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Sample records for host interactions reveals

  1. Revealing the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in sequencing technology and genome-wide association studies are now revealing the complex interactions between hosts and pathogen through genomic variation signatures, which arise from evolutionary co-existence. PMID:22011345

  2. Comparative genomics reveals distinct host-interacting traits of three major human-associated propionibacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionibacteria are part of the human microbiota. Many studies have addressed the predominant colonizer of sebaceous follicles of the skin, Propionibacterium acnes, and investigated its association with the skin disorder acne vulgaris, and lately with prostate cancer. Much less is known about two other propionibacterial species frequently found on human tissue sites, Propionibacterium granulosum and Propionibacterium avidum. Here we analyzed two and three genomes of P. granulosum and P. avidum, respectively, and compared them to two genomes of P. acnes; we further highlight differences among the three cutaneous species with proteomic and microscopy approaches. Results Electron and atomic force microscopy revealed an exopolysaccharide (EPS)-like structure surrounding P. avidum cells, that is absent in P. acnes and P. granulosum. In contrast, P. granulosum possesses pili-like appendices, which was confirmed by surface proteome analysis. The corresponding genes were identified; they are clustered with genes encoding sortases. Both, P. granulosum and P. avidum lack surface or secreted proteins for predicted host-interacting factors of P. acnes, including several CAMP factors, sialidases, dermatan-sulphate adhesins, hyaluronidase and a SH3 domain-containing lipoprotein; accordingly, only P. acnes exhibits neuraminidase and hyaluronidase activities. These functions are encoded on previously unrecognized island-like regions in the genome of P. acnes. Conclusions Despite their omnipresence on human skin little is known about the role of cutaneous propionibacteria. All three species are associated with a variety of diseases, including postoperative and device-related abscesses and infections. We showed that the three organisms have evolved distinct features to interact with their human host. Whereas P. avidum and P. granulosum produce an EPS-like surface structure and pili-like appendices, respectively, P. acnes possesses a number of unique surface

  3. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods. PMID:26522078

  4. Analysis of virus genomes from glacial environments reveals novel virus groups with unusual host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, Christopher M.; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities in glacial ecosystems are diverse, active, and subjected to strong viral pressures and infection rates. In this study we analyse putative virus genomes assembled from three dsDNA viromes from cryoconite hole ecosystems of Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet to assess the potential hosts and functional role viruses play in these habitats. We assembled 208 million reads from the virus-size fraction and developed a procedure to select genuine virus scaffolds from cellular contamination. Our curated virus library contained 546 scaffolds up to 230 Kb in length, 54 of which were circular virus consensus genomes. Analysis of virus marker genes revealed a wide range of viruses had been assembled, including bacteriophages, cyanophages, nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses and a virophage, with putative hosts identified as Cyanobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, eukaryotic algae and amoebae. Whole genome comparisons revealed the majority of circular genome scaffolds (CGS) formed 12 novel groups, two of which contained multiple phage members with plasmid-like properties, including a group of phage-plasmids possessing plasmid-like partition genes and toxin-antitoxin addiction modules to ensure their replication and a satellite phage-plasmid group. Surprisingly we also assembled a phage that not only encoded plasmid partition genes, but a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas adaptive bacterial immune system. One of the spacers was an exact match for another phage in our virome, indicating that in a novel use of the system, the lysogen was potentially capable of conferring immunity on its bacterial host against other phage. Together these results suggest that highly novel and diverse groups of viruses are present in glacial environments, some of which utilize very unusual life strategies and genes to control their replication and maintain a long-term relationship with their hosts

  5. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T.; Winget, Danielle M.; White, Richard A.; Hallam, Steven J.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant “nr” database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  6. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane T; Winget, Danielle M; White, Richard A; Hallam, Steven J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs) predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n = 5010) had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI's non-redundant "nr" database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:25914678

  7. In vitro adsorption revealing an apparent strong interaction between endophyte Pantoea agglomerans YS19 and host rice.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuxuan; Zhou, Jia; Chen, Cuicui; Shen, Delong; Song, Wei; Feng, Yongjun

    2008-12-01

    Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans YS19 is a dominant diazotrophic endophyte isolated from rice (Oryza sativa cv. Yuefu) grown in a temperate-climate region in west Beijing, China. In vitro adsorption and invasion of YS19 on host plant root were studied in this research. Adsorption of YS19 on rice seedling roots closely resembled the Langmuir adsorption and showed a higher adsorption quantity than the control strains Paenibacillus polymyxa WY110 (a rhizospheric bacterium from the same rice cultivar) and Escherichia coli HB101 (a general model bacterium). Adsorption dynamics study revealed high rates and a long duration of the YS19-rice root adsorption process. Adsorption of YS19 was mainly observed on the root hair, though which it enters the plant. This in vitro adsorption study revealed an apparent strong interaction between YS19 and rice at the early endophyte-host recognition stage. PMID:18781359

  8. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  9. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Osnat; Cohen, Yifat; Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  10. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  11. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Important Viral-Host Interactions in HCV-Infected Human Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Zhao, Ting; Song, BenBen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Tony T

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) poses a global threat to public health. HCV envelop protein E2 is the major component on the virus envelope, which plays an important role in virus entry and morphogenesis. Here, for the first time, we affinity purified E2 complex formed in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells and conducted comparative mass spectrometric analyses. 85 cellular proteins and three viral proteins were successfully identified in three independent trials, among which alphafetoprotein (AFP), UDP-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) and HCV NS4B were further validated as novel E2 binding partners. Subsequent functional characterization demonstrated that gene silencing of UGT1 in human hepatoma cell line Huh7.5.1 markedly decreased the production of infectious HCV, indicating a regulatory role of UGT1 in viral lifecycle. Domain mapping experiments showed that HCV E2-NS4B interaction requires the transmembrane domains of the two proteins. Altogether, our proteomics study has uncovered key viral and cellular factors that interact with E2 and provided new insights into our understanding of HCV infection. PMID:26808496

  12. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hieu X.; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T. H.

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  13. Metatranscriptome analysis reveals host-microbiome interactions in traps of carnivorous Genlisea species.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hieu X; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Pecinka, Ales; Schubert, Ingo; Vu, Giang T H

    2015-01-01

    In the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea a unique lobster pot trapping mechanism supplements nutrition in nutrient-poor habitats. A wide spectrum of microbes frequently occurs in Genlisea's leaf-derived traps without clear relevance for Genlisea carnivory. We sequenced the metatranscriptomes of subterrestrial traps vs. the aerial chlorophyll-containing leaves of G. nigrocaulis and of G. hispidula. Ribosomal RNA assignment revealed soil-borne microbial diversity in Genlisea traps, with 92 genera of 19 phyla present in more than one sample. Microbes from 16 of these phyla including proteobacteria, green algae, amoebozoa, fungi, ciliates and metazoans, contributed additionally short-lived mRNA to the metatranscriptome. Furthermore, transcripts of 438 members of hydrolases (e.g., proteases, phosphatases, lipases), mainly resembling those of metazoans, ciliates and green algae, were found. Compared to aerial leaves, Genlisea traps displayed a transcriptional up-regulation of endogenous NADH oxidases generating reactive oxygen species as well as of acid phosphatases for prey digestion. A leaf-vs.-trap transcriptome comparison reflects that carnivory provides inorganic P- and different forms of N-compounds (ammonium, nitrate, amino acid, oligopeptides) and implies the need to protect trap cells against oxidative stress. The analysis elucidates a complex food web inside the Genlisea traps, and suggests ecological relationships between this plant genus and its entrapped microbiome. PMID:26236284

  14. Microsporidia-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Szumowski, Suzannah C.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise one of the largest groups of obligate intracellular pathogens and can infect virtually all animals, but host response to these fungal-related microbes has been poorly understood. Several new studies of the host transcriptional response to microsporidia infection have found infection-induced regulation of genes involved in innate immunity, ubiquitylation, metabolism, and hormonal signaling. In addition, microsporidia have recently been shown to exploit host recycling endocytosis for exit from intestinal cells, and to interact with host degradation pathways. Microsporidia infection has also been shown to profoundly affect behavior in insect hosts. Altogether, these and other recent findings are providing much-needed insight into the underlying mechanisms of microsporidia interaction with host animals. PMID:25847674

  15. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of honey bee microsporidia, Nosema apis reveal novel insights into host-parasite interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The microsporidia parasite Nosema contributes to the steep global decline of honey bees that are critical pollinators of food crops. There are two species of Nosema that have been found to infect honey bees, Nosema apis and N. ceranae. Genome sequencing of N. apis and comparative genome analysis with N. ceranae, a fully sequenced microsporidia species, reveal novel insights into host-parasite interactions underlying the parasite infections. Results We applied the whole-genome shotgun sequencing approach to sequence and assemble the genome of N. apis which has an estimated size of 8.5 Mbp. We predicted 2,771 protein- coding genes and predicted the function of each putative protein using the Gene Ontology. The comparative genomic analysis led to identification of 1,356 orthologs that are conserved between the two Nosema species and genes that are unique characteristics of the individual species, thereby providing a list of virulence factors and new genetic tools for studying host-parasite interactions. We also identified a highly abundant motif in the upstream promoter regions of N. apis genes. This motif is also conserved in N. ceranae and other microsporidia species and likely plays a role in gene regulation across the microsporidia. Conclusions The availability of the N. apis genome sequence is a significant addition to the rapidly expanding body of microsprodian genomic data which has been improving our understanding of eukaryotic genome diversity and evolution in a broad sense. The predicted virulent genes and transcriptional regulatory elements are potential targets for innovative therapeutics to break down the life cycle of the parasite. PMID:23829473

  16. Exploring the associations of host genes for viral infection revealed by genome-wide RNAi and virus-host protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dafei; Han, Lu; Luo, Yifu; Liu, Yang; He, Song; Bai, Hui; Wang, Shengqi; Bo, Xiaochen

    2015-09-01

    Genome-wide RNA interference screens have greatly facilitated the identification of essential host factors (EHFs) for viral infections, whose knockdown effects significantly influence virus replication but not host cell viability. However, little has been done to link EHFs with another important host factor type, i.e., virus targeting proteins (VTPs) that viruses directly interact with for intracellular survival, hampering the integrative understanding of virus-host interactions. Using EHFs and VTPs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and influenza A virus (IAV) infections, we found in general that despite limited overlap, EHFs and VTPs are both among the most differentially dysregulated genes in host transcriptional response to HIV and IAV infections, and notably they show consistency in regulation orientation. In the human protein-protein interaction network, both EHFs and VTPs hold topologically important positions at the global center, and importantly their direct interactions are statistically significant. We also identified BRCA1 and TP53 (or SMAD3 and PIK3R1) being the most extensive VTP-interacting EHFs (or EHF-interacting VTPs) for HIV-1 and IAV, which hold great potential in deciphering specific infection features and discovery of host directed antivirals. Further, most EHFs are the upstream regulators of VTPs when mapped in the same signaling pathways, some of which present intensive cross links. Collectively, these results provide insights into functional associations of the identified host gene factors for viral infections and highlight the regulatory significance of EHFs, and the necessity of their selective exploitation in confrontation to viral infections. PMID:26166390

  17. Mass spectrometric analysis reveals remnants of host-pathogen molecular interactions at the starch granule surface in wheat endosperm.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael L; Wheeler, Heather L; Smith, Jeffrey; Figeys, Daniel; Altosaar, Illimar

    2010-09-01

    The starch granules of wheat seed are solar energy-driven deposits of fixed carbon and, as such, present themselves as targets of pathogen attack. The seed's array of antimicrobial proteins, peptides, and small molecules comprises a molecular defense against penetrating pathogens. In turn, pathogens exhibit an arsenal of enzymes to facilitate the degradation of the host's endosperm. In this context, the starch granule surface is a relatively unexplored domain in which unique molecular barriers may be deployed to defend against and inhibit the late stages of infection. Therefore, it was compelling to explore the starch granule surface in mature wheat seed, which revealed evidence of host-pathogen molecular interactions that may have occurred during grain development. In this study, starch granules from the soft wheat Triticum aestivum cv. AC Andrew and hard wheat T. turgidum durum were isolated and water washed 20 times, and their surface proteins were digested in situ with trypsin. The peptides liberated into the supernatant and the peptides remaining at the starch granule surface were separately examined. In this way, we demonstrated that the identified proteins have a strong affinity for the starch granule surface. Proteins with known antimicrobial activity were identified, as well as several proteins from the plant pathogens Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Fusarium graminearum, Magnaporthe grisea, Xanthomonas axonopodis, and X. oryzae. Although most of these peptides corresponded to uncharacterized hypothetical proteins of fungal pathogens, several peptide fragments were identical to cytosolic and membrane proteins of specific microbial pathogens. During development and maturation, wheat seed appeared to have resisted infection and lysed the pathogens where, upon desiccation, the molecular evidence remained fixed at the starch granule surface. PMID:20701481

  18. Molecular characterization of S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles reveals their regulatory roles in parasite-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihui; Liu, Juntao; Dao, Jinwei; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Gu, Huiming; Liu, Jinming; Feng, Xingang; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Secreted extracellular vesicles play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Increased knowledge of schistosome extracellular vesicles could provide insights into schistosome-host interactions and enable the development of novel intervention strategies to inhibit parasitic processes and lessen disease transmission. Here, we describe biochemical characterization of Schistosoma japonicum exosome-like vesicles (S. japonicum EVs). A total of 403 proteins were identified in S. japonicum EVs, and bioinformatics analyses indicated that these proteins were mainly involved in binding, catalytic activity, and translation regulatory activity. Next, we characterized the population of small RNAs associated with S. japonicum EVs. Further studies demonstrated that mammalian cells could internalize S. japonicum EVs and transfer their cargo miRNAs to recipient cells. Additionally, we found that a specific miRNA, likely originating from a final host, ocu-miR-191-5p, is also associated with S. japonicum EVs. Overall, our findings demonstrate that S. japonicum EVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis via a mechanism involving the transfer of their cargo miRNAs to hosts. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of schistosome-host interactions. PMID:27172881

  19. Molecular characterization of S. japonicum exosome-like vesicles reveals their regulatory roles in parasite-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lihui; Liu, Juntao; Dao, Jinwei; Lu, Ke; Li, Hao; Gu, Huiming; Liu, Jinming; Feng, Xingang; Cheng, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    Secreted extracellular vesicles play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Increased knowledge of schistosome extracellular vesicles could provide insights into schistosome-host interactions and enable the development of novel intervention strategies to inhibit parasitic processes and lessen disease transmission. Here, we describe biochemical characterization of Schistosoma japonicum exosome-like vesicles (S. japonicum EVs). A total of 403 proteins were identified in S. japonicum EVs, and bioinformatics analyses indicated that these proteins were mainly involved in binding, catalytic activity, and translation regulatory activity. Next, we characterized the population of small RNAs associated with S. japonicum EVs. Further studies demonstrated that mammalian cells could internalize S. japonicum EVs and transfer their cargo miRNAs to recipient cells. Additionally, we found that a specific miRNA, likely originating from a final host, ocu-miR-191–5p, is also associated with S. japonicum EVs. Overall, our findings demonstrate that S. japonicum EVs could be implicated in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis via a mechanism involving the transfer of their cargo miRNAs to hosts. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of schistosome-host interactions. PMID:27172881

  20. Tumor-host signaling interaction reveals a systemic, age-dependent splenic immune influence on tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Afshin; Wage, Justin; McDonald, J. Tyson; Lamont, Clare; Peluso, Michael; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of age-dependent host control of cancer development raises the natural question of how these effects manifest across the host tissue/organ types with which a tumor interacts, one important component of which is the aging immune system. To investigate this, changes in the spleen, an immune nexus in the mouse, was examined for its age-dependent interactive influence on the carcinogenesis process. The model is the C57BL/6 male mice (adolescent, young adult, middle-aged, and old or 68, 143, 551 and 736 days old respectively) with and without a syngeneic murine tumor implant. Through global transcriptome analysis, immune-related functions were found to be key regulators in the spleen associated with tumor progression as a function of age with CD2, CD3ε, CCL19, and CCL5 being the key molecules involved. Surprisingly, other than CCL5, all key factors and immune-related functions were not active in spleens from non-tumor bearing old mice. Our findings of age-dependent tumor-spleen signaling interaction suggest the existence of a global role of the aging host in carcinogenesis. Suggested is a new avenue for therapeutic improvement that capitalizes on the pervasive role of host aging in dictating the course of this disease. PMID:26497558

  1. Genome and metagenome analyses reveal adaptive evolution of the host and interaction with the gut microbiota in the goose

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guangliang; Zhao, Xianzhi; Li, Qin; He, Chuan; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Shuyun; Ding, Jinmei; Ye, Weixing; Wang, Jun; Chen, Ye; Wang, Haiwei; Li, Jing; Luo, Yi; Su, Jian; Huang, Yong; Liu, Zuohua; Dai, Ronghua; Shi, Yixiang; Meng, He; Wang, Qigui

    2016-01-01

    The goose is an economically important waterfowl that exhibits unique characteristics and abilities, such as liver fat deposition and fibre digestion. Here, we report de novo whole-genome assemblies for the goose and swan goose and describe the evolutionary relationships among 7 bird species, including domestic and wild geese, which diverged approximately 3.4~6.3 million years ago (Mya). In contrast to chickens as a proximal species, the expanded and rapidly evolving genes found in the goose genome are mainly involved in metabolism, including energy, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Further integrated analysis of the host genome and gut metagenome indicated that the most widely shared functional enrichment of genes occurs for functions such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, propanoate metabolism and the citrate cycle. We speculate that the unique physiological abilities of geese benefit from the adaptive evolution of the host genome and symbiotic interactions with gut microbes. PMID:27608918

  2. Genome and metagenome analyses reveal adaptive evolution of the host and interaction with the gut microbiota in the goose.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangliang; Zhao, Xianzhi; Li, Qin; He, Chuan; Zhao, Wenjing; Liu, Shuyun; Ding, Jinmei; Ye, Weixing; Wang, Jun; Chen, Ye; Wang, Haiwei; Li, Jing; Luo, Yi; Su, Jian; Huang, Yong; Liu, Zuohua; Dai, Ronghua; Shi, Yixiang; Meng, He; Wang, Qigui

    2016-01-01

    The goose is an economically important waterfowl that exhibits unique characteristics and abilities, such as liver fat deposition and fibre digestion. Here, we report de novo whole-genome assemblies for the goose and swan goose and describe the evolutionary relationships among 7 bird species, including domestic and wild geese, which diverged approximately 3.4~6.3 million years ago (Mya). In contrast to chickens as a proximal species, the expanded and rapidly evolving genes found in the goose genome are mainly involved in metabolism, including energy, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism. Further integrated analysis of the host genome and gut metagenome indicated that the most widely shared functional enrichment of genes occurs for functions such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, propanoate metabolism and the citrate cycle. We speculate that the unique physiological abilities of geese benefit from the adaptive evolution of the host genome and symbiotic interactions with gut microbes. PMID:27608918

  3. An atlas of the Epstein-Barr virus transcriptome and epigenome reveals host-virus regulatory interactions.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Aaron; Tempera, Italo; Tsai, Kevin; Chen, Horng-Shen; Tikhmyanova, Nadezhda; Klichinsky, Michael; Leslie, Christina; Lieberman, Paul M

    2012-08-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is associated with multiple human tumors, persists as a minichromosome in the nucleus of B lymphocytes and induces malignancies through incompletely understood mechanisms. Here, we present a large-scale functional genomic analysis of EBV. Our experimentally generated nucleosome positioning maps and viral protein binding data were integrated with over 700 publicly available high-throughput sequencing data sets for human lymphoblastoid cell lines mapped to the EBV genome. We found that viral lytic genes are coexpressed with cellular cancer-associated pathways, suggesting that the lytic cycle may play an unexpected role in virus-mediated oncogenesis. Host regulators of viral oncogene expression and chromosome structure were identified and validated, revealing a role for the B cell-specific protein Pax5 in viral gene regulation and the cohesin complex in regulating higher order chromatin structure. Our findings provide a deeper understanding of latent viral persistence in oncogenesis and establish a valuable viral genomics resource for future exploration. PMID:22901543

  4. Genome-wide Analysis of Host-Plasmodium yoelii Interactions Reveals Regulators of the Type I Interferon Response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cai, Baowei; Sun, Wenxiang; Huang, Ruili; Liu, Xueqiao; Lin, Meng; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Martin, Scott; Qi, Yanwei; Nair, Sethu C; Bolland, Silvia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Austin, Christopher P; Long, Carole A; Myers, Timothy G; Wang, Rong-Fu; Su, Xin-Zhuan

    2015-07-28

    Invading pathogens trigger specific host responses, an understanding of which might identify genes that function in pathogen recognition and elimination. In this study, we performed trans-species expression quantitative trait locus (ts-eQTL) analysis using genotypes of the Plasmodium yoelii malaria parasite and phenotypes of mouse gene expression. We significantly linked 1,054 host genes to parasite genetic loci (LOD score ≥ 3.0). Using LOD score patterns, which produced results that differed from direct expression-level clustering, we grouped host genes that function in related pathways, allowing functional prediction of unknown genes. As a proof of principle, 14 of 15 randomly selected genes predicted to function in type I interferon (IFN-I) responses were experimentally validated using overexpression, small hairpin RNA knockdown, viral infection, and/or infection of knockout mice. This study demonstrates an effective strategy for studying gene function, establishes a functional gene database, and identifies regulators in IFN-I pathways. PMID:26190101

  5. The complexity of signaling in host-pathogen interactions revealed by the Toxoplasma gondii-dependent modulation of JNK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Carmen, John C.; Southard, R. Chase; Sinai, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The inhibition of apoptosis by Toxoplasma gondii is governed by its modulation of several signaling cascades including the NFκappaB and JNK pathways. This is evident in the dysregulation of JNK activation following treatment with UV and TNFα, both apoptogenic stimuli. Infection-mediated interference with the JNK cascade was found to be highly reproducible in HeLa cells. In light of emerging evidence regarding cross talk between the JNK and NFκB cascades, we examined the impact of infection in wild type and RelA/p65−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Remarkably, parasite infection failed to significantly impact both UV and TNFα-mediated JNK phosphorylation in both cell lines suggesting a cell type specific effect. Furthermore siRNA-mediated knockdown of RelA/p65 failed to impact the parasite mediated effects on stimulus dependent activation of JNK in HeLa cells. Finally, the infection mediated suppression of JNK phosphorylation in HeLa cells did not result in decreased JNK kinase activity. Rather, the reduced levels of phospho-JNK in infected cells correlated with increased phosphatase activity noted by the partial rescue of the phenotype following treatment with okadaic acid. Taken together the results indicate that manipulation of the JNK-pathway does not involve NFκB and is furthermore not a central component of the parasite enforced block of apoptosis. It further highlights the complexity of these systems and the danger of extrapolating results both within and across pathogen-host cell systems based on limited studies. PMID:18929560

  6. Global Gene Expression Analysis of the Zoonotic Parasite Trichinella spiralis Revealed Novel Genes in Host Parasite Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Wang, Jielin; Tang, Bin; Lu, Huijun; Peng, Shuai; Chang, Zhiguang; Tang, Yizhi; Yin, Jigang; Liu, Mingyuan; Tan, Yan; Chen, Qijun

    2012-01-01

    Background Trichinellosis is a typical food-borne zoonotic disease which is epidemic worldwide and the nematode Trichinella spiralis is the main pathogen. The life cycle of T. spiralis contains three developmental stages, i.e. adult worms, new borne larva (new borne L1 larva) and muscular larva (infective L1 larva). Stage-specific gene expression in the parasites has been investigated with various immunological and cDNA cloning approaches, whereas the genome-wide transcriptome and expression features of the parasite have been largely unknown. The availability of the genome sequence information of T. spiralis has made it possible to deeply dissect parasite biology in association with global gene expression and pathogenesis. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we analyzed the global gene expression patterns in the three developmental stages of T. spiralis using digital gene expression (DGE) analysis. Almost 15 million sequence tags were generated with the Illumina RNA-seq technology, producing expression data for more than 9,000 genes, covering 65% of the genome. The transcriptome analysis revealed thousands of differentially expressed genes within the genome, and importantly, a panel of genes encoding functional proteins associated with parasite invasion and immuno-modulation were identified. More than 45% of the genes were found to be transcribed from both strands, indicating the importance of RNA-mediated gene regulation in the development of the parasite. Further, based on gene ontological analysis, over 3000 genes were functionally categorized and biological pathways in the three life cycle stage were elucidated. Conclusions and Significance The global transcriptome of T. spiralis in three developmental stages has been profiled, and most gene activity in the genome was found to be developmentally regulated. Many metabolic and biological pathways have been revealed. The findings of the differential expression of several protein families facilitate

  7. Integrated Omics and Computational Glycobiology Reveal Structural Basis for Influenza A Virus Glycan Microheterogeneity and Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Kshitij; Klein, Joshua A; White, Mitchell R; Grant, Oliver C; Leymarie, Nancy; Woods, Robert J; Hartshorn, Kevan L; Zaia, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Despite sustained biomedical research effort, influenza A virus remains an imminent threat to the world population and a major healthcare burden. The challenge in developing vaccines against influenza is the ability of the virus to mutate rapidly in response to selective immune pressure. Hemagglutinin is the predominant surface glycoprotein and the primary determinant of antigenicity, virulence and zoonotic potential. Mutations leading to changes in the number of HA glycosylation sites are often reported. Such genetic sequencing studies predict at best the disruption or creation of sequons for N-linked glycosylation; they do not reflect actual phenotypic changes in HA structure. Therefore, combined analysis of glycan micro and macro-heterogeneity and bioassays will better define the relationships among glycosylation, viral bioactivity and evolution. We present a study that integrates proteomics, glycomics and glycoproteomics of HA before and after adaptation to innate immune system pressure. We combined this information with glycan array and immune lectin binding data to correlate the phenotypic changes with biological activity. Underprocessed glycoforms predominated at the glycosylation sites found to be involved in viral evolution in response to selection pressures and interactions with innate immune-lectins. To understand the structural basis for site-specific glycan microheterogeneity at these sites, we performed structural modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. We observed that the presence of immature, high-mannose type glycans at a particular site correlated with reduced accessibility to glycan remodeling enzymes. Further, the high mannose glycans at sites implicated in immune lectin recognition were predicted to be capable of forming trimeric interactions with the immune-lectin surfactant protein-D. PMID:26984886

  8. Progress in computational studies of host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hufeng; Jin, Jingjing; Wong, Limsoon

    2013-04-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are important for understanding infection mechanism and developing better treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. Many computational studies on host-pathogen interactions have been published. Here, we review recent progress and results in this field and provide a systematic summary, comparison and discussion of computational studies on host-pathogen interactions, including prediction and analysis of host-pathogen protein-protein interactions; basic principles revealed from host-pathogen interactions; and database and software tools for host-pathogen interaction data collection, integration and analysis. PMID:23600809

  9. Live Imaging of Host-Parasite Interactions in a Zebrafish Infection Model Reveals Cryptococcal Determinants of Virulence and Central Nervous System Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tenor, Jennifer L.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Yang, Jialu L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is capable of infecting a broad range of hosts, from invertebrates like amoebas and nematodes to standard vertebrate models such as mice and rabbits. Here we have taken advantage of a zebrafish model to investigate host-pathogen interactions of Cryptococcus with the zebrafish innate immune system, which shares a highly conserved framework with that of mammals. Through live-imaging observations and genetic knockdown, we establish that macrophages are the primary immune cells responsible for responding to and containing acute cryptococcal infections. By interrogating survival and cryptococcal burden following infection with a panel of Cryptococcus mutants, we find that virulence factors initially identified as important in causing disease in mice are also necessary for pathogenesis in zebrafish larvae. Live imaging of the cranial blood vessels of infected larvae reveals that C. neoformans is able to penetrate the zebrafish brain following intravenous infection. By studying a C. neoformans FNX1 gene mutant, we find that blood-brain barrier invasion is dependent on a known cryptococcal invasion-promoting pathway previously identified in a murine model of central nervous system invasion. The zebrafish-C. neoformans platform provides a visually and genetically accessible vertebrate model system for cryptococcal pathogenesis with many of the advantages of small invertebrates. This model is well suited for higher-throughput screening of mutants, mechanistic dissection of cryptococcal pathogenesis in live animals, and use in the evaluation of therapeutic agents. PMID:26419880

  10. A Profile of an Endosymbiont-enriched Fraction of the Coral Stylophora pistillata Reveals Proteins Relevant to Microbial-Host Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Andrew J.; Dunlap, Walter C.; Shick, J. Malcolm; Klueter, Anke; Iglic, Katrina; Vukelic, Ana; Starcevic, Antonio; Ward, Malcolm; Wells, Mark L.; Trick, Charles G.; Long, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the response of Symbiodinium sp. endosymbionts from the coral Stylophora pistillata to moderate levels of thermal “bleaching” stress, with and without trace metal limitation. Using quantitative high throughput proteomics, we identified 8098 MS/MS events relating to individual peptides from the endosymbiont-enriched fraction, including 109 peptides meeting stringent criteria for quantification, of which only 26 showed significant change in our experimental treatments; 12 of 26 increased expression in response to thermal stress with little difference affected by iron limitation. Surprisingly, there were no significant increases in antioxidant or heat stress proteins; those induced to higher expression were generally involved in protein biosynthesis. An outstanding exception was a massive 114-fold increase of a viral replication protein indicating that thermal stress may substantially increase viral load and thereby contribute to the etiology of coral bleaching and disease. In the absence of a sequenced genome for Symbiodinium or other photosymbiotic dinoflagellate, this proteome reveals a plethora of proteins potentially involved in microbial-host interactions. This includes photosystem proteins, DNA repair enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, metabolic redox enzymes, heat shock proteins, globin hemoproteins, proteins of nitrogen metabolism, and a wide range of viral proteins associated with these endosymbiont-enriched samples. Also present were 21 unusual peptide/protein toxins thought to originate from either microbial consorts or from contamination by coral nematocysts. Of particular interest are the proteins of apoptosis, vesicular transport, and endo/exocytosis, which are discussed in context of the cellular processes of coral bleaching. Notably, the protein complement provides evidence that, rather than being expelled by the host, stressed endosymbionts may mediate their own departure. PMID:22351649

  11. Deep sequencing of amplified Prasinovirus and host green algal genes from an Indian Ocean transect reveals interacting trophic dependencies and new genotypes.

