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Sample records for hot atom chemical

  1. Molecular beam studies of hot atom chemical reactions: Reactive scattering of energetic deuterium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Continetti, R.E.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H/sub 2/ /minus/> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ /minus/> C/sub 2/HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Molecular Beam Studies of Hot Atom Chemical Reactions: Reactive Scattering of Energetic Deuterium Atoms

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Continetti, R. E.; Balko, B. A.; Lee, Y. T.

    1989-02-01

    A brief review of the application of the crossed molecular beams technique to the study of hot atom chemical reactions in the last twenty years is given. Specific emphasis is placed on recent advances in the use of photolytically produced energetic deuterium atoms in the study of the fundamental elementary reactions D + H{sub 2} -> DH + H and the substitution reaction D + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} -> C{sub 2}HD + H. Recent advances in uv laser and pulsed molecular beam techniques have made the detailed study of hydrogen atom reactions under single collision conditions possible.

  3. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J. )

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,'' Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH {yields} H{sub 2} R reactions where RH is CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants.

  4. Single-collision studies of hot atom energy transfer and chemical reaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses research in the collision dynamics of translationally hot atoms, with funding with DOE for the project ``Single-Collision Studies of Hot Atom Energy Transfer and Chemical Reaction,`` Grant Number DE-FG03-85ER13453. The work reported here was done during the period September 9, 1988 through October 31, 1991. During this period this DOE-funded work has been focused on several different efforts: (1) experimental studies of the state-to-state dynamics of the H + RH {yields} H{sub 2} R reactions where RH is CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, or C{sub 3}H{sub 8}, (2) theoretical (quasiclassical trajectory) studies of hot hydrogen atom collision dynamics, (3) the development of photochemical sources of translationally hot molecular free radicals and characterization of the high resolution CARS spectroscopy of molecular free radicals, (4) the implementation of stimulated Raman excitation (SRE) techniques for the preparation of vibrationally state-selected molecular reactants.

  5. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  6. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed. PMID:11537799

  7. Characterization of atomic-layer MoS2 synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying-Zi, Peng; Yang, Song; Xiao-Qiang, Xie; Yuan, Li; Zheng-Hong, Qian; Ru, Bai

    2016-05-01

    Atomic-layer MoS2 ultrathin films are synthesized using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transition electron microscopy (HRTEM), photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization methods is applied to investigate the crystal structures, valence states, and compositions of the ultrathin film areas. The nucleation particles show irregular morphology, while for a larger size somewhere, the films are granular and the grains have a triangle shape. The films grow in a preferred orientation (002). The HRTEM images present the graphene-like structure of stacked layers with low density of stacking fault, and the interlayer distance of plane is measured to be about 0.63 nm. It shows a clear quasi-honeycomb-like structure and 6-fold coordination symmetry. Room-temperature PL spectra for the atomic layer MoS2 under the condition of right and left circular light show that for both cases, the A1 and B1 direct excitonic transitions can be observed. In the meantime, valley polarization resolved PL spectra are obtained. XPS measurements provide high-purity samples aside from some contaminations from the air, and confirm the presence of pure MoS2. The stoichiometric mole ratio of S/Mo is about 2.0–2.1, suggesting that sulfur is abundant rather than deficient in the atomic layer MoS2 under our experimental conditions. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant Nos. LY16F040003 and LY16A040007) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51401069 and 11574067).

  8. T-v energy transfer and chemical reactions of laser-produced hot H and D atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, L.M.; Leone, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser photolysis of various molecular precursors provides a means to generate translationally fast H and D atoms with laboratory energies in the range of 1 - 3 eV. Because of the large disparity in the mass of the H atom compared to the mass of the other photolysis fragment, almost all of the excess energy of the photon is deposited into the kinetic energy of the light H atom. From conservation of energy and momentum, the energy of the H atom may be calculated almost exactly. With typical precursors such as HI, HBr, HC1, and H/sub 2/S, and excimer laser wavelengths at 193 and 248 nm, the widths of the H atom kinetic energy distributions are small compared to the total energies, providing a rather precise collision energy.

  9. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  10. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1986-11-15

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. Progress in the period November 16, 1985 to November 15, 1986 is reviewed in the following areas: (1) Recoil atom reaction studies. (2) Reactions of thermally generated free atoms.

  11. Liquid-metal atomization for hot working preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid quenching of a liquid metal by atomization or splat cooling overcomes the major limitation of most solidification processes, namely, the segregation of alloying elements, impurities, and constituent phases. The cooling rates of different atomizing processes are related to the dendrite arm spacings and to the microstructure of the atomized powders. The increased solubility limits and the formation of metastable compounds in splat-cooled alloys are discussed. Consolidation of the powders by hot isostatic compaction, hot extrusion, or hot forging and rolling processes yields billets with properties equivalent to or better than those of the wrought alloys. The application of this powder processing technology to high-performance alloys is reviewed.

  12. TOWARD CHEMICAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOT JUPITER MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M.

    2014-10-10

    The origin of hot Jupiters—gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars—is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  13. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1989-02-01

    Research has been continued on hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms. The results of experiments directed toward attaining the goals of this research program are briefly presented for the period September 1, 1987 to January 31, 1989 in sections entitled: (1) The mechanism of hydrogen acquisition by high energy silicon atoms. (2) The mechanism of disilene formation in the reactions of recoiling silicon atoms with silane. (3) The contribution of ionic processes to the primary reactions of recoiling silicon atoms. (4) The role of phosphine in hydrogen acquisition by recoiling silicon atoms. (5) Mechanism of reaction of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules.

  14. Chemical uncertainties in modeling hot Jupiters atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, Eric; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn

    2015-11-01

    Most predictions and interpretations of observations in beyond our Solar System have occurred through the use of 1D photo-thermo-chemical models. Their predicted atmospheric compositions are highly dependent on model parameters. Chemical reactions are based on empirical parameters that must be known at temperatures ranging from 100 K to above 2500 K and at pressures from millibars to hundreds of bars. Obtained from experiments, calculations and educated-guessed estimations, these parameters are always evaluated with substantial uncertainties. However, although of practical use, few models of exoplanetary atmospheres have considered these underlying chemical uncertainties and their consequences. Recent progress has been made recently that allow us to (1) evaluate the accuracy and precision of 1D models of planetary atmospheres, with quantifiable uncertainties on their predictions for the atmospheric composition and associated spectral features, (2) identify the ‘key parameters’ that contribute the most to the models predictivity and should therefore require further experimental or theoretical analysis, (3) reduce and optimize complex chemical networks for their inclusion in multidimensional atmospheric models.First, a global sampling approach based on low discrepancy sequences has been applied in order to propose error bars on simulations of the atmospheres HD 209458b and HD 189733b, using a detailed kinetic model derived from applied combustion models that was methodically validated over a range of temperatures and pressures typical for these hot Jupiters. A two-parameters temperature-dependent uncertainty factor has been assigned to each considered rate constant. Second, a global sensitivity approach based on high dimensional model representations (HDMR) has been applied in order to identify those reactions which make the largest contributions to the overall uncertainty of the simulated results. The HDMR analysis has been restricted to the most important

  15. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible. PMID:17330040

  16. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  17. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Scattergood, T.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 A) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system resulted in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  18. The study of metal sulphide nanomaterials obtained by chemical bath deposition and hot-injection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Forostyanaya, N. A.; Levitskiy, V. S.; Mazing, D. S.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. Ph; Moshnikov, V. A.; Shupta, A. A.; Spivak, Yu M.; Tulenin, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study lead sulphide - cadmium sulphide based layers were obtained through chemical deposition of water solutions and cadmium sulphide quantum dots were formed through hot-injection technique. The article discusses the results of surface investigations with the use of atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements.

  19. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The goal of this project was to increase the authors understanding of the interplay between the kinetic and electronic energy of free atoms and their chemical reactivity by answering the following questions: (1) what is the chemistry of high-energy carbon silicon and germanium atoms recoiling from nuclear transformations; (2) how do the reactions of recoiling carbon, silicon and germanium atoms take place - what are the operative reaction mechanisms; (3) how does the reactivity of free carbon, silicon and germanium atoms vary with energy and electronic state, and what are the differences in the chemistry of these three isoelectronic atoms This research program consisted of a coordinated set of experiments capable of achieving these goals by defining the structures, the kinetic and internal energy, and the charge states of the intermediates formed in the gas-phase reactions of recoiling silicon and germanium atoms with silane, germane, and unsaturated organic molecules, and of recoiling carbon atoms with aromatic molecules. The reactions of high energy silicon, germanium, and carbon atoms created by nuclear recoil were studied with substrates chosen so that their products illuminated the mechanism of the recoil reactions. Information about the energy and electronic state of the recoiling atoms at reaction was obtained from the variation in end product yields and the extent of decomposition and rearrangement of primary products (usually reactive intermediates) as a function of total pressure and the concentration of inert moderator molecules that remove kinetic energy from the recoiling atoms and can induce transitions between electronic spin states. 29 refs.

  20. A collisional-radiative average atom model for hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B.F.

    1996-10-17

    A collisional-radiative `average atom` (AA) model is presented for the calculation of opacities of hot plasmas not in the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The electron impact and radiative rate constants are calculated using the dipole oscillator strengths of the average atom. A key element of the model is the photon escape probability which at present is calculated for a semi infinite slab. The Fermi statistics renders the rate equation for the AA level occupancies nonlinear, which requires iterations until the steady state. AA level occupancies are found. Detailed electronic configurations are built into the model after the self-consistent non-LTE AA state is found. The model shows a continuous transition from the non-LTE to the LTE state depending on the optical thickness of the plasma. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Hot-atom synthesis of organic compounds on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Results of recent laboratory 'simulations' of photochemical processes on Jupiter are combined with available data on mixing rates and exposure times in the Jovian atmosphere to give quantitative predictions of the rate at which hot-atom reactions produce organic molecules. It is shown that abstraction reactions on methane by hot H atoms from solar UV photolysis of H2S will produce no more than 4 times 10 to the -17th power g/sq cm/sec for a steady-state mole fraction of total organics of approximately 10 to the -16th power. This is roughly 10 to the 7th power times less than the limit of detection of the most sensitive gas analysis experiments ever flown on a spacecraft. By far the most common organic molecule produced by this mechanism is CH3SH, methyl mercaptan, which is produced at a rate at least 600 times smaller than the rate of production of ethane by direct photolysis of CH4 at high altitudes.

  2. Extended Characterization of Chemical Processes in Hot Cells Using Environmental Swipe Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Thomas, M-L; Lepel, Elwood A.; Brunson, Ronald R.; Ladd-Lively, Jennifer

    2012-09-15

    Environmental sampling is used extensively by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verification of information from State declarations or a facility’s design regarding nuclear activities occurring within the country or a specific facility. Environmental sampling of hot cells within a facility under safeguards is conducted using 10.2 cm x 10.2 cm cotton swipe material or cellulose swipes. Traditional target analytes used by the IAEA to verify operations within a facility include a select list of gamma-emitting radionuclides and total and isotopic U and Pu. Analysis of environmental swipe samples collected within a hot-cell facility where chemical processing occurs may also provide information regarding specific chemicals used in fuel processing. However, using swipe material to elucidate what specific chemical processes were/are being used within a hot cell has not been previously evaluated. Staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) teamed to evaluate the potential use of environmental swipe samples as collection media for volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. This evaluation was initiated with sample collection during a series of Coupled End-to-End (CETE) reprocessing runs at ORNL. The study included measurement of gamma emitting radionuclides, total and isotopic U and Pu, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. These results allowed us to elucidate what chemical processes used in the hot cells during reprocessing of power reactor and identify other legacy chemicals used in hot cell operations which predate the CETE process.

  3. Novel Infrared Dynamics of Cold Atoms on Hot Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri; Clougherty, Dennis

    The low-energy dynamics of cold atoms interacting with macroscopic graphene membranes exhibits severe infrared divergences when treated perturbatively. These infrared problems are even more pronounced at finite temperature due to the (infinitely) many flexural phonons excited in graphene. We have devised a technique to take account (resummation) of such processes in the spirit of the well-known exact solution of the independent boson model. Remarkably, there is also similarity to the infrared problems and their treatment (via the Bloch-Nordsieck scheme) in finite temperature ``hot'' quantum electrodynamics and chromodynamics due to the long-range, unscreened nature of gauge interactions. The method takes into account correctly the strong damping provided by the many emitted phonons at finite temperature. In our case, the inverse membrane size plays the role of an effective low-energy scale, and, unlike the above mentioned field theories, there remains an unusual, highly nontrivial dependence on that scale due to the 2D nature of the problem. We present detailed results for the sticking (atomic damping rate) rate of cold atomic hydrogen as a function of the membrane temperature and size. We find that the rate is very strongly dependent on both quantities.

  4. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K. G.; Jellison, James L.; Staley, David J.

    1995-01-01

    A system for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs.

  5. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  6. Graphene-Semiconductor Catalytic Nanodiodes for Quantitative Detection of Hot Electrons Induced by a Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Changhwan; Choi, Hongkyw; Choi, Jin Sik; Choi, Choon-Gi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Direct detection of hot electrons generated by exothermic surface reactions on nanocatalysts is an effective strategy to obtain insight into electronic excitation during chemical reactions. For this purpose, we fabricated a novel catalytic nanodiode based on a Schottky junction between a single layer of graphene and an n-type TiO2 layer that enables the detection of hot electron flows produced by hydrogen oxidation on Pt nanoparticles. By making a comparative analysis of data obtained from measuring the hot electron current (chemicurrent) and turnover frequency, we demonstrate that graphene's unique electronic structure and extraordinary material properties, including its atomically thin nature and ballistic electron transport, allow improved conductivity at the interface between the catalytic Pt nanoparticles and the support. Thereby, graphene-based nanodiodes offer an effective and facile way to approach the study of chemical energy conversion mechanisms in composite catalysts with carbon-based supports. PMID:26910271

  7. 25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Wood quench tower, chemical tank on right, hot gas pipes between coke ovens and compressor building XX), coal conveyor to pulverizer building on right, water tank to left of quench tower. Looking north/northwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  8. RADIOACTIVE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS IN THE ATOMIC TABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.

    2005-08-13

    In the 1949 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, a series of new elements were added to the Atomic Weights Table. Since these elements had been produced in the laboratory and were not discovered in nature, the atomic weight value of these artificial products would depend upon the production method. Since atomic weight is a property of an element as it occurs in nature, it would be incorrect to assign an atomic weight value to that element. As a result of that discussion, the Commission decided to provide only the mass number of the most stable (longest-lived) known isotope as the number to be associated with these entries in the Atomic Weights Table. As a function of time, the mass number associated with various elements has changed as longer-lived isotopes of a particular elements has been found in nature, or as improved half-life values of an element's isotopes might cause a shift in the longest-lived isotope from one mass number to another. In the 1957 Report of the Atomic Weights Commission, it was decided to discontinue the listing of the mass number in the Atomic Weights Table on the grounds that the kind of information supplied by the mass number is inconsistent with the primary purpose of the Table, i.e., to provide accurate values of ''these constants'' for use in chemical calculations. In addition to the Table of Atomic Weights, the Commission included an auxiliary Table of Radioactive Elements for the first time, where the entry would be the isotope of that element which was most stable, i.e., it had the longest known half-life. In their 1973 report, the Commission noted that the users of the Atomic Weights Table were dissatisfied with the omission of values in the Table for some elements and it was decided to reintroduce the mass number for elements. In their 1983 report, the Commission decided that radioactive elements were considered to lack a characteristic terrestrial isotopic composition, from which an atomic weight value could be calculated to

  9. The status of chemical sensors for hot-dip galvanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    1996-09-01

    Alloying elements are added to the zinc used in the hot-dip galvanization of sheet steel to control the properties and appearance of the resulting coating. For example, aluminum is added to improve the corrosion resistance and adherence of the coating. Other additions, such as antimony, are added to control the grain size and, thus, the appearance of the coating. The concentrations of these alloying elements may change during the process, either deliberately according to product specifications or due to factors such as preferential oxidation. These changes may require replenishment of a depleted alloying element or adjustments in other processing parameters to maintain optimal efficiency. Intelligent adjustments require knowledge of the alloy composition, which requires inline measurement of the concentrations of alloying elements. This article presents recent developments in chemical sensors for use in hot-dip galvanization. In particular, electrochemical sensors for measuring the concentrations of aluminum and antimony in molten zinc are reviewed.

  10. Large gauge factor of hot wire chemical vapour deposition in-situ boron doped polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, David; Tarazona, Antulio; De Leon, Maria Theresa; Kiang, Kian S.; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Wood, Robert J. K.; Chong, Harold M. H.

    2016-04-01

    Polysilicon piezoresistors with a large longitudinal gauge factor (GF) of 44 have been achieved using in-situ boron doped hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD). This GF is a consequence of a high quality p-type doped polysilicon with a crystal volume of 97% and an average grain size of 150 nm, estimated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. The measured minimum Hooge factor associated to the 1/f noise of the polysilicon piezoresistors is 1.4 × 10‑3. These results indicate that HWCVD polysilicon is a suitable piezoresistive material for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) applications.

  11. Chemical Alterations in Martian Meteorites from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibus, G.; Huisl, W.; Spettel, B.; Haubold, R.; Jagoutz, E.

    2003-04-01

    Martian meteorites (SNC) provide evidence of the magmatic fractionation processes of their parent body. As 23 of the total of 27 meteorites are finds, the influence of chemical alterations during their residence time on Earth must be considered, when interpreting the mineralogical, chemical, or isotopic features. Many basaltic shergottites and nakhlites were collected both in the cold desert, Antarctica, and in hot deserts of North Africa and Asia. To detect alteration processes in the finds we have to compare their analytical data with those obtained from the very scarce falls. In this way, we find an overabundance of iodine in meteorites from Antarctica. The iodine contamination is caused by aerosols adhering to the ice. Therefore, iodine can penetrate into the meteorite during its residence in Antarctica. The iodine content measured in the Antarctic shergottites varies from 0.060 to 4.6 ppm and seems to depend on their residence time on ice. The paired Yamato nakhlites Y-000593 and Y-000749 recently discovered in Antarctica also reveal an iodine overabundance compared to Nakhla, which is the only fall among the nakhlites. However, in Nakhla we have another problem of alteration. Nakhla has unusually high Br and Cl concentrations which could originate from terrestrial or parent body alterations. As Cl and Br are readily extracted during water leaching experiments we favor a terrestrial contamination. A Br overabundance was also found in many olivine-rich shergottite finds from hot deserts, DaG 476, Dhofar 019, and SaU 005. However, in the basaltic shergottite Dhofar 378 and in the nakhlite NWA 817 [1] no Br contamination was observed. The olivine phases of the shergottites seem to be preferably attacked by weathering reactions in the hot deserts. In the shergottites from hot deserts, the subchondritic La/U ratios are remarkable, indicating a U contamination. All these meteorites are covered with an evaporation product, caliche. Caliche has a high content of

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H/sub 2/, rovibrational excitation of H/sub 2/ produced by the reaction H + HBr ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr.

  13. Experimental studies of laser-generated translationally hot atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cousins, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    An important determinant of the outcome of a chemical interaction is the relative translational energy of the partners. This thesis focuses on the generation of translationally energetic atoms and molecules and the role of translational energy in chemical interactions. One set of studies examines the competitive pathways of reactions and energy transfer in hyperthermal collisions of fast H or D atoms with HF. The vibrational excitation of HF or DF is measured using a time- and wavelength-resolved infrared emission technique. The results suggest that different collision geometries can lead to markedly different mechanisms for vibrational excitation. Another set of experiments is performed with a goal to generate a repetitively pulsed source of molecules or atoms with translational energies in the 0.1-10 eV range. A pulsed UV laser is used to excite a molecular film, vaporizing a number of molecules near the surface of the film. The composition and velocity of these molecules are measured by their time-of-flight to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Kinetic energies in the range of 0.1-10 eV are observed; the energies are continuously variable and the molecules can be repetitively and reproducibly generated. To establish the dynamics of the vaporization, the internal distributions of fast 0.1-0.7 eV NO molecules are measured using a laser multiphoton detection technique. These studies indicate that the translationally hot molecules are ejected rotationally cold, i.e. typically with only 3% of the energy in rotational excitation. The large disequilibrium between translation and rotation suggests that the vaporization occurs by a transient, nonequilibrium heating mechanism coupled with an adiabatic expansion. The result is additionally promising in light of the desire to produce fast beams of molecules with characterizable and narrow internal energy distributions.

  14. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. . Inst. de Physique); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of [mu][sup [minus]p] atoms in each target. The rates [lambda][sub pp[mu

  15. Infrared dynamics of cold atoms on hot graphene membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sanghita; Kotov, Valeri N.; Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2016-06-01

    We study the infrared dynamics of low-energy atoms interacting with a sample of suspended graphene at finite temperature. The dynamics exhibits severe infrared divergences order by order in perturbation theory as a result of the singular nature of low-energy flexural phonon emission. Our model can be viewed as a two-channel generalization of the independent boson model with asymmetric atom-phonon coupling. This allows us to take advantage of the exact nonperturbative solution of the independent boson model in the stronger channel while treating the weaker one perturbatively. In the low-energy limit, the exact solution can be viewed as a resummation (exponentiation) of the most divergent diagrams in the perturbative expansion. As a result of this procedure, we obtain the atom's Green function which we use to calculate the atom damping rate, a quantity equal to the quantum sticking rate. A characteristic feature of our results is that the Green's function retains a weak, infrared cutoff dependence that reflects the reduced dimensionality of the problem. As a consequence, we predict a measurable dependence of the sticking rate on graphene sample size. We provide detailed predictions for the sticking rate of atomic hydrogen as a function of temperature and sample size. The resummation yields an enhanced sticking rate relative to the conventional Fermi golden rule result (equivalent to the one-loop atom self-energy), as higher-order processes increase damping at finite temperature.

  16. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lock, D; Rusimova, K R; Pan, T L; Palmer, R E; Sloan, P A

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics. PMID:26387703

  17. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, D.; Rusimova, K. R.; Pan, T. L.; Palmer, R. E.; Sloan, P. A.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics.

  18. Atomically resolved real-space imaging of hot electron dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lock, D.; Rusimova, K. R.; Pan, T. L.; Palmer, R. E.; Sloan, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of hot electrons are central to understanding the properties of many electronic devices. But their ultra-short lifetime, typically 100 fs or less, and correspondingly short transport length-scale in the nanometre range constrain real-space investigations. Here we report variable temperature and voltage measurements of the nonlocal manipulation of adsorbed molecules on the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface in the scanning tunnelling microscope. The range of the nonlocal effect increases with temperature and, at constant temperature, is invariant over a wide range of electron energies. The measurements probe, in real space, the underlying hot electron dynamics on the 10 nm scale and are well described by a two-dimensional diffusive model with a single decay channel, consistent with 2-photon photo-emission (2PPE) measurements of the real time dynamics. PMID:26387703

  19. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots. PMID:26675422

  20. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaux, A.; Passerat de Silans, T.; Guerin, W.; Alibart, O.; Tanzilli, S.; Vakili, F.; Kaiser, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time scales (nanoseconds) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements justify the interest in temporal intensity correlation to access nontrivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  1. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  2. Quantum state-resolved study of pure rotational excitation of CO sub 2 by hot atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, J.F.; Hewitt, S.A.; Sarkar, S.K.; Flynn, G.W. ); Weston, R.E. Jr.

