Science.gov

Sample records for hot metal dephosphorization

  1. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Hot Metal during Hot Metal Dephosphorization Pretreatment Process Based on the Ion and Molecule Coexistence Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    A thermodynamic model for predicting phosphorus partition L P between a CaO-based slags and hot metal during hot metal dephosphorization pretreatment process has been developed based on the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT), i.e., the IMCT- L P model. The reaction abilities of structural units or ion couples in the CaO-based slags have been represented by the calculated mass action concentrations N i through the developed IMCT- N i model based on the IMCT. The developed IMCT- L P model has been verified to be valid through comparing with the measured L P as well as the predicted L P by two reported L P models from the literature. Besides the total phosphorus partition L P between the CaO-based slag and hot metal, the respective phosphorus partitions L P, i of nine dephosphorization products as P2O5, 3FeO·P2O5, 4FeO·P2O5, 2CaO·P2O5, 3CaO·P2O5, 4CaO·P2O5, 2MgO·P2O5, 3MgO·P2O5, and 3MnO·P2O5 can also be accurately predicted by the developed IMCT- L P model. The formed 3CaO·P2O5 accounts for 99.20 pct of dephosphorization products comparing with the generated 4CaO·P2O5 for 0.08 pct. The comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O, which can be described by the mass percentage ratio (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) or the mass action concentration ratio N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}} as well as the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or the mass action concentration product N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}5 × N_{{CaO}}3 , controls dephosphorization ability of the CaO-based slags. A linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O)/(pct CaO) can be correlated compared with a parabolic relationship of L P against N_{Fe}t O/N_{Fe}t O N_{CaO}. N_{CaO}, while the linear relationship of L P against (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) or N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 can be established. Thus, the mass percentage product (pct Fe t O) × (pct CaO) and the mass action concentration product N_{Fe}t O5 × N_{CaO}3 are recommended to represent the comprehensive effect of CaO+Fe t O on

  2. Spontaneous Emulsification of a Metal Drop Immersed in Slag Due to Dephosphorization: Surface Area Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.; Warnett, Jason; Spooner, Stephen; Fruehan, Richard J.; Williams, Mark A.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2015-04-01

    When a chemical reaction occurs between two immiscible liquids, mass transfer is continuously taking place at the liquid-liquid interface. Several studies have shown that if the species being exchanged between the two liquids are surface-active, a very pronounced decrease in interfacial tension can occur which can lead to a phenomenon called spontaneous emulsification. In steelmaking, this behavior has been observed for several reactions that involve the transfer of impurities from molten steel to a molten-oxide slag but little quantification has been made. This work focuses on spontaneous emulsification due to the dephosphorization of a Fe-P drop immersed in a basic oxygen furnace type slag. An Au-image furnace attached to a confocal scanning laser microscope was used to rapidly heat and cool the samples at different times, and X-ray computerized tomography was used to perform the surface area calculations of the samples where the slag/steel reaction was allowed to occur for distinct times. The results show that the surface area of the metal drop rapidly increases by over one order of magnitude during the first 60 seconds of the reaction while the chemical reaction is occurring at a fast rate. Once the reaction slows down, approximately after 60 seconds, the droplets start to coalesce back together minimizing the surface area and returning to a geometry close to its equilibrium shape.

  3. Investigations of the Dephosphorization of Liquid Iron Solution Containing Chromium and Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbowniczek, Miroslaw; Kawecka-Cebula, Elzbieta; Reichel, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The most up-to-date trends in stainless steel production—aiming at the reduction of production costs—consist of the substitution of steel scrap by hot metal, coming from the reduction of iron-chromium ores. This process requires a more extensive dephosphorization. The dephosphorization process, when applied to chromium steels, requires slag with high dephosphorization properties, as either chromium or chromium oxide entering the slag decreases distinctly the efficiency of the process. The results of laboratory investigations on the dephosphorization of liquid iron solutions containing chromium and nickel are presented. In particular, the study was focused on the selection of the optimal slag composition and the way the slag should be added. The slags based on calcium and fluorite with cryolite additions were considered. It was shown that the variables with the greatest impact on the dephosphorization process include chromium and nickel levels, temperature, and slag basicity. A statistical analysis was performed and regression equations were set. The results may be of use for the design of new methods of production of high-chromium steels.

