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Sample records for host cytokine response

  1. Involvement of the Cytokine MIF in the Snail Host Immune Response to the Parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Baeza Garcia, Alvaro; Pierce, Raymond J.; Gourbal, Benjamin; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Colinet, Dominique; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Dissous, Colette; Coustau, Christine

    2010-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) family member in the Lophotrochozoan invertebrate, Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. In mammals, MIF is a widely expressed pleiotropic cytokine with potent pro-inflammatory properties that controls cell functions such as gene expression, proliferation or apoptosis. Here we show that the MIF protein from B. glabrata (BgMIF) is expressed in circulating immune defense cells (hemocytes) of the snail as well as in the B. glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line that has hemocyte-like features. Recombinant BgMIF (rBgMIF) induced cell proliferation and inhibited NO-dependent p53-mediated apoptosis in Bge cells. Moreover, knock-down of BgMIF expression in Bge cells interfered with the in vitro encapsulation of S. mansoni sporocysts. Furthermore, the in vivo knock-down of BgMIF prevented the changes in circulating hemocyte populations that occur in response to an infection by S. mansoni miracidia and led to a significant increase in the parasite burden of the snails. These results provide the first functional evidence that a MIF ortholog is involved in an invertebrate immune response towards a parasitic infection and highlight the importance of cytokines in invertebrate-parasite interactions. PMID:20886098

  2. Hypothalamic neuronal responses to cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fever has been extensively studied in the past few decades. The hypothesis that hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons play a major role in both normal thermoregulation and in fever production and lysis has particularly helped to advance our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the response to pyrogens. Furthermore, new data in the study of host defense responses induced by pyrogenic cytokines such as interleukin 1, interferon alpha 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 have demonstrated that those factors have multiple, yet coordinated, regulatory activities in the central nervous system, so that our understanding of the role of the brain in the activity of these agents requires a new perspective and dimension. Thus, recent evidence from our laboratory indicates that blood-borne cytokines may be detected in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and transduced there into neuronal signals. Such signals may then affect distinct, but partially overlapping, sets of neuronal systems in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, mediating directly and/or indirectly the array of various host defense responses characteristic of infection that are thought to be induced by blood-borne cytokines. PMID:2205055

  3. miR-155 augments CD8+ T-cell antitumor activity in lymphoreplete hosts by enhancing responsiveness to homeostatic γc cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yun; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Yu, Zhiya; Hu, Jinhui; Gautam, Sanjivan; Hawk, Nga V.; Telford, William G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Franco, Zulmarie; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Surh, Charles D.; Waldmann, Thomas A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gattinoni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Lymphodepleting regimens are used before adoptive immunotherapy to augment the antitumor efficacy of transferred T cells by removing endogenous homeostatic “cytokine sinks.” These conditioning modalities, however, are often associated with severe toxicities. We found that microRNA-155 (miR-155) enabled tumor-specific CD8+ T cells to mediate profound antitumor responses in lymphoreplete hosts that were not potentiated by immune-ablation. miR-155 enhanced T-cell responsiveness to limited amounts of homeostatic γc cytokines, resulting in delayed cellular contraction and sustained cytokine production. miR-155 restrained the expression of the inositol 5-phosphatase Ship1, an inhibitor of the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, and multiple negative regulators of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (Stat5), including suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (Socs1) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase Ptpn2. Expression of constitutively active Stat5a recapitulated the survival advantages conferred by miR-155, whereas constitutive Akt activation promoted sustained effector functions. Our results indicate that overexpression of miR-155 in tumor-specific T cells can be used to increase the effectiveness of adoptive immunotherapies in a cell-intrinsic manner without the need for life-threatening, lymphodepleting maneuvers. PMID:25548153

  4. Host Cytokine Responses Induced after Overnight Stimulation with Novel M. tuberculosis Infection Phase-Dependent Antigens Show Promise as Diagnostic Candidates for TB Disease

    PubMed Central

    Essone, Paulin N.; Chegou, Novel N.; Loxton, Andre G.; Stanley, Kim; Kriel, Magdalena; van der Spuy, Gian; Franken, Kees L.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Walzl, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously identified Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) antigen-induced host markers that showed promise as TB diagnostic candidates in 7-day whole blood culture supernatants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of these markers further, and cross-compare results with short-term antigen stimulated and unstimulated culture supernatants. Methods We recruited 15 culture confirmed TB cases and 15 non-TB cases from a high-TB endemic community in Cape Town, South Africa into a pilot case-control study from an on-going larger study. Blood samples collected from study participants were stimulated with 4 M.tb antigens that were previously identified as promising (ESAT6/CFP10 (early secreted), Rv2029c (latency), Rv2032 (latency) and Rv2389c (rpf)) in a 7-day or overnight culture assay. Supernatants were also collected form the standard QuantiFERON In Tube (QFT-IT) test. The levels of 26 host markers were evaluated in the three culture supernatants using the Luminex platform. Results The unstimulated levels of CRP, Serum amyloid P (SAP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) and ESAT-6/CFP-10 specific IP-10 and SAA were amongst the best discriminatory markers in all 3 assays, ascertaining TB with AUC of 72–84%. Four-marker models accurately classified up to 92%, 100% and 100% of study participants in the overnight, 7-day and Quantiferon culture supernatants, respectively, after leave-one-out cross validation. Conclusion Unstimulated and antigen-specific levels of CRP, SAA, IP-10, MMP-2 and sCD40L hold promise as diagnostic candidates for TB disease in short-term stimulation assays. Larger studies are required to validate these findings but the data suggest that antigen-specific cytokine production and in particular mutimarker biosignatures might contribute to future diagnostic strategies. PMID:25025278

  5. Cytokine gene expression--part of host defence in pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Matthias; Delaleu, Nicolas; Du, Yunling; Bickel, Matthias

    2003-05-01

    Analyses of cytokines mediating inflammatory reactions are key to understanding the etiopathology of various diseases. This study investigated differences in cytokine gene expression between pulps from healthy virgin teeth and from symptomatic vital teeth with severe caries lesions in a group of young, healthy individuals. The mRNA levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 were measured concomitantly by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. IL-1alpha and IL-1beta were not expressed at significantly higher levels in symptomatic versus clinically healthy pulps, while the difference was significant for the other cytokines (log-rank test, P<0.05). A concordance test for independence revealed significant correlation between IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, and between IL-6, IL-8, and IL-18 mRNA levels (P<0.05). The cytokine-specific differences revealed a differential significance of gene expression in cytokine regulation. The hypothesis that increase of cytokine mRNA expression is part of host reaction in pulpitis was corroborated by our observation. PMID:12849707

  6. Host-dependent type 1 cytokine responses driven by inactivated viruses may fail to default in the absence of IL-12 or IFN-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Marel C; Horzinek, Marian C; Haagmans, Bart L; Schijns, Virgil E J C

    2004-04-01

    Replicating viruses generally induce type 1 immune responses, with high interferon (IFN)-gamma levels and antibodies of the IgG2a isotype. In the present study we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of non-replicating virions to induce comparable immune responses in the notable absence of any adjuvant. Injection of inactivated pseudorabies virus, an alphaherpesvirus, by various routes into mice resulted in the generation of T helper (Th) 1 type immune response. Co-delivery of inactivated pseudorabies herpesvirus (iPRV) with protein redirected IgG1-dominated tetanus toxoid-specific responses towards an IgG1/IgG2a balanced response. Also inactivated preparations of viruses from the paramyxo- (Newcastle disease virus), rhabdo- (rabies virus), corona- (infectious bronchitis virus) and reovirus (avian reovirus) families led to IgG2a antibody responses; however, the genetic background of the host did result in considerable variation. Because disrupted virions also induced type 1 immune responses, we conclude that structural elements of virions inherently contribute to IFN-gamma-dependent isotype switching by inactivated viruses. Strikingly, immunizations in gene-disrupted mice showed that a functional IFN-alpha/beta, IFN-gamma or interleukin (IL)-12 pathway was not required for the generation of a polarized Th1 type immune response initiated by inactivated virus particles. These findings have a bearing on the understanding of immune responsiveness to virus structures and the design of vaccines containing virus components. PMID:15039522

  7. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  8. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  9. Local Cytokine Response in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lindholm, C.; Quiding-Järbrink, M.; Lönroth, H.; Hamlet, A.; Svennerholm, A.-M.

    1998-01-01

    The host immune response to Helicobacter pylori infection might be of importance with regard to the outcome of infection by this organism, e.g., to explain why only a proportion of infected subjects develop peptic ulcers. In this study we have analyzed the local response of different cytokines—i.e., the proinflammatory interleukin-1β, (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-8; the immunoregulatory gamma interferon (IFN-γ); and IL-4; and the anti-inflammatory transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)—in antral biopsy specimens from H. pylori-infected duodenal ulcer (DU) patients and asymptomatic (AS) carriers (i.e., with chronic gastritis only). For comparison, biopsy specimens from uninfected healthy individuals were also analyzed. An immunohistochemical technique was used to allow quantification of the cytokine responses as well as identification of the cell types associated with the cytokine expression. We found that the levels of all of the studied cytokines except IL-4 were increased in the H. pylori-infected subjects compared to the levels in the healthy individuals. Our results indicate that the antral cytokine response is of the Th1 type since IFN-γ, but not IL-4, was up-regulated both in H. pylori-infected DU patients and in AS carriers. However, there were no significant differences in either proinflammatory or immunoregulatory cytokine levels when H. pylori-infected subjects with and without peptic ulcers were compared. Some of the cytokines, particularly IL-1β and TGF-β, were also found in the gastric mucosae of healthy, uninfected subjects. We also showed that the gastric epithelium contributes substantially to the antral cytokine response of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 in addition to IL-8. PMID:9826379

  10. Granzymes regulate proinflammatory cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2015-01-15

    Granzymes (Grs) are serine proteases mainly produced by cytotoxic lymphocytes and are traditionally considered to cause apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. However, the cytotoxicity of several Grs is currently being debated, and additional, predominantly extracellular, functions of Grs in inflammation are emerging. Extracellular soluble Grs are elevated in the circulation of patients with autoimmune diseases and infections. Additionally, Grs are expressed by several types of immune cells other than cytotoxic lymphocytes. Recent research has revealed novel immunomodulatory functions of Grs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview on the role of Grs in inflammation, highlighting their role in cytokine induction and processing. PMID:25556251

  11. Host innate immune responses to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Leopold, Stije J; Cranendonk, Duncan R; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to sepsis can be seen as a pattern recognition receptor-mediated dysregulation of the immune system following pathogen invasion in which a careful balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses is vital. Invasive infection triggers both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host responses, the magnitude of which depends on multiple factors, including pathogen virulence, site of infection, host genetics, and comorbidities. Toll-like receptors, the inflammasomes, and other pattern recognition receptors initiate the immune response after recognition of danger signals derived from microorganisms, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or derived from the host, so-called danger-associated molecular patterns. Further dissection of the role of host–pathogen interactions, the cytokine response, the coagulation cascade, and their multidirectional interactions in sepsis should lead toward the development of new therapeutic strategies in sepsis. PMID:23774844

  12. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  13. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Kuriakose, Shiby M; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  14. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  15. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  16. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  17. Role of inflammatory cytokines in the response of solid cancers to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai; Cecic, Ivana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) elicits a strong acute inflammatory response that has both local and systemic (acute phase response) attributes. The insult mediated by PDT-induced oxidative stress at the targeted site triggers a complex multifactorial response engaging host defence mechanisms associated with the inflammatory process to participate in the eradication of the treated tumor. Inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of critical events in this process as they regulate the activity of inflammatory, endothelial and other cells. The initial stimulus for enhanced production and release of cytokines likely originates from several types of events, such as activated transcription factors and complement deposition. The PDT-induced complement activation appears to be directly linked to the enhanced expression of various cytokines, including chemokines such as KC (in mouse models), and classic inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α , IL-6 and IL-10. A variety of interventions that modulate the activity of particular cytokines performed in conjunction with PDT were shown to influence the therapy outcome. The treatments such as using blocking antibodies and local or systemic cytokine delivery may either reduce or dramatically improve the curative effect of PDT. The inflammatory and related cytokines that at present appear particularly interesting and merit further investigation for use as adjuvants to PDT are IL-3, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF and GM-CSF.

  18. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  19. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species. PMID:26119751

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polymorphisms Associated with Cytokine Responses in Smallpox Vaccine Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The role that genetics plays in response to infection or disease is becoming increasingly clear as we learn more about immunogenetics and host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a genome-wide analysis of the effects of host genetic variation on cytokine responses to vaccinia virus stimulation in smallpox vaccine recipients. Our data show that vaccinia stimulation of immune individuals results in secretion of inflammatory and Th1 cytokines. We identified multiple SNPs significantly associated with variations in cytokine secretion. These SNPs are found in genes with known immune function, as well as in genes encoding for proteins involved in signal transduction, cytoskeleton, membrane channels and ion transport, as well as others with no previously identified connection to immune responses. The large number of significant SNP associations implies that cytokine secretion in response to vaccinia virus is a complex process controlled by multiple genes and gene families. Follow-up studies to replicate these findings and then pursue mechanistic studies will provide a greater understanding of how genetic variation influences vaccine responses. PMID:22610502

  1. Host response, obesity, and oral health.

    PubMed

    Słotwińska, Sylwia Małgorzata; Słotwiński, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proper food choices are part of preventing or reducing the risk of dental caries and periodontal disease. A significant association has been proven between oral diseases and the incidence of systemic diseases. Obesity, just like smoking, is one of the major risk factors for oral disease and is a serious social problem that has reached epidemic proportions in many developed countries. The results of studies on periodontitis confirm the relationship between the values of body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of periodontal diseases. Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ and it performs many important functions in the body, such as thermal isolation and protection, storage, and secretion. Many cytokines are secreted proportionally to the amount of fat present and are actively involved in the metabolism of the whole system, including the functioning of the immune system. Therefore, obesity may alter the response of the host to the antigens derived from bacterial plaque, and thus cause disturbances in the inflammatory response in the course of periodontal disease. PMID:26557035

  2. Host immune response in returning travellers infected with malaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical observations suggest that Canadian-born (CB) travellers are prone to more severe malaria, characterized by higher parasite density in the blood, and severe symptoms, such as cerebral malaria and renal failure, than foreign-born travellers (FB) from areas of malaria endemicity. It was hypothesized that host cytokine and chemokine responses differ significantly in CB versus FB patients returning with malaria, contributing to the courses of severity. A more detailed understanding of the profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and endothelial activation may be useful in developing biomarkers and novel therapeutic approaches for malaria. Materials and methods The patient population for the study (n = 186) was comprised of travellers returning to Toronto, Canada between 2007 and 2011. The patient blood samples’ cytokine, chemokine and angiopoietin concentrations were determined using cytokine multiplex assays, and ELISA assays. Results Significantly higher plasma cytokine levels of IL-12 (p40) were observed in CB compared to FB travellers, while epidermal growth factor (EGF) was observed to be higher in FB than CB travellers. Older travellers (55 years old or greater) with Plasmodium vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for IL-6 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) than other adults with P. vivax (ages 18–55). Patients with P. vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and M-CSF than patients with Plasmodium falciparum. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2) was higher for patients infected with P. falciparum than P. vivax, especially when comparing just the FB groups. IL-12 (p40) was higher in FB patients with P. vivax compared to P. falciparum. Il-12 (p40) was also higher in patients infected with P. vivax than those infected with Plasmodium ovale. For patients travelling to West Africa, IFN-γ and IL-6 was lower than for patients who were in other regions of Africa

  3. Tear cytokine response to multipurpose solutions for contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Kalsow, Carolyn M; Reindel, William T; Merchea, Mohinder M; Bateman, Kirk M; Barr, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An increased risk of corneal infiltrative events has been noted with the use of certain contact lenses and multipurpose solutions (MPS). This study was designed to evaluate tear cytokine assay as a sensitive, objective, and quantitative measure of the ocular surface response to contact lens/MPS and to consider the assay’s clinical relevance in the context of other measures of ocular surface response. Methods Two MPS, ReNu® Fresh™ (RNF) and Opti-Free® RepleniSH (OFR), were used with daily wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses in a randomized, prospective crossover study involving 26 subjects. Clinical data collection (conjunctival hyperemia, ocular surface sensitivity, solution induced corneal staining (SICS) test score, and subjective responses) and tear cytokine assays were conducted masked. Responses were tracked as change from baseline throughout the experimental schedule. Results Similar response patterns for several inflammatory cytokines were seen throughout both phases: subjects who received OFR in Phase I had mean tear concentrations that were generally higher than those of the RNF Phase I group. OFR Phase I subjects had significant (P < 0.01) increases over baseline at day 1 and/or following washout for 13 cytokines (cc chemokine ligands [CCL] 3, CCL5, CCL11, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], interferon [INF]-γ, interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α). These changes were not observed in RNF Phase I subjects, even though SICS test scores increased. Phase I OFR subjects also had increased dryness, while RNF Phase I subjects had decreased bulbar hyperemia. No changes were detected with respect to limbal hyperemia or surface sensitivity thresholds. Conclusion The tear cytokine assay can detect and differentiate contact lens/MPS induced increases in inflammatory cytokines. Changes in cytokine levels were consistent with measurement of hyperemia and dryness but not with

  4. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-02-15

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 {mu}g/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus.

  5. Cytokine Responses of Cattle to Experimental M. bovis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An impediment to the development of efficacious vaccines for bovine tuberculosis has been the failure to demonstrate strong associations between immune function and protective immunity. Cytokine gene expression in response to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection was evaluated to identify correla...

  6. Early-response cytokine expression in adult middle ear effusions.

    PubMed

    Ondrey, F G; Juhn, S K; Adams, G L

    1998-10-01

    Various cytokines are presently known to be associated with the regulation of inflammatory responses. In pediatric otitis media, cytokines that correlate with various degrees of inflammation are present in middle ear effusions as inflammatory mediators. The present study was undertaken to examine the potential role of the early-response cytokines, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, in adult otitis media. Fifty-nine adults with otitis media underwent tympanocentesis, and the effusion specimens were analyzed for the presence of both cytokines by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Eighty-eight percent of the effusions were serous in nature. Sixty-seven percent of the patients had a known history of head and neck malignancy and radiation to the temporal bone. Twelve percent of the effusions were positive for interleukin-1beta expression, compared with 85% of effusions in children with otitis media. Eight percent of the effusions contained tumor necrosis factor-alpha, compared with 85% of those collected in pediatric otitis media. All of the specimens that contained tumor necrosis factor-alpha also contained interleukin-1beta. In the present study, there was no correlation with head and neck malignancy/radiation or the clinical degree of inflammation with the presence of either cytokine. We conclude that adult otitis media is associated with lower expression of an acute inflammatory response, as judged by the levels of interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the effusions. Additionally, adult otitis probably represents a less severe and more chronic inflammatory state in comparison with pediatric otitis media. Further analysis of inflammatory mediators in adult otitis media is necessary to evaluate the contribution of cytokines in relation to various etiologic factors. PMID:9781987

  7. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Primes Cytokine Secretion and Lytic Activity in Response to Native Bacterial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kevin M.; Dryden, Tricia D.; Bigley, Nancy J.; Fink, Pamela S.

    1998-01-01

    Superantigens stimulate T-lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production, but the effects of superantigen exposure on cell function within a complex, highly regulated immune response remain to be determined. In this study, we demonstrate that superantigen exposure significantly alters the murine host response to bacterial antigens in an in vitro coculture system. Two days after exposure to the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B, splenocytes cultured with Streptococcus mutans produced significantly greater amounts of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 than did sham-injected controls. The majority of IFN-γ production appeared to be CD8+ T-cell derived since depletion of this cell type dramatically reduced the levels of IFN-γ. To study host cell damage that may occur following superantigen exposure, we analyzed cytotoxicity to “bystander” fibroblast cells cultured with splenocytes in the presence of bacterial antigens. Prior host exposure to staphylococcal enterotoxin B significantly enhanced fibroblast cytotoxicity in the presence of bacteria. Neutralization of IFN-γ decreased the amount of cytotoxicity observed. However, a greater reduction was evident when splenocyte-bacterium cocultures were separated from the bystander cell monolayer via a permeable membrane support. Increased cytotoxicity appears to be primarily dependent upon cell-cell contact. Collectively, these data indicate that overproduction of inflammatory cytokines may alter the activity of cytotoxic immune cells. Superantigen exposure exacerbates cytokine production and lytic cell activity when immune cells encounter bacteria in vitro and comparable activities could possibly occur in vivo. PMID:9784507

  8. Cytokine responses in birds challenged with the human food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni implies a Th17 response

    PubMed Central

    Reid, William D. K.; Close, Andrew J.; Humphrey, Suzanne; Chaloner, Gemma; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Williams, Nicola J.; Humphrey, Tom J.; Wigley, Paul; Rushton, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Development of process orientated understanding of cytokine interactions within the gastrointestinal tract during an immune response to pathogens requires experimentation and statistical modelling. The immune response against pathogen challenge depends on the specific threat to the host. Here, we show that broiler chickens mount a breed-dependent immune response to Campylobacter jejuni infection in the caeca by analysing experimental data using frequentist and Bayesian structural equation models (SEM). SEM provides a framework by which cytokine interdependencies, based on prior knowledge, can be tested. In both breeds important cytokines including pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β, , IL-4, IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ and anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β4 were expressed post-challenge. The SEM revealed a putative regulatory pathway illustrating a T helper (Th)17 response and regulation of IL-10, which is breed-dependent. The prominence of the Th17 pathway indicates the cytokine response aims to limit the invasion or colonization of an extracellular bacterial pathogen but the time-dependent nature of the response differs between breeds. PMID:27069644

  9. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  10. Neutrophil elastase modulates cytokine expression: contribution to host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Benabid, Rym; Wartelle, Julien; Malleret, Laurette; Guyot, Nicolas; Gangloff, Sophie; Lebargy, François; Belaaouaj, Azzaq

    2012-10-12

    There is accumulating evidence that following bacterial infection, the massive recruitment and activation of the phagocytes, neutrophils, is accompanied with the extracellular release of active neutrophil elastase (NE), a potent serine protease. Using NE-deficient mice in a clinically relevant model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced pneumonia, we provide compelling in vivo evidence that the absence of NE was associated with decreased protein and transcript levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-6 in the lungs, coinciding with increased mortality of mutant mice to infection. The implication of NE in the induction of cytokine expression involved at least in part Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4). These findings were further confirmed following exposure of cultured macrophages to purified NE. Together, our data suggest strongly for the first time that NE not only plays a direct antibacterial role as it has been previously reported, but released active enzyme can also modulate cytokine expression, which contributes to host protection against P. aeruginosa. In light of our findings, the long held view that considers NE as a prime suspect in P. aeruginosa-associated diseases will need to be carefully reassessed. Also, therapeutic strategies aiming at NE inhibition should take into account the physiologic roles of the enzyme. PMID:22927440

  11. Influenza virus pathogenicity regulated by host cellular proteases, cytokines and metabolites, and its therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes significant morbidity and mortality. The knowledge gained within the last decade on the pandemic IAV(H1N1)2009 improved our understanding not only of the viral pathogenicity but also the host cellular factors involved in the pathogenicity of multiorgan failure (MOF), such as cellular trypsin-type hemagglutinin (HA0) processing proteases for viral multiplication, cytokine storm, metabolic disorders and energy crisis. The HA processing proteases in the airway and organs for all IAV known to date have been identified. Recently, a new concept on the pathogenicity of MOF, the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle, has been proposed involving up-regulation of trypsin through pro-inflammatory cytokines, and potentiation of viral multiplication in various organs. Furthermore, the relationship between causative factors has been summarized as the “influenza virus–cytokine–trypsin” cycle interconnected with the “metabolic disorders–cytokine” cycle. These cycles provide new treatment concepts for ATP crisis and MOF. This review discusses IAV pathogenicity on cellular proteases, cytokines, metabolites and therapeutic options. PMID:26460316

  12. Modeling Systems-Level Regulation of Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pilione, Mylisa; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Harvill, Eric T; Albert, Réka

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens are able to manipulate the signaling pathways responsible for the generation of host immune responses. Here we examine and model a respiratory infection system in which disruption of host immune functions or of bacterial factors changes the dynamics of the infection. We synthesize the network of interactions between host immune components and two closely related bacteria in the genus Bordetellae. We incorporate existing experimental information on the timing of immune regulatory events into a discrete dynamic model, and verify the model by comparing the effects of simulated disruptions to the experimental outcome of knockout mutations. Our model indicates that the infection time course of both Bordetellae can be separated into three distinct phases based on the most active immune processes. We compare and discuss the effect of the species-specific virulence factors on disrupting the immune response during their infection of naive, antibody-treated, diseased, or convalescent hosts. Our model offers predictions regarding cytokine regulation, key immune components, and clearance of secondary infections; we experimentally validate two of these predictions. This type of modeling provides new insights into the virulence, pathogenesis, and host adaptation of disease-causing microorganisms and allows systems-level analysis that is not always possible using traditional methods. PMID:17559300

  13. Titanium surface hydrophilicity modulates the human macrophage inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Increased titanium surface hydrophilicity has been shown to accelerate dental implant osseointegration. Macrophages are important in the early inflammatory response to surgical implant placement and influence the subsequent healing response. This study investigated the modulatory effect of a hydrophilic titanium surface on the inflammatory cytokine expression profile in a human macrophage cell line (THP-1). Genes for 84 cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were analyzed following exposure to (1) polished (SMO), (2) micro-rough sand blasted, acid etched (SLA), and (3) hydrophilic-modified SLA (modSLA) titanium surfaces for 1 and 3 days. By day 3, the SLA surface elicited a pro-inflammatory response compared to the SMO surface with statistically significant up-regulation of 16 genes [Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) Interleukin (IL)-1β, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)-1, 2, 3, 4, 18, 19, and 20, Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-1, 5, 8 and 12, Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor (CCR)-7, Lymphotoxin-beta (LTB), and Leukotriene B4 receptor (LTB4R)]. This effect was countered by the modSLA surface, which down-regulated the expression of 10 genes (TNF, IL-1α and β, CCL-1, 3, 19 and 20, CXCL-1 and 8, and IL-1 receptor type 1), while two were up-regulated (osteopontin and CCR5) compared to the SLA surface. These cytokine gene expression changes were confirmed by decreased levels of corresponding protein secretion in response to modSLA compared to SLA. These results show that a hydrophilic titanium surface can modulate human macrophage pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and protein secretion. An attenuated pro-inflammatory response may be an important molecular mechanism for faster and/or improved wound healing. PMID:23595995

  14. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  16. RIPK4 activates an IRF6-mediated proinflammatory cytokine response in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kwa, Mei Qi; Scholz, Glen M; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-07-01

    Keratinocytes of the oral mucosa and epidermis play key roles in host defense. In addition to functioning as a physical barrier, they also produce cytokines to elicit inflammation in response to infection or injury. We recently established that receptor-interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4) and interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) function as a cell-intrinsic signaling axis to regulate keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated a functional relationship between RIPK4 and IRF6 in the control of proinflammatory cytokine expression in keratinocytes. The overexpression of RIPK4 by oral keratinocytes induced the strong expression of CCL5 and CXCL11. In contrast, the expression of other cytokines (e.g. IL8 and TNF) was largely unaffected, thus demonstrating specificity in the induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression by RIPK4. CCL5 and CXCL11 expression were also induced in response to the activation of the PKC pathway, and gene silencing experiments indicated that their inducible expression was dependent on RIPK4 and IRF6. Moreover, gene reporter assays suggested that RIPK4 induces CCL5 and CXCL11 expression by stimulating the transactivation of their promoters by IRF6. Accordingly, our findings suggest that the RIPK4-IRF6 signaling axis plays a multifaceted role in barrier epithelial homeostasis through its regulation of both keratinocyte inflammation and differentiation. PMID:27014863

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids modulate neonatal cytokine response to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael M; Lin, Hong; Foley, Elizabeth; Tsang, Valerie; Rhee, Eunice; Perlman, Jeffrey; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal immune response is characterized by an uncompensated pro-inflammatory response that can lead to inflammation-related morbidity and increased susceptibility to infection. We investigated the effects of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) pre-treatment on cytokine secretion to low-concentration endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) in THP-1 monocytes and neonatal cord blood (CB) from healthy full-term infants. Pre-treatment of THP-1 cells, with either n-3 PUFA at 25 or 100 μM significantly reduced IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 secretion while DHA, but not EPA, reduced TNF-α response to LPS. DHA inhibition was stronger compared to EPA and effective at the low concentration. The same concentrations of n-3 PUFAs inhibited IL-12 but not IL-10 cytokine response in whole CB from 9 infants pre-treated for 24 h. To assess clinical relevance for acute response to LPS, the effects of low-concentration DHA at 25 μM or 12.5 μM were assessed before and after LPS exposure of isolated CB mononuclear cells from 20 infants for 1 h. When added before or after LPS, physiologic DHA treatment produced significant concentration-dependent inhibition of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-8 secretion. The results demonstrate prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of neonatal cytokine response to LPS and provide proof-of-concept that low-concentration administration of n-3 PUFA could attenuate or resolve neonatal inflammatory response. PMID:26812855