    1989-10-15

    Rotationally inelastic scattering of carbon dioxide by translationally hot H, D, and Cl atoms was studied by time-resolved diode laser absorption. The high {ital J} rotational distribution falls off quite rapidly between {ital J}=60 and {ital J}=80. D atom collisions have roughly twice the excitation cross section versus H atom collisions, with the H*/D* ratio decreasing with increasing {ital J}. These results are consistent with a constraint on the total reagent orbital angular momentum available for rotational excitation. Transient Doppler profiles measured immediately after hot atom/CO{sub 2} collisions indicate that CO{sub 2} molecules excited to high {ital J} levels have a larger recoil velocity than molecules excited to lower {ital J} levels. This result is consistent with predictions based on a simple model which treats the CO{sub 2} potential as a hard shell ellipsoid.

  3. Hot oxygen atoms: Their generation and chemistry. [Production by sputtering; reaction with butenes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Chu, Yung Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen atoms with energies between 1 and 10 eV have been produced through ion beam sputtering from metal oxide targets. Argon ion beams were used on Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V/sub 2/O/sub 5/. Results show that some control may be exerted over the atom's kinetic energy by changing the target. Reactions of the hot O(/sup 3/P) with cis- and trans-butenes were investigated. (DLC)

  4. Quantum Chemical Topology: Knowledgeable atoms in peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The need to improve atomistic biomolecular force fields remains acute. Fortunately, the abundance of contemporary computing power enables an overhaul of the architecture of current force fields, which typically base their electrostatics on fixed atomic partial charges. We discuss the principles behind the electrostatics of a more realistic force field under construction, called QCTFF. At the heart of QCTFF lies the so-called topological atom, which is a malleable box, whose shape and electrostatics changes in response to a changing environment. This response is captured by a machine learning method called Kriging. Kriging directly predicts each multipole moment of a given atom (i.e. the output) from the coordinates of the nuclei surrounding this atom (i.e. the input). This procedure yields accurate interatomic electrostatic energies, which form the basis for future-proof progress in force field design.

  5. A Thermo-Chemical Reactor for analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.; Nagulin, K. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    A novel atomization/vaporization system for analytical atomic spectrometry is developed. It consists of two electrically and thermally separated parts that can be heated separately. Unlike conventional electrothermal atomizers in which atomization occurs immediately above the vaporization site and at the same instant of time, the proposed system allows analyte atomization via an intermediate stage of fractional condensation as a two stage process: Vaporization → Condensation → Atomization. The condensation step is selective since vaporized matrix constituents are mainly non-condensable gases and leave the system by diffusion while analyte species are trapped on the cold surface of a condenser. This kind of sample distillation keeps all the advantages of traditional electrothermal atomization and allows significant reduction of matrix interferences. Integration into one design a vaporizer, condenser and atomizer gives much more flexibility for in situ sample treatment and thus the system is called a Thermo-Chemical Reactor (TCR). Details of the design, temperature measurements, vaporization-condensation-atomization mechanisms of various elements in variety of matrices are investigated in the TCR with spectral, temporal and spatial resolution. The ability of the TCR to significantly reduce interferences and to conduct sample pyrolysis at much higher temperatures as compared to conventional electrothermal atomizers is demonstrated. The analytical potential of the system is shown when atomic absorption determination of Cd and Pb in citrus leaves and milk powder without the use of any chemical modification.

  6. Simultaneous growth of diamond and nanostructured graphite thin films by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Ürgen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond and graphite films on silicon wafer were simultaneously synthesized at 850 °C without any additional catalyst. The synthesis was achieved in hot-filament chemical vapor deposition reactor by changing distance among filaments in traditional gas mixture. The inter-wire distance for diamond and graphite deposition was kept 5 and 15 mm, whereas kept constant from the substrate. The Raman spectroscopic analyses show that film deposited at 5 mm is good quality diamond and at 15 mm is nanostructured graphite and respective growths confirm by scanning auger electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscope results exhibit that black soot graphite is composed of needle-like nanostructures, whereas diamond with pyramidal featured structure. Transformation of diamond into graphite mainly attributes lacking in atomic hydrogen. The present study develops new trend in the field of carbon based coatings, where single substrate incorporate dual application can be utilized.

  7. Atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis by annular dark-field electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Nicolosi, Valeria; Pennycook, Timothy J; Corbin, George J; Dellby, Niklas; Murfitt, Matthew F; Own, Christopher S; Szilagyi, Zoltan S; Oxley, Mark P; Pantelides, Sokrates T; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-03-25

    Direct imaging and chemical identification of all the atoms in a material with unknown three-dimensional structure would constitute a very powerful general analysis tool. Transmission electron microscopy should in principle be able to fulfil this role, as many scientists including Feynman realized early on. It images matter with electrons that scatter strongly from individual atoms and whose wavelengths are about 50 times smaller than an atom. Recently the technique has advanced greatly owing to the introduction of aberration-corrected optics. However, neither electron microscopy nor any other experimental technique has yet been able to resolve and identify all the atoms in a non-periodic material consisting of several atomic species. Here we show that annular dark-field imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope optimized for low voltage operation can resolve and identify the chemical type of every atom in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride that contains substitutional defects. Three types of atomic substitutions were found and identified: carbon substituting for boron, carbon substituting for nitrogen, and oxygen substituting for nitrogen. The substitutions caused in-plane distortions in the boron nitride monolayer of about 0.1 A magnitude, which were directly resolved, and verified by density functional theory calculations. The results demonstrate that atom-by-atom structural and chemical analysis of all radiation-damage-resistant atoms present in, and on top of, ultra-thin sheets has now become possible. PMID:20336141

  8. Comparative Study on Hot Atom Coronae of Solar and Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, Valery

    Solar/stellar forcing on the upper atmospheres of the solar and extrasolar planets via both absorption of the XUV (soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet) radiation and atmospheric sputtering results in the formation of an extended neutral corona populated by the suprathermal (hot) H, C, N, and O atoms (see, e.g., Johnson et al., 2008). The hot corona, in turn, is altered by an inflow of the solar wind/magnetospheric plasma and local pick-up ions onto the planetary exosphere. Such inflow results in the formation of the superthermal atoms (energetic neutral atoms - ENAs) due to the charge exchange with the high-energy precipitating ions and can affect the long-term evolution of the atmosphere due to the atmospheric escape. The origin, kinetics and transport of the suprathermal H, C, N, and O atoms in the transition regions (from thermosphere to exosphere) of the planetary atmospheres are discussed. Reactions of dissociative recombination of the ionospheric ions CO _{2} (+) , CO (+) , O _{2} (+) , and N _{2} (+) with thermal electrons are the main photochemical sources of hot atoms. The dissociation of atmospheric molecules by the solar/stellar XUV radiation and accompanying photoelectron fluxes and the induced exothermic photochemistry are also the important sources of the suprathermal atoms. Such kinetic systems with the non-thermal processes are usually investigated with the different (test particles, DSMC, and hybrid) versions of the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In our studies the kinetic energy distribution functions of suprathermal and superthermal atoms were calculated using the stochastic model of the hot planetary corona (Shematovich, 2004, 2010; Groeller et al., 2014), and the Monte Carlo model (Shematovich et al., 2011, 2013) of the high-energy proton and hydrogen atom precipitation into the atmosphere respectively. These functions allowed us to estimate the space distribution of suprathermals in the planetary transition regions. An application of these

  9. Scattering of cold-atom coherences by hot atoms: frequency shifts from background-gas collisions.

    PubMed

    Gibble, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    Frequency shifts from background-gas collisions currently contribute significantly to the inaccuracy of atomic clocks. Because nearly all collisions with room-temperature background gases that transfer momentum eject the cold atoms from the clock, the interference between the scattered and unscattered waves in the forward direction dominates these frequency shifts. We show they are ≈ 10 times smaller than in room-temperature clocks and that van der Waals interactions produce the cold-atom background-gas shift. General considerations allow the loss of the Ramsey fringe amplitude to bound this frequency shift. PMID:23683186

  10. Possibility of nonexistence of hot and superhot hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2010-09-15

    Recently, the existence of extremely energetic hydrogen atoms in electrical discharges has been proposed in the literature with large controversy, from the analysis of the anomalous broadening of hydrogen Balmer lines. In this paper, the velocity distribution of H atoms and the profiles of the emitting atom lines created by the exothermic reaction H{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 3}{sup +}+H+{Delta}E are calculated, as a function of the internal energy defect {Delta}E. The shapes found for the non-Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions resulting in non-Gaussian line profiles raise serious arguments against the existence of hot and superhot H atoms as it has been proposed, at least with those temperatures.

  11. Hot hydrogen atoms reactions of interest in molecular evolution and interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Hong, K.; Hong, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Hot hydrogen atoms which are photochemically generated initiate reactions among mixtures of methane, ethane, water and ammonia, to produce ethanol, organic amines, organic acids, and amino acids. Both ethanol and ethyl amine can also act as substrates for formation of amino acids. The one carbon substrate methane is sufficient as a carbon source to produce amino acids. Typical quantum yields for formation of amino acids are approximately 0.00002 to 0.00004. In one experiment, 6 protein amino acids were identified and 8 nonprotein amino acids verified utilizing gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. We propose that hot atoms, especially hydrogen, initiate reactions in the thermodynamic nonequilibrium environment of interstellar space as well as in the atmospheres of planets.

  12. Ultra fast cooling of hot steel plate by air atomized spray with salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Soumya S.; Ravikumar, Satya V.; Jha, Jay M.; Singh, Akhilendra K.; Bhattacharya, Chandrima; Pal, Surjya K.; Chakraborty, Sudipto

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, the applicability of air atomized spray with the salt added water has been studied for ultra fast cooling (UFC) of a 6 mm thick AISI-304 hot steel plate. The investigation includes the effect of salt (NaCl and MgSO4) concentration and spray mass flux on the cooling rate. The initial temperature of the steel plate before the commencement of cooling is kept at 900 °C or above, which is usually observed as the "finish rolling temperature" in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The heat transfer analysis shows that air atomized spray with the MgSO4 salt produces 1.5 times higher cooling rate than atomized spray with the pure water, whereas air atomized spray with NaCl produces only 1.2 times higher cooling rate. In transition boiling regime, the salt deposition occurs which causes enhancement in heat transfer rate by conduction. Moreover, surface tension is the governing parameter behind the vapour film instability and this length scale increases with increase in surface tension of coolant. Overall, the achieved cooling rates produced by both types of salt added air atomized spray are found to be in the UFC regime.

  13. Two-color ghost interference with photon pairs generated in hot atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Dongsheng; Zhou Zhiyuan; Shi Baosen; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan

    2012-09-15

    We report on an experimental observation of a two-photon ghost interference experiment. A distinguishing feature of our experiment is that the photons are generated via a non-degenerated spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a hot atomic ensemble; therefore the photon has narrow bandwidth. Besides, there is a large difference in frequency between two photons in a pair. Our works may be important to achieve more secure, large transmission capacity long-distance quantum communication.

  14. All-atomic generation and noise-quadrature filtering of squeezed vacuum in hot Rb vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrom, Travis; Romanov, Gleb; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2013-01-01

    With our all-atomic squeezing and filtering setup, we demonstrate control over the noise amplitudes and manipulation of the frequency-dependent squeezing angle of a squeezed vacuum quantum state by passing it through an atomic medium with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We generate low sideband frequency squeezed vacuum using the polarization self-rotation effect in a hot Rb vapor cell, and direct it through a second atomic vapor subject to EIT conditions. We use the frequency-dependent absorption of the EIT window to demonstrate an example of squeeze amplitude attenuation and squeeze angle rotation of the quantum noise quadratures of the squeezed probe. These studies have implications for quantum memory and storage as well as gravitational wave interferometric detectors.

  15. Growth and characterization of boron doped graphene by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique (HFCVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, A.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Large-area boron doped graphene was synthesized on Cu foil (as a catalyst) by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD) using boron oxide powder and ethanol vapor. To investigate the effect of different boron percentages, grow time and the growth mechanism of boron-doped graphene, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were applied. Also in this experiment, the I-V characteristic carried out for study of electrical property of graphene with keithley 2361 system. Nucleation of graphene domains with an average domain size of ~20 μm was observed when the growth time is 9 min that has full covered on the Cu surface. The Raman spectroscopy show that the frequency of the 2D band down-shifts with B doping, consistent with the increase of the in-plane lattice constant, and a weakening of the B-C in-plane bond strength relative to that of C-C bond. Also the shifts of the G-band frequencies can be interpreted in terms of the size of the C-C ring and the changes in the electronic structure of graphene in the presence of boron atoms. The study of electrical property shows that by increasing the grow time the conductance increases which this result in agree with SEM images and graphene grain boundary. Also by increasing the boron percentage in gas mixer the conductance decreases since doping graphene with boron creates a band-gap in graphene band structure. The XPS results of B doped graphene confirm the existence of boron in doped graphene, which indicates the boron atoms doped in the graphene lattice are mainly in the form of BC3. The results showed that boron-doped graphene can be successfully synthesized using boron oxide powder and ethanol vapor via a HFCVD method and also chemical boron doping can be change the electrical conductivity of the graphene.

  16. Infrared light emission from nano hot electron gas created in atomic point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, T.; Klein, H. R.; Iazykov, M.; Dumas, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Gold atomic point contacts are prototype systems to evidence ballistic electron transport. The typical dimension of the nanojunction being smaller than the electron-phonon interaction length, even at room temperature, electrons transfer their excess energy to the lattice only far from the contact. At the contact however, favored by huge current densities, electron-electron interactions result in a nano hot electron gas acting as a source of photons. Using a home built Mechanically Controlled Break Junction, it is reported here, for the first time, that this nano hot electron gas also radiates in the infrared range (0.2 eV to 1.2 eV). Moreover, following the description introduced by Tomchuk et al. (Sov. Phys.-Solid State, 8 (1966) 2510), we show that this radiation is compatible with a black-body–like spectrum emitted from an electron gas at temperatures of several thousands of kelvins.

  17. Global Dynamics of Hot Atomic Oxygen in Mars' Upper Atmosphere and Comparison with Recent Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.; Bougher, S. W.

    2012-12-01

    The production of energetic particles in Mars's upper thermosphere and exosphere results in the formation of hot atom coronae. Dissociative recombination (DR) of O2+ ion is the dominant source of the production of hot atomic oxygen and the most important reaction for the exosphere on Mars, which occurs mostly deep in the dayside thermosphere of Mars. In this investigation, we have carried out the study of the global dynamics of energetic particles in Mars' upper atmosphere using our newly developed self-consistent Monte-Carlo model. The calculated total global escapes of hot oxygen are presented for different solar activities (solar maximum and minimum) and Martian seasons (aphelion, equinox, and perihelion). To describe self-consistently the exosphere and the upper thermosphere, a combination of our 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) model [Valeille, A., Combi, M., Bougher, S., Tenishev, V., Nagy, A., 2009. J. Geophys. Res. 114, E11006. doi:10.1029/2009JE003389] and the 3D Mars Thermosphere General Circulation Model (MTGCM) [Bougher, S.W., Bell, J.M., Murphy, J.R., Lopez-Valverde, M.A., Withers, P.G., 2006. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, doi: 10.1029/2005GL024059. L02203] is used. Profiles of density and temperature, atmospheric loss rates, and return fluxes are studied using the model for the cases considered. Progress in updating the model physics is also described. Along with comparisons of our DSMC model outputs with those from other recent exosphere model studies, we present a comparison of our model results with the derived neutral oxygen density from atomic oxygen emission at 1304Å that was detected by Alice instrument on board European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft [Feldman, P., Steffl, A., Parker, J, A'Hearn, M., Bertaux, J., Stern, S., Weaver, H., Slater, D., Versteeg, M., Throop, H., Cunningham, N., Feaga, L., 2011. Icarus. 214, 2, 394-399, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.06.013].

  18. Collisional radiative model for heavy atoms in hot non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Klapisch, M.

    1997-07-01

    A collisional radiative model for calculating non-local-thermodynamical-equilibrium (non-LTE) spectra of heavy atoms in hot plasmas has been developed, taking into account the numerous excited and autoionizing states. This model uses superconfigurations as effective levels with an iterative procedure which converges to the detailed configuration spectrum. The non-LTE opacities and emissivities may serve as a reliable benchmark for simpler on-line models in hydrodynamic code simulations. The model is tested against detailed configuration calculations of selenium and is applied to non-LTE optically thin plasma of lutetium.

  19. Recent developments in atomic physics for the simulation of hot plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapisch, M.; Bar-Shalom, A.; Oreg, J.; Colombant, D.

    2001-05-01

    Simulations of plasmas in which atoms are not completely stripped require atomic data, like average charge, ionization energies, and radiative properties (emissivity, opacity). These depend on populations of energy levels. The basic framework for obtaining the latter is the collisional radiative model (CRM), which bridges the gap between the low-density Corona Equilibrium (CE) and Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). However, for nearly all but the simplest ions, the number of relevant bound states and cross sections is prohibitive. In this review we summarize some recent methods for handling complex ions: By focusing on an exact evaluation of relevant information and ignoring unobservable features, unresolved transition arrays (UTA) are obtained. The supertransition arrays (STA) model combines many UTAs in LTE. The STA code was recently extended to a non-LTE CRM called SCROLL. Using these models could improve radiation simulation in hot plasmas, even for simple spectra.

  20. Generating Molecular Rovibrational Coherence by Two-Photon Femtosecond Photoassociation of Thermally Hot Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michal; Moszynski, Robert; Koch, Christiane P.

    2011-12-30

    The formation of diatomic molecules with rotational and vibrational coherence is demonstrated experimentally in free-to-bound two-photon femtosecond photoassociation of hot atoms. In a thermal gas at a temperature of 1000 K, pairs of magnesium atoms, colliding in their electronic ground state, are excited into coherent superpositions of bound rovibrational levels in an electronically excited state. The rovibrational coherence is probed by a time-delayed third photon, resulting in quantum beats in the UV fluorescence. A comprehensive theoretical model based on ab initio calculations rationalizes the generation of coherence by Franck-Condon filtering of collision energies and partial waves, quantifying it in terms of an increase in quantum purity of the thermal ensemble. Our results open the way to coherent control of a binary reaction.

  1. Direct Atom Imaging by Chemical-Sensitive Holography.

    PubMed

    Lühr, Tobias; Winkelmann, Aimo; Nolze, Gert; Krull, Dominique; Westphal, Carsten

    2016-05-11

    In order to understand the physical and chemical properties of advanced materials, functional molecular adsorbates, and protein structures, a detailed knowledge of the atomic arrangement is essential. Up to now, if subsurface structures are under investigation, only indirect methods revealed reliable results of the atoms' spatial arrangement. An alternative and direct method is three-dimensional imaging by means of holography. Holography was in fact proposed for electron waves, because of the electrons' short wavelength at easily accessible energies. Further, electron waves are ideal structure probes on an atomic length scale, because electrons have a high scattering probability even for light elements. However, holographic reconstructions of electron diffraction patterns have in the past contained severe image artifacts and were limited to at most a few tens of atoms. Here, we present a general reconstruction algorithm that leads to high-quality atomic images showing thousands of atoms. Additionally, we show that different elements can be identified by electron holography for the example of FeS2. PMID:27070050

  2. Architectural and chemical insights into the origin of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-10-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of ``lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore is the widespread belief that hot Jupiters are less likely to be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets. I will show that in this case the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planetesimal-disk or planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets.

  3. Architectural and Chemical Insights into the Origin of Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.

    2015-08-01

    The origin of Jupiter-mass planets with orbital periods of only a few days is still uncertain. This problem has been with us for 20 years, long enough for significant progress to have been made, and also for a great deal of "lore" to have accumulated about the properties of these planets. Among this lore are the widespread beliefs that hot Jupiters are less likely be in multiple giant planet systems than longer-period giant planets, and that there is an excess of close-in giant planets with orbital periods near three days. I will show that in these cases the lore is not supported by the best data available today: hot Jupiters are not lonely and there is no evidence of a three-day pile-up. I will also show that stellar sodium abundance is inversely proportional to the probability that a star hosts a short-period giant planet. This observation is best explained by the effect of decreasing sodium abundance on protoplanetary disk structure and reveals that planet-disk interactions are critical for the existence of short-period giant planets. Collectively, these results support the importance of disk migration for the origin of short-period giant planets.

  4. Femtosecond two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms: A quantum dynamical study using thermal random phase wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michał; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Berglund, J. Martin; Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.

    2013-10-28

    Two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses, creating electronically excited magnesium dimer molecules, is studied from first principles, combining ab initio quantum chemistry and molecular quantum dynamics. This theoretical framework allows for rationalizing the generation of molecular rovibrational coherence from thermally hot atoms [L. Rybak, S. Amaran, L. Levin, M. Tomza, R. Moszynski, R. Kosloff, C. P. Koch, and Z. Amitay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 273001 (2011)]. Random phase thermal wavefunctions are employed to model the thermal ensemble of hot colliding atoms. Comparing two different choices of basis functions, random phase wavefunctions built from eigenstates are found to have the fastest convergence for the photoassociation yield. The interaction of the colliding atoms with a femtosecond laser pulse is modeled non-perturbatively to account for strong-field effects.

  5. Femtosecond two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms: A quantum dynamical study using thermal random phase wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaran, Saieswari; Kosloff, Ronnie; Tomza, Michał; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Pawłowski, Filip; Moszynski, Robert; Rybak, Leonid; Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Berglund, J. Martin; Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.

    2013-10-01

    Two-photon photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses, creating electronically excited magnesium dimer molecules, is studied from first principles, combining ab initio quantum chemistry and molecular quantum dynamics. This theoretical framework allows for rationalizing the generation of molecular rovibrational coherence from thermally hot atoms [L. Rybak, S. Amaran, L. Levin, M. Tomza, R. Moszynski, R. Kosloff, C. P. Koch, and Z. Amitay, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 273001 (2011)]. Random phase thermal wavefunctions are employed to model the thermal ensemble of hot colliding atoms. Comparing two different choices of basis functions, random phase wavefunctions built from eigenstates are found to have the fastest convergence for the photoassociation yield. The interaction of the colliding atoms with a femtosecond laser pulse is modeled non-perturbatively to account for strong-field effects.

  6. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Udo

    2014-12-10

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  7. Chemical reactions of excited nitrogen atoms for short wavelength chemical lasers. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-15

    Accomplishments of this program include the following: (1) Scalable, chemical generation of oxygen atoms by reaction of fluorine atoms and water vapor. (2) Production of nitrogen atom densities of 1 {times} 10{sup 1}5 cm{sup {minus}3} with 5% electrical efficiency by injecting trace amounts of fluorine into microwave discharged nitrogen. (3) Production of cyanide radicals by reaction of high densities of N atoms with cyanogen. (4) Production of carbon atoms by reaction of nitrogen atoms with cyanogen or with fluorine atoms and hydrogen cyanide. (5) Confirmation that the reaction of carbon atoms and carbonyl sulfide produces CS(a{sup 3} {Pi}{sub r}), as predicted by conservation of electron spin and orbital angular momenta and as proposed by others under another SWCL program. (6) Production of cyanide radicals by injection of cyanogen halides into active nitrogen and use as spectroscopic calibration source. (7) Demonstration that sodium atoms react with cyanogen chloride, bromide and iodide and with cyanuric trifluoride to produce cyanide radicals. (8) Demonstration of the potential utility of the fluorine atom plus ammonia reaction system in the production of NF(b{sup l}{Sigma}{sup +}) via N({sup 2}D) + F{sub 2}.

  8. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives. PMID:27307079

  9. Atomic-Resolution X-ray Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy Chemical Mapping of Substitutional Dy Atoms in a High-Coercivity Neodymium Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Masaru; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishida, Minoru; Daio, Takeshi; Matsumura, Syo

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated local element distributions in a Dy-doped Nd2Fe14B hot-deformed magnet by atomic-column resolution chemical mapping using an X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer (XEDS) attached to an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (Cs-corrected STEM). The positions of the Nd and Dy atomic columns were visualized in the XEDS maps. The substitution of Dy was limited to a surface layer 2-3 unit cells thick in the Nd2Fe14B grains, and the Dy atoms preferentially occupied the 4f-Nd sites of Nd2Fe14B. These results provide further insights into the principal mechanism governing the coercivity enhancement due to Dy doping.