  4. Modeling of Dephosphorization using Bloated Droplet Theory in Basic Oxygen Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit; Kundu, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    A considerable fraction of refining of hot metal in basic oxygen steelmaking is carried out in emulsion layer by interaction between the metal droplets and slag. The top oxygen blowing ejects metal droplets into the slag which then undergo refining reactions and return to the metal bath. During this period, the carbon in metal droplets reacts with available oxygen to form carbon monoxide. Above a certain threshold decarburization rate, the evolved carbon monoxide inside the droplet causes the droplet to bloat which increases its surface area. The bloating affects the residence time and the rate of certain interfacial reactions. Here, efforts have been made to study dephosphorization in metal droplet in emulsion by coupling dephosphorization kinetics with the 'bloated droplet theory'. As observed in industrial furnaces, the calculated phosphorous concentration in droplet was found to be lower than that of metal bath. Dephosphorization model developed using mixed transport control model was found to fit industrial data. The results obtained were in satisfactory agreement with the available data and a step ahead in improving the understanding of dephosphorization in steelmaking.

  5. Critical Evaluation of Prediction Models for Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Iron-based Melts during Dephosphorization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Min; Li, Jin-Yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, the collected 16 models of equilibrium quotient k_{P} or phosphorus partition L_{P} between CaO-based slags and iron-based melts from the literature have been evaluated. The collected 16 models for predicting equilibrium quotient k_{P} can be transferred to predict phosphorus partition L_{P} . The predicted results by the collected 16 models cannot be applied to be criteria for evaluating k_{P} or L_{P} due to various forms or definitions of k_{P} or L_{P} . Thus, the measured phosphorus content [pct P] in a hot metal bath at the end point of the dephosphorization pretreatment process is applied to be the fixed criteria for evaluating the collected 16 models. The collected 16 models can be described in the form of linear functions as y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts the temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results of k_{P} or L_{P} . Thus, a general approach to developing the thermodynamic model for predicting equilibrium quotient k_{P} or phosphorus partition L P or [pct P] in iron-based melts during the dephosphorization process is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the summarized 15 models except for Suito's model (M3). The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility among the collected 16 models have been selected and recommended. Compared with the predicted result by the revised 15 models and Suito's model (M3), the developed IMCT- L_{P} model coupled with the proposed dephosphorization mechanism by the present authors can be applied to accurately predict phosphorus partition L_{P} with the lowest mean deviation δ_{{L_{P} }} of log L_{P} as 2.33, as well as to predict [pct P] in a

  6. Critical Evaluation of Prediction Models for Phosphorus Partition between CaO-based Slags and Iron-based Melts during Dephosphorization Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-Min; Li, Jin-Yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, the collected 16 models of equilibrium quotient k_{{P}} or phosphorus partition L_{{P}} between CaO-based slags and iron-based melts from the literature have been evaluated. The collected 16 models for predicting equilibrium quotient k_{{P}} can be transferred to predict phosphorus partition L_{{P}} . The predicted results by the collected 16 models cannot be applied to be criteria for evaluating k_{{P}} or L_{{P}} due to various forms or definitions of k_{{P}} or L_{{P}} . Thus, the measured phosphorus content [pct P] in a hot metal bath at the end point of the dephosphorization pretreatment process is applied to be the fixed criteria for evaluating the collected 16 models. The collected 16 models can be described in the form of linear functions as y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts the temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results of k_{{P}} or L_{{P}} . Thus, a general approach to developing the thermodynamic model for predicting equilibrium quotient k_{{P}} or phosphorus partition L P or [pct P] in iron-based melts during the dephosphorization process is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the summarized 15 models except for Suito's model (M3). The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility among the collected 16 models have been selected and recommended. Compared with the predicted result by the revised 15 models and Suito's model (M3), the developed IMCT- L_{{P}} model coupled with the proposed dephosphorization mechanism by the present authors can be applied to accurately predict phosphorus partition L_{{P}} with the lowest mean deviation δ_{{L_{{P}} }} of log L_{{P}} as 2.33, as