  18. Modulation of Innate Cytokine Responses by Products of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Frank; Wilson, Keith T.; James, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    The gastric inflammatory and immune response in Helicobacter pylori infection may be due to the effect of different H. pylori products on innate immune mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine whether bacterial components could modulate cytokine production in vitro and thus contribute to Th1 polarization of the gastric immune response observed in vivo. The effect of H. pylori recombinant urease, bacterial lysate, intact bacteria, and bacterial DNA on proliferation and cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from H. pylori-negative donors was examined as a model for innate cytokine responses. Each of the different H. pylori preparations induced gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40), but not IL-2 or IL-5, production, and all but H. pylori DNA stimulated release of IL-10. Addition of anti-IL-12 antibody to cultures partially inhibited IFN-γ production. In addition, each bacterial product inhibited mitogen-stimulated IL-2 production by PBMCs and Jurkat T cells. The inhibitory effect of bacterial products on IL-2 production correlated with inhibition of mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, although urease inhibited IL-2 production without inhibiting proliferation, suggesting that inhibition of IL-2 production alone is not sufficient to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation. The results of these studies demonstrate that Th1 polarization of the gastric immune response may be due in part to the direct effects of multiple different H. pylori components that enhance IFN-γ and IL-12 production while inhibiting both IL-2 production and cell proliferation that may be necessary for Th2 responses. PMID:11035734

  19. Inflammatory cytokine response to Bacillus anthracis peptidoglycan requires phagocytosis and lysosomal trafficking.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Janaki K; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M; Ballard, Jimmy D; Metcalf, Jordan P; Merkel, Tod J; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2010-06-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cells in human blood. Here, we show that biologically active peptidoglycan is shed from an active culture of encapsulated B. anthracis strain Ames in blood. Peptidoglycan is able to bind to surfaces of responding cells, and internalization of peptidoglycan is required for the production of inflammatory cytokines. We also show that the peptidoglycan traffics to lysosomes, and lysosomal function is required for cytokine production. We conclude that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis is initially bound by an unknown extracellular receptor, is phagocytosed, and traffics to lysosomes, where it is degraded to a product recognized by an intracellular receptor. Binding of the peptidoglycan product to the intracellular receptor causes a proinflammatory response. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism by which B. anthracis triggers sepsis during a critical stage of anthrax disease. PMID:20308305

  20. Macrophage cytokine response to particles and lipopolysaccharide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U; Barnes, F H; Charlebois, S J; Smith, R A

    2000-03-15

    Several investigators have suggested that biologic molecules adsorbed onto particles may play a key role in determining macrophage response. Adsorbed endotoxins (bacterial debris) may be of particular importance since they are widely present exogenously and endogenously and adhere strongly to many materials. Murine-transformed peritoneal macrophages (IC-21) were used in this in vitro study. Secretions of IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 were used as a measure of macrophage response to micron-range particles of high-density polyethylene and Co-Cr-Mo alloy, with and without adsorbed lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Little cytokine secretion was measured in response to particles (and to polypropylene experimental chambers) cleaned with ethanol and saline and not exposed to LPS. The lack of macrophage response to cleaned particles has been reported by others and may help reconcile conflicting reports in the literature. Cytokine secretion levels were high in all cases if the chambers (with or without particles) were exposed to LPS (and rinsed to minimize nonbound LPS). Secretion patterns were different with particles present and for polymer versus metal particles. Overall, these results suggest that (1) adsorbed molecules on material surfaces strongly affect macrophage response and (2) particle surface chemistry and microstructure affect the concentration and configuration of adsorbed molecules, further influencing particle interaction with macrophage surface receptors. PMID:10602080

  1. Sonic hedgehog-responsive lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenase-2 modulate Dectin-1-induced inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Karnam, Anupama; Holla, Sahana; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2015-12-01

    Immune responses during fungal infections are predominately mediated by 5/15-lipoxygenases (LO)- or cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-catalysed bioactive eicosanoid metabolites like leukotrienes, lipoxins and prostaglandins. Although few host mediators of fungi-triggered eicosanoid production have been established, the molecular mechanism of expression and regulation of 5-LO, 15-LO and COX-2 are not well-defined. Here, we demonstrate that, macrophages infected with representative fungi Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus fumigatus or those treated with Curdlan, a selective agonist of pattern recognition receptor for fungi Dectin-1, displays increased expression of 5-LO, 15-LO and COX-2. Interestingly, Dectin-1-responsive Syk pathway activates mTOR-sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling cascade to stimulate the expression of these lipid metabolizing enzymes. Loss-of-function analysis of the identified intermediaries indicates that while Syk-mTOR-SHH pathway-induced 5-LO and 15-LO suppressed the Dectin-1-responsive pro-inflammatory signature cytokines like TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-12, Syk-mTOR-SHH-induced COX-2 positively regulated these cytokines. Dectin-1-stimulated IL-6, however, is dependent on 5-LO, 15-LO and COX-2 activity. Together, the current study establishes Dectin-1-arbitrated host mediators that direct the differential regulation of immune responses during fungal infections and thus are potential candidates of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26432261

  2. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-02-26

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  3. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  4. Recent progress in understanding host immunity to Avian Coccidiosis: Role of IL-17 Family Cytokines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host-pathogen interaction leading to protection against coccidiosis is complex, involving many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity to intracellular parasites. Recent application of global gene expression microarray analysis to investigate gut innate immune response to Eimeria infections led to t...

  5. Inflammatory Response to Burn Trauma: Nicotine Attenuates Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papst, S.; Reimers, K.; Stukenborg-Colsman, C.; Steinstraesser, L.; Vogt, P. M.; Kraft, T.; Niederbichler, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The immune response to an inflammatory stimulus is balanced and orchestrated by stimulatory and inhibitory factors. After a thermal trauma, this balance is disturbed and an excessive immune reaction with increased production and release of proinflammatory cytokines results. The nicotine-stimulated anti-inflammatory reflex offsets this. The goal of this study was to verify that transdermal administration of nicotine downregulates proinflammatory cytokine release after burn trauma. Methods: A 30% total body surface area full-thickness rat burn model was used in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 35, male). The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham + nicotine group with 5 experimental animals per group. The last 2 groups received a transdermal nicotine administration of 1.75 mg. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 were determined in homogenates of hearts, livers, and spleens 12 or 24 hours after burn trauma. Results: Experimental burn trauma resulted in a significant increase in cytokine levels in hearts, livers, and spleens. Nicotine treatment led to a decrease of the effect of the burn trauma with significantly lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 compared to the trauma group. Conclusions: This study confirms in a standardized burn model that stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in the regulation of effectory molecules of the immune response. Looking at the results of our study, further experiments designed to explore and evaluate the potency and mechanisms of the immunomodulating effects of this receptor system are warranted. PMID:25671045

  6. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections. PMID:25598340

  7. Bacterial Stress Responses during Host Infection.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Frawley, Elaine R; Tapscott, Timothy; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés

    2016-08-10

    Pathogenic bacteria must withstand diverse host environments during infection. Environmental signals, such as pH, temperature, nutrient limitation, etc., not only trigger adaptive responses within bacteria to these specific stress conditions but also direct the expression of virulence genes at an appropriate time and place. An appreciation of stress responses and their regulation is therefore essential for an understanding of bacterial pathogenesis. This review considers specific stresses in the host environment and their relevance to pathogenesis, with a particular focus on the enteric pathogen Salmonella. PMID:27512901

  8. Candida albicans Primes TLR Cytokine Responses through a Dectin-1/Raf-1–Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ifrim, Daniela C.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Jansen, Trees; Williams, David L.; Gow, Neil A. R.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is essential to maintain homeostasis with resident microbial populations, ensuring that the symbiotic host–microbial relationship is maintained. In parallel, commensal microbes significantly shape mammalian immunity at the host mucosal surface, as well as systemically. Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that lives as a commensal on skin and mucosa of healthy individuals. Little is known about its capacity to modulate responses toward other microorganisms, such as colonizing bacteria (e.g., intestinal microorganisms). The aim of this study was to assess the cytokine production of PBMCs induced by commensal bacteria when these cells were primed by C. albicans. We show that C. albicans and β-1,3-glucan induce priming of human primary mononuclear cells and this leads to enhanced cytokine production upon in vitro stimulation with TLR ligands and bacterial commensals. This priming requires the β-1,3-glucan receptor dectin-1 and the noncanonical Raf-1 pathway. In addition, although purified mannans cannot solely mediate the priming, the presence of mannosyl residues in the cell wall of C. albicans is nevertheless required. In conclusion, C. albicans is able to modify cytokine responses to TLR ligands and colonizing bacteria, which is likely to impact the inflammatory reaction during mucosal diseases. PMID:23475217

  9. Host Responses to the Pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Beneficial Microbes Exhibit Host Sex Specificity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, K. Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M.

    2014-01-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes—a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51—and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n = 5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) between the sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex. PMID:24814797

  10. Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-08-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex. PMID:24814797

  11. Variation in Inflammatory Response during Pneumococcal Infection Is Influenced by Host-Pathogen Interactions but Associated with Animal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Laura; Sylvius, Nicolas; Norman, Martin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a crucial part of innate immune responses but, if imbalanced, can lead to serious clinical conditions or even death. Cytokines regulate inflammation, and studies report their impact on clinical outcome. However, host and pathogen genetic backgrounds influence cytokine production, making it difficult to evaluate which inflammatory profiles (if any) relate to improved prognosis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common human pathogen associated with asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriage. Infrequently, it can lead to a wide range of diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. Studies show that both pneumococcal serotype and host genetic background affect the development of disease and contribute to variation in inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the impact of the host and pneumococcal genetic backgrounds on pulmonary cytokine responses and their relationship to animal survival. Two inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and CBA/Ca, were infected with 10 pneumococcal strains, and the concentrations of six pulmonary cytokines were measured at 6 h and 24 h postinfection. Collected data were analyzed by principal-component analysis to identify whether there is any pattern in the observed cytokine variation. Our results show that host-pneumococcus combination was at the core of observed variation in cytokine responses, yet the resulting cytokine profile discriminated only between survivors and fatalities but not mouse or pneumococcal strains used during infection. Therefore, our results indicate that although alternative inflammatory profiles are generated during pneumococcal infection, a common pattern emerged, which determined the clinical outcome of pneumococcal infections. PMID:26787718

  12. Variation in Inflammatory Response during Pneumococcal Infection Is Influenced by Host-Pathogen Interactions but Associated with Animal Survival.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Magda S; Escudero, Laura; Sylvius, Nicolas; Norman, Martin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Andrew, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation is a crucial part of innate immune responses but, if imbalanced, can lead to serious clinical conditions or even death. Cytokines regulate inflammation, and studies report their impact on clinical outcome. However, host and pathogen genetic backgrounds influence cytokine production, making it difficult to evaluate which inflammatory profiles (if any) relate to improved prognosis.Streptococcus pneumonia is a common human pathogen associated with asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriage. Infrequently, it can lead to a wide range of diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. Studies show that both pneumococcal serotype and host genetic background affect the development of disease and contribute to variation in inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the impact of the host and pneumococcal genetic backgrounds on pulmonary cytokine responses and their relationship to animal survival. Two inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and CBA/Ca, were infected with 10 pneumococcal strains, and the concentrations of six pulmonary cytokines were measured at 6 h and 24 h postinfection. Collected data were analyzed by principal-component analysis to identify whether there is any pattern in the observed cytokine variation. Our results show that host-pneumococcus combination was at the core of observed variation in cytokine responses, yet the resulting cytokine profile discriminated only between survivors and fatalities but not mouse or pneumococcal strains used during infection. Therefore, our results indicate that although alternative inflammatory profiles are generated during pneumococcal infection, a common pattern emerged, which determined the clinical outcome of pneumococcal infections. PMID:26787718

  13. Inter-individual variability and genetic influences on cytokine responses to bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Oosting, Marije; Deelen, Patrick; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Smeekens, Sanne; Jaeger, Martin; Matzaraki, Vasiliki; Swertz, Morris A; Xavier, Ramnik J; Franke, Lude; Wijmenga, Cisca; Joosten, Leo A B; Kumar, Vinod; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the inter-individual variation of cytokine responses to different pathogens in healthy individuals. To systematically describe cytokine responses elicited by distinct pathogens and to determine the effect of genetic variation on cytokine production, we profiled cytokines produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 197 individuals of European origin from the 200 Functional Genomics (200FG) cohort in the Human Functional Genomics Project (http://www.humanfunctionalgenomics.org), obtained over three different years. We compared bacteria- and fungi-induced cytokine profiles and found that most cytokine responses were organized around a physiological response to specific pathogens, rather than around a particular immune pathway or cytokine. We then correlated genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes with cytokine abundance and identified six cytokine quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Among them, a cytokine QTL at the NAA35-GOLM1 locus markedly modulated interleukin (IL)-6 production in response to multiple pathogens and was associated with susceptibility to candidemia. Furthermore, the cytokine QTLs that we identified were enriched among SNPs previously associated with infectious diseases and heart diseases. These data reveal and begin to explain the variability in cytokine production by human immune cells in response to pathogens. PMID:27376574

  14. Infection with arginase deficient Leishmania major reveals a parasite number-dependent and cytokine-independent regulation of host cellular arginase activity and disease pathogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Muleme, Helen M; Reguera, Rosa M; Berard, Alicia; Azinwi, Richard; Jia, Ping; Okwor, Ifeoma B; Beverley, Stephen; Uzonna, Jude E

    2009-01-01

    The balance between the products of L-arginine metabolism in macrophages regulates the outcome of Leishmania major infection. L-arginine can be oxidized by host inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to produce nitric oxide (NO), which contributes to parasite killing. In contrast, L-arginine hydrolysis by host arginase blocks NO generation and provides polyamines, which can support parasite proliferation. Additionally, Leishmania encode their own arginase which has considereable potential to modulate infectivity and disease pathogenesis. Here, we compare the infectivity and impact on host cellular immune response in vitro and in vivo of wild-type (WT) L. major with that of a parasite arginase null mutant (arg-). We found that arg- L. major are impaired in their macrophage infectivity in vitro independent of host iNOS activities. As with in vitro results, the proliferation of arg- L. major in animal infections was also significantly impaired in vivo resulting in delayed onset of lesion development, attenuated pathology and low parasite burden. Despite this attenuated pathology, the production of cytokines by cells from the draining lymph node of mice infected with WT and arg- L. major was similar at all times tested. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo arginase levels were significantly lower in arg- than in WT infected cases and were directly correlated with parasite numbers inside infected cells. These results suggest that Leishmania-encoded arginase enhances disease pathogenesis by augmenting host cellular arginase activities leading and that contrary to previous in vitro studies, the host cytokine response does not influence host arginase activity. PMID:19923451

  15. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Hempstead, Andrew D.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR. PMID:26598709

  16. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a “diffuse sensory organ” that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this “pan-endocrine illness” is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death. PMID:25763364

  17. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death. PMID:25763364

  18. Homeostatic cytokines in immune reconstitution and graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Thiant, Stéphanie; Moutuou, Moutuaata M; Leboeuf, Dominique; Guimond, Martin

    2016-06-01

    For numerous patients, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only therapeutic option that could potentially cure their disease. Despite significant progress made in clinical management of allogeneic SCT, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) remains the second cause of death after disease recurrence. aGVHD is highly immunosuppressive and the adverse effect of allogeneic SCT on T cell regeneration is typically more important than the levels of immunosuppression normally seen after autologous SCT. In these patients, immune reconstitution often takes several years to occur and restoring immunocompetence after allogeneic SCT represents an important challenge, principally because clinical options are limited and current methods used to accelerate immune reconstitution are associated with increased GVHD. Interleukin-7 and IL-15 are both under clinical investigation and demonstrate the greatest potential on peripheral T cells regeneration in mice and humans. However, awareness has been raised about the use of IL-7 and IL-15 after allogeneic SCT with regards to potential adverse effects on aGVHD. In this review, we will discuss about recent progress made in lymphocyte regeneration, the critical role played by IL-7 and IL-15 in T cell homeostasis and how these cytokines could be used to improve immune reconstitution after allogeneic SCT. PMID:26795458

  19. DNA methylation differentially regulates cytokine secretion in gingival epithelia in response to bacterial challenges.

    PubMed

    Drury, Jeanie L; Chung, Whasun Oh

    2015-03-01

    Epigenetic modifications are changes in gene expression without altering DNA sequence. We previously reported that bacteria-specific innate immune responses are regulated by epigenetic modifications. Our hypothesis is that DNA methylation affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to bacterial stimulation. Gingival epithelial cells (GECs) were treated with DNMT-1 inhibitors prior to Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) or Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) exposure. Protein secretion was assessed using ELISA. Gene expression was quantified using qRT-PCR. The ability of bacteria to invade inhibitor pretreated GECs was assessed utilizing flow cytometry. Changes were compared to unstimulated GECs. GEC upregulation of IL-6 and CXCL1 by Pg or Fn stimulation was significantly diminished by inhibitor pretreatment. Pg stimulated IL-1α secretion and inhibitor pretreatment significantly enhanced this upregulation, while Fn alone or with inhibitor pretreatment had no effect on IL-1α expression. GEC upregulation of human beta-definsin-2 in response to Pg and Fn exposure was enhanced following the inhibitor pretreatment. GEC susceptibility to bacterial invasion was unaltered. These results suggest that DNA methylation differentially affects gingival cytokine secretion in response to Pg or Fn. Our data provide basis for better understanding of how epigenetic modifications, brought on by exposure to oral bacteria, will subsequently affect host susceptibility to oral diseases. PMID:25722484

  20. Complement and cytokine response in acute Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, John-Paul; Langley, Kathryn; Heelas, Edward; Machin, Samuel J; Scully, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Complement dysregulation is key in the pathogenesis of atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (aHUS), but no clear role for complement has been identified in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). We aimed to assess complement activation and cytokine response in acute antibody-mediated TTP. Complement C3a and C5a and cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor, interferon-γ and IL-17a) were measured in 20 acute TTP patients and 49 remission cases. Anti-ADAMTS13 immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtypes were measured in acute patients in order to study the association with complement activation. In acute TTP, median C3a and C5a were significantly elevated compared to remission, C3a 63·9 ng/ml vs. 38·2 ng/ml (P < 0·001) and C5a 16·4 ng/ml vs. 9·29 ng/ml (P < 0·001), respectively. Median IL-6 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the acute vs. remission groups, IL-6: 8 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P = 0·003), IL-10: 6 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P < 0·001). C3a levels correlated with both anti-ADAMTS13 IgG (rs = 0·604, P = 0·017) and IL-10 (rs = 0·692, P = 0·006). No anti-ADAMTS13 IgG subtype was associated with higher complement activation, but patients with the highest C3a levels had 3 or 4 IgG subtypes present. These results suggest complement anaphylatoxin levels are higher in acute TTP cases than in remission, and the complement response seen acutely may relate to anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibody and IL-10 levels. PMID:24372446

  1. Inflammasomes in host response to protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Dario S; Lima-Junior, Djalma S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric complexes of proteins that are assembled in the host cell cytoplasm in response to specific stress signals or contamination of the cytoplasm by microbial molecules. The canonical inflammasomes are composed of at least three main components: an inflammatory caspase (caspase-1, caspase-11), an adapter molecule (such as ASC), and a sensor protein (such as NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP12, NAIP1, NAIP2, NAIP5, or AIM2). The sensor molecule determines the inflammasome specificity by detecting specific microbial products or cell stress signals. Upon activation, these molecular platforms facilitate restriction of microbial replication and trigger an inflammatory form of cell death called pyroptosis, thus accounting for the genesis of inflammatory processes. Inflammasome activation has been widely reported in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, recent reports have highlighted the important role of the inflammasomes in the host response to the pathogenesis of infections caused by intracellular protozoan parasites. Herein, we review the activation and specific roles of inflammasomes in recognition and host responses to intracellular protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., and Leishmania spp. PMID:25879291

  2. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium's ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B cell and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  3. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium’s ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  4. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  5. New insights about host response to smallpox using microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Gustavo H; Simoes, Ana CQ; Souza, Estevao; Dias, Rodrigo A; Ospina, Raydonal; Venancio, Thiago M

    2007-01-01

    Background Smallpox is a lethal disease that was endemic in many parts of the world until eradicated by massive immunization. Due to its lethality, there are serious concerns about its use as a bioweapon. Here we analyze publicly available microarray data to further understand survival of smallpox infected macaques, using systems biology approaches. Our goal is to improve the knowledge about the progression of this disease. Results We used KEGG pathways annotations to define groups of genes (or modules), and subsequently compared them to macaque survival times. This technique provided additional insights about the host response to this disease, such as increased expression of the cytokines and ECM receptors in the individuals with higher survival times. These results could indicate that these gene groups could influence an effective response from the host to smallpox. Conclusion Macaques with higher survival times clearly express some specific pathways previously unidentified using regular gene-by-gene approaches. Our work also shows how third party analysis of public datasets can be important to support new hypotheses to relevant biological problems. PMID:17718913

  6. Role of DNA repair in host immune response and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Fabrícia Lima; Pinheiro, Daniele Maria Lopes; Oliveira, Ana Helena Sales de; Oliveira, Rayssa Karla de Medeiros; Lajus, Tirzah Braz Petta; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the understanding of how DNA repair contributes to the development of innate and acquired immunity has emerged. The DNA damage incurred during the inflammatory response triggers the activation of DNA repair pathways, which are required for host-cell survival. Here, we reviewed current understanding of the mechanism by which DNA repair contributes to protection against the oxidized DNA damage generated during infectious and inflammatory diseases and its involvement in innate and adaptive immunity. We discussed the functional role of DNA repair enzymes in the immune activation and the relevance of these processes to: transcriptional regulation of cytokines and other genes involved in the inflammatory response; V(D)J recombination; class-switch recombination (CSR); and somatic hypermutation (SHM). These three last processes of DNA damage repair are required for effective humoral adaptive immunity, creating genetic diversity in developing T and B cells. Furthermore, viral replication is also dependent on host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, the elucidation of the pathways of DNA damage and its repair that activate innate and adaptive immunity will be important for a better understanding of the immune and inflammatory disorders and developing new therapeutic interventions for treatment of these diseases and for improving their outcome. PMID:25795123

  7. Bacterial invasion augments epithelial cytokine responses to Escherichia coli through a lipopolysaccharide-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schilling, J D; Mulvey, M A; Vincent, C D; Lorenz, R G; Hultgren, S J

    2001-01-15

    One mechanism of initiating innate host defenses against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the production of cytokines by bladder epithelial cells; however, the means by which these cells recognize bacterial pathogens is poorly understood. Type 1 pili, expressed by the majority of UPEC, have been shown to have a critical role in inducing the expression of IL-6 in bladder epithelial cells after exposure to E. coli. In this study, we demonstrate that type 1 pili are not sufficient to activate IL-6 production by bladder epithelial cells. Instead, it was shown that bacterial invasion mediated by type 1 pili augments bladder epithelial responses to E. coli via an LPS-dependent mechanism, leading to the production of IL-6. RNA transcripts for the LPSR Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was detected in cultured bladder epithelial cells. The in vivo role of TLR4 was assessed using C3H/HeJ mice, which express a dominant negative form of TLR4. After infection with UPEC, C3H/HeJ mice have large foci of intracellular bacteria that persist within the bladder epithelium in the absence of any notable inflammatory response. These results indicate that LPS is required for bacterial invasion to enhance host responses to E. coli within the bladder. PMID:11145696

  8. Early Cytokine Response to Infection with Pathogenic vs Non-Pathogenic Organisms in a Mouse Model of Endodontic Infection.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Aritsune; Stephens, Danielle; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Rittling, Susan R

    2015-01-01

    Using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection, we showed previously that a mixture of four endodontic pathogens (EP: P. intermedia, F. nucleatum, S. intermedius and P. micra) are able to persist without clearance for up to seven days, while a non-pathogenic oral species, S. mitis, was substantially cleared in this time. Here we have compared the cytokine response inside the chambers against these microorganisms. A majority of cytokines tested (17/24) showed different patterns of expression. Several cytokines had a peak of expression at 2 h after infection in response to the EP, while none showed this pattern in S. mitis infections. Chemokines were uniformly present at similar or higher levels in response to S. mitis, with redundant expression of CXCR2 ligands, while several growth/survival factors were present at higher levels in EP infections. Protease activity expressed by EP may be responsible for the lower levels of some chemokines. T-cell associated cytokines were in general expressed at extremely low levels, and did not differ between the two infections. The inflammatory markers IL-6, IL-1α and IL1-β were expressed at similar levels in both infections at early times, while TNFα was preferentially present in S. mitis infections. In EP infected chambers, reciprocal changes in levels of IL-6 and IL-1α were observed at later times suggesting a switch in the inflammatory response. Analysis of the cytokine response to infection with the individual species from the EP mix suggests that P. intermedia drives this inflammatory switch. Together these results show a surprising level of divergence of the host response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms associated with oral infections, and supports a dominant effect of P. intermedia in polymicrobial endodontic infections. PMID:26171605

  9. TLR4-dependent activation of inflammatory cytokine response in macrophages by Francisella elongation factor Tu1

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jyotika; Mishra, Bibhuti B.; Li, Qun; Teale, Judy M.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial determinants of pulmonary Francisella induced inflammatory responses and their interaction with host components are not clearly defined. In this study, proteomic and immunoblot analyses showed presence of a cytoplasmic protein elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) in the membrane fractions of virulent F. novicida, LVS and SchuS4, but not in an attenuated F. novicida mutant. EF-Tu was immunodominant in mice vaccinated and protected from virulent F. novicida. Moreover, recombinant EF-Tu induced macrophages to produce inflammatory cytokines in a TLR4 dependent manner. This study shows immune stimulatory properties of a cytoplasmic protein EF-Tu expressed on the membrane of virulent Francisella strains. PMID:21497800

  10. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance. PMID:27476413

  11. Diminazene Aceturate (Berenil) Modulates the Host Cellular and Inflammatory Responses to Trypanosoma congolense Infection

    PubMed Central

    Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Singh, Rani; Jia, Ping; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma congolense are extracellular and intravascular blood parasites that cause debilitating acute or chronic disease in cattle and other domestic animals. Diminazene aceturate (Berenil) has been widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for trypanosomiasis in livestock since 1955. As in livestock, treatment of infected highly susceptible BALB/c mice with Berenil leads to rapid control of parasitemia and survival from an otherwise lethal infection. The molecular and biochemical mechanisms of action of Berenil are still not very well defined and its effect on the host immune system has remained relatively unstudied. Here, we investigated whether Berenil has, in addition to its trypanolytic effect, a modulatory effect on the host immune response to Trypanosoma congolense. Methodology/Principal Findings BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were infected intraperitoneally with T. congolense, treated with Berenil and the expression of CD25 and FoxP3 on splenic cells was assessed directly ex vivo. In addition, serum levels and spontaneous and LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by splenic and hepatic CD11b+ cells were determined by ELISA. Berenil treatment significantly reduced the percentages of CD25+ cells, a concomitant reduction in the percentage of regulatory (CD4+Foxp3+) T cells and a striking reduction in serum levels of disease exacerbating pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, IL-12, TNF and IFN-γ. Furthermore, Berenil treatment significantly suppressed spontaneous and LPS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines by splenic and liver macrophages and significantly ameliorated LPS-induced septic shock and the associated cytokine storm. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, these results provide evidence that in addition to its direct trypanolytic effect, Berenil also modulates the host immune response to the parasite in a manner that dampen excessive immune activation and production of pathology-promoting pro-inflammatory cytokines

  12. Deficiency in Th2 cytokine responses exacerbate orthopoxvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Sakala, Isaac G; Chaudhri, Geeta; Eldi, Preethi; Buller, R Mark; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-01-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) causes mousepox in mice, a disease very similar to smallpox in humans. ECTV and variola virus (VARV), the agent of smallpox, are closely related orthopoxviruses. Mousepox is an excellent small animal model to study the genetic and immunologic basis for resistance and susceptibility of humans to smallpox. Resistance to mousepox is dependent on a strong polarized type 1 immune response, associated with robust natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses. In contrast, ECTV-susceptible mice generate a type 2 response, associated with weak NK cell, CTL and IFN-γ responses but robust IL-4 responses. Nonetheless, susceptible strains infected with mutant ECTV lacking virus-encoded IFN-γ binding protein (vIFN-γbp) (ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ) control virus replication through generation of type 1 response. Since the IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways polarize type 2/T helper 2 (Th2) responses with a corresponding suppression of IFN-γ production, we investigated whether the combined absence of vIFN-γbp, and one or more host genes involved in Th2 response development, influence generation of protective immunity. Most mutant mouse strains infected with wild-type (WT) virus succumbed to disease more rapidly than WT animals. Conversely, the disease outcome was significantly improved in WT mice infected with ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ but absence of IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways did not provide any added advantage. Deficiency in IL-13 or STAT-6 resulted in defective CTL responses, higher mortality rates and accelerated deaths. Deficiencies in IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways significantly reduced the numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4 and CD8 T cells, indicating an absence of a switch to a Th1-like response. Factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to mousepox are far more complex than a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses. PMID:25751266

  13. Deficiency in Th2 Cytokine Responses Exacerbate Orthopoxvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakala, Isaac G.; Chaudhri, Geeta; Eldi, Preethi; Buller, R. Mark; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-01-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) causes mousepox in mice, a disease very similar to smallpox in humans. ECTV and variola virus (VARV), the agent of smallpox, are closely related orthopoxviruses. Mousepox is an excellent small animal model to study the genetic and immunologic basis for resistance and susceptibility of humans to smallpox. Resistance to mousepox is dependent on a strong polarized type 1 immune response, associated with robust natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses. In contrast, ECTV-susceptible mice generate a type 2 response, associated with weak NK cell, CTL and IFN-γ responses but robust IL-4 responses. Nonetheless, susceptible strains infected with mutant ECTV lacking virus-encoded IFN-γ binding protein (vIFN-γbp) (ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ) control virus replication through generation of type 1 response. Since the IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways polarize type 2/T helper 2 (Th2) responses with a corresponding suppression of IFN-γ production, we investigated whether the combined absence of vIFN-γbp, and one or more host genes involved in Th2 response development, influence generation of protective immunity. Most mutant mouse strains infected with wild-type (WT) virus succumbed to disease more rapidly than WT animals. Conversely, the disease outcome was significantly improved in WT mice infected with ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ but absence of IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways did not provide any added advantage. Deficiency in IL-13 or STAT-6 resulted in defective CTL responses, higher mortality rates and accelerated deaths. Deficiencies in IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways significantly reduced the numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4 and CD8 T cells, indicating an absence of a switch to a Th1-like response. Factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to mousepox are far more complex than a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses. PMID:25751266

  14. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J. J.; Gupta, G.; Gray, P. C.; Hush, D. R.; Fugate, M. L.; Cleland, T. J.; Roberts, R. M.; Hlavacek, W. S.; Smith, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  15. In vitro comparison of the cytokine response to avian influenza virus from peripheral blood lymphocyles isolated from chickens differing in Mx631 gene polymorphism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following viral infection, the host innate immune response triggers induction of cytokine and interferon genes. Interferon-alpha induction stimulates expression interferon-stimulated genes, including the Mx protein. This protein has been shown to confer protection against influenza in mice. In ch...