  10. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic `hot' carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  11. Chemical control of electrical contact to sp2 carbon atoms

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Foti, Giuseppe; Scheurer, Fabrice; Speisser, Virginie; Schull, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures are attracting tremendous interest as components in ultrafast electronics and optoelectronics. The electrical interfaces to these structures play a crucial role for the electron transport, but the lack of control at the atomic scale can hamper device functionality and integration into operating circuitry. Here we study a prototype carbon-based molecular junction consisting of a single C60 molecule and probe how the electric current through the junction depends on the chemical nature of the foremost electrode atom in contact with the molecule. We find that the efficiency of charge injection to a C60 molecule varies substantially for the considered metallic species, and demonstrate that the relative strength of the metal-C bond can be extracted from our transport measurements. Our study further suggests that a single-C60 junction is a basic model to explore the properties of electrical contacts to meso- and macroscopic sp2 carbon structures. PMID:24736561

  12. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  13. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  14. Chemical hydrofracturing of the Hot Dry Rock reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, Leonid

    1996-01-24

    The experimental study of the water-rock interaction shows that the secondary mineral assemblage depends on the water composition. For example, granite-pure water interaction produces zeolites (relatively low-dense, Mg-poor minerals), whereas seawater yields chlorites (high-dense, Mg-rich minerals). The reactions have volumetric effects from several % to 20 % in magnitude. Volume deformations in the heterogeneous matrix cause uneven mechanical strains. Reactions with the effect of about 0,1 vol.% may cause strains of the order of 100-1000 bars being enough for destruction of rocks. Signs and magnitudes of local volume changes depend on the mineral composition of the secondary assemblage. Hence, one can provide either healing or cracking of primary fractures, as desired, by changing the composition of water in the water-felsic rock system where some elements (Mg, Fe) are in lack. The techniques of "chemical hydrofracturing" looks promising as applied to a granite HDR massif. One can regulate the permeability of fractured flow paths by changing in concord the composition and pressure of the injected water. This approach should promote efficient extraction of the petrothermal energy.

  15. Heat transfer and flow in an atomizing mist jet: a combined hot film and shadowgraph imaging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Oisín F. P.; Quinn, Cian; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina B.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents research in the area of heat transfer and fluid dynamics in an impinging atomizing air/water mist jet. Time averaged and fluctuating local surface heat transfer results obtained by microfoil and hot film sensors are correlated with flow field measurements of droplet diameter and velocity obtained by shadowgraph imaging and droplet tracking velocimetry. This paper seeks to understand the linkage between the atomization process in the nozzle, the two-phase flow dynamics and the surface heat transfer characteristics.

  16. Atmospheric mass loss from Hot Jupiters: chemical reactions and a new hypothesis for the origin of water in habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Rafael; Boechat-Roberty, Heloisa M.

    2015-08-01

    The chemistry along the mass loss of Hot Jupiters is generally considered to be simple, consisting mainly of atoms, prevented from forming more complex species by the intense radiation field from their host stars. However, the results of our chemical reaction simulations, involving 56 species and 566 reactions, indicate that many simple molecules, including H2O+ and OH+, are formed along the mass loss of HD 209458 b and analogs, in a region farther away from the planet, where the temperature is lower (T < 2000 K). Our simulations included benzene formation reactions; the results indicate that carbon chain species are not formed in the mass loss of HD 209458 b. We also formulate a new hypothesis for the origin of water on the surface of habitable planets in general: chemical interaction of their primordial atmospheres with hydrogen and oxygen ions from the atmospheric mass loss of primordial, low density Hot Jupiters. This mechanism could have possibly operated in the Solar System and accounted for the formation of the oceans of the Earth.

  17. Excitation of atomic nuclei in hot plasma through resonance inverse electron bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, E. V.; Akhrameev, E. V.; Arutyunyan, R. V.; Bol'shov, L. A.; Kondratenko, P. S.

    2014-09-01

    A process of nucleus excitation by photons under the mechanism of the inverse electron bridge (IEB) is examined provided the energies of atomic and nuclear transitions coincide. It is shown that in this case, the excitation of nuclei with EL[ML] transition with the energy ωN≲10keV is strengthened relative to the process of photoabsorption by nucleus by a factor of 1/(ωNr0)2(L +2) [e4/(ωNr0)2(L+2)], where r0 is a typical size of domain in the ion shell for accumulation of electronic integrals. In the Rb84 nuclei the IEB cross section for the 3.4 keV M1 transition 6-(463.59 keV) ↔5-(463.59keV ) can exceed even a photoexcitation cross section for the 3.4keVE1 transition with the reduced probability in the Weisskopf model BW .u.(E1)=1. This result can be important for understanding the mechanisms of atomic nucleus excitation in hot plasma. In particular, the considered process is capable to provide the existence of so called gamma luminescence wave or a nuclear isomer "burning" wave—an analog of self-maintaining process of triggered depopulation of nuclear isomer.

  18. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of hot springs along the along the Neogene Malawi rift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atekwana, E. A.; Tsokonombwe, G. W.; Elsenbeck, J.; Wanless, V. D.; Atekwana, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    We measured the concentrations of major ions and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and the stable isotopes of carbon (δ13CDIC), hydrogen (δD) and oxygen (δ18O) of hot springs along the Neogene Malawi rift. We compared the results with those of streams and a cold spring. We aimed to assess the hot springs for evidence of addition of mantle mass, specifically water and carbon and (2) determine the processes that control the chemical and isotopic evolution of the hot springs. Understanding the source(s) of heat for the springs and if the chemical and isotopic characteristics show evidence of mantle processes is an important goal of the Project for Rift Initiation, Development and Evolution (PRIDE). The temperature of the hot springs ranged from 35 to 80 ºC. High temperature anomalies are observed between latitudes 10 to 11, 12 to 13 and 15 to 16 degrees south along the rift axis. The δD and δ18O for the cold spring, hot springs and streams had a similar range, were positively correlated and lie on the trend of the local meteoric water line. We suggest negligible contribution of water from a connate or magmatic source and limited oxygen exchange from water-rock interaction or CO2 exchange from deep sedimentary carbonates. The DIC concentrations of the hot springs are higher (5 to 61 mg C/L) than those of streams (2 to 28 mg C/L) indicating addition of carbon to the DIC pool during the circulation of some springs. The range in the δ13CDIC of the hot springs (-17 to -8‰) is broader and lower compared to streams (-12 to -5‰) due to addition of carbon with a δ13CDIC of -15‰ to the spring water during circulation. Our results indicate that (1) the source of water for the hot springs is meteoric, (2) the hot springs have not experienced extensive water-rock interaction due to fast circulation suggesting highly permeable fault zones, (3) the source of carbon in the DIC of the hot springs is mostly CO2(g) from the soil zone and (4) the springs are heated by normal

  19. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage. PMID:22097561

  20. A THREE-PHASE CHEMICAL MODEL OF HOT CORES: THE FORMATION OF GLYCINE

    SciTech Connect

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures {approx}40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}-8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9}, occurring at {approx}200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH{sub 2}, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  1. A Three-phase Chemical Model of Hot Cores: The Formation of Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrod, Robin T.

    2013-03-01

    A new chemical model is presented that simulates fully coupled gas-phase, grain-surface, and bulk-ice chemistry in hot cores. Glycine (NH2CH2COOH), the simplest amino acid, and related molecules such as glycinal, propionic acid, and propanal, are included in the chemical network. Glycine is found to form in moderate abundance within and upon dust-grain ices via three radical-addition mechanisms, with no single mechanism strongly dominant. Glycine production in the ice occurs over temperatures ~40-120 K. Peak gas-phase glycine fractional abundances lie in the range 8 × 10-11-8 × 10-9, occurring at ~200 K, the evaporation temperature of glycine. A gas-phase mechanism for glycine production is tested and found insignificant, even under optimal conditions. A new spectroscopic radiative-transfer model is used, allowing the translation and comparison of the chemical-model results with observations of specific sources. Comparison with the nearby hot-core source NGC 6334 IRS1 shows excellent agreement with integrated line intensities of observed species, including methyl formate. The results for glycine are consistent with the current lack of a detection of this molecule toward other sources; the high evaporation temperature of glycine renders the emission region extremely compact. Glycine detection with ALMA is predicted to be highly plausible, for bright, nearby sources with narrow emission lines. Photodissociation of water and subsequent hydrogen abstraction from organic molecules by OH, and NH2, are crucial to the buildup of complex organic species in the ice. The inclusion of alternative branches within the network of radical-addition reactions appears important to the abundances of hot-core molecules; less favorable branching ratios may remedy the anomalously high abundance of glycolaldehyde predicted by this and previous models.

  2. CHEMICAL SEGREGATION TOWARD MASSIVE HOT CORES: THE AFGL2591 STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Serra, I.; Zhang, Q.; Viti, S.; Martin-Pintado, J.; De Wit, W.-J. E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jmartin@cab.inta-csic.es

    2012-07-01

    We present high angular resolution observations (0.''5 Multiplication-Sign 0.''3) carried out with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) toward the AFGL2591 high-mass star-forming region. Our SMA images reveal a clear chemical segregation within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core, where different molecular species (Types I, II, and III) appear distributed in three concentric shells. This is the first time that such a chemical segregation is ever reported at linear scales {<=}3000 AU within a hot core. While Type I species (H{sub 2}S and {sup 13}CS) peak at the AFGL2591 VLA 3 protostar, Type II molecules (HC{sub 3}N, OCS, SO, and SO{sub 2}) show a double-peaked structure circumventing the continuum peak. Type III species, represented by CH{sub 3}OH, form a ring-like structure surrounding the continuum emission. The excitation temperatures of SO{sub 2}, HC{sub 3}N, and CH{sub 3}OH (185 {+-} 11 K, 150 {+-} 20 K, and 124 {+-} 12 K, respectively) show a temperature gradient within the AFGL2591 VLA 3 envelope, consistent with previous observations and modeling of the source. By combining the H{sub 2}S, SO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH images, representative of the three concentric shells, we find that the global kinematics of the molecular gas follow Keplerian-like rotation around a 40 M{sub Sun} star. The chemical segregation observed toward AFGL2591 VLA 3 is explained by the combination of molecular UV photodissociation and a high-temperature ({approx}1000 K) gas-phase chemistry within the low extinction innermost region in the AFGL2591 VLA 3 hot core.

  3. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-11

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic ‘hot’ carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem intomore » three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions. As a result, we identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.« less

  4. Experimental investigations of reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with molecular hydrogen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    The state-to-state integral rate constants were measured for the three reactions: (1) D + H[sub 2](vj) [yields] HD(v[prime] = 0,1,2;j) + H at E[sub rel] = 1.4 and 0.8 eV and (2) H + D[sub 2] [yields] HD(v[prime] = 1,j[prime]) + D at E[sub rel] = 2.2 and 2.5 eV, and (3) H + D[sub 2]O [yields] HD(v[prime],j[prime]), + OD at E[sub rel] = 2.7 eV. The reagents were either in the ground state, (v = 0,j), or for the D + H[sub 2] work prepared in the first excited vibrational state, (v = 1, j = 1), by stimulated Raman pumping. Translationally hot D(H) atoms were generated by UV photolysis of D(H)I. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry were employed to detect the nascent HD product in a quantum-state-specific manner. For the reaction D + H[sub 2] we find that vibrational excitation of the H[sub 2] reagent results in: (1) substantial HD rotational excitation for each product vibrational state, (2) a [open quotes]heating[close quotes] of the vibrational product state distribution, and (3) almost no change in the total rate into HD(v[prime] = 0,1,2;j[prime]). The experimental results are consistent with a model in which internal energy of the reagents is conserved. Good to excellent agreement is found between the experiment and recent quantum-mechanical (QM) scattering calculations. The reaction H + D[sub 2] [yields] HD(v[prime] = 1,j[prime]) + D was studied at high collision energies. These experiments provide data that will be useful for determining the importance of the Jahn-Teller effect in reactive scattering systems and to the development of theoretical techniques in which the ground and first excited electronic surfaces are included in QM calculations. For the reaction H + D[sub 2]O, approximately 35% (12% in vibration, 23% in rotation) of the available energy is partitioned into the internal modes of the HD product.

  5. Moderation and absorption effects on hot replacement reactions of sup 38 Cl atoms in mixtures of o-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Berei, K.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.; Szatmary, Z.; Vass, Sz. )

    1990-03-22

    Conditions are given for the equivalence of the Estrup-Wolfgang description of the hot atom reaction kinetics with the first-order Hurwitz approximation in the neutron slowing down theory. Conclusions are drawn for the applicability of this approach for describing hot atom replacement processes in reactive mixtures. Analytical and numerical calculations were carried out to explain an unusual concentration dependence of {sup 38}Cl-for-Cl substitution, found experimentally in liquid binary mixtures of o-dichlorobenzene and hexafluorobenzene.

  6. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  7. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  8. Chemical Principles Revisited: Updating the Atomic Theory in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Mark

    1984-01-01

    Presents a descriptive overview of recent achievements in atomic structure to provide instructors with the background necessary to enhance their classroom presentations. Topics considered include hadrons, quarks, leptons, forces, and the unified fields theory. (JN)

  9. Extracting chemical information from plane wave calculations by a 3D 'fuzzy atoms' analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakó, I.; Stirling, A.; Seitsonen, A. P.; Mayer, I.

    2013-03-01

    Bond order and valence indices have been calculated by the method of the three-dimensional 'fuzzy atoms' analysis, using the numerical molecular orbitals obtained from plane wave DFT calculations, i.e., without introducing any external atom-centered functions. Weight functions of both Hirshfeld and Becke types have been applied. The results are rather close to the similar 'fuzzy atoms' ones obtained by using atom-centered basis sets and agree well with the chemical expectations, stressing the power of the genuine chemical concepts.

  10. Ion-atom charge-transfer reactions and a hot intercloud medium. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the ionization equilibrium of carbon in a hot intercloud medium (ICM), taking into account various charge-transfer reactions. Attention is given to problems related to observations of carbon along the lines of sight to several unreddened stars. It is pointed out that the observed underabundance of C III and overabundance of C I can be consistent with the presence of a hot, partially ionized ICM, provided that two of the charge-transfer reactions considered are rapid at thermal energies.

  11. Chemical and physical degradation of glass fiber reinforced cross-linked polyester immersed in hot water

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, H.; Maekawa, Z.I.; Ikuta, N.; Kiyosumi, K.; Tanimoto, T.; Morii, T.

    1994-12-31

    This study deals with chemical and physical degradation behavior of randomly oriented E-glass fiber continuous strand mat reinforced cross-linked polyester immersed in hot water at 80 and 95 C. The specimens were immersed in hot water for 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, 1000, 3000 and 4000h. Weight change measurement, three-point bending and infrared measurement were performed for the specimens after the immersion. Changes of the weight gain indicated the Fickian diffusion at early immersion time, and after that, it indicated the non-Fickian diffusion with a gradual progress of debonding between fiber and matrix. This degradation of the interface caused a remarkable increase of the weight loss, which was never observed in neat resin. The bending modulus decreased with increase of the weight gain at early immersion time, however, it kept constant at longer immersion time both at 80 C and at 95 C. The constant modulus level at 80C was higher than that at 95 C. At longer immersion time at 80 C, the modulus decreased again to the same level at 95C. The results of infrared measurement suggested the difference of degradation mechanism between early immersion time and longer immersion time. At early immersion time, the resin changed physically by swelling and extraction of polymer with water penetration. Such differences of degradation affected the reduction of modulus. Moreover, the effect of the debonding at the interface on the modulus was discussed by the finite element analysis by introducing the damage mechanics.

  12. Thermoelectric Power of Nanocrystalline Silicon Prepared by Hot-Wire Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Brian; Liu, Xiao; Jugdersuren, Battogtokh; Queen, Daniel; Metcalf, Thomas; Culbertson, James; Chervin, Christopher; Stroud, Rhonda; Nemeth, William; Wang, Qi

    Although doped bulk silicon possesses a favorable Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity, its thermal conductivity is too large for practical thermoelectric applications. Thin film nanocrystalline silicon prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition (HWCVD) is an established material used in multijunction amorphous silicon solar cells. Its potential in low cost and scalable thermoelectric applications depends on achieving a low thermal conductivity without sacrificing thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity. We examine the thermoelectric power of boron-doped HWCVD nanocrystalline silicon and find that it is comparable to doped nanostructured silicon alloys prepared by other methods. Given the low thermal conductivity and high electrical conductivity of these materials, they can achieve a high thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Electrical properties of boron-doped MWNTs synthesized by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, S.; Nagao, M.; Watanabe, T.; Tsuda, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takano, Y.

    2009-10-01

    We have synthesized a large amount of boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. The synthesis was carried out in a flask using a methanol solution of boric acid as a source material. The scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were performed to evaluate the structural properties of the obtained MWNTs. In order to evaluate the electrical properties, temperature dependence of resistivity was measured in an individual MWNTs with four metal electrodes. The Raman shifts suggest carrier injection into the boron-doped MWNTs, but the resistivity of the MWNTs was high and increased strongly with decreasing temperature. Defects induced by the plasma may cause this enhanced resistivity.

  14. Fabrication of commercial-scale fiber-reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.R.

    1992-11-01

    Goal was to fabricate a filter for removing particulates from hot gases; principal applications would be in advanced utility processes such as pressurized fluidized bed combustion or coal gasification combined cycle systems. Filters were made in two steps: make a ceramic fiber preform and coat it with SiC by chemical vapor infiltration (CVD). The most promising construction was felt/filament wound. Light, tough ceramic composite filters can be made; reinforcement by continuous fibers is needed to avoid brittleness. Direct metal to filter contact does not damage the top which simplifies installation. However, much of the filter surface of felt/filament wound structures is closed over by the CVD coating, and the surface is rough and subject to delamination. Recommendations are given for improving the filters.

  15. Evidence of hot electron-induced chemical degradation in electroluminescence spectra of polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, Gilbert; Laurent, Christian

    2008-02-15

    Unlike semiconducting organics, insulating polymers exhibit electroluminescence features that cannot be interpreted on the basis of the photophysical properties of the material. In particular, it is shown for the first time that the spectral components observed in electroluminescence of polyethylene can only be reproduced when the material is irradiated by an electron beam. This shows that hot electron impact is a driving process in electroluminescence and that the excited states decay route goes along the chemical pathway ending with molecular fragmentation. From these results, electroluminescence and electrical degradation can be associated in an implicit scheme, opening the way for defining safety limits in terms of electric stresses applied to a material for a given application.

  16. Growth, delta-doping and characterization of diamond films by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtengi, Bokani

    The synthesis of high-quality heteroepitaxial diamond films continues to attract interesting research possibilities for the development of diamond devices. Diamond has great properties; mechanical, optical, electrical and its natural impurities that can be explored for various applications. The color centers are widely recognized as promising solid-state platform for quantum computing applications. We report successful heteroepitaxial growth and delta doping of color centers in hot filament chemical vapor deposited diamond films composed of nitrogen, germanium and silicon indicated by the strong photoluminescence intensity peaks obtained using the confocal microscope. We studied the effect of hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions on the quality of diamond films grown on silicon and silicon carbide substrates. The effect of substrate distance, the methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases flow rates and ratios, substrate growth and filament temperature, growth time and growth termination procedures on diamond film quality are discussed. The relatively good quality of these films was confirmed by several spectroscopic techniques including, Raman spectroscopy that gave insights into the relative sp2/sp3 bonding configurations, the residual strain and the crystalline quality. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the grain size and morphology. In-situ growth monitoring was studied using the laser reflectance interferometer (LRI) tool, which provides data for thickness, growth rate measurements and guidance for nitrogen doping. Optimal growth conditions that lead to synthesis of high quality heteroepitaxial diamond layer at growth rate of 0.5microm/hr were determined. The delta-doped samples have been analyzed using the confocal optical microscope to measure their spin-dependent photoluminescence intensity (IPL). Electrical properties of the undoped diamond films have been measured using the Hall effects measurement for resistivity and

  17. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is it Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Mercè; Adúriz-Bravo, Agustín

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process of evidence construction, new contributions from physicists and physical chemists that were incorporated to chemical research acquired ‘chemical’ meaning, since they were related to research questions that genuinely came from chemistry. Conversely, the core ideas of 19th-century chemical atomism, among which we must highlight valence and Mendeleev’s periodic system, provided ‘clues’ for imagining an atom in terms of the elements adjusted to their chemical behaviour, which changed periodically as a function of atomic mass. With this, chemistry ceased to be a descriptive science and began to be a ‘law-based’, theoretical science. Little by little, chemistry teaching became the teaching of the internal structure of atoms, which were arranged in the Periodic Table according to criteria and ‘construction rules’ related to quantum mechanics. We pose the question: ‘how can we now teach general chemistry in a way that does not disregard current knowledge about the structure of the atom yet, at the same time, gives priority to chemical criteria, thus making such structure useful to interpret chemical change?’.

  18. Detection of hot muonic hydrogen atoms emitted in vacuum using x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. ); Bailey, J.M. ); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. ); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. ); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. ); Huber, T.M. ); Kammel, P

    1992-01-01

    Negative muons are stopped in solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. It was found that the time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law where the rate is the same as the disappearance rate of [mu][sup -]p atoms. The pp[mu]-formation rate and the muon transfer rate to deuterium are deduced.

  19. Chemical reactions involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions; Cr203 + 2 Na2S04(1) + 3/2 02 yields 2 Na2Cr04(1) + 2 S03(g)n TiO2 + Na2S04(1) yields Na20(T102)n + 503(g)n T102 + Na2Cro4(1) yields Na2(T102)n + Cr03(g).

  20. Gas temperature measurements inside a hot wall chemical vapor synthesis reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notthoff, Christian; Schilling, Carolin; Winterer, Markus

    2012-11-01

    One key but complex parameter in the chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) of nanoparticles is the time temperature profile of the gas phase, which determines particle characteristics such as size (distribution), morphology, microstructure, crystal, and local structure. Relevant for the CVS process and for the corresponding particle characteristics is, however, not the T(t)-profile generated by an external energy source such as a hot wall or microwave reactor but the temperature of the gas carrying reactants and products (particles). Due to a complex feedback of the thermodynamic and chemical processes in the reaction volume with the external energy source, it is very difficult to predict the real gas phase temperature field from the externally applied T(t)-profile. Therefore, a measurement technique capable to determine the temperature distribution of the gas phase under process conditions is needed. In this contribution, we demonstrate with three proof of principle experiments the use of laser induced fluorescence thermometry to investigate the CVS process under realistic conditions.

  1. Chemical mechanisms and reaction rates for the initiation of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium-sulfate-induced hot corrosion of preoxidized IN-738 was studied at 975 C with special emphasis placed on the processes occurring during the long induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for predetermined periods of time, and then one set of specimens was washed with water. Chemical analysis of the wash solutions yielded information about water soluble metal salts and residual sulfate. A second set of samples was cross sectioned dry and polished in a nonaqueous medium. Element distributions within the oxide scale were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. Evolution of SO was monitored throughout the thermogravimetric tests. Kinetic rate studies were performed for several pertinent processes; appropriate rate constants were obtained from the following chemical reactions: Cr2O3 + 2 Na2SO4(1) + 3/2 O2 yields 2 Na2CrO4(1) + 2 SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2SO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + SO3(g)n TiO2 + Na2CrO4(1) yields Na2O(TiO2)n + CrO3(g).

