates, an uncommon capability in the proteome. Some rodent chymases, however, have mutations resulting in elastolytic activity. Secreted tryptases and chymases promote inflammation, matrix destruction, and tissue remodeling by several mechanisms, including destroying pro-coagulant, matrix, growth and differentiation factors, and activating proteinase-activated receptors, urokinase, metalloproteinases, and angiotensin. They also modulate immune responses by hydrolyzing chemokines and cytokines. At least one chymase protects mice from intestinal worms. Tryptases and chymases also can oppose inflammation by inactivating allergens and neuropeptides causing inflammation and bronchoconstriction. Thus, like mast cells themselves, mast cell serine peptidases play multiple roles in host defense and any accounting of benefit versus harm is necessarily context-specific. PMID:17498057

  15. NK cell regulation of CD4 T cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Hazzan, Marc; Weatherly, Kathleen; Gaudray, Florence; Salmon, Isabelle; Braun, Michel Y

    2010-06-15

    CD3-negative NK cells are granular lymphocytes capable of producing inflammatory cytokines and killing malignant, infected, or stressed cells. We have recently observed a new role for NK cells in the control of the proliferation of CD4 T cells under persistent antigenic stimulation. Monoclonal anti-male CD4 T cells transferred into Rag2-/- male recipients did not expand or were rapidly eliminated. Remarkably, T cells transferred into NK cell-deficient Rag2-/- Il-2Rgammac-/- male hosts expanded extensively and mediated tissue lesions usually observed in chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). T cell failure to proliferate and to induce chronic GVHD was the result of NK cell activity, because depletion of the recipient's NK1.1+ cells by Ab treatment induced T cell expansion and chronic GVHD. T cells under chronic Ag stimulation upregulated ligands of the activating receptor NKG2D, and regulatory activity of NK cells was inhibited by the injection of Abs directed to NKG2D. On the contrary, blocking NKG2A inhibitory receptors did not increase NK cell regulatory activity. Finally, we show that NK regulation of T cell expansion did not involve perforin-mediated lytic activity of NK cells, but depended on T cell surface expression of a functional Fas molecule. These results highlight the potential role played by NK cells in controlling the Ag-specific CD4+ T cells responsible for chronic GVHD. PMID:20488796

  16. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  17. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements. PMID:27425421

  18. Host volatiles mediate cell invasion of honey bee brood cells by Varroa destructor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A female Varroa destructor mite parasitizes capped bee brood by invading the cell of a late 5th instar larvae just before the cell is capped, usually by transfer from a worker bee to the new larval host. Female mites must rely on chemical cues to successfully locate and transfer to an appropriate ag...

  19. Investigations of host defence in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, S H; Wright, G; Webster, A D; Segal, A W

    1985-03-01

    Parameters of host defence were investigated in 30 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). A newly devised perfusion system was used to study the kinetics in whole blood of leucocyte adherence, phagocytosis, killing and solubilization of a mixture of Staph. aureus and Str. pneumoniae, and secretion of lactoferrin. A skin window technique was used to examine the accumulation of leucocytes at inflammatory foci and their subsequent rate of movement through a filter. Serum concentrations of C3, C4, total haemolytic complement and immunoglobulins were also measured. The rate of neutrophil migration into filters was slightly reduced in patients with SCD. The proportion of monocytes that emigrated from the skin windows and their rate of migration were markedly diminished. The adhesion of neutrophils and their ability to kill staphylococci were also reduced, particularly in patients of the haemoglobin (Hb) SS and Hb S-beta-thalassaemia genotypes. Neutrophil function was mostly impaired in patients with the greatest frequency of bacterial infection. The rate of clearance of pneumococci was related to the concentration of type specific immunoglobulin G but not M. Serum concentrations of immunoglobulins and complement were normal. We were unable to define a defect of host defence of sufficient magnitude to explain the susceptibility of these patients to severe infection. PMID:3882140

  20. Silencing suppressors: viral weapons for countering host cell defenses.

    PubMed

    Song, Liping; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Yanjun; Zhou, Ling; Huang, Wenlin

    2011-04-01

    RNA silencing is a conserved eukaryotic pathway involved in the suppression of gene expression via sequence-specific interactions that are mediated by 21-23 nt RNA molecules. During infection, RNAi can act as an innate immune system to defend against viruses. As a counter-defensive strategy, silencing suppressors are encoded by viruses to inhibit various stages of the silencing process. These suppressors are diverse in sequence and structure and act via different mechanisms. In this review, we discuss whether RNAi is a defensive strategy in mammalian host cells and whether silencing suppressors can be encoded by mammalian viruses. We also review the modes of action proposed for some silencing suppressors. PMID:21528352

  1. Inkjet printing of silk nest arrays for cell hosting.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Rattanon; Drachuk, Irina; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-04-14

    An inkjet printing approach is presented for the facile fabrication of microscopic arrays of biocompatible silk "nests" capable of hosting live cells for prospective biosensors. The patterning of silk fibroin nests were constructed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of silk polyelectrolytes chemically modified with poly-(l-lysine) and poly-(l-glutamic acid) side chains. The inkjet-printed silk circular regions with a characteristic "nest" shape had diameters of 70-100 μm and a thickness several hundred nanometers were stabilized by ionic pairing and by the formation of the silk II crystalline secondary structure. These "locked-in" silk nests remained anchored to the substrate during incubation in cell growth media to provide a biotemplated platform for printing-in, immobilization, encapsulation and growth of cells. The process of inkjet-assisted printing is versatile and can be applied on any type of substrate, including rigid and flexible, with scalability and facile formation. PMID:24605757

  2. Host cell death due to enteropathogenic Escherichia coli has features of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Crane, J K; Majumdar, S; Pickhardt, D F

    1999-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a cause of prolonged watery diarrhea in children in developing countries. The ability of EPEC to kill host cells was investigated in vitro in assays using two human cultured cell lines, HeLa (cervical) and T84 (colonic). EPEC killed epithelial cells as assessed by permeability to the vital dyes trypan blue and propidium iodide. In addition, EPEC triggered changes in the host cell, suggesting apoptosis as the mode of death; such changes included early expression of phosphatidylserine on the host cell surface and internucleosomal cleavage of host cell DNA. Genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, and wortmannin, an inhibitor of host phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, markedly increased EPEC-induced cell death and enhanced the features of apoptosis. EPEC-induced cell death was contact dependent and required adherence of live bacteria to the host cell. A quantitative assay for EPEC-induced cell death was developed by using the propidium iodide uptake method adapted to a fluorescence plate reader. With EPEC, the rate and extent of host cell death were less that what has been reported for Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia, three other genera of enteric bacteria known to cause apoptosis. However, rapid apoptosis of the host cell may not favor the pathogenic strategy of EPEC, a mucosa-adhering, noninvasive pathogen. PMID:10225923

  3. The effect of enterohemorrhagic E. coli infection on the cell mechanics of host cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Su, Pin-Tzu; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Huang, Chien-Hsiu; Osterday, Kathryn; del Álamo, Juan C; Syu, Wan-Jr; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is a type of human pathogenic bacteria. The main virulence characteristics of EHEC include the formation of attaching and effacing lesions (A/E lesions) and the production of one or more Shiga-like toxins, which may induce human uremic complications. When EHEC infects host cells, it releases translocated intimin receptor (Tir) and effector proteins inside the host cells, inducing the rearrangement and accumulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, a phenotype leading to the formation of pedestals in the apical cell surface, and the growth of stress fibers at the base of the cells. To examine the effect of EHEC infection on cell mechanics, we carried out a series of experiments to examine HeLa cells with and without EHEC infection to quantify the changes in (1) focal adhesion area, visualized by anti-vinculin staining; (2) the distribution and orientation of stress fibers; and (3) the intracellular viscoelasticity, via directional video particle tracking microrheology. Our results indicated that in EHEC-infected HeLa cells, the focal adhesion area increased and the actin stress fibers became thicker and more aligned. The cytoskeletal reorganization induced by EHEC infection mediated a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic elastic shear modulus of the infected cells, and a transition in the viscoelastic behavior of the cells from viscous-like to elastic-like. These changes in mechanobiological characteristics might modulate the attachments between EHEC and the host cell to withstand exfoliation, and between the host cell and the extracellular matrix, and might also alter epithelial integrity. PMID:25369259

  4. Hypomethylation of host cell DNA synthesized after infection or transformation of cells by herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Macnab, J.C.M.; Adams, R.L.P.; Rinaldi, A.; Orr, A.; Clark, L.

    1988-04-01

    Infection of rat embryo cells with herpes simplex virus type 2 caused undermethylation of host cell DNA synthesized during infection. DNA made prior to infection was not demethylated, but some of its degradation products, including methyl dCMP, were incorporated into viral DNA. The use of mutant virus showed that some viral DNA synthesis appears to be required for the inhibition of methylation. Inhibition of methylation cannot be explained by an absence of DNA methyltransferase as the activity of this enzyme did not change during the early period of infection. Inhibition of host cell DNA methylation may be an important step in the transformation of cells by herpesviruses, and various transformed cell lines tested showed reduced levels of DNA methylation.

  5. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    SciTech Connect

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  6. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  7. The Kinome of Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas, Its Expression during Development and in Response to Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Epelboin, Yanouk; Quintric, Laure; Guévélou, Eric; Boudry, Pierre; Pichereau, Vianney; Corporeau, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Oysters play an important role in estuarine and coastal marine habitats, where the majority of humans live. In these ecosystems, environmental degradation is substantial, and oysters must cope with highly dynamic and stressful environmental constraints during their lives in the intertidal zone. The availability of the genome sequence of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas represents a unique opportunity for a comprehensive assessment of the signal transduction pathways that the species has developed to deal with this unique habitat. We performed an in silico analysis to identify, annotate and classify protein kinases in C. gigas, according to their kinase domain taxonomy classification, and compared with kinome already described in other animal species. The C. gigas kinome consists of 371 protein kinases, making it closely related to the sea urchin kinome, which has 353 protein kinases. The absence of gene redundancy in some groups of the C. gigas kinome may simplify functional studies of protein kinases. Through data mining of transcriptomes in C. gigas, we identified part of the kinome which may be central during development and may play a role in response to various environmental factors. Overall, this work contributes to a better understanding of key sensing pathways that may be central for adaptation to a highly dynamic marine environment. PMID:27231950

  8. Cutaneous graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant - a review*

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Cesar Daniel Villarreal; Alanis, Julio Cesar Salas; Pérez, Jose Carlos Jaime; Candiani, Jorge Ocampo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (allo-HSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The earliest and most common manifestation is cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. We discuss various insights into the disease's mechanisms and the different treatments for acute and chronic skin graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27438202

  9. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288

  10. Bacterial effectors target the plant cell nucleus to subvert host transcription

    PubMed Central

    Canonne, Joanne; Rivas, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote virulence, Gram-negative bacteria have evolved the ability to inject so-called type III effector proteins into host cells. The plant cell nucleus appears to be a subcellular compartment repeatedly targeted by bacterial effectors. In agreement with this observation, mounting evidence suggests that manipulation of host transcription is a major strategy developed by bacteria to counteract plant defense responses. It has been suggested that bacterial effectors may adopt at least three alternative, although not mutually exclusive, strategies to subvert host transcription. T3Es may (1) act as transcription factors that directly activate transcription in host cells, (2) affect histone packing and chromatin configuration, and/or (3) directly target host transcription factor activity. Here, we provide an overview on how all these strategies may lead to host transcriptional re-programming and, as a result, to improved bacterial multiplication inside plant cells. PMID:22353865

  11. Inhibition of Lapatinib-induced Kinome Reprogramming in ERBB2-positive Breast Cancer by Targeting BET Family Bromodomains

    PubMed Central

    Stuhlmiller, Timothy J.; Miller, Samantha M.; Zawistowski, Jon S.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Beltran, Adriana S.; Duncan, James S.; Angus, Steven P.; Collins, Kyla A. L.; Granger, Deborah A.; Reuther, Rachel A.; Graves, Lee M.; Gomez, Shawn M.; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Parker, Joel S.; Chen, Xin; Sciaky, Noah; Carey, Lisa A.; Earp, H. Shelton; Jin, Jian; Johnson, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Therapeutics such as lapatinib that target ERBB2 often provide initial clinical benefit but resistance frequently develops. Adaptive responses leading to lapatinib resistance involve reprogramming of the kinome through reactivation of ERBB2/ERBB3 signaling and transcriptional upregulation and activation of multiple tyrosine kinases. The heterogeneity of induced kinases prevents their targeting by a single kinase inhibitor, underscoring the challenge of predicting effective kinase inhibitor combination therapies. We hypothesized that to make the tumor response to single kinase inhibitors durable, the adaptive kinome response itself must be inhibited. Genetic and chemical inhibition of BET bromodomain chromatin readers suppresses transcription of many lapatinib-induced kinases involved in resistance including ERBB3, IGF1R, DDR1, MET, and FGFRs, preventing downstream SRC/FAK signaling and AKT reactivation. Combining inhibitors of kinases and chromatin readers prevents kinome adaptation by blocking transcription, generating a durable response to lapatinib and overcoming the dilemma of heterogeneity in the adaptive response. PMID:25865888

  12. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner. PMID:26187893

  13. Identifying Francisella tularensis genes required for growth in host cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cel...