  16. Hepatotoxicants induce cytokine imbalance in response to innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shima; Deguchi, Jiro; Nishio, Naoki; Nomura, Naruaki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, attention has been paid to innate immune systems as mechanisms to initiate or promote drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Kupffer cells are hepatic resident macrophages and might be involved in the pathogenesis of DILI by release of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and/or nitric oxides. The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations in mediator levels induced by hepatotoxic compounds in isolated Kupffer cells and discuss the relation between balance of each cytokine or chemokine and potential of innate immune-mediated DILI. Primary cultured rat Kupffer cells were treated with hepatotoxic (acetaminophen, troglitazone, trovafloxacin) or non-hepatotoxic (pioglitazone, levofloxacin) compounds with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After 24 hr treatment, cell supernatants were collected and various levels of mediators released by Kupffer cells were examined. Although hepatotoxicants had no effect on the LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion, they enhanced the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and suppressed the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) induced by LPS. These cytokine shifts were not associated with switching the phenotypes of M1 and M2 macrophages in Kupffer cells. In conclusion, the present study suggested that the levels of some specific cytokines are affected by DILI-related drugs with LPS stimulation, and imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, induced by the up-regulation of IL-1β and the down-regulation of IL-6 or IL-10, plays a key role in innate immune-mediated DILI. PMID:25972199

  17. Coincident Pre-Diabetes Is Associated with Dysregulated Cytokine Responses in Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V.; Nair, Dina; Sridhar, Rathinam; Kornfeld, Hardy; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) - Type 2 diabetes mellitus co-morbidity. However, the cytokine interactions that characterize PTB coincident with pre-diabetes (PDM) are not known. Methods To identify the influence of coincident PDM on cytokine levels in PTB, we examined circulating levels of a panel of cytokines in the plasma of individuals with TB-PDM and compared them with those without PDM (TB-NDM). Results TB-PDM is characterized by elevated circulating levels of Type 1 (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2), Type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) and other pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, IFNβ and GM-CSF) cytokines. TB-PDM is also characterized by increased systemic levels of Type 2 (IL-5) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGFβ) cytokines. Moreover, TB antigen stimulated whole blood also showed increased levels of pro-inflammatory (IFNγ, TNFα and IL-1β) cytokines as well. However, the cytokines did not exhibit any significant correlation with HbA1C levels or with bacterial burdens. Conclusion Our data reveal that pre-diabetes in PTB individuals is characterized by heightened cytokine responsiveness, indicating that a balanced pro and anti - inflammatory cytokine milieu is a feature of pre-diabetes - TB co-morbidity. PMID:25393696

  18. CYTOKINE PROFILES DO NOT PREDICT ANTIBODY RESPONSES AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses following dermal exposure has been proposed as a test to identify chemicals that pose a risk of occupational asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that relative differences in cytokine profiles for dini...

  19. INCONSISTENCIES BETWEEN CYTOKINE PROFILES, ANTIBODY RESPONSES, AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses has been proposed as a simple test to identify chemicals, such as low molecular weight diisocyanates, that pose a significant risk of occupational asthma. Previously, we reported cytokine mRNA profiles for dinitrochlorobenzene (DNC...

  20. Comparison of Cytokine Immune Responses to Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica Serotype O:9 Infections in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenpeng; Wang, Xin; Qiu, Haiyan; Cui, Buyun; Zhao, Shiwen; Zheng, Han; Xiao, Yuchun; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:9 serologically cross-react in the immune response with the host; therefore, our aim was to compare the immune responses to these two pathogens. We selected typical B. abortus and Y. enterocolitica O:9 strains to study the cytokine immune response and the histopathological changes in livers and spleens of BALB/c mice. The data showed the cytokine responses to the two strains of pathogens were different, where the average levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-12 (IL-12), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were higher with B. abortus infections than with Y. enterocolitica O:9 infections, especially for IFN-γ, while the IL-10 level was lower and the levels of IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6 were similar. The histopathological effects in the livers and spleens of the BALB/c mice with B. abortus and Y. enterocolitica O:9 infections were similar; however, the pathological changes in the liver were greater with B. abortus infections, while damage in the spleen was greater with Y. enterocolitica O:9 infections. These observations show that different cytokine responses and histopathological changes occur with B. abortus and Y. enterocolitica O:9 infections. PMID:24042115

  1. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h) and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut), while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL8 (MCP-2), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL3 (MIP-1α), antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1), desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP) and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1). Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease. PMID:21810247

  2. Comparative analysis of cellular immune responses and cytokine levels in sheep experimentally infected with bluetongue virus serotype 1 and 8.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cordón, P J; Pérez de Diego, A C; Gómez-Villamandos, J C; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M; Pleguezuelos, F J; Garfia, B; del Carmen, P; Pedrera, M

    2015-05-15

    Protective immunity in sheep with bluetongue virus (BTV) infection as well as the role of BTV-induced cytokines during immune response remains unclear. Understanding the basis immunological mechanisms in sheep experimentally infected with serotypes 1 and 8 (BTV-1 and -8) was the aim of this study. A time-course study was carried out in order to evaluate cell-mediated immune response and serum concentrations of cytokines (IL-1β, TNFα, IL-12, IFNγ, IL-4 and IL-10) with inflammatory and immunological functions. Depletion of T cell subsets (mainly CD4(+), γδ and CD25(+)) together with the absence of cytokines (IFNγ and IL-12) involved in the regulation of cell-mediated antiviral immunity at the first stage of the disease suggested that both BTV-1 and BTV-8 might impair host's capability against primary infections which would favor viral replication and spreading. However, cellular immune response and cytokines elicited an immune response in sheep that efficiently reduced viremia in the final stage of the experiment. Recovery of T cell subsets (CD4(+) and CD25(+)) together with a significant increase of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in both infected groups were observed in parallel with the decrease of viremia. Additionally, the recovery of CD4(+) T lymphocytes together with the significant increase of IL-4 serum levels at the final stage of the experiment might contribute to humoral immune response activation and neutralizing antibodies production against BTV previously described in the course of this experiment. These results suggested that both cellular and humoral immune response may contribute to protective immunity against BTV-1 and BTV-8 in sheep. The possible role played by IL-10 and CD25(+) cells in controlling inflammatory and immune response in the final stage of the experiment has also been suggested. PMID:25769647

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  4. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Eric R. G.; David, Victoria R.; Doyle, Adina L.; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A.; Pirrotte, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection. PMID:26275879

  5. Response of Cytokines and Hydrogen Peroxide to Sporothrix schenckii Exoantigen in Systemic Experimental Infection.

    PubMed

    Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Manente, Francine Alessandra; Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Vellosa, José Carlos Rebuglio; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-04-01

    The response of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and cytokines during an experimental sporotrichosis in male Swiss mice was assessed over a period of 10 weeks by monitoring macrophage activation challenged with exoantigen (ExoAg) from the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. The studied endpoints were: H2O2 production, fungal burden at spleen, apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages, and IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2, IL-10 production. During the two first weeks of infection was observed low burden of yeast in spleen and high response of H2O2, IL-2, and IL-1β. The weeks of highest fungal burden (fourth-sixth) coincided with major apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages, normal production of IL-6 and lower production of H2O2, IL-2, and IL-1β, suggesting a role for these three last in the early control of infection. On the other hand, IL-1β (but not IL-6) was recovered since the sixth week, suggesting a possible role in the late phase of infection, contributing to the fungal clearance in conjunction with the specific mechanisms. The IL-10 was elevated until the sixth, principally in the second week. These results evidences that ExoAg is involved in the host immune modulation, influencing the S. Schenckii virulence, and its role is related with the time of the infection in the model used. PMID:26603044

  6. Systemic Cytokine and Interferon Responsiveness Patterns in HIV and HCV Mono and Co-Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Ghare, Smita; Barve, Shirish; Young, Mary; Plankey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The role of host response-related factors in the fast progression of liver disease in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV viruses remains poorly understood. This study compared patterns of cytokines, caspase-1 activation, endotoxin exposure in plasma as well as interferon signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV/HCV co-infected (HIV+/HCV+), HCV mono-infected (HIV−/HCV+), HIV mono-infected (HIV+/HCV−) female patients and HIV- and HCV-uninfected women (HIV−/HCV−) who had enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). HIV+/HCV+ women had higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as caspase-1 compared with other groups. Both HIV+/HCV+ and HIV+/HCV− women had significantly higher sCD14 levels compared with other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HCV mono-infected patients had reduced levels of phosphorylation of STAT1 compared with other groups as well as lower basal levels of expression of the IFN-stimulated genes, OAS1, ISG15, and USP18 (UBP43). Basal expression of USP18, a functional antagonist of ISG15, as well as USP18/ISG15 ratios were increased in the HIV+/HCV+ group compared with HIV−/HCV+ and HIV+/HCV− groups. A more pronounced systemic inflammatory profile as well as increased expression ratios of USP18 to ISG15 may contribute to the more rapid progression of liver disease in HIV+/HCV+ individuals. PMID:24955730

  7. Systemic cytokine and interferon responsiveness Patterns in HIV and HCV mono and co-infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Ghare, Smita; Barve, Shirish; Young, Mary; Plankey, Michael; Bordon, Jose

    2014-11-01

    The role of host response-related factors in the fast progression of liver disease in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV viruses remains poorly understood. This study compared patterns of cytokines, caspase-1 activation, endotoxin exposure in plasma as well as interferon signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV/HCV co-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(+)), HCV mono-infected (HIV(-)/HCV(+)), HIV mono-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(-)) female patients and HIV- and HCV-uninfected women (HIV(-)/HCV(-)) who had enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). HIV(+)/HCV(+) women had higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as caspase-1 compared with other groups. Both HIV(+)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) women had significantly higher sCD14 levels compared with other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HCV mono-infected patients had reduced levels of phosphorylation of STAT1 compared with other groups as well as lower basal levels of expression of the IFN-stimulated genes, OAS1, ISG15, and USP18 (UBP43). Basal expression of USP18, a functional antagonist of ISG15, as well as USP18/ISG15 ratios were increased in the HIV(+)/HCV(+) group compared with HIV(-)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) groups. A more pronounced systemic inflammatory profile as well as increased expression ratios of USP18 to ISG15 may contribute to the more rapid progression of liver disease in HIV(+)/HCV(+) individuals. PMID:24955730

  8. Cytokine and Growth Factor Responses After Radiotherapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Gaber, M. Waleed

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the time course and clinical significance of cytokines and peptide growth factors in pediatric patients with ependymoma treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We measured 15 cytokines and growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-{gamma}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-{alpha}) from 30 patients before RT and 2 and 24 h, weekly for 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the initiation of RT. Two longitudinal models for the trend of log-transformed measurements were fitted, one during treatment and one through 12 months. Results: During RT, log IL-8 declined at a rate of -0.10389/wk (p = 0.0068). The rate of decline was greater (p = 0.028) for patients with an infratentorial tumor location. The decline in IL-8 after RT was significant when stratified by infratentorial tumor location (p = 0.0345) and more than one surgical procedure (p = 0.0272). During RT, the decline in log VEGF was significant when stratified by the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After RT, the log VEGF declined significantly at a rate of -0.06207/mo. The decline was significant for males (p = 0.0222), supratentorial tumors (p = 0.0158), one surgical procedure (p = 0.0222), no ventriculoperitoneal shunt (p = 0.0005), and the absence of treatment failure (p = 0.0028). Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 declined significantly during RT and the decline differed according to tumor location. The angiogenesis factor VEGF declined significantly during the 12 months after RT. The decline was greater in males, those without a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and in those with favorable disease factors, including one surgical procedure, supratentorial tumor location, and

  9. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  10. Rapid Detection of Neutrophil Oxidative Burst Capacity is Predictive of Whole Blood Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Philip J.; Schaub, Leasha J.; Dallelucca, Jurandir J.; Pusateri, Anthony E.; Sheppard, Forest R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maladaptive immune responses, particularly cytokine and chemokine-driven, are a significant contributor to the deleterious inflammation present in many types of injury and infection. Widely available applications to rapidly assess individual inflammatory capacity could permit identification of patients at risk for exacerbated immune responses and guide therapy. Here we evaluate neutrophil oxidative burst (NOX) capacity measured by plate reader to immuno-type Rhesus Macaques as an acute strategy to rapidly detect inflammatory capacity and predict maladaptive immune responses as assayed by cytokine array. Methods Whole blood was collected from anesthetized Rhesus Macaques (n = 25) and analyzed for plasma cytokine secretion (23-plex Luminex assay) and NOX capacity. For cytokine secretion, paired samples were either unstimulated or ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated (100μg/mL/24h). NOX capacity was measured in dihydrorhodamine-123 loaded samples following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin treatment. Pearson’s test was utilized to correlate NOX capacity with cytokine secretion, p<0.05 considered significant. Results LPS stimulation induced secretion of the inflammatory molecules G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12/23(p40), IL-18, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα. Although values were variable, several cytokines correlated with NOX capacity, p-values≤0.0001. Specifically, IL-1β (r = 0.66), IL-6 (r = 0.74), the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12/23(p40) (r = 0.78), and TNFα (r = 0.76) were strongly associated with NOX. Conclusion NOX capacity correlated with Th1-polarizing cytokine secretion, indicating its ability to rapidly predict inflammatory responses. These data suggest that NOX capacity may quickly identify patients at risk for maladaptive immune responses and who may benefit from immuno-modulatory therapies. Future studies will assess the in-vivo predictive value of NOX in animal models of immune-mediated pathologies. PMID

  11. Molecular signatures of phytol-derived immunostimulants in the context of chemokine-cytokine microenvironment and enhanced immune response.

    PubMed

    Aachoui, Youssef; Chowdhury, Roshni Roy; Fitch, Richard W; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2011-01-01

    In a previous report, we observed that the phytol-derived immunostimulant, PHIS-01 (phytanol), is a nontoxic oil-in-water adjuvant which is superior to most commercial adjuvants. In contrast, the parent diterpene alcohol phytol, though highly effective as an adjuvant, is relatively toxic. To assess the importance of the polar functional group in PHIS-01, we prepared two new compounds PHIS-02 (phytanyl amine) and PHIS-03 (phytanyl mannose). All three phytol derivatives proved to be excellent adjuvants, but differed in solubility and mode of action. To delineate their molecular signatures in the local microenvironment, we performed inflammasome and cytokine microarray analyses with the peritoneal fluid of mice treated with alum or the phytol compounds above, in the presence or absence of soluble protein antigens. We report here that the phytol derivatives had a significant time-dependent impact on the host chemokine-cytokine microenvironment and subsequently on specific humoral responses. Moreover, the inclusion of protein immunogens induced further changes in host microenvironments, including rapid (<2h) expression of cytokines and chemotactic factors (IL-6, MCP-1, KC, MIP-1, and LIX), implying mobilization and activation of neutrophils, and monocytes. PHIS-01 proved to be the most effective in this regard. Inflammatory cytokine cascades were dominant even after 24h possibly to facilitate involvement of the acquired immune system with the release of B-lymphocyte chemo-attractant BLC, T-cell activation-3 chemokines TCA, IL-4, IL-12, and TIMP-1. We also noted enhanced expression of NLRP genes including NLRP3 with both alum and phytol derivatives (particularly PHIS-01). PMID:21813116

  12. Effect of exhaustive exercise stress on the cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, C; König, D; Harnischmacher, R; Keul, J; Berg, A; Northoff, H

    1997-03-01

    Fifteen athletes were investigated 24 h before, 1 h after, and 20 h after an exhaustive exercise stress test (mean duration 68 min). Testing for cytokines was done in serum, urine, and the supernatants of whole blood cell cultures, which were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), concanavalin A (Con A), or phythaemagglutinin (PHA). Elevated levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were found 1 h after the run in both serum and urine samples. TNF-alpha in serum was also increased, whereas IL-2 in urine was decreased after the exercise. All other testings in serum and urine (including IFN-gamma) gave borderline or negative results. In cell cultures, the LPS-induced release of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6 was suppressed 1 h after exercise. Also, the Con-A-induced and LPS-induced release of IFN-gamma, and the PHA-induced release of IL-2 were suppressed 1 h after exercise. In contrast, Con-A-induced release of IL-2 was mildly increased after the run. We conclude that exercise of the intensity and duration described here causes an activation of the immune system, which is immediately counter-regulated. Twenty hours after the exercise, most of the observed changes were back to pre-exercise levels, indicating only a short duration for this suppressive counter-regulation. PMID:9139173

  13. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferon-β response in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J.; Millonig, Alban; Bertolotto, Antonio; Comabella, Manuel; Giovannoni, Gavin; Guger, Michael; Hoelzl, Martina; Khalil, Michael; Fazekas, Franz; Killestein, Joep; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Malucchi, Simona; Mehling, Matthias; Montalban, Xavier; Rudzki, Dagmar; Schautzer, Franz; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Deisenhammer, Florian; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)–β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays. Baseline cytokine profiles were grouped by hierarchical clustering analysis. Demographic features, changes in cytokines, and clinical outcome were then assessed in the clustered patient groups. Results: A total of 157 patients were included in the study and clustered into 6 distinct subsets by baseline cytokine profiles. These subsets differed significantly in their clinical and biological response to IFN-β therapy. Two subsets were associated with patients who responded poorly to therapy. Two other subsets, associated with a good response to therapy, showed a significant reduction in relapse rates and no worsening of disability. Each subset also had differential changes in cytokine levels after 3 months of IFN-β treatment. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the immunologic pathways of the RRMS population, which correlates with IFN-β response. PMID:26894205

  14. Response to stimulation with recombinant cytokines and synthesis of cytokines by murine intestinal macrophages infected with the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, N; Young, L S; Bermudez, L E

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the gut is the chief portal of entry for organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in AIDS patients. Bacterial invasion of intestinal mucosa presumably occurs through epithelial cells, and M cells in the Peyer's patches, where the bacteria have contact with immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and T and B lymphocytes. As mucosal macrophages are probably the first line of defense against MAC, we examined their ability to inhibit intracellular growth of MAC when properly stimulated. Mouse intestinal macrophages were purified, infected with MAC 101, serovar 1, and MAC 86-2686, serovar 16, and subsequently stimulated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Viable intracellular bacteria were quantitated at 24 h after infection and again after 4 days of infection. Stimulation with TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and GM-CSF, but not M-CSF, was associated with mycobacteriostatic and/or mycobactericidal activity in macrophages. Treatment with 10(3) U of TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IFN-gamma per ml at 24 h prior to infection with MAC resulted in a significant enhancement in killing of MAC at 4 days after infection, compared with that observed for macrophages exposed to cytokines after infection. When stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or live MAC, intestinal macrophages had produced significantly less TNF-alpha and transforming growth factor beta than had splenic and peritoneal macrophages, although the levels of production of interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 among the three populations of cells were similar. Intestinal macrophages can be stimulated with cytokines to inhibit the intracellular growth of MAC, but they have differentiated abilities to produce cytokines which can modulate the anti-MAC immune response. PMID:7822018

  15. The plastic response of Manduca sexta to host and non-host plants.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Christopher; Bretschneider, Anne; Heckel, David G; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald; Hansson, Bill S; Vogel, Heiko

    2015-08-01

    Specialist insect herbivores have evolved efficient ways to adapt to the major defenses of their host plants. Although Manduca sexta, specialized on Solanaceous plants, has become a model organism for insect molecular biology, little is known about its adaptive responses to the chemical defenses of its hosts. To study larval performance and transcriptomic responses to host and non-host plants, we conducted developmental assays and replicated RNAseq experiments with Manduca larvae fed on different Solanaceous plants as well as on a Brassicaceous non-host plant, Brassica napus. Manduca larvae developed fastest on Nicotiana attenuata, but no significant differences in performance were found on larvae fed on other Solanaceae or the non-host B. napus. The RNAseq experiments revealed that Manduca larvae display plastic responses at the gene expression level, and transcriptional signatures specific to the challenges of each host- and non-host plant. Our observations are not consistent with expectations that specialist herbivores would perform poorly on non-host plants. Instead, our findings demonstrate the ability of this specialized insect herbivore to efficiently use a larger repertoire of host plants than it utilizes in the field. PMID:26070471

  16. Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rudel, Thomas; Goebel, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defense answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies. PMID:23847769

  17. Preterm Infants Have Deficient Monocyte and Lymphocyte Cytokine Responses to Group B Streptococcus▿

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Andrew J.; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  18. Preterm infants have deficient monocyte and lymphocyte cytokine responses to group B streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Currie, Andrew J; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  19. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  20. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: oxidant mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, Amy; Ning, YaoYu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-acetyl cysteine (20mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 uM) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H2O2 generated by glucose oxidase, 10 uM/hr), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H2O2. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H2O2 but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H2O2-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H2O2 released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity. PMID:17222881

  1. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic response in infectious disease involves host as well as microbial determinants. Because the immune and inflammatory response to Leishmania (Viannia) species defines the outcome of infection and efficacy of treatment, immunomodulation is considered a promising therapeutic strategy. However, since Leishmania infection and antileishmanial drugs can themselves modulate drug transport, metabolism and/or immune responses, immunotherapeutic approaches require integrated assessment of host and parasite responses. Methodology To achieve an integrated assessment of current and innovative therapeutic strategies, we determined host and parasite responses to miltefosine and meglumine antimoniate alone and in combination with pentoxifylline or CpG 2006 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Parasite survival and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13 were evaluated concomitantly in PBMCs infected with Luc-L. (V.) panamensis exposed to meglumine antimoniate (4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 μg SbV/mL) or miltefosine (2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μM HePC). Concentrations of 4 μM of miltefosine and 8 μg SbV/mL were selected for evaluation in combination with immunomodulators based on the high but partial reduction of parasite burden by these antileishmanial concentrations without affecting cytokine secretion of infected PBMCs. Intracellular parasite survival was determined by luminometry and cytokine secretion measured by ELISA and multiplex assays. Principal Findings Anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of L. (V.) panamensis infection were evaluable concomitantly with viability of Leishmania within monocyte-derived macrophages present in PBMC cultures. Both antileishmanial drugs reduced the parasite load of macrophages; miltefosine also suppressed IL-10 and IL-13 secretion in a dose dependent manner. Pentoxifylline did not affect parasite survival or alter antileishmanial effects of miltefosine or meglumine

  2. Evaluation of the transcriptional status of host cytokines and viral genes in the trachea of vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens after challenge with the infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Vagnozzi, Ariel; Riblet, Sylva; Zavala, Guillermo; Ecco, Roselene; Afonso, Claudio L; García, Maricarmen

    2016-02-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis is a highly contagious disease of chickens responsible for significant economic losses for the poultry industry worldwide. The disease is caused by Gallid herpesvirus-1 (GaHV-1) commonly known as the infectious laryngotracheitis virus. Although characterized by their potential to regain virulence, chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines are the most effective vaccines against laryngotracheitis as they significantly reduce the replication of challenge virus in the trachea and conjunctiva. Knowledge on the nature of protective immunity elicited by CEO vaccines is very limited. Therefore, elucidating the origin of the immune responses elicited by CEO vaccination is relevant for development of safer control strategies. In this study the transcription levels of key host immune genes (IFN-γ, IFN-β, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-18) and viral genes (ICP4, ICP27, UL46, UL49), as well as viral genome loads in trachea were quantified at 6 and 12 hours post-challenge of CEO vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens. Immediately after challenge a significant increase in IFN-γ gene expression was followed by a significant reduction in viral replication. In contrast to the rapid induction of IFN-γ, expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8) and type I IFN β was either slightly reduced or remained at basal levels. These suggest that the former cytokines may not play important roles during immediate early responses induced by ILTV challenge in either vaccinated or non-vaccinated chickens. Overall, these results suggest that the rapid expression of IFN-γ may induce pathways of antiviral responses necessary for blocking early virus replication. PMID:26926298

  3. Preserved ex vivo inflammatory status and cytokine responses in naturally long-lived mice

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Lorena; Lord, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Preserved immune cell function has been reported in mice that achieve extreme longevity. Since cytokines are major modulators of immune responses, we aimed to determine the levels of 21 cytokines secreted ex vivo by peritoneal leukocytes cultured under basal- and mitogen- (conconavalin A (ConA) and LPS) stimulated conditions in middle-aged (44 ± 4 weeks), old (69 ± 4 weeks), very old (92 ± 4 weeks), and extreme long-lived (125 ± 4 weeks) ICR (CD1) female mice. The secretion of cytokines was measured by multiplex luminometry. Increased basal levels of proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, and TNF-α were seen in the old and very old animals, accompanied by decreased IL-10. In contrast, the extreme long-lived mice maintained the overall cytokine profile of middle-aged mice, though the basal secretion of IL-2, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-12 (p40) was raised. Under LPS- and/or ConA-stimulated conditions, leukocytes from old and very old animals showed a significantly impaired response with respect to secretion of Th1 cytokines IL-3, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, and TNF-α; Th2 cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13; and the regulatory cytokines IL-2, IL-5, and IL-17. Extreme long-lived mice preserved the middle-aged-like cytokine profile, with the most striking effect seen for the IL-2 response to ConA, which was minimal in the old and very old mice but increased with respect to the middle-aged level in extreme long-lived mice. Chemokine responses in regard to KC, MCP-1, MIP1β, and RANTES were more variable, though similar secretion of LPS-induced KC and MCP-1 and ConA-induced MCP-1, MIP-1β, and RANTES was found in long-lived and middle-aged mice. Thus, extreme long-lived animals showed only a minimal inflammatory profile, much lower than the old and very old groups and also lower than the middle-aged, which is likely mediated by the increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. This was coupled to a robust response to immune stimuli

  4. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination. PMID:18319583

  5. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  6. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  7. Cellular and Cytokine Responses in Feathers of Chickens Vaccinated Against Marek's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to characterize cellular and cytokine responses as indicators of cell-mediated immune response in feathers of chickens vaccinated against Marek’s disease (MD). Feathers constitute the site of virus shedding in the case of Marek’s disease virus (MDV). The feather sample...