  2. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  3. Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Polycrystalline Silicon : From Gas Molecule To Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenendaal, P. A. T. T.

    2002-10-01

    Although the effort to investigate the use of renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar energy, has increased, their contribution to the total energy consumption remains insignificant. The conversion of solar energy into electricity through solar cells is one of the most promising techniques, but the use of these cells is limited by the high cost of electricity. The major contributions to these costs are the material and manufacturing costs. Over the past decades, the development of silicon based thin film solar cells has received much attention, because the fabrication costs are low. A promising material for use in thin film solar cells is polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si:H). A relatively new technique to deposit poly-Si:H is Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (Hot-Wire CVD), in which the reactant gases are catalytically decomposed at the surface of a hot filament, mainly tungsten and tantalum. The main advantages of Hot-Wire CVD over PE-CVD are absence of ion bombardment, high deposition rate, low equipment cost and high gas utilization. This thesis deals with the full spectrum of deposition, characterization and application of poly-Si:H thin films, i.e. from gas molecule to solar cell. Studies on the decomposition of silane on the filament showed that the process is catalytic of nature and that silane is decomposed into Si and 4H. The dominant gas phase reaction is the reaction of Si and H with silane, resulting in SiH3, Si2H6, Si3H6 and H2SiSiH2. The film growth precursors are Si, SiH3 and Si2H4. Also, XPS results on used tantalum and tungsten filaments are discussed. The position dependent measurements show larger silicon contents at the ends of the tungsten filament, as compared to the middle, due to a lower filament temperature. This effect is insignificant for a tantalum filament. Deposition time dependent measurements show an increase in silicon content of the tungsten filament with time, while the silicon content on the tantalum filament saturates

  4. Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

    2009-06-01

    We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures < 750..deg..C, demonstrate open-circuit voltages > 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

  5. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  6. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  7. Neutral atom analyzers for diagnosing hot plasmas: A review of research at the ioffe physicotechnical institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakov, A. I.; Petrov, M. P.

    2009-07-01

    Research on neutral particle diagnostics of thermonuclear plasmas that has been carried out in recent years at the Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (St. Petersburg, Russia) is reviewed. Work on the creation and improvement of neutral atom analyzers was done in two directions: for potential applications (in particular, on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which is now under construction at Cadarache in France) and for investigation of the ion plasma component in various devices (in particular, in the largest tokamaks, such as JET, TFTR, and JT-60). Neutral atom analyzers are the main tool for studying the behavior of hydrogen ions and isotopes in magnetic confinement systems. They make it possible to determine energy spectra, to perform the isotope analysis of atom fluxes from the plasma, to measure the absolute intensity of the fluxes, and to record how these parameters vary with time. A comparative description of the analyzers developed in recent years at the Ioffe Institute is given. These are ACORD-12/24 analyzers for recording 0.2-100-keV hydrogen and deuterium atoms with a tunable range of simultaneously measured energies, CNPA compact analyzers for a fixed energy gain in the ranges 80-1000 eV and 0.8-100 keV, an ISEP analyzer for simultaneously recording the atoms of all the three hydrogen isotopes (H, D, and T) in the energy range 5-700 keV, and GEMMA analyzers for recording atom fluxes of hydrogen and helium isotopes in the range 0.1-4 MeV. The scintillating detectors of the ISEP and GEMMA analyzers have a lowered sensitivity to neutrons and thus can operate without additional shielding in neutron fields of up to 109 n/(cm2 s). These two types of analyzers, intended to operate under deuterium-tritium plasma conditions, are prototypes of atom analyzers created at the Ioffe Institute for use in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. With these analyzers, a number of new results have been

  8. On a new method for chemical production of iodine atoms in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2004-11-30

    A new method is proposed for generating iodine atoms in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. The method is based on a branched chain reaction of dissociation of the alkyl iodide CH{sub 3}I in a medium of singlet oxygen and chlorine. (active media)

  9. Deducing chemical structure from crystallographically determined atomic coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Ian J.; Shields, Gregory P.; Taylor, Robin

    2011-01-01

    An improved algorithm has been developed for assigning chemical structures to incoming entries to the Cambridge Structural Database, using only the information available in the deposited CIF. Steps in the algorithm include detection of bonds, selection of polymer unit, resolution of disorder, and assignment of bond types and formal charges. The chief difficulty is posed by the large number of metallo-organic crystal structures that must be processed, given our aspiration that assigned chemical structures should accurately reflect properties such as the oxidation states of metals and redox-active ligands, metal coordination numbers and hapticities, and the aromaticity or otherwise of metal ligands. Other complications arise from disorder, especially when it is symmetry imposed or modelled with the SQUEEZE algorithm. Each assigned structure is accompanied by an estimate of reliability and, where necessary, diagnostic information indicating probable points of error. Although the algorithm was written to aid building of the Cambridge Structural Database, it has the potential to develop into a general-purpose tool for adding chemical information to newly determined crystal structures. PMID:21775812

  10. In situ observation of thermomigration of Sn atoms to the hot end of 96.5Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu flip chip solder joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Fan-Yi; Kao, C.-L.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the phenomenon of thermomigration in 96.5Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu flip chip solder joints at an ambient temperature of 150 °C. We observed mass protrusion on the chip side (hot end), indicating that Sn atoms moved to the hot end, and void formation on the substrate side (cold end). The diffusion markers also moved to the substrate side, in the same direction of the vacancy flux, indicating that the latter played a dominant role during the thermomigration process. The molar heat of transport (Q*) of the Sn atoms was 3.38 kJ/mol.

  11. Hydrogen atom initiated chemistry. [chemical evolution in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. H.; Becker, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    H Atoms have been created by the photolysis of H2S. These then initiated reactions in mixtures involving acetylene-ammonia-water and ethylene-ammonia-water. In the case of the acetylene system, the products consisted of two amino acids, ethylene and a group of primarily cyclic thio-compounds, but no free sulfur. In the case of the ethylene systems, seven amino acids, including an aromatic one, ethane, free sulfur, and a group of solely linear thio-compounds were produced. Total quantum yields for the production of amino acids were about 3 x 10 to the -5th and about 2 x 10 to the -4th with ethylene and acetylene respectively as carbon substrates. Consideration is given of the mechanism for the formation of some of the products and implications regarding planetary atmosphere chemistry, particularly that of Jupiter, are explored.

  12. GHz Rabi Flopping to Rydberg States in Hot Atomic Vapor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, B.; Baluktsian, T.; Schlagmueller, M.; Koelle, A.; Kuebler, H.; Loew, R.; Pfau, T.

    2011-12-09

    We report on the observation of Rabi oscillations to a Rydberg state on a time scale below 1 ns in thermal rubidium vapor. We use a bandwidth-limited pulsed excitation and observe up to 6 full Rabi cycles within a pulse duration of {approx}4 ns. We find good agreement between the experiment and numerical simulations based on a surprisingly simple model. This result shows that fully coherent dynamics with Rydberg states can be achieved even in thermal atomic vapor, thus suggesting small vapor cells as a platform for room-temperature quantum devices. Furthermore, the result implies that previous coherent dynamics in single-atom Rydberg gates can be accelerated by 3 orders of magnitude.

  13. Interaction of hot swirling air and liquid film flow in airblast atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Wolfgang W.; Bendisch, Holger; Eickhoff, Heinrich; Thiele, Frank

    The flowfield in an airblast atomizer of the prefilming type is studied numerically. Special attention is drawn to the flow near the liquid film surface, which is calculated using a boundary-layer method. Thereby near-wall effects (e.g., evaporation) are exactly accounted for. The main nozzle flow is calculated using the Navier-Stokes equations. Both systems are linked by the boundary conditions. The results for an airblast atomizer with adjacent combustion chamber show significant differences between coupled and uncoupled calculations. It is shown that the detailed modeling of the film and the coupled calculation, which accounts exactly for boundary-layer effects including evaporation, is essential for accurate simulations.

  14. Hot atom populations in the terrestrial atmosphere. A comparison of the nonlinear and linearized Boltzmann equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sospedra-Alfonso, Reinel; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2012-11-01

    We use a finite difference discretization method to solve the space homogeneous, isotropic nonlinear Boltzmann equation. We study the time evolution of the distribution function in relation to the solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation for three different initial conditions. The relaxation process is described in terms of the Laguerre moments and the spectral properties of the linearized collision operator. The motivation is the need to include self-collisions in the study of suprathermal oxygen atoms in the terrestrial exosphere.

  15. Chemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas compositions of the hot springs of the Owyhee Uplands, Malheur County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariner, R.H.; Young, H.W.; Evans, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Hot springs along the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon between Three Forks and Lake Owyhee could be part of a north flowing regional system or a series of small separate geothermal systems Heat for the waters could be from a very young (Holocene) volcanic activity (basalt flows) of the Owyhee Uplands or the regional heat flow. The springs discharge warm to hot, dilute, slightly alkaline, sodium bicarbonate water. Chemically they are similar to the dilute thermal water at Bruneau Grand View and Twin Falls, Idaho. Maximum aquifer temperatures in the Owyhee Uplands, estimated from chemical geothermometry, are about 100°C. Dissolved helium concentrations, carbon 14 activity, and chemical and isotope data are examined fro systematic trends which would indicate a geothermal system of regional extent.

  16. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  17. Plasma effects in aligned carbon nanoflake growth by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. B.; Zheng, K.; Cheng, Q. J.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanofilms are directly grown on silicon substrates by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition in methane environment. It is shown that the nanofilms are composed of aligned carbon nanoflakes by extensive investigation of experimental results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In comparison with the graphene-like films grown without plasmas, the carbon nanoflakes grow in an alignment mode and the growth rate of the films is increased. The effects of the plasma on the growth of the carbon nanofilms are studied. The plasma plays three main effects of (1) promoting the separation of the carbon nanoflakes from the silicon substrate, (2) accelerating the motion of hydrocarbon radicals, and (3) enhancing the deposition of hydrocarbon ions onto the substrate surface. Due to these plasma-specific effects, the carbon nanofilms can be formed from the aligned carbon nanoflakes with a high rate. These results advance our knowledge on the synthesis, properties and applications of graphene-based materials.

  18. Synthesis of SiO{sub 2}/β-SiC/graphite hybrid composite by low temperature hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhikun; Bi, Kaifeng; Liu, Yanhong; Qin, Fuwen; Liu, Hongzhu; Bian, Jiming; Zhang, Dong; Miao, Lihua

    2013-11-18

    β-SiC thin films were synthesized directly on graphite by hot filament chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SiH{sub 4} diluted in hydrogen was employed as the silicon source, while graphite was functioned as both substrate and carbon source for the as-grown β-SiC films. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis indicate that SiO{sub 2}/β-SiC/graphite hybrid composite was formed after post annealing treatment, and its crystalline quality can be remarkably improved under optimized annealing conditions. The possible growth mechanism was proposed based on in situ etching of graphite by reactive hydrogen radicals at the atomic level.

  19. Direct chemical conversion of graphene to boron- and nitrogen- and carbon-containing atomic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yongji; Shi, Gang; Zhang, Zhuhua; Zhou, Wu; Jung, Jeil; Gao, Weilu; Ma, Lulu; Yang, Yang; Yang, Shubin; You, Ge; Vajtai, Robert; Xu, Qianfan; MacDonald, Allan H.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Lou, Jun; Liu, Zheng; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphene and hexagonal boron nitride are typical conductor and insulator, respectively, while their hybrids hexagonal boron carbonitride are promising as a semiconductor. Here we demonstrate a direct chemical conversion reaction, which systematically converts the hexagonal carbon lattice of graphene to boron nitride, making it possible to produce uniform boron nitride and boron carbonitride structures without disrupting the structural integrity of the original graphene templates. We synthesize high-quality atomic layer films with boron-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing atomic layers with full range of compositions. Using this approach, the electrical resistance, carrier mobilities and bandgaps of these atomic layers can be tuned from conductor to semiconductor to insulator. Combining this technique with lithography, local conversion could be realized at the nanometre scale, enabling the fabrication of in-plane atomic layer structures consisting of graphene, boron nitride and boron carbonitride. This is a step towards scalable synthesis of atomically thin two-dimensional integrated circuits.

  20. Determining chemically and spatially resolved atomic profile of low contrast interface structure with high resolution.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P C; Lodha, G S

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  1. Determining Chemically and Spatially Resolved Atomic Profile of Low Contrast Interface Structure with High Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Maheswar; Pradhan, P. C.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present precise measurements of atomic distributions of low electron density contrast at a buried interface using soft x-ray resonant scattering. This approach allows one to construct chemically and spatially highly resolved atomic distribution profile upto several tens of nanometer in a non-destructive and quantitative manner. We demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to resolve compositional differences of few atomic percent in nano-scaled layered structures of elements with poor electron density differences (0.05%). The present study near the edge of potential impurities in soft x-ray range for low-Z system will stimulate the activity in that field. PMID:25726866

  2. Charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with multiply charged ions in a hot plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V. A.; Baryshnikov, F. F.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    1980-08-01

    The symmetry properties of the hydrogen atom were used to calculate the charge exchange cross sections sigma of hydrogen with the nuclei of multiply charged ions, while allowance was made for the degeneration of final states. If the transitions between these states produced by rotation of the internuclear axis are taken into account, there is a qualitative change in the dependence of sigma on v for low values of v (a gradual decrease in the cross section instead of the exponential one in the Landau-Zener model) and also a considerable increase in the peak cross section. The cross sections are calculated for a wide range of velocities and charge values-Z. The distribution of final states over orbital angular momenta is found.

  3. Development Of Hot Surface Polysilicon-Based Chemical Sensor And Actuator With Integrated Catalytic Micropatterns For Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.

    2009-05-01

    Over the last twenty years, we have followed a rapid expansion in the development of chemical sensors and microreactors for detection and analysis of volatile organic compounds. However, for many of the developed gas sensors poor sensitivity and selectivity, and high-power consumption remain among one of the main drawbacks. One promising approach to increase selectivity at lower power consumption is calorimetric sensing, performed in a pulsed regime and using specific catalytic materials. In this work, we study kinetics of various catalytic oxidation reactions using micromachined hot surface polysilicon-based sensor containing sensitive and selective catalysts. The sensor acts as both thermal actuator of chemical and biochemical reactions on hot-surfaces and detector of heats (enthalpies) associated with these reactions. Using novel deposition techniques we integrated selective catalysts in an array of hot plates such that they can be thermally actuated and sensed individually. This allows selective detection and analysis of dangerous gas compounds in a mixture, specifically hydrocarbons at concentrations down to low ppm level. In this contribution we compare various techniques for the local immobilization of catalytic material on hot spots of the sensor in terms of process compatibility, mechanical stress, stability and cost.

  4. Impact of melt segregation on chemical composition with application to deep crustal hot zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, J.; Jackson, M.; Sparks, R. S.; Blundy, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Models of heat transfer during the emplacement of mantle-derived basaltic sills in the mid- to lower crust demonstrate that large volumes of evolved melt may be generated in deep crustal hot zones (DCHZ). These models consider only the thermal evolution of a DCHZ, yet melt must also segregate from along the grain boundaries where it initially resides to form a magma which leaves the DCHZ. However, models which include melt migration describe phase change using simple melt fraction-temperature relations, which do not capture the impact of melt segregation on the chemical evolution of melt and residual solid. We present a model of melting and buoyancy-driven melt segregation in which phase change is described using a phase diagram and the chemical evolution of the melt and residual solid is properly captured. Melt migration is assumed to occur along grain boundaries so local thermodynamic equilibrium is maintained. We begin by using a simple binary phase diagram and model a 1-D column with several different initial compositions and thermal boundary conditions. We investigate this simple case because it could be closely replicated in the laboratory, and allows aspects of the physics which hitherto have been poorly understood to be clearly observed and explained. It is trivial to extend our model to more complex systems. For an initially homogenous column, in which the fraction of component A is less than the eutectic composition, we find that the melt fraction at the base decreases and the bulk composition becomes enriched in component A, while the melt fraction at the top increases and the bulk composition tends towards the eutectic composition. Melt segregation provides a mechanism for accumulating melt of (or close to) the eutectic composition, but at much higher melt fractions than predicted by purely thermal models; for example, static melting to 10% may yield the eutectic composition, but melt segregation allows that composition to accumulate to 100%. For a

  5. Chemical processes involved in the initiation of hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryburg, G. C.; Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium sulfate induced hot corrosion of B-1900 and NASA-TRW VIA at 900 C was studied with special emphasis on the chemical reactions occurring during and immediately after the induction period. Thermogravimetric tests were run for set periods of time after which the samples were washed with water and water soluable metal salts and/or residual sulfates were analyzed chemically. Element distributions within the oxide layer were obtained from electron microprobe X-ray micrographs. A third set of samples were subjected to surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of SO2 was monitored throughout many of the hot corrosion tests. Results are interpreted in terms of acid-base fluxing mechanisms.

  6. Determination of hot and cool burning residential wood combustion source strengths using chemical mass balance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.A.; Huntzicker, J.J.; Khalil, M.A.K. )

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares CMB results using separate hot and cool RWC source composition profiles, a composite of hot and cool composition profiles weighted according reported stove usage patterns, and the conventional EPA RWC source composition profile. These profiles are shown. Since the composition of hot and cool burn particles is dramatically different, hot and cool burn composition profiles can be used as separate sources in the same CMB model. Hot burning RWC particles are black, have a mild acrid smell and contain from 20 to 60% carbon (up to 80% of the carbon can be in the form of elemental carbon) and high levels of trace elements (5-25%K, 2-5% S and 2-4% Cl). In contrast, cool or smoldering burn smoke particles are tan, have a strong pleasant wood smoke smell, and contain 55-60% carbon which is mostly in the form of organic carbon with only a few percent of elemental carbon. The concentrations of trace elements in cool burning emissions are generally less than 0.1%. During hot burning the RWC smoke plume is practically invisible, while during cool burning the plume is very visible and has the typical blue-gray color associated with wood burning. For similar amounts of fuel burning in a stove, emission levels for cool burning are an average of 4.8 times higher than for hot burning.

  7. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, R.

    2010-09-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a large scale and cannot be directly deposited on plastic substrates, much research is being done on thin film amorphous or nanocrystalline semiconductors and insulators. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) is a novel, low cost, and convenient way to deposit these materials. The process can be controlled in such a way that specific chemical reactions take place and unwanted side reactions are minimized. It can easily be scaled up to produce large-area thin film electronics. Conventionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit semiconductors and inorganic dielectrics. Recently, HWCVD has been explored for fast deposition of such materials. An adaptation of HWCVD, initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD), offers the unique possibility of producing organic materials and polymers in a vacuum reactor, without the use of solvents. This technique was originally proposed at the Massachusetts institute of technology (MIT) by Prof. Karen Gleason. The iCVD process involves the creation of radicals by dissociation of a peroxide (a molecule with a ~O-O~ bond) by a heated wire in a vacuum reactor. This radical initiates a polymerization reaction of a vinyl (a molecule with a double carbon-carbon bond, ~C=C~) monomer at a substrate held at room temperature. This thesis describes a dedicated iCVD reactor for polymer deposition, installed at Utrecht University, along with a reactor with a cooled substrate holder in an existing HWCVD multi-chamber setup for low-temperature silicon nitride (SiNx) depositions. The most important features of these reactors are described and the characterization techniques are explained. This thesis contains four new

  8. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices. PMID:27539942

  9. Ultrafast formation of interlayer hot excitons in atomically thin MoS2/WS2 heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hailong; Wen, Xiewen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Tianmin; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jiangtan; Yi, Chongyue; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Guangyu; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Van der Waals heterostructures composed of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides layers have recently emerged as a new family of materials, with great potential for atomically thin opto-electronic and photovoltaic applications. It is puzzling, however, that the photocurrent is yielded so efficiently in these structures, despite the apparent momentum mismatch between the intralayer/interlayer excitons during the charge transfer, as well as the tightly bound nature of the excitons in 2D geometry. Using the energy-state-resolved ultrafast visible/infrared microspectroscopy, we herein obtain unambiguous experimental evidence of the charge transfer intermediate state with excess energy, during the transition from an intralayer exciton to an interlayer exciton at the interface of a WS2/MoS2 heterostructure, and free carriers moving across the interface much faster than recombining into the intralayer excitons. The observations therefore explain how the remarkable charge transfer rate and photocurrent generation are achieved even with the aforementioned momentum mismatch and excitonic localization in 2D heterostructures and devices. PMID:27539942

  10. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena. PMID:26943670

  11. Atomic Force Tomography of a Nonplanar Molecule: Role of Lateral and Chemical Sample-Tip Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xianghua; Ji, Wei; Physics department, McGill Team; Physics department, Renmin University of China Team

    Atomically identification of the molecular geometric structures is an important prerequisite to understand their chemical and electrical properties. TiOPc, a steric structure, gives rise to two adsorption configurations of TiOPc on Cu(111), namely O-dn and O-up. The roles of chemical specific interactions of different intramolecular atoms with the AFM tips were discussed at the submolecular level. For O-up, the molecular backbone of TiOPc is only visible out of a certain range from the center of the molecule, accompanied with significant dissipation signal. Theoretical calculation identifies such dissipation signal as the chemical attraction between the out-of-plane O in TiOPc and the Cu atoms behind the CO of a tip at a certain range of lateral distance between them. When they approach closer, the sample O repulses another O in the CO tip making it tilting strongly, which softens the tip and thus leads to even stronger O (sample) - Cu (tip) attraction. A direct demonstration of sample-tip electronic hybridization was manifested in the simpler O-dn case where an explicit wavefunction overlap between the tip O atom and the sample Ti atom. Given these results presented here, we anticipate that this method might be developed further generally useful in single-molecule chemistry and physics. X.K. thanks the Chinese Scholarship Council for support.

  12. Fabrication of full-scale fiber reinforced hot-gas filters by chemical vapor deposition. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.G.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of this program was to develop and fabricate an initial set of ceramic fiber reinforced, ceramic matrix composite, hot gas candle filters for testing in a simulated pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) environment. Four full-scale ceramic fiber reinforced candle filters were fabricated in a multi step process. The substrate was filament wound using Nextel{trademark} 312 yarn and then coated with silicon carbide by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to form a ceramic composite shape that provides the candle`s structural shape, toughness, and strength. Filter layer material was applied over the surface and then bonded with silicon carbide in a chemical vapor infiltration, CVI, step.