  14. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  15. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  16. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  17. Remote Activation of Host Cell DNA Synthesis in Uninfected Cells Signaled by Infected Cells in Advance of Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Nora; Hennig, Thomas; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Marchetti, Magda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses modulate cellular processes and metabolism in diverse ways, but these are almost universally studied in the infected cell itself. Here, we study spatial organization of DNA synthesis during multiround transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV) using pulse-labeling with ethynyl nucleotides and cycloaddition of azide fluorophores. We report a hitherto unknown and unexpected outcome of virus-host interaction. Consistent with the current understanding of the single-step growth cycle, HSV suppresses host DNA synthesis and promotes viral DNA synthesis in spatially segregated compartments within the cell. In striking contrast, during progressive rounds of infection initiated at a single cell, we observe that infection induces a clear and pronounced stimulation of cellular DNA replication in remote uninfected cells. This induced DNA synthesis was observed in hundreds of uninfected cells at the extended border, outside the perimeter of the progressing infection. Moreover, using pulse-chase analysis, we show that this activation is maintained, resulting in a propagating wave of host DNA synthesis continually in advance of infection. As the virus reaches and infects these activated cells, host DNA synthesis is then shut off and replaced with virus DNA synthesis. Using nonpropagating viruses or conditioned medium, we demonstrate a paracrine effector of uninfected cell DNA synthesis in remote cells continually in advance of infection. These findings have significant implications, likely with broad applicability, for our understanding of the ways in which virus infection manipulates cell processes not only in the infected cell itself but also now in remote uninfected cells, as well as of mechanisms governing host DNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE We show that during infection initiated by a single particle with progressive cell-cell virus transmission (i.e., the normal situation), HSV induces host DNA synthesis in uninfected cells, mediated by a virus-induced paracrine

  18. From microbiology to cell biology: when an intracellular bacterium becomes part of its host cell.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, John P

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are now called organelles, but they used to be bacteria. As they transitioned from endosymbionts to organelles, they became more and more integrated into the biochemistry and cell biology of their hosts. Work over the last 15 years has shown that other symbioses show striking similarities to mitochondria and chloroplasts. In particular, many sap-feeding insects house intracellular bacteria that have genomes that overlap mitochondria and chloroplasts in terms of size and coding capacity. The massive levels of gene loss in some of these bacteria suggest that they, too, are becoming highly integrated with their host cells. Understanding these bacteria will require inspiration from eukaryotic cell biology, because a traditional microbiological framework is insufficient for understanding how they work. PMID:27267617

  19. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion. PMID:27414499

  20. Elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host macrophages in different models of regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Fatkhudinov, Timur; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Usman, Natalia; Bolshakova, Galina; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic multipotent stromal cells were previously thought to be poorly recognized by host immune system; the prolonged survival in host environments was explained by their immune privileged status. As long as the concept is currently reconsidered, the routes of elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host immunity must be taken into account. This is necessary for correct comprehension of their therapeutic action. The study was focused upon survival of umbilical cord-derived allogeneic multipotent stromal cells in different rat models of tissue regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or by critical limb ischemia. The observations were carried out by means of vital labeling of the cells with PKH26 prior to injection, in combination with differential immunostaining of host macrophages with anti-CD68 antibody. According to the results, allogeneic multipotent stromal cells are specifically eliminated by host immune system; the efficacy can reach 100%. Massive clearance of transplanted cells by host macrophages is accompanied by appropriation of the label by the latter, and this is a pronounced case of misleading presentation of exogenous label by host cells. The study emphasizes the role of macrophages in host response and also the need of additional criteria for correct data interpretation. PMID:26191137

  1. Elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host macrophages in different models of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Fatkhudinov, Timur; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Usman, Natalia; Bolshakova, Galina; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic multipotent stromal cells were previously thought to be poorly recognized by host immune system; the prolonged survival in host environments was explained by their immune privileged status. As long as the concept is currently reconsidered, the routes of elimination of allogeneic multipotent stromal cells by host immunity must be taken into account. This is necessary for correct comprehension of their therapeutic action. The study was focused upon survival of umbilical cord-derived allogeneic multipotent stromal cells in different rat models of tissue regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy or by critical limb ischemia. The observations were carried out by means of vital labeling of the cells with PKH26 prior to injection, in combination with differential immunostaining of host macrophages with anti-CD68 antibody. According to the results, allogeneic multipotent stromal cells are specifically eliminated by host immune system; the efficacy can reach 100%. Massive clearance of transplanted cells by host macrophages is accompanied by appropriation of the label by the latter, and this is a pronounced case of misleading presentation of exogenous label by host cells. The study emphasizes the role of macrophages in host response and also the need of additional criteria for correct data interpretation. PMID:26191137

  2. Listeria monocytogenes Exploits Normal Host Cell Processes to Spread from Cell to Cell✪

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Jennifer R.; Barth, Angela I.; Marquis, Hélène; de Hostos, Eugenio L.; Nelson, W. James; Theriot, Julie A.

    1999-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, grows in the cytoplasm of host cells and spreads intercellularly using a form of actin-based motility mediated by the bacterial protein ActA. Tightly adherent monolayers of MDCK cells that constitutively express GFP-actin were infected with L. monocytogenes, and intercellular spread of bacteria was observed by video microscopy. The probability of formation of membrane-bound protrusions containing bacteria decreased with host cell monolayer age and the establishment of extensive cell-cell contacts. After their extension into a recipient cell, intercellular membrane-bound protrusions underwent a period of bacterium-dependent fitful movement, followed by their collapse into a vacuole and rapid vacuolar lysis. Actin filaments in protrusions exhibited decreased turnover rates compared with bacterially associated cytoplasmic actin comet tails. Recovery of motility in the recipient cell required 1–2 bacterial generations. This delay may be explained by acid-dependent cleavage of ActA by the bacterial metalloprotease, Mpl. Importantly, we have observed that low levels of endocytosis of neighboring MDCK cell surface fragments occurs in the absence of bacteria, implying that intercellular spread of bacteria may exploit an endogenous process of paracytophagy. PMID:10491395

  3. Inhibition of host cell protein synthesis by UV-inactivated poliovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Helentjaris, T; Ehrenfeld, E

    1977-01-01

    The ability of poliovirus that was irradiated with UV light at energies up to 2,160 ergs/mm2 to subsequently inhibit host cell protein synthesis was measured. The inactivation of the host cell shutoff function followed one-hit kinetics. Increasing irradiation did not affect the rate of inhibition until the multiplicity of infection after irradiation was reduced to approximately 1 PFU/cell. At higher functional multiplicities, the rate was unchanged, but an increasing lag before the onset of inhibition was observed with increasing irradiation. The energy levels required to inactivate virus-induced inhibition of host cell protein synthesis suggest that damage to virus RNA rather than to virus capsid proteins is responsible for the loss of function. When the inactivation of host cell shutoff was compared with the inactivation of other viral functions by UV irradiation, it correlated exactly with the loss of infectivity but not with other viral functions measured. Guanidine treatment, which prevents detectable viral RNA and protein synthesis, completely inhibited host cell shutoff by low multiplicities of unirradiated virus infection but not higher multiplicities. When a high multiplicity of virus was first reduced to a low titer by irradiation, host cell shutoff was still evident in the presence of guanidine. The results demonstrate that the complete inhibition of host cell protein synthesis can be accomplished by one infectious viral genome per cell. Images PMID:189067

  4. Kinomic Profiling of Electromagnetic Navigational Bronchoscopy Specimens: A New Approach for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Minnich, Douglas J.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Denton, Alexander J.; Dussaq, Alex M.; Gilbert, Ashley N.; Rohrbach, Timothy D.; Arafat, Waleed; Welaya, Karim; Bonner, James A.; Willey, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Researchers are currently seeking relevant lung cancer biomarkers in order to make informed decisions regarding therapeutic selection for patients in so-called “precision medicine.” However, there are challenges to obtaining adequate lung cancer tissue for molecular analyses. Furthermore, current molecular testing of tumors at the genomic or transcriptomic level are very indirect measures of biological response to a drug, particularly for small molecule inhibitors that target kinases. Kinase activity profiling is therefore theorized to be more reflective of in vivo biology than many current molecular analysis techniques. As a result, this study seeks to prove the feasibility of combining a novel minimally invasive biopsy technique that expands the number of lesions amenable for biopsy with subsequent ex vivo kinase activity analysis. Methods Eight patients with lung lesions of varying location and size were biopsied using the novel electromagnetic navigational bronchoscopy (ENB) technique. Basal kinase activity (kinomic) profiles and ex vivo interrogation of samples in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib, crizotinib, and lapatinib were performed by PamStation 12 microarray analysis. Results Kinomic profiling qualitatively identified patient specific kinase activity profiles as well as patient and drug specific changes in kinase activity profiles following exposure to inhibitor. Thus, the study has verified the feasibility of ENB as a method for obtaining tissue in adequate quantities for kinomic analysis and has demonstrated the possible use of this tissue acquisition and analysis technique as a method for future study of lung cancer biomarkers. Conclusions We demonstrate the feasibility of using ENB-derived biopsies to perform kinase activity assessment in lung cancer patients. PMID:25549342

  5. A host cell membrane microdomain is a critical factor for organelle discharge by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2016-10-01

    Host cell microdomains are involved in the attachment, entry, and replication of intracellular microbial pathogens. Entry into the host cell of Toxoplasma gondii and the subsequent survival of this protozoan parasite are tightly coupled with the proteins secreted from organelle called rhoptry. The rhoptry proteins are rapidly discharged into clusters of vesicles, called evacuoles, which are then delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) or nucleus. In this study, we examined the roles of two host cell microdomain components, cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), in evacuole formation. The acute depletion of cholesterol from the host cell plasma membrane blocked evacuole formation but not invasion. Whereas the lack of host cell GPI also altered evacuole formation but not invasion, instead inducing excess evacuole formation. The latter effect was not influenced by the evacuole-inhibiting effects of host cell cholesterol depletion, indicating the independent roles of host GPI and cholesterol in evacuole formation. In addition, the excess formation of evacuoles resulted in the enhanced recruitment of host mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum to PVs, which in turn stimulated the growth of the parasite. PMID:27217289

  6. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M C; Brum, Felipe L; da Silva, Camila C; Zuma, Aline A; Elias, Maria C; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  7. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  8. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  9. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes

    PubMed Central

    Killackey, Samuel A.; Sorbara, Matthew T.; Girardin, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general. PMID:27066460