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human macrophages modulates the cytokine response to Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, O; Fishman, J A; Koziel, H; Pinkston, P; Rose, R M; Remold, H G

    1994-01-01

    The present studies examined production of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and IL-6 by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Pneumocystis carinii in vitro and the impact of concurrent macrophage infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on these cytokine responses. Macrophages were infected with the HIV-1 BaL monocytotropic strain for 10 to 14 days and then exposed to P. carinii. At various times following P. carinii treatment, culture supernatants were harvested to assess the cytokine profile. Addition of P. carinii to HIV-uninfected macrophages resulted in augmented production of IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IL-1 beta protein. By contrast, in HIV-infected macrophages exposed to P. carinii, only the release of IL-6 was increased compared with that for HIV-uninfected macrophages, while the levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta decreased. This altered response was confirmed at the molecular level for TNF-alpha mRNA. Preventing physical contact between P. carinii and macrophages by a membrane filter inhibited all cytokine release. Substituting P. carinii with a preparation of P. carinii 95- to 115-kDa major membrane glycoprotein A yielded a response similar to that obtained by addition of intact P. carinii. These results suggest that HIV-1 infection of human macrophages modulates cytokine responses to P. carinii. Images PMID:8300221

  9. Divergence in Olfactory Host Plant Preference in D. mojavensis in Response to Cactus Host Use

    PubMed Central

    Stensmyr, Marcus C.; Shann, Jodi; Hansson, Bill S.; Rollmann, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. In this study, we examine the evolution of host plant preferences in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that feeds and breeds on different cacti throughout its range. We show divergence in electrophysiological responses and olfactory behavior among populations with host plant shifts. Specifically, significant divergence was observed in the Mojave Desert population that specializes on barrel cactus. Differences were observed in electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organs and in behavioral responses to barrel cactus volatiles. Together our results suggest that the peripheral nervous system has changed in response to different ecological environments and that these changes likely contribute to divergence among D. mojavensis populations. PMID:23936137

  10. Divergence in olfactory host plant preference in D. mojavensis in response to cactus host use.

    PubMed

    Date, Priya; Dweck, Hany K M; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Shann, Jodi; Hansson, Bill S; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. In this study, we examine the evolution of host plant preferences in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that feeds and breeds on different cacti throughout its range. We show divergence in electrophysiological responses and olfactory behavior among populations with host plant shifts. Specifically, significant divergence was observed in the Mojave Desert population that specializes on barrel cactus. Differences were observed in electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organs and in behavioral responses to barrel cactus volatiles. Together our results suggest that the peripheral nervous system has changed in response to different ecological environments and that these changes likely contribute to divergence among D. mojavensis populations. PMID:23936137

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-operonic PE32/PPE65 Proteins Alter Host Immune Responses by Hampering Th1 Response

    PubMed Central

    Khubaib, Mohd; Sheikh, Javaid A.; Pandey, Saurabh; Srikanth, Battu; Bhuwan, Manish; Khan, Nooruddin; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.

    2016-01-01

    PE/PPE genes, present in cluster with ESAT-6 like genes, are suspected to have a role in antigenic variation and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their roles in immune evasion and immune modulation of host are also well documented. We present evidence that PE32/PPE65 present within the RD8 region are co-operonic, co-transcribed, and co-translated, and play role in modulating host immune responses. Experiments with macrophage cell lines revealed that this protein complex suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 whereas also inducing high expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Immunization of mice with these recombinant proteins dampens an effective Th1 response as evident from reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG sub-typing from serum of immunized mice revealed high levels of IgG1 when compared with IgG2a and IgG2b. Further IgG1/IgG2a ratio clearly demonstrated that the protein complex manipulates the host immune response favorable to the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the co-transcribed and co-translated PE32 and PPE65 antigens are involved specifically in modulating anti-mycobacterial host immune response by hampering Th1 response. PMID:27242739

  12. Heat stroke activates a stress-induced cytokine response in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Welc, Steven S; Clanton, Thomas L; Dineen, Shauna M; Leon, Lisa R

    2013-10-15

    Heat stroke (HS) induces a rapid elevation in a number of circulating cytokines. This is often attributed to the stimulatory effects of endotoxin, released from damaged intestine, on immune cells. However, parenchymal cells also produce cytokines, and skeletal muscle, comprising a large proportion of body mass, is thought to participate. We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle exhibits a cytokine response to HS that parallels the systemic response in conscious mice heated to a core temperature of 42.4°C (TcMax). Diaphragm and hindlimb muscles showed a rapid rise in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleuin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and transient inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) throughout early recovery, a pattern that parallels changes in circulating cytokines. IL-6 protein was transiently elevated in both muscles at ∼32 min after reaching TcMax. Other responses observed included an upregulation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) and heat shock protein-72 (HSP-72) mRNA but no change in TLR-2 or HSP25 mRNA. Furthermore, c-jun and c-fos mRNA increased. Together, c-jun/c-fos form the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor, critical for stress-induced regulation of IL-6. Interestingly, a second "late-phase" (24 h) cytokine response, with increases in IL-6, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNF-α protein, were observed in hindlimb but not diaphragm muscle. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle responds to HS with a distinct "stress-induced immune response," characterized by an early upregulation of IL-6, IL-10, and TLR-4 and suppression of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA, a pattern discrete from classic innate immune cytokine responses. PMID:23928112

  13. Coccidioidomycosis: Host Response and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Rebecca A.; Magee, D. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is caused by the dimorphic fungi in the genus Coccidioides. These fungi live as mycelia in the soil of desert areas of the American Southwest, and when the infectious spores, the arthroconidia, are inhaled, they convert into the parasitic spherule/endospore phase. Most infections are mild, but these organisms are frank pathogens and can cause severe lethal disease in fully immunocompetent individuals. While there is increased risk of disseminated disease in certain racial groups and immunocompromised persons, the fact that there are hosts who contain the initial infection and exhibit long-term immunity to reinfection supports the hypothesis that a vaccine against these pathogens is feasible. Multiple studies have shown that protective immunity against primary disease is associated with T-helper 1 (Th-1)-associated immune responses. The single best vaccine in animal models, formalin-killed spherules (FKS), was tested in a human trial but was not found to be significantly protective. This result has prompted studies to better define immunodominant Coccidioides antigen with the thought that a subunit vaccine would be protective. These efforts have defined multiple candidates, but the single best individual immunogen is the protein termed antigen 2/proline-rich antigen (Ag2/PRA). Studies in multiple laboratories have shown that Ag2/PRA as both protein and genetic vaccines provides significant protection against mice challenged systemically with Coccidioides. Unfortunately, compared to the FKS vaccine, it is significantly less protective as measured by both assays of reduction in fungal CFU and assays of survival. The capacity of Ag2/PRA to induce only partial protection was emphasized when animals were challenged intranasally. Thus, there is a need to define new candidates to create a multivalent vaccine to increase the effectiveness of Ag2/PRA. Efforts of genomic screening using expression library immunization or bioinformatic approaches to identify

  14. Mycobacterial Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides Negatively Regulate Host Toll-like Receptor 4, MyD88-dependent Proinflammatory Cytokines, and TRIF-dependent Co-stimulatory Molecule Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Doz, Emilie; Rose, Stéphanie; Court, Nathalie; Front, Sophie; Vasseur, Virginie; Charron, Sabine; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain; Fremaux, Isabelle; Delneste, Yves; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernhard; Martin, Olivier R.; Quesniaux, Valerie F. J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates host immune responses through proteins and complex glycolipids. Here, we report that the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor phosphatidyl-myo-inositol hexamannosides PIM6 or PIM2 exert potent anti-inflammatory activities. PIM strongly inhibited the Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation protein 88 (MyD88)-mediated release of NO, cytokines, and chemokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 12 (IL-12) p40, IL-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and also IL-10 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages. This effect was independent of the presence of TLR2. PIM also reduced the LPS-induced MyD88-independent, TIR domain-containing adaptor protein inducing interferon β (TRIF)-mediated expression of co-stimulatory receptors. PIM inhibited LPS/TLR4-induced NFκB translocation. Synthetic PIM1 and a PIM2 mimetic recapitulated these in vitro activities and inhibited endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, TNF and keratinocyte-derived chemokine secretion, and neutrophil recruitment in vivo. Mannosyl, two acyl chains, and phosphatidyl residues are essential for PIM anti-inflammatory activity, whereas the inosityl moiety is dispensable. Therefore, PIM exert potent antiinflammatory effects both in vitro and in vivo that may contribute to the strategy developed by mycobacteria for repressing the host innate immunity, and synthetic PIM analogs represent powerful anti-inflammatory leads. PMID:19561082

  15. Do β-Cells Generate Peroxynitrite in Response to Cytokine Treatment?*

    PubMed Central

    Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Mathews, Clayton E.; Corbett, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reactive species that is responsible for cytokine-mediated β-cell death. Inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase prevent this death, and addition of exogenous nitric oxide using donors induces β-cell death. The reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide results in the generation of peroxynitrite, and this powerful oxidant has been suggested to be the mediator of β-cell death in response to cytokine treatment. Recently, coumarin-7-boronate has been developed as a probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite. Using this reagent, we show that addition of the NADPH oxidase activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to nitric oxide-producing macrophages results in peroxynitrite generation. Using a similar approach, we demonstrate that cytokines fail to stimulate peroxynitrite generation by rat islets and insulinoma cells, either with or without phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment. When forced to produce superoxide using redox cyclers, this generation is associated with protection from nitric oxide toxicity. These findings indicate that: (i) nitric oxide is the likely mediator of the toxic effects of cytokines, (ii) β-cells do not produce peroxynitrite in response to cytokines, and (iii) when forced to produce superoxide, the scavenging of nitric oxide by superoxide is associated with protection of β-cells from nitric oxide-mediated toxicity. PMID:24194521

  16. Impact of influenza vaccine formulation with a detailed analysis of the cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Szyszko, E; Brokstad, K; Cox, R J; Hovden, A-O; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2006-11-01

    Vaccination provides the most effective method of limiting the impact of influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines are available in three formulations and more information needs to be generated on how antigen presented in different vaccine formulations influences the subsequent immune response. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of two different influenza vaccine formulations on the resulting antibody and cytokine responses and compared these responses with influenza infection. Mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with one or two doses of whole or split virus vaccine or alternatively intranasally infected with influenza virus. Lymphocytes were isolated from spleen cells and stimulated in vitro for 24 or 72 h for analysis of cytokine profile at the gene expression and at the protein level. Additionally, whole blood was collected and the serum antibody response investigated by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that one dose of whole virus vaccine induced higher antibody and cytokine responses and thus was more immunogenic in unprimed mice than split virus vaccine. Whole virus vaccine induced a strong IFN-gamma (type 1) immune response after one dose of vaccine and a more mixed cytokine response after the second dose. Split virus vaccine induced a type 2 response, particularly after two vaccine doses. Our results show that two doses of vaccine (both vaccine formulation) were more effective in induction of Th2 type of cytokines and thus indicate that both the formulation and also the number of vaccine doses substantially influences the magnitude and quality of the immune response. PMID:17032238

  17. Resistant and susceptible responses of cereal hosts to aphid feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although cereal host resistance to aphids has been examined extensively, little information is available on etiology of aphid injury and biochemical responses of resistant and susceptible cereal hosts to aphid feeding. Our team examined both aphid and plant factors for the Russian wheat aphid (RWA)...

  18. Contrasting host immuno-inflammatory responses to bacterial challenge within venous and diabetic ulcers.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Rachael L; Cullen, Breda M; Hill, Katja E; Price, Patricia E; Harding, Keith G; Thomas, David W; Stephens, Phil; Moseley, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Within chronic wounds, the relationship between the clinical diagnosis of infection and bacterial/immuno-inflammatory responses is imprecise. This study prospectively examined the interrelationship between clinical, microbiological, and proinflammatory biomarker levels between chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs) and diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). Wound swabs and fluids were collected from CVLUs (n = 18) and DFUs (n = 15) and diagnosed clinically as noninfected or infected; and qualitative/quantitative microbiology was performed. CVLU and DFU fluids were also analyzed for cytokine, growth factor, receptor, proteinase/proteinase inhibitor; and oxidative stress biomarker (protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde, and antioxidant capacity) levels. While no correlations existed between clinical diagnosis, microbiology, or biomarker profiles, increasing bacterial bioburden (≥10(7) colony-forming unit/mL) was associated with significant alterations in cytokine, growth factor, and receptor levels. These responses contrasted between ulcer type, with elevated and decreased cytokine, growth factor, and receptor levels in CVLUs and DFUs with increasing bioburden, respectively. Despite proteinase biomarkers exhibiting few differences between CVLUs and DFUs, significant elevations in antioxidant capacities correlated with increased bioburden in CVLU fluids, but not in DFUs. Furthermore, oxidative stress biomarker levels were significantly elevated in all DFU fluids compared with CVLUs. This study provides further insight into the contrasting disease-specific host responses to bacterial challenge within infected CVLUs and DFUs. PMID:24354589

  19. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  20. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients. PMID:27110576

  1. Intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine does not modify plasma cytokines and chemokines or intracellular cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum in Mozambican Children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytokines and chemokines are key mediators of anti-malarial immunity. We evaluated whether Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) had an effect on the acquisition of these cellular immune responses in Mozambican children. Multiple cytokines and chemokines were quantified in plasma by luminex, and antigen-specific cytokine production in whole blood was determined by intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry, at ages 5, 9, 12 and 24 months. Results IPTi-SP did not significantly affect the proportion of CD3+ cells producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-10. Overall, plasma cytokine or chemokine concentrations did not differ between treatment groups. Th1 and pro-inflammatory responses were higher than Th2 and anti-inflammatory responses, respectively, and IFN-γ:IL-4 ratios were higher for placebo than for SP recipients. Levels of cytokines and chemokines varied according to age, declining from 5 to 9 months. Plasma concentrations of IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13 were associated with current infection or prior malaria episodes. Higher frequencies of IFN-γ and IL-10 producing CD3+ cells and elevated IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-13 in plasma were individually associated with increased malaria incidence, at different time points. When all markers were analyzed together, only higher IL-17 at 12 months was associated with lower incidence of malaria up to 24 months. Conclusions Our work has confirmed that IPTi-SP does not negatively affect the development of cellular immune response during early childhood. This study has also provided new insights as to how these cytokine responses are acquired upon age and exposure to P. falciparum, as well as their associations with malaria susceptibility. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00209795 PMID:22280502

  2. Altered Responses to Homeostatic Cytokines in Patients with Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mouthon, Luc; Landires, Ivan; Rohrlich, Pierre; Pestre, Vincent; Thèze, Jacques; Lortholary, Olivier; Chakrabarti, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare immune deficiency characterized by a protracted CD4+ T cell loss of unknown etiology and by the occurrence of opportunistic infections similar to those seen in AIDS. We investigated whether a defect in responses to cytokines that control CD4+ T cell homeostasis could play a role in ICL. Immunophenotype and signaling responses to interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-2, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were analyzed by flow cytometry in CD4+ T cells from 15 ICL patients and 15 healthy blood donors. The induction of phospho-STAT5 after IL-7 stimulation was decreased in memory CD4+ T cells of some ICL patients, which correlated with a decreased expression of the IL-7Rα receptor chain (R = 0.74, p<0.005) and with lower CD4+ T cell counts (R = 0.69, p<0.005). IL-2 responses were also impaired, both in the Treg and conventional memory subsets. Decreased IL-2 responses correlated with decreased IL-7 responses (R = 0.75, p<0.005), pointing to combined defects that may significantly perturb CD4+ T cell homeostasis in a subset of ICL patients. Unexpectedly, responses to the IL-7-related cytokine TSLP were increased in ICL patients, while they remained barely detectable in healthy controls. TSLP responses correlated inversely with IL-7 responses (R = −0.41; p<0.05), suggesting a cross-regulation between the two cytokine systems. In conclusion, IL-7 and IL-2 signaling are impaired in ICL, which may account for the loss of CD4+ T cell homeostasis. Increased TSLP responses point to a compensatory homeostatic mechanism that may mitigate defects in γc cytokine responses. PMID:23383227

  3. In vivo effects of the antiglucocorticoid RU 486 on glucocorticoid and cytokine responses to Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, A S; Rock, C S; Keogh, C V; Lowry, S F; Calvano, S E

    1992-01-01

    The endogenous adrenocortical response to sepsis is critical for host survival. The in vivo interactions among the endogenous glucocorticoid response, the induction of cytokines, and host survival during endotoxemia were explored in this study by use of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU 486. Male Lewis rats underwent sterile insertion of a right jugular venous catheter. After a 72-h recovery period, animals received a 50% lethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (2.5 mg/kg) via the catheter after pretreatment for 30 min prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment with (i) vehicle alone intravenously (i.v.) (-corticosterone [-Cort]/-RU 486/+LPS) (n = 10), (ii) the antiglucocorticoid RU 486 (10 mg/kg) i.v. (-Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) (n = 11), or (iii) RU 486 (10 mg/kg) i.v. in animals that had undergone subcutaneous implantation of a corticosterone pellet at the time of catheter insertion (+Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) (n = 10). Except in animals receiving corticosterone pretreatment, baseline plasma corticosterone levels were low in all groups. Plasma corticosterone levels increased significantly (P less than 0.001) above the baseline following LPS administration. Animals in the -Cort/+RU 486/+LPS-treated group exhibited significantly increased mortality (P less than 0.001), with only 9% of the animals surviving at 72 h, as well as significantly increased plasma interleukin-6 levels, compared with animals receiving the vehicle alone (-Cort/-RU 486/+LPS), which showed 50% mortality. Pretreatment with corticosterone and RU 486 (+Cort/+RU 486/+LPS) significantly (P less than 0.001) reversed the mortality observed with RU 486 pretreatment alone (-Cort/+RU 486/+LPS), with 70% of the animals surviving at 72 h, and significantly attenuated the peak plasma tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 responses to LPS, compared with those in the animals treated with vehicle alone. These data demonstrate that the blockade of glucocorticoid binding by RU 486 increases LPS

  4. Inflammatory cytokines provide both infection-responsive and developmental signals for blood development: Lessons from the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hall, Chris; Crosier, Phil; Crosier, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare, largely dormant, long-lived cells that are capable of establishing and regenerating all mature blood cell lineages throughout the life of the host. Given their therapeutic importance, understanding factors that regulate HSC development and influence HSC proliferation and differentiation is of great interest. Exploring HSC biology through the lens of infection has altered our traditional view of the HSC. The HSC can now be considered a component of the immune response to infection. In response to inflammatory cytokine signaling, HSCs enhance their proliferative state and contribute to the production of in-demand blood cell lineages. Similar cytokine signaling pathways also participate during embryonic HSC production. With its highly conserved hematopoietic system and experimental tractability, the zebrafish model has made significant contributions to the hematopoietic field. In particular, the zebrafish system has been ideally suited to help reveal the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying HSC development. This review highlights recent zebrafish studies that have uncovered new mechanistic insights into how inflammatory signaling pathways influence HSC behavior during infection and HSC production within the embryo. PMID:26563946

  5. Impaired cytokine responses in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, M H; van de Vosse, E; Goldbach-Mansky, R; Holland, S M

    2014-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is characterized by dysregulated inflammation with excessive interleukin (IL)-1β activation and secretion. Neonatal-onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID) is the most severe form. We explored cytokine responses in 32 CAPS patients before and after IL-1β blocking therapy. We measured cytokines produced by activated peripheral blood monuclear cells (PBMCs) from treated and untreated CAPS patients after stimulation for 48 h with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), PHA plus IL-12, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS plus interferon (IFN)-γ. We measured IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in the supernatants. PBMCs from three untreated CAPS patients were cultured in the presence of the IL-1β blocker Anakinra. Fifty healthy individuals served as controls. CAPS patients had high spontaneous production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IFN-γ by unstimulated cells. However, stimulation indexes (SIs, ratio of stimulated to unstimulated production) of these cytokines to PHA and LPS were low in NOMID patients compared to controls. Unstimulated IL-10 and IL-12p70 production was normal, but up-regulation after PHA and LPS was also low. LPS plus IFN-γ inadequately up-regulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IL-10 in CAPS patients. In-vitro but not in-vivo treatment with Anakinra improved SIs by lowering spontaneous cytokine production. However, in-vitro treatment did not improve the low stimulated cytokine levels. Activating mutations in NLRP3 in CAPS are correlated with poor SIs to PHA, LPS and IFN-γ. The impairment in stimulated cytokine responses in spite of IL-1β blocking therapy suggests a broader intrinsic defect in CAPS patients, which is not corrected by targeting IL-1β. PMID:24773462

  6. URI in athletes: are mucosal immunity and cytokine responses key risk factors?

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Michael; Bishop, Nicolette C

    2013-07-01

    Infection incidence among athletes is highest during periods of intensified training and competition and after strenuous long-distance events. Which aspects of depressed immune function are responsible for this increased infection risk are not known, but our hypothesis is that lower salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion and a higher antiinflammatory cytokine response to antigen exposure are key determinants of infection risk. PMID:23792489

  7. Environmental Mold and Mycotoxin Exposures Elicit Specific Cytokine and Chemokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Molina, Ramon M.; Thompson, Khristy J.; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Methods and Findings Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation

  8. Differential Biphasic Transcriptional Host Response Associated with Coevolution of Hemagglutinin Quasispecies of Influenza A Virus.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Himanshu; Seidel, Nora; Blaess, Markus F; Claus, Ralf A; Linde, Joerg; Slevogt, Hortense; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Severe influenza associated with strong symptoms and lung inflammation can be caused by intra-host evolution of quasispecies with aspartic acid or glycine in hemagglutinin position 222 (HA-222D/G; H1 numbering). To gain insights into the dynamics of host response to this coevolution and to identify key mechanisms contributing to copathogenesis, the lung transcriptional response of BALB/c mice infected with an A(H1N1)pdm09 isolate consisting HA-222D/G quasispecies was analyzed from days 1 to 12 post infection (p.i). At day 2 p.i. 968 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected. The DEG number declined to 359 at day 4 and reached 1001 at day 7 p.i. prior to recovery. Interestingly, a biphasic expression profile was shown for the majority of these genes. Cytokine assays confirmed these results on protein level exemplarily for two key inflammatory cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 6. Using a reverse engineering strategy, a regulatory network was inferred to hypothetically explain the biphasic pattern for selected DEGs. Known regulatory interactions were extracted by Pathway Studio 9.0 and integrated during network inference. The hypothetic gene regulatory network revealed a positive feedback loop of Ifng, Stat1, and Tlr3 gene signaling that was triggered by the HA-G222 variant and correlated with a clinical symptom score indicating disease severity. PMID:27536272

  9. Differential Biphasic Transcriptional Host Response Associated with Coevolution of Hemagglutinin Quasispecies of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Himanshu; Seidel, Nora; Blaess, Markus F.; Claus, Ralf A.; Linde, Joerg; Slevogt, Hortense; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Severe influenza associated with strong symptoms and lung inflammation can be caused by intra-host evolution of quasispecies with aspartic acid or glycine in hemagglutinin position 222 (HA-222D/G; H1 numbering). To gain insights into the dynamics of host response to this coevolution and to identify key mechanisms contributing to copathogenesis, the lung transcriptional response of BALB/c mice infected with an A(H1N1)pdm09 isolate consisting HA-222D/G quasispecies was analyzed from days 1 to 12 post infection (p.i). At day 2 p.i. 968 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected. The DEG number declined to 359 at day 4 and reached 1001 at day 7 p.i. prior to recovery. Interestingly, a biphasic expression profile was shown for the majority of these genes. Cytokine assays confirmed these results on protein level exemplarily for two key inflammatory cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 6. Using a reverse engineering strategy, a regulatory network was inferred to hypothetically explain the biphasic pattern for selected DEGs. Known regulatory interactions were extracted by Pathway Studio 9.0 and integrated during network inference. The hypothetic gene regulatory network revealed a positive feedback loop of Ifng, Stat1, and Tlr3 gene signaling that was triggered by the HA-G222 variant and correlated with a clinical symptom score indicating disease severity. PMID:27536272

  10. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis. PMID:27262511

  11. TNFα Impairs Rhabdoviral Clearance by Inhibiting the Host Autophagic Antiviral Response.

    PubMed

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Martínez-López, Alicia; Roca, Francisco J; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; García-Moreno, Diana; Falco, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Estepa, Amparo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-06-01

    TNFα is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine with a key role in the activation of the immune system to fight viral infections. Despite its antiviral role, a few viruses might utilize the host produced TNFα to their benefit. Some recent reports have shown that anti-TNFα therapies could be utilized to treat certain viral infections. However, the underlying mechanisms by which TNFα can favor virus replication have not been identified. Here, a rhabdoviral infection model in zebrafish allowed us to identify the mechanism of action by which Tnfa has a deleterious role for the host to combat certain viral infections. Our results demonstrate that Tnfa signals through its receptor Tnfr2 to enhance viral replication. Mechanistically, Tnfa does not affect viral adhesion and delivery from endosomes to the cytosol. In addition, the host interferon response was also unaffected by Tnfa levels. However, Tnfa blocks the host autophagic response, which is required for viral clearance. This mechanism of action provides new therapeutic targets for the treatment of SVCV-infected fish, and advances our understanding of the previously enigmatic deleterious role of TNFα in certain viral infections. PMID:27351838

  12. TNFα Impairs Rhabdoviral Clearance by Inhibiting the Host Autophagic Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Francisco J.; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Candel, Sergio; García-Moreno, Diana; Falco, Alberto; Meseguer, José

    2016-01-01

    TNFα is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine with a key role in the activation of the immune system to fight viral infections. Despite its antiviral role, a few viruses might utilize the host produced TNFα to their benefit. Some recent reports have shown that anti-TNFα therapies could be utilized to treat certain viral infections. However, the underlying mechanisms by which TNFα can favor virus replication have not been identified. Here, a rhabdoviral infection model in zebrafish allowed us to identify the mechanism of action by which Tnfa has a deleterious role for the host to combat certain viral infections. Our results demonstrate that Tnfa signals through its receptor Tnfr2 to enhance viral replication. Mechanistically, Tnfa does not affect viral adhesion and delivery from endosomes to the cytosol. In addition, the host interferon response was also unaffected by Tnfa levels. However, Tnfa blocks the host autophagic response, which is required for viral clearance. This mechanism of action provides new therapeutic targets for the treatment of SVCV-infected fish, and advances our understanding of the previously enigmatic deleterious role of TNFα in certain viral infections. PMID:27351838

  13. Immunologic Characterization of Cytokine Responses to Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 Infection in Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-Yan; Xu, Mei-Yan; Xu, Hong-Mei; Li, Xiu-Jun; Ding, Shu-Jun; Wang, Xian-Jun; Li, Ting-Yu; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Viral encephalitis is a serious complication of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD), but characteristics of cytokines response in enterovirus 71 (EV-71) and/or coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) associated HFMD with or without viral encephalitis remained unclear. We performed a multigroup retrospective study and compared the serum cytokines concentrations among 16 encephalitis patients infected with EV-71 and CV-A16, 24 encephalitis patients with single EV-71 infection, 34 mild HFMD patients with EV-71 infection, 18 mild HFMD patients with CV-A16 infection, and 39 healthy control subjects. Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-22, and IL-23 were significantly higher in encephalitis patients than in HFMD-alone patients when adjusting for age and sex; IL-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-4, IL-22, and IL-1β were significantly higher in HFMD-alone patients of EV-71 infection than in CV-A16 infected HFMD patients; cerebrospinal fluid level of IL-6 was lower in the EV-71/CV-A16 associated encephalitis than that in the EV-71 alone associated encephalitis patients. Over or low expression of the cytokines cascade in HFMD patients appears to play an important role in the elicitation of the immune response to EV-71 and CV-A16. These data will be used to define a cytokine profile, which might help to recognize HFMD patients with the high risk of developing encephalitis. PMID:26166120

  14. IL-12 enhances the natural killer cell cytokine response to Ab-coated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Robin; Dierksheide, Julie; Hu, Yan; Carson, William E

    2002-10-01

    The anti-tumor activity of recombinant mAb's directed against tumor cell growth receptors has generally been considered to result from direct antiproliferative effects, the induction of apoptosis, or possibly Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated against tumor targets. However, it remains unclear to what degree these mechanisms actually aid in the clearance of Ab-coated tumor cells in vivo. We show here that NK cells secrete a distinct profile of potent immunostimulatory cytokines in response to dual stimulation with Ab-coated tumor cells and IL-12. This response could not be duplicated by costimulation with other ILs and was significantly enhanced in the presence of monocytes. Cytokine production was dependent upon synergistic signals mediated by the activating receptor for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaRIII) and the IL-12 receptor expressed on NK cells. Coadministration of Ab-coated tumor cells and IL-12 to BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced circulating levels of NK cell-derived cytokines with the capacity to augment anti-tumor immunity. These findings suggest that, in addition to mediating cellular cytotoxicity and apoptosis, the anti-tumor activity of mAb's might also result from activation of a potent cytokine secretion program within immune effectors capable of recognizing mAb-coated targets. PMID:12370276

  15. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas' disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts' immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host's immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite-host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites-hosts-vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  16. Early cytokine and antibody responses against Coxiella burnetii in aerosol infection of BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Schoffelen, Teske; Self, Joshua S; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A; Netea, Mihai G; van Deuren, Marcel; Joosten, Leo A B; Kersh, Gilbert J