  13. Development of nanodiamond foils for H- stripping to Support the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) using hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vispute, R D; Ermer, Henry K; Sinsky, Phillip; Seiser, Andrew; Shaw, Robert W; Wilson, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Thin diamond foils are needed in many particle accelerator experiments regarding nuclear and atomic physics, as well as in some interdisciplinary research. Particularly, nanodiamond texture is attractive for this purpose as it possesses a unique combination of diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength and high radiation hardness; therefore, it is a potential material for energetic ion beam stripper foils. At the ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), the installed set of foils must be able to survive a nominal five-month operation period, without the need for unscheduled costly shutdowns and repairs. Thus, a small foil about the size of a postage stamp is critical to the operation of SNS and similar sources in U.S. laboratories and around the world. We are investigating nanocrystalline, polycrystalline and their admixture films fabricated using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system for H- stripping to support the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here we discuss optimization of process variables such as substrate temperature, process gas ratio of H2/Ar/CH4, substrate to filament distance, filament temperature, carburization conditions, and filament geometry to achieve high purity diamond foils on patterned silicon substrates with manageable intrinsic and thermal stresses so that they can be released as free standing foils without curling. An in situ laser reflectance interferometry tool (LRI) is used for monitoring the growth characteristics of the diamond thin film materials. The optimization process has yielded free standing foils with no pinholes. The sp3/sp2 bonds are controlled to optimize electrical resistivity to reduce the possibility of surface charging of the foils. The integrated LRI and HFCVD process provides real time information on the growth of films and can quickly illustrate growth features and control film thickness. The results are discussed in the light of development of nanodiamond foils that

  14. Assessing Mixing Quality of a Copovidone-TPGS Hot Melt Extrusion Process with Atomic Force Microscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Matthew S; DiNunzio, James; Khawaja, Nazia N; Crocker, Louis S; Pecora, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) were used to evaluate the extent of mixing of a hot melt extrusion process for producing solid dispersions of copovidone and D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS 1000). In addition to composition, extrusion process parameters of screw speed and thermal quench rate were varied. The data indicated that for 10% TPGS and 300 rpm screw speed, the mixing was insufficient to yield a single-phase amorphous material. AFM images of the extrudate cross section for air-cooled material indicate round domains 200 to 700 nm in diameter without any observed alignment resulting from the extrusion whereas domains in extrudate subjected to chilled rolls were elliptical in shape with uniform orientation. Thermal analysis indicated that the domains were predominantly semi-crystalline TPGS. For 10% TPGS and 600 rpm screw speed, AFM and mDSC data were consistent with that of a single-phase amorphous material for both thermal quench rates examined. When the TPGS concentration was reduced to 5%, a single-phase amorphous material was achieved for all conditions even the slowest screw speed studied (150 rpm). PMID:26283196

  15. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  16. Reactions of hot deuterium atoms with OCS in the gas phase and in OCS--DI complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehmer, E.; Mikhaylichenko, K.; Wittig, C. )

    1993-11-01

    Reactions of photolytically prepared hot deuterium atoms with OCS have been investigated: (i) under gas phase, single collision, arrested relaxation (i.e., bulk) conditions; and (ii) by photoinitiating reactions within weakly bound OCS--DI complexes. Nascent SD([ital X] [sup 2][Pi], [ital v]=0) rotational, spin--orbit, and [Lambda]-doublet populations were obtained for the photolysis wavelengths 250, 225, and 223 nm by using [ital A] [sup 2][Sigma][l arrow][ital X] [sup 2][Pi] laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The reason for using deuterium is strictly experimental: [ital A] [sup 2][Sigma] predissociation rates are considerably smaller for SD than for SH. The SD ([ital v]=0) rotational distribution was found to be very cold and essentially the same for both bulk and complexed conditions; the most probable rotational energy is [similar to]180 cm[sup [minus]1]. No bias in [Lambda]-doublet populations was detected. Spin--orbit excitation for bulk conditions was estimated to be [[sup 2][Pi][sub 1/2

  17. He-Ion and Self-Atom Induced Damage and Surface-Morphology Changes of a Hot W Target

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Hijazi, Hussein Dib; Krstic, Predrag S; Dadras, Mostafa Jonny; Meyer III, Harry M; Parish, Chad M; Bannister, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80 12,000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundreds impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in FIB/SEM scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased.

  18. He-ion and self-atom induced damage and surface-morphology changes of a hot W target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Hijazi, H.; Bannister, M. E.; Krstic, P. S.; Dadras, J.; Meyer, H. M., III; Parish, C. M.

    2014-04-01

    We report results of measurements on the evolution of the surface morphology of a hot tungsten surface due to impacting low-energy (80-12 000 eV) He ions and of simulations of damage caused by cumulative bombardment of 1 and 10 keV W self-atoms. The measurements were performed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, while the simulations were done at the Kraken supercomputing facility of the University of Tennessee. At 1 keV, the simulations show strong defect-recombination effects that lead to a saturation of the total defect number after a few hundred impacts, while sputtering leads to an imbalance of the vacancy and interstitial number. On the experimental side, surface morphology changes were investigated over a broad range of fluences, energies and temperatures for both virgin and pre-damaged W-targets. At the lowest accumulated fluences, small surface-grain features and near-surface He bubbles are observed. At the largest fluences, individual grain characteristics disappear in focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) scans, and the entire surface is covered by a multitude of near-surface bubbles with a broad range of sizes, and disordered whisker growth, while in top-down SEM imaging the surface is virtually indistinguishable from the nano-fuzz produced on linear plasma devices. These features are evident at progressively lower fluences as the He-ion energy is increased.

  19. Atom-by-atom simulations of chemical vapor deposition of nanoporous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houska, J.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.; Martinu, L.

    2010-04-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiNH) materials prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are of high interest because of their suitability for diverse applications including optical coatings, gas/vapor permeation barriers, corrosion resistant, and protective coatings and numerous others. In addition, they are very suitable for structurally graded systems such as those with a graded refractive index. In parallel, modeling the PECVD process of SiN(H) of an a priori given SiN(H) ratio by atomistic calculations represents a challenge due to: (1) different (and far from constant) sticking coefficients of individual elements, and (2) expected formation of N2 (and H2) gas molecules. In the present work, we report molecular-dynamics simulations of particle-by-particle deposition process of SiNH films from SiHx and N radicals. We observe formation of a mixed zone (damaged layer) in the initial stages of film growth, and (under certain conditions) formation of nanopores in the film bulk. We investigate the effect of various PECVD process parameters (ion energy, composition of the SiHx+N particle flux, ion fraction in the particle flux, composition of the SiHx radicals, angle of incidence of the particle flux) on both (1) deposition characteristics, such as sticking coefficients, and (2) material characteristics, such as dimension of the nanopores formed. The results provide detailed insight into the complex relationships between these process parameters and the characteristics of the deposited SiNH materials and exhibit an excellent agreement with the experimentally observed results.

  20. ReactionMap: an efficient atom-mapping algorithm for chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Fooshee, David; Andronico, Alessio; Baldi, Pierre

    2013-11-25

    Large databases of chemical reactions provide new data-mining opportunities and challenges. Key challenges result from the imperfect quality of the data and the fact that many of these reactions are not properly balanced or atom-mapped. Here, we describe ReactionMap, an efficient atom-mapping algorithm. Our approach uses a combination of maximum common chemical subgraph search and minimization of an assignment cost function derived empirically from training data. We use a set of over 259,000 balanced atom-mapped reactions from the SPRESI commercial database to train the system, and we validate it on random sets of 1000 and 17,996 reactions sampled from this pool. These large test sets represent a broad range of chemical reaction types, and ReactionMap correctly maps about 99% of the atoms and about 96% of the reactions, with a mean time per mapping of 2 s. Most correctly mapped reactions are mapped with high confidence. Mapping accuracy compares favorably with ChemAxon's AutoMapper, versions 5 and 6.1, and the DREAM Web tool. These approaches correctly map 60.7%, 86.5%, and 90.3% of the reactions, respectively, on the same data set. A ReactionMap server is available on the ChemDB Web portal at http://cdb.ics.uci.edu . PMID:24160861

  1. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore, the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.

  2. Chemical Quantification of Atomic-Scale EDS Maps under Thin Specimen Conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Ping; Romero, Eric; Lee, Shinbuhm; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.; Jia, Quanxi

    2014-10-13

    We report our effort to quantify atomic-scale chemical maps obtained by collecting energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) (STEM-EDS). Under a thin specimen condition and when the EDS scattering potential is localized, the X-ray counts from atomic columns can be properly counted by fitting Gaussian peaks at the atomic columns, and can then be used for site-by-site chemical quantification. The effects of specimen thickness and X-ray energy on the Gaussian peak-width are investigated by using SrTiO3 (STO) as a model specimen. The relationship between the peak-width and spatial-resolution of an EDS map is also studied. Furthermore,more » the method developed by this work is applied to study a Sm-doped STO thin film and antiphase boundaries present within the STO film. We find that Sm atoms occupy both Sr and Ti sites but preferably the Sr sites, and Sm atoms are relatively depleted at the antiphase boundaries likely due to the effect of strain.« less

  3. Radical and Atom Transfer Halogenation (RATH): A Facile Route for Chemical and Polymer Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Yu; Liang, Mong; Liu, Ying-Ling

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a new halogenation reaction through sequential radical and halogen transfer reactions, named as "radical and atom transfer halogenation" (RATH). Both benzoxazine compounds and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) have been demonstrated as active species for RATH. Consequently, the halogenated compound becomes an active initiator of atom transfer radical polymerization. Combination of RATH and sequential ATRP provides an convenient and effective approach to prepare reactive and crosslinkable polymers. The RATH reaction opens a new window both to chemical synthesis and molecular design and preparation of polymeric materials. PMID:27027639

  4. Expanding the Scope of Density Derived Electrostatic and Chemical Charge Partitioning to Thousands of Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Louis P; Limas, Nidia Gabaldon; Cole, Daniel J; Payne, Mike C; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Manz, Thomas A

    2014-12-01

    The density derived electrostatic and chemical (DDEC/c3) method is implemented into the onetep program to compute net atomic charges (NACs), as well as higher-order atomic multipole moments, of molecules, dense solids, nanoclusters, liquids, and biomolecules using linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) in a distributed memory parallel computing environment. For a >1000 atom model of the oxygenated myoglobin protein, the DDEC/c3 net charge of the adsorbed oxygen molecule is approximately -1e (in agreement with the Weiss model) using a dynamical mean field theory treatment of the iron atom, but much smaller in magnitude when using the generalized gradient approximation. For GaAs semiconducting nanorods, the system dipole moment using the DDEC/c3 NACs is about 5% higher in magnitude than the dipole computed directly from the quantum mechanical electron density distribution, and the DDEC/c3 NACs reproduce the electrostatic potential to within approximately 0.1 V on the nanorod's solvent-accessible surface. As examples of conducting materials, we study (i) a 55-atom Pt cluster with an adsorbed CO molecule and (ii) the dense solids Mo2C and Pd3V. Our results for solid Mo2C and Pd3V confirm the necessity of a constraint enforcing exponentially decaying electron density in the tails of buried atoms. PMID:26583221

  5. Gas-phase silicon atom densities in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Ho, P.

    1993-12-31

    Silicon atom number density profiles have been measured using laser-induced fluorescence during the chemical vapor deposition of silicon from silane. Measurements were obtained in a rotating-disk reactor as a function of silane partial pressure and the amount of hydrogen added to the carrier gas. Absolute number densities were obtained using an atomic absorption technique. Results were compared with calculated density profiles from a model of the coupled fluid flow, gas-phase and surface chemistry for an infinite-radius rotating disk. An analysis of the reaction mechanism showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH{sub 2} is not the dominant source of Si atoms. Profile shapes and positions, and all experimental trends are well matched by the calculations. However, the calculated number density is up to 100 times smaller than measured.

  6. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    A decomposition of the molecular energy is presented that is motivated by the atom superposition and electron delocalization physical model of chemical binding. The energy appears in physically transparent form consisting of a classical electrostatic interaction, a zero order two electron exchange interaction, a relaxation energy, and the atomic energies. Detailed formulae are derived in zero and first order of approximation. The formulation extends beyond first order to any chosen level of approximation leading, in principle, to the exact energy. The structure of this energy decomposition lends itself to the fullest utilization of the solutions to the atomic sub problems to simplify the calculation of the molecular energy. If nonlinear relaxation effects remain minor, the molecular energy calculation requires at most the calculation of two center, two electron integrals. This scheme thus affords the prospects of substantially reducing the computational effort required for the calculation of molecular energies.

  7. Calculation of the Relative Chemical Stabilities of Proteins as a Function of Temperature and Redox Chemistry in a Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the chemical and physical links between natural environments and microbial communities is becoming increasingly amenable owing to geochemical observations and metagenomic sequencing. At the hot spring known as Bison Pool in Yellowstone National Park, the cooling of the water in the outflow channel is associated with an increase in oxidation potential estimated from multiple field-based measurements. Representative groups of proteins whose sequences were derived from metagenomic data also exhibit an increase in average oxidation state of carbon in the protein molecules with distance from the hot-spring source. The energetic requirements of reactions to form selected proteins used in the model were computed using amino-acid group additivity for the standard molal thermodynamic properties of the proteins, and the relative chemical stabilities of the proteins were investigated by varying temperature, pH and oxidation state, expressed as activity of dissolved hydrogen. The relative stabilities of the proteins were found to track the locations of the sampling sites when the calculations included a function for hydrogen activity that increases with temperature and is higher, or more reducing, than values consistent with measurements of dissolved oxygen, sulfide and oxidation-reduction potential in the field. These findings imply that spatial patterns in the amino acid compositions of proteins can be linked, through energetics of overall chemical reactions representing the formation of the proteins, to the environmental conditions at this hot spring, even if microbial cells maintain considerably different internal conditions. Further applications of the thermodynamic calculations are possible for other natural microbial ecosystems. PMID:21853048

  8. Method and apparatus for fabricating a thin-film solar cell utilizing a hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Iwaniczko, Eugene

    2006-10-17

    A thin-film solar cell is provided. The thin-film solar cell comprises an a-SiGe:H (1.6 eV) n-i-p solar cell having a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer by hot wire chemical vapor deposition. A method for fabricating a thin film solar cell is also provided. The method comprises depositing a n-i-p layer at a deposition rate of at least ten (10) .ANG./second for the a-SiGe:H intrinsic layer.

  9. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  10. A collaboration of labs: The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)

    ScienceCinema

    Lobo, Rodrigo; Marshall, Chris; Cheng, Lei; Stair, Peter; Wu, Tianpan; Ray, Natalie; O'Neil, Brandon; Dietrich, Paul

    2013-04-19

    The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. IACT focuses on advancing the science of catalysis to improve the efficiency of producing fuels from biomass and coal. IACT is a collaborative effort that brings together a diverse team of scientists from Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Northwestern University, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin. For more information, visit www.iact.anl.gov

  11. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility hot test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, R.L.

    1993-09-01

    Prior to initial operation with radioactive feed or ``hot`` operation, the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal (LET&D) Facility underwent extensive testing. This report provides a detailed description and analysis of this testing. Testing has determined that LET&D is capable of processing radioactive solutions between the design flowrates of 275 gph to 550 gph. Modifications made to prevent condensation on the off-gas HEPA filters, to the process vacuum control, bottoms cooler rupture disks, and feed control system operation were successful. Unfortunately, two mixers failed prior to ``hot`` testing due to manufacturer`s error which limited operation of the PEW Evaporator System and sampling was not able to prove that design removal efficiencies for Mercury, Cadmium, Plutonium, and Non-Volatile Radionuclides.

  12. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition chamber and process with multiple gas inlets

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Povolny, Henry S.

    2004-06-29

    A thin film deposition method uses a vacuum confinement cup that employs a dense hot filament and multiple gas inlets. At least one reactant gas is introduced into the confinement cup both near and spaced apart from the heated filament. An electrode inside the confinement cup is used to generate plasma for film deposition. The method is used to deposit advanced thin films (such as silicon based thin films) at a high quality and at a high deposition rate.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  14. Chemical structure imaging of a single molecule by atomic force microscopy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kota; Yamazaki, Shiro; Mutombo, Pingo; Hapala, Prokop; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is capable of resolving the chemical structure of a single molecule on a surface. In previous research, such high resolution has only been obtained at low temperatures. Here we demonstrate that the chemical structure of a single molecule can be clearly revealed even at room temperature. 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride, which is strongly adsorbed onto a corner-hole site of a Si(111)–(7 × 7) surface in a bridge-like configuration is used for demonstration. Force spectroscopy combined with first-principle calculations clarifies that chemical structures can be resolved independent of tip reactivity. We show that the submolecular contrast over a central part of the molecule is achieved in the repulsive regime due to differences in the attractive van der Waals interaction and the Pauli repulsive interaction between different sites of the molecule. PMID:26178193

  15. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces. PMID:27528258

  16. Directed self-assembly of block copolymer films on atomically-thin graphene chemical patterns

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Xiong, Shisheng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Mikael, Solomon; Suh, Hyo Seon; Liu, Chi-Chun; Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong; Arnold, Michael S.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Nealey, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Directed self-assembly of block copolymers is a scalable method to fabricate well-ordered patterns over the wafer scale with feature sizes below the resolution of conventional lithography. Typically, lithographically-defined prepatterns with varying chemical contrast are used to rationally guide the assembly of block copolymers. The directed self-assembly to obtain accurate registration and alignment is largely influenced by the assembly kinetics. Furthermore, a considerably broad processing window is favored for industrial manufacturing. Using an atomically-thin layer of graphene on germanium, after two simple processing steps, we create a novel chemical pattern to direct the assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate). Faster assembly kinetics are observed on graphene/germanium chemical patterns than on conventional chemical patterns based on polymer mats and brushes. This new chemical pattern allows for assembly on a wide range of guiding periods and along designed 90° bending structures. We also achieve density multiplication by a factor of 10, greatly enhancing the pattern resolution. The rapid assembly kinetics, minimal topography, and broad processing window demonstrate the advantages of inorganic chemical patterns composed of hard surfaces. PMID:27528258

  17. Deposition of microcrystalline silicon prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition: The influence of the deposition parameters on the material properties and solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Stefan; Finger, Friedhelm; Carius, Reinhard; Stutzmann, Martin

    2005-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) of superior quality can be prepared using the hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition method (HWCVD). At a low substrate temperature (TS) of 185 °C excellent material properties and solar cell performance were obtained with spin densities of 6×1015cm-3 and solar cell efficiencies up to 9.4%, respectively. In this study we have systematically investigated the influence of various deposition parameters on the deposition rate and the material properties. For this purpose, thin films and solar cells were prepared at specific substrate and filament temperatures and deposition pressures (pD), covering the complete range from amorphous to highly crystalline material by adjusting the silane concentration. The influence of these deposition parameters on the chemical reactions at the filament and in the gas phase qualitatively explains the behavior of the structural composition and the formation of defects. In particular, we propose that the deposition rate is determined by the production of reactive species at the filament and a particular atomic-hydrogen-to-silicon ratio is found at the microcrystalline/amorphous transition. The structural, optical, and electronic properties were studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopies, optical-absorption measurements, electron-spin resonance, and dark and photoconductivities. These experiments show that higher TS and pD lead to a deterioration of the material quality, i.e., much higher defect densities, oxygen contaminations, and SiH absorption at 2100cm-1. Similar to plasma enhanced chemical-vapor deposition material, μc-Si:H solar cells prepared with HW i layers show increasing open circuit voltages (Voc) with increasing silane concentration and best performance is achieved near the transition to amorphous growth. Such solar cells prepared at low TS exhibit very high Voc up to 600 mV and fill factors above 70% with i layers prepared by HWCVD.

  18. Hot subluminous stars: On the Search for Chemical Signatures of their Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Heiko Andreas

    2009-10-01

    This thesis deals with the hot subluminous stars of spectral class O. Although the name suggests otherwise, these stars are still 10 to 1000 times more luminous than the sun, they emit most of their radiation energy in the ultraviolet range. First stars of this type have been categorized in the 1950ies. Since they are blue objects like Quasars they often are discovered in surveys at high Galactic latitudes aiming at Quasars and other extragalactic objects. The hot subluminous stars can be divided into two classes, the subluminous O and subluminous B stars, or short sdO and sdB. The sdOs and sdBs play an important role in astronomy, as many old stellar populations, e.g. globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, have strong UV fluxes. UV bright regions often are "stellar nurseries", where new stars are born. Globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, however, do not experience star formation. This UV excess can be explained by population models that include the hot subluminous stars. Many sdB stars show short-period, multiperiodic light variations, which are due to radial and nonradial pulsations. Asteroseismology can explore the inner structure of stars and estimate e.g. the stellar mass, a variable that can only determine in very lucky circumstances (eclipsing binaries). These stars are also important for cosmology because they qualify as supernova Ia progenitors. The nature of the sdO stars is less well understood than that of their cooler and more numerous siblings, the sdBs. The connection of the sdBs to the horizontal branch is established for many years now, accordingly they are old helium core burning objects after their red giant phase. More precisely, they are on the extended horizontal branch (EHB), the hot end of the horizontal branch. EHB stars are characterized by a very low envelope mass, i.e. we see more or less directly the hot helium burning core. Strong mass loss in the RGB phase is regarded as responsible for this phenomenon, the exact mechanism

  19. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-03-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  20. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  1. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J.; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F. Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H.; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L.; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M.

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel’s Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  2. Physico-Chemical and Structural Interpretation of Discrete Derivative Indices on N-Tuples Atoms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Le Thi Thu, Huong; Torres, F Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H; Muñiz Olite, Jorge L; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; Vivas-Reyes, Ricardo; Vázquez Infante, Liliana; Artiles Martínez, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    This report examines the interpretation of the Graph Derivative Indices (GDIs) from three different perspectives (i.e., in structural, steric and electronic terms). It is found that the individual vertex frequencies may be expressed in terms of the geometrical and electronic reactivity of the atoms and bonds, respectively. On the other hand, it is demonstrated that the GDIs are sensitive to progressive structural modifications in terms of: size, ramifications, electronic richness, conjugation effects and molecular symmetry. Moreover, it is observed that the GDIs quantify the interaction capacity among molecules and codify information on the activation entropy. A structure property relationship study reveals that there exists a direct correspondence between the individual frequencies of atoms and Hückel's Free Valence, as well as between the atomic GDIs and the chemical shift in NMR, which collectively validates the theory that these indices codify steric and electronic information of the atoms in a molecule. Taking in consideration the regularity and coherence found in experiments performed with the GDIs, it is possible to say that GDIs possess plausible interpretation in structural and physicochemical terms. PMID:27240357

  3. Characterization of pressurized hot water extracts of grape pomace: chemical and biological antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Salinas, J R; Vergara, Mauricio; Altamirano, Claudia; Gonzalez, Álvaro; Pérez-Correa, J R

    2015-03-15

    Pressurized hot water extracts obtained at different temperatures possess different compositions and antioxidant activities and, consequently, different bioactivities. We characterized two pressurized hot water extracts from grape pomace obtained at 100°C (GPE100) and 200°C (GPE200) in terms of antioxidant activity and composition, as well as protective effect on cell growth and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in a HL-60 cell culture under oxidative conditions. GPE100 extracts were richer in polyphenols and poorer in Maillard reaction products (MRPs) than were GPE200 extracts. Moreover, hydroxymethylfurfural was detected only in GPE200. Both extracts exhibited similar protective effects on cell growth (comparable to the effect of trolox). In addition, GPE100 strongly decreased the Δψm loss, reaching values even lower than those of the control culture. This protective effect may be related to its high polyphenols content. At the highest concentration assessed, both extracts showed strong cytotoxicity, especially GPE200. This cytotoxicity could be related to their MRPs content. PMID:25308643

  4. Reaction studies of hot silicon, germanium and carbon atoms: Progress report, February 1, 1985-July 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, P.P.

    1987-08-01

    The experimental approach toward attaining the goals of this research program is briefly outlined, and the progress made in the 1985 to 1987 period is reviewed in sections entitled: (1) reactions of recoiling silicon atoms; (2) reactions of recoiling carbon atoms; and (3) reactions of thermally evaporated germanium atoms.