    PubMed

    Clerissi, Camille; Desdevises, Yves; Romac, Sarah; Audic, Stéphane; de Vargas, Colomban; Acinas, Silvia G; Casotti, Raffaella; Poulain, Julie; Wincker, Patrick; Hingamp, Pascal; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Grimsley, Nigel

    2015-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing of Prasinovirus DNA polymerase and host green algal (Mamiellophyceae) ribosomal RNA genes was used to analyse the diversity and distribution of these taxa over a ∼10 000 km latitudinal section of the Indian Ocean. New viral and host groups were identified among the different trophic conditions observed, and highlighted that although unknown prasinoviruses are diverse, the cosmopolitan algal genera Bathycoccus, Micromonas and Ostreococcus represent a large proportion of the host diversity. While Prasinovirus communities were correlated to both the geography and the environment, host communities were not, perhaps because the genetic marker used lacked sufficient resolution. Nevertheless, analysis of single environmental variables showed that eutrophic conditions strongly influence the distributions of both hosts and viruses. Moreover, these communities were not correlated, in their composition or specific richness. These observations could result from antagonistic dynamics, such as that illustrated in a prey-predator model, and/or because hosts might be under a complex set of selective pressures. Both of these reasons must be considered to interpret environmental surveys of viruses and hosts, because covariation does not always imply interaction. PMID:26472079

  12. Genome sequence reveals that Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 possesses a large and diverse array of systems for rhizosphere function and host interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar-beet rhizosphere. This bacterium has been extensively studied as a model strain for genetic regulation of secondary metabolite production in P. fluorescens, as a candidate biocontrol agent against phytopathogens, and as a heterologous host for expression of genes with biotechnological application. The F113 genome sequence and annotation has been recently reported. Results Comparative analysis of 50 genome sequences of strains belonging to the P. fluorescens group has revealed the existence of five distinct subgroups. F113 belongs to subgroup I, which is mostly composed of strains classified as P. brassicacearum. The core genome of these five strains is highly conserved and represents approximately 76% of the protein-coding genes in any given genome. Despite this strong conservation, F113 also contains a large number of unique protein-coding genes that encode traits potentially involved in the rhizocompetence of this strain. These features include protein coding genes required for denitrification, diterpenoids catabolism, motility and chemotaxis, protein secretion and production of antimicrobial compounds and insect toxins. Conclusions The genome of P. fluorescens F113 is composed of numerous protein-coding genes, not usually found together in previously sequenced genomes, which are potentially decisive during the colonisation of the rhizosphere and/or interaction with other soil organisms. This includes genes encoding proteins involved in the production of a second flagellar apparatus, the use of abietic acid as a growth substrate, the complete denitrification pathway, the possible production of a macrolide antibiotic and the assembly of multiple protein secretion systems. PMID:23350846

  13. RNA-Sequencing Reveals the Progression of Phage-Host Interactions between φR1-37 and Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Blasdel, Bob G.; Lavigne, Rob; Skurnik, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Despite the expanding interest in bacterial viruses (bacteriophages), insights into the intracellular development of bacteriophage and its impact on bacterial physiology are still scarce. Here we investigate during lytic infection the whole-genome transcription of the giant phage vB_YecM_φR1-37 (φR1-37) and its host, the gastroenteritis causing bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica. RNA sequencing reveals that the gene expression of φR1-37 does not follow a pattern typical observed in other lytic bacteriophages, as only selected genes could be classified as typically early, middle or late genes. The majority of the genes appear to be expressed constitutively throughout infection. Additionally, our study demonstrates that transcription occurs mainly from the positive strand, while the negative strand encodes only genes with low to medium expression levels. Interestingly, we also detected the presence of antisense RNA species, as well as one non-coding intragenic RNA species. Gene expression in the phage-infected cell is characterized by the broad replacement of host transcripts with phage transcripts. However, the host response in the late phase of infection was also characterized by up-regulation of several specific bacterial gene products known to be involved in stress response and membrane stability, including the Cpx pathway regulators, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, phage- and cold-shock proteins. PMID:27110815

  14. RNA-Sequencing Reveals the Progression of Phage-Host Interactions between φR1-37 and Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Blasdel, Bob G; Lavigne, Rob; Skurnik, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    Despite the expanding interest in bacterial viruses (bacteriophages), insights into the intracellular development of bacteriophage and its impact on bacterial physiology are still scarce. Here we investigate during lytic infection the whole-genome transcription of the giant phage vB_YecM_φR1-37 (φR1-37) and its host, the gastroenteritis causing bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica. RNA sequencing reveals that the gene expression of φR1-37 does not follow a pattern typical observed in other lytic bacteriophages, as only selected genes could be classified as typically early, middle or late genes. The majority of the genes appear to be expressed constitutively throughout infection. Additionally, our study demonstrates that transcription occurs mainly from the positive strand, while the negative strand encodes only genes with low to medium expression levels. Interestingly, we also detected the presence of antisense RNA species, as well as one non-coding intragenic RNA species. Gene expression in the phage-infected cell is characterized by the broad replacement of host transcripts with phage transcripts. However, the host response in the late phase of infection was also characterized by up-regulation of several specific bacterial gene products known to be involved in stress response and membrane stability, including the Cpx pathway regulators, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, phage- and cold-shock proteins. PMID:27110815

  15. Docking studies and network analyses reveal capacity of compounds from Kandelia rheedii to strengthen cellular immunity by interacting with host proteins during tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Aubhishek

    2012-01-01

    Kandelia rheedii (locally known as Guria or Rasunia), widely found and used in Indian subcontinent, is a well-known herbal cure to tuberculosis. However, neither the mechanism nor the active components of the plant extract responsible for mediating this action has yet been confirmed. Here in this study, molecular interactions of three compounds (emodin, fusaric acid and skyrin) from the plant extract with the host protein targets (casein kinase (CSNK), estrogen receptor (ERBB), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) and glucagon receptor (Gcgr)) has been found. These protein targets are known to be responsible for strengthening cellular immunity against Mycobacteria tuberculosis. The specific interactions of these three compounds with the respective protein targets have been discussed here. The insights from study should further help us designing molecular medicines against tuberculosis. PMID:23275699

  16. Crystal structures of two bacterial HECT-like E3 ligases in complex with a human E2 reveal atomic details of pathogen-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Diao, Jianbo; Chen, Jue

    2012-12-10

    In eukaryotes, ubiquitination is an important posttranslational process achieved through a cascade of ubiquitin-activating (E1), conjugating (E2), and ligase (E3) enzymes. Many pathogenic bacteria deliver virulence factors into the host cell that function as E3 ligases. How these bacterial 'Trojan horses' integrate into the eukaryotic ubiquitin system has remained a mystery. Here we report crystal structures of two bacterial E3s, Salmonella SopA and Escherichia coli NleL, both in complex with human E2 UbcH7. These structures represent two distinct conformational states of the bacterial E3s, supporting the necessary structural rearrangements associated with ubiquitin transfer. The E2-interacting surface of SopA and NleL has little similarity to those of eukaryotic E3s. However, both bacterial E3s bind to the canonical surface of E2 that normally interacts with eukaryotic E3s. Furthermore, we show that a glutamate residue on E3 is involved in catalyzing ubiquitin transfer from E3 to the substrate, but not from E2 to E3. Together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the ubiquitin pathway and a framework for understanding molecular mimicry in bacterial pathogenesis.

  17. Cytological and Transcriptional Dynamics Analysis of Host Plant Revealed Stage-Specific Biological Processes Related to Compatible Rice-Ustilaginoidea virens Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jinquan; Jin, Jie; Wang, Dong; Han, Ran; Zhu, Renshan; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rice false smut, a fungal disease caused by Ustilaginoidea virens is becoming a severe detriment to rice production worldwide. However, little is known about the molecular response of rice to attacks by the smut pathogen. In this article, we define the initial infection process as having three stages: initial colonization on the pistil (stage 1, S1), amplification on the anther (stage 2, S2) and sporulation in the anther chambers (stage 3, S3). Based on the transcriptome of rice hosts in response to U. virens in two separate years, we identified 126, 204, and 580 specific regulated genes in their respective stages S1, S2, and S3, respectively, by excluding common expression patterns in other openly biotic/abiotic databases using bioinformatics. As the disease progresses, several stage-specific biological processes (BP) terms were distinctively enriched: “Phosphorylation” in stage S1, “PCD” in S2, and “Cell wall biogenesis” in S3, implying a concise signal cascade indicative of the tactics that smut pathogens use to control host rice cells during infection. 113 regulated genes were coexpressed among the three stages. They shared highly conserved promoter cis-element in the promoters in response to the regulation of WRKY and Myb for up-regulation, and ABA and Ca2+ for down regulation, indicating their potentially critical roles in signal transduction during rice-U. virens interaction. We further analyzed seven highly regulated unique genes; four were specific to pollen development, implying that pollen-related genes play critical roles in the establishment of rice susceptibility to U. virens. To my knowledge, this is the first report about probing of molecular response of rice to smut pathogen infection, which will greatly expand our understanding of the molecular events surrounding infection by rice false smut. PMID:24646527

  18. Polymicrobial-Host Interactions during Infection.

    PubMed

    Tay, Wei Hong; Chong, Kelvin Kian Long; Kline, Kimberly A

    2016-08-28

    Microbial pathogenesis research has, historically, focused on the study of infections as monomicrobial events. However, the advent of next generation sequencing and culture-independent identification methods has revealed that many, if not most, infections are polymicrobial either in origin or in manifestation. Polymicrobial infections are often associated with increased infection severity and poorer patient outcome. Multiple infecting microbes can interact synergistically to induce virulence traits, alter the infected niche, or modulate the host immune response, all of which can promote polymicrobial infection. Importantly, a polymicrobial environment at the time of inoculation, consisting of multiple pathogens or pathogens in combination with the native microbiota, can contribute to the pathogenic progression of a single predominant organism at the time of diagnosis. Hence, in order to completely understand and elucidate the impact of these polymicrobial interactions on infection outcomes, a thorough examination of the entire microbial community present throughout the pathogenic cascade is required: from the time of inoculation to symptomology to resolution. In this review, we highlight the themes of metabolite exploitation, immune modulation, niche optimization, and virulence induction that contribute to polymicrobial infections. We focus on recent literature about microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions that promote polymicrobial infections with an emphasis on understanding these interactions to identify better interventions for these sometimes complex infections. PMID:27170548

  19. Recent insights into hepatitis B virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Ozawa, Makoto; Kohara, Michinori; Elmdaghri, Naima; Benjelloun, Soumaya; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) poses a threat to global public health mainly because of complications of HBV-related chronic liver disease. HBV exhibits a narrow host range, replicating primarily in hepatocytes by a still poorly understood mechanism. For the generation of progeny virions, HBV depends on interactions with specific host factors through its life cycle. Revealing and characterizing these interactions are keys to identifying novel antiviral targets, and to developing specific treatment strategies for HBV patients. In this review, recent insights into the HBV-host interactions, especially on virus entry, intracellular trafficking, genome transcription and replication, budding and release, and even cellular restriction factors were reviewed. PMID:24604126

  20. Coevolutionary interactions between host and parasite genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Louis; Fellous, Simon; Koella, Jacob C

    2006-01-01

    More than 20 years after Dawkins introduced the concept of "extended phenotype" (i.e. phenotypes of hosts and parasites result from interactions between the two genomes) and although this idea has now reached contemporary textbooks of evolutionary biology, most studies of the evolution of host-parasite systems still focus solely on either the host or the parasite, neglecting the role of the other partner. It is important to consider that host and parasite genotypes share control of the epidemiological parameters of their relationship. Moreover, not only the traits of the infection but also the genetic correlations among these and other traits that determine fitness might be controlled by interactions between host and parasite genotypes. PMID:16310412

  1. Host-Microbe Interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Aixin

    2013-01-01

    A good understanding of how microbes interact with hosts has a direct bearing on our capability of fighting infectious microbial pathogens and making good use of beneficial ones. Among the model organisms used to study reciprocal actions among microbes and hosts, C. elegans may be the most advantageous in the context of its unique attributes such as the short life cycle, easiness of laboratory maintenance, and the availability of different genetic mutants. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding host-microbe interactions in C. elegans. Although these investigations have greatly enhanced our understanding of C. elegans-microbe relationships, all but one of them involve only one or few microbial species. We argue here that more research is needed for exploring the evolution and establishment of a complex microbial community in the worm's intestine and its interaction with the host. PMID:23984180

  2. Visualization of Host-Polerovirus Interaction Topologies Using Protein Interaction Reporter Technology

    PubMed Central

    DeBlasio, Stacy L.; Chavez, Juan D.; Alexander, Mariko M.; Ramsey, John; Eng, Jimmy K.; Mahoney, Jaclyn; Gray, Stewart M.; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating direct interactions between host and virus proteins during infection is a major goal and challenge for the field of virology. Most protein interactions are not binary or easily amenable to structural determination. Using infectious preparations of a polerovirus (Potato leafroll virus [PLRV]) and protein interaction reporter (PIR), a revolutionary technology that couples a mass spectrometric-cleavable chemical cross-linker with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we provide the first report of a host-pathogen protein interaction network that includes data-derived, topological features for every cross-linked site that was identified. We show that PLRV virions have hot spots of protein interaction and multifunctional surface topologies, revealing how these plant viruses maximize their use of binding interfaces. Modeling data, guided by cross-linking constraints, suggest asymmetric packing of the major capsid protein in the virion, which supports previous epitope mapping studies. Protein interaction topologies are conserved with other species in the Luteoviridae and with unrelated viruses in the Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae. Functional analysis of three PLRV-interacting host proteins in planta using a reverse-genetics approach revealed a complex, molecular tug-of-war between host and virus. Structural mimicry and diversifying selection—hallmarks of host-pathogen interactions—were identified within host and viral binding interfaces predicted by our models. These results illuminate the functional diversity of the PLRV-host protein interaction network and demonstrate the usefulness of PIR technology for precision mapping of functional host-pathogen protein interaction topologies. IMPORTANCE The exterior shape of a plant virus and its interacting host and insect vector proteins determine whether a virus will be transmitted by an insect or infect a specific host. Gaining this information is difficult and requires years of experimentation. We used

  3. Host-Pathogen Interactions 1

    PubMed Central

    Cervone, Felice; Hahn, Michael G.; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of a plant-derived polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) on the activity of endopolygalacturonases isolated from fungi. PGIP's effect on endopolygalacturonases is to enhance the production of oligogalacturonides that are active as elicitors of phytoalexin (antibiotic) accumulation and other defense reactions in plants. Only oligogalacturonides with a degree of polymerization higher than nine are able to elicit phytoalexin synthesis in soybean cotyledons. In the absence of PGIP, a 1-minute exposure of polygalacturonic acid to endopolygalacturonase resulted in the production of elicitor-active oligogalacturonides. However, the enzyme depolymerized essentially all of the polygalacturonic acid substrate to elicitor-inactive oligogalacturonides within 15 minutes. When the digestion of polygalacturonic acid was carried out with the same amount of enzyme but in the presence of excess PGIP, the rate of production of elicitor-active oligogalacturonides was dramatically altered. The amount of elicitor-active oligogalacturonide steadily increased for 24 hours. It was only after about 48 hours that the enzyme converted the polygalacturonic acid into short, elicitor-inactive oligomers. PGIP is a specific, reversible, saturable, high-affinity receptor for endopolygalacturonase. Formation of the PGIP-endopolygalacturonase complex results in increased concentrations of oligogalacturonides that activate plant defense responses. The interaction of the plant-derived PGIP with fungal endopolygalacturonases may be a mechanism by which plants convert endopolygalacturonase, a factor important for the virulence of pathogens, into a factor that elicits plant defense mechanisms. PMID:16666805

  4. Glycoconjugates in Host-Helminth Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L.; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Helminths are multicellular parasitic worms that comprise a major class of human pathogens and cause an immense amount of suffering worldwide. Helminths possess an abundance of complex and unique glycoconjugates that interact with both the innate and adaptive arms of immunity in definitive and intermediate hosts. These glycoconjugates represent a major untapped reservoir of immunomodulatory compounds, which have the potential to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, and antigenic glycans, which could be exploited as vaccines and diagnostics. This review will survey current knowledge of the interactions between helminth glycans and host immunity and highlight the gaps in our understanding which are relevant to advancing therapeutics, vaccine development, and diagnostics. PMID:24009607

  5. Comparative genome analysis of Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reveals a wide spectrum of endophytic lifestyles based on interaction strategies with host plants

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Birgit; Petric, Alexandra; Shin, Maria W.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara; Nowak, Jerzy; Sessitsch, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN is a naturally occurring plant-associated bacterial endophyte that effectively colonizes a wide range of plants and stimulates their growth and vitality. Here we analyze whole genomes, of PsJN and of eight other endophytic bacteria. This study illustrates that a wide spectrum of endophytic life styles exists. Although we postulate the existence of typical endophytic traits, no unique gene cluster could be exclusively linked to the endophytic lifestyle. Furthermore, our study revealed a high genetic diversity among bacterial endophytes as reflected in their genotypic and phenotypic features. B. phytofirmans PsJN is in many aspects outstanding among the selected endophytes. It has the biggest genome consisting of two chromosomes and one plasmid, well-equipped with genes for the degradation of complex organic compounds and detoxification, e.g., 24 glutathione-S-transferase (GST) genes. Furthermore, strain PsJN has a high number of cell surface signaling and secretion systems and harbors the 3-OH-PAME quorum-sensing system that coordinates the switch of free-living to the symbiotic lifestyle in the plant-pathogen R. solanacearum. The ability of B. phytofirmans PsJN to successfully colonize such a wide variety of plant species might be based on its large genome harboring a broad range of physiological functions. PMID:23641251

  6. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282

  7. Proteinaceous Molecules Mediating Bifidobacterium-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; Delgado, Susana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commensal microoganisms found in the gastrointestinal tract. Several strains have been attributed beneficial traits at local and systemic levels, through pathogen exclusion or immune modulation, among other benefits. This has promoted a growing industrial and scientific interest in bifidobacteria as probiotic supplements. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this cross-talk with the human host remain unknown. High-throughput technologies, from functional genomics to transcriptomics, proteomics, and interactomics coupled to the development of both in vitro and in vivo models to study the dynamics of the intestinal microbiota and their effects on host cells, have eased the identification of key molecules in these interactions. Numerous secreted or surface-associated proteins or peptides have been identified as potential mediators of bifidobacteria-host interactions and molecular cross-talk, directly participating in sensing environmental factors, promoting intestinal colonization, or mediating a dialogue with mucosa-associated immune cells. On the other hand, bifidobacteria induce the production of proteins in the intestine, by epithelial or immune cells, and other gut bacteria, which are key elements in orchestrating interactions among bifidobacteria, gut microbiota, and host cells. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview on proteinaceous molecules described and characterized to date, as mediators of the dynamic interplay between bifidobacteria and the human host, providing a framework to identify knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27536282

  8. Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcriptional Responses to Different Aphid Species Reveals Genes that Contribute to Host Susceptibility and Non-host Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jaouannet, Maëlle; Morris, Jenny A.; Hedley, Peter E.; Bos, Jorunn I. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aphids are economically important pests that display exceptional variation in host range. The determinants of diverse aphid host ranges are not well understood, but it is likely that molecular interactions are involved. With significant progress being made towards understanding host responses upon aphid attack, the mechanisms underlying non-host resistance remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated and compared Arabidopsis thaliana host and non-host responses to aphids at the transcriptional level using three different aphid species, Myzus persicae, Myzus cerasi and Rhopalosiphum pisum. Gene expression analyses revealed a high level of overlap in the overall gene expression changes during the host and non-host interactions with regards to the sets of genes differentially expressed and the direction of expression changes. Despite this overlap in transcriptional responses across interactions, there was a stronger repression of genes involved in metabolism and oxidative responses specifically during the host interaction with M. persicae. In addition, we identified a set of genes with opposite gene expression patterns during the host versus non-host interactions. Aphid performance assays on Arabidopsis mutants that were selected based on our transcriptome analyses identified novel genes contributing to host susceptibility, host defences during interactions with M. persicae as well to non-host resistance against R. padi. Understanding how plants respond to aphid species that differ in their ability to infest plant species, and identifying the genes and signaling pathways involved, is essential for the development of novel and durable aphid control in crop plants. PMID:25993686

  9. Probing Pseudomonas syringae host interactions using metatranscriptomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome analyses during the interaction of plants and pathogens can be used to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of plant resistance as well as the mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to hosts and cause disease. We performed a dual in planta RNA-Seq experiment to profile RNA expressi...

  10. Host-Salmonella interaction: human trials.

    PubMed

    Levine, M M; Tacket, C O; Sztein, M B

    2001-01-01

    Human clinical trials, including experimental challenges of volunteers with pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, small phase I and II trials that monitor the immune responses to vaccines, and large-scale controlled field trials that assess vaccine efficacy under conditions of natural challenge, have helped elucidate the interactions between Salmonella typhi and human hosts. PMID:11755415

  11. Interactions between hemiparasitic plants and their hosts

    PubMed Central

    Plavcová, Lenka; Cameron, Duncan D

    2010-01-01

    Hemiparasitic plants display a unique strategy of resource acquisition combining parasitism of other species and own photosynthetic activity. Despite the active photoassimilation and green habit, they acquire substantial amount of carbon from their hosts. The organic carbon transfer has a crucial influence on the nature of the interaction between hemiparasites and their hosts which can oscillate between parasitism and competition for light. In this minireview, we summarize methodical approaches and results of various studies dealing with carbon budget of hemiparasites and the ecological implications of carbon heterotrophy in hemiparasites. PMID:20729638

  12. Interaction of spirochetes with the host.

    PubMed

    Hindersson, P; Thomas, D; Stamm, L; Penn, C; Norris, S; Joens, L A

    1992-01-01

    The success of an invading organism must depend on several cytoplasmic, surface-associated and secreted factors. The technical difficulties in handling pathogenic spirochetes like Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi have made it difficult to define specific factors involved in entry and long-term survival. The problem of defining virulence factors has been attacked by several strategies: T. pallidum secretes a number of immunogenic low molecular mass proteins. The most predominant are of molecular weight 15.5 and 22 kDa. Preliminary data suggest that antibodies against these proteins induce protective immunity in rabbits experimentally infected with T. pallidum. Many potentially important surface-associated antigens of T. pallidum have now been cloned and characterized. Two of these, TpD and TpE, are lipoproteins which exhibit characteristic size heterogeneity. The apparent molecular weight of TpE from T. pallidum and T. pertenue are different. The clinical symptoms in syphilis and yaws are very different, but sequence analysis of TpE has shown that the TpE proteins are indeed very similar in the two strains. This observation makes it unlikely that heterogeneity of TpE can account for the different clinical symptoms of syphilis and yaws. Sequence data for another newly sequenced surface-associated antigen of T. pallidum (molecular weight 41 kDa) indicate that this protein is involved in glucose transport and chemotaxis/motility. Intracellular factors like the molecular chaperonin GroEL have been documented both in treponemes and borreliae. This stress protein is involved in cellular repair processes and folding/assembly of protein subunits. Indirect evidence suggests that GroEL affects the ability of spirochetes to survive in the stressful environment of the infected host. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Osp proteins of Borrelia are important for host/parasite interaction. Further support for this idea has come from studies of a series of

  13. Using metabolomics to dissect host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Kloehn, J; Blume, M; Cobbold, S A; Saunders, E C; Dagley, M J; McConville, M J

    2016-08-01

    Protozoan parasites have evolved diverse growth and metabolic strategies for surviving and proliferating within different extracellular and intracellular niches in their mammalian hosts. Metabolomic approaches, including high coverage metabolite profiling and (13)C/(2)H-stable isotope labeling, are increasingly being used to identify parasite metabolic pathways that are important for survival and replication in vivo. These approaches are highlighting new links between parasite carbon metabolism and the ability of different parasite stages to colonize specific niches or host cell types. They have also revealed novel metabolic regulatory mechanisms that are important for homeostasis and survival in potentially nutrient variable environments. These studies highlight the importance of parasite and host metabolism as determinants of host-parasite interactions. PMID:27200489

  14. Host-pathogen interactions in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly S; Fulde, Marcus; Gratz, Nina; Kim, Brandon J; Nau, Roland; Prasadarao, Nemani; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a devastating disease occurring worldwide with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. Due to intrinsic properties of the meningeal pathogens and the host responses they induce, infection can cause relatively specific lesions and clinical syndromes that result from interference with the function of the affected nervous system tissue. Pathogenesis is based on complex host-pathogen interactions, some of which are specific for certain bacteria, whereas others are shared among different pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in these interactions. We focus on selected major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumonia, S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli K1, and also include a neglected zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus suis. These neuroinvasive pathogens represent common themes of host-pathogen interactions, such as colonization and invasion of mucosal barriers, survival in the blood stream, entry into the central nervous system by translocation of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and induction of meningeal inflammation, affecting pia mater, the arachnoid and subarachnoid spaces. PMID:26744349

  15. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Host SUMOylation Pathways To Mediate Effector-Host Interactions and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Paige Selvy; Luo, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that selectively infects mononuclear phagocytes. We recently reported that E. chaffeensis utilizes a type 1 secretion (T1S) system to export tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors and demonstrated that these effectors interact with a functionally diverse array of host proteins. By way of these interactions, TRP effectors modulate host cell functions; however, the molecular basis of these interactions and their roles in ehrlichial pathobiology are not well defined. In this study, we describe the first bacterial protein posttranslational modification (PTM) by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). The E. chaffeensis T1S effector TRP120 is conjugated to SUMO at a carboxy-terminal canonical consensus SUMO conjugation motif in vitro and in human cells. In human cells, TRP120 was selectively conjugated with SUMO2/3 isoforms. Disruption of TRP120 SUMOylation perturbed interactions with known host proteins, through predicted SUMO interaction motif-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E. chaffeensis infection did not result in dramatic changes in the global host SUMOylated protein profile, but a robust colocalization of predominately SUMO1 with ehrlichial inclusions was observed. Inhibiting the SUMO pathway with a small-molecule inhibitor had a significant impact on E. chaffeensis replication and recruitment of the TRP120-interacting protein polycomb group ring finger protein 5 (PCGF5) to the inclusion, indicating that the SUMO pathway is critical for intracellular survival. This study reveals the novel exploitation of the SUMO pathway by Ehrlichia, which facilitates effector-eukaryote interactions necessary to usurp the host and create a permissive intracellular niche. PMID:25047847

  16. Use of host-like peptide motifs in viral proteins is a prevalent strategy in host-virus interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hagai, Tzachi; Azia, Ariel; Babu, M. Madan; Andino, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Virus interact extensively with host proteins, but the mechanisms controlling these interactions are not well understood. We present a comprehensive analysis of eukaryotic linear-peptide motifs (ELMs) in 2,208 viral genomes and reveal that viruses exploit molecular mimicry of host-like ELMs to possibly assist in host-virus interactions. Using a statistical genomics approach, we identify a large number of potentially functional ELMs and observe that the occurrence of ELMs is often evolutionarily conserved but not uniform across virus families. Some viral proteins contain multiple types of ELMs, in striking similarity to complex regulatory modules in host proteins, suggesting that ELMs may act combinatorially to assist viral replication. Furthermore, a simple evolutionary model suggests that the inherent structural simplicity of ELMs often enables them to tolerate mutations and evolve quickly. Our findings suggest that ELMs may allow fast rewiring of host-virus interactions, which likely assists rapid viral evolution and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:24882001