    2015-04-01

    Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium, can give rise to Q fever in humans and is transmitted mainly by inhalation of infected aerosols from animal reservoirs. Serology is commonly used to diagnose Q fever, but the early cellular immune response-i.e., C. burnetii-specific interferon γ (IFN-γ) production in response to antigen challenge-might be an additional diagnostic. Detection of IFN-γ responses has been used to identify past and chronic Q fever infections, but the IFN-γ response in acute Q fever has not been described. By challenging immunocompetent BALB/c mice with aerosols containing phase I C. burnetii, the timing and extent of IFN-γ recall responses were evaluated in an acute C. burnetii infection. Other cytokines were also measured in an effort to identify other potential diagnostic markers. The data show that after initial expansion of bacteria first in lungs and then in other tissues, the infection was cleared from day 10 onwards as reflected by the decreasing number of bacteria. The antigen-induced IFN-γ production by splenocytes coincided with emergence of IgM phase II antibodies at day 10 postinfection and preceded appearance of IgG antibodies. This was accompanied by the production of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL) 6, keratinocyte-derived cytokine, and IFN-γ-induced protein 10, followed by monocyte chemotactic protein 1, but not by IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor α, and only very low production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These data suggest that analysis of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses could be a useful tool for diagnosis of acute Q fever. Moreover, the current model of C. burnetii infection could be used to give new insights into immunological factors that predispose to development of persistent infection. PMID:25618420

  17. TLR9 Activation Dampens the Early Inflammatory Response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Impacting Host Survival

    PubMed Central

    Menino, João Filipe; Saraiva, Margarida; Gomes-Alves, Ana G.; Lobo-Silva, Diogo; Sturme, Mark; Gomes-Rezende, Jéssica; Saraiva, Ana Laura; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Romani, Luigina; Pedrosa, Jorge; Castro, António Gil; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes paracoccidioidomycosis, one of the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Thus, understanding the characteristics of the protective immune response to P. brasiliensis is of interest, as it may reveal targets for disease control. The initiation of the immune response relies on the activation of pattern recognition receptors, among which are TLRs. Both TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the recognition of P. brasiliensis and regulation of the immune response. However, the role of TLR9 during the infection by this fungus remains unclear. Methodology/Principal findings We used in vitro and in vivo models of infection by P. brasiliensis, comparing wild type and TLR9 deficient (−/−) mice, to assess the contribution of TLR9 on cytokine induction, phagocytosis and outcome of infection. We show that TLR9 recognizes either the yeast form or DNA from P. brasiliensis by stimulating the expression/production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow derived macrophages, also increasing their phagocytic ability. We further show that TLR9 plays a protective role early after intravenous infection with P. brasiliensis, as infected TLR9−/− mice died at higher rate during the first 48 hours post infection than wild type mice. Moreover, TLR9−/− mice presented tissue damage and increased expression of several cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. The increased pattern of cytokine expression was also observed during intraperitoneal infection of TLR9−/− mice, with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils. The phenotype of TLR9−/− hosts observed during the early stages of P. brasiliensis infection was reverted upon a transient, 48 hours post-infection, neutrophil depletion. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that TLR9 activation plays an early protective role against P. brasiliensis, by avoiding a deregulated type of inflammatory response associated to neutrophils that may lead to tissue damage. Thus

  18. CR3 and Dectin-1 Collaborate in Macrophage Cytokine Response through Association on Lipid Rafts and Activation of Syk-JNK-AP-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juin-Hua; Lin, Ching-Yu; Wu, Sheng-Yang; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Brown, Gordon D; Chuu, Chih-Pin; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2015-07-01

    Collaboration between heterogeneous pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) leading to synergistic coordination of immune response is important for the host to fight against invading pathogens. Although complement receptor 3 (CR3) and Dectin-1 are major PRRs to detect fungi, crosstalk between these two receptors in antifungal immunity is largely undefined. Here we took advantage of Histoplasma capsulatum which is known to interact with both CR3 and Dectin-1 and specific particulate ligands to study the collaboration of CR3 and Dectin-1 in macrophage cytokine response. By employing Micro-Western Array (MWA), genetic approach, and pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrated that CR3 and Dectin-1 act collaboratively to trigger macrophage TNF and IL-6 response through signaling integration at Syk kinase, allowing subsequent enhanced activation of Syk-JNK-AP-1 pathway. Upon engagement, CR3 and Dectin-1 colocalize and form clusters on lipid raft microdomains which serve as a platform facilitating their cooperation in signaling activation and cytokine production. Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that CR3 and Dectin-1 cooperatively participate in host defense against disseminated histoplasmosis and instruct adaptive immune response. Taken together, our findings define the mechanism of receptor crosstalk between CR3 and Dectin-1 and demonstrate the importance of their collaboration in host defense against fungal infection. PMID:26132276

  19. In vitro cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy dogs to distemper virus, Malassezia and Toxocara.

    PubMed

    Valli, J L; Williamson, A; Sharif, S; Rice, J; Shewen, P E

    2010-04-15

    Naïve CD4+ T cells may differentiate into a number of subsets including T helper 1 (Th1) Th2, Th3, Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells depending on the type of antigen they encounter. These CD4+ families have been defined based on the array of cytokines they produce and the effects they have on adaptive immune responses. CD4+ subsets are cross regulatory and at times cooperative. The study of these adaptive immune modulators has revealed the important role that cytokines play in mounting effective as well as detrimental immune responses to pathogens. Examining the cytokine responses of lymphocytes in culture can provide important understanding of how immune responses to pathogens are orchestrated. For this purpose the in vitro cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy dogs was examined in response to stimulation with antigens from a common canine virus (canine distemper virus, CDV), a commensal skin yeast of dogs (Malassezia pachydermatis) and a common canine helminth (Toxocara canis (T. canis)). Cell culture supernatants were removed from antigen stimulated and unstimulated control PBMC after 4, 24, 48 and 72 h and the concentration of Th1 type cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha) and Th2 type cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10) was determined using sandwich ELISA assays. CDV induced low levels of cytokine production initially with a predominance of IL-10 at 24h and a balanced response at 48 h of incubation. Malassezia antigen stimulated an early type 2 cytokine response with dramatic production of IL-4 at 24h of incubation compared to the other stimulants examined. By 48 h of incubation, however, the cytokine mix in response to Malassezia had also moved toward a Th1 type response. T. canis induced early production of Th2 type cytokines with IL-5 predominating; however, with longer incubation (48-72 h) there was a switch to a balanced Th1/Th2 response. In conclusion, the cytokines produced in vitro by canine PBMC in response to

  20. Genetics of host response in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Milton Ozório; Cardoso, Cynthia Chester; Vanderborght, Patrícia Rosa; Pacheco, Antônio Guilherme

    2006-09-01

    In this review, we discuss recently accumulated data, analysing genetic influence on leprosy outcome. Most leprosy-related epidemiological studies are based on the comparison of frequencies of genetic markers in case-control designs using candidate genes, mainly on immunological pathways. Genomic scans using family-based designs also identified some chromosome regions to be tested for association with leprosy. The results have suggested that different genes are implicated in resistance/susceptibility to leprosy, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin (IL)-10, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and parkin, although some of the results obtained in different populations are controversial. In spite of the recent advances in genomics and genetic epidemiology we have experienced, the results must be confirmed using better designed epidemiological studies to directly pinpoint the genes responsible for leprosy outcome. Furthermore, there is a clear requirement of functional/biological data in order to validate epidemiological findings. In this way, these genetic markers could be used to screen high-risk populations introducing gene testing as diagnostic and prognostic tools to interrupt the chain of transmission and prevent neurological damage. PMID:17171999

  1. Spatiotemporal phosphoprotein distribution and associated cytokine response of a traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Alice A; Currie, Holly N; Loos, Matthew S; Vrana, Julie A; Fabyanic, Emily B; Prediger, Maren S; Boyd, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of wound healing have been extensively characterized, providing a better understanding of the processes involved in wound repair and offering advances in treatment methods. Both spatial and temporal investigations of injury biomarkers have helped to pinpoint significant time points and locations during the recovery process, which may be vital in managing the injury and making the appropriate diagnosis. This study addresses spatial and temporal differences of phosphoproteins found in skeletal muscle tissue following a traumatic femur fracture, which were further compared to co-localized cytokine responses. In particular, several proteins (Akt, ERK, c-Jun, CREB, JNK, MEK1, and p38) and post-translational phosphorylations (p-Akt, p-c-Jun, p-CREB, p-ERK1/2, p-MEK1, p-p38, p-GSK3α/β, p-HSP27, p-p70S6K, and p-STAT3) associated with inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling were found to exhibit significant spatial and temporal differences in response to the traumatic injury. Quadratic discriminant analysis of all measured responses, including cytokine concentrations from previously published findings, was used to classify temporal and spatial observations at high predictive rates, further confirming that distinct spatiotemporal distributions for total protein, phosphorylation signaling, and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL2, IL6, TNF-α, and MIP-1α) responses exist. Finally, phosphoprotein measurements were found to be significantly correlated to cytokine concentrations, suggesting coordinated intracellular and extracellular activity during crucial periods of repair. This study represents a first attempt to monitor and assess integrated changes in extracellular and intracellular signaling in response to a traumatic injury in muscle tissues, which may provide a framework for future research to improve both our understanding of wounds and their treatment options. PMID:26702931

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  3. Early Cytokine Release in Response to Live Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Spirochetes Is Largely Complement Independent

    PubMed Central

    Säve, Susanne; Bergström, Sven; Forsberg, Pia; Jonsson, Nina; Ernerudh, Jan; Ekdahl, Kristina N.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Here we investigated the role of complement activation in phagocytosis and the release of cytokines and chemokines in response to two clinical isolates: Borrelia afzelii K78, which is resistant to complement-mediated lysis, and Borrelia garinii LU59, which is complement-sensitive. Methods Borrelia spirochetes were incubated in hirudin plasma, or hirudin-anticoagulated whole blood. Complement activation was measured as the generation of C3a and sC5b-9. Binding of the complement components C3, factor H, C4, and C4BP to the bacterial surfaces was analyzed. The importance of complement activation on phagocytosis, and on the release of cytokines and chemokines, was investigated using inhibitors acting at different levels of the complement cascade. Results 1) Borrelia garinii LU59 induced significantly higher complement activation than did Borrelia afzelii K78. 2) Borrelia afzelii K78 recruited higher amounts of factor H resulting in significantly lower C3 binding. 3) Both Borrelia strains were efficiently phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes, with substantial inhibition by complement blockade at the levels of C3 and C5. 4) The release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, CCL20, and CXCL8, together with the anti-inflammatory IL-10, were increased the most (by>10-fold after exposure to Borrelia). 5) Both strains induced a similar release of cytokines and chemokines, which in contrast to the phagocytosis, was almost totally unaffected by complement blockade. Conclusions Our results show that complement activation plays an important role in the process of phagocytosis but not in the subsequent cytokine release in response to live Borrelia spirochetes. PMID:25265036

  4. Host Genetic Background Strongly Influences the Response to Influenza A Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Barkha; Błażejewska, Paulina; Heßmann, Manuela; Bruder, Dunja; Geffers, Robert; Mauel, Susanne; Gruber, Achim D.; Schughart, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The genetic make-up of the host has a major influence on its response to combat pathogens. For influenza A virus, several single gene mutations have been described which contribute to survival, the immune response and clearance of the pathogen by the host organism. Here, we have studied the influence of the genetic background to influenza A H1N1 (PR8) and H7N7 (SC35M) viruses. The seven inbred laboratory strains of mice analyzed exhibited different weight loss kinetics and survival rates after infection with PR8. Two strains in particular, DBA/2J and A/J, showed very high susceptibility to viral infections compared to all other strains. The LD50 to the influenza virus PR8 in DBA/2J mice was more than 1000-fold lower than in C57BL/6J mice. High susceptibility in DBA/2J mice was also observed after infection with influenza strain SC35M. In addition, infected DBA/2J mice showed a higher viral load in their lungs, elevated expression of cytokines and chemokines, and a more severe and extended lung pathology compared to infected C57BL/6J mice. These findings indicate a major contribution of the genetic background of the host to influenza A virus infections. The overall response in highly susceptible DBA/2J mice resembled the pathology described for infections with the highly virulent influenza H1N1-1918 and newly emerged H5N1 viruses. PMID:19293935

  5. Role of Central β-Adrenergic Receptors in Regulating Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses to a Peripheral Bacterial Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, John D.; Cortez, Valerie; Kennedy, Sarah L.; Foley, Teresa E.; Hanson, Hugo; Fleshner, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Elevation of proinflammatory cytokines in the brain have potent effects on altering physiological, behavioral, and cognitive processes. The mechanism(s) by which brain cytokines are induced during a peripheral immune challenge remains unclear since microorganisms/cytokines do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent studies indicate that central β-adrenergic receptors (β-ADRs) may mediate brain interleukin-1beta (IL-1) production. This has direct implications for the production of brain cytokines during a peripheral immune response since peripheral pathogens and cytokines rapidly stimulate brainstem catecholamine neurons via peripheral nerves and circumventricular pathways. Studies here examine the role of central β-ADRs in regulating brain cytokine production following peripheral Escherichia coli (E.coli) challenge. Rats were centrally administered propranolol (β-ADR antagonist) or vehicle followed by peripheral E.coli or saline and sacrificed 6h later for measurement of cytokines. Pretreatment with propranolol completely blocked the induction of brain IL-1 following E.coli. Surprisingly, central propranolol also attenuated E.coli-induced peripheral cytokines. To examine whether the attenuated peripheral cytokine response following central propranolol administration was due leakage of propranolol into the general circulation and blockade of peripheral β-blockade, nadolol (β-ADR antagonist that does not cross the BBB) was administered peripherally prior to E.coli. Nadolol administration did not block central cytokine production following E.coli, but instead enhanced both peripheral and central proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, central administration of isoproterenol (β-ADR agonist) results in a time-dependent increase in brain IL-1 production. These data demonstrate central β-ADRs may play a critical role to induce brain IL-1, while peripheral β-ADRs inhibit cytokine response to bacterial challenge. PMID:18468841

  6. Cytokine Responses in Gills of Capoeta umbla as Biomarkers of Environmental Pollution.

    PubMed

    Danabas, Durali; Yildirim, Nuran Cikcikoglu; Yildirim, Numan; Onal, Ayten Oztufekci; Uslu, Gulsad; Unlu, Erhan; Danabas, Seval; Ergin, Cemil; Tayhan, Nilgun

    2016-03-01

    Immunological biomarkers reflect the effects of exposure to environmental contaminants. In this study, the suitability and sensitivity of cytokine responses, interleukin1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in gill tissues of Capoeta umbla (Heckel, 1843), collected from different regions, as early warning indices of environmental pollution and ecosystem health was evaluated. Fish and water samples were taken from ten stations in March and September 2011 and 2012. Tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels were determined in samples of the gill tissues by using an ELISA kit. Significant variations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels observed between stations and seasons. The results of this study show that seasonal variations of cytokine responses in gills of Capoeta umbla are sensitive to the contaminants present in Uzuncayir Dam Lake (Tunceli, Turkey) water and are valuable biomarkers for environmental pollution and ecosystem health. PMID:26931532

  7. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  8. Reservoir Host Immune Responses to Emerging Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, Judith N.; Ahmed, Rafi; Barreiro, Luis B.; Daszak, Peter; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Feinberg, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic viruses, such as HIV, Ebola virus, coronaviruses, influenza A viruses, hantaviruses, or henipaviruses, can result in profound pathology in humans. In contrast, populations of the reservoir hosts of zoonotic pathogens often appear to tolerate these infections with little evidence of disease. Why are viruses more dangerous in one species than another? Immunological studies investigating quantitative and qualitative differences in the host-virus equilibrium in animal reservoirs will be key to answering this question, informing new approaches for treating and preventing zoonotic diseases. Integrating an understanding of host immune responses with epidemiological, ecological, and evolutionary insights into viral emergence will shed light on mechanisms that minimize fitness costs associated with viral infection, facilitate transmission to other hosts, and underlie the association of specific reservoir hosts with multiple emerging viruses. Reservoir host studies provide a rich opportunity for elucidating fundamental immunological processes and their underlying genetic basis, in the context of distinct physiological and metabolic constraints that contribute to host resistance and disease tolerance. PMID:25533784

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Kevin W.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Clark, Andrew T.; Dunne, W. Michael; Dixon, David J.; Turnbull, Isaiah R.; DiPasco, Peter J.; Osberghaus, William F.; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R.; Walter, Michael J.; Cobb, J. Perren; Buchman, Timothy G.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, treatment involves only non-specific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar following disparate infections with similar mortalities. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Interventions Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple timepoints. Measurements and Main Results The host response was dependent upon the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro- and anti- inflammatory response was independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of 5 distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary MIP-2 and IL-10 with progression of infection while elevated plasma TNFsr2 and MCP-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hours. Conclusions Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a potential therapeutic

  10. Cytokines and persistent viral infections.

    PubMed

    Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C and B or Epstein-Barr virus often cause chronic viral infections in humans. Persistence of these viruses in the host is associated with a dramatic loss of T-cell immune response due to functional T-cell exhaustion. Developing efficient immunotherapeutic approaches to prevent viral persistence and/or to restore a highly functional T-cell mediated immunity remains a major challenge. During the last two decades, numerous studies aimed to identify relevant host-derived factors that could be modulated to achieve this goal. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the role of cytokines in preventing or facilitating viral persistence. We concentrate on the impact of multiple relevant cytokines in T-cell dependent immune response to chronic viral infection and the potential for using cytokines as therapeutic agents in mice and humans. PMID:26907634

  11. Host-Selective Toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Induce Common Responses Associated with Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pandelova, Iovanna; Figueroa, Melania; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Manning, Viola A.; Mankaney, Aakash N.; Mockler, Todd C.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs) necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA) and Ptr ToxB (ToxB), are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death. PMID:22792250

  12. Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) expression and response to inflammatory cytokines in middle ear epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kerschner, Joseph E; Khampang, Pawjai; Erbe, Christy B; Kolker, Alexander; Cioffi, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) has been identified as a major gel-forming mucin in the human middle ear (ME). The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the expression and assess the regulation of MUC19 in the ME cell culture models utilized in the study of otitis media (OM). Findings demonstrate that MUC19 is expressed in both human immortalized cell culture (HMEEC) and chinchilla primary epithelial culture (CMEEC). ME exposure to inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 up-regulate MUC19 transcription, most robustly after exposure to TNF-alpha. Kinetic experiments suggest a relative early response in MUC19 transcription and a down-regulation after prolonged exposure. Glycoprotein production was increased in response to the increased transcription as well. Similar to other mucin genes in the ME, MUC19 is differentially regulated after exposure to inflammatory cytokines. The large size, gel-forming properties and up-regulation in response to important inflammatory cytokines of MUC19 suggest that it has significant potential to play a role in both physiology and pathophysiology of the ME. PMID:19533339

  13. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  14. Host Response Dynamics Following Lethal Infection of Rhesus Macaques With Zaire ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rockx, Barry; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Brining, Douglas; LaCasse, Rachel A.; Gardner, Don; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    To gain further insight into the interdependent pathogenic processes in Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), we have examined the dynamics of host responses in individual rhesus macaques infected with Zaire ebolavirus over the entire disease course. Examination of coagulation parameters revealed that decreased coagulation inhibitor activity triggered severe coagulopathy as indicated by prolonged coagulation times and decreased fibrinogen levels. This has been proposed as one of the significant mechanisms underlying disseminated intravascular coagulation in EHF patients. Furthermore, monitoring of expression levels for cytokines/chemokines suggested a mixed anti-inflammatory response syndrome (MARS), which indicates that a catastrophic uncontrolled immunological status contributes to the development of fatal hemorrhagic fever. These results highlight the pathological analogies between EHF and severe sepsis and not only contribute to our understanding of the pathogenic process, but will also help to establish novel postexposure treatment modalities. PMID:21987781

  15. Cytokine, Antibody and Proliferative Cellular Responses Elicited by Taenia solium Calreticulin upon Experimental Infection in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis. PMID:25811778

  16. Involvement of three mechanisms in the alteration of cytokine responses by sodium methyldithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@LSUHSC.edu; Fan, Ruping; Zheng, Qiang

    2006-06-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is the third most abundantly used conventional pesticide in the U.S. We recently reported that it alters the induction of cytokine production mediated though Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 at relevant dosages in mice. Its chemical properties and evidence from the literature suggest thee potential mechanisms of action for this compound. It could either act as a free radical scavenger (by means of its free S{sup -}group) or promote oxidation by breaking down to form methylisothiocyanate, which can deplete glutathione. It is a potent copper chelator and may affect the availability of copper to a number of copper-dependent enzymes (including some signaling molecules). SMD induces a classical neuroendocrine stress response characterized by elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, which could affect cytokine production. Although each of these mechanisms could potentially contribute to altered cytokine responses, direct evidence is lacking. The present study was conducted to obtain such evidence. The role of redox balance was investigated by pretreating mice with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which increases cellular glutathione concentrations, before administration of SMD. NAC exacerbated the SMD-induced suppression of IL-12 and the SMD-induced enhancement of IL-10 in the serum. The role of copper chelation was investigated by comparing the effects of SMD with an equimolar dose to SMD that was administered in the form of a copper chelation complex. Addition of copper significantly decreased the action of SMD on IL-12 production but not on IL-10 production. The role of the stress response was investigated by pretreating mice with antagonists of corticosterone and catecholamines. This treatment partially prevented the action of SMD on IL-10 and IL-12 in the peritoneal fluid. The results suggest that all of the proposed mechanisms have some role in the alteration of cytokine production by SMD.

  17. The host response to allogeneic and xenogeneic biological scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-05-01

    The clinical use of biological scaffold materials has become commonplace. Such scaffolds are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), or components of ECM, derived from allogeneic or xenogeneic tissues. Such scaffold materials vary widely in their source tissue, processing methods and sterilization methods. The success or failure of an ECM scaffold for a given application is dependent on the host response following implantation; a response that is largely mediated by the innate immune system and which is influenced by a numerous factors, including the processing methods used in the preparation of biological scaffolds. The present paper reviews various aspects of the host response to biological scaffolds and factors that affect this response. In addition, some of the logistical, regulatory and reconstructive implications associated with the use of biological scaffolds are discussed. PMID:24668694

  18. Human Bladder Uroepithelial Cells Synergize with Monocytes to Promote IL-10 Synthesis and Other Cytokine Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Duell, Benjamin L.; Carey, Alison J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24155979

  19. Combination of Cytokine Responses Indicative of Latent TB and Active TB in Malawian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Yun-Gyoung; Gorak-Stolinska, Patricia; Ben-Smith, Anne; Lalor, Maeve K.; Chaguluka, Steven; Dacombe, Russell; Doherty, T. Mark; Ottenhoff, Tom H.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Crampin, Amelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Background An IFN-γ response to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens is an effective biomarker for M. tuberculosis infection but it cannot discriminate between latent TB infection and active TB disease. Combining a number of cytokine/chemokine responses to M. tuberculosis antigens may enable differentiation of latent TB from active disease. Methods Asymptomatic recently-exposed individuals (spouses of TB patients) were recruited and tuberculin skin tested, bled and followed-up for two years. Culture supernatants, from a six-day culture of diluted whole blood samples stimulated with M. tuberculosis-derived PPD or ESAT-6, were measured for IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α and CXCL10 using cytokine ELISAs. In addition, 15 patients with sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB were recruited and tested. Results Spouses with positive IFN-γ responses to M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 (>62.5 pg/mL) and TB patients showed high production of IL-17, CXCL10 and TNF-α. Higher production of IL-10 and IL-17 in response to ESAT-6 was observed in the spouses compared with TB patients while the ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-17 in response to M. tuberculosis-derived PPD were significantly higher in TB patients compared with the spouses. Tuberculin skin test results did not correlate with cytokine responses. Conclusions CXCL10 and TNF-α may be used as adjunct markers alongside an IFN-γ release assay to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection, and IL-17 and IL-10 production may differentiate individuals with LTBI from active TB. PMID:24260295

  20. Modulation of the Cytokine Response in Human Monocytes by Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid-1

    PubMed Central

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy. PMID:21981546

  1. Pten Cell Autonomously Modulates the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Response to Inflammatory Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Porter, Shaina N; Cluster, Andrew S; Signer, Robert A J; Voigtmann, Jenna; Monlish, Darlene A; Schuettpelz, Laura G; Magee, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-14

    Pten negatively regulates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and is required to maintain quiescent adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Pten has been proposed to regulate HSCs cell autonomously and non-cell autonomously, but the relative importance of each mechanism has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the cytokines that activate the PI3K pathway upstream of Pten are not well defined. We sought to clarify whether Pten cell autonomously or non-cell autonomously regulates HSC mobilization. We also tested whether Pten deficiency affects the HSC response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interferon-α (IFNα) since these cytokines induce HSC mobilization or proliferation, respectively. We show that Pten regulates HSC mobilization and expansion in the spleen primarily via cell-autonomous mechanisms. Pten-deficient HSCs do not require G-CSF to mobilize, although they are hyper-sensitized to even low doses of exogenous G-CSF. Pten-deficient HSCs are similarly sensitized to IFNα. Pten therefore modulates the HSC response to inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27185281

  2. Cytokine-Defined B Cell Responses as Therapeutic Targets in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Healy, Luke M.; Muirhead, Gillian; Prat, Alexandre; Gommerman, Jennifer L.; Bar-Or, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Important antibody-independent pathogenic roles of B cells are emerging in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). The contrasting results of different treatments targeting B cells in patients (in spite of predictions of therapeutic benefits from animal models) call for a better understanding of the multiple roles that distinct human B cell responses likely play in MS. In recent years, both murine and human B cells have been identified with distinct functional properties related to their expression of particular cytokines. These have included regulatory (Breg) B cells (secreting interleukin (IL)-10 or IL-35) and pro-inflammatory B cells (secreting tumor necrosis factor α, LTα, IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Better understanding of human cytokine-defined B cell responses is necessary in both health and diseases, such as MS. Investigation of their surface phenotype, distinct functions, and the mechanisms of regulation (both cell intrinsic and cell extrinsic) may help develop effective treatments that are more selective and safe. In this review, we focus on mechanisms by which cytokine-defined B cells contribute to the peripheral immune cascades that are thought to underlie MS relapses, and the impact of B cell-directed therapies on these mechanisms. PMID:26779181

  3. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B; Bjerre, M; Stenager, E; Petersen, T; Vissing, K

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F secretion following resistance exercise was observed in the trained compared with the untrained state. This study suggests little acute and chronic effect of PRT on cytokine levels in IFN-treated PwMS. PMID:26105554

  4. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3+CD4+, and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14+ cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells. PMID:27586092

  5. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3(+)CD4(+), and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14(+) cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells. PMID:27586092

  6. Modulation of the host response in human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, M.; Poindexter, R. W.; Ruiz-Tiben, E.; Ottesen, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanisms for modulating the host's immune response in human Schistosomiasis mansoni have been described for delayed hypersensitivity responsiveness and antibody production. Since clinical symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity (i.e. allergic reactivity) are rare in schistosomiasis despite the presence of parasite-specific immunoglobulin E, circulating parasite antigen, and normal numbers of basophils and mast cells in infected patients, it seemed likely that there was host modulation of immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness as well. Using an in vitro basophil histamine release assay we have shown that basophils from fifteen patients with S. mansoni infections are sensitized with schistosome-specific immunoglobulin E and will release histamine in an antigen-dose-dependent manner when challenged with a soluble adult worm antigen. This histamine release was suppressed by autologus, but not normal serum. Fractionation of the serum over staphylococcal protein A and antigen affinity columns identified an immunoglobulin G parasite-specific `blocking antibody', analogous to blocking antibodies elicited during immunotherapy of atopic patients, as being responsible for the modulation of this immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness in vitro. Blocking antibody specificity varied from patient to patient, an observation suggesting that different allergens were being recognized by different individuals. These studies demonstrate that in addition to the immunoregulatory mechanisms previously described in patients with schistosome infections, there is host modulation of immediate hypersensitivity responsiveness that appears to involve specific immunoglobulin G blocking antibodies. PMID:6179857

  7. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. PMID:27021246

  8. Senescence of human skeletal muscle impairs the local inflammatory cytokine response to acute eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Koichiro; Vannier, Edouard; Sacheck, Jennifer M; Witsell, Alice L; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2005-02-01

    The impact of aging on the cytokine response of human skeletal muscle to exercise-induced injury remains poorly understood. We enrolled physically active, young (23-35 years old, n=15) and old (66-78 years old, n=15) men to perform 45 min of downhill running (16% descent) at 75% VO2max. Biopsies of vastus lateralis were obtained 24 h before and 72 h after acute eccentric exercise. Transcripts for inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TGF-beta1) were quantified by real-time PCR. Before exercise, cytokine transcripts did not differ with age. At old age, exercise induced a blunted accumulation of transcripts encoding the pan-leukocyte surface marker CD18 (young: 10.1-fold increase, P<0.005; old: 4.7-fold increase, P=0.02; young vs. old: P<0.05). In both age groups, CD18 transcript accumulation strongly correlated with TNF-alpha (young, r=0.87, P<0.001; old, r=0.72, P=0.002) and TGF-beta1 transcript accumulation (young, r=0.80, P<0.001; old, r=0.64, P=0.008). At old age, there was no correlation between IL-1beta and CD18 transcript accumulation. Furthermore, exercise induced IL-6 transcript accumulation in young (3.6-fold, P=0.057) but not in old men. Our results suggest that aging impairs the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to eccentric exercise by differential modulation of a discrete set of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine genes. PMID:15556970