  5. Chemical indicators of subsurface temperature applied to hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1970-01-01

    Under favorable conditions the chemistry of hot springs may give reliable indications of subsurface temperatures and circulation patterns. These chemical indicators can be classified by the type of process involved: {A table is presented}. All these indicators have certain limitations. The silica geothermometer gives results independent of the local mineral suite and gas partial pressures, but may be affected by dilution. Alkali ratios are strongly affected by the local mineral suite and the formation of complex ions. Carbonate-chloride ratios are strongly affected by subsurface PCO2. The relative concentration of volatiles can be very misleading in high-pressure liquid systems. In Yellowstone National Park most thermal waters issue from hot, shallow aquifers with pressures in excess of hydrostatic by 2 to 6 bars and with large flows (the flow of hot spring water from the Park is greater than 4000 liters per second). These conditions should be ideal for the use of chemical indicators to estimate aquifer temperatures. In five drill holes aquifer temperatures were within 2??C of that predicted from the silica content of nearby hot springs; the temperature level off at a lower value than predicted in only one hole, and in four other holes drilling was terminated before the predicted aquifer temperature was reached. The temperature-Na/K ratio relationship does not follow any published experimental or empirical curve for water-feldspar or water-clay reactions. We suspect that ion exchange reactions involving zeolites in the Yellowstone rocks result in higher Na/K ratios at given temperatures than result from feldspar or clay reactions. Comparison of SiO2 and Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) suggest that because of higher subsurface PCO2 in Upper Geyser Basin a given Cl/(HCO3 + CO3) ratio there means a higher temperature than in Lower Geyser Basin. No correlation was found in Yellowstone Park between the subsurface regions of highest temperature and the relative concentration of volatile

  6. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovan, R. Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  7. Mathematical modeling of chemical composition modification and etching of polymers under the atomic oxygen influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirskaia, Natalia; Novikov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    Atomic oxygen (AO) of the upper atmosphere is one of the most important space factors that can cause degradation of spacecraft surface. In our previous mathematical model the Monte Carlo method and the "large particles" approximation were used for simulating processes of polymer etching under the influence of AO [1]. The interaction of enlarged AO particles with the polymer was described in terms of probabilities of reactions such as etching of polymer and specular and diffuse scattering of the AO particles on polymer. The effects of atomic oxygen on protected polymers and microfiller containing composites were simulated. The simulation results were in quite good agreement with the results of laboratory experiments on magnetoplasmadynamic accelerator of the oxygen plasma of SINP MSU [2]. In this paper we present a new model that describes the reactions of AO interactions with polymeric materials in more detail. Reactions of formation and further emission of chemical compounds such as CO, CO _{2}, H _{2}O, etc. cause the modification of the chemical composition of the polymer and change the probabilities of its consequent interaction with the AO. The simulation results are compared with the results of previous simulation and with the results of laboratory experiments. The reasons for the differences between the results of natural experiments on spacecraft, laboratory experiments and simulations are discussed. N. Chirskaya, M. Samokhina, Computer modeling of polymer structures degradation under the atomic oxygen exposure, WDS'12 Proceedings of Contributed Papers: Part III - Physics, Matfyzpress Prague, 2012, pp. 30-35. E. Voronina, L. Novikov, V. Chernik, N. Chirskaya, K. Vernigorov, G. Bondarenko, and A. Gaidar, Mathematical and experimental simulation of impact of atomic oxygen of the earth's upper atmosphere on nanostructures and polymer composites, Inorganic Materials: Applied Research, 2012, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 95-101.

  8. Characterizing intra and inter annual variability of storm events based on very high frequency monitoring of hydrological and chemical variables: what can we learn about hot spots and hot moments from continuous hydro-chemical sensors ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fovet, O.; Thelusma, G.; Humbert, G.; Dupas, R.; Jaffrezic, A.; Grimaldi, C.; Faucheux, M.; Gilliet, N.; Hamon, Y.; Gruau, G.

    2015-12-01

    Storm events are hot moments of emission for several dissolved and particulate chemical species at major stake for water quality (e.g. dissolved organic carbon DOC, suspended sediments, phosphorus, NH4). During such events, the solutes or particles are exported from heterogeneous sources through various pathways to stream or are possibly stored in retention hot spots temporary. This leads to specific integrated signals at the outlet at the scale of storm events. The dynamics of such events are also very short especially in headwater catchments where their total duration ranges over 10h to 3 days, with very quick variations in stream flow and concentrations at the outlet occurring in a few hours. Thus for investigating properly event processes, high frequency monitoring of flow and water quality is required. We analysed 103 storm events in a 5 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, part of the AgrHys Observatory, on the basis of a 3-year-long data set which combined meterological (Rainfall), hydrological (flow and piezometry), and water quality (turbidity, conductivity, DOC and NO3 concentrations) data recorded at very high frequencies (from 1 to 20 min) thanks to dedicated sensors. We described the storm events using simple (1 variable) and combined (2 variables) descriptors for characterizing level and dynamics of flow (Q), groundwater levels, and concentrations (C) but also the C-Q relationships. Three intra annual periods have been previously defined for base flow dynamic according to shallow groundwater table variations so that they correspond to different connectivity status in the catchment. The seasonal and inter-annual variability of the storm events have been analysed using the descriptors and based on these predefined periods. Principal component analysis based on storm chemical descriptors led to discriminate these three seasons while storm hydrological descriptors are less variable between them. Finally we used a clustering method to build a typology of

  9. The Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union: refining strategies for labor.

    PubMed

    Wooding, J; Levenstein, C; Rosenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    In a period of declining union membership and severe economic and environmental crisis it is important that labor unions rethink their traditional roles and organizational goals. Responding to some of these problems and reflecting a history of innovative and progressive unionism, the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers Union (OCAW) has sought to address occupational and environmental health problems within the context of a political struggle. This study suggests that by joining with the environmental movement and community activists, by pursuing a strategy of coalition building, and by developing an initiative to build and advocate for a new political party, OCAW provides a model for reinvigorating trade unionism in the United States. PMID:9031016

  10. KFC2: a knowledge-based hot spot prediction method based on interface solvation, atomic density, and plasticity features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Mitchell, Julie C

    2011-09-01

    Hot spots constitute a small fraction of protein-protein interface residues, yet they account for a large fraction of the binding affinity. Based on our previous method (KFC), we present two new methods (KFC2a and KFC2b) that outperform other methods at hot spot prediction. A number of improvements were made in developing these new methods. First, we created a training data set that contained a similar number of hot spot and non-hot spot residues. In addition, we generated 47 different features, and different numbers of features were used to train the models to avoid over-fitting. Finally, two feature combinations were selected: One (used in KFC2a) is composed of eight features that are mainly related to solvent accessible surface area and local plasticity; the other (KFC2b) is composed of seven features, only two of which are identical to those used in KFC2a. The two models were built using support vector machines (SVM). The two KFC2 models were then tested on a mixed independent test set, and compared with other methods such as Robetta, FOLDEF, HotPoint, MINERVA, and KFC. KFC2a showed the highest predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.85); however, the false positive rate was somewhat higher than for other models. KFC2b showed the best predictive accuracy for hot spot residues (True Positive Rate: TPR = 0.62) among all methods other than KFC2a, and the False Positive Rate (FPR = 0.15) was comparable with other highly predictive methods. PMID:21735484

  11. On the possibility to grow zinc oxide-based transparent conducting oxide films by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Abrutis, Adulfas Silimavicus, Laimis; Kubilius, Virgaudas; Murauskas, Tomas; Saltyte, Zita; Kuprenaite, Sabina; Plausinaitiene, Valentina

    2014-03-15

    Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) was applied to grow zinc oxide (ZnO)-based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Indium (In)-doped ZnO films were deposited using a cold wall pulsed liquid injection CVD system with three nichrome wires installed at a distance of 2 cm from the substrate holder. The wires were heated by an AC current in the range of 0–10 A. Zn and In 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionates dissolved in 1,2-dimethoxyethane were used as precursors. The hot wires had a marked effect on the growth rates of ZnO, In-doped ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films; at a current of 6–10 A, growth rates were increased by a factor of ≈10–20 compared with those of traditional CVD at the same substrate temperature (400 °C). In-doped ZnO films with thickness of ≈150 nm deposited on sapphire-R grown at a wire current of 9 A exhibited a resistivity of ≈2 × 10{sup −3} Ωcm and transparency of >90% in the visible spectral range. These initial results reveal the potential of HW-CVD for the growth of TCOs.

  12. Boron nitride phosphide thin films grown on quartz substrate by hot-filament and plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.; Xu, S. Y.; Han, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Boron nitride phosphide films are, for the first time, grown on transparent quartz substrate by hot filament and radio-frequency plasma co-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. XPS, XRD, SEM, and UV measurements are performed to study the chemical composition, crystallization, microstructure, and optical absorption, respectively. A centipede-like microstructure and undulating ground morphology on the film surface are observed, and their growth mechanism is speculated upon. The chemical composition is determined as BN1-xPx, whose characteristic XRD peak is preliminarily identified. The optical band gap can be modulated between 5.52 eV and 3.74 eV, simply by adjusting the phosphorus content in BN1-xPx through modifying the PH3 flux during the film-deposition process. The merits of the BN1-xPx film, such as high ultraviolet photoelectric sensitivity with negligible sensitivity in the visible region, modifiable wide optical band gap, and good adhesion on transparent substrate, suggest potential applications for ultraviolet photo-electronics.

  13. Chemical and Physical Weathering in a Hot-arid, Tectonically Active Alluvial System (Anza-Borrego Desert, CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Y. J.; Elwood Madden, M.; Soreghan, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and tectonics are primary controls on bedrock erosion, and sediment production, transport, and deposition. Additionally, silicate weathering in tectonically active regions is known to play a significant role in global climate owing to the high rates of physical erosion and exposure of unweathered bedrock to chemical weathering, which removes CO2 from the atmosphere. Therefore, the feedback between weathering and climate is key to understanding climate change through Earth history. This study investigates chemical and physical weathering of alluvial sediments in the Anza-Borrego Desert, California, located in the southern part of the San Andreas Fault System. This setting provides an ideal opportunity to study weathering in a hot and arid climate with mean annual temperatures of ~23 °C and mean annual precipitation of ~160 mm in the basin. Samples were collected along a proximal-to-distal transect of an alluvial-fan system sourced exclusively from Cretaceous tonalite of the Peninsular Range. The single bedrock lithology enables exploration of the effects of other variables — climate, transport distance, drainage area, and tectonics— on the physical and chemical properties of the sediments. Although minimal overall (CIA = 56-61), the degree of chemical weathering increases down transect, dominated by plagioclase dissolution. BET surface area of the mud (<63µm) fraction decreases distally, which is consistent with coarsening grain-size. Chemical alteration and BET surface area both increase in a distal region, within the active Elsinore Fault zone. Extensive fracturing here, together with a more-humid Pleistocene climate likely facilitated in-situ bedrock weathering; specifically, dissolution of primary minerals (e.g. plagioclase), preceding the arid alluvial erosion, transport, and deposition in the Holocene. This study further seeks to disentangle the complex record of the climate and tectonic signals imprinted in these sediments.

  14. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  15. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  16. Undergraduate chemistry students' conceptions of atomic structure, molecular structure and chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Erin Roberts

    The process of chemical education should facilitate students' construction of meaningful conceptual structures about the concepts and processes of chemistry. It is evident, however, that students at all levels possess concepts that are inconsistent with currently accepted scientific views. The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate chemistry students' conceptions of atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular structure. A diagnostic instrument to evaluate students' conceptions of atomic and molecular structure was developed by the researcher. The instrument incorporated multiple-choice items and reasoned explanations based upon relevant literature and a categorical summarization of student responses (Treagust, 1988, 1995). A covalent bonding and molecular structure diagnostic instrument developed by Peterson and Treagust (1989) was also employed. The ex post facto portion of the study examined the conceptual understanding of undergraduate chemistry students using descriptive statistics to summarize the results obtained from the diagnostic instruments. In addition to the descriptive portion of the study, a total score for each student was calculated based on the combination of correct and incorrect choices made for each item. A comparison of scores obtained on the diagnostic instruments by the upper and lower classes of undergraduate students was made using a t-Test. This study also examined an axiomatic assumption that an understanding of atomic structure is important in understanding bonding and molecular structure. A Pearson Correlation Coefficient, ṟ, was calculated to provide a measure of the strength of this association. Additionally, this study gathered information regarding expectations of undergraduate chemistry students' understanding held by the chemical community. Two questionnaires were developed with items based upon the propositional knowledge statements used in the development of the diagnostic instruments. Subgroups of items from

  17. Chemical Stability of Titania and Alumina Thin Films Formed by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Correa, Gabriela C; Bao, Bo; Strandwitz, Nicholas C

    2015-07-15

    Thin films formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are being examined for a variety of chemical protection and diffusion barrier applications, yet their stability in various fluid environments is not well characterized. The chemical stability of titania and alumina thin films in air, 18 MΩ water, 1 M KCl, 1 M HNO3, 1 M H2SO4, 1 M HCl, 1 M KOH, and mercury was studied. Films were deposited at 150 °C using trimethylaluminum-H2O and tetrakis(dimethylamido)titanium-H2O chemistries for alumina and titania, respectively. A subset of samples were heated to 450 and 900 °C in inert atmosphere. Films were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Notably, alumina samples were found to be unstable in pure water, acid, and basic environments in the as-synthesized state and after 450 °C thermal treatment. In pure water, a dissolution-precipitation mechanism is hypothesized to cause surface roughening. The stability of alumina films was greatly enhanced after annealing at 900 °C in acidic and basic solutions. Titania films were found to be stable in acid after annealing at or above 450 °C. All films showed a composition-independent increase in measured thickness when immersed in mercury. These results provide stability-processing relationships that are important for controlled etching and protective barrier layers. PMID:26107803

  18. Quantifying net microbial metabolism in the sub-seafloor using the chemical composition of adjacent hot and warm vent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Holden, J. F.; Roe, K. K.; Lilley, M. D.; Olson, E. J.; Ver Eecke, H. C.; Opatkiewicz, A. D.; Huber, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Myriad evidence points to the existence and activity of diverse microbial communities living in the sub-seafloor where hot hydrothermal fluids (T>300°C) mix with cold seawater to create thermal and chemical gradients that can support many different metabolic types. When the hot source composition is well characterized, chemical mixing models can be used to compare the expected and actual composition of warm diffuse vents. The differences are attributed to sub-seafloor reactions. In some cases, e.g. for methanogenesis and methanotrophy, the sub-seafloor reactions can be unambiguously attributed to microbial activity. In other cases, e.g. sulfide oxidation, the effects of competing abiotic reactions may sometimes be constrained or simplifying assumptions made to estimate the role of microbial activity. The mixing model concept has been applied before, but there have been very few systematic surveys to quantify sub-seafloor mixing zone reactions on a vent field scale. During two recent expeditions to the Endeavour Integrated Studies Site and Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca ridge, NE Pacific, the Hydrothermal Fluid and Particle Sampler was used to collect 6-10 paired samples of adjacent focused and diffuse fluids. Chemical mixing model results show evidence of variable, site-specific sulfide oxidation (loss of 25-94%), methane oxidation (loss of 20-66%), and methanogenesis (3 to 5-fold gain) in the sub-seafloor mixing zone. Laboratory experiments on microbial cultures of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii grew optimally at 82°C with H2 concentrations near 100µM, and showed no measurable growth when H2 concentrations were below 20 µM. Most of the high-temperature sources at Endeavour in 2008/9 have too little hydrogen to provide this concentration range when mixed with enough seawater to bring the temperature below 100°C, producing sub-optimal conditions for methanogens. In many Endeavour vents, we find evidence for loss of methane in the sub-seafloor mixing zone

  19. Chemical disinfection of Legionella in hot water systems biofilm: a pilot-scale 1 study.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Maha; Trouilhé, Marie-Cécile; Forêt, Christophe; Hater, Wolfgang; Moletta-Denat, Marina; Robine, Enric; Frère, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Legionella bacteria encounter optimum growing conditions in hot water systems and cooling towers. A pilot-scale 1 unit was built in order to study the biofilm disinfection. It consisted of two identical loops, one used as a control and the other as a 'Test Loop'. A combination of a bio-detergent and a biocide (hydrogen peroxide + peracetic acid) was applied in the Test Loop three times under the same conditions at 100 and 1,000 mg/L with a contact time of 24 and 3-6 hours, respectively. Each treatment test was preceded by a three week period of biofilm re-colonization. Initial concentrations of culturable Legionella into biofilm were close to 10(3) CFU/cm2. Results showed that culturable Legionella spp. in biofilm were no longer detectable three days following each treatment. evertheless, initial Legionella spp. concentrations were recovered 7 days after the treatments (in two cases). Before the tests, Legionella spp. and L. pneumophila PCR counts were both about 10(4) GU/cm2 in biofilm and they both decreased by 1 to 2 log units 72 hours after each treatment. The three tests had a good but transient efficiency on Legionella disinfection in biofilm. PMID:22097051

  20. Progress in Visualizing Atomic Size Effects with DFT-Chemical Pressure Analysis: From Isolated Atoms to Trends in AB5 Intermetallics.

    PubMed

    Berns, Veronica M; Engelkemier, Joshua; Guo, Yiming; Kilduff, Brandon J; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2014-08-12

    The notion of atomic size poses an important challenge to chemical theory: empirical evidence has long established that atoms have spatial requirements, which are summarized in tables of covalent, ionic, metallic, and van der Waals radii. Considerations based on these radii play a central role in the design and interpretation of experiments, but few methods are available to directly support arguments based on atomic size using electronic structure methods. Recently, we described an approach to elucidating atomic size effects using theoretical calculations: the DFT-Chemical Pressure analysis, which visualizes the local pressures arising in crystal structures from the interactions of atomic size and electronic effects. Using this approach, a variety of structural phenomena in intermetallic phases have already been understood in terms that provide guidance to new synthetic experiments. However, the applicability of the DFT-CP method to the broad range of the structures encountered in the solid state is limited by two issues: (1) the difficulty of interpreting the intense pressure features that appear in atomic core regions and (2) the need to divide space among pairs of interacting atoms in a meaningful way. In this article, we describe general solutions to these issues. In addressing the first issue, we explore the CP analysis of a test case in which no core pressures would be expected to arise: isolated atoms in large boxes. Our calculations reveal that intense core pressures do indeed arise in these virtually pressure-less model systems and allow us to trace the issue to the shifts in the voxel positions relative to atomic centers upon expanding and contracting the unit cell. A compensatory grid unwarping procedure is introduced to remedy this artifact. The second issue revolves around the difficulty of interpreting the pressure map in terms of interatomic interactions in a way that respects the size differences of the atoms and avoids artificial geometrical

  1. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes on diamond-like carbon by the hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Chang; Park, Yong Seob; Hong, Byungyou

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention as possible routes to device miniaturization due to their excellent mechanical, thermal, and electronic properties. These properties show great potential for devices such as field emission displays, transistors, and sensors. The growth of CNTs can be explained by interaction between small carbon patches and the metal catalyst. The metals such as nickel, cobalt, gold, iron, platinum, and palladium are used as the catalysts for the CNT growth. In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) was used for CNT growth as a nonmetallic catalyst layer. DLC films were deposited by a radio frequency (RF) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) method with a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases. CNTs were synthesized by a hot filament plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD) method with ammonia (NH3) as a pretreatment gas and acetylene (C2H2) as a carbon source gas. The grown CNTs and the pretreated DLC films were observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) measurement, and the structure of the grown CNTs was analyzed by high resolution transmission scanning electron microscopy (HR-TEM). Also, using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurement, we confirmed that only the carbon component remained on the substrate. PMID:19318258

  3. Effects of the bias enhanced nucleation hot-filament chemical-vapor deposition parameters on diamond nucleation on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnault, J. C.; Schull, G.; Polini, R.; Mermoux, M.; Faerber, J.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of the bias current density and the filament-to-substrate distance on the nucleation of diamond on iridium buffer layers were investigated in a hot-filament chemical-vapor deposition (HFCVD) reactor. The nucleation density increased by several orders of magnitude with the raise of the bias current density. According to high-resolution field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy observation, diamond nuclei formed during bias-enhanced nucleation (BEN) did not show any preferred oriented growth. Moreover, the first-nearest-neighbor distance distribution was consistent with a random nucleation mechanism. This occurrence suggested that the diffusion of carbon species at the substrate surface was not the predominant mechanism taking place during BEN in the HFCVD process. This fact was attributed to the formation of a graphitic layer prior to diamond nucleation. We also observed that the reduction of the filament sample distance during BEN was helpful for diamond growth. This nucleation behavior was different from the one previously reported in the case of BEN-microwave chemical-vapor deposition experiments on iridium and has been tentatively explained by taking into account the specific properties and limitations of the HFCVD technique.

  4. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  5. Role of hydrogen in the chemical vapor deposition growth of MoS2 atomic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Li, Xinming; Zang, Xiaobei; Zhu, Miao; He, Yijia; Wang, Kunlin; Xie, Dan; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen plays a crucial role in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Here, we have revealed the roles of hydrogen in the two-step CVD growth of MoS2. Our study demonstrates that hydrogen acts as the following: (i) an inhibitor of the thermal-induced etching effect in the continuous film growth process; and (ii) a promoter of the desulfurization reaction by decreasing the S/Mo atomic ratio and the oxidation reaction of the obtained MoSx (0 < x < 2) films. A high hydrogen content of more than 100% in argon forms nano-sized circle-like defects and damages the continuity and uniformity of the film. Continuous MoS2 films with a high crystallinity and a nearly perfect S/Mo atomic ratio were finally obtained after sulfurization annealing with a hydrogen content in the range of 20%-80%. This insightful understanding reveals the crucial roles of hydrogen in the CVD growth of MoS2 and paves the way for the controllable synthesis of two-dimensional materials.Hydrogen plays a crucial role in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Here, we have revealed the roles of hydrogen in the two-step CVD growth of MoS2. Our study demonstrates that hydrogen acts as the following: (i) an inhibitor of the thermal-induced etching effect in the continuous film growth process; and (ii) a promoter of the desulfurization reaction by decreasing the S/Mo atomic ratio and the oxidation reaction of the obtained MoSx (0 < x < 2) films. A high hydrogen content of more than 100% in argon forms nano-sized circle-like defects and damages the continuity and uniformity of the film. Continuous MoS2 films with a high crystallinity and a nearly perfect S/Mo atomic ratio were finally obtained after sulfurization annealing with a hydrogen content in the range of 20%-80%. This insightful understanding reveals the crucial roles of hydrogen in the CVD growth of MoS2 and paves the way for the controllable synthesis of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary

  6. Interlayer Potassium And Its Neighboring Atoms in Micas: Crystal-Chemical Modeling And Xanes Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brigatti, M.F.; Malferrari, D.; Poppi, M.; Mottana, A.; Cibin, G.; Marcelli, A.; Cinque, G.

    2009-05-12

    A detailed description of the interlayer site in trioctahedral true micas is presented based on a statistical appraisal of crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic data determined on two sets of trioctahedral micas extensively studied by both X-ray diffraction refinement on single crystals (SC-XRD) and X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS) at the potassium K-edge. Spectroscopy was carried out on both random powders and oriented cleavage flakes, the latter setting taking advantage of the polarized character of synchrotron radiation. Such an approach (AXANES) is shown to be complementary to crystal-chemical investigation based on SC-XRD refinement. However, the results are not definitive as they focus on few samples having extreme features only (e.g., end-members, unusual compositions, and samples with extreme and well-identified substitution mechanisms). The experimental absorption K-edge (XANES) for potassium was decomposed by calculation and extrapolated into a full in-plane absorption component ({sigma}{parallel}) and a full out-of-plane absorption component ({sigma}{perpendicular}). These two patterns reflect different structural features: {sigma}{parallel}represents the arrangement of the atoms located in the mica interlayer space and facing tetrahedral sheets; {sigma}{perpendicular} is associated with multiple-scattering interactions entering deep into the mica structure, thus also reflecting interactions with the heavy atoms (essentially Fe) located in the octahedral sheet. The out-of-plane patterns also provide insights into the electronic properties of the octahedral cations, such as their oxidation states (e.g., Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) and their ordering (e.g., trans- vs. cis-setting). It is also possible to distinguish between F- and OH-rich micas due to peculiar absorption features originating from the F vs. OH occupancy of the O4 octahedral site. Thus, combining crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic information is shown to be a

  7. Atomic scale dynamics of a solid state chemical reaction directly determined by annular dark-field electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Jones, Lewys; Pettersson, Henrik; Coelho, João; Canavan, Megan; Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz; Nicolosi, Valeria; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic processes, such as solid-state chemical reactions and phase changes, are ubiquitous in materials science, and developing a capability to observe the mechanisms of such processes on the atomic scale can offer new insights across a wide range of materials systems. Aberration correction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has enabled atomic resolution imaging at significantly reduced beam energies and electron doses. It has also made possible the quantitative determination of the composition and occupancy of atomic columns using the atomic number (Z)-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging available in STEM. Here we combine these benefits to record the motions and quantitative changes in the occupancy of individual atomic columns during a solid-state chemical reaction in manganese oxides. These oxides are of great interest for energy-storage applications such as for electrode materials in pseudocapacitors. We employ rapid scanning in STEM to both drive and directly observe the atomic scale dynamics behind the transformation of Mn3O4 into MnO. The results demonstrate we now have the experimental capability to understand the complex atomic mechanisms involved in phase changes and solid state chemical reactions. PMID:25532123

  8. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Toyonobu Nabemoto; Fujio Katahira; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Shinichi Aose; Takafumi Kitajima; Kouji Ogasawara; Kazunori Nomura; Shigehiko Miyachi; Yoshiaki Ichige; Tadahiro Shinozaki; Shinichi Ohuchi

    2008-01-15

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material.