  17. Helicobacter pylori: Genomic Insight into the Host-Pathogen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Kathryn P.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of genomic analyses has revolutionized the study of human health. Infectious disease research in particular has experienced an explosion of bacterial genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data complementing the phenotypic methods employed in traditional bacteriology. Together, these techniques have revealed novel virulence determinants in numerous pathogens and have provided information for potential chemotherapeutics. The bacterial pathogen, Helicobacter pylori, has been recognized as a class 1 carcinogen and contributes to chronic inflammation within the gastric niche. Genomic analyses have uncovered remarkable coevolution between the human host and H. pylori. Perturbation of this coevolution results in dysregulation of the host-pathogen interaction, leading to oncogenic effects. This review discusses the relationship of H. pylori with the human host and environment and the contribution of each of these factors to disease progression, with an emphasis on features that have been illuminated by genomic tools. PMID:25722969

  18. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  19. HIV–host interactome revealed directly from infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Greco, Todd M.; Mohammed, Kevin D.; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P.; Chait, Brian T.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen–host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27375898

  20. HIV-host interactome revealed directly from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y; Greco, Todd M; Mohammed, Kevin D; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M; Cristea, Ileana M; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T; Muesing, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen-host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27572969

  1. Interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Host Cell Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lalitha; Ahlbrand, Sarah; Briken, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has coevolved with humans for tens of thousands of years. It is thus highly adapted to its human host and has evolved multiple mechanisms to manipulate host immune responses to its advantage. One central host pathogen interaction modality is host cell death pathways. Host cell apoptosis is associated with a protective response to Mtb infection, whereas a necrotic response favors the pathogen. Consistently, Mtb inhibits host cell apoptosis signaling but promotes induction of programmed necrosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in Mtb-mediated host cell death manipulation, the consequences for host immunity, and the potential for therapeutic and preventive approaches will be discussed. PMID:24968864

  2. Pathogenesis of influenza: virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Godlee, Alexandra; Almond, Mark H; Dong, Tao

    2011-08-01

    Since their inception in March 1972, Keystone Symposia on Molecular and Cellular Biology have brought together scientists from across the globe to discuss key biological topics. Now in its 40th year, it is a completely independent, nonprofit organization devoted solely to providing outstanding scientific conferences in all areas of the biological and biomedical sciences. Towards the end of May 2011, over 200 virologists and immunologists came to Hong Kong, an appropriate setting given the emergence of H5N1, to discuss influenza virus and host interactions. The meeting, expertly organized by Siamon Gordon (University of Oxford, Oxofrd, UK), Malik Peiris (University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China) and Kanta Subbarao (NIAID, NIH, MD, USA), took place in the aftermath of the first pandemic in 40 years and provided great insight into both pandemic H1N1 and H5N1. This article focuses on some of the recurring themes that were discussed during the week. PMID:21819324

  3. Epigenomic regulation of host-microbiota interactions

    PubMed Central

    Alenghat, Theresa; Artis, David

    2014-01-01

    The trillions of beneficial commensal microorganisms that normally reside in the gastrointestinal tract have emerged as a critical source of environmentally-derived stimuli that can impact health and disease. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms that recognize commensal bacteria-derived signals and regulate mammalian homeostasis are just beginning to be defined. Highly coordinated epigenomic modifications allow mammals to alter the transcriptional program of a cell in response to environmental cues. These modifications may play a key role in regulating the dynamic relationship between mammals and their microbiota. Here we review recent advances in understanding of the interplay between the microbiota and mammalian epigenomic pathways, and highlight emerging findings that implicate a central role for histone deacetylases (HDACs) in orchestrating host-microbiota interactions. PMID:25443494

  4. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  5. Enteroviral proteases: structure, host interactions and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Olli H; Svedin, Emma; Kapell, Sebastian; Nurminen, Anssi; Hytönen, Vesa P; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-07-01

    Enteroviruses are common human pathogens, and infections are particularly frequent in children. Severe infections can lead to a variety of diseases, including poliomyelitis, aseptic meningitis, myocarditis and neonatal sepsis. Enterovirus infections have also been implicated in asthmatic exacerbations and type 1 diabetes. The large disease spectrum of the closely related enteroviruses may be partially, but not fully, explained by differences in tissue tropism. The molecular mechanisms by which enteroviruses cause disease are poorly understood, but there is increasing evidence that the two enteroviral proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) , are important mediators of pathology. These proteases perform the post-translational proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein, but they also cleave several host-cell proteins in order to promote the production of new virus particles, as well as to evade the cellular antiviral immune responses. Enterovirus-associated processing of cellular proteins may also contribute to pathology, as elegantly demonstrated by the 2A(pro) -mediated cleavage of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes contributing to Coxsackievirus-induced cardiomyopathy. It is likely that improved tools to identify targets for these proteases will reveal additional host protein substrates that can be linked to specific enterovirus-associated diseases. Here, we discuss the function of the enteroviral proteases in the virus replication cycle and review the current knowledge regarding how these proteases modulate the infected cell in order to favour virus replication, including ways to avoid detection by the immune system. We also highlight new possibilities for the identification of protease-specific cellular targets and thereby a way to discover novel mechanisms contributing to disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27145174

  6. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward; Das, Jayajit

    2015-02-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species.

  7. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species. PMID:25473880

  8. Dynamics of Mycobacteriophage-Mycobacterial Host Interaction: Evidence for Secondary Mechanisms for Host Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Samaddar, Sourabh; Grewal, Rajdeep Kaur; Sinha, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages infect mycobacteria, resulting in their death. Therefore, the possibility of using them as therapeutic agents against the deadly mycobacterial disease tuberculosis (TB) is of great interest. To obtain better insight into the dynamics of mycobacterial inactivation by mycobacteriophages, this study was initiated using mycobacteriophage D29 and Mycobacterium smegmatis as the phage-host system. Here, we implemented a goal-oriented iterative cycle of experiments on one hand and mathematical modeling combined with Monte Carlo simulations on the other. This integrative approach lends valuable insight into the detailed kinetics of bacterium-phage interactions. We measured time-dependent changes in host viability during the growth of phage D29 in M. smegmatis at different multiplicities of infection (MOI). The predictions emerging out of theoretical analyses were further examined using biochemical and cell biological assays. In a phage-host interaction system where multiple rounds of infection are allowed to take place, cell counts drop more rapidly than expected if cell lysis is considered the only mechanism for cell death. The phenomenon could be explained by considering a secondary factor for cell death in addition to lysis. Further investigations reveal that phage infection leads to the increased production of superoxide radicals, which appears to be the secondary factor. Therefore, mycobacteriophage D29 can function as an effective antimycobacterial agent, the killing potential of which may be amplified through secondary mechanisms. PMID:26475112

  9. Macrophage Polarization in Virus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Miller, Laura C; Blecha, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have revealed the complexity of macrophage polarization in response to various cellular mediators and exogenous stimuli by adopting a multipolar view to revisit the differential process of macrophages, especially those re-polarized during viral infections. Here, through examination of viral infections targeting macrophages/monocytic cells, we focus on the direct involvement of macrophage polarization during viral infections. Type I and type III interferons (IFNs) are critical in regulation of viral pathogenesis and host antiviral infection; thus, we propose to incorporate IFN-mediated antiviral states into the framework of macrophage polarization. This view is supported by the multifunctional properties of type I IFNs, which potentially elicit and regulate both M1- and M2-polarization in addition to inducing the antiviral state, and by the discoveries of viral mechanisms to adapt and modulate macrophage polarization. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated effective prevention of viral diseases through manipulation of macrophage immune statuses. PMID:26213635

  10. Host-Parasite Interactions in Some Fish Species

    PubMed Central

    Khan, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Host-parasite interactions are complex, compounded by factors that are capable of shifting the balance in either direction. The host's age, behaviour, immunological status, and environmental change can affect the association that is beneficial to the host whereas evasion of the host's immune response favours the parasite. In fish, some infections that induce mortality are age and temperature dependent. Environmental change, especially habitat degradation by anthropogenic pollutants and oceanographic alterations induced by climatic, can influence parasitic-host interaction. The outcome of these associations will hinge on susceptibility and resistance. PMID:22900144

  11. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  12. Host-microbe interactions in the developing zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kanther, Michelle; Rawls, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of recent advances The amenability of the zebrafish to in vivo imaging and genetic analysis has fueled expanded use of this vertebrate model to investigate the molecular and cellular foundations of host-microbe relationships. Study of microbial encounters in zebrafish hosts has concentrated on developing embryonic and larval stages, when the advantages of the zebrafish model are maximized. A comprehensive understanding of these host-microbe interactions requires appreciation of the developmental context into which a microbe is introduced, as well as the effects of that microbial challenge on host ontogeny. In this review, we discuss how in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish has advanced our knowledge of host-microbe interactions in the context of a developing vertebrate host. We focus on recent insights into immune cell ontogeny and function, commensal microbial relationships in the intestine, and microbial pathogenesis in zebrafish hosts. PMID:20153622

  13. Biological warfare: Microorganisms as drivers of host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Poulin, Robert; Thomas, Frédéric

    2015-08-01

    Understanding parasite strategies for evasion, manipulation or exploitation of hosts is crucial for many fields, from ecology to medical sciences. Generally, research has focused on either the host response to parasitic infection, or the parasite virulence mechanisms. More recently, integrated studies of host-parasite interactions have allowed significant advances in theoretical and applied biology. However, these studies still provide a simplistic view of these as mere two-player interactions. Host and parasite are associated with a myriad of microorganisms that could benefit from the improved fitness of their partner. Illustrations of such complex multi-player interactions have emerged recently from studies performed in various taxa. In this conceptual article, we propose how these associated microorganisms may participate in the phenotypic alterations induced by parasites and hence in host-parasite interactions, from an ecological and evolutionary perspective. Host- and parasite-associated microorganisms may participate in the host-parasite interaction by interacting directly or indirectly with the other partner. As a result, parasites may develop (i) the disruptive strategy in which the parasite alters the host microbiota to its advantage, and (ii) the biological weapon strategy where the parasite-associated microorganism contributes to or modulates the parasite's virulence. Some phenotypic alterations induced by parasite may also arise from conflicts of interests between the host or parasite and its associated microorganism. For each situation, we review the literature and propose new directions for future research. Specifically, investigating the role of host- and parasite-associated microorganisms in host-parasite interactions at the individual, local and regional level will lead to a holistic understanding of how the co-evolution of the different partners influences how the other ones respond, both ecologically and evolutionary. The conceptual framework we

  14. Versatile Supramolecular Gene Vector Based on Host-Guest Interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Hennink, Wim E; van Steenbergen, Mies J; Zhuo, Renxi; Jiang, Xulin

    2016-04-20

    It is a great challenge to arrange multiple functional components into one gene vector system to overcome the extra- and intracellular obstacles for gene therapy. In this study, we developed a supramolecular approach for constructing a versatile gene delivery system composed of adamantyl-terminated functional polymers and a β-cyclodextrin based polymer. Adamantyl-functionalized low molecular weight PEIs (PEI-Ad) and PEG (Ad-PEG) as well as poly(β-cyclodextrin) (PCD) were synthesized by one-step chemical reactions. The supramolecular inclusion complex formed from PCD to assemble LMW PEI-Ad4 via host-guest interactions can condense plasmid DNA to form nanopolyplexes by electrostatic interactions. The supramolecular polyplexes can be further PEGylated with Ad-PEG to form inclusion complexes, which showed increased salt and serum stability. In vitro experiments revealed that these supramolecular assembly polyplexes had good cytocompatibility and showed high transfection activity close to that of the commercial ExGen 500 at high dose of DNA. Also, the supramolecular vector system exhibited about 60% silencing efficiency as a siRNA vector. Thus, a versatile effective supramolecular gene vector based on host-guest complexes was fabricated with good cytocompatbility and transfection activity. PMID:27019340

  15. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  16. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or s...

  17. Architecture and host interface of environmental chlamydiae revealed by electron cryotomography

    PubMed Central

    Pilhofer, Martin; Aistleitner, Karin; Ladinsky, Mark S.; König, Lena; Horn, Matthias; Jensen, Grant J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chlamydiae comprise important pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria that alternate between morphologically and physiologically different life stages during their developmental cycle. Using electron cryotomography, we characterize the ultrastructure of the developmental stages of three environmental chlamydiae: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, Protochlamydia amoebophila and Simkania negevensis. We show that chemical fixation and dehydration alter the cell shape of Parachlamydia and that the crescent body is not a developmental stage, but an artefact of conventional electron microscopy. We further reveal type III secretion systems of environmental chlamydiae at macromolecular resolution and find support for a chlamydial needle-tip protein. Imaging bacteria inside their host cells by cryotomography for the first time, we observe marked differences in inclusion morphology and development as well as host organelle recruitment between the three chlamydial organisms, with Simkania inclusions being tightly enveloped by the host endoplasmic reticulum. The study demonstrates the power of electron cryotomography to reveal structural details of bacteria–host interactions that are not accessible using traditional methods. PMID:24118768

  18. Host-microbe interactions shaping the gastrointestinal environment

    PubMed Central

    Kaiko, Gerard E; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in mapping the complexity of the human gut microbiota in both health and disease states. These analyses have revealed that rather than a constellation of individual species, a healthy microbiota consists of an inter-dependent network of microbes. The microbial and host interactions that shape both this network and the gastrointestinal environment are areas of intense investigation. Here, we review emerging concepts of how microbial metabolic processes control commensal composition, invading pathogens, immune activation, and intestinal barrier function. We posit that all these factors are critical for the maintenance of homeostasis and avoidance of overt inflammatory disease. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms will shed light on the pathogenesis of many diseases and guide new therapeutic interventions. PMID:25220948

  19. PAK in pathogen-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Semblat, Jean-Philippe; Doerig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic, prokaryotic and viral pathogens are known to interfere with signaling pathways of their host to promote their own survival and proliferation. Here, we present selected examples of modulation of PAK activity in human cells by both intracellular and extracellular pathogens, focusing on one eukaryotic pathogen, the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, two Gram-negative bacteria (Helicobacter pylori and Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and two viruses belonging to distinct groups, the lentivirus HIV and the orthomyxovirus Influenza virus A. PMID:23125952

  20. New Insights into Molecular Ehrlichia chaffeensis-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wakeel, Abdul; Zhu, Bing; Yu, Xue-jie; McBride, Jere W.

    2010-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes and survives by reprogramming the host cell. Here we review new information regarding the newly characterized effector molecules and the complex network of molecular host-pathogen interactions that the organism exploits enabling it to thrive and persist intracellularly. PMID:20116446

  1. Sialomes and Mialomes: A Systems-Biology View of Tick Tissues and Tick-Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Chmelař, Jindřich; Kotál, Jan; Karim, Shahid; Kopacek, Petr; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Pedra, Joao H F; Kotsyfakis, Michail

    2016-03-01

    Tick saliva facilitates tick feeding and infection of the host. Gene expression analysis of tick salivary glands and other tissues involved in host-pathogen interactions has revealed a wide range of bioactive tick proteins. Transcriptomic analysis has been a milestone in the field and has recently been enhanced by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Furthermore, the application of quantitative proteomics to ticks with unknown genomes has provided deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tick hematophagy, pathogen transmission, and tick-host-pathogen interactions. We review current knowledge on the transcriptomics and proteomics of tick tissues from a systems-biology perspective and discuss future challenges in the field. PMID:26520005

  2. Olfactory regulation of mosquito–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zwiebel, L.J.; Takken, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes that act as disease vectors rely upon olfactory cues to direct several important behaviors that are fundamentally involved in establishing their overall vectorial capacity. Of these, the propensity to select humans for blood feeding is arguably the most important of these olfactory driven behaviors in so far as it significantly contributes to the ability of these mosquitoes to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and most significantly human malaria. Here, we review significant advances in behavioral, physiological and molecular investigations into mosquito host preference, with a particular emphasis on studies that have emerged in the post-genomic era that seek to combine these approaches. PMID:15242705

  3. Expanding the antimalarial toolkit: Targeting host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Langhorne, Jean; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-02-01

    Recent successes in malaria control are threatened by drug-resistant Plasmodium parasites and insecticide-resistant Anopheles mosquitoes, and first generation vaccines offer only partial protection. New research approaches have highlighted host as well as parasite molecules or pathways that could be targeted for interventions. In this study, we discuss host-parasite interactions at the different stages of the Plasmodium life cycle within the mammalian host and the potential for therapeutics that prevent parasite migration, invasion, intracellular growth, or egress from host cells, as well as parasite-induced pathology. PMID:26834158

  4. Interactions of porcine circovirus 2 with its hosts.

    PubMed

    Ren, Linzhu; Chen, Xinrong; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-08-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) can cause porcine circovirus diseases and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD), which are widely presented in swine-producing countries. Since the discovery of this virus, considerable efforts have been devoted to understanding this pathogen and its interactions with its host. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on interactions between host cell factors and PCV2 with respect to viral proliferation, virus-induced cell apoptosis and autophagy, and host antiviral defenses during PCV2 infection. We also review mouse model systems for PCV2 infection. PMID:27016220

  5. Bizarre interactions and endgames: entomopathogenic fungi and their arthropod hosts.

    PubMed

    Roy, H E; Steinkraus, D C; Eilenberg, J; Hajek, A E; Pell, J K

    2006-01-01

    Invertebrate pathogens and their hosts are taxonomically diverse. Despite this, there is one unifying concept relevant to all such parasitic associations: Both pathogen and host adapt to maximize their own reproductive output and ultimate fitness. The strategies adopted by pathogens and hosts to achieve this goal are almost as diverse as the organisms themselves, but studies examining such relationships have traditionally concentrated only on aspects of host physiology. Here we review examples of host-altered behavior and consider these within a broad ecological and evolutionary context. Research on pathogen-induced and host-mediated behavioral changes demonstrates the range of altered behaviors exhibited by invertebrates including behaviorally induced fever, elevation seeking, reduced or increased activity, reduced response to semiochemicals, and changes in reproductive behavior. These interactions are sometimes quite bizarre, intricate, and of great scientific interest. PMID:16332215

  6. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Alison L; Cantarel, Brandi; Lamendella, Regina; Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh B; Halfvarsson, J; Tysk, C; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Fraser-Liggett, C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  7. Wolbachia-Host Interactions: Host Mating Patterns Affect Wolbachia Density Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Xiao; Zhang, Xiang-Fei; Chen, Da-Song; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited intracellular bacteria that infect a wide range of arthropods and cause an array of effects on host reproduction, fitness and mating behavior. Although our understanding of the Wolbachia-associated effects on hosts is rapidly expanding, our knowledge of the host factors that mediate Wolbachia dynamics is rudimentary. Here, we explore the interactions between Wolbachia and its host, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch. Our results indicate that Wolbachia induces strong cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), increases host fecundity, but has no effects on the longevity of females and the mating competitiveness of males in T. urticae. Most importantly, host mating pattern was found to affect Wolbachia density dynamics during host aging. Mating of an uninfected mite of either sex with an infected mite attenuates the Wolbachia density in the infected mite. According to the results of Wolbachia localization, this finding may be associated with the tropism of Wolbachia for the reproductive tissue in adult spider mites. Our findings describe a new interaction between Wolbachia and their hosts. PMID:23823081

  8. Within-host competition between Borrelia afzelii ospC strains in wild hosts as revealed by massively parallel amplicon sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Infections frequently consist of more than one strain of a given pathogen. Experiments have shown that co-infecting strains often compete, so that the infection intensity of each strain in mixed infections is lower than in single strain infections. Such within-host competition can have important epidemiological and evolutionary consequences. However, the extent of competition has rarely been investigated in wild, naturally infected hosts, where there is noise in the form of varying inoculation doses, asynchronous infections and host heterogeneity, which can potentially alleviate or eliminate competition. Here, we investigated the extent of competition between Borrelia afzelii strains (as determined by ospC genotype) in three host species sampled in the wild. For this purpose, we developed a protocol for 454 amplicon sequencing of ospC, which allows both detection and quantification of each individual strain in an infection. Each host individual was infected with one to six ospC strains. The infection intensity of each strain was lower in mixed infections than in single ones, showing that there was competition. Rank-abundance plots revealed that there was typically one dominant strain, but that the evenness of the relative infection intensity of the different strains in an infection increased with the multiplicity of infection. We conclude that within-host competition can play an important role under natural conditions despite many potential sources of noise, and that quantification by next-generation amplicon sequencing offers new possibilities to dissect within-host interactions in naturally infected hosts. PMID:26150659

  9. Within-host competition between Borrelia afzelii ospC strains in wild hosts as revealed by massively parallel amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Strandh, Maria; Råberg, Lars

    2015-08-19

    Infections frequently consist of more than one strain of a given pathogen. Experiments have shown that co-infecting strains often compete, so that the infection intensity of each strain in mixed infections is lower than in single strain infections. Such within-host competition can have important epidemiological and evolutionary consequences. However, the extent of competition has rarely been investigated in wild, naturally infected hosts, where there is noise in the form of varying inoculation doses, asynchronous infections and host heterogeneity, which can potentially alleviate or eliminate competition. Here, we investigated the extent of competition between Borrelia afzelii strains (as determined by ospC genotype) in three host species sampled in the wild. For this purpose, we developed a protocol for 454 amplicon sequencing of ospC, which allows both detection and quantification of each individual strain in an infection. Each host individual was infected with one to six ospC strains. The infection intensity of each strain was lower in mixed infections than in single ones, showing that there was competition. Rank-abundance plots revealed that there was typically one dominant strain, but that the evenness of the relative infection intensity of the different strains in an infection increased with the multiplicity of infection. We conclude that within-host competition can play an important role under natural conditions despite many potential sources of noise, and that quantification by next-generation amplicon sequencing offers new possibilities to dissect within-host interactions in naturally infected hosts. PMID:26150659

  10. Exploring NAD+ metabolism in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Inês; Varela, Patrícia; Belinha, Ana; Gaifem, Joana; Laforge, Mireille; Vergnes, Baptiste; Estaquier, Jérôme; Silvestre, Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a vital molecule found in all living cells. NAD(+) intracellular levels are dictated by its synthesis, using the de novo and/or salvage pathway, and through its catabolic use as co-enzyme or co-substrate. The regulation of NAD(+) metabolism has proven to be an adequate drug target for several diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative or inflammatory diseases. Increasing interest has been given to NAD(+) metabolism during innate and adaptive immune responses suggesting that its modulation could also be relevant during host-pathogen interactions. While the maintenance of NAD(+) homeostatic levels assures an adequate environment for host cell survival and proliferation, fluctuations in NAD(+) or biosynthetic precursors bioavailability have been described during host-pathogen interactions, which will interfere with pathogen persistence or clearance. Here, we review the double-edged sword of NAD(+) metabolism during host-pathogen interactions emphasizing its potential for treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:26718485

  11. Macrophage polarization in virus-host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macrophage involvement in viral infections and antiviral states is common. However, this involvement has not been well-studied in the paradigm of macrophage polarization, which typically has been categorized by the dichotomy of classical (M1) and alternative (M2) statuses. Recent studies have reveal...

  12. LuxS signaling in Porphyromonas gingivalis-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheres, Nina; Lamont, Richard J; Crielaard, Wim; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2015-10-01

    Dental plaque is a multispecies biofilm in the oral cavity that significantly influences oral health. The presence of the oral anaerobic pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis is an important determinant in the development of periodontitis. Direct and indirect interactions between P. gingivalis and the host play a major role in disease development. Transcriptome analysis recently revealed that P. gingivalis gene-expression is regulated by LuxS in both an AI-2-dependent and an AI-2 independent manner. However, little is known about the role of LuxS-signaling in P. gingivalis-host interactions. Here, we investigated the effect of a luxS mutation on the ability of P. gingivalis to induce an inflammatory response in human oral cells in vitro. Primary periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts were challenged with P. gingivalis ΔluxS or the wild-type parental strain and gene-expression of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β, IL-6 and MCP-1 was determined by real-time PCR. The ability of P. gingivalis ΔluxS to induce an inflammatory response was severely impaired in PDL-fibroblasts. This phenotype could be restored by providing of LuxS in trans, but not by addition of the AI-2 precursor DPD. A similar phenomenon was observed in a previous transcriptome study showing that expression of PGN_0482 was reduced in the luxS mutant independently of AI-2. We therefore also analyzed the effect of a mutation in PGN_0482, which encodes an immuno-reactive, putative outer-membrane protein. Similar to P. gingivalis ΔluxS, the P. gingivalis Δ0482 mutant had an impaired ability to induce an inflammatory response in PDL fibroblasts. LuxS thus appears to influence the pro-inflammatory responses of host cells to P. gingivalis, likely through regulation of PGN_0482. PMID:25434960

  13. Interaction of chlamydiae and host cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, J W

    1991-01-01

    The obligately intracellular bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, which is only remotely related to other eubacterial genera, cause many diseases of humans, nonhuman mammals, and birds. Interaction of chlamydiae with host cells in vitro has been studied as a model of infection in natural hosts and as an example of the adaptation of an organism to an unusual environment, the inside of another living cell. Among the novel adaptations made by chlamydiae have been the substitution of disulfide-bond-cross-linked polypeptides for peptidoglycans and the use of host-generated nucleotide triphosphates as sources of metabolic energy. The effect of contact between chlamydiae and host cells in culture varies from no effect at all to rapid destruction of either chlamydiae or host cells. When successful infection occurs, it is usually followed by production of large numbers of progeny and destruction of host cells. However, host cells containing chlamydiae sometimes continue to divide, with or without overt signs of infection, and chlamydiae may persist indefinitely in cell cultures. Some of the many factors that influence the outcome of chlamydia-host cell interaction are kind of chlamydiae, kind of host cells, mode of chlamydial entry, nutritional adequacy of the culture medium, presence of antimicrobial agents, and presence of immune cells and soluble immune factors. General characteristics of chlamydial multiplication in cells of their natural hosts are reproduced in established cell lines, but reproduction in vitro of the subtle differences in chlamydial behavior responsible for the individuality of the different chlamydial diseases will require better in vitro models. PMID:2030670

  14. Viruses, microRNAs, and Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2013-01-01

    The most significant recent advance in biomedical research has been the discovery of the~22-nt long class of non-coding RNAs designated as microRNAs (miRNAs). These regulatory RNAs provide a unique level of post-transcriptional gene regulation that modulates a range of fundamental cellular processes. Several viruses, including especially herpesviruses, also encode miRNAs and over 200 viral miRNAs have now been identified. Current evidence indicates that viruses use these miRNAs to manipulate both cellular and viral gene expression. Furthermore, viral infection can exert a profound impact on the cellular miRNA expression profile, and several RNA viruses have been reported to interact directly with cellular miRNAs and/or to use these miRNAs to augment their replication potential. Here we discuss our current knowledge of viral miRNAs and virally-influenced cellular miRNAs, and their relationship to viral infection. PMID:20477536

  15. Studies of host graft interactions in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljekvist-Larsson, Ingela; Johansson, Kjell

    2007-09-01

    Progenitor and stem cell transplantation represent therapeutic strategies for retinal disorders that are accompanied by photoreceptor degeneration. The transplanted cells may either replace degenerating photoreceptors or secrete beneficial factors that halt the processes of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study analyzes whether rat retinal progenitor cells differentiated into photoreceptor phenotypic cells in neurospheres have a potential to interact with rat retinal explants. Immunocytochemistry for rhodopsin and synaptophysin indicated photoreceptor cell-like differentiation in neurospheres that were stimulated by basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor. Differentiation into neural phenotypes including photoreceptor cells was effectively blocked by an addition of leukemia inhibitory factor. Grafting of neurospheres onto retinal explants demonstrated a consistent penetration of glial cell processes into the explanted tissue. On the other hand, the incorporation of donor cells into explants was very low. A general finding was that neurospheres grafting was associated with local decrease in Müller cell activation in the explants. Further characterization of these effect(s) could provide further insight into progenitor cell-based therapies of retinal degenerative disorders.