  10. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  11. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J.; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M.; Hughes, Andrew D.; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Nakao, A.; Shufesky, William J.; Williams, Amanda L.; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  12. A Sequential Model of Host Cell Killing and Phagocytosis by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Sateriale, Adam; Huston, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica is responsible for invasive intestinal and extraintestinal amebiasis. The virulence of Entamoeba histolytica is strongly correlated with the parasite's capacity to effectively kill and phagocytose host cells. The process by which host cells are killed and phagocytosed follows a sequential model of adherence, cell killing, initiation of phagocytosis, and engulfment. This paper presents recent advances in the cytolytic and phagocytic processes of Entamoeba histolytica in context of the sequential model. PMID:21331284

  13. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  14. Host parasite communications-Messages from helminths for the immune system: Parasite communication and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Gillian; Buck, Amy H; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Helminths are metazoan organisms many of which have evolved parasitic life styles dependent on sophisticated manipulation of the host environment. Most notably, they down-regulate host immune responses to ensure their own survival, by exporting a range of immuno-modulatory mediators that interact with host cells and tissues. While a number of secreted immunoregulatory parasite proteins have been defined, new work also points to the release of extracellular vesicles, or exosomes, that interact with and manipulate host gene expression. These recent results are discussed in the overall context of how helminths communicate effectively with the host organism. PMID:27297184

  15. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry. PMID:26021693

  16. Cross-reactivityvirtual profiling of the human kinome by X-ReactKIN – a Chemical Systems Biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Many drug candidates fail in clinical development due to their insufficient selectivity that may cause undesired side effects. Therefore, modern drug discovery is routinely supported by computational techniques, which can identify alternate molecular targets with a significant potential for cross-reactivity. In particular, the development of highly selective kinase inhibitors is complicated by the strong conservation of the ATP-binding site across the kinase family. In this paper, we describe X-ReactKIN, a new machine learning approach that extends the modeling and virtual screening of individual protein kinases to a system level in order to construct a cross-reactivity virtual profile for the human kinome. To maximize the coverage of the kinome, X-ReactKIN relies solely on the predicted target structures and employs state-of-the-art modeling techniques. Benchmark tests carried out against available selectivity data from high-throughput kinase profiling experiments demonstrate that for almost 70% of the inhibitors, their alternate molecular targets can be effectively identified in the human kinome with a high (>0.5) sensitivity at the expense of a relatively low false positive rate (<0.5). Furthermore, in a case study, we demonstrate how X-ReactKIN can support the development of selective inhibitors by optimizing the selection of kinase targets for small-scale counter-screen experiments. The constructed cross-reactivity profiles for the human kinome are freely available to the academic community at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/kinomelhm/ PMID:20958088

  17. Cross-reactivity virtual profiling of the human kinome by X-react(KIN): a chemical systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Brylinski, Michal; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    Many drug candidates fail in clinical development due to their insufficient selectivity that may cause undesired side effects. Therefore, modern drug discovery is routinely supported by computational techniques, which can identify alternate molecular targets with a significant potential for cross-reactivity. In particular, the development of highly selective kinase inhibitors is complicated by the strong conservation of the ATP-binding site across the kinase family. In this paper, we describe X-React(KIN), a new machine learning approach that extends the modeling and virtual screening of individual protein kinases to a system level in order to construct a cross-reactivity virtual profile for the human kinome. To maximize the coverage of the kinome, X-React(KIN) relies solely on the predicted target structures and employs state-of-the-art modeling techniques. Benchmark tests carried out against available selectivity data from high-throughput kinase profiling experiments demonstrate that, for almost 70% of the inhibitors, their alternate molecular targets can be effectively identified in the human kinome with a high (>0.5) sensitivity at the expense of a relatively low false positive rate (<0.5). Furthermore, in a case study, we demonstrate how X-React(KIN) can support the development of selective inhibitors by optimizing the selection of kinase targets for small-scale counter-screen experiments. The constructed cross-reactivity profiles for the human kinome are freely available to the academic community at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/kinomelhm/ . PMID:20958088

  18. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  19. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae’s consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host–pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner. PMID:26187893

  20. In situ regeneration of skeletal muscle tissue through host cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Min; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J; Lee, Sang Jin

    2014-10-01

    Standard reconstructive procedures for restoring normal function after skeletal muscle defects involve the use of existing host tissues such as muscular flaps. In many instances, this approach is not feasible and delays the rehabilitation process and restoration of tissue function. Currently, cell-based tissue engineering strategies have been used for reconstruction; however, donor tissue biopsy and ex vivo cell manipulation are required prior to implantation. The present study aimed to overcome these limitations by demonstrating mobilization of muscle cells into a target-specific site for in situ muscle regeneration. First, we investigated whether host muscle cells could be mobilized into an implanted scaffold. Poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffolds were implanted in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats, and the retrieved scaffolds were characterized by examining host cell infiltration in the scaffolds. The host cell infiltrates, including Pax7+ cells, gradually increased with time. Second, we demonstrated that host muscle cells could be enriched by a myogenic factor released from the scaffolds. Gelatin-based scaffolds containing a myogenic factor were implanted in the TA muscle of rats, and the Pax7+ cell infiltration and newly formed muscle fibers were examined. By the second week after implantation, the Pax7+ cell infiltrates and muscle formation were significantly accelerated within the scaffolds containing insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Our data suggest an ability of host stem cells to be recruited into the scaffolds with the capability of differentiating to muscle cells. In addition, the myogenic factor effectively promoted host cell recruitment, which resulted in accelerating muscle regeneration in situ. PMID:24954910

  1. Host Range Expansion of Honey Bee Black Queen Cell Virus in the Bumble Bee, Bombus huntii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bee viruses display a host range that is not restricted to their original host, European honey bees, Apis mellifera. Here we provide the first evidence that Black Queen Cell Virus (BQCV), one of the most prevalent honey bee viruses, can cause an infection in both laboratory-reared and field-co...

  2. Enteropathogenic E. coli-induced barrier function alteration is not a consequence of host cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V. K.; Weflen, Andrew; Koutsouris, Athanasia; Roxas, Jennifer L.; Hecht, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a diarrheagenic pathogen that perturbs intestinal epithelial function. Many of the alterations in the host cells are mediated by effector molecules that are secreted directly into epithelial cells by the EPEC type III secretion system. The secreted effector molecule EspF plays a key role in redistributing tight junction proteins and altering epithelial barrier function. EspF has also been shown to localize to mitochondria and trigger membrane depolarization and eventual host cell death. The relationship, if any, between EspF-induced host cell death and epithelial barrier disruption is presently not known. Site-directed mutation of leucine 16 (L16E) of EspF impairs both mitochondrial localization and consequent host cell death. Although the mutation lies within a region critical for type III secretion, EspF(L16E) is secreted efficiently from EPEC. Despite its inability to promote cell death, EspF(L16E) was not impaired for tight junction alteration or barrier disruption. Consistent with this, the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPH, despite reducing EPEC-induced host cell death, had no effect on infection-mediated barrier function alteration. Thus EPEC alters the epithelial barrier independent of its ability to induce host cell death. PMID:18356531

  3. Inhibitors of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 with Exquisite Kinome-Wide Selectivity and Their Functional Effects.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Florence F; Bishop, Joshua A; Gale, Jennifer P; Shi, Xi; Walk, Michelle; Ketterman, Joshua; Patnaik, Debasis; Barker, Doug; Walpita, Deepika; Campbell, Arthur J; Nguyen, Shannon; Lewis, Michael; Ross, Linda; Weïwer, Michel; An, W Frank; Germain, Andrew R; Nag, Partha P; Metkar, Shailesh; Kaya, Taner; Dandapani, Sivaraman; Olson, David E; Barbe, Anne-Laure; Lazzaro, Fanny; Sacher, Joshua R; Cheah, Jaime H; Fei, David; Perez, Jose; Munoz, Benito; Palmer, Michelle; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Schreiber, Stuart L; Scolnick, Edward; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Haggarty, Stephen J; Holson, Edward B; Pan, Jen Q

    2016-07-15

    The mood stabilizer lithium, the first-line treatment for bipolar disorder, is hypothesized to exert its effects through direct inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and indirectly by increasing GSK3's inhibitory serine phosphorylation. GSK3 comprises two highly similar paralogs, GSK3α and GSK3β, which are key regulatory kinases in the canonical Wnt pathway. GSK3 stands as a nodal target within this pathway and is an attractive therapeutic target for multiple indications. Despite being an active field of research for the past 20 years, many GSK3 inhibitors demonstrate either poor to moderate selectivity versus the broader human kinome or physicochemical properties unsuitable for use in in vitro systems or in vivo models. A nonconventional analysis of data from a GSK3β inhibitor high-throughput screening campaign, which excluded known GSK3 inhibitor chemotypes, led to the discovery of a novel pyrazolo-tetrahydroquinolinone scaffold with unparalleled kinome-wide selectivity for the GSK3 kinases. Taking advantage of an uncommon tridentate interaction with the hinge region of GSK3, we developed highly selective and potent GSK3 inhibitors, BRD1652 and BRD0209, which demonstrated in vivo efficacy in a dopaminergic signaling paradigm modeling mood-related disorders. These new chemical probes open the way for exclusive analyses of the function of GSK3 kinases in multiple signaling pathways involved in many prevalent disorders. PMID:27128528

  4. Epigenetics: A New Model for Intracellular Parasite-Host Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Robert McMaster, W; Morrison, Charlotte J; Kobor, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Intracellular protozoan parasites are an extremely important class of pathogens that cause a spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that protozoan parasites, like other prokaryotic and viral pathogens, manipulate host cells via epigenetic modifications of the host genome that alter transcription and corresponding signaling pathways. In light of these data, we examine the role of epigenetics in downregulation of host macrophages by Leishmania that could potentially lead to a permanent state of inactivation, thus favoring pathogen survival and disease progression. PMID:27142564

  5. Diversity in host clone performance within a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Peter M; Berthelot, Maud E; Young, Robert J; Graham, James W A; Racher, Andrew J; Aldana, Dulce

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve the capabilities of individual Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell lines to synthesize recombinant therapeutic proteins (rPs). However, given the increasing variety in rP molecular types and formats it may be advantageous to employ a toolbox of CHO host cell lines in biomanufacturing. Such a toolbox would contain a panel of hosts with specific capabilities to synthesize certain molecular types at high volumetric concentrations and with the correct product quality (PQ). In this work, we examine a panel of clonally derived host cell lines isolated from CHOK1SV for the ability to manufacture two model proteins, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) and an Fc-fusion protein (etanercept). We show that these host cell lines vary in their relative ability to synthesize these proteins in transient and stable pool production format. Furthermore, we examined the PQ attributes of the stable pool-produced Mab and etanercept (by N-glycan ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively), and uncovered substantial variation between the host cell lines in Mab N-glycan micro-heterogeneity and etanercept N and O-linked macro-heterogeneity. To further investigate the capabilities of these hosts to act as cell factories, we examined the glycosylation pathway gene expression profiles as well as the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in the untransfected hosts. We uncovered a moderate correlation between ER mass and the volumetric product concentration in transient and stable pool Mab production. This work demonstrates the utility of leveraging diversity within the CHOK1SV pool to identify new host cell lines with different performance characteristics. PMID:25918883

  6. Bacterial Cell-Cell Communication in the Host via RRNPP Peptide-Binding Regulators.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pascual, David; Monnet, Véronique; Gardan, Rozenn

    2016-01-01

    Human microbiomes are composed of complex and dense bacterial consortia. In these environments, bacteria are able to react quickly to change by coordinating their gene expression at the population level via small signaling molecules. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication is mostly mediated by peptides that are released into the extracellular environment. Cell-cell communication based on these peptides is especially widespread in the group Firmicutes, in which they regulate a wide array of biological processes, including functions related to host-microbe interactions. Among the different agents of communication, the RRNPP family of cytoplasmic transcriptional regulators, together with their cognate re-internalized signaling peptides, represents a group of emerging importance. RRNPP members that have been studied so far are found mainly in species of bacilli, streptococci, and enterococci. These bacteria are characterized as both human commensal and pathogenic, and share different niches in the human body with other microorganisms. The goal of this mini-review is to present the current state of research on the biological relevance of RRNPP mechanisms in the context of the host, highlighting their specific roles in commensalism or virulence. PMID:27242728

  7. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  8. Involvement of DNA polymerase alpha in host cell reactivation of UV-irradiated herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Maeno, K.