  9. Wet Etching of Heat Treated Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposited Zirconium Oxide in HF Based Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Sriram; Raghavan, Srini

    2008-06-01

    Alternative materials are being considered to replace silicon dioxide as gate dielectric material. Of these, the oxides of hafnium and zirconium show the most promise. However, integrating these new high-k materials into the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process remains a challenge. One particular area of concern is the wet etching of heat treated high-k dielectrics. In this paper, work done on the wet etching of heat treated atomic layer chemical vapor deposited (ALCVD) zirconium oxide in HF based solutions is presented. It was found that heat treated material, while refractory to wet etching at room temperature, is more amenable to etching at higher temperatures when methane sulfonic acid is added to dilute HF solutions. Selectivity over SiO2 is still a concern.

  10. Survey of reproductive hazards among oil, chemical, and atomic workers exposed to halogenated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.; Harley, B.; Krekel, S.; Marshall, J.; Bondy, J.; Orleans, M.

    1984-01-01

    Several halogenated hydrocarbons are suspected of causing adverse reproductive effects. Because of such concerns, the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union surveyed the reproductive histories of two groups of workers. One group worked at plants engaged in the production or use of halogenated hydrocarbons (exposed) whereas the others had no such opportunity for exposure (nonexposed). Although a low response rate precludes firm conclusions, the 1,280 completed questionnaires provide useful data for generating hypotheses in this developing field of interest. A history of diagnosed cancer was reported more frequently among exposed workers. The infant mortality rate was also significantly elevated among the offspring of exposed workers. No risk gradient was observed for episodes of infertility, fetal loss, congenital defects, or low-birthweight offspring. Concerns with nonresponse, exposure characterization, possible confounding factors, and limited statistical power are addressed. The results provide further suggestions which help to direct studies of occupational reproductive risks.

  11. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  12. Multi-element analysis of manganese nodules by atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.; Harnly, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Five manganese nodules, including the USGS reference nodules A-1 and P-1, were analyzed for Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn without prior chemical separation by using a simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometer with an air-cetylene flame. The nodules were prepared in three digestion matrices. One of these solutions was measured using sixteen different combinations of burner height and air/acetylene ratios. Results for A-1 and P-1 are compared to recommended values and results for all nodules are compared to those obtained with an inductively coupled plasma. The elements Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, and Zn are simultaneously determined with a composite recovery for all elements of 100 ?? 7%, independent of the digestion matrices, heights in the flame, or flame stoichiometries examined. Individual recoveries for Co, K, and Ni are considerably poorer in two digests than this composite figure, however. The optimum individual recoveries of 100 ?? 5% and imprecisions of 1-4%, except for zinc, are obtained when Co, K, Mn, Na and Ni are determined simultaneously in a concentrated digest, and in another analytical sequence, when Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn are measured simultaneously after dilution. Determination of manganese is equally accurate in the two sequences; its measurement in both assures internal consistency between the two measurement sequences. This approach improves analytical efficiency over that for conventional atomic absorption methods, while minimizing loss of accuracy or precision for individual elements. ?? 1982.

  13. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G.

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnOx-CVD layers.

  14. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers. PMID:24089868

  15. Evaluating and Interpreting the Chemical Relevance of the Linear Response Kernel for Atoms.

    PubMed

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2013-02-12

    Although a lot of work has been done on the chemical relevance of the atom-condensed linear response kernel χAB regarding inductive, mesomeric, and hyperconjugative effects as well as (anti)aromaticity of molecules, the same cannot be said about its not condensed form χ(r,r'). Using a single Slater determinant KS type ansatz involving second order perturbation theory, we set out to investigate the linear response kernel for a number of judiciously chosen closed (sub)shell atoms throughout the periodic table and its relevance, e.g., in relation to the shell structure and polarizability. The numerical results are to the best of our knowledge the first systematic study on this noncondensed linear response function, the results for He and Be being in line with earlier work by Savin. Different graphical representations of the kernel are presented and discussed. Moreover, a frontier orbital approach has been tested illustrating the sensitivity of the nonintegrated kernel to the nodal structure of the orbitals. As a test of our method, a numerical integration of the linear response kernel was performed, yielding an accuracy of 10(-4). We also compare calculated values of the polarizability tensor and their evolution throughout the periodic table to high-level values found in the literature. PMID:26588743

  16. Examinations of Chemical Resistance and Thermal Behaviour of Ceramic Filter Materials for Hot-Gas Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Angermann, J.; Meyer, B.; Horlbeck, W.

    2002-09-19

    Increasing prosperity and the steady growth of the world population lead to a strongly rising energy requirement. Therefore the saving of the available resources as well as the limitation of CO{sub 2}-emission are the main reasons for developing highly efficient power stations. The use of combined cycle technology for advanced coal fired power plants allow a significantly higher conversion efficiency than it is possible in an only steam power plant. In order to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature, the filtration of fine particles is necessary. Therefore the filtration unit is one of the key components of the circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology (PFBC). To use this technology more effectively, gas cleaning at high temperatures or in an reducing atmosphere is necessary. A possibility of the effective gas cleaning at high temperatures is the use of porous ceramic candle filters. The structure of such filter elements usually consists of a highly porous sup port which ensures the mechanical strength and a layer which operates as the functional part for the particle removal. To ensure a guaranteed lifetime of about 16000 h the effect of combustion or gasification atmosphere and temperature on the thermal and mechanical properties of the filter material has to be studied. The examinations and results, described in this article, are part of some previous work. This paper focuses especially on the chemical resistance and the thermal behaviour of the used ceramic filter materials.

  17. Chemical enrichment in the hot intra-cluster medium seen with XMM-Newton/EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM), permeating the large gravitational potential well of galaxy clusters and groups, is rich in metals, which can be detected via their emission lines in the soft X-ray band. These heavy elements (typically from O to Ni) have been synthesized by Type Ia (SNIa) and core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae within the galaxy members, and continuously enrich the ICM since the cosmic star formation peak (z ≃ 2-3). Because the predicted chemical yields of supernovae depend on either their explosion mechanisms (SNIa) or the initial mass and metallicity of their progenitors (SNcc), measuring the abundances in the ICM can help to constrain supernovae models. In this study, we use XMM-Newton/EPIC to measure the abundances of 9 elements (Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni) in a sample of 44 cool-core galaxy clusters, groups and ellipticals (the CHEERS catalog). Combining these results with the O and Ne abundances measured using RGS, we establish an average X/Fe abundance pattern in the ICM, and we determine the best-fit SNIa and SNcc models, as well as the relative fraction of SNIa/SNcc responsible for the enrichment.

  18. Chemical enrichment in the hot intra-cluster medium seen with XMM-Newton/EPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mernier, F.; de Plaa, J.; Pinto, C.; Kaastra, J.; Kosec, P.; Zhang, Y.; Mao, J.; Werner, N.

    2016-06-01

    The intra-cluster medium (ICM), permeating the large gravitational potential well of galaxy clusters and groups, is rich in metals, which can be detected via their emission lines in the soft X-ray band. These heavy elements (typically from O to Ni) have been synthesized by Type Ia (SNIa) and core-collapse (SNcc) supernovae within the galaxy members, and continuously enrich the ICM since the cosmic star formation peak (z ≃ 2--3). Because the predicted chemical yields of supernovae depend on either their explosion mechanisms (SNIa) or the initial mass and metallicity of their progenitors (SNcc), measuring the abundances in the ICM can help to constrain supernovae models. In this study, we use XMM-Newton/EPIC to measure the abundances of 9 elements (Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni) in a sample of 44 cool-core galaxy clusters, groups and ellipticals (the CHEERS catalog). Combining these results with the O and Ne abundances measured using RGS, we establish an average X/Fe abundance pattern in the ICM, and we determine the best-fit SNIa and SNcc models, as well as the relative fraction of SNIa/SNcc responsible for the enrichment.

  19. Localizing chemical groups while imaging single native proteins by high-resolution atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Hilbert, Manuel; Steinmetz, Michel O; Müller, Daniel J

    2014-05-14

    Simultaneous high-resolution imaging and localization of chemical interaction sites on single native proteins is a pertinent biophysical, biochemical, and nanotechnological challenge. Such structural mapping and characterization of binding sites is of importance in understanding how proteins interact with their environment and in manipulating such interactions in a plethora of biotechnological applications. Thus far, this challenge remains to be tackled. Here, we introduce force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) for the high-resolution imaging of SAS-6, a protein that self-assembles into cartwheel-like structures. Using functionalized AFM tips bearing Ni(2+)-N-nitrilotriacetate groups, we locate specific interaction sites on SAS-6 at nanometer resolution and quantify the binding strength of the Ni(2+)-NTA groups to histidine residues. The FD-based AFM approach can readily be applied to image any other native protein and to locate and structurally map histidine residues. Moreover, the surface chemistry used to functionalize the AFM tip can be modified to map other chemical interaction sites. PMID:24766578

  20. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), also referred to as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD), has been used to produce Si-containing thin films, nanomaterials, and functional polymer coatings that have found wide applications in microelectronic and photovoltaic devices, in automobiles, and in biotechnology. The success of HWCVD is largely due to its various advantages, including high deposition rate, low substrate temperatures, lack of plasma-induced damage, and large-area uniformity. Film growth in HWCVD is induced by reactive species generated from primary decomposition on the metal wire or from secondary reactions in the gas phase. In order to achieve a rational and efficient optimization of the process, it is essential to identify the reactive species and to understand the chemical kinetics that govern the production of these precursor species for film growth. In this Account, we report recent progress in unraveling the complex gas-phase reaction chemistry in the HWCVD growth of silicon carbide thin films using organosilicon compounds as single-source precursors. We have demonstrated that laser ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful diagnostic tool for studying the gas-phase reaction chemistry when combined with the methods of isotope labeling and chemical trapping. The four methyl-substituted silane molecules, belonging to open-chain alkylsilanes, dissociatively adsorb on W and Ta filaments to produce methyl radical and H2 molecule. Under the typical deposition pressures, with increasing number of methyl substitution, the dominant chemistry occurring in the gas phase switches from silylene/silene reactions to free-radical short chain reactions. This change in dominant reaction intermediates from silylene/silene to methyl radicals explains the observation from thin film deposition that silicon carbide films become more C-rich with a decreasing number of Si-H bonds in the four precursor molecules. In the case of cyclic monosilacyclobutanes, we have

  1. Hot bubbles of planetary nebulae with hydrogen-deficient winds. I. Heat conduction in a chemically stratified plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, C.; Steffen, M.; Schönberner, D.; Rühling, U.

    2016-02-01

    Heat conduction has been found a plausible solution to explain discrepancies between expected and measured temperatures in hot bubbles of planetary nebulae (PNe). While the heat conduction process depends on the chemical composition, to date it has been exclusively studied for pure hydrogen plasmas in PNe. A smaller population of PNe show hydrogen-deficient and helium- and carbon-enriched surfaces surrounded by bubbles of the same composition; considerable differences are expected in physical properties of these objects in comparison to the pure hydrogen case. The aim of this study is to explore how a chemistry-dependent formulation of the heat conduction affects physical properties and how it affects the X-ray emission from PN bubbles of hydrogen-deficient stars. We extend the description of heat conduction in our radiation hydrodynamics code to work with any chemical composition. We then compare the bubble-formation process with a representative PN model using both the new and the old descriptions. We also compare differences in the resulting X-ray temperature and luminosity observables of the two descriptions. The improved equations show that the heat conduction in our representative model of a hydrogen-deficient PN is nearly as efficient with the chemistry-dependent description; a lower value on the diffusion coefficient is compensated by a slightly steeper temperature gradient. The bubble becomes somewhat hotter with the improved equations, but differences are otherwise minute. The observable properties of the bubble in terms of the X-ray temperature and luminosity are seemingly unaffected.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of silicon based thermal neutron detector with hot wire chemical vapor deposited boron carbide converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Pradip; Singh, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Dusane, Rajiv

    2015-04-01

    In order to utilize the well established silicon detector technology for neutron detection application, a silicon based thermal neutron detector was fabricated by integrating a thin boron carbide layer as a neutron converter with a silicon PIN detector. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), which is a low cost, low temperature process for deposition of thin films with precise thickness was explored as a technique for direct deposition of a boron carbide layer over the metalized front surface of the detector chip. The presence of B-C bonding and 10B isotope in the boron carbide film were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry respectively. The deposition of HWCVD boron carbide layer being a low temperature process was observed not to cause degradation of the PIN detector. The response of the detector with 0.2 μm and 0.5 μm thick boron carbide layer was examined in a nuclear reactor. The pulse height spectrum shows evidence of thermal neutron response with signature of (n, α) reaction. The results presented in this article indicate that HWCVD boron carbide deposition technique would be suitable for low cost industrial fabrication of PIN based single element or 1D/2D position sensitive thermal neutron detectors.

  3. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. PMID:25261762

  4. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS. PMID:25958863

  5. Computer Modeling Of Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M.; Ibrahim, E.; Przekwas, A.; Cheuch, S.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H.; Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mathematical models based on fundamental principles of conservation of mass, energy, and momentum developed for use in computer simulation of atomization of jets of liquid fuel in rocket engines. Models also used to study atomization in terrestrial applications; prove especially useful in designing improved industrial sprays - humidifier water sprays, chemical process sprays, and sprays of molten metal. Because present improved mathematical models based on first principles, they are minimally dependent on empirical correlations and better able to represent hot-flow conditions that prevail in rocket engines and are too severe to be accessible for detailed experimentation.

  6. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, Norbert; Schaffenroth, Veronika; Nieva, Maria-Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This facilitates tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for wide applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be in focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  7. Learning about Atoms, Molecules, and Chemical Bonds: A Case Study of Multiple-Model Use in Grade 11 Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allan G.; Treagust, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Reports in detail on a year-long case study of multiple-model use at grade 11. Suggests that students who socially negotiated the shared and unshared attributes of common analogical models for atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds used these models more consistently in their explanations. (Author/CCM)

  8. Characterization of chemically and enzymatically treated hemp fibres using atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael; Mussone, Paolo G.; Abboud, Zeinab; Bressler, David C.

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical and moisture resistance properties of natural fibre reinforced composites are dependent on the adhesion between the matrix of choice and the fibre. The main goal of this study was to investigate the effect of NaOH swelling of hemp fibres prior to enzymatic treatment and a novel chemical sulfonic acid method on the physical properties of hemp fibres. The colloidal properties of treated hemp fibres were studied exclusively using an atomic force microscope. AFM imaging in tapping mode revealed that each treatment rendered the surface topography of the hemp fibres clean and exposed the individual fibre bundles. Hemp fibres treated with laccase had no effect on the surface adhesion forces measured. Interestingly, mercerization prior to xylanase + cellulase and laccase treatments resulted in greater enzyme access evident in the increased adhesion force measurements. Hemp fibres treated with sulfonic acid showed an increase in surface de-fibrillation and smoothness. A decrease in adhesion forces for 4-aminotoulene-3-sulfonic acid (AT3S) treated fibres suggested a reduction in surface polarity. This work demonstrated that AFM can be used as a tool to estimate the surface forces and roughness for modified fibres and that enzymatic coupled with chemical methods can be used to improve the surface properties of natural fibres for composite applications. Further, this work is one of the first that offers some insight into the effect of mercerization prior to enzymes and the effect on the surface topography. AFM will be used to selectively screen treated fibres for composite applications based on the adhesion forces associated with the colloidal interface between the AFM tip and the fibre surfaces.

  9. Average atom transport properties for pure and mixed species in the hot and warm dense matter regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Starrett, C. E.; Kress, J. D.; Collins, L. A.; Hanson, D. E.; Clerouin, J.; Recoules, V.

    2012-10-15

    The Kubo-Greenwood formulation for calculation of optical conductivities with an average atom model is extended to calculate thermal conductivities. The method is applied to species and conditions of interest for inertial confinement fusion. For the mixed species studied, the partial pressure mixing rule is used. Results including pressures, dc, and thermal conductivities are compared to ab initio calculations. Agreement for pressures is good, for both the pure and mixed species. For conductivities, it is found that the ad hoc renormalization method with line broadening, described in the text, gives best agreement with the ab initio results. However, some disagreement is found and the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  10. Local atomic and electronic structure of boron chemical doping in monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liuyan; Levendorf, Mark; Goncher, Scott; Schiros, Theanne; Pálová, Lucia; Zabet-Khosousi, Amir; Rim, Kwang Taeg; Gutiérrez, Christopher; Nordlund, Dennis; Jaye, Cherno; Hybertsen, Mark; Reichman, David; Flynn, George W; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2013-10-01

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy to characterize the atomic and electronic structure of boron-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene created by chemical vapor deposition on copper substrates. Microscopic measurements show that boron, like nitrogen, incorporates into the carbon lattice primarily in the graphitic form and contributes ~0.5 carriers into the graphene sheet per dopant. Density functional theory calculations indicate that boron dopants interact strongly with the underlying copper substrate while nitrogen dopants do not. The local bonding differences between graphitic boron and nitrogen dopants lead to large scale differences in dopant distribution. The distribution of dopants is observed to be completely random in the case of boron, while nitrogen displays strong sublattice clustering. Structurally, nitrogen-doped graphene is relatively defect-free while boron-doped graphene films show a large number of Stone-Wales defects. These defects create local electronic resonances and cause electronic scattering, but do not electronically dope the graphene film. PMID:24032458

  11. Determination of cadmium in water samples by fast pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingya; Fang, Jinliang; Duan, Xuchuan

    2016-08-01

    A pyrolysis-vapor generation procedure to determine cadmium by atomic fluorescence spectrometry has been established. Under fast pyrolysis, cadmium ion can be reduced to volatile cadmium species by sodium formate. The presence of thiourea enhanced the efficiency of cadmium vapor generation and eliminated the interference of copper. The possible mechanism of vapor generation of cadmium was discussed. The optimization of the parameters for pyrolysis-chemical vapor generation, including pyrolysis temperature, amount of sodium formate, concentration of hydrochloric acid, and carrier argon flow rate were carried out. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute and concentration detection limits were 0.38 ng and 2.2 ng ml- 1, respectively, assuming that 0.17 ml of sample was injected. The generation efficiency of was 28-37%. The method was successfully applied to determine trace amounts of cadmium in two certified reference materials of Environmental Water (GSB07-1185-2000 and GSBZ 50009-88). The results were in good agreement with the certified reference values.

  12. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  13. Increase in the power of lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkin, V M; Sokovikov, V G

    2007-02-28

    A method for increasing the power of pulsed lasing on atomic and ion transitions in chemical elements obtained by the conversion of the UV radiation of excimer lasers in cells with metal vapours is studied. A part of UV radiation transmitted through a cell with metal vapour is used for pumping a dye solution in such a way that the cell converter with metal vapour represents a master oscillator, while the dye cell represents an amplifier. The study is performed by the example of amplification of weak spectral components of radiation from a XeCl* laser converted in mercury and barium vapours. In the amplifying stage the longitudinal pumping of the dye is used and a scheme for suppressing self-excitation is employed. It is found by selecting dyes that the alcohol solution of uranin is nearly optimal for amplification of the 546.1-nm laser line of mercury, while the best results in amplification of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm laser lines of barium were obtained by using alcohol solutions of rhodamine 6G and oxazine 17, respectively. The power of the 546.1-nm mercury line was increased by an order of magnitude, while the power of the 533-nm and 648.2-nm lines of barium - almost by a factor of twenty-five. (lasers)

  14. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers’ global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  15. Analysis of atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal by 11B solid state NMR.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Takafumi; Kashiwakura, Shunsuke; Kanehashi, Koji; Hayashi, Shunichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2011-02-01

    Atomic scale chemical environments of boron in coal has been studied by solid state NMR spectroscopy including magic angle spinning (MAS), satellite transition magic angle spinning (STMAS), and cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS). The (11)B NMR spectra can be briefly classified according to the degree of coalification. On the (11)B NMR spectra of lignite, bituminous, and sub-bituminous coals (carbon content of 70-90mass%), three sites assigned to four-coordinate boron ([4])B with small quadrupolar coupling constants (≤0.9 MHz) are observed. Two of the ([4])B sites in downfield are considered organoboron complexes with aromatic ligands, while the other in the most upper field is considered inorganic tetragonal boron (BO(4)). By contrast, on the (11)B NMR spectra of blind coal (carbon content >90mass%), the ([4])B which substitutes tetrahedral silicon of Illite is observed as a representative species. It has been considered that the organoboron is decomposed and released from the parent phase with the advance of coal maturation, and then the released boron reacts with the inorganic phase to substitute an element of inorganic minerals. Otherwise boron contained originally in inorganic minerals might remain preserved even under the high temperature condition that is generated during coalification. PMID:21175186

  16. Design, Modeling, Fabrication, and Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators with Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposited Polysilicon as Thermoelement Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leon, Maria Theresa; Tarazona, Antulio; Chong, Harold; Kraft, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the design, modeling, fabrication, and evaluation of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) with p-type polysilicon deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) as thermoelement material. A thermal model is developed based on energy balance and heat transfer equations using lumped thermal conductances. Several test structures were fabricated to allow characterization of the boron-doped polysilicon material deposited by HWCVD. The film was found to be electrically active without any post-deposition annealing. Based on the tests performed on the test structures, it is determined that the Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and electrical resistivity of the HWCVD polysilicon are 113 μV/K, 126 W/mK, and 3.58 × 10-5 Ω m, respectively. Results from laser tests performed on the fabricated TEG are in good agreement with the thermal model. The temperature values derived from the thermal model are within 2.8% of the measured temperature values. For a 1-W laser input, an open-circuit voltage and output power of 247 mV and 347 nW, respectively, were generated. This translates to a temperature difference of 63°C across the thermoelements. This paper demonstrates that HWCVD, which is a cost-effective way of producing solar cells, can also be applied in the production of TEGs. By establishing that HWCVD polysilicon can be an effective thermoelectric material, further work on developing photovoltaic-thermoelectric (PV-TE) hybrid microsystems that are cost-effective and better performing can be explored.

  17. Atomic-level investigation of the growth of Si/Ge by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Miller, T.; Chiang, T.