  16. Host-microbiome interactions in acute and chronic respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven L; Wesselingh, Steve; Rogers, Geraint B

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory infection is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Understanding the factors that influence risk and outcome of these infections is essential to improving care. We increasingly understand that interactions between the microbial residents of our mucosal surfaces and host regulatory systems is fundamental to shaping local and systemic immunity. These mechanisms are most well defined in the gastrointestinal tract, however analogous systems also occur in the airways. Moreover, we now appreciate that the host-microbiota interactions at a given mucosal surface influence systemic host processes, in turn, affecting the course of infection at other anatomical sites. This review discusses the mechanisms by which the respiratory microbiome influences acute and chronic airway disease and examines the contribution of cross-talk between the gastrointestinal and respiratory compartments to microbe-mucosa interactions. PMID:26972325

  17. Tree phylogenetic diversity promotes host-parasitoid interactions.

    PubMed

    Staab, Michael; Bruelheide, Helge; Durka, Walter; Michalski, Stefan; Purschke, Oliver; Zhu, Chao-Dong; Klein, Alexandra-Maria

    2016-07-13

    Evidence from grassland experiments suggests that a plant community's phylogenetic diversity (PD) is a strong predictor of ecosystem processes, even stronger than species richness per se This has, however, never been extended to species-rich forests and host-parasitoid interactions. We used cavity-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasitoids collected in a subtropical forest as a model system to test whether hosts, parasitoids, and their interactions are influenced by tree PD and a comprehensive set of environmental variables, including tree species richness. Parasitism rate and parasitoid abundance were positively correlated with tree PD. All variables describing parasitoids decreased with elevation, and were, except parasitism rate, dependent on host abundance. Quantitative descriptors of host-parasitoid networks were independent of the environment. Our study indicates that host-parasitoid interactions in species-rich forests are related to the PD of the tree community, which influences parasitism rates through parasitoid abundance. We show that effects of tree community PD are much stronger than effects of tree species richness, can cascade to high trophic levels, and promote trophic interactions. As during habitat modification phylogenetic information is usually lost non-randomly, even species-rich habitats may not be able to continuously provide the ecosystem process parasitism if the evolutionarily most distinct plant lineages vanish. PMID:27383815

  18. Interactions of bovine and caprine herpesviruses with the natural and the foreign hosts.

    PubMed

    Engels, M; Palatini, M; Metzler, A E; Probst, U; Kihm, U; Ackermann, M

    1992-11-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) and caprine herpesvirus 1 (CapHV1) are useful models to study virus-host interactions, as well as pathogenicity and latency, when comparing the outcome of infection in the natural and the foreign hosts. Molecular seroepidemiological analyses revealed that cross-reacting antibodies were mainly induced by glycoprotein gI (gB analogue), by the major capsid protein and by nonstructural proteins, whereas the most virus-specific antibodies were elicited by glycoproteins gIII and gIV. These glycoproteins, especially gIII (gC analogue), might therefore play an important role in the virus-host-interactions. As a basis for further studies, we re-evaluated observations concerning experimental infections with BHV1 and CapHV1 in the natural and the foreign hosts. All parameters indicated that both viruses were able to infect either host, but that the pathogenicity was restricted to the natural host. Latent virus could be reactivated exclusively from cows infected with BHV1. It was possible neither to reactivate BHV1 from goats, nor to reactivate CapHV1 from either species. The experiments indicated that the outcome of infection in the natural and the foreign host is dependent on host and viral factors, whereby gIII is only one important virus component involved. Further investigations in the host and host cell range of BHV1 and CapHV1 will help to clarify the role of factors responsible for virus-host-interactions. PMID:1336252

  19. Inactivation of Wolbachia Reveals Its Biological Roles in Whitefly Host

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xia; Li, Shao-Jian; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.; De Barro, Paul J.; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is cryptic species complex composed of numerous species. Individual species from the complex harbor a diversity of bacterial endosymbionts including Wolbachia. However, while Wolbachia is known to have a number of different roles, its role in B. tabaci is unclear. Here, the antibiotic rifampicin is used to selectively eliminate Wolbachia from B. tabaci so as to enable its roles in whitefly development and reproduction to be explored. The indirect effects of Wolbachia elimination on the biology of Encarsia bimaculata, a dominant parasitoid of B. tabaci in South China, were also investigated. Methodology/Principal Finding qRT-PCR and FISH were used to show that after 48 h exposure to 1.0 mg/ml rifampicin, Wolbachia was completely inactivated from B. tabaci Mediterranean (MED) without any significant impact on either the primary symbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum or any of the other secondary endosymbionts present. For B. tabaci MED, Wolbachia was shown to be associated with decreased juvenile development time, increased likelihood that nymphs completed development, increased adult life span and increased percentage of female progeny. Inactivation was associated with a significant decrease in the body size of the 4th instar which leads us to speculate as to whether Wolbachia may have a nutrient supplementation role. The reduction in nymph body size has consequences for its parasitoid, E. bimaculata. The elimination of Wolbachia lead to a marked increase in the proportion of parasitoid eggs that completed their development, but the reduced size of the whitefly host was also associated with a significant reduction in the size of the emerging parasitoid adult and this was in turn associated with a marked reduction in adult parasitoid longevity. Conclusions/Significance Wolbachia increases the fitness of the whitefly host and provides some protection against parasitization. These observations add to our understanding of the roles

  20. A slowly evolving host moves first in symbiotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damore, James; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Symbiotic relationships, both parasitic and mutualistic, are ubiquitous in nature. Understanding how these symbioses evolve, from bacteria and their phages to humans and our gut microflora, is crucial in understanding how life operates. Often, symbioses consist of a slowly evolving host species with each host only interacting with its own sub-population of symbionts. The Red Queen hypothesis describes coevolutionary relationships as constant arms races with each species rushing to evolve an advantage over the other, suggesting that faster evolution is favored. Here, we use a simple game theoretic model of host- symbiont coevolution that includes population structure to show that if the symbionts evolve much faster than the host, the equilibrium distribution is the same as it would be if it were a sequential game where the host moves first against its symbionts. For the slowly evolving host, this will prove to be advantageous in mutualisms and a handicap in antagonisms. The model allows for symbiont adaptation to its host, a result that is robust to changes in the parameters and generalizes to continuous and multiplayer games. Our findings provide insight into a wide range of symbiotic phenomena and help to unify the field of coevolutionary theory.

  1. Mathematical model of mycobacterium-host interaction describes physiology of persistence.

    PubMed

    Pedruzzi, Gabriele; Rao, Kanury V S; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive studies on the interactions between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and macrophages, the mechanism by which pathogen evades anti-microbial responses and establishes persistence within the host cell remains unknown. In this study, we developed a four-dimensional ODE model to describe the dynamics of host-pathogen interactions in the early phase of macrophage infection. The aim was to characterize the role of host cellular regulators such as iron and lipids, in addition to the bactericidal effector molecule Nitric Oxide. Conditions for existence and stability of the equilibrium point were analysed by examining the behaviour of the model through numerical simulations. These computational investigations revealed that it was the ability of pathogen to interfere with iron and lipid homeostatic pathways of the host cell, which ensured a shift in balance towards pathogen survival and persistence. Interestingly, small perturbations in this equilibrium triggered the cell's bactericidal response, thereby producing an oscillatory dynamic for disease progression. PMID:25865521

  2. Screening for Host Factors Directly Interacting with RSV Protein: Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Sarit; Avrahami, Dorit; Bajorek, Monika; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-throughput microfluidics platform to identify novel host cell binding partners of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) matrix (M) protein. The device consists of thousands of reaction chambers controlled by micro-mechanical valves. The microfluidic device is mated to a microarray-printed custom-made gene library. These genes are then transcribed and translated on-chip, resulting in a protein array ready for binding to RSV M protein.Even small viral proteome, such as that of RSV, presents a challenge due to the fact that viral proteins are usually multifunctional and thus their interaction with the host is complex. Protein microarrays technology allows the interrogation of protein-protein interactions, which could possibly overcome obstacles by using conventional high throughput methods. Using microfluidics platform we have identified new host interactors of M involved in various cellular pathways. A number of microfluidics based assays have already provided novel insights into the virus-host interactome, and the results have important implications for future antiviral strategies aimed at targets of viral protein interactions with the host. PMID:27464694

  3. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Elisabeth O; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Hagedorn, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  4. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Elisabeth O.; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  5. Virus-Host Interactions: From Unbiased Genetic Screens to Function.

    PubMed

    Ramage, Holly; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-01

    Deciphering the many interactions that occur between a virus and host cell over the course of infection is paramount to understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis and to the future development of antiviral therapies. Over the past decade, researchers have started to understand these complicated relationships through the development of methodologies, including advances in RNA interference, proteomics, and the development of genetic tools such as haploid cell lines, allowing high-throughput screening to identify critical contact points between virus and host. These advances have produced a wealth of data regarding host factors hijacked by viruses to promote infection, as well as antiviral factors responsible for subverting viral infection. This review highlights findings from virus-host screens and discusses our thoughts on the direction of screening strategies moving forward. PMID:26958926

  6. Zika virus: epidemiology, clinical features and host-virus interactions.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Liégeois, Florian; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Pompon, Julien; Diop, Fodé; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Desprès, Philippe; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) has gained a medical importance following the large-scale epidemics in South Pacific and Latin America. This paper reviews information on the epidemiology and clinical features of Zika disease with a particular emphasis on the host-virus interactions that contribute to the pathogenicity of ZIKV in humans. PMID:27012221

  7. Host/pathogen interactions and immune effector mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of the host/pathogen interactions for mycobacterial infections underpins many of the outcomes required for improving disease control, including better diagnostic tests, vaccines and breeding for disease resistance. Upon infection these mycobacteria come in contact with cells of the ...

  8. Porphyromonas gingivalis-host interactions in a Drosophila melanogaster model.

    PubMed

    Igboin, Christina O; Tordoff, Kevin P; Moeschberger, Melvin L; Griffen, Ann L; Leys, Eugene J

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative obligate anaerobe that has been implicated in the etiology of adult periodontitis. We recently introduced a Drosophila melanogaster killing model for examination of P. gingivalis-host interactions. In the current study, the Drosophila killing model was used to characterize the host response to P. gingivalis infection by identifying host components that play a role during infection. Drosophila immune response gene mutants were screened for altered susceptibility to killing by P. gingivalis. The Imd signaling pathway was shown to be important for the survival of Drosophila infected by nonencapsulated P. gingivalis strains but was dispensable for the survival of Drosophila infected by encapsulated P. gingivalis strains. The P. gingivalis capsule was shown to mediate resistance to killing by Drosophila antimicrobial peptides (Imd pathway-regulated cecropinA and drosocin) and human beta-defensin 3. Drosophila thiol-ester protein II (Tep II) and Tep IV and the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) homolog Eiger were also involved in the immune response against P. gingivalis infection, while the scavenger receptors Eater and Croquemort played no roles in the response to P. gingivalis infection. This study demonstrates that the Drosophila killing model is a useful high-throughput model for characterizing the host response to P. gingivalis infection and uncovering novel interactions between the bacterium and the host. PMID:21041486

  9. Evolved plasmid-host interactions reduce plasmid interference cost.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hirokazu; Wegrzyn, Katarznya; Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Johnson, Jenny; Deckert, Gail E; Rogers, Linda M; Konieczny, Igor; Top, Eva M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic selection drives adaptation of antibiotic resistance plasmids to new bacterial hosts, but the molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously showed that a broad-host-range plasmid was poorly maintained in Shewanella oneidensis, but rapidly adapted through mutations in the replication initiation gene trfA1. Here we examined if these mutations reduced the fitness cost of TrfA1, and whether this was due to changes in interaction with the host's DNA helicase DnaB. The strains expressing evolved TrfA1 variants showed a higher growth rate than those expressing ancestral TrfA1. The evolved TrfA1 variants showed a lower affinity to the helicase than ancestral TrfA1 and were no longer able to activate the helicase at the oriV without host DnaA. Moreover, persistence of the ancestral plasmid was increased upon overexpression of DnaB. Finally, the evolved TrfA1 variants generated higher plasmid copy numbers than ancestral TrfA1. The findings suggest that ancestral plasmid instability can at least partly be explained by titration of DnaB by TrfA1. Thus under antibiotic selection resistance plasmids can adapt to a novel bacterial host through partial loss of function mutations that simultaneously increase plasmid copy number and decrease unfavorably high affinity to one of the hosts' essential proteins. PMID:27121483

  10. Entomopathogenic Fungi: New Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Butt, T M; Coates, C J; Dubovskiy, I M; Ratcliffe, N A

    2016-01-01

    Although many insects successfully live in dangerous environments exposed to diverse communities of microbes, they are often exploited and killed by specialist pathogens. Studies of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the highly aggressive coevolutionary arms race between entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) and their arthropod hosts. The host defenses are designed to exclude the pathogen or mitigate the damage inflicted while the pathogen responds with immune evasion and utilization of host resources. EPF neutralize their immediate surroundings on the insect integument and benefit from the physiochemical properties of the cuticle and its compounds that exclude competing microbes. EPF also exhibit adaptations aimed at minimizing trauma that can be deleterious to both host and pathogen (eg, melanization of hemolymph), form narrow penetration pegs that alleviate host dehydration and produce blastospores that lack immunogenic sugars/enzymes but facilitate rapid assimilation of hemolymph nutrients. In response, insects deploy an extensive armory of hemocytes and macromolecules, such as lectins and phenoloxidase, that repel, immobilize, and kill EPF. New evidence suggests that immune bioactives work synergistically (eg, lysozyme with antimicrobial peptides) to combat infections. Some proteins, including transferrin and apolipophorin III, also demonstrate multifunctional properties, participating in metabolism, homeostasis, and pathogen recognition. This review discusses the molecular intricacies of these HPI, highlighting the interplay between immunity, stress management, and metabolism. Increased knowledge in this area could enhance the efficacy of EPF, ensuring their future in integrated pest management programs. PMID:27131329

  11. Proteomic characterization of a natural host-pathogen interaction: repertoire of in vivo expressed bacterial and host surface-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Rees, Megan A; Kleifeld, Oded; Crellin, Paul K; Ho, Bosco; Stinear, Timothy P; Smith, A Ian; Coppel, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between a host and a bacterial pathogen are mediated by cross-talk between molecules present on, or secreted by, pathogens and host binding-molecules. Identifying proteins involved at this interface would provide substantial insights into this interaction. Although numerous studies have examined in vitro models of infection at the level of transcriptional change and proteomic profiling, there is virtually no information available on naturally occurring host-pathogen interactions in vivo. We employed membrane shaving to identify peptide fragments cleaved from surface-expressed bacterial proteins and also detected proteins originating from the infected host. We optimized this technique for media-cultured Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, a sheep pathogen, revealing a set of 247 surface proteins. We then studied a natural host-pathogen interaction by performing membrane shaving on C. pseudotuberculosis harvested directly from naturally infected sheep lymph nodes. Thirty-one bacterial surface proteins were identified, including 13 not identified in culture media, suggesting that a different surface protein repertoire is expressed in this hostile environment. Forty-nine host proteins were identified, including immune mediators and antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin. This novel application of proteolytic shaving has documented sets of host and pathogen proteins present at the bacterial surface in an infection of the native host. PMID:25329524

  12. Empirical evaluation of neutral interactions in host-parasite networks.

    PubMed

    Canard, E F; Mouquet, N; Mouillot, D; Stanko, M; Miklisova, D; Gravel, D

    2014-04-01

    While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization. PMID:24642492

  13. Host restriction factors in retroviral infection: promises in virus-host interaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses have an intricate life cycle. There is much to be learned from studying retrovirus-host interactions. Among retroviruses, the primate lentiviruses have one of the more complex genome structures with three categories of viral genes: structural, regulatory, and accessory genes. Over time, we have gained increasing understanding of the lentivirus life cycle from studying host factors that support virus replication. Similarly, studies on host restriction factors that inhibit viral replication have also made significant contributions to our knowledge. Here, we review recent progress on the rapidly growing field of restriction factors, focusing on the antiretroviral activities of APOBEC3G, TRIM5, tetherin, SAMHD1, MOV10, and cellular microRNAs (miRNAs), and the counter-activities of Vif, Vpu, Vpr, Vpx, and Nef. PMID:23254112

  14. Host-Microbe Interactions in Microgravity: Assessment and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Jamie S.; Wheeler, Raymond M.; Pamphile, Regine

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight imposes several unique stresses on biological life that together can have a profound impact on the homeostasis between eukaryotes and their associated microbes. One such stressor, microgravity, has been shown to alter host-microbe interactions at the genetic and physiological levels. Recent sequencing of the microbiomes associated with plants and animals have shown that these interactions are essential for maintaining host health through the regulation of several metabolic and immune responses. Disruptions to various environmental parameters or community characteristics may impact the resiliency of the microbiome, thus potentially driving host-microbe associations towards disease. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of host-microbe interactions in microgravity and assess the impact of this unique environmental stress on the normal physiological and genetic responses of both pathogenic and mutualistic associations. As humans move beyond our biosphere and undergo longer duration space flights, it will be essential to more fully understand microbial fitness in microgravity conditions in order to maintain a healthy homeostasis between humans, plants and their respective microbiomes. PMID:25370197

  15. Leptospira spp.: Novel insights into host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Luis G; Siqueira, Gabriela H; Teixeira, Aline R F; Silva, Lucas P; Figueredo, Jupciana M; Cosate, Maria R; Vieira, Monica L; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2016-08-01

    Leptospirosis is a widespread zoonosis caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp. It is an important infectious disease that affects humans and animals. The disease causes economic losses as it affects livestock, with decreased milk production and death. Our group is investigating the genome sequences of L. interrogans targeting surface-exposed proteins because, due to their location, these proteins are capable to interact with several host components that could allow establishment of the infection. These interactions may involve adhesion of the bacteria to extracellular matrix (ECM) components and, hence, help bacterial colonization. The bacteria could also react with the host fibrinolytic system and/or with the coagulation cascade components, such as, plasminogen (PLG) and fibrinogen (Fg), respectively. The binding with the first system generates plasmin (PLA), increasing the proteolytic power of the bacteria, while the second interferes with clotting in a thrombin-catalyzed reaction, which may promote hemorrhage foci and increase bacterial dissemination. Interaction with the complement system negative regulators may help bacteria to evade the host immune system, facilitating the invasion. This work compiles the main described leptospiral proteins that could act as adhesins, as PLG and fibrinogen receptors and as complement regulator binding proteins. We present models in which we suggest possible mechanisms of how leptospires might colonize and invade host tissues, causing the disease. Understanding leptospiral pathogenesis will help to identify antigen candidates that would contribute to the development of more effective vaccines and diagnostic tests. PMID:26727033

  16. Host-microbe interactions in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Takayuki; Hori, Aki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Many insect species subsist on decaying and contaminated matter and are thus exposed to large quantities of microorganisms. To control beneficial commensals and combat infectious pathogens, insects must be armed with efficient systems for microbial recognition, signaling pathways, and effector molecules. The molecular mechanisms regulating these host-microbe interactions in insects have been largely clarified in Drosophila melanogaster with its powerful genetic and genomic tools. Here we review recent advances in this field, focusing mainly on the relationships between microbes and epithelial cells in the intestinal tract where the host exposure to the external environment is most frequent. PMID:24381562

  17. Pathogens and polymers: Microbe–host interactions illuminate the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Cat M.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens subvert the host cell cytoskeleton to promote their own survival, replication, and dissemination. Study of these microbes has led to many discoveries about host cell biology, including the identification of cytoskeletal proteins, regulatory pathways, and mechanisms of cytoskeletal function. Actin is a common target of bacterial pathogens, but recent work also highlights the use of microtubules, cytoskeletal motors, intermediate filaments, and septins. The study of pathogen interactions with the cytoskeleton has illuminated key cellular processes such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, membrane trafficking, motility, autophagy, and signal transduction. PMID:21969466

  18. Salmonella-host interactions - modulation of the host innate immune system.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Daniel; McCusker, Matthew P; Fanning, Séamus; Martins, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) are Gram-negative bacteria that can invade a broad range of hosts causing both acute and chronic infections. This phenotype is related to its ability to replicate and persist within non-phagocytic host epithelial cells as well as phagocytic dendritic cells and macrophages of the innate immune system. Infection with S. enterica manifests itself through a broad range of clinical symptoms and can result in asymptomatic carriage, gastroenteritis, systemic disease such as typhoid fever and in severe cases, death (1). Exposure to S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi exhibits clinical symptoms including diarrhea, fatigue, fever, and temperature fluctuations. Other serovars such as the non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS), of which there are over 2,500, are commonly contracted as, but not limited to, food-borne sources causing gastrointestinal symptoms, which include diarrhea and vomiting. The availability of complete genome sequences for many S. enterica serovars has facilitated research into the genetic determinants of virulence for this pathogen. This work has led to the identification of important bacterial components, including flagella, type III secretion systems, lipopolysaccharides, and Salmonella pathogenicity islands, all of which support the intracellular life cycle of S. enterica. Studies focusing on the host-pathogen interaction have provided insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system. Therefore, characterizing the host-S. enterica interaction is critical to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria in a clinically relevant context. This review outlines salmonellosis and the clinical manifestations between typhoidal and NTS infections as well as discussing the host immune response to infection and the models that are being used to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25339955

  19. Microbe–Host Interactions are Positively and Negatively Regulated by Galectin–Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Linda G.; Garner, Omai B.; Schaefer, Katrin; Lee, Benhur

    2014-01-01

    Microbe–host interactions are complex processes that are directly and indirectly regulated by a variety of factors, including microbe presentation of specific molecular signatures on the microbial surface, as well as host cell presentation of receptors that recognize these pathogen signatures. Cell surface glycans are one important class of microbial signatures that are recognized by a variety of host cell lectins. Host cell lectins that recognize microbial glycans include members of the galectin family of lectins that recognize specific glycan ligands on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. In this review, we will discuss the ways that the interactions of microbial glycans with host cell galectins positively and negatively regulate pathogen attachment, invasion, and survival, as well as regulate host responses that mitigate microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24995007

  20. Emerging Supramolecular Therapeutic Carriers Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anis Abdul; Dou, Qingqing; Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in host-guest chemistry have significantly influenced the construction of supramolecular soft biomaterials. The highly selective and non-covalent interactions provide vast possibilities of manipulating supramolecular self-assemblies at the molecular level, allowing a rational design to control the sizes and morphologies of the resultant objects as carrier vehicles in a delivery system. In this Focus Review, the most recent developments of supramolecular self-assemblies through host-guest inclusion, including nanoparticles, micelles, vesicles, hydrogels, and various stimuli-responsive morphology transition materials are presented. These sophisticated materials with diverse functions, oriented towards therapeutic agent delivery, are further summarized into several active domains in the areas of drug delivery, gene delivery, co-delivery and site-specific targeting deliveries. Finally, the possible strategies for future design of multifunctional delivery carriers by combining host-guest chemistry with biological interface science are proposed. PMID:26833861

  1. Virus-Host Mucosal Interactions During Early SIV Rectal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wuxun; Ma, Fangrui; Churbanov, Alexander; Wan, Yanmin; Li, Yue; Kang, Guobin; Yuan, Zhe; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Chi; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark; Li, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    To deepen our understanding of early rectal transmission of HIV-1, we studied virus-host interactions in the rectal mucosa using simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-Indian rhesus macaque model and mRNA deep sequencing. We found that rectal mucosa actively responded to SIV as early as 3 days post-rectal inoculation (dpi) and mobilized more robust responses at 6 and 10 dpi. Our results suggests that the failure of the host to contain virus replication at the portal of entry is attributable to both a high-level expression of lymphocyte chemoattractant, proinflammatory and immune activation genes, which can recruit and activate viral susceptible target cells into mucosa; and a high-level expression of SIV accessory genes, which are known to be able to counter and evade host restriction factors and innate immune responses. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of rectal transmission. PMID:25128762

  2. Understanding complex host-microbe interactions in Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Thomas C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Any multicellular organism may be considered a metaorganism or holobiont—comprised of the macroscopic host and synergistic interdependence with bacteria, archaea, fungi, viruses, and numerous other microbial and eukaryotic species including algal symbionts. Defining the individual microbe-host conversations in these consortia is a challenging but necessary step on the path to understanding the function of the associations as a whole. Dissecting the fundamental principles that underlie all host-microbe interactions requires simple animal models with only a few specific bacterial species. Here I present Hydra as such a model with one of the simplest epithelia in the animal kingdom, with the availability of a fully sequenced genome and numerous genomic tools, and with few associated bacterial species. PMID:22688725

  3. Interactions between host factors and the skin microbiome

    PubMed Central

    SanMiguel, Adam; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    The skin is colonized by an assemblage of microorganisms which, for the most part, peacefully coexist with their hosts. In some cases, these communities also provide vital functions to cutaneous health through the modulation of host factors. Recent studies have illuminated the role of anatomical skin site, gender, age, and the immune system in shaping the cutaneous ecosystem. Alterations to microbial communities have also been associated with, and likely contribute to, a number of cutaneous disorders. This review focuses on the host factors that shape and maintain skin microbial communities, and the reciprocal role of microbes in modulating skin immunity. A greater understanding of these interactions is critical to elucidating the forces that shape cutaneous populations and their contributions to skin homeostasis. This knowledge can also inform the tendency of perturbations to predispose and/or bring about certain skin disorders. PMID:25548803

  4. Searching for Magnetic Interactions Between Exoplanets and Their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saken, JoN M.; Gray, R. O.; Flora, C. T.; Izlar, K. A.

    2008-05-01

    A large fraction of the known exoplanets are so called "hot-Jupiters", planets with roughly Jovian mass and orbits that bring them fairly close to their host stars. Assuming that their properties are somewhat similar to the gas giants in our own solar system, such planets might be expected to produce enhanced chromospheric activity in their host stars via magnetic interactions. Investigations of these interactions can help shed light on the nature and character of exoplanet magnetospheres. [To date, only one such interaction has been observed, in HD179949 (Shkolnik 2005).] Recently we have begun a long-term spectroscopic campaign at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory, monitoring the chromospheric activity of stars with exoplanets orbiting within 0.25 AU. The monitoring of host stars over a long time frame is important,since interactions may only be detectable when the stars are in an "active" state. Preliminary results from the first year of observations will be presented here. Support provided by NC SpaceGrant.

  5. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant. PMID:26322072

  6. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-03-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds. PMID:25905427

  7. Dual Analysis of the Murine Cytomegalovirus and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveal New Aspects of the Virus-Host Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Juranic Lisnic, Vanda; Babic Cac, Marina; Lisnic, Berislav; Trsan, Tihana; Mefferd, Adam; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Cook, Charles H.; Jonjic, Stipan; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq). We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus-associated diseases. PMID:24086132

  8. Host-pathogen interactions in malaria: cross-kingdom signaling and mitochondrial regulation.

    PubMed

    Luckhart, Shirley; Pakpour, Nazzy; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Malaria parasite-host interactions are complex and have confounded available drugs and the development of vaccines. Further, we now appreciate that interventions for malaria elimination and eradication must include therapeutics with intrinsic transmission blocking activity to treat the patient and prevent disease spread. Studies over the past 15 years have revealed significant conservation in the response to infection in mosquito and human hosts. More recently, we have recognized that conserved cell signaling cascades in mosquitoes and humans dictate infection outcome through the regulation of mitochondrial function and biogenesis, which feed back to host immunity, basic intermediary metabolism, and stress responses. These responses - reflected clearly in the primeval insect host - provide fertile ground for innovative strategies for both treatment and transmission blocking. PMID:26210301

  9. Protozoa lectins and their role in host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Walia, Amandeep Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins of non-immune origin that agglutinate red blood cells, lymphocytes, fibroblasts, etc., and bind reversibly to carbohydrates present on the apposing cells. They have at least two carbohydrate binding sites and their binding can be inhibited by one or more carbohydrates. Owing to carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins, they mediate cell-cell interactions and play role in protozoan adhesion and host cell cytotoxicity, thus are central to the pathogenic property of the parasite. Several parasitic protozoa possess lectins which mediate parasite adherence to host cells based on their carbohydrate specificities. These interactions could be exploited for development of novel therapeutics, targeting the adherence and thus helpful in eradicating wide spread of protozoan diseases. The current review highlights the present state knowledge with regard to protozoal lectins with an emphasis on their haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, characteristics and also their role in pathogenesis notably as adhesion molecules, thereby aiding the pathogen in disease establishment. PMID:27268207

  10. Bioinformatic Prediction of WSSV-Host Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-01-01

    WSSV is one of the most dangerous pathogens in shrimp aquaculture. However, the molecular mechanism of how WSSV interacts with shrimp is still not very clear. In the present study, bioinformatic approaches were used to predict interactions between proteins from WSSV and shrimp. The genome data of WSSV (NC_003225.1) and the constructed transcriptome data of F. chinensis were used to screen potentially interacting proteins by searching in protein interaction databases, including STRING, Reactome, and DIP. Forty-four pairs of proteins were suggested to have interactions between WSSV and the shrimp. Gene ontology analysis revealed that 6 pairs of these interacting proteins were classified into “extracellular region” or “receptor complex” GO-terms. KEGG pathway analysis showed that they were involved in the “ECM-receptor interaction pathway.” In the 6 pairs of interacting proteins, an envelope protein called “collagen-like protein” (WSSV-CLP) encoded by an early virus gene “wsv001” in WSSV interacted with 6 deduced proteins from the shrimp, including three integrin alpha (ITGA), two integrin beta (ITGB), and one syndecan (SDC). Sequence analysis on WSSV-CLP, ITGA, ITGB, and SDC revealed that they possessed the sequence features for protein-protein interactions. This study might provide new insights into the interaction mechanisms between WSSV and shrimp. PMID:24982879

  11. Egg colour mimicry in the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus as revealed by modelling host retinal function.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Jesús M

    2008-10-22

    Some parasite cuckoo species lay eggs that, to the human eye, appear to mimic the appearance of the eggs of their favourite hosts, which hinders discrimination and removal of their eggs by host species. Hitherto, perception of cuckoo-host egg mimicry has been estimated based on human vision or spectrophotometry, which does not account for what the receivers' eye (i.e. hosts) actually discriminates. Using a discrimination model approach that reproduces host retinal functioning, and museum egg collections collected in the south of Finland, where at least six different races of the European cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) coexist, I first assess whether the colour design of cuckoo eggs of different races maximizes matching for two favourite avian hosts, viz. the redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) and the pied wagtail (Motacilla alba). Second, I assess the role of nest luminosity on host perception of mimicry by the same two hosts. Phoenicurus-cuckoo eggs showed a better chromatic matching with the redstart-host eggs than other cuckoo races, and in most cases can not be discriminated. Sylvia-cuckoo eggs, however, showed better achromatic matching with redstart-host eggs than Phoenicurus-cuckoo eggs. Also, Motacilla-cuckoo eggs showed poorer chromatic and achromatic matching with pied wagtail-host eggs than Sylvia-cuckoo eggs. Nest luminosity affected chromatic and achromatic differences between cuckoo and host eggs, although only minimally affected the proportion of cuckoo eggs discriminated by chromatic signals. These results reveal that cuckoo races as assessed by humans do not entirely match with host perception of matching and that achromatic mechanisms could play a main role in the discrimination of cuckoo eggs at low-light levels. PMID:18595836

  12. Food availability affects the strength of mutualistic host-microbiota interactions in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Callens, Martijn; Macke, Emilie; Muylaert, Koenraad; Bossier, Peter; Lievens, Bart; Waud, Michael; Decaestecker, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic gut microbial community is generally known to have a strong impact on the fitness of its host. Nevertheless, it is less clear how the impact of symbiotic interactions on the hosts' fitness varies according to environmental circumstances such as changes in the diet. This study aims to get a better understanding of host-microbiota interactions under different levels of food availability. We conducted experiments with the invertebrate, experimental model organism Daphnia magna and compared growth, survival and reproduction of conventionalized symbiotic Daphnia with germ-free individuals given varying quantities of food. Our experiments revealed that the relative importance of the microbiota for the hosts' fitness varied according to dietary conditions. The presence of the microbiota had strong positive effects on Daphnia when food was sufficient or abundant, but had weaker effects under food limitation. Our results indicate that the microbiota can be a potentially important factor in determining host responses to changes in dietary conditions. Characterization of the host-associated microbiota further showed that Aeromonas sp. was the most prevalent taxon in the digestive tract of Daphnia. PMID:26405832

  13. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG - host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is one of the most widely used probiotic strains. Various health effects are well documented including the prevention and treatment of gastro-intestinal infections and diarrhea, and stimulation of immune responses that promote vaccination or even prevent certain allergic symptoms. However, not all intervention studies could show a clinical benefit and even for the same conditions, the results are not univocal. Clearly, the host phenotype governed by age, genetics and environmental factors such as the endogenous microbiota, plays a role in whether individuals are responders or non-responders. However, we believe that a detailed knowledge of the bacterial physiology and the LGG molecules that play a key role in its host-interaction capacity is crucial for a better understanding of its potential health benefits. Molecules that were yet identified as important factors governing host interactions include its adhesive pili or fimbriae, its lipoteichoic acid molecules, its major secreted proteins and its galactose-rich exopolysaccharides, as well as specific DNA motifs. Nevertheless, future studies are needed to correlate specific health effects to these molecular effectors in LGG, and also in other probiotic strains. PMID:25186587

  14. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  15. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1's role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  16. Modelling the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts.