  9. Autophagy suppresses host adaptive immune responses toward Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Buffen, Kathrin; Oosting, Marije; Li, Yang; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy increased the Borrelia burgdorferi induced innate cytokine production in vitro, but little is known regarding the effect of autophagy on in vivo models of Borrelia infection. Here, we showed that ATG7-deficient mice that were intra-articular injected with Borrelia spirochetes displayed increased joint swelling, cell influx, and enhanced interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 production by inflamed synovial tissue. Because both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 are linked to the development of adaptive immune responses, we examine the function of autophagy on Borrelia induced adaptive immunity. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with autophagy inhibitors showed an increase in interleukin-17, interleukin-22, and interferon-γ production in response to exposure to Borrelia burgdorferi. Increased IL-17 production was dependent on IL-1β release but, interestingly, not on interleukin-23 production. In addition, cytokine quantitative trait loci in ATG9B modulate the Borrelia induced interleukin-17 production. Because high levels of IL-17 have been found in patients with confirmed, severe, chronic borreliosis, we propose that the modulation of autophagy may be a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy in patients with persistent Lyme disease. PMID:27101991

  10. Reduced ratio of protective versus proinflammatory cytokine responses to commensal bacteria in HLA-B27 transgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    DIELEMAN, L A; HOENTJEN, F; QIAN, B-F; SPRENGERS, D; TJWA, E; TORRES, M F; TORRICE, C D; SARTOR, R B; TONKONOGY, S L

    2004-01-01

    Germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats do not develop colitis, but colonization with specific pathogen-free (SPF) bacteria induces colitis accompanied by immune activation. To study host-dependent immune responses to commensal caecal bacteria we investigated cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from HLA-B27 TG versus nontransgenic (non-TG) littermates after in vitro stimulation with caecal bacterial lysates (CBL). Supernatants from CBL-stimulated unseparated T- or B- cell-depleted MLN cells from HLA-B27 TG and non-TG littermates were analysed for IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF, IL-10 and TGF-β production. Our results show that unfractionated TG MLN cells stimulated with CBL produced more IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF than did non-TG MLN cells. In contrast, CBL-stimulated non-TG MLN cells produced more IL-10 and TGF-β. T cell depletion abolished IFN-γ and decreased IL-12 production, but did not affect IL-10 and TGF-β production. Conversely, neither IL-10 nor TGF-β was produced in cultures of B cell-depleted MLN. In addition, CD4+ T cells enriched from MLN of HLA-B27 TG but not from non-TG rats produced IFN-γ when cocultured with CBL-pulsed antigen presenting cells from non-TG rats. Interestingly, IL-10 and TGF-β, but not IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF were produced by MLN cells from germ-free TG rats. These results indicate that the colitis that develops in SPF HLA-B27 TG rats is accompanied by activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells that respond to commensal bacteria. However, B cell cytokine production in response to components of commensal intestinal microorganisms occurs in the absence of intestinal inflammation. PMID:15030511

  11. Immunohistochemical study and mRNA cytokine profile of the local immune response in cattle naturally infected with Calicophoron daubneyi.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Miguel; Manga-González, Yolanda; Benavides, Julio; González-Lanza, M Camino; Giráldez, Francisco Javier; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Fernández, Miguel; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Castaño, Pablo; Royo, Marcos; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Pérez, Valentín; Ferreras, M Carmen

    2015-11-30

    In order to recognize the local immune response of the definitive host to Calicophoron daubneyi natural infection, an immunohistochemical study was carried out in the reticulum and rumen in 49 naturally infected cattle. The role of cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 interleukins and IFN-γ) in the activation of specific defence mechanisms was evaluated by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays to study cytokine mRNA expression. In all infected animals, CD3+ T lymphocytes seemed to be the main element of the inflammatory infiltrate in the reticular and ruminal lamina propria at the point of the parasite adhesion. Intraepithelial globule leukocytes also showed immunolabelling for CD3. Most CD3+ cells also expressed CD4 (T cell helper) antigen although sporadic CD8+-cytotoxic lymphocytes were observed. Local expression of IFN-γ was observed in damaged papillae at the site of parasite attachment and in scattered cells in the lamina propria. B cells (CD79αcy+, CD45+ and IgG+) were found constantly in relation to lymphoid aggregates. MAC387 was expressed in squamous epithelium and in macrophages of the lamina propria of affected papillae. Macrophages in this location also stained positively for CD163 and CD68. Intraepithelial Langerhans cells and macrophages located in the lamina propria showed immunopositivity for MHCII in the affected areas. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed a statistical significant increase of IFN-γ, and IL-10 expression (p<0.01) in the rumen associated with the presence of flukes. These findings suggest a predominant Th1 polarized local immune response with the probable involvement of Th regulatory cells in cattle C. daubneyi natural infection. PMID:26508417

  12. Role of an Iron-Dependent Transcriptional Regulator in the Pathogenesis and Host Response to Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radha; Bhatty, Minny; Swiatlo, Edwin; Nanduri, Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a critical cofactor for many enzymes and is known to regulate gene expression in many bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae normally inhabits the upper respiratory mucosa but can also invade and replicate in lungs and blood. These anatomic sites vary considerably in both the quantity and form of available iron. The genome of serotype 4 pneumococcal strain TIGR4 encodes a putative iron-dependent transcriptional regulator (IDTR). A mutant deleted at idtr (Δidtr) exhibited growth kinetics similar to parent strain TIGR4 in vitro and in mouse blood for up to 48 hours following infection. However, Δidtr was significantly attenuated in a murine model of sepsis. IDTR down-regulates the expression of ten characterized and putative virulence genes in nasopharyngeal colonization and pneumonia. The host cytokine response was significantly suppressed in sepsis with Δidtr. Since an exaggerated inflammatory response is associated with a poor prognosis in sepsis, the decreased inflammatory response could explain the increased survival with Δidtr. Our results suggest that IDTR, which is dispensable for pneumococcal growth in vitro, is associated with regulation of pneumococcal virulence in specific host environments. Additionally, IDTR ultimately modulates the host cytokine response and systemic inflammation that contributes to morbidity and mortality of invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:23437050

  13. Equine herpesvirus type 1 modulates inflammatory host immune response genes in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Stephanie; Barsova, Jekaterina; Campos, Isabel; Frampton, Arthur R

    2016-08-30

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a disease caused by equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), is characterized by severe inflammation, thrombosis, and hypoxia in central nervous system (CNS) endothelial cells, which can result in a spectrum of clinical signs including urinary incontinence, ataxia, and paralysis. Strains of EHV-1 that contain a single point mutation within the viral DNA polymerase (nucleotide A2254>G2254: amino acid N752→D752) are isolated from EHM afflicted horses at higher frequencies than EHV-1 strains that do not harbor this mutation. Due to the correlation between the DNA Pol mutation and EHM disease, EHV-1 strains that contain the mutation have been designated as neurologic. In this study, we measured virus replication, cell to cell spread efficacy, and host inflammatory responses in equine endothelial cells infected with 12 different strains of EHV-1. Two strains, T953 (Ohio 2003) (neurologic) and Kentucky A (KyA) (non-neurologic), have well described disease phenotypes while the remaining strains used in this study are classified as neurologic or non-neurologic based solely on the presence or absence of the DNA pol mutation, respectively. Results show that the neurologic strains do not replicate better or spread more efficiently in endothelial cells. Also, the majority of the host inflammatory genes were modulated similarly regardless of EHV-1 genotype. Analyses of host gene expression showed that a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, as well as CCL5, IL-6 and TNF-α were consistently up-regulated in endothelial cells infected with each EHV-1 strain. The identification of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells that are modulated by EHV-1 provides further insight into the factors that contribute to the immunopathology observed after infection and may also reveal new targets for disease intervention. PMID:27527764

  14. Immunomicrobial pathogenesis of periodontitis: keystones, pathobionts, and host response.

    PubMed

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered novel mechanisms underlying the breakdown of periodontal host-microbe homeostasis, which can precipitate dysbiosis and periodontitis in susceptible hosts. Dysbiotic microbial communities of keystone pathogens and pathobionts are thought to exhibit synergistic virulence whereby not only can they endure the host response but can also thrive by exploiting tissue-destructive inflammation, which fuels a self-feeding cycle of escalating dysbiosis and inflammatory bone loss, potentially leading to tooth loss and systemic complications. Here, I discuss new paradigms in our understanding of periodontitis, which may shed light into other polymicrobial inflammatory disorders. In addition, I highlight gaps in knowledge required for an integrated picture of the interplay between microbes and innate and adaptive immune elements that initiate and propagate chronic periodontal inflammation. PMID:24269668

  15. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal.

    PubMed

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-08-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal-induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  16. Effects of prior acute exercise on circulating cytokine concentration responses to a high-fat meal

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Landers-Ramos, Rian Q; Jenkins, Nathan T; Spangenburg, Espen E; Hagberg, James M; Prior, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    High-fat meal consumption alters the circulating cytokine profile and contributes to cardiometabolic diseases. A prior bout of exercise can ameliorate the triglyceride response to a high-fat meal, but the interactive effects of exercise and high-fat meals on cytokines that mediate cardiometabolic risk are not fully understood. We investigated the effects of prior exercise on the responses of circulating tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, leptin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) to a high-fat meal. Ten healthy men were studied before and 4 h after ingestion of a high-fat meal either with or without ∼50 min of endurance exercise at 70% of VO2 max on the preceding day. In response to the high-fat meal, lower leptin and higher VEGF, bFGF, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations were evident (P < 0.05 for all). There was no effect of the high-fat meal on PlGF, TNF-α, or RBP4 concentrations. We found lower leptin concentrations with prior exercise (P < 0.05) and interactive effects of prior exercise and the high-fat meal on sFlt-1 (P < 0.05). The high-fat meal increased IL-6 by 59% without prior exercise and 218% with prior exercise (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a prior bout of endurance exercise does not affect all high-fat meal–induced changes in circulating cytokines, but does affect fasting or postprandial concentrations of IL-6, leptin, and sFlt-1. These data may reflect a salutary effect of prior exercise on metabolic responses to a high-fat meal. PMID:24303126

  17. Nrf2 suppresses macrophage inflammatory response by blocking proinflammatory cytokine transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Eri H.; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hayashi, Makiko; Sekine, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Moriguchi, Takashi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Nakayama, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor-2) transcription factor regulates oxidative/xenobiotic stress response and also represses inflammation. However, the mechanisms how Nrf2 alleviates inflammation are still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 interferes with lipopolysaccharide-induced transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-1β. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and ChIP-qPCR analyses revealed that Nrf2 binds to the proximity of these genes in macrophages and inhibits RNA Pol II recruitment. Further, we found that Nrf2-mediated inhibition is independent of the Nrf2-binding motif and reactive oxygen species level. Murine inflammatory models further demonstrated that Nrf2 interferes with IL6 induction and inflammatory phenotypes in vivo. Thus, contrary to the widely accepted view that Nrf2 suppresses inflammation through redox control, we demonstrate here that Nrf2 opposes transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine genes. This study identifies Nrf2 as the upstream regulator of cytokine production and establishes a molecular basis for an Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammation approach. PMID:27211851

  18. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  19. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-06-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection. PMID:27014727

  20. Suppressed Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Cytokine Responses in Active Tuberculosis in Children ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Pavan; Anuradha, R.; Suresh, R.; Ganesh, R.; Shankar, Janani; Kumaraswami, V.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 cytokine responses are known to play an important role in immunity to tuberculosis (TB) in children, although little is known about other factors that might be important. In addition, children are more prone to developing extrapulmonary manifestations of TB than adults. To identify the immune responses important both in control of infection and in extrapulmonary dissemination, we examined mycobacterium-specific cytokine responses of children with pulmonary TB (PTB) and extrapulmonary TB (ETB) and compared them with those of healthy control children (HC). No significant differences were found in the cytokine responses either with no stimulation or following mycobacterial-antigen (Ag) stimulation between children with PTB and ETB. On the other hand, children with active TB compared with HC showed markedly diminished production of type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]), 2 (interleukin 4 [IL-4] and IL-13), and 17 (IL-17A, IL-21, and IL-23)-associated cytokines with no stimulation and in response to mycobacterial antigens. This was not associated with significantly altered production of IL-10 or transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Among children with ETB, those with neurologic involvement exhibited more significantly diminished Ag-driven IFN-γ and IL-17 production. Pediatric TB is characterized by diminished type 1, 2, and 17 cytokine responses, with the most profound diminution favoring development of neurologic TB, suggesting a crucial role for these cytokines in protection against pediatric tuberculosis. PMID:21955625

  1. Correlation of in Vitro Cytokine Responses with the Chemical Composition of Soil-Derived Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Veranth, John M.; Moss, Tyler A.; Chow, Judith C.; Labban, Raed; Nichols, William K.; Walton, John C.; Watson, John G.; Yost, Garold S.

    2006-01-01

    We treated human lung epithelial cells, type BEAS-2B, with 10–80 μg/cm2 of dust from soils and road surfaces in the western United States that contained particulate matter (PM) < 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter. Cell viability and cytokine secretion responses were measured at 24 hr. Each dust sample is a complex mixture containing particles from different minerals mixed with biogenic and anthropogenic materials. We determined the particle chemical composition using methods based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Speciation Trends Network (STN) and the National Park Service Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network. The functionally defined carbon fractions reported by the ambient monitoring networks have not been widely used for toxicology studies. The soil-derived PM2.5 from different sites showed a wide range of potency for inducing the release of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 in vitro. Univariate regression and multivariate redundancy analysis were used to test for correlation of viability and cytokine release with the concentrations of 40 elements, 7 ions, and 8 carbon fractions. The particles showed positive correlation between IL-6 release and the elemental and pyrolyzable carbon fractions, and the strongest correlation involving crustal elements was between IL-6 release and the aluminum:silicon ratio. The observed correlations between low-volatility organic components of soil- and road-derived dusts and the cytokine release by BEAS-2B cells are relevant for investigation of mechanisms linking specific air pollution particle types with the initiating events leading to airway inflammation in sensitive populations. PMID:16507455

  2. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, S.F.; Mendonça, V.A.; Teles, M.C.; Ribeiro, V.G.C.; Tossige-Gomes, R.; Neves, C.D.C.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Leite, L.H.R.; Soares, D.D.; Coimbra, C.C.; Lacerda, A.C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H) and 8 normotensive (N) subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively). They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C) followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity). Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP). Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05), although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1) and lower TBARS (P<0.01) and FRAP (P<0.05) levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors), present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response. PMID:26840715

  3. At the Bench: Helicobacter pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hardbower, Dana M; Peek, Richard M; Wilson, Keith T

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Given that ∼50% of the global population is infected with this pathogen, there is great impetus to elucidate underlying causes that mediate progression from infection to cancer. Recent evidence suggests that H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and oxidative stress create an environment conducive to DNA damage and tissue injury. DNA damage leads to genetic instability and eventually, neoplastic transformation. Pathogen-encoded virulence factors induce a robust but futile immune response and alter host pathways that lower the threshold for carcinogenesis, including DNA damage repair, polyamine synthesis and catabolism, antioxidant responses, and cytokine production. Collectively, such dysregulation creates a protumorigenic microenvironment within the stomach. This review seeks to address each of these aspects of H. pylori infection and to call attention to areas of particular interest within this field of research. This review also seeks to prioritize areas of translational research related to H. pylori-induced gastric cancer based on insights garnered from basic research in this field. See related review by Dalal and Moss, At the Bedside: H. pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer. PMID:24868089

  4. Microarray Analysis of the Intestinal Host Response in Giardia duodenalis Assemblage E Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Dreesen, Leentje; Rinaldi, Manuela; Chiers, Koen; Li, Robert; Geurden, Thomas; Van den Broeck, Wim; Goddeeris, Bruno; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Despite Giardia duodenalis being one of the most commonly found intestinal pathogens in humans and animals, little is known about the host-parasite interactions in its natural hosts. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the intestinal response in calves following a G. duodenalis infection, using a bovine high-density oligo microarray to analyze global gene expression in the small intestine. The resulting microarray data suggested a decrease in inflammation, immune response, and immune cell migration in infected animals. These findings were examined in more detail by histological analyses combined with quantitative real-time PCR on a panel of cytokines. The transcription levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-γ showed a trend of being downregulated in the jejunum of infected animals compared to the negative controls,.No immune cell recruitment could be seen after infection, and no intestinal pathologies, such as villus shortening or increased levels of apoptosis. Possible regulators of this intestinal response are the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha (PPARα), and gamma (PPARγ) and the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA), all for which an upregulated expression was found in the microarray and qRT-PCR analyses. PMID:22848418

  5. At the Bench: Helicobacter pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardbower, Dana M.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Given that ∼50% of the global population is infected with this pathogen, there is great impetus to elucidate underlying causes that mediate progression from infection to cancer. Recent evidence suggests that H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and oxidative stress create an environment conducive to DNA damage and tissue injury. DNA damage leads to genetic instability and eventually, neoplastic transformation. Pathogen-encoded virulence factors induce a robust but futile immune response and alter host pathways that lower the threshold for carcinogenesis, including DNA damage repair, polyamine synthesis and catabolism, antioxidant responses, and cytokine production. Collectively, such dysregulation creates a protumorigenic microenvironment within the stomach. This review seeks to address each of these aspects of H. pylori infection and to call attention to areas of particular interest within this field of research. This review also seeks to prioritize areas of translational research related to H. pylori-induced gastric cancer based on insights garnered from basic research in this field. See related review by Dalal and Moss, At the Bedside: H. pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer. PMID:24868089

  6. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  7. Winter Day Lengths Enhance T Lymphocyte Phenotypes, Inhibit Cytokine Responses, and Attenuate Behavioral Symptoms of Infection in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Kampf-Lassin, August; Yee, Jason R.; Galang, Jerome; McMaster, Nicholas; Kay, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    Annual variations in day length (photoperiod) trigger changes in the immune and reproductive system of seasonally-breeding animals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether photoperiodic changes in immunity depend on concurrent photoperiodic responses in the reproductive system, or whether immunological responses to photoperiod occur independent of reproductive responses. Here we report photoperiodic changes in enumerative, functional, and behavioral aspects of the immune system, and in immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, in reproductively non-photoperiodic Wistar rats. T-cell numbers (CD3+, CD8+, CD8+CD25+, CD4+CD25+) were higher in the blood of rats housed in short as opposed to long day lengths for 10 weeks. Following a simulated bacterial infection (E. coli LPS; 125 μg/kg) the severity of several acute-phase sickness behaviors (anorexia, cachexia, neophobia, and social withdrawal) were attenuated in short days. LPS-stimulated IL-1β and IL-6 production were comparable between photoperiods, but plasma TNFα was higher in long-day relative to short-day rats. In addition, corticosterone concentrations were higher in short-day relative to long-day rats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that photoperiodic regulation of the immune system can occur entirely independently of photoperiodic regulation of the reproductive system. In the absence of concurrent reproductive responses, short days increase the numbers of leukocytes capable of immunosurveillance and inhibition of inflammatory responses, increase proinflammatory cytokine production, increase immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, and ultimately attenuate behavioral responses to infection. Seasonal changes in the host immune system, endocrine system, and behavior may contribute to the seasonal variability in disease outcomes, even in reproductively non-photoperiodic mammals. PMID:17728099

  8. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences. PMID:24914222

  9. Cytokines and antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2003-06-01

    Currently, the notion of immunosurveillance against tumors is enjoying something of a renaissance. Even if we still refuse to accept that tumors arising in the normal host are unable to trigger an immune response because of the lack of initiation ("danger") signals, there is no doubt that the immune system can be manipulated experimentally and by implication therapeutically to exert anti-tumor effects. For this activity to be successful, the appropriate cytokine milieu has to be provided, making cytokine manipulation central to immunotherapy. On the other hand, the major hurdle currently preventing successful immunotherapy is the ability of tumors to evolve resistant variants under the pressure of immune selection. Here, too, the cytokine milieu plays an essential role. The purpose of this brief review is to consider the current status of the application of cytokines in facilitating antitumor immunity, as well their role in inhibiting responses to tumors. Clearly, encouraging the former but preventing the latter will be the key to the effective clinical application of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12779349

  10. Sequential production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in response to live bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed Central

    Sander, B; Skansén-Saphir, U; Damm, O; Håkansson, L; Andersson, J; Andersson, U

    1995-01-01

    Causes of individual variation in susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases are only partly understood. An efficient cell-mediated immune response is crucial for resistance. Macrophages and T cells interact to eliminate the mycobacteria, partially through the effects of secreted cytokines. A vigorous anti-bacterial inflammatory response is sometimes accompanied by severe tissue damage, while immunosuppression leads to progressive infection. Here, live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), was used as a model antigen to study cytokine production at the single-cell level in response to mycobacteria. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals were challenged in vitro and the kinetics and frequencies of cytokine-producing cells were studied by immunofluorescent visualization of intracellular cytokines. Fourteen cytokines were assayed; interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), TNF-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). A sequential production of T helper-1 (Th1) and T helper-2 (Th2) cytokines was induced by BCG. Early, at days 1-2 after stimulation, the response was dominated by monokines and a low IFN-gamma and TNF-beta production. At days 4-5 there was a marked production of Th1 lymphokines, with approximately 6% IFN-gamma+ cells, 4% TNF-beta+ cells and 2% IL-2+ cells. Late in the reaction, at days 10-12, a Th2 response with IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 was detected, while the synthesis of Th1 lymphokines and monokines declined. Overall, our results provide further evidence of IFN-gamma as the major cytokine induced by mycobacteria in healthy individuals, but also suggest that Th2 cytokines participate in the response. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8567014

  11. Proinflammatory Cytokine Gene Expression by Murine Macrophages in Response to Brugia malayi Wolbachia Surface Protein

    PubMed Central

    Porksakorn, Chantima; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Park, Kiwon; Scott, Alan L.

    2007-01-01

    Wolbachia, an endosymbiotic bacterium found in most species of filarial parasites, is thought to play a significant role in inducing innate inflammatory responses in lymphatic filariasis patients. However, the Wolbachia-derived molecules that are recognized by the innate immune system have not yet been identified. In this study, we exposed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to a recombinant form of the major Wolbachia surface protein (rWSP) to determine if WSP is capable of innately inducing cytokine transcription. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNAs were all upregulated by the rWSP stimulation in a dose-dependant manner. TNF transcription peaked at 3 hours, whereas IL-1β and IL-6 transcription peaked at 6 hours post-rWSP exposure. The levels of innate cytokine expression induced by a high-dose (9.0 μg/mL) rWSP in the RAW 264.7 cells were comparable to the levels induced by 0.1 μg/mL E. coli-derived lipopolysaccharides. Pretreatment of the rWSP with proteinase-K drastically reduced IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF transcription. However, the proinflammatory response was not inhibited by polymyxin B treatment. These results strongly suggest that the major Wolbachia surface protein molecule WSP is an important inducer of innate immune responses during filarial infections. PMID:17641731

  12. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the immune responses to BCG and DTwP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Karolina; Szpakowski, Piotr; Wawrocki, Sebastian; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and pertussis vaccines have been found to be insufficient and their further improvement is required. In order to develop improved vaccines, a better understanding of the main pathways involved in the host's protective immunity to the pathogens is crucial. We address the question as to whether the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production might affect the host responses to BCG and diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccines. The study population consisted of 118 healthy people, age range 18-30 years, who had been subjected to BCG and DTwP vaccination according to the state policy. Tuberculin skin testing (TST) revealed a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD (purified protein derivative) in 53% volunteers. The variability in development of the BCG-driven DTH to tuberculin prompted us to address a question as to whether Th1/Th2 polarization is involved in the lack of skin responsiveness to PPD. PPD-stimulated blood lymphocytes from TST(+) participants produced significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than lymphocytes from TST(-) volunteers. However, TST(-) volunteers' sera contained more anti-pertussis IgG but not anti-diphtheria toxin IgG. Mycobacterial antigens and particularly PPD induced a higher expression of HLA-DR and co-stimulatory CD80 receptors on DCs from TST(+) than TST(-) participants. BCG but not PPD pulsed DCs from TST(-) volunteers produced significantly more IL-10. Mycobacterial antigen stimulated DCs from TST(+) volunteers induced a more intense IFN-γ production in co-cultures with autologous lymphocytes than the cells from TST(-) participants. Differences among the types of dendritic cell activities contribute to development of tuberculin reactivity in BCG vaccinated volunteers. PMID:26641637

  13. Infection of Burkholderia cepacia Induces Homeostatic Responses in the Host for Their Prolonged Survival: The Microarray Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Thimma, Jaikumar; Hashim, Onn Haji; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with life-threatening pulmonary infections in immunocompromised individuals. Pathogenesis of B. cepacia infection involves adherence, colonisation, invasion, survival and persistence in the host. In addition, B. cepacia are also known to secrete factors, which are associated with virulence in the pathogenesis of the infection. In this study, the host factor that may be the cause of the infection was elucidated in human epithelial cell line, A549, that was exposed to live B. cepacia (mid-log phase) and its secretory proteins (mid-log and early-stationary phases) using the Illumina Human Ref-8 microarray platform. The non-infection A549 cells were used as a control. Expression of the host genes that are related to apoptosis, inflammation and cell cycle as well as metabolic pathways were differentially regulated during the infection. Apoptosis of the host cells and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be inhibited by both live B. cepacia and its secretory proteins. In contrast, the host cell cycle and metabolic processes, particularly glycolysis/glycogenesis and fatty acid metabolism were transcriptionally up-regulated during the infection. Our microarray analysis provided preliminary insights into mechanisms of B. cepacia pathogenesis. The understanding of host response to an infection would provide novel therapeutic targets both for enhancing the host’s defences and repressing detrimental responses induced by the invading pathogen. PMID:24116227

  14. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  15. Activation of cytokine genes during primary and anamnestic immune response to inactivated c. albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, E; Scaringi, L; Cornacchione, P; Fettucciari, K; Sabatini, R; Mezzasoma, L; Benedetti, C; Cianetti, S; Rossi, R; Marconi, P

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that after repeated stimulations with inactivated C. albicans (CA) cells, CD2F1 mice respond with a cytokine pattern typical of T-helper 1 (ThI) subset development. The purpose of this study was to analyse the sequence of immunological events which, soon after priming mice with CA, lead to the development of primary and anamnestic response. A comprehensive kinetics analysis of cytokine mRNA expression was performed by Northern blot assay, in peritoneal exudate cells (PEC), at different phases of immune response to CA: after priming (one i.p. injection of 2 x 10(7) CA cells mouse), during development of the primary immune response (five progressive CA i.p. injections over a 2-week period) and in the anamnestic response (CA booster 30 days after the primary response). In vitro assays were performed 2 and 24 hr after every CA stimulation. The response to CA priming was characterized by an early and high expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-1 beta mRNAs At 24hr. IL-2 mRNA was still at a high level, while IL-1 beta had greatly decreased. A weak expression of IL-10 was only induced at 2 hr. whereas IL-12 p40 subunit, interferon-7 (IFN-7) IL-4 and IL-5 mRNAs were undetectable. In this phase no in vitro proliferative response of PEC to CA was observed, whereas a significant natural killer (NK) activity was induced. From the second CA injection, the IFN-7 mRNA was already induced at 2 hr. Its expression level increased progressively with the number of CA injections persisting up to 24 hr after the fifth stimulation. A progressive increase of IL-2 mRNA expression was also induced whereas IL-1 beta and IL-10 mRNAs were always transiently expressed at 2 hr at levels similar to those observed after the priming. IL-12 p40 subunit. IL-4 and IL-5 mRNAs were never detectable. The expression of this selected cytokine pattern typical of Thl response was correlated with the development of CA-specific T lymphocytes as confirmed by the in vitro