    1984-02-01

    Aphidicolin is a potent inhibitor of both host cell DNA polymerase alpha and herpes simplex virus (HSV)-induced DNA polymerase but has no effect on DNA polymerases beta and gamma of host cells. By using an aphidicolin-resistant mutant (Aphr) of HSV, a possible involvement of DNA polymerase alpha in host cell reactivation of UV-damaged HSV was studied. Plaque formation by UV-irradiated Aphr was markedly inhibited by 1 microgram of aphidicolin per ml, which did not affect the plating efficiency of nonirradiated Aphr. Aphidicolin added before 12 h postinfection inhibited plaque formation by irradiated Aphr, which became aphidicolin insensitive after 36 h postinfection. The results strongly suggest that host cell DNA polymerase alpha is involved in the repair of UV-irradiated HSV DNA.

  9. Stealing the Keys to the Kitchen: Viral Manipulation of the Host Cell Metabolic Network.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Christopher M; Xu, Shihao; Munger, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    Host cells possess the metabolic assets required for viral infection. Recent studies indicate that control of the host's metabolic resources is a core host-pathogen interaction. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to usurp the host's metabolic resources, funneling them towards the production of virion components as well as the organization of specialized compartments for replication, maturation, and dissemination. Consequently, hosts have developed a variety of metabolic countermeasures to sense and resist these viral changes. The complex interplay between virus and host over metabolic control has only just begun to be deconvoluted. However, it is clear that virally induced metabolic reprogramming can substantially impact infectious outcomes, highlighting the promise of targeting these processes for antiviral therapeutic development. PMID:26439298

  10. Perturbation of Host Cell Cytoskeleton by Cranberry Proanthocyanidins and Their Effect on Enteric Infections

    PubMed Central

    Harmidy, Kevin; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Cranberry-derived compounds, including a fraction known as proanthocyanidins (PACs) exhibit anti-microbial, anti-infective, and anti-adhesive properties against a number of disease-causing organisms. In this study, the effect of cranberry proanthocyanidins (CPACs) on the infection of epithelial cells by two enteric bacterial pathogens, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Salmonella Typhimurium was investigated. Immunofluorescence data showed that actin pedestal formation, required for infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), was disrupted in the presence of CPACs. In addition, invasion of HeLa cells by Salmonella Typhimurium was significantly reduced, as verified by gentamicin protection assay and immunofluorescence. CPACs had no effect on bacterial growth, nor any detectable effect on the production of bacterial effector proteins of the type III secretion system. Furthermore, CPACs did not affect the viability of host cells. Interestingly, we found that CPACs had a potent and dose-dependent effect on the host cell cytoskeleton that was evident even in uninfected cells. CPACs inhibited the phagocytosis of inert particles by a macrophage cell line, providing further evidence that actin-mediated host cell functions are disrupted in the presence of cranberry CPACs. Thus, although CPAC treatment inhibited Salmonella invasion and EPEC pedestal formation, our results suggest that this is likely primarily because of the perturbation of the host cell cytoskeleton by CPACs rather than an effect on bacterial virulence itself. These findings have significant implications for the interpretation of experiments on the effects of CPACs on bacteria-host cell interactions. PMID:22076143

  11. Fibroblasts—a key host cell type in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Rundqvist, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between the host environment and cancer cells. Fibroblasts are now recognized as a key host cell type involved in host–cancer signaling. This review discusses some recent studies that highlight the roles of fibroblasts in tumor initiation, early progression, invasion, and metastasis. Some clinical studies describing the prognostic significance of fibroblast-derived markers and signatures are also discussed. PMID:22509805

  12. HIV–host interactome revealed directly from infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Greco, Todd M.; Mohammed, Kevin D.; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P.; Chait, Brian T.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen–host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27375898

  13. HIV-host interactome revealed directly from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y; Greco, Todd M; Mohammed, Kevin D; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M; Cristea, Ileana M; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T; Muesing, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen-host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27572969

  14. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  15. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  16. Identification of host proteins involved in rickettsial invasion of tick cells.

    PubMed

    Petchampai, Natthida; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Banajee, Kaikhushroo H; Verhoeve, Victoria I; Kearney, Michael T; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2015-03-01

    Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species are obligate intracellular bacteria capable of infecting both vertebrate and invertebrate host cells, an essential process for subsequent bacterial survival in distinct hosts. The host cell signaling molecules involved in the uptake of Rickettsia into mammalian and Drosophila cells have been identified; however, invasion into tick cells is understudied. Considering the movement of SFG Rickettsia between vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, the hypothesis is that conserved mechanisms are utilized for host cell invasion. The current study employed biochemical inhibition assays to determine the tick proteins involved in Rickettsia montanensis infection of tick-derived cells from a natural host, Dermacentor variabilis. The results revealed several tick proteins important for rickettsial invasion, including actin filaments, actin-related protein 2/3 complex, phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase, protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), Src family PTK, focal adhesion kinase, Rho GTPase Rac1, and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of rickettsial infection is critical to a thorough understanding of rickettsial transmission in tick populations and the ecology of tick-borne rickettsial diseases. PMID:25547795

  17. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP32 Interacts with Host Cell Targets That Influence Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian

    2012-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes and survives by evading host cell defense mechanisms. Recently, molecular interactions of E. chaffeensis tandem repeat proteins 47 and 120 (TRP47 and -120) and the eukaryotic host cell have been described. In this investigation, yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that an E. chaffeensis type 1 secretion system substrate, TRP32, interacts with a diverse group of human proteins associated with major biological processes of the host cell, including protein synthesis, trafficking, degradation, immune signaling, cell signaling, iron metabolism, and apoptosis. Eight target proteins, including translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EF1A1), deleted in azoospermia (DAZ)-associated protein 2 (DAZAP2), ferritin light polypeptide (FTL), CD63, CD14, proteasome subunit beta type 1 (PSMB1), ring finger and CCCH-type domain 1 (RC3H1), and tumor protein p53-inducible protein 11 (TP53I11) interacted with TRP32 as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, colocalization with TRP32 in HeLa and THP-1 cells, and/or RNA interference. Interactions between TRP32 and host targets localized to the E. chaffeensis morulae or in the host cell cytoplasm adjacent to morulae. Common or closely related interacting partners of E. chaffeensis TRP32, TRP47, and TRP120 demonstrate a molecular convergence on common cellular processes and molecular cross talk between Ehrlichia TRPs and host targets. These findings further support the role of TRPs as effectors that promote intracellular survival. PMID:22547548

  18. Identification of Host Proteins Involved in Rickettsial Invasion of Tick Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Banajee, Kaikhushroo H.; Verhoeve, Victoria I.; Kearney, Michael T.; Macaluso, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Tick-borne spotted fever group (SFG) Rickettsia species are obligate intracellular bacteria capable of infecting both vertebrate and invertebrate host cells, an essential process for subsequent bacterial survival in distinct hosts. The host cell signaling molecules involved in the uptake of Rickettsia into mammalian and Drosophila cells have been identified; however, invasion into tick cells is understudied. Considering the movement of SFG Rickettsia between vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, the hypothesis is that conserved mechanisms are utilized for host cell invasion. The current study employed biochemical inhibition assays to determine the tick proteins involved in Rickettsia montanensis infection of tick-derived cells from a natural host, Dermacentor variabilis. The results revealed several tick proteins important for rickettsial invasion, including actin filaments, actin-related protein 2/3 complex, phosphatidylinositol-3′-kinase, protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), Src family PTK, focal adhesion kinase, Rho GTPase Rac1, and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of rickettsial infection is critical to a thorough understanding of rickettsial transmission in tick populations and the ecology of tick-borne rickettsial diseases. PMID:25547795

  19. Intestinal epithelial cells as mediators of the commensal–host immune crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ivanov, Ivaylo I

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria regulate the homeostasis of host effector immune cell subsets. The mechanisms involved in this commensal–host crosstalk are not well understood. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only create a physical barrier between the commensals and immune cells in host tissues, but also facilitate interactions between them. Perturbations of epithelial homeostasis or function lead to the development of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and intestinal cancer. IECs receive signals from commensals and produce effector immune molecules. IECs also affect the function of immune cells in the lamina propria. Here we discuss some of these properties of IECs that define them as innate immune cells. We focus on how IECs may integrate and transmit signals from individual commensal bacteria to mucosal innate and adaptive immune cells for the establishment of the unique mucosal immunological equilibrium. PMID:23318659

  20. Host cell autophagy modulates early stages of adenovirus infections in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xuehuo; Carlin, Cathleen R

    2013-02-01

    Human adenoviruses typically cause mild infections in the upper or lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, or ocular epithelium. However, adenoviruses may be life-threatening in patients with impaired immunity and some serotypes cause epidemic outbreaks. Attachment to host cell receptors activates cell signaling and virus uptake by endocytosis. At present, it is unclear how vital cellular homeostatic mechanisms affect these early steps in the adenovirus life cycle. Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway for recycling intracellular components that is upregulated during periods of cell stress. Autophagic cargo is sequestered in double-membrane structures called autophagosomes that fuse with endosomes to form amphisomes which then deliver their content to lysosomes. Autophagy is an important adaptive response in airway epithelial cells targeted by many common adenovirus serotypes. Using two established tissue culture models, we demonstrate here that adaptive autophagy enhances expression of the early region 1 adenovirus protein, induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and production of new viral progeny in airway epithelial cells infected with adenovirus type 2. We have also discovered that adenovirus infections are tightly regulated by endosome maturation, a process characterized by abrupt exchange of Rab5 and Rab7 GTPases, associated with early and late endosomes, respectively. Moreover, endosome maturation appears to control a pool of early endosomes capable of fusing with autophagosomes which enhance adenovirus infection. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to induce autophagy in order to aid their own replication. Our studies reveal a novel role for host cell autophagy that could have a significant impact on the outcome of respiratory infections. PMID:23236070

  1. A statistical approach to determining criticality of residual host cell DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Harry; Wei, Ziping; Schenerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for determining the criticality of residual host cell DNA, which is characterized through two attributes, namely the size and amount of residual DNA in biopharmaceutical product. By applying a mechanistic modeling approach to the problem, we establish the linkage between residual DNA and product safety measured in terms of immunogenicity, oncogenicity, and infectivity. Such a link makes it possible to establish acceptable ranges of residual DNA size and amount. Application of the method is illustrated through two real-life examples related to a vaccine manufactured in Madin Darby Canine Kidney cell line and a monoclonal antibody using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line as host cells. PMID:25358029

  2. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  3. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV) of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM) to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated) and 901 (CAM treated) THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold), eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold) between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the pathogen whether or not

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Stimulates Endogenous Host Progenitor Cells to Improve Colonic Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sémont, Alexandra; Demarquay, Christelle; Bessout, Raphaëlle; Durand, Christelle; Benderitter, Marc; Mathieu, Noëlle