    PubMed

    Beke, Gabor; Stano, Matej; Klucar, Lubos

    2016-09-01

    A mathematical model simulating the interaction between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts has been developed. It is based on other known models describing this type of interaction, enhanced with an ability to model the system influenced by other environmental factor such as pH and temperature. This could be used for numerous estimations of growth rate, when the pH and/or the temperature of the environment are not constant. The change of pH or the temperature greatly affects the specific growth rate which has an effect on the final results of the simulation. Since the model aims on practical application and easy accessibility, an interactive website has been developed where users can run simulations with their own parameters and easily calculate and visualise the result of simulation. The web simulation is accessible at the URL http://www.phisite.org/model. PMID:27393678

  17. Students' Peer Interactions within a Cohort and in Host Countries during a Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jessup-Anger, Jody E.; Aragones, Aileen

    2013-01-01

    In this qualitative case study, we explored students' peer interactions within their cohort and in the host countries during a short-term study abroad. Framed by Bronfenbrenner's (1993) ecological systems theory, findings revealed that students spent considerable energy reflecting on interactions with peers. The students considered…

  18. Visualization of host-polerovirus interaction topologies using Protein Interaction Reporter technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demonstrating direct interactions between host and virus proteins during infection is a major goal and challenge for the field of virology. The majority of interactions are not binary or easily amenable to structural determination. Using infectious preparations of a polerovirus (Potato leafroll viru...

  19. Identification of host proteins, Spata3 and Dkk2, interacting with Toxoplasma gondii micronemal protein MIC3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Fang, Rui; Yuan, Yuan; Pan, Ming; Hu, Min; Zhou, Yanqin; Shen, Bang; Zhao, Junlong

    2016-07-01

    As an obligate intracellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii is a successful pathogen infecting a variety of animals, including humans. As an adhesin involving in host invasion, the micronemal protein MIC3 plays important roles in host cell attachment, as well as modulation of host EGFR signaling cascade. However, the specific host proteins that interact with MIC3 are unknown and the identification of such proteins will increase our understanding of how MIC3 exerts its functions. This study was designed to identify host proteins interacting with MIC3 by yeast two-hybrid screens. Using MIC3 as bait, a library expressing mouse proteins was screened, uncovering eight mouse proteins that showed positive interactions with MIC3. Two of which, spermatogenesis-associated protein 3 (Spata3) and dickkopf-related protein 2 (Dkk2), were further confirmed to interact with MIC3 by additional protein-protein interaction tests. The results also revealed that the tandem repeat EGF domains of MIC3 were critical in mediating the interactions with the identified host proteins. This is the first study to show that MIC3 interacts with host proteins that are involved in reproduction, growth, and development. The results will provide a clearer understanding of the functions of adhesion-associated micronemal proteins in T. gondii. PMID:27053129

  20. The EHEC-host interactome reveals novel targets for the translocated intimin receptor.

    PubMed

    Blasche, Sonja; Arens, Stefan; Ceol, Arnaud; Siszler, Gabriella; Schmidt, M Alexander; Häuser, Roman; Schwarz, Frank; Wuchty, Stefan; Aloy, Patrick; Uetz, Peter; Stradal, Theresia; Koegl, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) manipulate their human host through at least 39 effector proteins which hijack host processes through direct protein-protein interactions (PPIs). To identify their protein targets in the host cells, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens, allowing us to find 48 high-confidence protein-protein interactions between 15 EHEC effectors and 47 human host proteins. In comparison to other bacteria and viruses we found that EHEC effectors bind more frequently to hub proteins as well as to proteins that participate in a higher number of protein complexes. The data set includes six new interactions that involve the translocated intimin receptor (TIR), namely HPCAL1, HPCAL4, NCALD, ARRB1, PDE6D, and STK16. We compared these TIR interactions in EHEC and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and found that five interactions were conserved. Notably, the conserved interactions included those of serine/threonine kinase 16 (STK16), hippocalcin-like 1 (HPCAL1) as well as neurocalcin-delta (NCALD). These proteins co-localize with the infection sites of EPEC. Furthermore, our results suggest putative functions of poorly characterized effectors (EspJ, EspY1). In particular, we observed that EspJ is connected to the microtubule system while EspY1 appears to be involved in apoptosis/cell cycle regulation. PMID:25519916

  1. Salmonella–Host Interactions – Modulation of the Host Innate Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Daniel; McCusker, Matthew P.; Fanning, Séamus; Martins, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) are Gram-negative bacteria that can invade a broad range of hosts causing both acute and chronic infections. This phenotype is related to its ability to replicate and persist within non-phagocytic host epithelial cells as well as phagocytic dendritic cells and macrophages of the innate immune system. Infection with S. enterica manifests itself through a broad range of clinical symptoms and can result in asymptomatic carriage, gastroenteritis, systemic disease such as typhoid fever and in severe cases, death (1). Exposure to S. enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi exhibits clinical symptoms including diarrhea, fatigue, fever, and temperature fluctuations. Other serovars such as the non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS), of which there are over 2,500, are commonly contracted as, but not limited to, food-borne sources causing gastrointestinal symptoms, which include diarrhea and vomiting. The availability of complete genome sequences for many S. enterica serovars has facilitated research into the genetic determinants of virulence for this pathogen. This work has led to the identification of important bacterial components, including flagella, type III secretion systems, lipopolysaccharides, and Salmonella pathogenicity islands, all of which support the intracellular life cycle of S. enterica. Studies focusing on the host–pathogen interaction have provided insights into receptor activation of the innate immune system. Therefore, characterizing the host–S. enterica interaction is critical to understand the pathogenicity of the bacteria in a clinically relevant context. This review outlines salmonellosis and the clinical manifestations between typhoidal and NTS infections as well as discussing the host immune response to infection and the models that are being used to elucidate the mechanisms involved in Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25339955

  2. Revealing protein–lncRNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Colantoni, Alessio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated to a plethora of cellular functions, most of which require the interaction with one or more RNA-binding proteins (RBPs); similarly, RBPs are often able to bind a large number of different RNAs. The currently available knowledge is already drawing an intricate network of interactions, whose deregulation is frequently associated to pathological states. Several different techniques were developed in the past years to obtain protein–RNA binding data in a high-throughput fashion. In parallel, in silico inference methods were developed for the accurate computational prediction of the interaction of RBP–lncRNA pairs. The field is growing rapidly, and it is foreseeable that in the near future, the protein–lncRNA interaction network will rise, offering essential clues for a better understanding of lncRNA cellular mechanisms and their disease-associated perturbations. PMID:26041786

  3. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  4. Vector-Host Interactions Governing Epidemiology of West Nile Virus in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Molaei, Goudarz; Cummings, Robert F.; Su, Tianyun; Armstrong, Philip M.; Williams, Greg A.; Cheng, Min-Lee; Webb, James P.; Andreadis, Theodore G.

    2010-01-01

    Southern California remains an important focus of West Nile virus (WNV) activity, with persistently elevated incidence after invasion by the virus in 2003 and subsequent amplification to epidemic levels in 2004. Eco-epidemiological studies of vectors-hosts-pathogen interactions are of paramount importance for better understanding of the transmission dynamics of WNV and other emerging mosquito-borne arboviruses. We investigated vector-host interactions and host-feeding patterns of 531 blood-engorged mosquitoes in four competent mosquito vectors by using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method targeting mitochondrial DNA to identify vertebrate hosts of blood-fed mosquitoes. Diagnostic testing by cell culture, real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, and immunoassays were used to examine WNV infection in blood-fed mosquitoes, mosquito pools, dead birds, and mammals. Prevalence of WNV antibodies among wild birds was estimated by using a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analyses of engorged Culex quinquefasciatus revealed that this mosquito species acquired 88.4% of the blood meals from avian and 11.6% from mammalian hosts, including humans. Similarly, Culex tarsalis fed 82% on birds and 18% on mammals. Culex erythrothorax fed on both birds (59%) and mammals (41%). In contrast, Culex stigmatosoma acquired all blood meals from avian hosts. House finches and a few other mostly passeriform birds served as the main hosts for the blood-seeking mosquitoes. Evidence of WNV infection was detected in mosquito pools, wild birds, dead birds, and mammals, including human fatalities during the study period. Our results emphasize the important role of house finches and several other passeriform birds in the maintenance and amplification of WNV in southern California, with Cx. quinquefasciatus acting as both the principal enzootic and “bridge vector” responsible for the spillover of WNV to humans. Other mosquito species, such as Cx. tarsalis and Cx. stigmatosoma, are

  5. Individual Apostichopus japonicus fecal microbiome reveals a link with polyhydroxybutyrate producers in host growth gaps.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yohei; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Thompson, Fabiano L; Sakai, Yuichi; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiome shapes various aspects of a host's physiology, but these functions in aquatic animal hosts have yet to be fully investigated. The sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Selenka is one such example. The large growth gap in their body size has delayed the development of intensive aquaculture, nevertheless the species is in urgent need of conservation. To understand possible contributions of the gut microbiome to its host's growth, individual fecal microbiome comparisons were performed. High-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing revealed significantly different microbiota in larger and smaller individuals; Rhodobacterales in particular was the most significantly abundant bacterial group in the larger specimens. Further shotgun metagenome of representative samples revealed a significant abundance of microbiome retaining polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism genes in the largest individual. The PHB metabolism reads were potentially derived from Rhodobacterales. These results imply a possible link between microbial PHB producers and potential growth promotion in Deuterostomia marine invertebrates. PMID:26905381

  6. Comparative Transcriptomic Exploration Reveals Unique Molecular Adaptations of Neuropathogenic Trichobilharzia to Invade and Parasitize Its Avian Definitive Host.

    PubMed

    Leontovyč, Roman; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Hall, Ross S; Tan, Patrick; Mikeš, Libor; Kašný, Martin; Horák, Petr; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-02-01

    To date, most molecular investigations of schistosomatids have focused principally on blood flukes (schistosomes) of humans. Despite the clinical importance of cercarial dermatitis in humans caused by Trichobilharzia regenti and the serious neuropathologic disease that this parasite causes in its permissive avian hosts and accidental mammalian hosts, almost nothing is known about the molecular aspects of how this fluke invades its hosts, migrates in host tissues and how it interacts with its hosts' immune system. Here, we explored selected aspects using a transcriptomic-bioinformatic approach. To do this, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome representing two consecutive life stages (cercariae and schistosomula) of T. regenti involved in the first phases of infection of the avian host. We identified key biological and metabolic pathways specific to each of these two developmental stages and also undertook comparative analyses using data available for taxonomically related blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Detailed comparative analyses revealed the unique involvement of carbohydrate metabolism, translation and amino acid metabolism, and calcium in T. regenti cercariae during their invasion and in growth and development, as well as the roles of cell adhesion molecules, microaerobic metabolism (citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation), peptidases (cathepsins) and other histolytic and lysozomal proteins in schistosomula during their particular migration in neural tissues of the avian host. In conclusion, the present transcriptomic exploration provides new and significant insights into the molecular biology of T. regenti, which should underpin future genomic and proteomic investigations of T. regenti and, importantly, provides a useful starting point for a range of comparative studies of schistosomatids and other trematodes. PMID:26863542

  7. Host parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    The study addresses interaction of bacteria and phages in the host parasite system in batch and continuous cultures. The study system consists of the auxotrophic strain of Brevibacterium Brevibacterium sp. 22L and the bacteriophage of Brevibacterium sp., isolated from the soil by the enrichment method.Closed system. In the investigation of the relationship between the time of bacterial lysis and multiplicity of phage infection it has been found that at a lower phage amount per cell it takes a longer time for the lysis of the culture to become discernible. Another important factor determining cytolysis in liquid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population. Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection has been chosen as an indicator of the physiological state of bacteria. It has been shown that the shortest latent period and the largest output of the phage are observed during the logarithmic growth phase of bacteria grown under favorable nutrient conditions. In the stationary phase, bacterial cells become “a bad host” for the phage, whose reproduction rate decreases, and the lysis either slows down significantly or does not occur at all.Open system. It has been found that in continuous culture, the components of the host parasite system can coexist over a long period of time. After phage infection, the sizes of the both populations vary for some time and then the density of the host population reaches the level close to that of the uninfected culture. The phage population copies the variations in the density of the host population, but in antiphase. It has been proven that the bacterium becomes resistant to the phage rather soon. It has been supposed that primary resistance is of physiological origin, because the percentage of cells that have survived lysis about 0.2% of the initial bacterial population is too high for phage-resistant mutants. Bacteria and phages cultured over extended periods of time in the host parasite system

  8. Altered host cell-bacteria interaction due to nanoparticle interaction with a bacterial biofilm.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Tara D; Lindler, Heidi; McNealy, Tamara L

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) use in everyday applications creates the potential for NPs to enter the environment where, in aquatic systems, they are likely to settle on substrates and interact with microbial communities. Legionella pneumophila biofilms are found as part of microbial communities in both natural and man-made environments, especially in man-made cooling systems. The bacterium is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Legionella requires a host cell for replication in the environment, and amoebae commonly serve as this host cell. Our previous work demonstrated significant changes in Legionella biofilm morphology after exposure to 0.7 μg/L gold NPs (AuNPs). Here, we investigate how these morphology changes alter host-bacteria interactions using Acanthamoeba polyphaga as a model. Host-bacteria-NP interactions are affected by NP characteristics. Biofilms exposed to 4- and 18-nm, citrate-capped, spherical AuNPs significantly altered the grazing ability of A. polyphaga, which was not observed in biofilms exposed to 24-nm polystyrene beads. Uptake and replication of NP-exposed planktonic L. pneumophila within A. polyphaga were not altered regardless of NP size or core chemistry. Nanomaterial effects on the interaction of benthic organisms and bacteria may be directly or, as shown here, indirectly dependent on bacterial morphology. NP contamination therefore may alter interactions in a normal ecosystem function. PMID:23052925

  9. Networks of Host Factors that Interact with NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Thulasi Raman, Sathya N.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Pigs are an important host of influenza A viruses due to their ability to generate reassortant viruses with pandemic potential. NS1 protein of influenza A viruses is a key virulence factor and a major antagonist of innate immune responses. It is also involved in enhancing viral mRNA translation and regulation of virus replication. Being a protein with pleiotropic functions, NS1 has a variety of cellular interaction partners. Hence, studies on swine influenza viruses (SIV) and identification of swine influenza NS1-interacting host proteins is of great interest. Here, we constructed a recombinant SIV carrying a Strep-tag in the NS1 protein and infected primary swine respiratory epithelial cells (SRECs) with this virus. The Strep-tag sequence in the NS1 protein enabled us to purify intact, the NS1 protein and its interacting protein complex specifically. We identified cellular proteins present in the purified complex by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and generated a dataset of these proteins. 445 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS and among them 192 proteins were selected by setting up a threshold based on MS parameters. The selected proteins were analyzed by bioinformatics and were categorized as belonging to different functional groups including translation, RNA processing, cytoskeleton, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Protein interaction networks were derived using these data and the NS1 interactions with some of the specific host factors were verified by immunoprecipitation. The novel proteins and the networks revealed in our study will be the potential candidates for targeted study of the molecular interaction of NS1 with host proteins, which will provide insights into the identification of new therapeutic targets to control influenza infection and disease pathogenesis. PMID:27199973

  10. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  11. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  12. High richness of ectomycorrhizal fungi and low host specificity in a coastal sand dune ecosystem revealed by network analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy-Bolduc, Alice; Laliberté, Etienne; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are ubiquitous in temperate and boreal forests, comprising over 20,000 species forming root symbiotic associations with Pinaceae and woody angiosperms. As much as 100 different EM fungal species can coexist and interact with the same tree species, forming complex multispecies networks in soils. The degree of host specificity and structural properties of these interaction networks (e.g., nestedness and modularity) may influence plant and fungal community assembly and species coexistence, yet their structure has been little studied in northern coniferous forests, where trees depend on EM fungi for nutrient acquisition. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the composition and diversity of bulk soil and root-associated fungal communities in four co-occurring Pinaceae in a relic foredune plain located at Îles de la Madeleine, Québec, Canada. We found high EM fungal richness across the four hosts, with a total of 200 EM operational taxonomic units (OTUs), mainly belonging to the Agaricomycetes. Network analysis revealed an antinested pattern in both bulk soil and roots EM fungal communities. However, there was no detectable modularity (i.e., subgroups of interacting species) in the interaction networks, indicating a low level of specificity in these EM associations. In addition, there were no differences in EM fungal OTU richness or community structure among the four tree species. Limited shared resources and competitive exclusion typically restrict the number of taxa coexisting within the same niche. As such, our finding of high EM fungal richness and low host specificity highlights the need for further studies to determine the mechanisms enabling such a large number of EM fungal species to coexist locally on the same hosts. PMID:26811798

  13. Host-Pathogen Interactions Made Transparent with the Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Annemarie H; Spaink, Herman P

    2011-01-01

    The zebrafish holds much promise as a high-throughput drug screening model for immune-related diseases, including inflammatory and infectious diseases and cancer. This is due to the excellent possibilities for in vivo imaging in combination with advanced tools for genomic and large scale mutant analysis. The context of the embryo’s developing immune system makes it possible to study the contribution of different immune cell types to disease progression. Furthermore, due to the temporal separation of innate immunity from adaptive responses, zebrafish embryos and larvae are particularly useful for dissecting the innate host factors involved in pathology. Recent studies have underscored the remarkable similarity of the zebrafish and human immune systems, which is important for biomedical applications. This review is focused on the use of zebrafish as a model for infectious diseases, with emphasis on bacterial pathogens. Following a brief overview of the zebrafish immune system and the tools and methods used to study host-pathogen interactions in zebrafish, we discuss the current knowledge on receptors and downstream signaling components that are involved in the zebrafish embryo’s innate immune response. We summarize recent insights gained from the use of bacterial infection models, particularly the Mycobacterium marinum model, that illustrate the potential of the zebrafish model for high-throughput antimicrobial drug screening. PMID:21366518

  14. Host-pathogen interactions: leukocyte phagocytosis and associated sequelae.

    PubMed

    Voyich, Jovanka M; DeLeo, Frank R

    2002-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are a critical component of the human innate immune response and are the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Phagocytosis of invading microbes induces production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PMNs, which facilitates bactericidal activity. In addition to eliminating microorganisms, phagocytosis also accelerates PMN apoptosis, a process critical for resolution of inflammation. Inasmuch as leukocyte phagocytosis and ROS production are key components of the innate immune response, we developed flow cytometric methods to evaluate these processes in human PMNs. In contrast to traditional microscopy-based analyses, the methods described herein provide objective and high throughput measures of host cell-pathogen interactions. Importantly, they can be adapted for use with a number of fluorometric probes, and bacterium and host cell of choice, and each is based upon a common phagocytosis assay system. We also describe methods to measure phagocytosis-induced PMN apoptosis with this assay system. These methods entail detecting surface-exposed phosphatidylserine (early apoptosis), and measuring PMN chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation (late apoptosis). Taken together, these assays provide rapid and accurate assessment of critical PMN processes. PMID:12815296

  15. Workshop on Spaceflight Alterations in Host-Microorganism Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark

    2010-01-01

    On June 11, 2009, a workshop that included internal and external experts was convened to determine the risk of changes in microorganisms that could alter host-microorganism interactions during a mission. The evidence is based in part on multiple flight experiments which indicate altered virulence in Salmonella typhimurium when cultured in flight. The workshop participants were tasked to determine if adequate information was available to initiate changes in NASA's current approach to infectious disease risk assessment and medical operations. The consensus of the participants is that the current evidence was not adequate to provide direction for operational changes; however, the evidence is compelling and clearly indicates that changes to microorganisms were occurring during spaceflight and further research is required.

  16. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Transcriptome in Mammalian and Arthropod Hosts Reveals Differential Gene Expression and Post Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Jeeba A.; Miyashiro, Simone; Luo, Tian; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2011-01-01

    associated with host-pathogen interactions are differentially expressed and regulated by post transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:21915290

  17. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a novel transcription strategy for late genes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M. Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle. PMID:25544563

  18. Understanding the complexities of Salmonella-host crosstalk as revealed by in vivo model organisms.

    PubMed

    Verma, Smriti; Srikanth, Chittur V

    2015-07-01

    Foodborne infections caused by non-typhoidal Salmonellae, such as Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST), pose a major challenge in the developed and developing world. With constant rise of drug-resistant strains, understanding the epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions biology is a mandatory requirement to enable health systems to be ready to combat these illnesses. Patient data from hospitals, at least from some parts of the world, have aided in epidemiological understanding of ST-mediated disease. Most of the other aspects connected to Salmonella-host crosstalk have come from model systems that offer convenience, genetic tractability and low maintenance costs that make them extremely valuable tools. Complex model systems such as the bovine model have helped in understanding key virulence factors needed for infection. Simple systems such as fruit flies and Caenorhabditis elegans have aided in identification of novel virulence factors, host pathways and mechanistic details of interactions. Some of the path-breaking concepts of the field have come from mice model of ST colitis, which allows genetic manipulations as well as high degree of similarity to human counterpart. Together, they are invaluable for correlating in vitro findings of ST-induced disease progression in vivo. The current review is a compilation of various advances of ST-host interactions at cellular and molecular levels that has come from investigations involving model organisms. PMID:26179888

  19. Genetics of host-pathogen interactions in the wheat-Stagonospora nodorum pathosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stagonospora nodorum causes the disease Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) in wheat. S. nodorum produces numerous host-selective toxins (HSTs), all of which interact with dominant host sensitivity genes to cause disease. These host-toxin interactions are mirror images of classical gene-for-gene inter...

  20. Genetic and environmental control of host-gut microbiota interactions.

    PubMed

    Org, Elin; Parks, Brian W; Joo, Jong Wha J; Emert, Benjamin; Schwartzman, William; Kang, Eun Yong; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Knight, Rob; Gunsalus, Robert; Drake, Thomas A; Eskin, Eleazar; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-10-01

    Genetics provides a potentially powerful approach to dissect host-gut microbiota interactions. Toward this end, we profiled gut microbiota using 16s rRNA gene sequencing in a panel of 110 diverse inbred strains of mice. This panel has previously been studied for a wide range of metabolic traits and can be used for high-resolution association mapping. Using a SNP-based approach with a linear mixed model, we estimated the heritability of microbiota composition. We conclude that, in a controlled environment, the genetic background accounts for a substantial fraction of abundance of most common microbiota. The mice were previously studied for response to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet, and we hypothesized that the dietary response was determined in part by gut microbiota composition. We tested this using a cross-fostering strategy in which a strain showing a modest response, SWR, was seeded with microbiota from a strain showing a strong response, A×B19. Consistent with a role of microbiota in dietary response, the cross-fostered SWR pups exhibited a significantly increased response in weight gain. To examine specific microbiota contributing to the response, we identified various genera whose abundance correlated with dietary response. Among these, we chose Akkermansia muciniphila, a common anaerobe previously associated with metabolic effects. When administered to strain A×B19 by gavage, the dietary response was significantly blunted for obesity, plasma lipids, and insulin resistance. In an effort to further understand host-microbiota interactions, we mapped loci controlling microbiota composition and prioritized candidate genes. Our publicly available data provide a resource for future studies. PMID:26260972

  1. Genetic and environmental control of host-gut microbiota interactions

    PubMed Central

    Org, Elin; Parks, Brian W.; Joo, Jong Wha J.; Emert, Benjamin; Schwartzman, William; Kang, Eun Yong; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Knight, Rob; Gunsalus, Robert; Drake, Thomas A.; Eskin, Eleazar; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetics provides a potentially powerful approach to dissect host-gut microbiota interactions. Toward this end, we profiled gut microbiota using 16s rRNA gene sequencing in a panel of 110 diverse inbred strains of mice. This panel has previously been studied for a wide range of metabolic traits and can be used for high-resolution association mapping. Using a SNP-based approach with a linear mixed model, we estimated the heritability of microbiota composition. We conclude that, in a controlled environment, the genetic background accounts for a substantial fraction of abundance of most common microbiota. The mice were previously studied for response to a high-fat, high-sucrose diet, and we hypothesized that the dietary response was determined in part by gut microbiota composition. We tested this using a cross-fostering strategy in which a strain showing a modest response, SWR, was seeded with microbiota from a strain showing a strong response, A×B19. Consistent with a role of microbiota in dietary response, the cross-fostered SWR pups exhibited a significantly increased response in weight gain. To examine specific microbiota contributing to the response, we identified various genera whose abundance correlated with dietary response. Among these, we chose Akkermansia muciniphila, a common anaerobe previously associated with metabolic effects. When administered to strain A×B19 by gavage, the dietary response was significantly blunted for obesity, plasma lipids, and insulin resistance. In an effort to further understand host-microbiota interactions, we mapped loci controlling microbiota composition and prioritized candidate genes. Our publicly available data provide a resource for future studies. PMID:26260972

  2. Comparative Transcriptomic Exploration Reveals Unique Molecular Adaptations of Neuropathogenic Trichobilharzia to Invade and Parasitize Its Avian Definitive Host

    PubMed Central

    Leontovyč, Roman; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Hall, Ross S.; Tan, Patrick; Mikeš, Libor; Kašný, Martin; Horák, Petr; Gasser, Robin B.