  7. Dephosphorization when using DRI

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-21

    The increase in high quality steel production in electric arc furnaces (EAFs) requires the use of scrap substitute materials, such as Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) and Hot Briquetted Iron (HBI). Although DRI and HBI products have lower copper and nickel contents than most scrap materials, they can contain up to ten times more phosphorus. This project, led by Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Iron and Steelmaking Research, improves the understanding of how phosphorus behaves when DRI and HBI melt.

  8. 13. Underside Span 1, Hot Metal Bridge on right toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Underside Span 1, Hot Metal Bridge on right toward Pier 1. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  9. METHOD OF HOT ROLLING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Kaufmann, A.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method is given for quickly and efficiently hot rolling uranium metal in the upper part of the alpha phase temperature region to obtain sound bars and sheets possessing a good surface finish. The uranium metal billet is heated to a temperature in the range of 1000 deg F to 1220 deg F by immersion iii a molten lead bath. The heated billet is then passed through the rolls. The temperature is restored to the desired range between successive passes through the rolls, and the rolls are turned down approximately 0.050 inch between successive passes.

  10. Dephosphorization of Steelmaking Slag by Leaching with Acidic Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yong; Diao, Jiang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Xiaosa; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Bing

    2015-12-01

    In the present paper, dephosphorization of steelmaking slag by leaching with acidic aqueous solution composed of citric acid, sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ion-exchanged water was investigated. The buffer solution of C6H8O7-NaOH-HCl system prevented changes in the pH values. Kinetic parameters including leaching temperature, slag particle size and pH values of the solution were optimized. The results showed that temperature has no obvious effect on the dissolution ratio of phosphorus. However, it has a significant effect on the dissolution ratio of iron. The dephosphorization rate increases with the decrease of slag particle size and the pH value of the solution. Over 90% of the phosphorus can be dissolved in the solution while the corresponding leaching ratio of iron was only 30% below the optimal condition. Leaching kinetics of dephosphorization follow the unreacted shrinking core model with a rate controlled step by the solid diffusion layer, the corresponding apparent activation energy being 1.233 kJ mol-1. A semiempirical kinetic equation was established. After leaching, most of the nC2S-C3P solid solution in the steelmaking slag was selectively dissolved in the aqueous solution and the iron content in the solid residue was correspondingly enriched.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF METALLIC HOT GAS FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Gleeson, B.; Terpstra, R.L.

    2003-04-23

    Successful development of metallic filters with high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance for fly ash capture is a key to enabling advanced coal combustion and power generation technologies. Compared to ceramic filters, metallic filters can offer increased resistance to impact and thermal fatigue, greatly improving filter reliability. A beneficial metallic filter structure, composed of a thin-wall (0.5mm) tube with uniform porosity (about 30%), is being developed using a unique spherical powder processing and partial sintering approach, combined with porous sheet rolling and resistance welding. Alloy choices based on modified superalloys, e.g., Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-3Fe (wt.%), are being tested in porous and bulk samples for oxide (typically alumina) scale stability in simulated oxidizing/sulfidizing atmospheres found in PFBC and IGCC systems at temperatures up to 850 C. Recent ''hanging o-ring'' exposure tests in actual combustion systems at a collaborating DOE site (EERC) have been initiated to study the combined corrosive effects from particulate deposits and hot exhaust gases. New studies are exploring the correlation between sintered microstructure, tensile strength, and permeability of porous sheet samples.