  16. Cytokine responses during mycobacterial and schistosomal antigen-induced pulmonary granuloma formation. Production of Th1 and Th2 cytokines and relative contribution of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Chensue, S. W.; Warmington, K.; Ruth, J.; Lincoln, P.; Kuo, M. C.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    Synchronized pulmonary granulomas (GRs) were induced in presensitized mice by intravenous embolization of polymer beads bound with purified protein derivative (PPD) of Mycobacteria tuberculosis or soluble antigens derived from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (SEA). Uncoated beads served as a foreign body control (CON). Antigen-coated beads elicited GRs with characteristic epithelioid macrophages and multinucleate giant cells by 4 days after embolization. Unlike PPD GR, SEA bead lesions contained eosinophils, whereas CON beads elicited only a limited mononuclear infiltrate. GRs and draining lymph nodes (LN) were assessed on days 2, 4, and 8 for Th1-(interleukin-2 [IL-2], interferon-gamma[IFN] and Th2-type (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) cytokines. CON GR produced only a small amount of IFN-gamma on day 2 and failed to induce a significant response in draining LN. In contrast, both PPD and SEA antigen-coated beads induced reactive lymphoid hyperplasia but differed greatly in local and regional cytokine profiles. PPD GR produced IFN-gamma on day 2 and the draining LN produced predominantly Th1 cytokines on days 2 and 4. In contrast, SEA beads GRs were dominated by Th2 cytokines. The corresponding LN produced IL-2 and IL-4 on day 2; IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma, and IL-10 on day 4; then IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-4 on day 8, probably reflecting maturational changes of T cells. Macrophages (MP) from bead GR also showed different patterns of IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production. Compared with CON GR, MPs from PPD GR were weak sources of IL-6, whereas those of SEA GR showed enhanced and accelerated production. In contrast, MP of PPD GR had augmented TNF-producing capacity, whereas those of SEA GR showed delayed TNF production. In vivo depletion of TNF, respectively, caused 40 and 10% decreases in PPD GR and SEA GR but had no effect on CON GR area, indicating that TNF contributed to a greater degree to the PPD response. These data show that depending on the inciting agent, GR can be

  17. Air pollution and cytokine responsiveness in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Klümper, Claudia; Krämer, Ursula; Lehmann, Irina; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Herberth, Gunda; Beckmann, Christina; Link, Elke; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schins, Roel P F

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that asthmatic children are more susceptible to traffic-related air pollution exposure than non-asthmatic children. Local and systemic inflammation in combination with oxidative stress have been suggested as a possible susceptibility factor. We investigated effect modification by asthma status for the association between air pollution exposure and systemic effects using whole blood cytokine responsiveness as an inflammatory marker. The study was nested within the two German birth cohort studies GINIplus and LISAplus and initially designed as a random sub-sample enriched with asthmatic children. Using data from 27 asthmatic and 59 non-asthmatic six-year-old children we measured the production of Interleukin-6 (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in whole blood after ex-vivo stimulation with urban particulate matter (EHC-93). Air pollution exposure (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5μm (PM2.5mass), coarse particulate matter (PMcoarse) and PM2.5absorbance (PM2.5abs)) was modelled for children´s home addresses applying land-use regression. To assess effect modification by asthma status linear regression models with multiplicative interaction terms were used. In asthmatics exposure to NO2 was associated with higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines: adjusted means ratio (MR) 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.22-4.04) for IL-6 per 2.68µg/m³ NO2. The interaction term between asthma status and NO2 exposure was significant. Results for NOx, PM10, PM2.5mass and PM2.5abs were in the same direction. No association between air pollution and cytokine responsiveness was found in the group of non-asthmatic children and in the overall group. Traffic-related air pollution exposure is associated with higher pro

  18. Eyelid and Sternum Fibroblasts Differ in Their Contraction Potential and Responses to Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Roos, Jonathan C. P.; Rose, Geoffrey E.; Ezra, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adverse skin scarring varies by anatomical site with, for example, presternal skin showing a greater hypertrophic response when compared with eyelid; such differences have traditionally been attributed to regional variations in skin tension, thickness, and Langer’s lines. Fibroblasts are the main cell implicated in fibrosis, and they too are known to show anatomical variation in their expression, differentiation, and intercellular interactions. We, therefore, investigated whether intrinsic differences in skin fibroblasts derived from separate locations might contribute to the observed discrepancies in clinical scarring. Methods: Primary in vitro cultures were established using matched eyelid and presternal skin from 3 healthy donors undergoing blepharoplasty surgery. We used an in vitro collagen gel model of fibroblast-mediated tissue contraction to compare the properties of the dermal fibroblasts from each site. Cell contractile force and matrix stiffness were assessed in 3-dimensional tissue constructs using an automated high-throughput device. Results: Dermal fibroblasts isolated from eyelid and sternum differ both in their ability to contract a gel matrix and in their response to cytokine stimulation; despite having lower intrinsic contractile force (P < 0.01) and resting stiffness (P < 0.02), the presternal cells were more contractile (P < 0.001) following stimulation with serum, or inflammatory cytokines transforming growth factor-β (P < 0.01) and interleukin-1β (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The propensity to cutaneous scarring may, at least in part, result from intrinsic differences in the local fibroblasts’ ability to contract and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines. Improved understanding of the underlying molecular pathways should prove useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for altering surgical and other scarring. PMID:26301137

  19. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  20. Biomaterials and host versus graft response: A short review

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd; Klobucar, Robert; Gradisnik, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials and biotechnology are increasing becoming an important area in modern medicine. The main aim in this area is the development of materials, which are biocompatible to normal tissue. Tissue-implant interactions with molecular, biological and cellular characteristics at the implant-tissue interface are important for the use and development of implants. Implantation may cause an inflammatory and immune response in tissue, foreign body reaction, systemic toxicity and imminent infection. Tissue-implant interactions determine the implant life-period. The aims of the study are to consider the biological response to implants. Biomaterials and host reactions to implants and their mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26894284

  1. Legionella suppresses the host unfolded protein response via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Treacy-Abarca, Sean; Mukherjee, Shaeri

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, secretes ∼300 effector proteins to modulate the host environment. Given the intimate interaction between L. pneumophila and the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the role of the host unfolded protein response (UPR) during L. pneumophila infection. Interestingly, we show that the host identifies L. pneumophila infection as a form of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the sensor pATF6 is processed to generate pATF6(N), a transcriptional activator of downstream UPR genes. However, L. pneumophila is able to suppress the UPR and block the translation of prototypical UPR genes, BiP and CHOP. Furthermore, biochemical studies reveal that L. pneumophila uses two effectors (Lgt1 and Lgt2) to inhibit the splicing of XBP1u mRNA to spliced XBP1 (XBP1s), an UPR response regulator. Thus, we demonstrate that L. pneumophila is able to inhibit the UPR by multiple mechanisms including blocking XBP1u splicing and causing translational repression. This observation highlights the utility of L. pneumophila as a powerful tool for studying a critical protein homeostasis regulator. PMID:26219498

  2. Response to Dengue virus infections altered by cytokine-like substances from mosquito cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With both shrimp and commercial insects such as honey bees, it is known that stable, persistent viral infections characterized by absence of disease can sometimes shift to overt disease states as a result of various stress triggers and that this can result in serious economic losses. The main research interest of our group is to understand the dynamics of stable viral infections in shrimp and how they can be destabilized by stress. Since there are no continuous cell lines for crustaceans, we have used a C6/36 mosquito cell line infected with Dengue virus to test hypotheses regarding these interactions. As a result, we accidentally discovered two new cytokine-like substances in 5 kDa extracts from supernatant solutions of acutely and persistently infected mosquito cells. Results Naïve C6/36 cells were exposed for 48 h to 5 kDa membrane filtrates prepared from the supernatant medium of stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Subsequent challenge of naïve cells with a virulent stock of Dengue virus 2 (DEN-2) and analysis by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy using anti-DEN-2 antibody revealed a dramatic reduction in the percentage of DEN-2 infected cells when compared to control cells. Similar filtrates prepared from C6/36 cells with acute DEN-2 infections were used to treat stable C6/36 mosquito cell cultures persistently-infected with Dengue virus. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy revealed destabilization in the form of an apoptosis-like response. Proteinase K treatment removed the cell-altering activities indicating that they were caused by small polypeptides similar to those previously reported from insects. Conclusions This is the first report of cytokine-like substances that can alter the responses of mosquito cells to Dengue virus. This simple model system allows detailed molecular studies on insect cytokine production and on cytokine activity in a standard insect cell line. PMID:21078201

  3. IRAK-M expression limits dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine production in response to Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Jessica; Czinn, Steven J; Kobayashi, Koichi S; Sun, Yezhou; Blanchard, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the gastric mucosa and persists for the life of the host. Bacterial persistence may be due to the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) whichmay have protective effects against other diseases such as asthma. It has been shown that H. pylori modulates the T cell response through dendritic cell reprogramming but the molecular pathways involved are relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to identify critical elements of dendritic cell (DC) activation and evaluate potential influence on immune activation. Microarray analysis was used to demonstrate limited gene expression changes in H. pylori stimulated bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) compared to the BMDCs stimulated with E. coli. IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, was upregulated and we selectedit for investigation of its role in modulating the DC and T cell responses. IRAK-M(-/-) and wild type BMDC were compared for their response to H. pylori. Cells lacking IRAK-M produced significantly greater amounts of proinflammatory MIP-2 and reduced amounts of immunomodulatory IL-10 than wild type BMDC. IRAK-M(-/-) cells also demonstrated increased MHC II expression upon activation. However, IRAK-M(-/-) BMDCs were comparable to wild type BMDCs in inducing T-helper 17 (TH17) and Treg responses as demonstrated in vitro using BMDC CD4+ T cells co-culture assays,and in vivo though the adoptive transfer of CD4(+) FoxP3-GFP T cells into H. pylori infected IRAK-M(-/-) mice. These results suggest that H. pylori infection leads to the upregulation of anti-inflammatory molecules like IRAK-M and that IRAK-M has a direct impact on innate functions in DCs such as cytokine and costimulation molecule upregulation but may not affect T cell skewing. PMID:23776703

  4. Complement activation and cytokine response by BioProtein, a bacterial single cell protein.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, L I B; Thorgersen, E B; Haug, T; Mollnes, T E

    2007-04-01

    The bacterial single cell protein (BSCP), BioProtein, is dried bacterial mass derived from fermentation of the gram negative bacteria Methylococcus capsulatus, used for animal and fish feed. Workers in this industry suffer frequently from pulmonary and systemic symptoms which may be induced by an inflammatory reaction. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of BSCP on inflammation in vitro as evaluated by complement activation and cytokine production. Human serum was incubated with BSCP and complement activation products specific for all pathways were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Human whole blood anti-coagulated with lepirudin was incubated with BSCP and a panel of 27 biological mediators was measured using multiplex technology. BSCP induced a dose-dependent complement activation as revealed by a pronounced increase in alternative and terminal pathway activation (fivefold and 20-fold, respectively) at doses from 1 microg BSCP/ml serum and a similar, but less extensive (two- to fourfold) increase in activation of the lectin and classical pathways at doses from 100 and 1000 microg BSCP/ml serum, respectively. Similarly, BSCP induced a dose-dependent production of a number of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors in human whole blood. At doses as low as 0 x 05-0 x 5 microg BSCP/ml blood a substantial increase was seen for tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1-beta, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta, IL-4, IL-9, IL-17, IL-1Ra, granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Thus, BSCP induced a substantial activation of all three initial complement pathways as well as a pronounced cytokine response in vitro, indicating a potent inflammatory property of this agent. PMID:17302729

  5. Quantitative PET imaging of bone marrow glucose metabolic response to hematopoietic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W.J.; Hoh, C.K.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of hematopoietic cytokines on bone marrow glucose metabolism noninvasively, the authors studied serial quantitative FDG-PET images in 18 patients with metastic melanoma and normal bone marrow who were undergoing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) administration as an adjunct to chemotherapy. All patients received 14 days of cytokine therapy in three groups; four patients were treated with GMCSF (5 {mu}g/kg/d SQ), eight patients were treated with GMCSF (5 {mu}g/kg/d SQ) and monoclonal antibody (MAbR24) and six patients were treated with MCSF (80 {mu}g/kg/d IVCI) and MAbR24. Dynamic FDG-PET imaging was performed over the lower thoracic or upper lumbar spine at four time points in each patient. Baseline glucose metabolic rates in the bone marrow of these three groups of patients were similar (5.2 {plus_minus} 0.7, 4.4 {plus_minus} 0.8 and 4.8 {plus_minus} 1.2 {mu}g/min/g as mean value and standard deviations, respectively). In both GMCSF and GMCSF + R24 groups, rapid increases in bone marrow glucose metabolic rates were observed during therapy. After GMCSF was stopped, bone marrow glucose metabolic rates rapdily decreased in both groups. The glucose metabolic response in these two groups was not significantly different by pooled t-statistics (p = 0.105). In the MCSF + R24 group, the increase of glucose metabolic rate on Days 3 and 10 was 35% and 31% above baseline on the average, but was not significant. The results support the use of parametric FDG-PET imaging for noninvasive quantitation of bone marrow glucose metabolic changes to hematopoietic cytokines in vivo. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Identification of Toxoplasma gondii Genes Responsive to the Host Immune Response during In Vivo Infection

    PubMed Central

    Skariah, Sini; Mordue, Dana G.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoa parasite that causes the disease toxoplasmosis. It resides within host cells in a parasitophorous vacuole distinct from the host cell endocytic system. T. gondii was used as a model to investigate how obligate intracellular parasites alter their gene expression in response to the host immune response during infection compared to growth in host cells in vitro. While bacterial pathogens clearly alter gene expression to adapt to the host environment during infection, the degree to which the external environment affects gene expression by obligate intracellular pathogens sequestered within host cells is less clear. The global transcriptome of T. gondii was analyzed in vivo in the presence and absence of the IFN-γ-dependent host innate immune response. The parasites' in vivo transcriptome was also compared to its transcriptome in vitro in fibroblast cells. Our results indicate that the parasite transcriptome is significantly altered during in vivo infection in the presence, but not absence, of IFN–γ-dependent immunity compared with fibroblasts infected in vitro. Many of the parasite genes increased in vivo appear to be common to an early general stress response by the parasite; surprisingly putative oocyst stage specific genes were also disproportionately increased during infection. PMID:23071600

  7. Early Divergent Host Responses in SHIVsf162P3 and SIVmac251 Infected Macaques Correlate with Control of Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Morici, Lisa A.; Pahar, Bapi; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed intravaginal inoculation with SHIVsf162p3 results in transient viremia followed by undetectable viremia in most macaques, and some displayed subsequent immunity to superinfection with pathogenic SIVmac251. Here we compare early T cell activation, proliferation, and plasma cytokine/chemokine responses in macaques intravaginally infected with either SHIVsf162p3 or SIVmac251 to determine whether distinct differences in host responses may be associated with early viral containment. The data show SIVmac251 infection results in significantly higher levels of T cell activation, proliferation, and a mixed cytokine/chemokine “storm” in plasma in primary infection, whereas infection with SHIVsf162p3 resulted in significantly lower levels of T cell activation, proliferation, and better preservation of memory CD4+ T cells in early infection which immediately preceded control of viremia. These results support the hypothesis that early systemic immune activation, T cell proliferation, and a more prominent and broader array of cytokine/chemokine responses facilitate SIV replication, and may play a key role in persistence of infection, and the progression to AIDS. In contrast, immune unresponsiveness may be associated with eventual clearance of virus, a concept that may have key significance for therapy and vaccine design. PMID:21464951

  8. Clinical aspects and cytokine response in severe H1N1 influenza A virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The immune responses in patients with novel A(H1N1) virus infection (nvA(H1N1)) are incompletely characterized. We investigated the profile of Th1 and Th17 mediators and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in groups with severe and mild nvA(H1N1) disease and correlated them with clinical aspects. Methods Thirty-two patients hospitalized with confirmed nvA(H1N1) infection were enrolled in the study: 21 patients with nvA(H1N1)-acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and 11 patients with mild disease. One group of 20 patients with bacterial sepsis-ARDS and another group of 15 healthy volunteers were added to compare their cytokine levels with pandemic influenza groups. In the nvA(H1N1)-ARDS group, the serum cytokine samples were obtained on admission and 3 days later. The clinical aspects were recorded prospectively. Results In the nvA(H1N1)-ARDS group, obesity and lymphocytopenia were more common and IP-10, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-9 were significantly increased versus control. When comparing mild with severe nvA(H1N1) groups, IL-6, IL-8, IL-15 and TNFα were significantly higher in the severe group. In nonsurvivors versus survivors, IL-6 and IL-15 were increased on admission and remained higher 3 days later. A positive correlation of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-15 levels with C-reactive protein and with > 5-day interval between symptom onset and admission, and a negative correlation with the PaO2:FiO2 ratio, were found in nvA(H1N1) groups. In obese patients with influenza disease, a significant increased level of IL-8 was found. When comparing viral ARDS with bacterial ARDS, the level of IL-8, IL-17 and TNFα was significantly higher in bacterial ARDS and IL-12 was increased only in viral ARDS. Conclusions In our critically ill patients with novel influenza A(H1N1) virus infection, the hallmarks of the severity of disease were IL-6, IL-15, IL-8 and TNFα. These cytokines, except TNFα, had a positive

  9. Migrational changes of mesenchymal stem cells in response to cytokines, growth factors, hypoxia, and aging.

    PubMed

    Naaldijk, Yahaira; Johnson, Adiv A; Ishak, Stefan; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Hohaus, Christian; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2015-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-immunogenic, multipotent cells with at least trilineage differentiation potential. They promote wound healing, improve regeneration of injured tissue, and mediate numerous other health effects. MSCs migrate to sites of injury and stimulate repair either through direct differentiation or indirectly through the stimulation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Using the in vitro scratch assay, we show that the inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors TNF-α, SDF-1, PDGF, and bFGF enhance migration of rat MSCs under normoxic conditions, while TNF-α, IFN-γ, PDGF, and bFGF promote MSC migration under hypoxic conditions. This indicates that the oxygen concentration affects how MSCs will migrate in response to specific factors and, consistent with this, differential expression of cytokines was observed under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Using the transwell migration assay, we find that TNF-α, IFN-γ, bFGF, IGF-1, PDGF, and SDF-1 significantly increase transmigration of rat MSCs compared to unstimulated medium. MSCs derived from aged rats exhibited comparable migration to MSCs derived from young rats under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, even after application with specific factors. Similarly, migration in MSCs from aged, human donors did not statistically differ compared to migration in MSCs derived from human umbilical cord tissue or younger donors. PMID:26335540

  10. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    PubMed

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015. PMID:27196982

  11. Toll-like receptor 3 regulates NK cell responses to cytokines and controls experimental metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Guillerey, Camille; Chow, Melvyn T; Miles, Kim; Olver, Stuart; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist poly(I:C) is a promising adjuvant for cancer vaccines due to its induction of potent antitumor responses occurring primarily through the activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NK) cells. However, little is known about the role of TLR3 sensing of endogenous ligands in innate tumor immunosurveillance. Here, we investigated whether TLR3 could modulate immune responses and facilitate tumor control without administration of an agonist. We observed only limited impact of TLR3 deficiency on spontaneous carcinogenesis and primary growth of B16F10, E0771 or MC38 tumors when injected subcutaneously to mice. Nevertheless, TLR3 was observed to limit experimental B16F10 lung metastasis, an immunologic constraint dependent on both IFNγ secretion and NK cells. Interestingly, we observed that NK cells derived from Tlr3 null (Tlr3−/−) mice were hyporesponsive to cytokine stimulation. Indeed, compared with NK cells with intact TLR3, Tlr3−/− NK cells produced significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ, when incubated in the presence of different combinations of IL-12, IL-18 and IL-15. Bone-marrow chimera experiments established that competent NK cell responses required TLR3 sensing on radio-sensitive immune cells. Intriguingly, although CD8α DCs robustly express high levels of TLR3, we found that those cells were not necessary for efficient IFNγ production by NK cells. Moreover, the defective NK cell phenotype of Tlr3−/− mice appeared to be independent of the gut microbiota. Altogether, our data demonstrate a pivotal role of endogenous TLR3 stimulation for the acquisition of full NK cell functions and immune protection against experimental metastasis. PMID:26405596

  12. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 modulates the immune response profile and development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Brant, Fatima; Miranda, Aline S; Esper, Lisia; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Cisalpino, Daniel; de Souza, Danielle da Gloria; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2016-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection results in severe malaria in humans, affecting various organs, including the liver, spleen and brain, and resulting in high morbidity and mortality. The Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection in mice closely recapitulates many aspects of human cerebral malaria (CM); thus, this model has been used to investigate the pathogenesis of CM. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2), an intracellular protein induced by cytokines and hormones, modulates the immune response, neural development, neurogenesis and neurotrophic pathways. However, the role of SOCS2 during CM remains unknown. SOCS2 knockout (SOCS2(-/-)) mice infected with PbA show an initial resistance to infection with reduced parasitemia and production of TNF, TGF-β, IL-12 and IL-17 in the brain. Interestingly, in the late phase of infection, SOCS2(-/-) mice display increased parasitemia and reduced Treg cell infiltration, associated with enhanced levels of Th1 and Th17 cells and related cytokines IL-17, IL-6, and TGF-β in the brain. A significant reduction in protective neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), was also observed. Moreover, the molecular alterations in the brain of infected SOCS2(-/-) mice were associated with anxiety-related behaviors and cognition impairment. Mechanistically, these results revealed enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production in PbA-infected SOCS2(-/-) mice, and the inhibition of NO synthesis through l-NAME led to a marked decrease in survival, the disruption of parasitemia control and more pronounced anxiety-like behavior. Treatment with l-NAME also shifted the levels of Th1, Th7 and Treg cells in the brains of infected SOCS2(-/-) mice to the background levels observed in infected WT, with remarkable exception of increased CD8(+)IFN(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes. These results indicate that SOCS2 plays a dual role during PbA infection, being detrimental

  13. Vitamin D inhibits the occurrence of experimental cerebral malaria in mice by suppressing the host inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiyue; Yan, Juan; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Qinghui; Pang, Wei; Qi, Zanmei; Wang, Meilian; Luo, Enjie; Parker, Daniel M.; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Cui, Liwang; Cao, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    In animal models of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), neuropathology is associated with an overwhelming inflammatory response and sequestration of leucocytes and parasite-infected red blood cells in the brain. Here we explored the effect of vitamin D (VD, cholecalciferol) treatment on host immunity and outcome of ECM in C57BL/6 mice during Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection. We observed that oral administration of VD both before and after PbA infection completely protected mice from ECM. VD administration significantly dampened the inducible systemic inflammatory responses with reduced circulating cytokines IFN-γ and TNF and decreased expression of these cytokines by the spleen cells. Meanwhile, VD also resulted in decreased expression of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and cytoadhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD36) in the brain, leading to reduced accumulation of pathogenic T cells in the brain and ultimately substantial improvement of the blood-brain barriers of PbA-infected mice. In addition, VD inhibited the differentiation, activation and maturation of splenic dendritic cells. Meanwhile, regulatory T cells and IL-10 expression levels were upregulated upon VD treatment. These data collectively demonstrated the suppressive function of VD on host inflammatory responses, which provides significant survival benefits in the murine ECM model. PMID:24965778

  14. Dynamics of the microbiota in response to host infection.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Clara; Gerber, Georg K; Roeselers, Guus; Delaney, Mary; DuBois, Andrea; Liu, Qing; Belavusava, Vera; Yeliseyev, Vladimir; Houseman, Andres; Onderdonk, Andrew; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Bry, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiologic responses in vivo. Employing a murine model of infectious colitis with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, we generated a 2-month time-series of 16S rDNA gene profiles, and quantitatively cultured commensals, from multiple intestinal sites in infected and uninfected mice. We developed a computational framework to discover time-varying signatures for individual taxa, and to automatically group signatures to identify microbial sub-communities within the larger gut ecosystem that demonstrate common behaviors. Application of this model to the 16S rDNA dataset revealed dynamic alterations in the microbiota at multiple levels of resolution, from effects on systems-level metrics to changes across anatomic sites for individual taxa and species. These analyses revealed unique, time-dependent microbial signatures associated with host responses at different stages of colitis. Signatures included a Mucispirillum OTU associated with early disruption of the colonic surface mucus layer, prior to the onset of symptomatic colitis, and members of the Clostridiales and Lactobacillales that increased with successful resolution of inflammation, after clearance of the pathogen. Quantitative culture data validated findings for predominant species, further refining and strengthening model predictions. These findings provide new insights into the complex behaviors found within host ecosystems, and define several time-dependent microbial signatures that may be leveraged in studies of other infectious or inflammatory conditions. PMID:25014551

  15. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  16. Host response to laparoscopic surgery: mechanisms and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Hackam, David J.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    1998-01-01

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionized the treatment of a variety of surgical diseases, partly because it is associated with less patient morbidity than nonlaparoscopic surgical procedures. Emerging evidence suggests that alteration in the host response after laparoscopic procedures has significantly contributed to the improved postoperative course. Laparoscopy modulates both afferent stimuli (including tissue trauma, pain and wound size) and efferent responses (via neuroendocrine, metabolic, immunologic and cardiorespiratory systems). These effects lead to a decrease in postoperative pain, fever and disability. Laparoscopy mediates these effects through reduced wound size, the activities of endotoxin and immunomodulatory actions of the insufflated gas, resulting in impaired macrophage activity. Although clearly beneficial in reducing postoperative morbidity after elective surgery, this immunosuppression could increase the risk of complications during procedures for infection or neoplasia. PMID:9575992

  17. Vitamin A Modifies the Intestinal Chemokine and Cytokine Responses to Norovirus Infection in Mexican Children12

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kurt Z.; Garcıa, Coralith; Ko, GwangPyo; Santos, Jose I.; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Rosado, Jorge L.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Nathakumar, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A supplementation is associated with divergent clinical norovirus (NoV) outcomes in Mexican children. Fecal cytokine concentrations following NoV genogroup infections among 127 Mexican children 5–15 mo old enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, vitamin A supplementation trial were determined to clarify the role the gut immune response plays in these associations. Stools collected from supplemented children [20,000 IU retinol (3.3 IU = 1 μg retinol) for children < 12 mo of age; 45,000 iu for children ≥ 12 mo] or children in the placebo group were screened for NoV genogroups I (GI) and II (GII). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), TNFα, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFNγ, and IL-10 fecal concentrations were also determined. Differences in cytokine levels between the 2 groups following GI and GII infections were determined using ordered logistic regression models. MCP-1 and IL-8 levels were greater among GI- and GII-infected children, respectively, compared with uninfected children, whereas IL-5 levels were greater following both genogroup infections. MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-6 fecal levels were reduced among supplemented children with GII-associated diarrhea compared with the placebo group. Vitamin A–supplemented, GII-infected children had reduced MCP-1 and TNFα levels compared with GII-infected children in the placebo group (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). Supplemented children with GI-associated diarrhea had higher TNFα and IL-4 levels compared with children in the placebo group with diarrhea (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.02, respectively). The divergent effects of supplementation on NoV outcomes may result from the different effects vitamin A has on the genogroup-specific immune responses. PMID:21411606

  18. Thrombocytopenia is associated with a dysregulated host response in critically ill sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Claushuis, Theodora A M; van Vught, Lonneke A; Scicluna, Brendon P; Wiewel, Maryse A; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Ong, David S Y; Cremer, Olaf L; Horn, Janneke; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bonten, Marc J; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-06-16

    Preclinical studies have suggested that platelets influence the host response during sepsis. We sought to assess the association of admission thrombocytopenia with the presentation, outcome, and host response in patients with sepsis. Nine hundred thirty-one consecutive sepsis patients were stratified according to platelet counts (very low <50 × 10(9)/L, intermediate-low 50 × 10(9) to 99 × 10(9)/L, low 100 × 10(9) to 149 × 10(9)/L, or normal 150 × 10(9) to 399 × 10(9)/L) on admission to the intensive care unit. Sepsis patients with platelet counts <50 × 10(9)/L and 50 × 10(9) to 99 × 10(9)/L presented with higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation scores and more shock. Both levels of thrombocytopenia were independently associated with increased 30-day mortality (hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals 2.00 [1.32-3.05] and 1.72 [1.22-2.44], respectively). To account for baseline differences besides platelet counts, propensity matching was performed, after which the association between thrombocytopenia and the host response was tested, as evaluated by measuring 17 plasma biomarkers indicative of activation and/or dysregulation of pathways implicated in sepsis pathogenesis and by whole genome blood leukocyte expression profiling. In the propensity matched cohort, platelet counts < 50 × 10(9)/L were associated with increased cytokine levels and enhanced endothelial cell activation. All thrombocytopenic groups showed evidence of impaired vascular integrity, whereas coagulation activation was similar between groups. Blood microarray analysis revealed a distinct gene expression pattern in sepsis patients with <50 × 10(9)/L platelets, showing reduced signaling in leukocyte adhesion and diapedesis and increased complement signaling. These data show that admission thrombocytopenia is associated with enhanced mortality and a more disturbed host response during sepsis independent of disease severity, thereby providing clinical validity to animal

  19. Pulmonary collectins modulate strain-specific influenza a virus infection and host responses.

    PubMed

    Hawgood, Samuel; Brown, Cynthia; Edmondson, Jess; Stumbaugh, Amber; Allen, Lennell; Goerke, Jon; Clark, Howard; Poulain, Francis