    1997-05-01

    Si and Ge films can be prepared under ultrahigh vacuum conditions by chemical vapor deposition using disilane and digermane as source gases. These gases offer a high sticking probability, and are suitable for atomic layer epitaxy. Using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, we have examined the surface processes associated with the heteroepitaxial growth of Ge/Si. The measured surface-induced shifts and chemical shifts of the Si 2p and Ge 3d core levels allow us to identify the surface species and to determine the surface chemical composition, and this information is correlated with the atomic features observed by scanning tunneling microscopy. Issues related to precursor dissociation, attachment to dangling bonds, diffusion, surface segregation, growth morphology, and pyrolytic reaction pathways will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  18. Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

  19. Imaging and three-dimensional reconstruction of chemical groups inside a protein complex using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duckhoe; Sahin, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopes can be used to image and chemically characterize surfaces down to the atomic scale. However, the localized tip-sample interactions in scanning probe microscopes limit high-resolution images to the topmost atomic layer of surfaces, and characterizing the inner structures of materials and biomolecules is a challenge for such instruments. Here, we show that an atomic force microscope can be used to image and three-dimensionally reconstruct chemical groups inside a protein complex. We use short single-stranded DNAs as imaging labels that are linked to target regions inside a protein complex, and T-shaped atomic force microscope cantilevers functionalized with complementary probe DNAs allow the labels to be located with sequence specificity and subnanometre resolution. After measuring pairwise distances between labels, we reconstruct the three-dimensional structure formed by the target chemical groups within the protein complex using simple geometric calculations. Experiments with the biotin-streptavidin complex show that the predicted three-dimensional loci of the carboxylic acid groups of biotins are within 2 Å of their respective loci in the corresponding crystal structure, suggesting that scanning probe microscopes could complement existing structural biological techniques in solving structures that are difficult to study due to their size and complexity.

  20. Substrate patterning with NiOx nanoparticles and hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of WO3x and carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, Z. S.

    2011-10-01

    The first part of the thesis treats the formation of nickel catalyst nanoparticles. First, a patterning technique using colloids is employed to create ordered distributions of monodisperse nanoparticles. Second, nickel films are thermally dewetted, which produces mobile species that self-arrange in non-ordered distributions of polydisperse particles. Third, the mobility of the nickel species is successfully reduced by the addition of air during the dewetting and the use of a special anchoring layer. Thus, non-ordered distributions of self-arranged monodisperse nickel oxide nanoparticles (82±10 nm x 16±2 nm) are made. Studies on nickel thickness, dewetting time and dewetting temperature are conducted. With these particle templates, graphitic carbon nanotubes are synthesised using catalytic hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), demonstrating the high-temperature processability of the nanoparticles. The second part of this thesis treats the non-catalytic HWCVD of tungsten oxides (WO3-x). Resistively heated tungsten filaments exposed to an air flow at subatmospheric pressures, produce tungsten oxide vapour species, which are collected on substrates and are subsequently characterised. First, a complete study on the process conditions is conducted, whereby the effects of filament radiation, filament temperature, process gas pressure and substrate temperature, are investigated. The thus controlled growth of nanogranular smooth amorphous and crystalline WO3-x thin films is presented for the first time. Partially crystalline smooth hydrous WO3-x thin films consisting of 20 nm grains can be deposited at very high rates. The synthesis of ultrafine powders with particle sizes of about 7 nm and very high specific surface areas of 121.7±0.4 m2·g-1 at ultrahigh deposition rates of 36 µm·min-1, is presented. Using substrate heating to 600°C or more, while using air pressures of 3·10-5 mbar to 0.1 mbar, leads to pronounced crystal structures, from nanowires, to

  1. Geochemistry, Comparative Analysis, and Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Thermal Waters East of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas, 2006-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kresse, Timothy M.; Hays, Phillip D.

    2009-01-01

    rock collapse for uncased wells completed in highly fractured rock. However, the propagation of newly formed large fractures that potentially could damage well structures or result in pirating of water from production wells appears to be of limited possibility based on review of relevant studies. Characteristics of hydraulic conductivity, storage, and fracture porosity were interpreted from flow rates observed in individual wells completed in the Bigfork Chert and Stanley Shale; from hydrographs produced from continuous measurements of water levels in wells completed in the Arkansas Novaculite, the Bigfork Chert, and Stanley Shale; and from a potentiometric-surface map constructed using water levels in wells throughout the study area. Data gathered from these three separate exercises showed that fracture porosity is much greater in the Bigfork Chert relative to that in the Stanley Shale, shallow groundwater flows from elevated recharge areas with exposures of Bigfork Chert along and into streams within the valleys formed on exposures of the Stanley Shale, and there was no evidence of interbasin transfer of groundwater within the shallow flow system. Fifteen shallow wells and two cold-water springs were sampled from the various exposed formations in the study area to characterize the water quality and geochemistry for the shallow groundwater system and for comparison to the geochemistry of the hot springs in Hot Springs National Park. For the quartz formations (novaculite, chert, and sandstone formations), total dissolved solids concentrations were very low with a median concentration of 23 milligrams per liter, whereas the median concentration for groundwater from the shale formations was 184 milligrams per liter. Ten hot springs in Hot Springs National Park were sampled for the study. Several chemical constituents for the hot springs, including pH, total dissolved solids, major cations and anions, and trace metals, show similarity with the shale formations

  2. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  3. Chemical Vapor Deposition Synthesized Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide with Optoelectronic-Grade Crystalline Quality.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ismail; Liu, Fangze; Vargas, Anthony; Winchester, Andrew; Man, Michael K L; Upmanyu, Moneesh; Dani, Keshav M; Gupta, Gautam; Talapatra, Saikat; Mohite, Aditya D; Kar, Swastik

    2015-09-22

    The ability to synthesize high-quality samples over large areas and at low cost is one of the biggest challenges during the developmental stage of any novel material. While chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods provide a promising low-cost route for CMOS compatible, large-scale growth of materials, it often falls short of the high-quality demands in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. We present large-scale CVD synthesis of single- and few-layered MoS2 using direct vapor-phase sulfurization of MoO2, which enables us to obtain extremely high-quality single-crystal monolayer MoS2 samples with field-effect mobility exceeding 30 cm(2)/(V s) in monolayers. These samples can be readily synthesized on a variety of substrates, and demonstrate a high-degree of optoelectronic uniformity in Raman and photoluminescence mapping over entire crystals with areas exceeding hundreds of square micrometers. Because of their high crystalline quality, Raman spectroscopy on these samples reveal a range of multiphonon processes through peaks with equal or better clarity compared to past reports on mechanically exfoliated samples. This enables us to investigate the layer thickness and substrate dependence of the extremely weak phonon processes at 285 and 487 cm(-1) in 2D-MoS2. The ultrahigh, optoelectronic-grade crystalline quality of these samples could be further established through photocurrent spectroscopy, which clearly reveal excitonic states at room temperature, a feat that has been previously demonstrated only on samples which were fabricated by micro-mechanical exfoliation and then artificially suspended across trenches. Our method reflects a big step in the development of atomically thin, 2D-MoS2 for scalable, high-quality optoelectronics. PMID:26256639

  4. Atomic-level structural and chemical analysis of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, A.; Kepaptsoglou, D.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Ramasse, Q.; Hesjedal, T.; Lazarov, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the structure and chemical composition of the Cr-doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Single-crystalline thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Al2O3 (0001), and their structural and chemical properties determined on an atomic level by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A regular quintuple layer stacking of the Bi2Se3 film is found, with the exception of the first several atomic layers in the initial growth. The spectroscopy data gives direct evidence that Cr is preferentially substituting for Bi in the Bi2Se3 host. We also show that Cr has a tendency to segregate at internal grain boundaries of the Bi2Se3 film. PMID:27221782

  5. Atomic-level structural and chemical analysis of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A; Kepaptsoglou, D; Collins-McIntyre, L J; Ramasse, Q; Hesjedal, T; Lazarov, V K

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the structure and chemical composition of the Cr-doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Single-crystalline thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Al2O3 (0001), and their structural and chemical properties determined on an atomic level by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A regular quintuple layer stacking of the Bi2Se3 film is found, with the exception of the first several atomic layers in the initial growth. The spectroscopy data gives direct evidence that Cr is preferentially substituting for Bi in the Bi2Se3 host. We also show that Cr has a tendency to segregate at internal grain boundaries of the Bi2Se3 film. PMID:27221782

  6. Atomic-level structural and chemical analysis of Cr-doped Bi2Se3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, A.; Kepaptsoglou, D.; Collins-McIntyre, L. J.; Ramasse, Q.; Hesjedal, T.; Lazarov, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study of the structure and chemical composition of the Cr-doped 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3. Single-crystalline thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Al2O3 (0001), and their structural and chemical properties determined on an atomic level by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. A regular quintuple layer stacking of the Bi2Se3 film is found, with the exception of the first several atomic layers in the initial growth. The spectroscopy data gives direct evidence that Cr is preferentially substituting for Bi in the Bi2Se3 host. We also show that Cr has a tendency to segregate at internal grain boundaries of the Bi2Se3 film.

  7. Influence of Chemical Composition and Melting Process on Hot Rolling of NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belbasi, Majid; Salehi, Mohammad T.

    2014-07-01

    NiTiHf high-temperature shape memory alloy ingots with transformation temperatures above 100 °C were produced by vacuum induction melting (VIM) and vacuum arc melting (VAM). The effects of melting process and compositional changes were investigated on hot rolling of cast samples. The amount of (Ti,Hf)2Ni second phase which was formed during solidification and the (Ti,Hf)C formed due to graphite crucible using in VIM have significantly affected the microstructure of the cast sample due to poor coherency, which affected the hot-rolling behavior. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to inspect the observed cracks in the microstructure after the hot-rolling process. The results displayed that the formation of (Ti,Hf)C and the existence of (Ti,Hf)2Ni second phase had harmful effects on the workability of the cast specimen due to the feeble coherency of (Ti,Hf)C and (Ti,Hf)2 Ni with the matrix, which caused a failure in the hot-rolled specimen. The Ni50Ti40Hf10 alloy produced by VAM shows better workability in hot rolling due to lower amount of (Ti,Hf)2Ni, (Ti,Hf)C phases.

  8. Physical Construction of the Chemical Atom: Is It Convenient to Go All the Way Back?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izquierdo-Aymerich, Merce; Aduriz-Bravo, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of chemistry texts (mainly textbooks) published during the first half of the 20th century. We show the evolution of the explanations therein in terms of atoms and of atomic structure, when scientists were interpreting phenomena as evidence of the discontinuous, corpuscular structure of matter. In this process…

  9. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-06-01

    Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers has been demonstrated. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f 6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2 levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf 6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf 8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  10. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf69/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  11. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 groundmore » state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.« less

  12. Atomic-scale chemical imaging and quantification of metallic alloy structures by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M J; Smith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L2(1) phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B(Ι)-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B(ΙΙ)-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  13. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  14. Physical and chemical nature of sensitization centers left from hot spots caused in triaminotrinitrobenzene by shock or impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, J.; Forbes, J.W.; Coffey, C.S.; Liddiard, T.P.

    1987-09-10

    Samples of triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), a well-known explosive, were taken to the brink of ignition by either underwater shock or impact and were investigated for the generation of hot spots. SEM was used for detecting, locating, and measuring the size of the hot spot remnants. These were found to be tiny ragged holes in the explosive with a fine deposit of debris near them. By use of XPS, a specially surface-sensitive technique, it was found that the debris consisted of furoxan and furazan derivatives of TATB produced from its decomposition. The furoxans are far more sensitive than TATB and constitute sensitization centers where reaction an easily restart during handling of the explosive. The hot spot sites were of micron size for the impacted samples and an order of magnitude smaller for the underwater-shocked samples.

  15. Chemical and Thermoelectric Properties of Hot Pressed and Spark Plasma Sintered Type-I Clathrate Ba8Cu4.8Si41.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Populoh, S.; Weidenkaff, A.; Rogl, P.; Paschen, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructuring has been considered as an effective way to reduce the thermal conductivity and enhance the thermoelectric performance in different material systems. Here, we present the chemical and thermoelectric properties of the nanostructured bulk type-I clathrate Ba8Cu4.8Si41.2. The samples were prepared by consolidating ball-milled nanopowders either by hot pressing or by spark plasma sintering. Fine powders and high sintering temperatures are needed to reach a high bulk density and high thermoelectric performance in the sintered samples. The highest ZT of 0.3 at 870 K is achieved in the most dense sample sintered at 800°C by hot pressing. Further improvement is expected if smaller grain sizes could be stabilized.

  16. Atom probe study of the carbon distribution in a hardened martensitic hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1.

    PubMed

    Lerchbacher, Christoph; Zinner, Silvia; Leitner, Harald

    2012-07-01

    The microstructure of the hardened common hot-work tool steel X38CrMoV5-1 has been characterized by atom probe tomography with the focus on the carbon distribution. Samples quenched with technically relevant cooling parameters λ from 0.1 (30 K/s) to 12 (0.25 K/s) have been investigated. The parameter λ is an industrially commonly used exponential cooling parameter, representing the cooling time from 800 to 500 °C in seconds divided with hundred. In all samples pronounced carbon segregation to dislocations and cluster formation could be observed after quenching. Carbon enriched interlath films with peak carbon levels of 6-10 at.%, which have been identified to be retained austenite by TEM, show a thickness increase with increasing λ. Therefore, the fraction of total carbon staying in the austenite grows. This carbon is not available for the tempering induced precipitation of secondary carbides in the bulk. Through all samples no segregation of any substitutional elements takes place. Charpy impact testing and fracture surface analysis of the hardened samples reveal the cooling rate induced microstructural distinctions. PMID:22391101

  17. Ultracold Chemical Reactions of a Single Rydberg Atom in a Dense Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Liebisch, Tara Cubel; Engel, Felix; Kleinbach, Kathrin S.; Böttcher, Fabian; Hermann, Udo; Westphal, Karl M.; Gaj, Anita; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2016-07-01

    Within a dense environment (ρ ≈1014 atoms /cm3 ) at ultracold temperatures (T <1 μ K ), a single atom excited to a Rydberg state acts as a reaction center for surrounding neutral atoms. At these temperatures, almost all neutral atoms within the Rydberg orbit are bound to the Rydberg core and interact with the Rydberg atom. We have studied the reaction rate and products for n S 87Rb Rydberg states, and we mainly observe a state change of the Rydberg electron to a high orbital angular momentum l , with the released energy being converted into kinetic energy of the Rydberg atom. Unexpectedly, the measurements show a threshold behavior at n ≈100 for the inelastic collision time leading to increased lifetimes of the Rydberg state independent of the densities investigated. Even at very high densities (ρ ≈4.8 ×1014 cm-3 ), the lifetime of a Rydberg atom exceeds 10 μ s at n >140 compared to 1 μ s at n =90 . In addition, a second observed reaction mechanism, namely, Rb2+ molecule formation, was studied. Both reaction products are equally probable for n =40 , but the fraction of Rb2+ created drops to below 10% for n ≥90 .

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements and kinetic analysis of Si atom formation in a rotating disk chemical vapor deposition reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Coltrin, M.E.; Breiland, W.G. )

    1994-10-06

    An extensive set of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of Si atoms during the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane and disilane in a research rotating disk reactor are presented. The experimental results are compared in detail with predictions from a numerical model of CVD from silane and disilane that treats the fluid flow coupled to gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry. The comparisons showed that the unimolecular decomposition of SiH[sub 2] could not account for the observed gas-phase Si atom density profiles. The H[sub 3]SiSiH [leftrightarrow] Si + SiH[sub 4] and H[sub 3]SiSiH + SiH[sub 2] [leftrightarrow] Si + Si[sub 2]H[sub 6] reactions are proposed as the primary Si atom production routes. The model is in good agreement with the measured shapes of the Si atom profiles and the trends in Si atom density with susceptor temperature, pressure, and reactant gas mixture. 33 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The effect of different chemical agents on human enamel: an atomic force and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rominu, Roxana O.; Rominu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Pop, Daniela; Petrescu, Emanuela

    2010-12-01

    PURPOSE: The goal of our study was to investigate the changes in enamel surface roughess induced by the application of different chemical substances by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. METHOD: Five sound human first upper premolar teeth were chosen for the study. The buccal surface of each tooth was treated with a different chemical agent as follows: Sample 1 - 38% phosphoric acid etching (30s) , sample 2 - no surface treatment (control sample), 3 - bleaching with 37.5 % hydrogen peroxide (according to the manufacturer's instructions), 4 - conditioning with a self-etching primer (15 s), 5 - 9.6 % hydrofluoric acid etching (30s). All samples were investigated by atomic force microscopy in a non-contact mode and by scanning electron microscopy. Several images were obtained for each sample, showing evident differences regarding enamel surface morphology. The mean surface roughness and the mean square roughness were calculated and compared. RESULTS: All chemical substances led to an increased surface roughness. Phosphoric acid led to the highest roughness while the control sample showed the lowest. Hydrofluoric acid also led to an increase in surface roughness but its effects have yet to be investigated due to its potential toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: By treating the human enamel with the above mentioned chemical compounds a negative microretentive surface is obtained, with a morphology depending on the applied substance.

  20. New horizons in chemical propulsion. [processes using free radicals, atomic hydrogen, excited species, etc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, W.

    1973-01-01

    After a review of the work of the late-Fifties on free radicals for propulsion, it is concluded that atomic hydrogen would provide a potentially large increase in specific impulse. Work conducted to find an approach for isolating atomic hydrogen is considered. Other possibilities for obtaining propellants of greatly increased capability might be connected with the technology for the generation of activated states of gases, metallic hydrogen, fuels obtained from other planets, and laser transfer of energy.

  1. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  2. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: comparative study of different chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Vilar Fariñas, M; Barciela García, J; García Martín, S; Peña Crecente, R; Herrero Latorre, C

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO3)2 and (NH4)H2PO4-Mg(NO3)2] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 microg L(-1)), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  3. Large-area high-throughput synthesis of monolayer graphene sheet by Hot Filament Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hawaldar, Ranjit; Merino, P.; Correia, M. R.; Bdikin, Igor; Grácio, José; Méndez, J.; Martín-Gago, J. A.; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2012-01-01

    We report hot filament thermal CVD (HFTCVD) as a new hybrid of hot filament and thermal CVD and demonstrate its feasibility by producing high quality large area strictly monolayer graphene films on Cu substrates. Gradient in gas composition and flow rate that arises due to smart placement of the substrate inside the Ta filament wound alumina tube accompanied by radical formation on Ta due to precracking coupled with substrate mediated physicochemical processes like diffusion, polymerization etc., led to graphene growth. We further confirmed our mechanistic hypothesis by depositing graphene on Ni and SiO2/Si substrates. HFTCVD can be further extended to dope graphene with various heteroatoms (H, N, and B, etc.,), combine with functional materials (diamond, carbon nanotubes etc.,) and can be extended to all other materials (Si, SiO2, SiC etc.,) and processes (initiator polymerization, TFT processing) possible by HFCVD and thermal CVD. PMID:23002423

  4. Catalyst-free growth of mono- and few-atomic-layer boron nitride sheets by chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Yu, Jie; Li, Mingyu; Liu, Fei; Bai, Xuedong

    2011-05-27

    Boron nitride (BN) is a wide bandgap semiconductor with a structure analogous to graphite. Mono- and few-atomic-layer BN sheets have been grown on silicon substrates by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from a gas mixture of BF(3)-H(2)-N(2) without using any catalysts. Growth of the BN sheets can be ascribed to the etching effects of the fluorine-containing gases and the thickness control down to mono- and few-atomic-layers was realized by decreasing the concentrations of BF(3) and H(2) in N(2). A large decrease of the BF(3) and H(2) concentrations was achieved by increasing the gas flow rate of N(2) and keeping the BF(3) and H(2) flow rates constant and the mono- and few-atomic-layered BN sheets were obtained at the BF(3), H(2) and N(2) flow rates of 3, 10, and 1200 sccm. The present mono- and few-atomic-layer BN sheets are promising for applications in catalyst supports, composites, gas adsorption, nanoelectronics, etc. PMID:21451227

  5. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  6. Influence of ultrasonic pretreatment on the yield of bio-oil prepared by thermo-chemical conversion of rice husk in hot-compressed water.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen; Jia, Jingfu; Gao, Yahui; Zhao, Yaping

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate the feasibility of thermo-chemical conversion of rice husk in hot-compressed water via ultrasonic pretreatment to increase the bio-oil yield. The results show that ultrasonic pretreatment remarkably changes the structures of the rice husk, such as enhancing swelling and surface area, eroding lignin structure, and resulting in more exposure of the cellulose and hemicellulose. The highest bio-oil yield of 42.8% was obtained from the thermo-chemical conversion at 300 °C and 0 min of the residence time for the 1 h pretreated rice husk. GC-MS analysis indicates that the relative contents of phenols, 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural, and lactic acid are higher in bio-oils obtained from the pretreated rice husks than that from the raw rice husk. PMID:23948273

  7. Behaviour of chemical modifiers in the determination of arsenic by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Reboucas, Marcio V; Ferreira, Sergio L C; de Barros Neto, Benicio

    2005-07-15

    Most comparative studies on the efficiency of chemical modifiers have been conducted in aqueous media. In the present work, we proposed a detailed study of the use of different chemical modifiers for direct determination of arsenic in complex organic matrices by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Palladium, rhodium, tungsten, silver, lanthanum and a mixture of palladium and magnesium were tested. The figures of merit used for evaluation and comparison were acquired in the optimal conditions for each modifier, established by multivariate optimization of the main variables based on Doehlert designs. Singular features were observed for the chemical behaviour of some modifiers in organic matrices compared to aqueous media, such as the worse performance of Pd+Mg modifier and no notice of severe tube corrosion from La application. Lanthanum was chosen as the best chemical modifier for the present application, according to predefined criteria. Lanthanum showed the minimum limit of detection, characteristic concentration and blank signal among all tested species and no effect of the concomitants usually present in petrochemical feedstocks. Using a 200mgL(-1) lanthanum solution as a chemical modifier, the average relative standard deviations of 7 and 16% (at 3-15mugL(-1) level) and characteristic concentrations of 0.47 and 0.77mugL(-1) for naphtha and petroleum condensates, respectively, were observed. PMID:18970155

  8. Chemical Structure and Properties: A Modified Atoms-First, One-Semester Introductory Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaller, Chris P.; Graham, Kate J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Jakubowski, Henry V.; McKenna, Anna G.; McIntee, Edward J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Fazal, M. A.; Peterson, Alicia A.

    2015-01-01

    A one-semester, introductory chemistry course is described that develops a primarily qualitative understanding of structure-property relationships. Starting from an atoms-first approach, the course examines the properties and three-dimensional structure of metallic and ionic solids before expanding into a thorough investigation of molecules. In…

  9. Evaluating and interpreting the chemical relevance of the linear response kernel for atoms II: open shell.

    PubMed

    Boisdenghien, Zino; Fias, Stijn; Van Alsenoy, Christian; De Proft, Frank; Geerlings, Paul

    2014-07-28

    Most of the work done on the linear response kernel χ(r,r') has focussed on its atom-atom condensed form χAB. Our previous work [Boisdenghien et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2013, 9, 1007] was the first effort to truly focus on the non-condensed form of this function for closed (sub)shell atoms in a systematic fashion. In this work, we extend our method to the open shell case. To simplify the plotting of our results, we average our results to a symmetrical quantity χ(r,r'). This allows us to plot the linear response kernel for all elements up to and including argon and to investigate the periodicity throughout the first three rows in the periodic table and in the different representations of χ(r,r'). Within the context of Spin Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory, the first two-dimensional plots of spin polarized linear response functions are presented and commented on for some selected cases on the basis of the atomic ground state electronic configurations. Using the relation between the linear response kernel and the polarizability we compare the values of the polarizability tensor calculated using our method to high-level values. PMID:24837234

  10. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.