    2016-01-01

    To date, most molecular investigations of schistosomatids have focused principally on blood flukes (schistosomes) of humans. Despite the clinical importance of cercarial dermatitis in humans caused by Trichobilharzia regenti and the serious neuropathologic disease that this parasite causes in its permissive avian hosts and accidental mammalian hosts, almost nothing is known about the molecular aspects of how this fluke invades its hosts, migrates in host tissues and how it interacts with its hosts’ immune system. Here, we explored selected aspects using a transcriptomic-bioinformatic approach. To do this, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome representing two consecutive life stages (cercariae and schistosomula) of T. regenti involved in the first phases of infection of the avian host. We identified key biological and metabolic pathways specific to each of these two developmental stages and also undertook comparative analyses using data available for taxonomically related blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Detailed comparative analyses revealed the unique involvement of carbohydrate metabolism, translation and amino acid metabolism, and calcium in T. regenti cercariae during their invasion and in growth and development, as well as the roles of cell adhesion molecules, microaerobic metabolism (citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation), peptidases (cathepsins) and other histolytic and lysozomal proteins in schistosomula during their particular migration in neural tissues of the avian host. In conclusion, the present transcriptomic exploration provides new and significant insights into the molecular biology of T. regenti, which should underpin future genomic and proteomic investigations of T. regenti and, importantly, provides a useful starting point for a range of comparative studies of schistosomatids and other trematodes. PMID:26863542

  3. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ximing; Ford, Susan E

    2016-03-01

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance. PMID:26880838

  4. Granuloma Transplantation: An Approach to Study Mycobacterium–Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Jeffrey S.; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Sandor, Matyas

    2011-01-01

    The host–pathogen biology during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is incredibly complex and despite accelerating progress in research, remains poorly understood. Our limited understanding hinders the development of new drugs, next generation vaccines, and novel therapies. The granuloma is the site where mycobacteria are both controlled and allowed to persist, but it remains one of the least studied aspects of the host–pathogen relationship. Here, we review the development, application, potential uses, and limitations of a novel model of granuloma transplantation as a tool to study specific host–pathogen interactions that have been difficult to probe. Application of this new model has already contributed to our understanding of granuloma cell traffic, repopulation, and the relationship between systemic immunity and mycobacteria-containing granulomas. The data collected highlight the dynamic interaction between systemic and local immune processes and support a paradigm that defines the granuloma as a highly dynamic structure. Granuloma transplantation also has special potential as a novel latency model that can contribute to our understanding of host protection factors and bacterial mutants, and serve as a platform for drug testing. PMID:22180751

  5. Environment, interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host, and health.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Antonio R L; Gomes, Clever; Lozzi, Silene P; Hecht, Mariana M; Rosa, Ana de Cássia; Monteiro, Pedro S; Bussacos, Ana Carolina; Nitz, Nadjar; McManus, Concepta

    2009-01-01

    An epidemiological chain involving Trypanosoma cruzi is discussed at the environmental level, and in terms of fine molecular interactions in invertebrate and vertebrate hosts dwelling in different ecosystems. This protozoan has a complex, genetically controlled plasticity, which confers adaptation to approximately 40 blood-sucking triatomine species and to over 1,000 mammalian species, fulfilling diverse metabolic requirements in its complex life-cycle. The Tr. cruzi infections are deeply embedded in countless ecotypes, where they are difficult to defeat using the control methods that are currently available. Many more field and laboratory studies are required to obtain data and information that may be used for the control and prevention of Tr. cruzi infections and their various disease manifestations. Emphasis should be placed on those sensitive interactions at cellular and environmental levels that could become selected targets for disease prevention. In the short term, new technologies for social mobilization should be used by people and organizations working for justice and equality through health information and promotion. A mass media directed program could deliver education, information and communication to protect the inhabitants at risk of contracting Tr. cruzi infections. PMID:19287864

  6. Parasite Transmission in Social Interacting Hosts: Monogenean Epidemics in Guppies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mirelle B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection incidence increases with the average number of contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. Contact rates are normally assumed to increase linearly with host density. However, social species seek out each other at low density and saturate their contact rates at high densities. Although predicting epidemic behaviour requires knowing how contact rates scale with host density, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of host density. Also, most theory assumes each host has an equal probability of transmitting parasites, even though individual parasite load and infection duration can vary. To our knowledge, the relative importance of characteristics of the primary infected host vs. the susceptible population has never been tested experimentally. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we examine epidemics using a common ectoparasite, Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting its guppy host (Poecilia reticulata). Hosts were maintained at different densities (3, 6, 12 and 24 fish in 40 L aquaria), and we monitored gyrodactylids both at a population and individual host level. Although parasite population size increased with host density, the probability of an epidemic did not. Epidemics were more likely when the primary infected fish had a high mean intensity and duration of infection. Epidemics only occurred if the primary infected host experienced more than 23 worm days. Female guppies contracted infections sooner than males, probably because females have a higher propensity for shoaling. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that in social hosts like guppies, the frequency of social contact largely governs disease epidemics independent of host density. PMID:21897838

  7. Parasite transmission in social interacting hosts: Monogenean epidemics in guppies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.B.; Lafferty, K.D.; van, Oosterhout C.; Cable, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infection incidence increases with the average number of contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. Contact rates are normally assumed to increase linearly with host density. However, social species seek out each other at low density and saturate their contact rates at high densities. Although predicting epidemic behaviour requires knowing how contact rates scale with host density, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of host density. Also, most theory assumes each host has an equal probability of transmitting parasites, even though individual parasite load and infection duration can vary. To our knowledge, the relative importance of characteristics of the primary infected host vs. the susceptible population has never been tested experimentally. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here, we examine epidemics using a common ectoparasite, Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting its guppy host (Poecilia reticulata). Hosts were maintained at different densities (3, 6, 12 and 24 fish in 40 L aquaria), and we monitored gyrodactylids both at a population and individual host level. Although parasite population size increased with host density, the probability of an epidemic did not. Epidemics were more likely when the primary infected fish had a high mean intensity and duration of infection. Epidemics only occurred if the primary infected host experienced more than 23 worm days. Female guppies contracted infections sooner than males, probably because females have a higher propensity for shoaling. Conclusions/Significance: These findings suggest that in social hosts like guppies, the frequency of social contact largely governs disease epidemics independent of host density. ?? 2011 Johnson et al.

  8. Parasite transmission in social interacting hosts: Monogenean epidemics in guppies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Mirelle B.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection incidence increases with the average number of contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. Contact rates are normally assumed to increase linearly with host density. However, social species seek out each other at low density and saturate their contact rates at high densities. Although predicting epidemic behaviour requires knowing how contact rates scale with host density, few empirical studies have investigated the effect of host density. Also, most theory assumes each host has an equal probability of transmitting parasites, even though individual parasite load and infection duration can vary. To our knowledge, the relative importance of characteristics of the primary infected host vs. the susceptible population has never been tested experimentally. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we examine epidemics using a common ectoparasite, Gyrodactylus turnbulli infecting its guppy host (Poecilia reticulata). Hosts were maintained at different densities (3, 6, 12 and 24 fish in 40 L aquaria), and we monitored gyrodactylids both at a population and individual host level. Although parasite population size increased with host density, the probability of an epidemic did not. Epidemics were more likely when the primary infected fish had a high mean intensity and duration of infection. Epidemics only occurred if the primary infected host experienced more than 23 worm days. Female guppies contracted infections sooner than males, probably because females have a higher propensity for shoaling. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that in social hosts like guppies, the frequency of social contact largely governs disease epidemics independent of host density.

  9. Host-parasite interactions: Marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, Perkinsus species.

    PubMed

    Soudant, Philippe; E Chu, Fu-Lin; Volety, Aswani

    2013-10-01

    This review assesses and examines the work conducted to date concerning host and parasite interactions between marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, belonging to Perkinsus species. The review focuses on two well-studied host-parasite interaction models: the two clam species, Ruditapes philippinarum and R. decussatus, and the parasite Perkinsus olseni, and the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the parasite Perkinsus marinus. Cellular and humoral defense responses of the host in combating parasitic infection, the mechanisms (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, extracellular products) employed by the parasite in evading host defenses as well as the role of environmental factors in modulating the host-parasite interactions are described. PMID:23871855

  10. Parasites destabilize host populations by shifting stage-structured interactions.

    PubMed

    Hite, Jessica L; Penczykowski, Rachel M; Shocket, Marta S; Strauss, Alexander T; Orlando, Paul A; Duffy, Meghan A; Cáceres, Carla E; Hall, Spencer R

    2016-02-01

    Should parasites stabilize or destabilize consumer-resource dynamics? Recent theory suggests that parasite-enhanced mortality may confer underappreciated stability to their hosts. We tested this hypothesis using disease in zooplankton. Across both natural and experimental epidemics, bigger epidemics correlated with larger--not smaller--host fluctuations. Thus, we tested two mechanistic hypotheses to explain destabilization or apparent destabilization by parasites. First, enrichment could, in principle, simultaneously enhance both instability and disease prevalence. In natural epidemics, destabilization was correlated with enrichment (indexed by total phosphorous). However, an in situ (lake enclosure) experiment did not support these links. Instead, field and experimental results point to a novel destabilizing mechanism involving host stage structure. Epidemics pushed hosts from relatively more stable host dynamics with less-synchronized juveniles and adults to less stable dynamics with more-synchronized juveniles and adults. Our results demonstrate how links between host stage structure and disease can shape host/consumer-resource stability. PMID:27145618

  11. The Integrative Taxonomic Approach Reveals Host Specific Species in an Encyrtid Parasitoid Species Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chesters, Douglas; Wang, Ying; Yu, Fang; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Tong-Xin; Hu, Hao-Yuan; Zhu, Chao-Dong; Li, Cheng-De; Zhang, Yan-Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Integrated taxonomy uses evidence from a number of different character types to delimit species and other natural groupings. While this approach has been advocated recently, and should be of particular utility in the case of diminutive insect parasitoids, there are relatively few examples of its application in these taxa. Here, we use an integrated framework to delimit independent lineages in Encyrtus sasakii (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Encyrtidae), a parasitoid morphospecies previously considered a host generalist. Sequence variation at the DNA barcode (cytochrome c oxidase I, COI) and nuclear 28S rDNA loci were compared to morphometric recordings and mating compatibility tests, among samples of this species complex collected from its four scale insect hosts, covering a broad geographic range of northern and central China. Our results reveal that Encyrtus sasakii comprises three lineages that, while sharing a similar morphology, are highly divergent at the molecular level. At the barcode locus, the median K2P molecular distance between individuals from three primary populations was found to be 11.3%, well outside the divergence usually observed between Chalcidoidea conspecifics (0.5%). Corroborative evidence that the genetic lineages represent independent species was found from mating tests, where compatibility was observed only within populations, and morphometric analysis, which found that despite apparent morphological homogeneity, populations clustered according to forewing shape. The independent lineages defined by the integrated analysis correspond to the three scale insect hosts, suggesting the presence of host specific cryptic species. The finding of hidden host specificity in this species complex demonstrates the critical role that DNA barcoding will increasingly play in revealing hidden biodiversity in taxa that present difficulties for traditional taxonomic approaches. PMID:22666375

  12. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    details the interaction between lactoferrin and parasite host cells, ie, RBCs and macrophages, using various cellular processes and expression studies. The study reveals the possible mechanism of action against various intracellular pathogens such as Toxoplasma, Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Mycobacterium. The presence of iron in lactoferrin plays an important role in enhancing the various activities taking place inside these cells. This work provides a lot of information about targeting lactoferrin against many parasitic infections which can rule out the exact pathways for inhibition of diseases caused by intracellular microbes mainly targeting RBCs and macrophages for their survival. Therefore, this initial study can serve as a baseline for further evaluation of the mechanism of action of lactoferrin against parasitic diseases, which is not fully understood to date. PMID:26251568

  13. A meta-metabolome network of carbohydrate metabolism: interactions between gut microbiota and host.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Maziya; Anishetty, Sharmila

    2012-11-16

    With the current knowledge of the multitude of microbes that inhabit the human body, it is increasingly clear that they constitute an integral component of the host. The gut microbiota community is principally involved in the metabolism of dietary constituents such as carbohydrates which account for majority of the energy intake from diet. Diet has gained an important role in shaping the composition of gut inhabitants. The quantity and type of food consumed is recognized as a causal factor for metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Analysis of host-microbe interactions can thus contribute to the understanding of such metabolic disorders. In this study, data from Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Carbohydrate Active EnZYmes Database was utilized as a starting point. Enzyme information from the host Homo sapiens coupled with details of the three predominant phyla of gut bacteria, namely Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were used in the creation of a comprehensive metabolic network, which we refer to as 'meta-metabolome'. This 'meta-metabolome' provides a perspective of the degree to which microbes influence carbohydrate metabolism, in conjunction with host specific enzymes. Analysis of reactions in the network reveals the amplification of monosaccharide content brought about by microbial enzyme activity. The framework outlined in this study provides a holistic approach to assess host-microbe symbiosis. It also provides us with a means of analyzing how diet can be modulated to provide beneficial effects to the host or how probiotics can potentially be used to relieve certain metabolic disorders. PMID:23085046

  14. Host-parasite interactions in closed and open microbial cultivation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, T. I.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    We studied interaction between bacteria and phages within a host-parasite system the members of the system being continuously and closely cultivated The objects of our research were auxotrophic strain Brevibacterium 22L and bacteriophage Brevibacterium sp strain A discovered in the soil of the Soviet Union Republic of Latvia using enrichment method 1 Closed system We investigated the dependence of bacteriolysis time upon the multiplicity of phage infection It was shown that reduction of phage amount by one bacterium leads to increase of marked lysis Another important factor determining cytolysis in fluid medium is the physiological state of bacterial population Specific growth rate of bacteria at the moment of phage infection was chosen as the index of the physiological state of bacteria It was revealed that the shortest latent period and the maximal phage burst is observed when the bacteria located in a favorable nutrient medium are in the logarithmic phase If the bacterial population has already passed from the logarithmic phase to the stationary one the cells become a bad host for phage reproduction and lysis occurs very slowly or even never starts at all 2 Open system In the process of continuous cultivation the members of the host-parasite system showed an ability to coexist over a long period of time After phage infection there were variations in the size of both populations and then the density of the host population reached the level close to that of the uninfected culture In this situation the phage population

  15. Evidence for additive and interaction effects of host genotype and infection in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Quinlan, Jacklyn; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Berghout, Joanne; Gbeha, Elias; Bruat, Vanessa; de Malliard, Thibault; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Gomez, Selma; Gros, Philippe; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Sanni, Ambaliou; Awadalla, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The host mechanisms responsible for protection against malaria remain poorly understood, with only a few protective genetic effects mapped in humans. Here, we characterize a host-specific genome-wide signature in whole-blood transcriptomes of Plasmodium falciparum-infected West African children and report a demonstration of genotype-by-infection interactions in vivo. Several associations involve transcripts sensitive to infection and implicate complement system, antigen processing and presentation, and T-cell activation (i.e., SLC39A8, C3AR1, FCGR3B, RAD21, RETN, LRRC25, SLC3A2, and TAPBP), including one association that validated a genome-wide association candidate gene (SCO1), implicating binding variation within a noncoding regulatory element. Gene expression profiles in mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi revealed and validated similar responses and highlighted specific pathways and genes that are likely important responders in both hosts. These results suggest that host variation and its interplay with infection affect children’s ability to cope with infection and suggest a polygenic model mounted at the transcriptional level for susceptibility. PMID:22949651

  16. Gut microbiome-host interactions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The gut microbiome is the term given to describe the vast collection of symbiotic microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal system and their collective interacting genomes. Recent studies have suggested that the gut microbiome performs numerous important biochemical functions for the host, and disorders of the microbiome are associated with many and diverse human disease processes. Systems biology approaches based on next generation 'omics' technologies are now able to describe the gut microbiome at a detailed genetic and functional (transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic) level, providing new insights into the importance of the gut microbiome in human health, and they are able to map microbiome variability between species, individuals and populations. This has established the importance of the gut microbiome in the disease pathogenesis for numerous systemic disease states, such as obesity and cardiovascular disease, and in intestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease. Thus, understanding microbiome activity is essential to the development of future personalized strategies of healthcare, as well as potentially providing new targets for drug development. Here, we review recent metagenomic and metabonomic approaches that have enabled advances in understanding gut microbiome activity in relation to human health, and gut microbial modulation for the treatment of disease. We also describe possible avenues of research in this rapidly growing field with respect to future personalized healthcare strategies. PMID:21392406

  17. Engineering the AAV capsid to optimize vector-host-interactions.

    PubMed

    Büning, Hildegard; Huber, Anke; Zhang, Liang; Meumann, Nadja; Hacker, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are the most widely used delivery system for in vivo gene therapy. Vectors developed from natural AAV isolates achieved clinical benefit for a number of patients suffering from monogenetic disorders. However, high vector doses were required and the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies precluded a number of patients from participation. Further challenges are related to AAV's tropism that lacks cell type selectivity resulting in off-target transduction. Conversely, specific cell types representing important targets for gene therapy like stem cells or endothelial cells show low permissiveness. To overcome these limitations, elegant rational design- as well as directed evolution-based strategies were developed to optimize various steps of AAV's host interaction. These efforts resulted in next generation vectors with enhanced capabilities, that is increased efficiency of cell transduction, targeted transduction of previously non-permissive cell types, escape from antibody neutralization and off-target free in vivo delivery of vector genomes. These important achievements are expected to improve current and pave the way towards novel AAV-based applications in gene therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:26302254

  18. Role of Sex Steroid Hormones in Bacterial-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Elizabeth; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones play important physiological roles in reproductive and nonreproductive tissues, including immune cells. These hormones exert their functions by binding to either specific intracellular receptors that act as ligand-dependent transcription factors or membrane receptors that stimulate several signal transduction pathways. The elevated susceptibility of males to bacterial infections can be related to the usually lower immune responses presented in males as compared to females. This dimorphic sex difference is mainly due to the differential modulation of the immune system by sex steroid hormones through the control of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines expression, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expression and antibody production. Besides, sex hormones can also affect the metabolism, growth, or virulence of pathogenic bacteria. In turn, pathogenic, microbiota, and environmental bacteria are able to metabolize and degrade steroid hormones and their related compounds. All these data suggest that sex steroid hormones play a key role in the modulation of bacterial-host interactions. PMID:23509808

  19. Proteomic profiling of host-biofilm interactions in an oral infection model resembling the periodontal pocket

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Belibasakis, Georgios N.; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal infections cause inflammatory destruction of the tooth supporting tissues. We recently developed a dynamic, in vitro periodontal organotypic tissue model in a perfusion bioreactor system, in co-culture with an 11-species subgingival biofilm, which may recapitulate early events during the establishment of periodontal infections. This study aimed to characterize the global proteome regulations in this host-biofilm interaction model. Semi-quantitative shotgun proteomics were applied for protein identification and quantification in the co-culture supernatants (human and bacterial) and the biofilm lysates (bacterial). A total of 896 and 3363 proteins were identified as secreted in the supernatant and expressed in the biofilm lysate, respectively. Enriched gene ontology analysis revealed that the regulated secreted human tissue proteins were related to processes of cytoskeletal rearrangement, stress responses, apoptosis, and antigen presentation, all of which are commensurate with deregulated host responses. Most secreted bacterial biofilm proteins derived from their cytoplasmic domain. In the presence of the tissue, the levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinomyces oris and Campylobacter rectus proteins were significantly regulated. The functions of the up-regulated intracellular (biofilm lysate) proteins were associated with cytokinesis. In conclusion, the proteomic overview of regulated pathways in this host-biofilm interaction model provides insights to the early events of periodontal pathogenesis. PMID:26525412

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Host-Toxin Interaction in the Wheat - Stagonospora Nodorum Pathosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stagonospora nodorum, casual agent of Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB) of wheat, produces a number of host-selective toxins (HSTs) known to be important in disease. To date, four HSTs and corresponding host sensitivity genes have been reported, and all four host-toxin interactions are significant f...

  1. Virus-host interactions: new insights from the small RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Edward P; Li, Junjie; Chong, Mark; Littman, Dan R

    2005-01-01

    RNA silencing has a known role in the antiviral responses of plants and insects. Recent evidence, including the finding that the Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can suppress the host's RNA-silencing pathway and may thus counteract host antiviral RNAs, suggests that RNA-silencing pathways could also have key roles in mammalian virus-host interactions. PMID:16277756

  2. Interactions of seedborne bacterial pathogens with host and non-host plants in relation to seed infestation and seedling transmission.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Bhabesh; Gitaitis, Ronald; Smith, Samuel; Langston, David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens (Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea) to infest seeds of host and non-host plants (watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean) and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1 × 10(6) colony forming units (CFUs)/flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels (in case of onion). Seeds harvested from each host/non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host/non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out (SGO) assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% (by plating), respectively and they were not significantly different (P = 0.67). The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% (by plating) and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens (P = 0.03). None of the seedlots with incompatible/null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be colonized by

  3. Interactions of Seedborne Bacterial Pathogens with Host and Non-Host Plants in Relation to Seed Infestation and Seedling Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Bhabesh; Gitaitis, Ronald; Smith, Samuel; Langston, David

    2014-01-01

    The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens (Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea) to infest seeds of host and non-host plants (watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean) and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1×106 colony forming units (CFUs)/flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels (in case of onion). Seeds harvested from each host/non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host/non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out (SGO) assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% (by plating), respectively and they were not significantly different (P = 0.67). The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% (by plating) and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens (P = 0.03). None of the seedlots with incompatible/null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be colonized

  4. Influence of symbiotic bacteria on entomopathogenic nematode--host interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are three players in the infection process of entomopathogenic nematodes (Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae): the nematodes themselves, the host insect, and the nematode’s mutualistic bacteria (Xenorhabdus and Photorhabdus spp.). As a host infection progresses, all three of these players...

  5. Hepatitis C virus-host interactions: Etiopathogenesis and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed; Selimovic, Denis; El-Khattouti, Abdelouahid; Ghozlan, Hanan; Haikel, Youssef; Abdelkader, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant health problem facing the world. This virus infects more than 170 million people worldwide and is considered the major cause of both acute and chronic hepatitis. Persons become infected mainly through parenteral exposure to infected material by blood transfusions or injections with nonsterile needles. Although the sexual behavior is considered as a high risk factor for HCV infection, the transmission of HCV infection through sexual means, is less frequently. Currently, the available treatment for patients with chronic HCV infection is interferon based therapies alone or in combination with ribavirin and protease inhibitors. Although a sustained virological response of patients to the applied therapy, a great portion of patients did not show any response. HCV infection is mostly associated with progressive liver diseases including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the focus of many patients and clinicians is sometimes limited to that problem, the natural history of HCV infection (HCV) is also associated with the development of several extrahepatic manifestations including dermatologic, rheumatologic, neurologic, and nephrologic complications, diabetes, arterial hypertension, autoantibodies and cryglobulins. Despite the notion that HCV-mediated extrahepatic manifestations are credible, the mechanism of their modulation is not fully described in detail. Therefore, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HCV-induced alteration of intracellular signal transduction pathways, during the course of HCV infection, may offer novel therapeutic targets for HCV-associated both hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations. This review will elaborate the etiopathogenesis of HCV-host interactions and summarize the current knowledge of HCV-associated diseases and their possible therapeutic strategies. PMID:24520529

  6. Host genetic determinants of microbiota-dependent nutrition revealed by genome-wide analysis of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Adam J.; Chaston, John M.; Newell, Peter D.; Donahue, Leanne; Hermann, Sara L.; Sannino, David R.; Westmiller, Stephanie; Wong, Adam C.-N.; Clark, Andrew G.; Lazzaro, Brian P.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2015-01-01

    Animals bear communities of gut microorganisms with substantial effects on animal nutrition, but the host genetic basis of these effects is unknown. Here, we use Drosophila to demonstrate substantial among-genotype variation in the effects of eliminating the gut microbiota on five host nutritional indices (weight, and protein, lipid, glucose and glycogen contents); this includes variation in both the magnitude and direction of microbiota-dependent effects. Genome-wide associations to identify the genetic basis of the microbiota-dependent variation reveal polymorphisms in largely non-overlapping sets of genes associated with variation in the nutritional traits, including strong representation of conserved genes functioning in signaling. Key genes identified by the GWA study are validated by loss-of-function mutations that altered microbiota-dependent nutritional effects. We conclude that the microbiota interacts with the animal at multiple points in the signaling and regulatory networks that determine animal nutrition. These interactions with the microbiota are likely conserved across animals, including humans. PMID:25692519

  7. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis. PMID:27240978

  8. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  9. Smart nanosystems: Bio-inspired technologies that interact with the host environment

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ester J.; Lo, Justin H.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle technologies intended for human administration must be designed to interact with, and ideally leverage, a living host environment. Here, we describe smart nanosystems classified in two categories: (i) those that sense the host environment and respond and (ii) those that first prime the host environment to interact with engineered nanoparticles. Smart nanosystems have the potential to produce personalized diagnostic and therapeutic schema by using the local environment to drive material behavior and ultimately improve human health. PMID:26598694

  10. Coevolutionary interactions between farmers and mafia induce host acceptance of avian brood parasites.

    PubMed

    Abou Chakra, Maria; Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Brood parasites exploit their host in order to increase their own fitness. Typically, this results in an arms race between parasite trickery and host defence. Thus, it is puzzling to observe hosts that accept parasitism without any resistance. The 'mafia' hypothesis suggests that these hosts accept parasitism to avoid retaliation. Retaliation has been shown to evolve when the hosts condition their response to mafia parasites, who use depredation as a targeted response to rejection. However, it is unclear if acceptance would also emerge when 'farming' parasites are present in the population. Farming parasites use depredation to synchronize the timing with the host, destroying mature clutches to force the host to re-nest. Herein, we develop an evolutionary model to analyse the interaction between depredatory parasites and their hosts. We show that coevolutionary cycles between farmers and mafia can still induce host acceptance of brood parasites. However, this equilibrium is unstable and in the long-run the dynamics of this host-parasite interaction exhibits strong oscillations: when farmers are the majority, accepters conditional to mafia (the host will reject first and only accept after retaliation by the parasite) have a higher fitness than unconditional accepters (the host always accepts parasitism). This leads to an increase in mafia parasites' fitness and in turn induce an optimal environment for accepter hosts. PMID:27293783

  11. Red Queen dynamics in multi-host and multi-parasite interaction system

    PubMed Central

    Rabajante, Jomar F.; Tubay, Jerrold M.; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Ebert, Dieter; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In host-parasite systems, dominant host types are expected to be eventually replaced by other hosts due to the elevated potency of their specific parasites. This leads to changes in the abundance of both hosts and parasites exhibiting cycles of alternating dominance called Red Queen dynamics. Host-parasite models with less than three hosts and parasites have been demonstrated to exhibit Red Queen cycles, but natural host-parasite interactions typically involve many host and parasite types resulting in an intractable system with many parameters. Here we present numerical simulations of Red Queen dynamics with more than ten hosts and specialist parasites under the condition of no super-host nor super-parasite. The parameter region where the Red Queen cycles arise contracts as the number of interacting host and parasite types increases. The interplay between inter-host competition and parasite infectivity influences the condition for the Red Queen dynamics. Relatively large host carrying capacity and intermediate rates of parasite mortality result in never-ending cycles of dominant types. PMID:25899168

  12. Bacterial-induced cell reprogramming to stem cell-like cells: new premise in host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Samuel; Rambukkana, Anura

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens employ a myriad of strategies to alter host tissue cell functions for bacterial advantage during infection. Recent advances revealed a fusion of infection biology with stem cell biology by demonstrating developmental reprogramming of lineage committed host glial cells to progenitor/stem cell-like cells by an intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Acquisition of migratory and immunomodulatory properties of such reprogrammed cells provides an added advantage for promoting bacterial spread. This presents a previously unseen sophistication of cell manipulation by hijacking the genomic plasticity of host cells by a human bacterial pathogen. The rationale for such extreme fate conversion of host cells may be directly linked to the exceedingly passive obligate life style of M. leprae with a degraded genome and host cell dependence for both bacterial survival and dissemination, particularly the use of host-derived stem cell-like cells as a vehicle for spreading infection without being detected by immune cells. Thus, this unexpected link between cell reprogramming and infection opens up a new premise in host-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, such bacterial ingenuity could also be harnessed for developing natural ways of reprogramming host cells for repairing damaged tissues from infection, injury and diseases. PMID:25541240

  13. Health trajectories reveal the dynamic contributions of host genetic resistance and tolerance to infection outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Graham; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Bergmann, Silke; Lengeling, Andreas; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance are two alternative strategies hosts can adopt to survive infections. Both strategies may be genetically controlled. To date, the relative contribution of resistance and tolerance to infection outcome is poorly understood. Here, we use a bioluminescent Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infection challenge model to study the genetic determination and dynamic contributions of host resistance and tolerance to listeriosis in four genetically diverse mouse strains. Using conventional statistical analyses, we detect significant genetic variation in both resistance and tolerance, but cannot capture the time-dependent relative importance of either host strategy. We overcome these limitations through the development of novel statistical tools to analyse individual infection trajectories portraying simultaneous changes in infection severity and health. Based on these tools, early expression of resistance followed by expression of tolerance emerge as important hallmarks for surviving Lm infections. Our trajectory analysis further reveals that survivors and non-survivors follow distinct infection paths (which are also genetically determined) and provides new survival thresholds as objective endpoints in infection experiments. Future studies may use trajectories as novel traits for mapping and identifying genes that control infection dynamics and outcome. A Matlab script for user-friendly trajectory analysis is provided. PMID:26582028