    2013-01-01

    Patients who undergo pelvic radiotherapy may develop severe and chronic complications resulting from gastrointestinal alterations. The lack of curative treatment highlights the importance of novel and effective therapeutic strategies. We thus tested the therapeutic benefit of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) treatment and proposed molecular mechanisms of action. MSC efficacy was tested in an experimental model of radiation-induced severe colonic ulceration histologically similar to that observed in patients. In this model, MSC from bone marrow were administered intravenously, immediately or three weeks (established lesions) after irradiation. MSC therapy reduces radiation-induced colonic ulceration and increases animal survival. MSC treatment induces therapeutic efficacy whatever the time of cell infusion. Infused-MSC engraft in the colon but also increase endogenous MSC mobilization in blood that have lasting benefits over time. In vitro analysis demonstrates that the MSC effect is mediated by paracrine mechanisms through the non-canonical WNT (Wingless integration site) pathway. In irradiated rat colons, MSC treatment increases the expression of the non-canonical WNT4 ligand by epithelial cells. The epithelial regenerative process is improved after MSC injection by stimulation of colonic epithelial cells positive for SOX9 (SRY-box containing gene 9) progenitor/stem cell markers. This study demonstrates that MSC treatment induces stimulation of endogenous host progenitor cells to improve the regenerative process and constitutes an initial approach to arguing in favor of the use of MSC to limit/reduce colorectal damage induced by radiation. PMID:23922953

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  6. Apicomplexans pulling the strings: manipulation of the host cell cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Helena; Hemphill, Andrew; Leitão, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Invasive stages of apicomplexan parasites require a host cell to survive, proliferate and advance to the next life cycle stage. Once invasion is achieved, apicomplexans interact closely with the host cell cytoskeleton, but in many cases the different species have evolved distinct mechanisms and pathways to modulate the structural organization of cytoskeletal filaments. The host cell cytoskeleton is a complex network, largely, but not exclusively, composed of microtubules, actin microfilaments and intermediate filaments, all of which are modulated by associated proteins, and it is involved in diverse functions including maintenance of cell morphology and mechanical support, migration, signal transduction, nutrient uptake, membrane and organelle trafficking and cell division. The ability of apicomplexans to modulate the cytoskeleton to their own advantage is clearly beneficial. We here review different aspects of the interactions of apicomplexans with the three main cytoskeletal filament types, provide information on the currently known parasite effector proteins and respective host cell targets involved, and how these interactions modulate the host cell physiology. Some of these findings could provide novel targets that could be exploited for the development of preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. PMID:27041483

  7. Insect Gut Symbiont Susceptibility to Host Antimicrobial Peptides Caused by Alteration of the Bacterial Cell Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Son, Dae Woo; Kim, Chan-Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Park, Ha Young; Huh, Ye Rang; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of symbionts is pivotal for understanding the cross-talk between symbionts and hosts. In addition to valuable knowledge obtained from symbiont genomic studies, the biochemical characterization of symbionts is important to fully understand symbiotic interactions. The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) has been recognized as a useful experimental insect gut symbiosis model system because of its cultivatable Burkholderia symbionts. This system is greatly advantageous because it allows the acquisition of a large quantity of homogeneous symbionts from the host midgut. Using these naïve gut symbionts, it is possible to directly compare in vivo symbiotic cells with in vitro cultured cells using biochemical approaches. With the goal of understanding molecular changes that occur in Burkholderia cells as they adapt to the Riptortus gut environment, we first elucidated that symbiotic Burkholderia cells are highly susceptible to purified Riptortus antimicrobial peptides. In search of the mechanisms of the increased immunosusceptibility of symbionts, we found striking differences in cell envelope structures between cultured and symbiotic Burkholderia cells. The bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigen was absent from symbiotic cells examined by gel electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses, and their membranes were more sensitive to detergent lysis. These changes in the cell envelope were responsible for the increased susceptibility of the Burkholderia symbionts to host innate immunity. Our results suggest that the symbiotic interactions between the Riptortus host and Burkholderia gut symbionts induce bacterial cell envelope changes to achieve successful gut symbiosis. PMID:26116716

  8. Delivery of host cell-directed therapeutics for intracellular pathogen clearance

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Michael A.; Gallovic, Matthew D.; Peine, Kevin J.; Duong, Anthony D.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Ainslie, Kristy M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens present a major health risk because of their innate ability to evade clearance. Their location within host cells and ability to react to the host environment by mutation or transcriptional changes often enables survival mechanisms to resist standard therapies. Host-directed drugs do not target the pathogen, minimizing the potential development of drug resistance; however, they can be difficult to deliver efficiently to intracellular sites. Vehicle delivery of host-mediated response drugs not only improves drug distribution and toxicity profiles, but can reduce the total amount of drug necessary to clear infection. In this article, we will review some host-directed drugs and current drug delivery techniques that can be used to efficiently clear intracellular infections. PMID:24134600

  9. Traversing the Cell: Agrobacterium T-DNA’s Journey to the Host Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Agrobacterium is unique in its ability to conduct interkingdom genetic exchange. Virulent Agrobacterium strains transfer single-strand forms of T-DNA (T-strands) and several Virulence effector proteins through a bacterial type IV secretion system into plant host cells. T-strands must traverse the plant wall and plasma membrane, traffic through the cytoplasm, enter the nucleus, and ultimately target host chromatin for stable integration. Because any DNA sequence placed between T-DNA “borders” can be transferred to plants and integrated into the plant genome, the transfer and intracellular trafficking processes must be mediated by bacterial and host proteins that form complexes with T-strands. This review summarizes current knowledge of proteins that interact with T-strands in the plant cell, and discusses several models of T-complex (T-strand and associated proteins) trafficking. A detailed understanding of how these macromolecular complexes enter the host cell and traverse the plant cytoplasm will require development of novel technologies to follow molecules from their bacterial site of synthesis into the plant cell, and how these transferred molecules interact with host proteins and sub-cellular structures within the host cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:22645590

  10. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David JP; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10809.001 PMID:26576949

  11. Autologous apoptotic cells preceding transplantation enhance survival in lethal murine graft-versus-host models

    PubMed Central

    Florek, Mareike; Sega, Emanuela I.; Leveson-Gower, Dennis B.; Baker, Jeanette; Müller, Antonia M. S.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Meyer, Everett

    2014-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is induced by alloreactivity of donor T cells toward host antigens presented on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Apoptotic cells are capable of inducing tolerance by altering APC maturation. Apoptosis can be induced by extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP). We demonstrate that the use of ECP as a prophylaxis prior to conditioning significantly improves survival (P < .0001) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by inhibiting the initiation phase of acute GVHD in a murine BMT model. ECP-treated autologous splenocytes resulted in immune tolerance in the host, including reduced dendritic cell activation with decreased nuclear factor-κB engagement, increased regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers with enhanced expression of cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, potentiating their suppressive function. The protective effect required host production of interleukin-10 and host Tregs. Conventional T cells that entered this tolerant environment experienced reduced proliferation, as well as a reduction of tissue homing and expression of activation markers. The induction of this tolerant state by ECP was obviated by cotreatment with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that the inflammatory state of the recipient prior to treatment would play a role in potential clinical translation. The use of prophylactic ECP may provide an alternative and safe method for immunosuppression in the bone marrow transplant setting. PMID:25030062

  12. Autologous apoptotic cells preceding transplantation enhance survival in lethal murine graft-versus-host models.

    PubMed

    Florek, Mareike; Sega, Emanuela I; Leveson-Gower, Dennis B; Baker, Jeanette; Müller, Antonia M S; Schneidawind, Dominik; Meyer, Everett; Negrin, Robert S

    2014-09-11

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is induced by alloreactivity of donor T cells toward host antigens presented on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Apoptotic cells are capable of inducing tolerance by altering APC maturation. Apoptosis can be induced by extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP). We demonstrate that the use of ECP as a prophylaxis prior to conditioning significantly improves survival (P < .0001) after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by inhibiting the initiation phase of acute GVHD in a murine BMT model. ECP-treated autologous splenocytes resulted in immune tolerance in the host, including reduced dendritic cell activation with decreased nuclear factor-κB engagement, increased regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers with enhanced expression of cytolytic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, potentiating their suppressive function. The protective effect required host production of interleukin-10 and host Tregs. Conventional T cells that entered this tolerant environment experienced reduced proliferation, as well as a reduction of tissue homing and expression of activation markers. The induction of this tolerant state by ECP was obviated by cotreatment with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that the inflammatory state of the recipient prior to treatment would play a role in potential clinical translation. The use of prophylactic ECP may provide an alternative and safe method for immunosuppression in the bone marrow transplant setting. PMID:25030062

  13. Lipid composition and fluidity of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope and host cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Aloia, R C; Tian, H; Jensen, F C

    1993-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is enclosed with a lipid envelope similar in composition to cell plasma membranes and to other viruses. Further, the fluidity, as measured by spin resonance spectroscopy, is low and the viral envelope is among the most highly ordered membranes analyzed. However, the relationship between viral envelope lipids and those of the host cell is not known. Here we demonstrate that the phospholipids within the envelopes of HIV-1RF and HIV-2-L are similar to each other but significantly different from their respective host cell surface membranes. Further, we demonstrate that the cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio of the viral envelope is approximately 2.5 times that of the host cell surface membranes. Consistent with the elevated cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio, the viral envelopes of HIV-1RF and HIV-2-L were shown to be 7.5% and 10.5% more ordered than the plasma membranes of their respective host cells. These data demonstrate that HIV-1 and HIV-2-L select specific lipid domains within the surface membrane of their host cells through which to emerge during viral maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8389472

  14. Permissive expansion and homing of adoptively transferred T cells in tumor-bearing hosts.

    PubMed

    Perez, C; Jukica, A; Listopad, J J; Anders, K; Kühl, A A; Loddenkemper, C; Blankenstein, T; Charo, J

    2015-07-15

    Activated T cells expressing endogenous or transduced TCRs are two cell types currently used in clinical adoptive T-cell therapy. The ability of these cells to recognize their antigen, expand and traffic to the tumor site are the initial steps necessary for successful therapy. In this study, we used in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) expressing T cells to evaluate the ability of adoptively transferred T cells to survive, expand and home to tumor site in vivo. Using this method, termed RT-Rack (Rluc T cell tracking), we followed T-cell response against tumors in vivo. Expansion and homing of adoptively transferred T cells were antigen dependent, but independent of the host immune status. Moreover, we successfully detected T-cell response to small and large tumors, including autochthonous liver tumors. The adoptively transferred T cells were not ignorant or excluded in a partially tolerant host, which expressed low level of the target in the periphery. Using T cell receptor (TCR)-engineered T cells, we showed the ability of these cells to respond in tumor-bearing hosts by expanding and homing to the tumor site. In all these models, the host immune status, the nature of the tumor or of the antigen, the tumor size and the presence of the targeted antigen in the periphery did not prevent the adoptively transferred T cells from responding by expanding and homing to the tumor. However, T cells had higher expression of the inhibitory receptor PD1 and reduced functional activity when a self-antigen was targeted. PMID:25530110

  15. Delineation of Polypharmacology across the Human Structural Kinome Using a Functional Site Interaction Fingerprint Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zheng; Xie, Li; Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E

    2016-05-12

    Targeted polypharmacology of kinases has emerged as a promising strategy to design efficient and safe therapeutics. Here, we perform a systematic study of kinase-ligand binding modes for the human structural kinome at scale (208 kinases, 1777 unique ligands, and their complexes) by integrating chemical genomics and structural genomics data and by introducing a functional site interaction fingerprint (Fs-IFP) method. New insights into kinase-ligand binding modes were obtained. We establish relationships between the features of binding modes, the ligands, and the binding pockets, respectively. We also drive the intrinsic binding specificity and which correlation with amino acid conservation. Third, we explore the landscape of the binding modes and highlight the regions of "selectivity pocket" and "selectivity entrance". Finally, we demonstrate that Fs-IFP similarity is directly correlated to the experimentally determined profile. These improve our understanding of kinase-ligand interactions and contribute to the design of novel polypharmacological therapies targeting kinases. PMID:26929980

  16. Identification of a thienopyrimidine derivatives target by a kinome and chemical biology approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chulho; Yang, Jee Sun; Han, Gyoonhee