    2004-08-01

    Collectins are secreted collagen-like lectins that bind, agglutinate, and neutralize influenza A virus (IAV) in vitro. Surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D) are collectins expressed in the airway and alveolar epithelium and could have a role in the regulation of IAV infection in vivo. Previous studies have shown that binding of SP-D to IAV is dependent on the glycosylation of specific sites on the HA1 domain of hemagglutinin on the surface of IAV, while the binding of SP-A to the HA1 domain is dependent on the glycosylation of the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A. Here, using SP-A and SP-D gene-targeted mice on a common C57BL6 background, we report that viral replication and the host response as measured by weight loss, neutrophil influx into the lung, and local cytokine release are regulated by SP-D but not SP-A when the IAV is glycosylated at a specific site (N165) on the HA1 domain. SP-D does not protect against IAV infection with a strain lacking glycosylation at N165. With the exception of a small difference on day 2 after infection with X-79, we did not find any significant difference in viral load in SP-A(-/-) mice with either IAV strain, although small differences in the cytokine responses to IAV were detected in SP-A(-/-) mice. Mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D responded to IAV similarly to mice deficient in SP-D alone. Since most strains of IAV currently circulating are glycosylated at N165, SP-D may play a role in protection from IAV infection. PMID:15280465

  20. Residual oil fly ash amplifies allergic cytokines, airway responsiveness, and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gavett, S H; Madison, S L; Stevens, M A; Costa, D L

    1999-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution may increase symptom severity in allergic asthmatics. To examine possible interaction, or greater than additive responses, between PM effects and allergic responses, an ovalbumin-sensitized and challenged (OVA) mouse model of allergic airways disease was utilized. After challenge, mice were intratracheally instilled with saline vehicle or 3 mg/kg (approximately 60 microg) residual oil fly ash (ROFA), a transition metal-rich emission source PM sample. Physiological and inflammatory responses were examined 1, 3, 8, and 15 d later. In response to intravenously administered methacholine, ROFA increased total respiratory system resistance and decreased compliance 1 d after exposure, whereas effects of OVA lasted at least 15 d after exposure. Significant interactions between OVA and ROFA were mainly observed 8 d after challenge and exposure, especially with respect to compliance. A strong interaction (p < 0.01) between OVA and ROFA exposure resulted in 8-fold (1 d) and 3-fold (3 d) increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid eosinophil numbers. A similarly strong interaction (8-fold) was observed in BAL fluid interleukin-4 (IL-4) 1 d after challenge and exposure. Significant though less strong interactions were also found with respect to IL-4 and IL-5 by 3 d postchallenge/exposure. This study shows that allergen challenge and exposure to emission source particulate matter containing relatively high levels of transitions metals can interact to increase Th2 cytokine production, eosinophil recruitment, and airway hyperresponsiveness in previously sensitized mice. PMID:10588603

  1. Specific humoral response of hosts with variable schistosomiasis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; McWilliam, Hamish E G; Gaze, Soraya; Piedrafita, David; Pearson, Mark S; Nakajima, Rie; Duke, Mary; Trieu, Angela; Doolan, Denise L; Cardoso, Fernanda C; Jasinskas, Algis; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Felgner, Philip L; Loukas, Alex; Meeusen, Els; McManus, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    The schistosome blood flukes are some of the largest global causes of parasitic morbidity. Further study of the specific antibody response during schistosomiasis may yield the vaccines and diagnostics needed to combat this disease. Therefore, for the purposes of antigen discovery, sera and antibody-secreting cell (ASC) probes from semi-permissive rats and sera from susceptible mice were used to screen a schistosome protein microarray. Following Schistosoma japonicum infection, rats had reduced pathology, increased antibody responses and broader antigen recognition profiles compared with mice. With successive infections, rat global serological reactivity and the number of recognized antigens increased. The local antibody response in rat skin and lung, measured with ASC probes, increased after parasite migration and contributed antigen-specific antibodies to the multivalent serological response. In addition, the temporal variation of anti-parasite serum antibodies after infection and reinfection followed patterns that appear related to the antigen driving the response. Among the 29 antigens differentially recognized by the infected hosts were numerous known vaccine candidates, drug targets and several S. japonicum homologs of human schistosomiasis resistance markers-the tegument allergen-like proteins. From this set, we prioritized eight proteins that may prove to be novel schistosome vaccine and diagnostic antigens. PMID:26044065

  2. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  3. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  4. A distinct array of proinflammatory cytokines is expressed in human colon epithelial cells in response to bacterial invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, H C; Eckmann, L; Yang, S K; Panja, A; Fierer, J; Morzycka-Wroblewska, E; Kagnoff, M F

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria that penetrate the intestinal epithelial barrier stimulate an inflammatory response in the adjacent intestinal mucosa. The present studies asked whether colon epithelial cells can provide signals that are important for the initiation and amplification of an acute mucosal inflammatory response. Infection of monolayers of human colon epithelial cell lines (T84, HT29, Caco-2) with invasive strains of bacteria (Salmonella dublin, Shigella dysenteriae, Yersinia enterocolitica, Listeria monocytogenes, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli) resulted in the coordinate expression and upregulation of a specific array of four proinflammatory cytokines, IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, GM-CSF, and TNF alpha, as assessed by mRNA levels and cytokine secretion. Expression of the same cytokines was upregulated after TNF alpha or IL-1 stimulation of these cells. In contrast, cytokine gene expression was not altered after infection of colon epithelial cells with noninvasive bacteria or the noninvasive protozoan parasite, G. lamblia. Notably, none of the cell lines expressed mRNA for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-gamma, or significant levels of IL-1 or IL-10 in response to the identical stimuli. The coordinate expression of IL-8, MCP-1, GM-CSF and TNF alpha appears to be a general property of human colon epithelial cells since an identical array of cytokines, as well as IL-6, also was expressed by freshly isolated human colon epithelial cells. Since the cytokines expressed in response to bacterial invasion or other proinflammatory agonists have a well documented role in chemotaxis and activation of inflammatory cells, colon epithelial cells appear to be programmed to provide a set of signals for the activation of the mucosal inflammatory response in the earliest phases after microbial invasion. Images PMID:7814646

  5. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics. PMID:21637028

  6. Natural antibodies and the host immune responses to xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D V

    2000-05-01

    Natural antibodies are present in the serum of individuals in the absence of known antigenic stimulation. These antibodies are primarily IgM, polyreactive, and encoded by immunoglobulin V genes in germline configuration. Natural antibodies are produced by B-1 lymphocytes, cells that form the primary cell of the fetal and newborn B cell repertoire and may represent the basic foundation upon which the adult repertoire of B cell antibodies is based. Natural antibodies react with a variety of endogenous and exogenous antigens, including xenoantigens expressed by tissues between unrelated species. These antibodies are capable of causing the immediate rejection of grafts exchanged across species barriers. One of the central issues related to our understanding of the immunopathologic mechanisms responsible for rejection of xenografts is whether pre-formed natural antibodies and new antibodies induced following xenotransplantation are produced by the same pathways of B cell antibody production. We have established in studies conducted in rodents and humans that the initial phases of antibody production xenogeneic tissues involves the use of a restricted population of Ig germline genes to encode xenoantibody binding. As the humoral xenoantibody response matures, the same closely-related groups of Ig V genes are used to encode antibody binding and there is evidence for an isotype switch to IgG antibody production and the appearance of somatic mutations consistent with antigen-driven affinity maturation. Our findings in both rodent and human studies form the basis for our proposal that the xenograft response reflects the use of B cell natural antibody repertoires originally intended to provide protection against infection. The host humoral response is inadvertently recruited to mount antibody responses against foreign grafts because they display carbohydrate antigens that are shared by common environmental microbes. This model of xenoantibody responses is being tested in our

  7. Cytokine profile of autologous platelet-derived eye drops in patients with ocular chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Valentini, C G; Nuzzolo, E R; Orlando, N; Metafuni, E; Bianchi, M; Chiusolo, P; Zini, G; Teofili, L

    2016-02-01

    Ocular chronic GVHD is efficaciously treated with autologous platelet-derived eye drops. We investigated the cytokine content of eye drops produced using a non-gelified lysate obtained from autologous platelet-rich plasma in six patients with ocular GVHD. In both the responding (n = 4) and the resistant (n = 2) patients, the eye drops were significantly enriched with various growth factors, in amounts proportional with the platelet counts. In contrast, chemokine ligand and interleukin levels were similar to those of plasma. The non-responding patients showed the highest levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10. These findings provide possible explanations for beneficial or detrimental effects of eye drops. PMID:26383050

  8. Natural innate cytokine response to immunomodulators and adjuvants in human precision-cut lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Switalla, S.; Lauenstein, L.; Prenzler, F.; Knothe, S.; Foerster, C.; Fieguth, H.-G.; Pfennig, O.; Schaumann, F.; Martin, C.; Guzman, C.A.; Ebensen, T.; Mueller, M.; Hohlfeld, J.M.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.; Sewald, K.

    2010-08-01

    Prediction of lung innate immune responses is critical for developing new drugs. Well-established immune modulators like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can elicit a wide range of immunological effects. They are involved in acute lung diseases such as infections or chronic airway diseases such as COPD. LPS has a strong adjuvant activity, but its pyrogenicity has precluded therapeutic use. The bacterial lipopeptide MALP-2 and its synthetic derivative BPPcysMPEG are better tolerated. We have compared the effects of LPS and BPPcysMPEG on the innate immune response in human precision-cut lung slices. Cytokine responses were quantified by ELISA, Luminex, and Meso Scale Discovery technology. The initial response to LPS and BPPcysMPEG was marked by coordinated and significant release of the mediators IL-1{beta}, MIP-1{beta}, and IL-10 in viable PCLS. Stimulation of lung tissue with BPPcysMPEG, however, induced a differential response. While LPS upregulated IFN-{gamma}, BPPcysMPEG did not. This traces back to their signaling pathways via TLR4 and TLR2/6. The calculated exposure doses selected for LPS covered ranges occurring in clinical studies with human beings. Correlation of obtained data with data from human BAL fluid after segmental provocation with endotoxin showed highly comparable effects, resulting in a coefficient of correlation > 0.9. Furthermore, we were interested in modulating the response to LPS. Using dexamethasone as an immunosuppressive drug for anti-inflammatory therapy, we found a significant reduction of GM-CSF, IL-1{beta}, and IFN-{gamma}. The PCLS-model offers the unique opportunity to test the efficacy and toxicity of biological agents intended for use by inhalation in a complex setting in humans.

  9. In vitro cow's milk protein-specific inflammatory and regulatory cytokine responses in preterm infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Adel E; Chuang, Shu-Ling; Hayes, Peter; Fell, John M E

    2011-02-01

    Enteral feeding with cow's milk formula is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and sepsis. Dietary antigen sensitization may play a role in promoting and/or sustaining inflammation in both conditions. Aiming at investigating cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific cytokine responses in preterm infants with NEC and sepsis, 14 babies with NEC, 14 matched healthy controls, and 10 septic controls were recruited. Unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) secreting IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β1 were counted by the single-cell enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay. During the acute phase of NEC, patients showed a general pattern of a high level of cytokine secretion both when unstimulated and stimulated by mitogen [phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)] and CMPs: beta-lactoglobulin (β-lg) and casein. These responses were more marked to β-lg for IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 than TGF-β1. Cytokine responses in sepsis were lower than in NEC (lowest in healthy controls, with a minimal TGF-β1 response). At term, lower frequencies of cytokine-secreting cells were elicited than during the acute phase, except for TGF-β1 secreting cells, which increased at term (in response to PHA and CMPs) particularly following not only NEC but also sepsis. PMID:20975616

  10. Analysis of complex biomarkers for human immune-mediated disorders based on cytokine responsiveness of peripheral blood cells123

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John M.; Knutson, Keith L.; Strausbauch, Michael A.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Therneau, Terry M.; Wettstein, Peter J.; Matteson, Eric L.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of improved biomarkers promises to enhance the clinical care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other immune-mediated disorders. We have developed an innovative approach to broadly assess the cytokine responsiveness of human PBMC using a multi-stimulant panel and multiplexed immunoassays. The objective of this study was to demonstrate this concept by determining whether cytokine profiles could discriminate RA patients according to disease stage (early vs. late) or severity. A 10-cytokine profile, consisting of IL-12, CCL4, TNFα, IL-4, and IL-10 release in response to stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28, CXCL8 and IL-6 in response to CMV/EBV lysate, and IL-17A, GM-CSF, and CCL2 in response to HSP60, easily discriminated the early RA group from controls. These data were used to create an immune response score, which performed well in distinguishing the early RA patients from controls and also correlated with several markers of disease severity among the patients with late RA. In contrast, the same 10-cytokine profile assessed in serum was far less effective in discriminating the groups. Thus, our approach lays the foundation for the development of immunologic ‘signatures’ that could be useful in predicting disease course and monitoring the outcomes of therapy among patients with immune-mediated diseases. PMID:20495063

  11. Host Response of Ornamental Palms to Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    PubMed

    Inserra, R N; Dunn, R A; Vovlas, N

    1994-12-01

    The responses of 20 species of ornamental palms and one cycad (Cycas revoluta) to two populations of the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, from southern Florida were studied in two greenhouse experiments conducted in 1989-1991 and 1991-92. Ornamental palms in pots were exposed to initial population densities of 400 and 1,500 R. reniformis/l00 cm(3) soil for 16 and 15 months, respectively. Nematode reproduction occurred on Acoelorrhaphe wrightii and Washingtonia robusta, but not on the other palms or the cycad. In both experiments, nematode numbers on A. wrightii and W. robusta were significantly smaller than those on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a susceptible host of the nematode used as a control in these experiments. Nematodes surviving in pots containing nonhost palms for 16 months retained infectivity and were able to reproduce on susceptible cowpea in a bioassay. Sections from Washingtonia robusta roots infected by R. reniformis females showed the nematode feeding on syncytia formed by endodermal, pericyclic, and vascular parenchyma cells in a manner similar to that reported for other monocot hosts of the reniform nematode. PMID:19279956

  12. Host Response of Ornamental Palms to Rotylenchulus reniformis

    PubMed Central

    Inserra, R. N.; Dunn, R. A.; Vovlas, N.

    1994-01-01

    The responses of 20 species of ornamental palms and one cycad (Cycas revoluta) to two populations of the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, from southern Florida were studied in two greenhouse experiments conducted in 1989-1991 and 1991-92. Ornamental palms in pots were exposed to initial population densities of 400 and 1,500 R. reniformis/l00 cm³ soil for 16 and 15 months, respectively. Nematode reproduction occurred on Acoelorrhaphe wrightii and Washingtonia robusta, but not on the other palms or the cycad. In both experiments, nematode numbers on A. wrightii and W. robusta were significantly smaller than those on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a susceptible host of the nematode used as a control in these experiments. Nematodes surviving in pots containing nonhost palms for 16 months retained infectivity and were able to reproduce on susceptible cowpea in a bioassay. Sections from Washingtonia robusta roots infected by R. reniformis females showed the nematode feeding on syncytia formed by endodermal, pericyclic, and vascular parenchyma cells in a manner similar to that reported for other monocot hosts of the reniform nematode. PMID:19279956

  13. An autologous endothelial cell:peripheral blood mononuclear cell assay that detects cytokine storm responses to biologics.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel M; Paschalaki, Koralia E; Starke, Richard D; Mohamed, Nura A; Sharp, Giles; Fox, Bernard; Eastwood, David; Bristow, Adrian; Ball, Christina; Vessillier, Sandrine; Hansel, Trevor T; Thorpe, Susan J; Randi, Anna M; Stebbings, Richard; Mitchell, Jane A

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent unmet need for human tissue bioassays to predict cytokine storm responses to biologics. Current bioassays that detect cytokine storm responses in vitro rely on endothelial cells, usually from umbilical veins or cell lines, cocultured with freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy adult volunteers. These assays therefore comprise cells from 2 separate donors and carry the disadvantage of mismatched tissues and lack the advantage of personalized medicine. Current assays also do not fully delineate mild (such as Campath) and severe (such as TGN1412) cytokine storm-inducing drugs. Here, we report a novel bioassay where endothelial cells grown from stem cells in the peripheral blood (blood outgrowth endothelial cells) and PBMCs from the same donor can be used to create an autologous coculture bioassay that responds by releasing a plethora of cytokines to authentic TGN1412 but only modestly to Campath and not to control antibodies such as Herceptin, Avastin, and Arzerra. This assay performed better than the traditional mixed donor assay in terms of cytokine release to TGN1412 and, thus, we suggest provides significant advancement and a definitive system by which biologics can be tested and paves the way for personalized medicine. PMID:25746794

  14. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D; Udagama, Preethi V

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~5ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~9360pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P<0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P<0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P<0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  15. Host Habitat Volatiles Enhance the Olfactory Response of the Larval Parasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis to Specifically Host-Associated Cues.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, Benjamin; Adler, Cornel; Schulz, Hartwig; Hilker, Monika

    2016-09-01

    Host foraging of parasitic wasps attacking insects living in stored food may be guided by volatile cues emanating from these postharvest products. However, little knowledge is available as to how habitat odor released from noninfested stored food affects the parasitoid's response to host-specific chemicals. In this study, we investigated the impact of wheat grist odor on the olfactory host search by the ectoparasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis This parasitoid attacks larvae of the confused flour beetle Tribolium confusum, a common pest of grain products. Olfactometer bioassays showed that female H. sylvanidis were attracted by volatiles released from host larval feces, whereas odor of noninfested wheat grist was neither attractive nor did it mask the host-indicating cues. We analyzed the odor of host larval feces and wheat grist by coupled gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and recorded the parasitoid's electroantennographic (EAG) responses to the detected volatiles. Two specifically host-associated components of the fecal odor, (E)-2-nonenal and 1-pentadecene, elicited strong EAG responses. Both components were attractive when tested individually, but less than larval feces. Attraction of parasitoids to these host-specific key compounds was enhanced by addition of (i) noninfested habitat substrate odor or (ii) a blend of 3 EAG-active (but not behaviorally active) volatiles that had been identified in odor of noninfested grist (benzaldehyde, 1-tetradecene, 1-hexadecene), but were also detected in the host fecal odor. The impact of these volatiles ubiquitously released in a food store by noninfested habitat substrate on the parasitoid's orientation to host-specific volatile cues is discussed. PMID:27261526

  16. Innate immune memory: Implications for host responses to damage-associated molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Crișan, Tania O; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the innate immune system build immunological memory via epigenetic reprogramming after stimulations with microbial ligands. This functional readjustment allows for enhanced nonspecific inflammatory responses upon secondary challenges, a process termed "trained immunity." The epigenomic blueprint of trained monocytes has been recently reported, which revealed several important immunologic and metabolic mechanisms that underlie these changes. Interestingly, similar long-term reprogramming of cytokine production has also been described to be induced by endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Here, we present an overview of the novel data showing that endogenous alarm signals associated with tissue damage and sterile inflammation can induce trained immunity through epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs. We describe new and old evidence of persistent effects of DAMPs in driving inflammation and enforce the concept that the influence of tissue-derived signals is critical in adjusting the magnitude and type of immune response built by the host. The better characterization of trained immunity for the persistence of inflammation induced by DAMPs would provide new possibilities for intervention in aging and autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:26970440

  17. Role of Host Granulomatous Response in Murine Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Olds, G. Richard; Mahmoud, Adel A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Eosinophils form 50% of cells in the host granulomatous response to Schistosoma mansoni eggs, but their functional role in these granulomas and their relation to egg destruction is unknown. We have studied the course of S. mansoni infection in mice treated with normal rabbit serum (NRS) or depleted of their eosinophils by monospecific anti-eosinophil serum (AES). At 6-wk of infection (after 2 wk of egg deposition) the AES-treated animals were similar to NRS-treated controls with the exception that hepatic granulomas in the AES-treated animals were 50% smaller and devoid of eosinophils. At 8 wk of infection, AES-treated mice had significantly higher mortality, spleen weight, portal pressure, and 80% more eggs retained in their livers. These data suggest that eosinophil depletion delayed egg destruction. We subsequently studied destruction of eggs injected into the pulmonary microvasculature of sensitized mice. 2,000 S. mansoni eggs were intravenously injected into the tail veins of mice treated with NRS, anti-neutrophil serum, AES or ATG (anti-thymocyte globulin); at time intervals the remaining eggs were recovered from the lungs by tissue digestion. Egg recovery from NRS- or anti-neutrophil serum-treated mice began to decrease by day 16 and the percent recovery of eggs at day 24 was 55 and 52%, respectively. In contrast, animals treated with AES had smaller lung granulomas that were devoid of eosinophils and a marked delay of egg destruction was seen. It took until day 44 for 50% of the eggs to be destroyed. In ATG-treated animals smaller granulomas were seen that had diminished lymphocytes and also 75% less eosinophils. ATG treatment apparently slowed egg destruction but was not statistically significant. Our data define the role of the eosinophils in destruction of schistosome eggs in vivo and delineates the protective function of these cells within the host granulomatous response. PMID:7440710

  18. Host neuro- immuno-endocrine responses in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rettori, Elisa; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Dees, W Les; Endruhn, Axel; Rettori, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory complex disease caused by microorganisms. It may be influenced by diverse systemic disorders, environmental, genetic and socio-psychological factors with the ability to alter the balance of the host neuro-immunoendocrine responses. It is characterized by the progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss, with possible impact on general health. Starting with a brief description of the periodontium, etiopathogenesis, repair processes and several physiological mechanisms and their disarray on periodontium response to bacterial challenge. Following, the negative effects of stress on the disease and some remarks on the recently discovered effects of oxytocin that modulate stress response and its role in individual coping mechanisms to stress. We also focus on the participation of components and functions of endocannabinoid system with anti-inflammatory actions on gingiva. Finally, a discussion that may link between diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, stroke and metabolic syndrome associated with periodontal disease; all of them sharing a common denominator that is inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:24588827

  19. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect of immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge were assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 increased in a time-dependent manner f...

  20. Neonatal and Adult AMphi Upregulate Cytokine Gene Transcription Via p38 MAPK Signaling in Response to RSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis in premature and newborn infants. Alveolar macrophages (AMphi) are important innate cytokine-secreting cells in the lung, with critical roles in pathogen clearance and antigen presentation. As the neonatal AMphi response is not co...

  1. Temporal pattern and effect of sex on lipopolysaccharide-induced stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temporal pattern and gender effect on immune and stress hormone responses to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was assessed using a pig model. Secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta and IL-6 increased (P < 0.05) in a time-depend...

  2. Sepsis chronically in MARS: systemic cytokine responses are always mixed regardless of the outcome, magnitude, or phase of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Osuchowski, Marcin F; Craciun, Florin; Weixelbaumer, Katrin M; Duffy, Elizabeth R; Remick, Daniel G

    2012-11-01

    The paradigm of systemic inflammatory response syndrome-to-compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome transition implies that hyperinflammation triggers acute sepsis mortality, whereas hypoinflammation (release of anti-inflammatory cytokines) in late sepsis induces chronic deaths. However, the exact humoral inflammatory mechanisms attributable to sepsis outcomes remain elusive. In the first part of this study, we characterized the systemic dynamics of the chronic inflammation in dying (DIE) and surviving (SUR) mice suffering from cecal ligation and puncture sepsis (days 6-28). In the second part, we combined the current chronic and previous acute/chronic sepsis data to compare the outcome-dependent inflammatory signatures between these two phases. A composite cytokine score (CCS) was calculated to compare global inflammatory responses. Mice were never sacrificed but were sampled daily (20 μl) for blood. In the first part of the study, parameters from chronic DIE mice were clustered into the 72, 48, and 24 h before death time points and compared with SUR of the same post-cecal ligation and puncture day. Cytokine increases were mixed and never preceded chronic deaths earlier than 48 h (3- to 180-fold increase). CCS demonstrated simultaneous and similar upregulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory compartments at 24 h before chronic death (DIE 80- and 50-fold higher versus SUR). In the second part of the study, cytokine ratios across sepsis phases/outcomes indicated steady proinflammatory versus anti-inflammatory balance. CCS showed the inflammatory response in chronic DIE was 5-fold lower than acute DIE mice, but identical to acute SUR. The systemic mixed anti-inflammatory response syndrome-like pattern (concurrent release of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines) occurs irrespective of the sepsis phase, response magnitude, and/or outcome. Although different in magnitude, neither acute nor chronic septic mortality is associated with a

  3. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  4. Hepatitis-related hepatocellular carcinoma: Insights into cytokine gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Dondeti, Mahmoud Fathy; El-Maadawy, Eman Anwar; Talaat, Roba Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary liver cancer, which is one of the most prevalent cancers among humans. Many factors are involved in the liver carcinogenesis as lifestyle and environmental factors. Hepatitis virus infections are now recognized as the chief etiology of HCC; however, the precise mechanism is still enigmatic till now. The inflammation triggered by the cytokine-mediated immune response, was reported to be the closest factor of HCC development. Cytokines are immunoregulatory proteins produced by immune cells, functioning as orchestrators of the immune response. Genes of cytokines and their receptors are known to be polymorphic, which give rise to variations in their genes. These variations have a great impact on the expression levels of the secreted cytokines. Therefore, cytokine gene polymorphisms are involved in the molecular mechanisms of several diseases. This piece of work aims to shed much light on the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms as genetic host factor in hepatitis related HCC. PMID:27570418

  5. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  6. Glia in the cytokine-mediated onset of depression: fine tuning the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Wendy K.; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Emrich, Hinderk M.; Dietrich, Detlef E.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a mood disorder of multifactorial origin affecting millions of people worldwide. The alarming estimated rates of prevalence and relapse make it a global public health concern. Moreover, the current setback of available antidepressants in the clinical setting is discouraging. Therefore, efforts to eradicate depression should be directed towards understanding the pathomechanisms involved in the hope of finding cost-effective treatment alternatives. The pathophysiology of MDD comprises the breakdown of different pathways, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the glutamatergic system, and monoaminergic neurotransmission, affecting cognition and emotional behavior. Inflammatory cytokines have been postulated to be the possible link and culprit in the disruption of these systems. In addition, evidence from different studies suggests that impairment of glial functions appears to be a major contributor as well. Thus, the intricate role between glia, namely microglia and astrocytes, and the central nervous system’s (CNSs) immune response is briefly discussed, highlighting the kynurenine pathway as a pivotal player. Moreover, evaluations of different treatment strategies targeting the inflammatory response are considered. The immuno-modulatory properties of vitamin D receptor (VDR) suggest that vitamin D is an attractive and plausible candidate in spite of controversial findings. Further research investigating the role of VDR in mood disorders is warranted. PMID:26217190

  7. [The role of cytokines in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Ishida, N; Yoshida, T

    1987-05-01

    A variety of normal tissue or malignant cells can produce and/or release various biologically active substances (hormone-like mediators) now collectively called cytokines. Because immunological and non-immunological responses of malignant cells were modified by many of them, some cytokines have been employed as so-called Biological Response Modifiers (BRM) in the treatment of cancers in animals and humans. This overview discussed a few of the difficulties, probably inherent in cytokine therapy, that have already been encountered in early clinical trials as well as some of those that can be anticipated in future work. These include unexpected and undesirable reactions due to the systemic administration in relatively large amounts of a cytokine that is, under physiological conditions, supposed to act as a paracrine and/or autocrine among cells located within a limited distance. Even a pure recombinant preparation of a cytokine is now known to affect multiple target cells if they are accessible to it. Furthermore, this kind of therapy may sometimes be little more than a shot in the dark, since the physiological balance (homeostasis) among many of the cytokines present or produced in a host receiving a large quantity of exogenous cytokines is not well understood. Making the situation still more complicated, many types of tumor cells are known to release some of these cytokines spontaneously. Many challenging problems remain to be solved before we can confidently prescribe a cocktail of cytokines precisely suitable for a given patient according to the individual's in vivo cytokine profile. Nevertheless, in spite of all these reservations, cytokine therapy has been too frequently beneficial to be allowed to be discouraged. "Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety". PMID:3034167

  8. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amelia E.; Fleming, Brittany A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In

  9. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Barber, Amelia E; Fleming, Brittany A; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In the

  10. MicroRNA-98 and let-7 Regulate Expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-4 in Biliary Epithelial Cells in Response to Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoku; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Jun; Gong, Ai-Yu; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the cytokine-inducible Src homology 2 protein (CIS) and suppressors of cytokine signaling proteins (SOCS) represents an important element of host cell reactions in response to pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that Cryptosporidium parvum infection downregulates miR-98 and let-7 to induce CIS expression in biliary epithelial cells. We reported here that downregulation of miR-98 and let-7 also coordinates epithelial expression of SOCS4 following C. parvum infection. Targeting of SOCS4 3'-untranslated region by miR-98 or let-7 resulted in translational repression. Functional manipulation of miR-98 caused reciprocal alterations in SOCS4 protein expression. Transfection of miR-98 precursor abolished C. parvum-stimulated SOCS4 upregulation. Moreover, expression of SOCS4 in epithelial cells showed an inhibitory effect on phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins induced by C. parvum. These data suggest an important role for miRNAs in the coordinated regulation of CIS/SOCS expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:20486857