  14. Individual Apostichopus japonicus fecal microbiome reveals a link with polyhydroxybutyrate producers in host growth gaps

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yohei; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; Mino, Sayaka; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Thompson, Fabiano L.; Sakai, Yuichi; Sawabe, Toko; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiome shapes various aspects of a host’s physiology, but these functions in aquatic animal hosts have yet to be fully investigated. The sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus Selenka is one such example. The large growth gap in their body size has delayed the development of intensive aquaculture, nevertheless the species is in urgent need of conservation. To understand possible contributions of the gut microbiome to its host’s growth, individual fecal microbiome comparisons were performed. High-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing revealed significantly different microbiota in larger and smaller individuals; Rhodobacterales in particular was the most significantly abundant bacterial group in the larger specimens. Further shotgun metagenome of representative samples revealed a significant abundance of microbiome retaining polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) metabolism genes in the largest individual. The PHB metabolism reads were potentially derived from Rhodobacterales. These results imply a possible link between microbial PHB producers and potential growth promotion in Deuterostomia marine invertebrates. PMID:26905381

  15. Mining Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions to Characterize Burkholderia mallei Infectivity Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Pieper, Rembert; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pathogenicity relies on protein virulence factors to control and promote bacterial internalization, survival, and replication within eukaryotic host cells. We recently used yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening to identify a small set of novel Burkholderia proteins that were shown to attenuate disease progression in an aerosol infection animal model using the virulent Burkholderia mallei ATCC 23344 strain. Here, we performed an extended analysis of primarily nine B. mallei virulence factors and their interactions with human proteins to map out how the bacteria can influence and alter host processes and pathways. Specifically, we employed topological analyses to assess the connectivity patterns of targeted host proteins, identify modules of pathogen-interacting host proteins linked to processes promoting infectivity, and evaluate the effect of crosstalk among the identified host protein modules. Overall, our analysis showed that the targeted host proteins generally had a large number of interacting partners and interacted with other host proteins that were also targeted by B. mallei proteins. We also introduced a novel Host-Pathogen Interaction Alignment (HPIA) algorithm and used it to explore similarities between host-pathogen interactions of B. mallei, Yersinia pestis, and Salmonella enterica. We inferred putative roles of B. mallei proteins based on the roles of their aligned Y. pestis and S. enterica partners and showed that up to 73% of the predicted roles matched existing annotations. A key insight into Burkholderia pathogenicity derived from these analyses of Y2H host-pathogen interactions is the identification of eukaryotic-specific targeted cellular mechanisms, including the ubiquitination degradation system and the use of the focal adhesion pathway as a fulcrum for transmitting mechanical forces and regulatory signals. This provides the mechanisms to modulate and adapt the host-cell environment for the successful establishment of host infections

  16. Interaction between viral RNA silencing suppressors and host factors in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Masuta, Chikara

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate events in the molecular arms race between the host and pathogen in evaluating plant immunity, a zigzag model is useful for uncovering aspects common to different host-pathogen interactions. By analogy of the steps in virus-host interactions with the steps in the standard zigzag model outlined in recent papers, we may regard RNA silencing as pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) against viruses, RNA silencing suppressors (RSSs) as effectors to overcome host RNA silencing and resistance gene (R-gene)-mediated defense as effector-triggered immunity (ETI) recognizing RSSs as avirulence proteins. However, because the standard zigzag model does not fully apply to some unique aspects in the interactions between a plant host and virus, we here defined a model especially designed for viruses. Although we simplified the phenomena involved in the virus-host interactions in the model, certain specific interactive steps can be explained by integrating additional host factors into the model. These host factors are thought to play an important role in maintaining the efficacy of the various steps in the main pathway of defense against viruses in this model for virus-plant interactions. For example, we propose candidates that may interact with viral RSSs to induce the resistance response. PMID:24875766

  17. A three-way perspective of stoichiometric changes on host-parasite interactions.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Sanni L; Decaestecker, Ellen; Pulkkinen, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Changes in environmental nutrients play a crucial role in driving disease dynamics, but global patterns in nutrient-driven changes in disease are difficult to predict. In this paper we use ecological stoichiometry as a framework to review host-parasite interactions under changing nutrient ratios, focusing on three pathways: (i) altered host resistance and parasite virulence through host stoichiometry (ii) changed encounter or contact rates at population level, and (iii) changed host community structure. We predict that the outcome of nutrient changes on host-parasite interactions depends on which pathways are modified, and suggest that the outcome of infection could depend on the overlap in stoichiometric requirements of the host and the parasite. We hypothesize that environmental nutrient enrichment alters infectivity dynamics leading to fluctuating selection dynamics in host-parasite coevolution. PMID:25978937

  18. Bacterial receptors for host transferrin and lactoferrin: molecular mechanisms and role in host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Pogoutse, Anastassia; Adamiak, Paul; Moraes, Trevor F; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2013-12-01

    Iron homeostasis in the mammalian host limits the availability of iron to invading pathogens and is thought to restrict iron availability for microbes inhabiting mucosal surfaces. The presence of surface receptors for the host iron-binding glycoproteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin (Lf) in globally important Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of humans and food production animals suggests that Tf and Lf are important sources of iron in the upper respiratory or genitourinary tracts, where they exclusively reside. Lf receptors have the additional function of protecting against host cationic antimicrobial peptides, suggesting that the bacteria expressing these receptors reside in a niche where exposure is likely. In this review we compare Tf and Lf receptors with respect to their structural and functional features, their role in colonization and infection, and their distribution among pathogenic and commensal bacteria. PMID:24266357

  19. Infectious Bursal Disease: a complex host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Ingrao, Fiona; Rauw, Fabienne; Lambrecht, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Thierry

    2013-11-01

    Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD) is caused by a small, non-enveloped virus, highly resistant in the outside environment. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) targets the chicken's immune system in a very comprehensive and complex manner by destroying B lymphocytes, attracting T cells and activating macrophages. As an RNA virus, IBDV has a high mutation rate and may thus give rise to viruses with a modified antigenicity or increased virulence, as emphasized during the last decades. The molecular basis of pathogenicity and the exact cause of clinical disease and death are still poorly understood, as it is not clearly related to the severity of the lesions and the extent of the bursal damage. Recent works however, pointed out the role of an exacerbated innate immune response during the early stage of the infection with upregulated production of promediators that will induce a cytokine storm. In the case of IBDV, immunosuppression is both a direct consequence of the infection of specific target immune cells and an indirect consequence of the interactions occurring in the immune network of the host. Recovery from disease or subclinical infection will be followed by immunosuppression with more serious consequences if the strain is very virulent and infection occurs early in life. Although the immunosuppression caused by IBDV is principally directed towards B-lymphocytes, an effect on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) has also been demonstrated therefore increasing the impact of IBDV on the immunocompetence of the chicken. In addition to its zootechnical impact and its role in the development of secondary infections, it may affect the immune response of the chicken to subsequent vaccinations, essential in all types of intensive farming. Recent progress in the field of avian immunology has allowed a better knowledge of the immunological mechanisms involved in the disease but also should give improved tools for the measurement of immunosuppression in the field situation

  20. Bayesian species delimitation reveals generalist and specialist parasitic wasps on Galerucella beetles (Chrysomelidae): sorting by herbivore or plant host

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To understand the ecological and evolutionary consequences of species interactions in food webs necessitates that interactions are properly identified. Genetic analyses suggest that many supposedly generalist parasitoid species should rather be defined as multiple species with a more narrow diet, reducing the probability that such species may mediate indirect interactions such as apparent competition among hosts. Recent studies showed that the parasitoid Asecodes lucens mediate apparent competition between two hosts, Galerucella tenella and G. calmariensis, affecting both interaction strengths and evolutionary feedbacks. The same parasitoid was also recorded from other species in the genus Galerucella, suggesting that similar indirect effects may also occur for other species pairs. Methods To explore the possibility of such interactions, we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers to resolve the phylogeny of both host and parasitoid and to test the number of parasitoid species involved. We thus collected 139 Galerucella larvae from 8 host plant species and sequenced 31 adult beetle and 108 parasitoid individuals. Results The analysis of the Galerucella data, that also included sequences from previous studies, verified the five species previously documented as reciprocally monophyletic, but the Bayesian species delimitation for A. lucens suggested 3–4 cryptic taxa with a more specialised host use than previously suggested. The gene data analyzed under the multispecies coalescent model allowed us to reconstruct the species tree phylogeny for both host and parasitoid and we found a fully congruent coevolutionary pattern suggesting that parasitoid speciation followed upon host speciation. Conclusion Using multilocus sequence data in a Bayesian species delimitation analysis we propose that hymenopteran parasitoids of the genus Asecodes that infest Galerucella larvae constitute at least three species with narrow diet breath. The evolution of

  1. Coevolutionary interactions between farmers and mafia induce host acceptance of avian brood parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Brood parasites exploit their host in order to increase their own fitness. Typically, this results in an arms race between parasite trickery and host defence. Thus, it is puzzling to observe hosts that accept parasitism without any resistance. The ‘mafia’ hypothesis suggests that these hosts accept parasitism to avoid retaliation. Retaliation has been shown to evolve when the hosts condition their response to mafia parasites, who use depredation as a targeted response to rejection. However, it is unclear if acceptance would also emerge when ‘farming’ parasites are present in the population. Farming parasites use depredation to synchronize the timing with the host, destroying mature clutches to force the host to re-nest. Herein, we develop an evolutionary model to analyse the interaction between depredatory parasites and their hosts. We show that coevolutionary cycles between farmers and mafia can still induce host acceptance of brood parasites. However, this equilibrium is unstable and in the long-run the dynamics of this host–parasite interaction exhibits strong oscillations: when farmers are the majority, accepters conditional to mafia (the host will reject first and only accept after retaliation by the parasite) have a higher fitness than unconditional accepters (the host always accepts parasitism). This leads to an increase in mafia parasites’ fitness and in turn induce an optimal environment for accepter hosts. PMID:27293783

  2. Proteomics in the investigation of HIV-1 interactions with host proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Productive HIV-1 infection depends on host machinery, including a broad array of cellular proteins. Proteomics has played a significant role in the discovery of HIV-1 host proteins. In this review, after a brief survey of the HIV-1 host proteins that were discovered by proteomic analyses, we focus on analyzing the interactions between the virion and host proteins, as well as the technologies and strategies used in those proteomic studies. With the help of proteomics, the identification and characterization of HIV-1 host proteins can be translated into novel antiretroviral therapeutics. PMID:25523935

  3. HIV-Host Interactions: Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Korber, Bette; Kelsoe, Garnett; Sodroski, Joseph; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Borrow, Persephone; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is a global priority. However, the extreme diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which is a consequence of its propensity to mutate to escape immune responses, along with host factors that prevent the elicitation of protective immune responses, continue to hinder vaccine development. Breakthroughs in understanding of the biology of the transmitted virus, the structure and nature of its envelope trimer, vaccine-induced CD8 T cell control in primates, and host control of broadly neutralizing antibody elicitation have given rise to new vaccine strategies. Despite this promise, emerging data from preclinical trials reinforce the need for gaining additional insight into virus – host biology in order to facilitate the development of a successful vaccine. PMID:26922989

  4. Transplant Antennae and Host Brain Interact to Shape Odor Perceptual Space in Male Moths

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Gyu; Poole, Kathy; Linn, Charles E.; Vickers, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses to odors rely first upon their accurate detection by peripheral sensory organs followed by subsequent processing within the brain’s olfactory system and higher centers. These processes allow the animal to form a unified impression of the odor environment and recognize combinations of odorants as single entities. To investigate how interactions between peripheral and central olfactory pathways shape odor perception, we transplanted antennal imaginal discs between larval males of two species of moth Heliothis virescens and Heliothis subflexa that utilize distinct pheromone blends. During metamorphic development olfactory receptor neurons originating from transplanted discs formed connections with host brain neurons within olfactory glomeruli of the adult antennal lobe. The normal antennal receptor repertoire exhibited by males of each species reflects the differences in the pheromone blends that these species employ. Behavioral assays of adult transplant males revealed high response levels to two odor blends that were dissimilar from those that attract normal males of either species. Neurophysiological analyses of peripheral receptor neurons and central olfactory neurons revealed that these behavioral responses were a result of: 1. the specificity of H. virescens donor olfactory receptor neurons for odorants unique to the donor pheromone blend and, 2. central odor recognition by the H. subflexa host brain, which typically requires peripheral receptor input across 3 distinct odor channels in order to elicit behavioral responses. PMID:26816291

  5. Antagonistic within-host interactions between plant viruses: molecular basis and impact on viral and host fitness.

    PubMed

    Syller, Jerzy; Grupa, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Double infections of related or unrelated viruses frequently occur in single plants, the viral agents being inoculated into the host plant simultaneously (co-infection) or sequentially (super-infection). Plants attacked by viruses activate sophisticated defence pathways which operate at different levels, often at significant fitness costs, resulting in yield reduction in crop plants. The occurrence and severity of the negative effects depend on the type of within-host interaction between the infecting viruses. Unrelated viruses generally interact with each other in a synergistic manner, whereas interactions between related viruses are mostly antagonistic. These can incur substantial fitness costs to one or both of the competitors. A relatively well-known antagonistic interaction is cross-protection, also referred to as super-infection exclusion. This type of interaction occurs when a previous infection with one virus prevents or interferes with subsequent infection by a homologous second virus. The current knowledge on why and how one virus variant excludes or restricts another is scant. Super-infection exclusion between viruses has predominantly been attributed to the induction of RNA silencing, which is a major antiviral defence mechanism in plants. There are, however, presumptions that various mechanisms are involved in this phenomenon. This review outlines the current state of knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms behind antagonistic interactions between plant viruses. Harmful or beneficial effects of these interactions on viral and host plant fitness are also characterized. Moreover, the review briefly outlines the past and present attempts to utilize antagonistic interactions among viruses to protect crop plants against destructive diseases. PMID:26416204

  6. Lipids at the interface of virus-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Heaton, Nicholas S.; Randall, Glenn

    2012-01-01

    Viruses physically and metabolically remodel the host cell to establish an optimal environment for their replication. Many of these processes involve the manipulation of lipid signaling, synthesis and metabolism. An emerging theme is that these lipid-modifying pathways are also linked to innate anti-viral responses and can be modulated to inhibit viral replication. PMID:22682978

  7. Comparative metagenomic analyses reveal viral-induced shifts of host metabolism towards nucleotide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral genomes often contain metabolic genes that were acquired from host genomes (auxiliary genes). It is assumed that these genes are fixed in viral genomes as a result of a selective force, favoring viruses that acquire specific metabolic functions. While many individual auxiliary genes were observed in viral genomes and metagenomes, there is great importance in investigating the abundance of auxiliary genes and metabolic functions in the marine environment towards a better understanding of their role in promoting viral reproduction. Results In this study, we searched for enriched viral auxiliary genes and mapped them to metabolic pathways. To initially identify enriched auxiliary genes, we analyzed metagenomic microbial reads from the Global Ocean Survey (GOS) dataset that were characterized as viral, as well as marine virome and microbiome datasets from the Line Islands. Viral-enriched genes were mapped to a “global metabolism network” that comprises all KEGG metabolic pathways. Our analysis of the viral-enriched pathways revealed that purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways are among the most enriched pathways. Moreover, many other viral-enriched metabolic pathways were found to be closely associated with the purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways. Furthermore, we observed that sequential reactions are promoted in pathways having a high proportion of enriched genes. In addition, these enriched genes were found to be of modular nature, participating in several pathways. Conclusions Our naïve metagenomic analyses strongly support the well-established notion that viral auxiliary genes promote viral replication via both degradation of host DNA and RNA as well as a shift of the host metabolism towards nucleotide biosynthesis, clearly indicating that comparative metagenomics can be used to understand different environments and systems without prior knowledge of pathways involved. PMID:24666644

  8. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  9. Using metabarcoding to reveal and quantify plant-pollinator interactions.

    PubMed

    Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Burrus, Monique; Holota, Hélène; Khimoun, Aurélie; Mariette, Jérome; Pellizzari, Charlène; Iribar, Amaia; Etienne, Roselyne; Taberlet, Pierre; Vidal, Marie; Winterton, Peter; Zinger, Lucie; Andalo, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Given the ongoing decline of both pollinators and plants, it is crucial to implement effective methods to describe complex pollination networks across time and space in a comprehensive and high-throughput way. Here we tested if metabarcoding may circumvent the limits of conventional methodologies in detecting and quantifying plant-pollinator interactions. Metabarcoding experiments on pollen DNA mixtures described a positive relationship between the amounts of DNA from focal species and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences yielded. The study of pollen loads of insects captured in plant communities revealed that as compared to the observation of visits, metabarcoding revealed 2.5 times more plant species involved in plant-pollinator interactions. We further observed a tight positive relationship between the pollen-carrying capacities of insect taxa and the number of trnL and ITS1 sequences. The number of visits received per plant species also positively correlated to the number of their ITS1 and trnL sequences in insect pollen loads. By revealing interactions hard to observe otherwise, metabarcoding significantly enlarges the spatiotemporal observation window of pollination interactions. By providing new qualitative and quantitative information, metabarcoding holds great promise for investigating diverse facets of interactions and will provide a new perception of pollination networks as a whole. PMID:27255732

  10. Curtovirus-cucurbit interaction: acquisition host plays a role in leafhopper transmission in a host-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Fang; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Curly top disease (CTD) of vegetable crops is caused by viruses in the genus Curtovirus (family Geminiviridae). Cucurbits are reported to be susceptible to CTD; however, the disease is rare in California despite annual outbreaks in other hosts (e.g., common bean, pepper, sugar beet, and tomato). Consistent with these observations, no obvious curly top symptoms were observed in melon fields surveyed for CTD in Central California in 2004 and 2005, whereas the disease was readily observed in tomato plants in nearby fields. However, samples of cucurbits from Idaho with curly top-like symptoms, collected in 2005 and 2007, were confirmed to have the disease. The susceptibility of cucurbits (cantaloupe, honeydew melon, pumpkin, and watermelon) to the three curtoviruses known to occur in California (Beet curly top virus, BCTV; Beet severe curly top virus, BSCTV; and Beet mild curly top virus, BMCTV) was evaluated by agroinoculation or leafhopper transmission. Irrespective of the curtovirus species and inoculation method, low rates of infection and mild or symptomless disease phenotypes were observed in cucurbits. In contrast, all inoculated tomato, Nicotiana benthamiana, or shepherd's purse plants were infected and developed severe symptoms. In leafhopper transmission experiments, BMCTV infected cucurbits when leafhoppers acquired the virus from a symptomatic host with a high viral titer (shepherd's purse), whereas no infection occurred when the acquisition host had mild symptoms and a low viral titer (sugar beet); in contrast, the acquisition host did not influence transmission of BMCTV to tomato or shepherd's purse (all plants were infected). This revealed an influence of the acquisition host on leafhopper transmission in a host-specific manner. Our results also indicate that, although cucurbits can develop CTD, they are relatively poor hosts for these curtoviruses. PMID:19055441

  11. Comparative Pathogenomics Reveals Horizontally Acquired Novel Virulence Genes in Fungi Infecting Cereal Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Donald M.; McDonald, Megan C.; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Solomon, Peter S.; Rusu, Anca G.; Marshall, Mhairi; Kazan, Kemal; Chakraborty, Sukumar; McDonald, Bruce A.; Manners, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analyses of pathogen genomes provide new insights into how pathogens have evolved common and divergent virulence strategies to invade related plant species. Fusarium crown and root rots are important diseases of wheat and barley world-wide. In Australia, these diseases are primarily caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum. Comparative genomic analyses showed that the F. pseudograminearum genome encodes proteins that are present in other fungal pathogens of cereals but absent in non-cereal pathogens. In some cases, these cereal pathogen specific genes were also found in bacteria associated with plants. Phylogenetic analysis of selected F. pseudograminearum genes supported the hypothesis of horizontal gene transfer into diverse cereal pathogens. Two horizontally acquired genes with no previously known role in fungal pathogenesis were studied functionally via gene knockout methods and shown to significantly affect virulence of F. pseudograminearum on the cereal hosts wheat and barley. Our results indicate using comparative genomics to identify genes specific to pathogens of related hosts reveals novel virulence genes and illustrates the importance of horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of plant infecting fungal pathogens. PMID:23028337

  12. Recent Progress in Studies of Arterivirus- and Coronavirus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yanxin; Tan, Yong Wah; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Animal coronaviruses, such as infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), and arteriviruses, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are able to manifest highly contagious infections in their specific native hosts, thereby arising in critical economic damage to animal industries. This review discusses recent progress in studies of virus-host interactions during animal and human coronavirus and arterivirus infections, with emphasis on IBV-host cell interactions. These interactions may be directly involved in viral replication or lead to the alteration of certain signaling pathways, such as cell stress response and innate immunity, to facilitate viral replication and pathogenesis. PMID:22816036

  13. Interactive host cells related to Mycoplasma suis α-enolase by yeast two-hybrid analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Jia, Lijun; Li, Jixu; Xue, Shujiang; Gao, Xu; Yu, Longzheng; Zhang, Shoufa

    2014-10-01

    Mycoplasma suis belongs to the haemotrophic mycoplasmas, which colonise the red blood cells of a wide range of vertebrates. Adhesion to red blood cells is the crucial step in the unique lifecycle of M. suis. In addition to MSG1 protein, α-enolase is the second adhesion protein of M. suis, and may be involved in the adhesion of M. suis to porcine red blood cells (RBC). To simulate the environment of the RBC, we established the cDNA library of swine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) system was adopted to screen α-enolase interactive proteins in the PBMC line. Alignment with the NCBI database revealed four interactive proteins: beta-actin, 60S ribosomal protein L11, clusterin precursor and endonuclease/reverse transcriptase. However, the M. suis α-enolase interactive proteins in the PBMC cDNA library obtained in the current study provide valuable information about the host cell interactions of the M. suis α-enolase protein. PMID:25085536

  14. Parasitic plants of the genus Cuscuta and their interaction with susceptible and resistant host plants

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Bettina; Vogg, Gerd; Fürst, Ursula B.; Albert, Markus

    2015-01-01

    By comparison with plant–microbe interaction, little is known about the interaction of parasitic plants with their hosts. Plants of the genus Cuscuta belong to the family of Cuscutaceae and comprise about 200 species, all of which live as stem holoparasites on other plants. Cuscuta spp. possess no roots nor fully expanded leaves and the vegetative portion appears to be a stem only. The parasite winds around plants and penetrates the host stems via haustoria, forming direct connections to the vascular bundles of their hosts to withdraw water, carbohydrates, and other solutes. Besides susceptible hosts, a few plants exist that exhibit an active resistance against infestation by Cuscuta spp. For example, cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fends off Cuscuta reflexa by means of a hypersensitive-type response occurring in the early penetration phase. This report on the plant–plant dialog between Cuscuta spp. and its host plants focuses on the incompatible interaction of C. reflexa with tomato. PMID:25699071

  15. The civRT operon is important for Campylobacter jejuni strain 81-176 host cell interactions through regulation of the formate dehydrogenase operon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C. jejuni colonizes the intestinal mucosa, and the severity of disease in different strains is correlated with host cell interaction and invasion. A microarray screen to identify genes differentially regulated during C. jejuni interaction with tissue culture cells revealed the up-regulation of a two...

  16. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  17. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Thai Viet

    2005-12-20

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  18. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene–Gene Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host–pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene–gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene–gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene–gene interactions demonstrates that host–pathogen gene–gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically

  19. Mapping Protein Interactions between Dengue Virus and Its Human and Insect Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Janet M.; Gomez, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is an increasingly significant arthropod-borne viral disease, with at least 50 million cases per year worldwide. As with other viral pathogens, dengue virus is dependent on its host to perform the bulk of functions necessary for viral survival and replication. To be successful, dengue must manipulate host cell biological processes towards its own ends, while avoiding elimination by the immune system. Protein-protein interactions between the virus and its host are one avenue through which dengue can connect and exploit these host cellular pathways and processes. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented a computational approach to predict interactions between Dengue virus (DENV) and both of its hosts, Homo sapiens and the insect vector Aedes aegypti. Our approach is based on structural similarity between DENV and host proteins and incorporates knowledge from the literature to further support a subset of the predictions. We predict over 4,000 interactions between DENV and humans, as well as 176 interactions between DENV and A. aegypti. Additional filtering based on shared Gene Ontology cellular component annotation reduced the number of predictions to approximately 2,000 for humans and 18 for A. aegypti. Of 19 experimentally validated interactions between DENV and humans extracted from the literature, this method was able to predict nearly half (9). Additional predictions suggest specific interactions between virus and host proteins relevant to interferon signaling, transcriptional regulation, stress, and the unfolded protein response. Conclusions/Significance Dengue virus manipulates cellular processes to its advantage through specific interactions with the host's protein interaction network. The interaction networks presented here provide a set of hypothesis for further experimental investigation into the DENV life cycle as well as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:21358811

  20. A hyperbranched supramolecular polymer constructed by orthogonal triple hydrogen bonding and host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruirui; Yao, Jian; Fu, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Qu, Da-Hui

    2015-03-28

    A hyperbranched supramolecular polymer has been constructed through orthogonal self-crosslinking by two classical binding interactions: triple hydrogen bonding interaction between a three-arm melamine derivative and DB24C8-containing bisimide and host-guest interaction between DB24C8 crown ether and ditopic dibenzyl ammonium moieties. PMID:25421931

  1. Host-virus interaction: a new role for microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Scaria, Vinod; Hariharan, Manoj; Maiti, Souvik; Pillai, Beena; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of 18–23 nucleotide long non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in a wide spectrum of biological processes. Recent reports also throw light into the role of microRNAs as critical effectors in the intricate host-pathogen interaction networks. Evidence suggests that both virus and hosts encode microRNAs. The exclusive dependence of viruses on the host cellular machinery for their propagation and survival also make them highly susceptible to the vagaries of the cellular environment like small RNA mediated interference. It also gives the virus an opportunity to fight and/or modulate the host to suite its needs. Thus the range of interactions possible through miRNA-mRNA cross-talk at the host-pathogen interface is large. These interactions can be further fine-tuned in the host by changes in gene expression, mutations and polymorphisms. In the pathogen, the high rate of mutations adds to the complexity of the interaction network. Though evidence regarding microRNA mediated cross-talk in viral infections is just emerging, it offers an immense opportunity not only to understand the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions, and possible explanations to viral tropism, latency and oncogenesis, but also to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:17032463

  2. Molecular biology of viroid-host interactions and disease control strategies.

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, Natalia; Hammond, Rosemarie W

    2014-11-01

    Viroids are single-stranded, covalently closed, circular, highly structured noncoding RNAs that cause disease in several economically important crop plants. They replicate autonomously and move systemically in host plants with the aid of the host machinery. In addition to symptomatic infections, viroids also cause latent infections where there is no visual evidence of infection in the host; however, transfer to a susceptible host can result in devastating disease. While there are non-hosts for viroids, no naturally occurring durable resistance has been observed in most host species. Current effective control methods for viroid diseases include detection and eradication, and cultural controls. In addition, heat or cold therapy combined with meristem tip culture has been shown to be effective for elimination of viroids for some viroid-host combinations. An understanding of viroid-host interactions, host susceptibility, and non-host resistance could provide guidance for the design of viroid-resistant plants. Efforts to engineer viroid resistance into host species have been underway for several years, and include the use of antisense RNA, antisense RNA plus ribozymes, a dsRNase, and siRNAs, among others. The results of those efforts and the challenges associated with creating viroid resistant plants are summarized in this review. PMID:25438785

  3. Accounting for reciprocal host-microbiome interactions in experimental science.

    PubMed

    Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-06-01

    Mammals are defined by their metagenome, a combination of host and microbiome genes. This knowledge presents opportunities to further basic biology with translation to human diseases. However, the now-documented influence of the metagenome on experimental results and the reproducibility of in vivo mammalian models present new challenges. Here we provide the scientific basis for calling on all investigators, editors and funding agencies to embrace changes that will enhance reproducible and interpretable experiments by accounting for metagenomic effects. Implementation of new reporting and experimental design principles will improve experimental work, speed discovery and translation, and properly use substantial investments in biomedical research. PMID:27279212

  4. Cold-active bacteriophages from the Baltic Sea ice have diverse genomes and virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Senčilo, Ana; Luhtanen, Anne-Mari; Saarijärvi, Mikko; Bamford, Dennis H; Roine, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria are the major prokaryotic component of the Baltic Sea ice microbiome, and it is postulated that phages are among their major parasites. In this study, we sequenced the complete genomes of six earlier reported phage isolates from the Baltic Sea ice infecting Shewanella sp. and Flavobacterium sp. hosts as well as characterized the phage-host interactions. Based on the genome sequences, the six phages were classified into five new genera. Only two phages, 1/4 and 1/40, both infecting Shewanella sp. strains, showed significant nucleotide sequence similarity to each other and could be grouped into the same genus. These two phages are also related to Vibrio-specific phages sharing approximately 25% of the predicted gene products. Nevertheless, cross-titrations showed that the cold-active phages studied are host specific: none of the seven additionally tested, closely related Shewanella strains served as hosts for the phages. Adsorption experiments of two Shewanella phages, 1/4 and 3/49, conducted at 4 °C and at 15 °C revealed relatively fast adsorption rates that are, for example, comparable with those of phages infective in mesophilic conditions. Despite the small number of Shewanella phages characterized here, we could already find different types of phage-host interactions including a putative abortive infection. PMID:25156651

  5. Global approaches to study protein-protein interactions among viruses and hosts.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Rios, Jorge; Uetz, Peter

    2010-02-01

    While high-throughput protein-protein interaction screens were first published approximately 10 years ago, systematic attempts to map interactions among viruses and hosts started only a few years ago. HIV-human interactions dominate host-pathogen interaction databases (with approximately 2000 interactions) despite the fact that probably none of these interactions have been identified in systematic interaction screens. Recently, combinations of protein interaction data with RNAi and other functional genomics data allowed researchers to model more complex interaction networks. The rapid progress in this area promises a flood of new data in the near future, with clinical applications as soon as structural and functional genomics catches up with next-generation sequencing of human variation and structure-based drug design. PMID:20143950

  6. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-01-01

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 Å, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface. PMID:20089642

  7. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  8. Macrophage-pathogen interactions in infectious diseases: new therapeutic insights from the zebrafish host model

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Masud, Samrah; Spaink, Herman P.; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2014-01-01

    Studying macrophage biology in the context of a whole living organism provides unique possibilities to understand the contribution of this extremely dynamic cell subset in the reaction to infections, and has revealed the relevance of cellular and molecular processes that are fundamental to the cell-mediated innate immune response. In particular, various recently established zebrafish infectious disease models are contributing substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms by which different pathogens interact with macrophages and evade host innate immunity. Transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled macrophages and other leukocyte populations enable non-invasive imaging at the optically transparent early life stages. Furthermore, there is a continuously expanding availability of vital reporters for subcellular compartments and for probing activation of immune defense mechanisms. These are powerful tools to visualize the activity of phagocytic cells in real time and shed light on the intriguing paradoxical roles of these cells in both limiting infection and supporting the dissemination of intracellular pathogens. This Review will discuss how several bacterial and fungal infection models in zebrafish embryos have led to new insights into the dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms at play when pathogens encounter host macrophages. We also describe how these insights are inspiring novel therapeutic strategies for infectious disease treatment. PMID:24973749

  9. Molecular Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Integration Host Factor Reveals Novel Insights into the Mode of DNA Binding and Nucleoid Compaction*

    PubMed Central

    Sharadamma, Narayanaswamy; Harshavardhana, Yadumurthy; Ravishankar, Apoorva; Anand, Praveen; Chandra, Nagasuma; Muniyappa, K.