    2015-09-01

    Target identification through chemical biology has been considered one of the most efficient approaches for drug discovery. Thienopyrimidine derivatives were designed to discover potent IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitors based on a known IKKβ inhibitor library. Most of the thienopyrimidine derivatives inhibited nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which are downstream of the NF-κB signaling pathway, but not IKKβ. To identify the appropriate targets of thienopyrimidine analogues, chemical biology approaches, including text mining and a subsequent kinase panel assay from the kinome profiling were used. Based on the results, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 was found to be the target for thienopyrimidine derivatives, and was confirmed to be a potent inhibitor for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26186885

  17. Rapid Functional Decline of Activated and Memory Graft-versus-Host-Reactive T Cells Encountering Host Antigens in the Absence of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao Wei; Andreola, Giovanna; Carlson, Alicia L; Shao, Steven; Lin, Charles P; Zhao, Guiling; Sykes, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation in the priming host environment has critical effects on the graft-versus-host (GVH) responses mediated by naive donor T cells. However, it is unclear how a quiescent or inflammatory environment impacts the activity of GVH-reactive primed T and memory cells. We show in this article that GVH-reactive primed donor T cells generated in irradiated recipients had diminished ability compared with naive T cells to increase donor chimerism when transferred to quiescent mixed allogeneic chimeras. GVH-reactive primed T cells showed marked loss of cytotoxic function and activation, and delayed but not decreased proliferation or accumulation in lymphoid tissues when transferred to quiescent mixed chimeras compared with freshly irradiated secondary recipients. Primed CD4 and CD8 T cells provided mutual help to sustain these functions in both subsets. CD8 help for CD4 cells was largely IFN-γ dependent. TLR stimulation after transfer of GVH-reactive primed T cells to mixed chimeras restored their cytotoxic effector function and permitted the generation of more effective T cell memory in association with reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 memory cells. Our data indicate that an inflammatory host environment is required for the maintenance of GVH-reactive primed T cell functions and the generation of memory T cells that can rapidly acquire effector functions. These findings have important implications for graft-versus-host disease and T cell-mediated immunotherapies. PMID:26085679

  18. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia M. Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    In the present short review, we analyze past experiments that addressed the interactions of intracellular pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium) with host cells and the initial use of the term active penetration to indicate that a protozoan “crossed the host cell membrane, penetrating into the cytoplasm.” However, the subsequent use of transmission electron microscopy showed that, for all of the protozoans and cell types examined, endocytosis, classically defined as involving the formation of a membrane-bound vacuole, took place during the interaction process. As a consequence, the recently penetrated parasites are always within a vacuole, designated the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). PMID:23355838

  19. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  20. Stem cell progeny contribute to the schistosome host-parasite interface

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J; Wendt, George R; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes infect more than 200 million of the world's poorest people. These parasites live in the vasculature, producing eggs that spur a variety of chronic, potentially life-threatening, pathologies exacerbated by the long lifespan of schistosomes, that can thrive in the host for decades. How schistosomes maintain their longevity in this immunologically hostile environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that somatic stem cells in Schistosoma mansoni are biased towards generating a population of cells expressing factors associated exclusively with the schistosome host-parasite interface, a structure called the tegument. We show cells expressing these tegumental factors are short-lived and rapidly turned over. We suggest that stem cell-driven renewal of this tegumental lineage represents an important strategy for parasite survival in the context of the host vasculature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12473.001 PMID:27003592

  1. Recruitment of BAD by the Chlamydia trachomatis Vacuole Correlates with Host-Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Philippe; Welter-Stahl, Lynn; Ying, Songmin; Hansen, Jon; Häcker, Georg; Darville, Toni; Ojcius, David M

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydiae replicate intracellularly in a vacuole called an inclusion. Chlamydial-infected host cells are protected from mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis, partly due to degradation of BH3-only proteins. The host-cell adapter protein 14-3-3β can interact with host-cell apoptotic signaling pathways in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. In Chlamydia trachomatis-infected cells, 14-3-3β co-localizes to the inclusion via direct interaction with a C. trachomatis-encoded inclusion membrane protein. We therefore explored the possibility that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway may contribute to resistance of infected cells to apoptosis. We found that inhibition of PI3K renders C. trachomatis-infected cells sensitive to staurosporine-induced apoptosis, which is accompanied by mitochondrial cytochrome c release. 14-3-3β does not associate with the Chlamydia pneumoniae inclusion, and inhibition of PI3K does not affect protection against apoptosis of C. pneumoniae-infected cells. In C. trachomatis-infected cells, the PI3K pathway activates AKT/protein kinase B, which leads to maintenance of the pro-apoptotic protein BAD in a phosphorylated state. Phosphorylated BAD is sequestered via 14-3-3β to the inclusion, but it is released when PI3K is inhibited. Depletion of AKT through short-interfering RNA reverses the resistance to apoptosis of C. trachomatis-infected cells. BAD phosphorylation is not maintained and it is not recruited to the inclusion of Chlamydia muridarum, which protects poorly against apoptosis. Thus, sequestration of BAD away from mitochondria provides C. trachomatis with a mechanism to protect the host cell from apoptosis via the interaction of a C. trachomatis-encoded inclusion protein with a host-cell phosphoserine-binding protein. PMID:16710454

  2. Relationship between Eimeria tenella development and host cell apoptosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Ming-xue; Xu, Zhi-yong; Xu, Huan-cheng; Cui, Xiao-zhen; Yang, Sha-sha; Zhao, Wen-long; Li, Shan; Lv, Qiang-hua; Bai, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Coccidiosis causes considerable economic losses in the poultry industry. At present, the pathology of coccidiosis is preventable with anticoccidials and vaccination, although at considerable cost to the international poultry industry. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between Eimeria tenella development and host cell apoptosis in chickens, which provides a theoretical basis for further study of the injury mechanism of E. tenella and the prevention and treatment of coccidiosis. Cecal epithelial cells from chick embryo were used as host cells in vitro. In addition, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end labeling, and histopathological assays were used to detect the dynamic changes in E. tenella infection rates, DNA injury rates, and apoptosis rates in groups treated with and without the caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK. Following E. tenella infection, we demonstrated that untreated cells had less apoptosis at 4 h and, inversely, more apoptosis at 24 to 120 h compared with control cells. Furthermore, after the application of Z-LEHD-FMK, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assays, and translation of phosphatidyl serines to the host cell plasma membrane surface, the treated group chick embryo cecal epithelial cells exhibited decreased apoptosis and DNA injuries (P<0.01) at 24 to 120 h. However, light microscopy showed that E. tenella infection rates of treated cells were higher (P<0.01) than untreated cells during the whole experimental period. Together, these observations suggest that E. tenella can protect host cells from apoptosis at early stages of development but can promote apoptosis during the middle to late stages. In addition, the inhibition of host cell apoptosis can be beneficial to the intracellular growth and development of E. tenella. PMID:26467006

  3. Global analysis of fungal morphology exposes mechanisms of host cell escape

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Veri, Amanda O.; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry; Cowen, Leah E.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental transitions between single-cell yeast and multicellular filaments underpin virulence of diverse fungal pathogens. For the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, filamentation is thought to be required for immune cell escape via induction of an inflammatory programmed cell death. Here we perform a genome-scale analysis of C. albicans morphogenesis and identify 102 negative morphogenetic regulators and 872 positive regulators, highlighting key roles for ergosterol biosynthesis and N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate that C. albicans filamentation is not required for escape from host immune cells; instead, macrophage pyroptosis is driven by fungal cell-wall remodelling and exposure of glycosylated proteins in response to the macrophage phagosome. The capacity of killed, previously phagocytized cells to drive macrophage lysis is also observed with the distantly related fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This study provides a global view of morphogenetic circuitry governing a key virulence trait, and illuminates a new mechanism by which fungi trigger host cell death. PMID:25824284

  4. Unmasking Determinants of Specificity in the Human Kinome

    PubMed Central

    Creixell, Pau; Palmeri, Antonio; Miller, Chad J.; Lou, Hua Jane; Santini, Cristina C.; Nielsen, Morten; Turk, Benjamin E.; Linding, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein kinases control cellular responses to environmental cues by swift and accurate signal processing. Breakdowns in this high-fidelity capability are a driving force in cancer and other diseases. Thus, our limited understanding of which amino acids in the kinase domain encode substrate specificity, the so-called determinants of specificity (DoS), constitutes a major obstacle in cancer signaling. Here, we systematically discover several DoS and experimentally validate three of them, named the αC1, αC3, and APE-7 residues. We demonstrate that DoS form sparse networks of non-conserved residues spanning distant regions. Our results reveal a likely role for inter-residue allostery in specificity and an evolutionary decoupling of kinase activity and specificity, which appear loaded on independent groups of residues. Finally, we uncover similar properties driving SH2 domain specificity and demonstrate how the identification of DoS can be utilized to elucidate a greater understanding of the role of signaling networks in cancer (Creixell et al., 2015 [this issue of Cell]). PMID:26388442

  5. HtrA chaperone activity contributes to host cell binding in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis caused by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is associated with attachment of bacteria to the intestinal epithelium and subsequent invasion of epithelial cells. In C. jejuni, the periplasmic protein HtrA is required for efficient binding to epithelial cells. HtrA has both protease and chaperone activity, and is important for virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Results The aim of this study was to determine the role of the dual activities of HtrA in host cell interaction of C. jejuni by comparing an htrA mutant lacking protease activity, but retaining chaperone activity, with a ΔhtrA mutant and the wild type strain. Binding of C. jejuni to both epithelial cells and macrophages was facilitated mainly by HtrA chaperone activity that may be involved in folding of outer membrane adhesins. In contrast, HtrA protease activity played only a minor role in interaction with host cells. Conclusion We show that HtrA protease and chaperone activities contribute differently to C. jejuni's interaction with mammalian host cells, with the chaperone activity playing the major role in host cell binding. PMID:21939552

  6. Kinome Screen Identifies PFKFB3 and Glucose Metabolism as Important Regulators of the Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF)-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Trefely, Sophie; Khoo, Poh-Sim; Krycer, James R; Chaudhuri, Rima; Fazakerley, Daniel J; Parker, Benjamin L; Sultani, Ghazal; Lee, James; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Torres, Eric; Jung, Kenneth; Kuijl, Coenraad; James, David E; Junutula, Jagath R; Stöckli, Jacqueline

    2015-10-23

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 signaling pathway (ISP) plays a fundamental role in long term health in a range of organisms. Protein kinases including Akt and ERK are intimately involved in the ISP. To identify other kinases that may participate in this pathway or intersect with it in a regulatory manner, we performed a whole kinome (779 kinases) siRNA screen for positive or negative regulators of the ISP, using GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface as an output for pathway activity. We identified PFKFB3, a positive regulator of glycolysis that is highly expressed in cancer cells and adipocytes, as a positive ISP regulator. Pharmacological inhibition of PFKFB3 suppressed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, GLUT4 translocation, and Akt signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In contrast, overexpression of PFKFB3 in HEK293 cells potentiated insulin-dependent phosphorylation of Akt and Akt substrates. Furthermore, pharmacological modulation of glycolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes affected Akt phosphorylation. These data add to an emerging body of evidence that metabolism plays a central role in regulating numerous biological processes including the ISP. Our findings have important implications for diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cancer that are characterized by marked disruption of both metabolism and growth factor signaling. PMID:26342081

  7. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  8. The Legionella pneumophila replication vacuole: making a cosy niche inside host cells.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Ralph R; O'Connor, Tamara J; Heidtman, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila is derived from its growth within lung macrophages after aerosols are inhaled from contaminated water sources. Interest in this bacterium stems from its ability to manipulate host cell vesicular-trafficking pathways and establish a membrane-bound replication vacuole, making it a model for intravacuolar pathogens. Establishment of the replication compartment requires a specialized translocation system that transports a large cadre of protein substrates across the vacuolar membrane. These substrates regulate vesicle traffic and survival pathways in the host cell. This Review focuses on the strategies that L. pneumophila uses to establish intracellular growth and evaluates why this microorganism has accumulated an unprecedented number of translocated substrates that are targeted at host cells. PMID:19011659