    2014-01-01

    The annotated whole-genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed that Rv1388 (Mtihf) is likely to encode for a putative 20-kDa integration host factor (mIHF). However, very little is known about the functional properties of mIHF or the organization of the mycobacterial nucleoid. Molecular modeling of the mIHF three-dimensional structure, based on the cocrystal structure of Streptomyces coelicolor IHF duplex DNA, a bona fide relative of mIHF, revealed the presence of Arg-170, Arg-171, and Arg-173, which might be involved in DNA binding, and a conserved proline (Pro-150) in the tight turn. The phenotypic sensitivity of Escherichia coli ΔihfA and ΔihfB strains to UV and methyl methanesulfonate could be complemented with the wild-type Mtihf but not its alleles bearing mutations in the DNA-binding residues. Protein-DNA interaction assays revealed that wild-type mIHF, but not its DNA-binding variants, binds with high affinity to fragments containing attB and attP sites and curved DNA. Strikingly, the functionally important amino acid residues of mIHF and the mechanism(s) underlying its binding to DNA, DNA bending, and site-specific recombination are fundamentally different from that of E. coli IHFαβ. Furthermore, we reveal novel insights into IHF-mediated DNA compaction depending on the placement of its preferred binding sites; mIHF promotes DNA compaction into nucleoid-like or higher order filamentous structures. We therefore propose that mIHF is a distinct member of a subfamily of proteins that serve as essential cofactors in site-specific recombination and nucleoid organization and that these findings represent a significant advance in our understanding of the role(s) of nucleoid-associated proteins. PMID:25324543

  10. Host-pathogen interactions in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nielubowicz, Greta R; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-08-01

    The urinary tract is a common site of bacterial infections; nearly half of all women experience at least one urinary tract infection (UTI) during their lifetime. These infections are classified based on the condition of the host. Uncomplicated infections affect otherwise healthy individuals and are most commonly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, whereas complicated infections affect patients with underlying difficulties, such as a urinary tract abnormality or catheterization, and are commonly caused by species such as Proteus mirabilis. Virulence and fitness factors produced by both pathogens include fimbriae, toxins, flagella, iron acquisition systems, and proteins that function in immune evasion. Additional factors that contribute to infection include the formation of intracellular bacterial communities by E. coli and the production of urease by P. mirabilis, which can result in urinary stone formation. Innate immune responses are induced or mediated by pattern recognition receptors, antimicrobial peptides, and neutrophils. The adaptive immune response to UTI is less well understood. Host factors TLR4 and CXCR1 are implicated in disease outcome and susceptibility, respectively. Low levels of TLR4 are associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria while low levels of CXCR1 are associated with increased incidence of acute pyelonephritis. Current research is focused on the identification of additional virulence factors and therapeutic or prophylactic targets that might be used in the generation of vaccines against both uropathogens. PMID:20647992

  11. Evolution of Hawaiian shield volcano revealed by antecryst-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sakyi, P. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, E.

    2009-12-01

    Ocean island basalts, exemplified by the Hawaiian Volcanics, are often considered to be the best targets for understanding the chemical and thermal structure of upwelling mantle plumes. The important feature with regards to the petrogenesis of the recent Hawaiian shield building lavas is the existence of a double volcanic loci (Loa and Kea), which has resulted in large-scale heterogeneity between the north-western and south-eastern sides of the plume. The temporal Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic trends displayed by the Loa-type lavas may have been caused by systematic vertical heterogeneity of the SW part of the Hawaiian plume. The majority of the available OIB samples are limited to the youngest lava flows covering the shield, with the exception of samples obtained from drilled cores and land slide deposits. Thus, sampling is biased to the latest stages of the shield building process, and consequently, so are geochemical studies. We found that the majority of olivine crystals coarser than ˜1 mm in the Hawaiian lavas are antecryst, which originally crystallized from previous stages of Hawaiian magmatism. These anatecrysts were then plastically deformed prior to entrainment in the erupted host magmas. The Pb isotopic compositions of antecryst-hosted melt inclusions reveal that the mantle source components that formed Hawaiian shields successively changed during shield formation. The temporal geochemical trend in the Kilauea melt inclusion could be caused by increasing the degree of partial melting by moving the melting source of the volcano from the periphery to the centre of the plume. The Pb isotopic trend of Koolau melt inclusions are consistent with the previously identified temporal isotopic trend, which shows that the 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb of the Koolau magma systematically increased with time. Thus, antecryst-hosted melt inclusions preserve geochemical information regarding the petrogenesis of the Hawaiian shield lavas, which is unobtainable via whole rock

  12. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners.

    PubMed

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W; Merchant, Michael L; Clark, Jennifer A; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  13. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Novel RASSF2 Interaction Partners

    PubMed Central

    Barnoud, Thibaut; Wilkey, Daniel W.; Merchant, Michael L.; Clark, Jennifer A.; Donninger, Howard

    2016-01-01

    RASSF2 is a tumor suppressor that shares homology with other Ras-association domain (RASSF) family members. It is a powerful pro-apoptotic K-Ras effector that is frequently inactivated in many human tumors. The exact mechanism by which RASSF2 functions is not clearly defined, but it likely acts as a scaffolding protein, modulating the activity of other pro-apoptotic effectors, thereby regulating and integrating tumor suppressor pathways. However, only a limited number of RASSF2 interacting partners have been identified to date. We used a proteomics based approach to identify additional RASSF2 interactions, and thereby gain a better insight into the mechanism of action of RASSF2. We identified several proteins, including C1QBP, Vimentin, Protein phosphatase 1G and Ribonuclease inhibitor that function in diverse biological processes, including protein post-translational modifications, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell migration and redox homeostasis, which have not previously been reported to interact with RASSF2. We independently validated two of these novel interactions, C1QBP and Vimentin and found that the interaction with C1QBP was enhanced by K-Ras whereas, interestingly, the Vimentin interaction was reduced by K-Ras. Additionally, RASSF2/K-Ras regulated the acetylation of Vimentin. Our data thus reveal novel mechanisms by which RASSF2 may exert its functions, several of which may be Ras-regulated. PMID:26999212

  14. The interactions of intracellular Protista and their host cells, with special reference to heterotrophic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L H

    1979-04-11

    Intracellular genera are found in all the major groups of Protista, but are particularly common among the dinoflagellates, trypanosomatid zooflagellates and suctorian ciliates; the Sporozoa are nearly all intracellular at some stage of their life, and the Microspora entirely so. Intracellular forms can dwell in the nucleus, within phagosomal or other vacuoles or may lie free in the hyaloplasm of their host cells. Organisms tend to select their hosts from a restricted taxonomic range although there are some notable exceptions. There is also great variation in the types of host cell inhabited. There are various reasons for both host and cell selectivity including recognition phenomena at the cell surfaces. Invasion of host cells is usually preceded by surface interactions with the invader. Some organisms depend upon phagocytosis for entry, but others induce host cells to engulf them by non-phagocytic means or invade by microinjection through the host plasma membrane. Protista avoid lysosomal destruction by their resistance to enzyme attack, by surrounding themselves with lysosome-inhibiting vacuoles, by escaping from the phagosomal system into the hyaloplasm and by choosing host cells which lack lysosomes. Nutrition of intracellular heterotrophic organisms involves some degree of competition with the host cell's metabolism as well as erosion of host cell cytoplasm. In Plasmodium infections, red cells are made more permeable to required nutrients by the action of the parasite on the host cell membrane. The parasite is often dependent upon the host cell for complex nutrients which it cannot synthesize for itself. Intracellular forms often profoundly modify the structure and metabolism of the host cell or interfere with its growth and multiplication. This may result in the final lysis of the host cell at the end of the intracellular phase or before the infection of other cells. Certain types of intracellular organisms may have arisen initially as forms attached to the

  15. Interactive effects between diet and genotypes of host and pathogen define the severity of infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friman, Ville-Petri; Laakso, Jouni; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-09-01

    Host resistance and parasite virulence are influenced by multiple interacting factors in complex natural communities. Yet, these interactive effects are seldom studied concurrently, resulting in poor understanding of host-pathogen-environment dynamics. Here, we investigated how the level of opportunist pathogen virulence, strength of host immunity and the host condition manipulated via diet affect the survival of wood tiger moth Parasemia plantaginis (Arctidae). Larvae from "low cuticular melanin" and "high cuticular melanin" (considered as low and high pathogen resistance, respectively) selection lines were infected with moderately and highly virulent bacteria strains of Serratia marcescens, while simultaneously manipulating host diet (with or without antibacterial compounds). We measured host survival and food preference before and after infection to test whether the larvae "self-medicate" by choosing an anti-infection diet (Plantago major, i.e., plantain leaf) over lettuce (Lactuca sativa). "High melanin" larvae were more resistant than "low melanin" larvae to the less virulent strain that had slower growth and colonization rate compared with the more virulent strain. Cuticular melanin did not enhance survival when the larvae were infected with the highly virulent strain. Anti-infection diet enhanced survival of the "high melanin" but not the "low melanin" hosts. Survival was dependent on family origin even within the melanin selection lines. Despite the intrinsic preference for lettuce, no evidence of self-medication was found. These results demonstrate that the relative benefit of host cuticular melanin depends on both diet and pathogen virulence: plantain diet only boosted the immunity of already resistant "high melanin" hosts, and cuticular melanin increased host survival only when infected with moderately virulent pathogen. Moreover, there was considerable variation in host survival between families within both melanin lines suggesting genetic basis for

  16. Uncovering New Pathogen–Host Protein–Protein Interactions by Pairwise Structure Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Tao; Li, Weihui; Liu, Lei; Huang, Qiaoyun; He, Zheng-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens usually evade and manipulate host-immune pathways through pathogen–host protein–protein interactions (PPIs) to avoid being killed by the host immune system. Therefore, uncovering pathogen–host PPIs is critical for determining the mechanisms underlying pathogen infection and survival. In this study, we developed a computational method, which we named pairwise structure similarity (PSS)-PPI, to predict pathogen–host PPIs. First, a high-quality and non-redundant structure–structure interaction (SSI) template library was constructed by exhaustively exploring heteromeric protein complex structures in the PDB database. New interactions were then predicted by searching for PSS with complex structures in the SSI template library. A quantitative score named the PSS score, which integrated structure similarity and residue–residue contact-coverage information, was used to describe the overall similarity of each predicted interaction with the corresponding SSI template. Notably, PSS-PPI yielded experimentally confirmed pathogen–host PPIs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with performance close to that of in vitro high-throughput screening approaches. Finally, a pathogen–host PPI network of human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, was constructed using PSS-PPI and refined using filtration steps based on cellular localization information. Analysis of the resulting network indicated that secreted proteins of the STPK, ESX-1, and PE/PPE family in M. tuberculosis targeted human proteins involved in immune response and phagocytosis. M. tuberculosis also targeted host factors known to regulate HIV replication. Taken together, our findings provide insights into the survival mechanisms of M. tuberculosis in human hosts, as well as co-infection of tuberculosis and HIV. With the rapid pace of three-dimensional protein structure discovery, the SSI template library we constructed and the PSS-PPI method we devised

  17. Dissecting host-virus interaction in lytic replication of a model herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaonan; Feng, Pinghui

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, a host develops various defensive responses, such as activating innate immune signaling pathways that lead to antiviral cytokine production. In order to colonize the host, viruses are obligate to evade host antiviral responses and manipulate signaling pathways. Unraveling the host-virus interaction will shed light on the development of novel therapeutic strategies against viral infection. Murine γHV68 is closely related to human oncogenic Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epsten-Barr virus. γHV68 infection in laboratory mice provides a tractable small animal model to examine the entire course of host responses and viral infection in vivo, which are not available for human herpesviruses. In this protocol, we present a panel of methods for phenotypic characterization and molecular dissection of host signaling components in γHV68 lytic replication both in vivo and ex vivo. The availability of genetically modified mouse strains permits the interrogation of the roles of host signaling pathways during γHV68 acute infection in vivo. Additionally, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these deficient mouse strains can be used to further dissect roles of these molecules during γHV68 lytic replication ex vivo. Using virological and molecular biology assays, we can pinpoint the molecular mechanism of host-virus interactions and identify host and viral genes essential for viral lytic replication. Finally, a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system facilitates the introduction of mutations into the viral factor(s) that specifically interrupt the host-virus interaction. Recombinant γHV68 carrying these mutations can be used to recapitulate the phenotypes of γHV68 lytic replication in MEFs deficient in key host signaling components. This protocol offers an excellent strategy to interrogate host-pathogen interaction at multiple levels of intervention in vivo and ex vivo. Recently, we have discovered that γHV68 usurps

  18. Nitric Oxide Production by Necrotrophic Pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina and the Host Plant in Charcoal Rot Disease of Jute: Complexity of the Interplay between Necrotroph–Host Plant Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Biswas, Pranjal; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    M. phaseolina, a global devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen causes charcoal rot disease in more than 500 host plants. With the aim of understanding the plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction associated with charcoal rot disease of jute, biochemical approach was attempted to study cellular nitric oxide production under diseased condition. This is the first report on M. phaseolina infection in Corchorus capsularis (jute) plants which resulted in elevated nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species and S nitrosothiols production in infected tissues. Time dependent nitric oxide production was also assessed with 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2′,7′-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate using single leaf experiment both in presence of M. phaseolina and xylanases obtained from fungal secretome. Cellular redox status and redox active enzymes were also assessed during plant fungal interaction. Interestingly, M. phaseolina was found to produce nitric oxide which was detected in vitro inside the mycelium and in the surrounding medium. Addition of mammalian nitric oxide synthase inhibitor could block the nitric oxide production in M. phaseolina. Bioinformatics analysis revealed nitric oxide synthase like sequence with conserved amino acid sequences in M. phaseolina genome sequence. In conclusion, the production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species may have important physiological significance in necrotrophic host pathogen interaction. PMID:25208092

  19. Nitric oxide production by necrotrophic pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina and the host plant in charcoal rot disease of jute: complexity of the interplay between necrotroph-host plant interactions.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Biswas, Pranjal; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    M. phaseolina, a global devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen causes charcoal rot disease in more than 500 host plants. With the aim of understanding the plant-necrotrophic pathogen interaction associated with charcoal rot disease of jute, biochemical approach was attempted to study cellular nitric oxide production under diseased condition. This is the first report on M. phaseolina infection in Corchorus capsularis (jute) plants which resulted in elevated nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen species and S nitrosothiols production in infected tissues. Time dependent nitric oxide production was also assessed with 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein Diacetate using single leaf experiment both in presence of M. phaseolina and xylanases obtained from fungal secretome. Cellular redox status and redox active enzymes were also assessed during plant fungal interaction. Interestingly, M. phaseolina was found to produce nitric oxide which was detected in vitro inside the mycelium and in the surrounding medium. Addition of mammalian nitric oxide synthase inhibitor could block the nitric oxide production in M. phaseolina. Bioinformatics analysis revealed nitric oxide synthase like sequence with conserved amino acid sequences in M. phaseolina genome sequence. In conclusion, the production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species may have important physiological significance in necrotrophic host pathogen interaction. PMID:25208092

  20. Microbiota-Host Interactions in Mucosal Homeostasis and Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Longman, Randy S.; Yang, Yi; Diehl, Gretchen E.; Kim, Sangwon V.; Littman, Dan R.

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate intestinal tract is colonized by hundreds of species of bacteria that must be compartmentalized and tolerated to prevent invasive growth and harmful inflammatory responses. Signaling initiated by commensal bacteria shapes antigen-specific mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity. A distinct type of effector CD4+ T cells, Th17 cells, play a key role in coordinating the inflammatory immune responses that afford protection to pathogens at the mucosal interface. Balancing this powerful inflammatory response, regulatory T cells limit collateral damage and provide antigen-specific tolerance to both food and microbial antigens. Here, we discuss the implications for how the microbiota as a whole contribute to compartmentalization from the host and how individual constituents of the microbiota influence the functions and repertoire of effector T cells and organ-specific autoimmune disease. PMID:24913313

  1. Know your neighbor: Microbiota and host epithelial cells interact locally to control intestinal function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Felix; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between the host and its associated microbiota differ spatially and the local cross talk determines organ function and physiology. Animals and their organs are not uniform but contain several functional and cellular compartments and gradients. In the intestinal tract, different parts of the gut carry out different functions, tissue structure varies accordingly, epithelial cells are differentially distributed and gradients exist for several physicochemical parameters such as nutrients, pH, or oxygen. Consequently, the microbiota composition also differs along the length of the gut, but also between lumen and mucosa of the same intestinal segment, and even along the crypt-villus axis in the epithelium. Thus, host-microbiota interactions are highly site-specific and the local cross talk determines intestinal function and physiology. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of site-specific host-microbiota interactions and discuss their functional relevance for host physiology. PMID:26990415

  2. Intestinal microbiome of poultry and its interaction with host and diet

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Yu, Zhongtang

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of poultry is densely populated with microorganisms which closely and intensively interact with the host and ingested feed. The gut microbiome benefits the host by providing nutrients from otherwise poorly utilized dietary substrates and modulating the development and function of the digestive and immune system. In return, the host provides a permissive habitat and nutrients for bacterial colonization and growth. Gut microbiome can be affected by diet, and different dietary interventions are used by poultry producers to enhance bird growth and reduce risk of enteric infection by pathogens. There also exist extensive interactions among members of the gut microbiome. A comprehensive understanding of these interactions will help develop new dietary or managerial interventions that can enhance bird growth, maximize host feed utilization, and protect birds from enteric diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24256702

  3. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP32 Interacts with Host Cell Targets That Influence Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian

    2012-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that exhibits tropism for mononuclear phagocytes and survives by evading host cell defense mechanisms. Recently, molecular interactions of E. chaffeensis tandem repeat proteins 47 and 120 (TRP47 and -120) and the eukaryotic host cell have been described. In this investigation, yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that an E. chaffeensis type 1 secretion system substrate, TRP32, interacts with a diverse group of human proteins associated with major biological processes of the host cell, including protein synthesis, trafficking, degradation, immune signaling, cell signaling, iron metabolism, and apoptosis. Eight target proteins, including translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 (EF1A1), deleted in azoospermia (DAZ)-associated protein 2 (DAZAP2), ferritin light polypeptide (FTL), CD63, CD14, proteasome subunit beta type 1 (PSMB1), ring finger and CCCH-type domain 1 (RC3H1), and tumor protein p53-inducible protein 11 (TP53I11) interacted with TRP32 as determined by coimmunoprecipitation assays, colocalization with TRP32 in HeLa and THP-1 cells, and/or RNA interference. Interactions between TRP32 and host targets localized to the E. chaffeensis morulae or in the host cell cytoplasm adjacent to morulae. Common or closely related interacting partners of E. chaffeensis TRP32, TRP47, and TRP120 demonstrate a molecular convergence on common cellular processes and molecular cross talk between Ehrlichia TRPs and host targets. These findings further support the role of TRPs as effectors that promote intracellular survival. PMID:22547548

  4. The seven-transmembrane receptor Gpr1 governs processes relevant for the antagonistic interaction of Trichoderma atroviride with its host.

    PubMed

    Omann, Markus R; Lehner, Sylvia; Escobar Rodríguez, Carolina; Brunner, Kurt; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Mycoparasitic Trichoderma species are applied as biocontrol agents in agriculture to guard plants against fungal diseases. During mycoparasitism, Trichoderma directly interacts with phytopathogenic fungi, preceded by a specific recognition of the host and resulting in its disarming and killing. In various fungal pathogens, including mycoparasites, signalling via heterotrimeric G proteins plays a major role in regulating pathogenicity-related functions. However, the corresponding receptors involved in the recognition of host-derived signals are largely unknown. Functional characterization of Trichoderma atroviride Gpr1 revealed a prominent role of this seven-transmembrane protein of the cAMP-receptor-like family of fungal G-protein-coupled receptors in the antagonistic interaction with the host fungus and governing of mycoparasitism-related processes. Silencing of gpr1 led to an avirulent phenotype accompanied by an inability to attach to host hyphae. Furthermore, gpr1-silenced transformants were unable to respond to the presence of living host fungi with the expression of chitinase- and protease-encoding genes. Addition of exogenous cAMP was able to restore host attachment in gpr1-silenced transformants but could not restore mycoparasitic overgrowth. A search for downstream targets of the signalling pathway(s) involving Gpr1 resulted in the isolation of genes encoding e.g. a member of the cyclin-like superfamily and a small secreted cysteine-rich protein. Although silencing of gpr1 caused defects similar to those of mutants lacking the Tga3 Gα protein, no direct interaction between Gpr1 and Tga3 was observed in a split-ubiquitin two-hybrid assay. PMID:22075023

  5. Host-Symbiont Interactions: Male-Killers Exposed.

    PubMed

    Larracuente, Amanda M; Meller, Victoria H

    2016-05-23

    Male-killing is one strategy used by maternally transmitted bacterial symbionts to boost transmission and spread in populations. In Drosophila melanogaster, Spiroplasma target males by hijacking an essential, male-limited epigenetic process. A new study reveals clues to the mode of killing. PMID:27218854

  6. Host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis interactome reveals a novel iron assimilation mechanism linked to nitric oxide stress during early infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The initial interaction between host cell and pathogen sets the stage for the ensuing infection and ultimately determine the course of disease. However, there is limited knowledge of the transcripts utilized by host and pathogen and how they may impact one another during this critical step. The purpose of this study was to create a host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) interactome for early infection in an epithelium-macrophage co-culture system using RNA-seq. Results Establishment of the host-MAP interactome revealed a novel iron assimilation system for carboxymycobactin. Iron assimilation is linked to nitric oxide synthase-2 production by the host and subsequent nitric oxide buildup. Iron limitation as well as nitric oxide is a prompt for MAP to enter into an iron sequestration program. This new iron sequestration program provides an explanation for mycobactin independence in some MAP strains grown in vitro as well as during infection within the host cell. Utilization of such a pathway is likely to aid MAP establishment and long-term survival within the host. Conclusions The host-MAP interactome identified a number of metabolic, DNA repair and virulence genes worthy for consideration as novel drug targets as well as future pathogenesis studies. Reported interactome data may also be utilized to conduct focused, hypothesis-driven research. Co-culture of uninfected bovine epithelial cells (MAC-T) and primary bovine macrophages creates a tolerant genotype as demonstrated by downregulation of inflammatory pathways. This co-culture system may serve as a model to investigate other bovine enteric pathogens. PMID:24112552

  7. Oligosaccharide Binding Proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis Reveal a Preference for Host Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:21423604

  8. Conditional Degradation of Plasmodium Calcineurin Reveals Functions in Parasite Colonization of both Host and Vector

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Nisha; Waters, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional analysis of essential genes in the malarial parasite, Plasmodium, is hindered by lack of efficient strategies for conditional protein regulation. We report the development of a rapid, specific, and inducible chemical-genetic tool in the rodent malaria parasite, P. berghei, in which endogenous proteins engineered to contain the auxin-inducible degron (AID) are selectively degraded upon adding auxin. Application of AID to the calcium-regulated protein phosphatase, calcineurin, revealed functions in host and vector stages of parasite development. Whereas depletion of calcineurin in late-stage schizonts demonstrated its critical role in erythrocyte attachment and invasion in vivo, stage-specific depletion uncovered roles in gamete development, fertilization, and ookinete-to-oocyst and sporozoite-to-liver stage transitions. Furthermore, AID technology facilitated concurrent generation and phenotyping of transgenic lines, allowing multiple lines to be assessed simultaneously with significant reductions in animal use. This study highlights the broad applicability of AID for functional analysis of proteins across the Plasmodium life cycle. PMID:26118994

  9. Anticipatory eye fixations reveal tool knowledge for tool interaction.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Anna; Barabas, Marissa; Himmelbach, Marc; Butz, Martin V

    2016-08-01

    Action-oriented eye-tracking studies have shown that eye fixations reveal much about current behavioral intentions. The eyes typically fixate those positions of a tool or an object where the fingers will be placed next, or those positions in a scene, where obstacles need to be avoided to successfully reach or transport a tool or object. Here, we asked to what extent eye fixations can also reveal active cognitive inference processes, which are expected to integrate bottom-up visual information with internal knowledge for planning suitable object interactions task-dependently. In accordance to the available literature, we expected that task-relevant knowledge will include sensorimotor, semantic, and mechanical aspects. To investigate if and in which way this internal knowledge influences eye fixation behavior while planning an object interaction, we presented pictures of familiar and unfamiliar tools and instructed participants to either pantomime 'lifting' or 'using' the respective tool. When confronted with unfamiliar tools, participants fixated the tool's effector part closer and longer in comparison with familiar tools. This difference was particularly prominent during 'using' trials when compared with 'lifting' trials. We suggest that this difference indicates that the brain actively extracts mechanical information about the unknown tool in order to infer its appropriate usage. Moreover, the successive fixations over a trial indicate that a dynamic, task-oriented, active cognitive process unfolds, which integrates available tool knowledge with visually gathered information to plan and determine the currently intended tool interaction. PMID:27068808

  10. The Use of Arabidopsis to Study Interactions between Parasitic Angiosperms and Their Plant Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Goldwasser, Y.; Westwood, J. H.; Yoder, J. I.

    2002-01-01

    Parasitic plants invade host plants in order to rob them of water, minerals and nutrients. The consequences to the infected hosts can be debilitating and some of the world's most pernicious agricultural weeds are parasitic. Parasitic genera of the Scrophulariaceae and Orobanchaceae directly invade roots of neighboring plants via underground structures called haustoria. The mechanisms by which these parasites identify and associate with host plants present unsurpassed opportunities for studying chemical signaling in plant-plant interactions. Seeds of some parasites require specific host factors for efficient germination, thereby insuring the availability of an appropriate host root prior to germination. A second set of signal molecules is required to induce haustorium development and the beginning of heterotrophy. Later stages in parasitism also require the presence of host factors, although these have not yet been well characterized. Arabidopsis is being used as a model host plant to identify genetic loci associated with stimulating parasite germination, haustorium development, and parasite support. Arabidopsis is also being employed to explore how host plants respond to parasite attack. Current methodologies and recent findings in Arabidopsis – parasitic plant interactions will be discussed. PMID:22303205