  9. Dynamic Behavior and Function of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Tumor Bearing Host

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F Xiao-Feng

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing forkhead/winged-helix transcription factor Foxp3 represent a distinct lineage of lymphocytes which play a central role in protecting the host from autoimmune diseases. However, Tregs also pose a major problem to anti-tumor immunity. Growing body of evidence from both laboratory and clinical investigations has demonstrated that expansion and accumulation of these immunosuppressive cells correlates with advanced tumor growth and predicts poor disease prognosis. How tumor development subverts normal self-tolerance function of Tregs thereby thwarts host anti-tumor immunity remains elusive. This review will discuss our current knowledge in understanding the dynamics and plasticity of Foxp3+ Treg activation and induction in tumor bearing hosts and their interaction with various antigen presenting cells (APCs) in tumor microenvironment leading to the establishment of active local and systemic immune suppression. PMID:19254475

  10. Selective destruction of a host blood cell type by a parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Rizki, R M; Rizki, T M

    1984-10-01

    Foreign objects that enter the hemocoel of Drosophila melanogaster larvae are encapsulated by one type of blood cell, the lamellocyte, yet eggs of the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma remain unencapsulated in D. melanogaster larval hosts that have many lamellocytes. Here we demonstrate that shortly after a female wasp oviposits in the hemocoel the lamellocytes undergo morphological changes and lose their adhesiveness. These affected blood cells are eventually destroyed as the parasitoid egg continues its development. The factor responsible for lamellocyte destruction, lamellolysin, is contained in an accessory gland of the female reproductive system and is injected along with the egg into the host hemocoel. Lamellolysin does not alter the morphology or the defense functions of the other types of blood cells in the host. PMID:6435126

  11. Host-parasite interactions that guide red blood cell invasion by malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Aditya S.; Egan, Elizabeth S.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Malaria is caused by the infection and proliferation of parasites from the genus Plasmodium in red blood cells (RBCs). A free Plasmodium parasite, or merozoite, released from an infected RBC must invade another RBC host cell to sustain a blood-stage infection. Here, we review recent advances on RBC invasion by Plasmodium merozoites, focusing on specific molecular interactions between host and parasite. Recent findings Recent work highlights the central role of host-parasite interactions at virtually every stage of RBC invasion by merozoites. Biophysical experiments have for the first time measured the strength of merozoite-RBC attachment during invasion. For P. falciparum, there have been many key insights regarding the invasion ligand PfRh5 in particular, including its influence on host species tropism, a co-crystal structure with its RBC receptor basigin, and its suitability as a vaccine target. For P. vivax, researchers identified the origin and emergence of the parasite from Africa, demonstrating a natural link to the Duffy-negative RBC variant in African populations. For the simian parasite P. knowlesi, zoonotic invasion into human cells is linked to RBC age, which has implications for parasitemia during an infection and thus malaria. Summary New studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing RBC invasion by Plasmodium parasites have shed light on various aspects of parasite biology and host cell tropism; and indicate opportunities for malaria control. PMID:25767956

  12. Role of B Cells in Host Defense against Primary Coxiella burnetii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite Coxiella burnetii being an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, our recent study demonstrated that B cells play a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity to C. burnetii infection by producing protective antibodies. However, the role of B cells in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether B cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. The results showed that peritoneal B cells were able to phagocytose virulent C. burnetii bacteria and form Coxiella-containing vacuoles (CCVs) and that C. burnetii can infect and replicate in peritoneal B1a subset B cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential role for peritoneal B cells in host defense against C. burnetii infection in vivo. In addition, the results showing that B1a cells secreted a high level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in response to C. burnetii infection in vitro suggest that B1a cells may play an important role in inhibiting the C. burnetii infection-induced inflammatory response. The observation that adoptive transfer of peritoneal B cells did not significantly affect the severity of C. burnetii infection-induced diseases in both severe combined immunity-deficient (SCID) and μMT mice indicates that peritoneal B cells alone may not be able to control C. burnetii infection. In contrast, our finding that C. burnetii infection induced more-severe splenomegaly and a higher bacterial burden in the spleens of B1a cell-deficient Bruton's tyrosine kinase x-linked immunity-deficient (BTKxid) mice than in their wild-type counterparts further suggests that B1a cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. PMID:26438792

  13. Role of B cells in host defense against primary Coxiella burnetii infection.

    PubMed

    Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William J; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-12-01

    Despite Coxiella burnetii being an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen, our recent study demonstrated that B cells play a critical role in vaccine-induced immunity to C. burnetii infection by producing protective antibodies. However, the role of B cells in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether B cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. The results showed that peritoneal B cells were able to phagocytose virulent C. burnetii bacteria and form Coxiella-containing vacuoles (CCVs) and that C. burnetii can infect and replicate in peritoneal B1a subset B cells in vitro, demonstrating a potential role for peritoneal B cells in host defense against C. burnetii infection in vivo. In addition, the results showing that B1a cells secreted a high level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in response to C. burnetii infection in vitro suggest that B1a cells may play an important role in inhibiting the C. burnetii infection-induced inflammatory response. The observation that adoptive transfer of peritoneal B cells did not significantly affect the severity of C. burnetii infection-induced diseases in both severe combined immunity-deficient (SCID) and μMT mice indicates that peritoneal B cells alone may not be able to control C. burnetii infection. In contrast, our finding that C. burnetii infection induced more-severe splenomegaly and a higher bacterial burden in the spleens of B1a cell-deficient Bruton's tyrosine kinase x-linked immunity-deficient (BTK(xid)) mice than in their wild-type counterparts further suggests that B1a cells play an important role in host defense against primary C. burnetii infection. PMID:26438792

  14. African Swine Fever Virus Uses Macropinocytosis to Enter Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Elena G.; Quintas, Ana; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Nogal, Marisa; Barroso, Susana; Carrascosa, Ángel L.; Revilla, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is caused by a large and highly pathogenic DNA virus, African swine fever virus (ASFV), which provokes severe economic losses and expansion threats. Presently, no specific protection or vaccine against ASF is available, despite the high hazard that the continued occurrence of the disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the recent outbreak in the Caucasus in 2007, and the potential dissemination to neighboring countries, represents. Although virus entry is a remarkable target for the development of protection tools, knowledge of the ASFV entry mechanism is still very limited. Whereas early studies have proposed that the virus enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, the specific mechanism used by ASFV remains uncertain. Here we used the ASFV virulent isolate Ba71, adapted to grow in Vero cells (Ba71V), and the virulent strain E70 to demonstrate that entry and internalization of ASFV includes most of the features of macropinocytosis. By a combination of optical and electron microscopy, we show that the virus causes cytoplasm membrane perturbation, blebbing and ruffles. We have also found that internalization of the virions depends on actin reorganization, activity of Na+/H+ exchangers, and signaling events typical of the macropinocytic mechanism of endocytosis. The entry of virus into cells appears to directly stimulate dextran uptake, actin polarization and EGFR, PI3K-Akt, Pak1 and Rac1 activation. Inhibition of these key regulators of macropinocytosis, as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, results in a considerable decrease in ASFV entry and infection. In conclusion, this study identifies for the first time the whole pathway for ASFV entry, including the key cellular factors required for the uptake of the virus and the cell signaling involved. PMID:22719252

  15. Relationships between host and symbiont cell cycles in sea anemones and their symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Dimond, James L; Pineda, Rea R; Ramos-Ascherl, Zullaylee; Bingham, Brian L

    2013-10-01

    The processes by which cnidarians and their algal endosymbionts achieve balanced growth and biomass could include coordination of host and symbiont cell cycles. We evaluated this theory with natural populations of sea anemones hosting symbiotic dinoflagellates, focusing on the temperate sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima symbiotic with Symbiodinium muscatinei in Washington State, USA, and the tropical anemone Stichodactyla helianthus associating with unknown Symbiodinium spp. in Belize. By extruding symbiont-containing gastrodermal cells from the relatively large tentacles of these species and using nuclear staining and flow cytometry, we selectively analyzed cell cycle distributions of the symbionts and the host gastrodermal cells that house them. We found no indications of diel synchrony in host and symbiont G2/M phases, and we observed evidence of diel periodicity only in Symbiodinium spp. associated with S. helianthus but not in the anemone itself. Seasonally, S. muscatinei showed considerable G2/M phase variability among samples collected quarterly over an annual period, while the G2/M phase of its host varied much less. Within samples taken at different times of the year, correlations between host and symbiont G2/M phases ranged from very weakly to very strongly positive, with significant correlations in only half of the samples (two of four A. elegantissima samples and one of two S. helianthus samples). Overall, the G2/M phase relationships across species and sampling periods were positive. Thus, while we found no evidence of close cell cycle coupling, our results suggest a loose, positive relationship between cell cycle processes of the symbiotic partners. PMID:24243963

  16. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (P<0.05) in production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic activity, and Toll-like receptor expression was observed in host cells incubated with iron-saturated lactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study

  17. Parasitophorous vacuoles of Leishmania mexicana acquire macromolecules from the host cell cytosol via two independent routes.

    PubMed

    Schaible, U E; Schlesinger, P H; Steinberg, T H; Mangel, W F; Kobayashi, T; Russell, D G

    1999-03-01

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania survives and proliferates in host macrophages. In this study we show that parasitophorous vacuoles of L. mexicana gain access to cytosolic material via two different routes. (1) Small anionic molecules such as Lucifer Yellow are rapidly transported into the vacuoles by an active transport mechanism that is sensitive to inhibitors of the host cell's organic anion transporter. (2) Larger molecules such as fluorescent dextrans introduced into the host cell cytosol are also delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles. This transport is slower and sensitive to modulators of autophagy. Infected macrophages were examined by two novel assays to visualize and quantify this process. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells loaded with digoxigenin-dextran revealed label in multivesicular endosomes, which appeared to fuse with parasitophorous vacuoles. The inner membranes of the multivesicular vesicles label strongly with antibodies against lysobisphosphatidic acid, suggesting that they represent a point of confluence between the endosomal and autophagosomal pathways. Although the rate of autophagous transfer was comparable in infected and uninfected cells, infected cells retained hydrolyzed cysteine proteinase substrate to a greater degree. These data suggest that L. mexicana-containing vacuoles have access to potential nutrients in the host cell cytosol via at least two independent mechanisms. PMID:9973603

  18. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus-host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Wommack, K Eric; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-11-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus-host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus-host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage-host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host-virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  19. The graft-versus-host reaction and immune function. I. T helper cell immunodeficiency associated with graft-versus-host-induced thymic epithelial cell damage

    SciTech Connect

    Seddik, M.; Seemayer, T.A.; Lapp, W.S.

    1984-03-01

    The injection of parental A strain lymphoid cells into adrenalectomized CBAxA F1 (BAF1) mice induced a chronic graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction resulting in T cell and B cell immunosuppression as well as thymic epithelial cell injury, but not stress-related thymic involution. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice undergoing a GVH reaction were studied for their ability to reconstitute T helper cell (TH) function and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) mitogen responses in thymectomized, irradiated, BAF1 mice reconstituted with normal syngeneic bone marrow (ATxBM). Thymocytes from BAF1 mice early after the induction of a GVH reaction (days 10-12) were as effective as normal thymocytes in reconstituting TH and mitogen responses. Thymocytes from BAF1 mice 40 or more days after the induction of a GVH reaction did not reconstitute either the TH function or PHA and Con A responses in ATxBM mice. The inability to reconstitute ATxBM mice was not due to the presence of suppressor cells contained in the thymocyte inoculum. It is proposed that GVH-induced thymic epithelial cell injury blocks or arrests normal T cell differentiation, resulting in a population of thymocytes that lack the potential to become competent T helper cells or mitogen-responsive cells when transferred into ATxBM mice. This thymic functional defect results in a permanent TH immunodeficiency in mice experiencing a chronic GVH reaction.

  20. More similar than different: Host cell protein production using three null CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Inn H; Nishihara, Julie; Walker, Donald; Huang, Eric; Gunawan, Feny; Subramanian, Jayashree; Pynn, Abigail F J; Yu, X Christopher; Zhu-Shimoni, Judith; Vanderlaan, Martin; Krawitz, Denise C

    2015-10-01

    To understand the diversity in the cell culture harvest (i.e., feedstock) provided for downstream processing, we compared host cell protein (HCP) profiles using three Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines in null runs which did not generate any recombinant product. Despite differences in CHO lineage, upstream process, and culture performance, the cell lines yielded similar cell-specific productivities for immunogenic HCPs. To compare the dynamics of HCP production, we searched for correlations between the time-course profiles of HCP (as measured by multi-analyte ELISA) and those of two intracellular HCP species, phospholipase B-like 2 (PLBL2) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Across the cell lines, proteins in the day 14 supernatants analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) showed different spot patterns. However, subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated otherwise: the total number of peptides and proteins identified were comparable, and 80% of the top 1,000 proteins identified were common to all three lines. Finally, to assess the impact of culture viability on extracellular HCP profiles, we analyzed supernatants from a cell line whose viability dropped after day 10. The amounts of HCP and PLBL2 (quantified by their respective ELISAs) as well as the numbers and major populations of HCPs (identified by LC-MS/MS) were similar across days 10, 14, and 17, during which viabilities declined from ∼80% to <20% and extracellular LDH levels increased several-fold. Our findings indicate that the CHO-derived HCPs in the feedstock for downstream processing may not be as diverse across cell lines and upstream processes, or change as dramatically upon viability decline as originally expected. In addition, our findings show that high density CHO cultures (>10(7) cells/mL)-operated in fed-batch mode and exhibiting high viabilities (>70%) throughout the culture duration-can accumulate a

  1. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J. J.; Gupta, G.; Gray, P. C.; Hush, D. R.; Fugate, M. L.; Cleland, T. J.; Roberts, R. M.; Hlavacek, W. S.; Smith, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  2. Binding of Host Factors Influences Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of Streptococcus uberis in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Raul A.; Dunlap, John R.; Oliver, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    We showed that internalization of Streptococcus uberis into bovine mammary epithelial cells occurred through receptor- (RME) and caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CME). We reported also that treatment of S. uberis with host proteins including lactoferrin (LF) enhanced its internalization into host cells. Since the underlying mechanism(s) involved in such enhancement was unknown we investigated if preincubation of S. uberis with host proteins drives internalization of this pathogen into host cells through CME. Thus, experiments involving coculture of collagen-, fibronectin-, and LF-pretreated S. uberis with bovine mammary epithelial cells treated with RME and CME inhibitors were conducted. Results showed that internalization of host proteins-pretreated S. uberis into mammary epithelial cells treated with RME inhibitors was higher than that of untreated controls. These results suggest that pretreatment with selected host proteins commits S. uberis to CME, thus avoiding intracellular bactericidal mechanisms and allowing its persistence into bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:20614000

  3. Bioinformatic identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins likely to target host cell mitochondria: virulence factors?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background M. tuberculosis infection either induces or inhibits host cell death, depending on the bacterial strain and the cell microenvironment. There is evidence suggesting a role for mitochondria in these processes. On the other hand, it has been shown that several bacterial proteins are able to target mitochondria, playing a critical role in bacterial pathogenesis and modulation of cell death. However, mycobacteria–derived proteins able to target host cell mitochondria are less studied. Results A bioinformaic analysis based on available genomic sequences of the common laboratory virulent reference strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, the avirulent strain H37Ra, the clinical isolate CDC1551, and M. bovis BCG Pasteur strain 1173P2, as well as of suitable bioinformatic tools (MitoProt II, PSORT II, and SignalP) for the in silico search for proteins likely to be secreted by mycobacteria that could target host cell mitochondria, showed that at least 19 M. tuberculosis proteins could possibly target host cell mitochondria. We experimentally tested this bioinformatic prediction on four M. tuberculosis recombinant proteins chosen from this list of 19 proteins (p27, PE_PGRS1, PE_PGRS33, and MT_1866). Confocal microscopy analyses showed that p27, and PE_PGRS33 proteins colocalize with mitochondria. Conclusions Based on the bioinformatic analysis of whole M. tuberculosis genome sequences, we propose that at least 19 out of 4,246 M. tuberculosis predicted proteins would be able to target host cell mitochondria and, in turn, control mitochondrial physiology. Interestingly, such a list of 19 proteins includes five members of a mycobacteria specific family of proteins (PE/PE_PGRS) thought to be virulence factors, and p27, a well known virulence factor. P27, and PE_PGRS33 proteins experimentally showed to target mitochondria in J774 cells. Our results suggest a link between mitochondrial targeting of M. tuberculosis proteins and virulence. PMID:23259719

  4. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  5. Variation among Staphylococcus aureus membrane vesicle proteomes affects cytotoxicity of host cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyejin; Oh, Man Hwan; Jun, So Hyun; Kim, Seung Il; Choi, Chi Won; Kwon, Hyo Il; Na, Seok Hyeon; Kim, Yoo Jeong; Nicholas, Asiimwe; Selasi, Gati Noble; Lee, Je Chul

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which can deliver virulence factors to host cells and induce cytopathology. However, the cytopathology of host cells induced by MVs derived from different S. aureus strains has not yet been characterized. In the present study, the cytotoxic activity of MVs from different S. aureus isolates on host cells was compared and the proteomes of S. aureus MVs were analyzed. The MVs purified from S. aureus M060 isolated from a patient with staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome showed higher cytotoxic activity toward host cells than that shown by MVs from three other clinical S. aureus isolates. S. aureus M060 MVs induced HEp-2 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, but the cytotoxic activity of MVs was completely abolished by treatment with proteinase K. In a proteomic analysis, the MVs from three S. aureus isolates not only carry 25 common proteins, but also carry ≥60 strain-specific proteins. All S. aureus MVs contained δ-hemolysin (Hld), γ-hemolysin, leukocidin D, and exfoliative toxin C, but exfoliative toxin A (ETA) was specifically identified in S. aureus M060 MVs. ETA was delivered to HEp-2 cells via S. aureus MVs. Both rETA and rHld induced cytotoxicity in HEp-2 cells. In conclusion, MVs from clinical S. aureus isolates differ with respect to cytotoxic activity in host cells, and these differences may result from differences in the MV proteomes. Further proteogenomic analysis or mutagenesis of specific genes is necessary to identify cytotoxic factors in S. aureus MVs. PMID:26924795

  6. Venom of Euplectrus separatae causes hyperlipidemia by lysis of host fat body cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamatsu, Y; Tanaka, T

    2004-04-01

    Although the lepidopteran larva Pseudaletia separata is attacked by the gregarious ectoparasitoid Euplectrus separatae, it continues to feed and grow. Lipid concentration in the hemolymph of the parasitized host was higher than that of the nonparasitized host from 3 to 8 days after parasitization. Artificial injection of parasitoid venom also elevated lipid concentration in the host hemolymph. One day after venom injection the host's fat body contained many lipid particles, but most of the lipid particles disappeared 7 days later. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed the lipid particles leaving the fat body cells as a result of the lysis of the fat body cells. These results suggest that the venom elevated the lipid concentration in the host hemolymph by provoking the release of lipid particles from the fat body. Though most of the lipid particles were freely floating in the host hemolymph, a portion of the released lipid particles were phagocytized by hemocytes. The amount of lipid that was loaded to lipophorin in the hemolymph of the venom-injected host was measured, but it was not sufficient to explain the high lipid titer in the hemolymph of parasitized and venom-injected host larvae. The fact that parasitoid larva consumed many hemocytes as evidenced by their presence in the midgut supported the hypothesis that the parasitoid larvae fed on the host hemolymph containing the free lipid particles, the hemocytes phagocytizing the lipid particles, and the lipid-loaded lipophorin. The possibility of the venom contribution to the disruption of the intercellular matrix was examined. The venom showed high activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), especially when it was mixed with the hemolymph of non-parasitized 5th instar larvae. We suggest that the MMP in the venom was activated by some components of the host hemolymph. On the other hand, the venom mixed with hemolymph could not decompose gelatin on zymography, suggesting that the venom

  7. Know your neighbor: Microbiota and host epithelial cells interact locally to control intestinal function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Felix; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between the host and its associated microbiota differ spatially and the local cross talk determines organ function and physiology. Animals and their organs are not uniform but contain several functional and cellular compartments and gradients. In the intestinal tract, different parts of the gut carry out different functions, tissue structure varies accordingly, epithelial cells are differentially distributed and gradients exist for several physicochemical parameters such as nutrients, pH, or oxygen. Consequently, the microbiota composition also differs along the length of the gut, but also between lumen and mucosa of the same intestinal segment, and even along the crypt-villus axis in the epithelium. Thus, host-microbiota interactions are highly site-specific and the local cross talk determines intestinal function and physiology. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of site-specific host-microbiota interactions and discuss their functional relevance for host physiology. PMID:26990415

  8. Tracking single viruses infecting their host cells using quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Single-virus tracking (SVT) technique, which uses microscopy to monitor the behaviors of viruses, is a vital tool to study the real-time and in situ infection dynamics and virus-related interactions in live cells. To make SVT a more versatile tool in biological research, the researchers have developed a quantum dot (QD)-based SVT technique, which can be utilized for long-term and highly sensitive tracking in live cells. In this review, we describe the development of a QD-based SVT technique and its biological applications. We first discuss the advantage of QDs as tags in the SVT field by comparing the conventional tags, and then focus on the implementation of QD-based SVT experiments, including the QD labeling strategy, instrumentation, and image analysis method. Next, we elaborate the recent advances of QD-based SVT in the biological field, and mainly emphasize the representative examples to show how to use this technique to acquire more meaningful biological information. PMID:26695711

  9. Mg2Si As Li-Intercalation Host For Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Surampudi, Subbarao; Attia, Alan; Halpert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Compound Mg2Si shows promise as lithium-intercalation host for ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium electrochemical cells. As anode reactant material, LiXMg2Si chemically stable in presence of organic electrolyte used in such cells and stores large amounts of lithium. Intercalation reactions highly reversible at room temperature. Also retains sufficient mechanical strength during charge/discharge cycling. Lithium cells containing LixMg2Si anodes prove useful in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high energy-storage densities of lithium cells in general and rechargeability of cells needed.

  10. Single-cell sequencing provides clues about the host interactions of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB)

    PubMed Central

    Pamp, Sünje J.; Harrington, Eoghan D.; Quake, Stephen R.; Relman, David A.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are host-specific intestinal symbionts that comprise a distinct clade within the Clostridiaceae, designated Candidatus Arthromitus. SFB display a unique life cycle within the host, involving differentiation into multiple cell types. The latter include filaments that attach intimately to intestinal epithelial cells, and from which “holdfasts” and spores develop. SFB induce a multifaceted immune response, leading to host protection from intestinal pathogens. Cultivation resistance has hindered characterization of these enigmatic bacteria. In the present study, we isolated five SFB filaments from a mouse using a microfluidic device equipped with laser tweezers, generated genome sequences from each, and compared these sequences with each other, as well as to recently published SFB genome sequences. Based on the resulting analyses, SFB appear to be dependent on the host for a variety of essential nutrients. SFB have a relatively high abundance of predicted proteins devoted to cell cycle control and to envelope biogenesis, and have a group of SFB-specific autolysins and a dynamin-like protein. Among the five filament genomes, an average of 8.6% of predicted proteins were novel, including a family of secreted SFB-specific proteins. Four ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) sequence types, and a myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein were discovered; we hypothesize that they are involved in modulation of host responses. The presence of polymorphisms among mouse SFB genomes suggests the evolution of distinct SFB lineages. Overall, our results reveal several aspects of SFB adaptation to the mammalian intestinal tract. PMID:22434425