  12. 2. HOT METAL BRIDGE (ACROSS THE MONONGAHELA RIVER) AND CARRIE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. HOT METAL BRIDGE (ACROSS THE MONONGAHELA RIVER) AND CARRIE FURNACES No. 3 AND No. 4 FROM THE TOP OF WATER TOWER. THE EDGAR THOMSON WORKS IS VISIBLE BEYOND HOT METAL BRIDGE. Jet Lowe, Photographer, 1989. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Critical Assessment of P2O5 Activity Coefficients in CaO-based Slags during Dephosphorization Process of Iron-based Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-05-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in the CaO-based slags has been determined using the calculated comprehensive mass action concentration N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} of iron oxides by the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT) for representing the reaction ability of Fe t O, i.e., activity of a_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} . The collected ten models from the literature for predicting activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags have been evaluated based on the determined activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 by the IMCT as the criterion. The collected ten models of activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags can be described in the form of a linear function as log γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} ≡ y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results. Thus, a general approach for obtaining good prediction results of activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the collected ten models. The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility in the collected ten models have been selected and recommended.

  14. Critical Assessment of P2O5 Activity Coefficients in CaO-based Slags during Dephosphorization Process of Iron-based Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in the CaO-based slags has been determined using the calculated comprehensive mass action concentration N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} of iron oxides by the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT) for representing the reaction ability of Fe t O, i.e., activity of a_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} . The collected ten models from the literature for predicting activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags have been evaluated based on the determined activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 by the IMCT as the criterion. The collected ten models of activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags can be described in the form of a linear function as log γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} ≡ y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results. Thus, a general approach for obtaining good prediction results of activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the collected ten models. The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility in the collected ten models have been selected and recommended.

  15. HOT METAL BRIDGE (NOTE: BUILDERS: JONES AND LAUGHLIN STEEL CA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT METAL BRIDGE (NOTE: BUILDERS: JONES AND LAUGHLIN STEEL CA. 1890), SOUTH PORTAL. THREE PIN CONNECTED CAMELBACK TRUSS SPANS, ONE SKEWED THROUGH TRUSS SPAN ON NORTH SIDE TRUSS BRIDGE, EAST OF HOT METAL BRIDGE BUILT BY AMERICAN BRIDGE COMPANY CA. 1910. (RIVETED MULTI-SPAN TRUSS). - Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, Pittsburgh Works, Morgan Billet Mill Engine, 550 feet north of East Carson Street, opposite South Twenty-seventh Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  16. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals

    SciTech Connect

    More, R.M.; Goto, M.; Graziani, F.; Ni, P.A.; Yoneda, H.

    2009-12-01

    We consider the emission of visible light by hot metal surfaces having uniform and non-uniform temperature distributions and by small droplets of liquid metal. The calculations employ a nonlocal transport theory for light emission, using the Kubo formula to relate microscopic current fluctuations to the dielectric function of the material. We describe a related algorithm for calculating radiation emission in particle simulation of hot fusion plasmas.

  17. Plasmon-induced hot carriers in metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manjavacas, Alejandro; Liu, Jun G; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter

    2014-08-26

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. However, despite very significant experimental effort, a comprehensive theoretical description of the hot carrier generation process is still missing. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. In this model, the conduction electrons of the metal are described as free particles in a finite spherical potential well, and the plasmon-induced hot carrier production is calculated using Fermi’s golden rule. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. Specifically, larger nanoparticle sizes and shorter lifetimes result in higher carrier production rates but smaller energies, and vice versa. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. The results presented here contribute to the basic understanding of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and provide insight for optimization of the process. PMID:24960573

  18. Liquid-metal atomization for hot working preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rapid quenching of a liquid metal by atomization or splat cooling overcomes the major limitation of most solidification processes, namely, the segregation of alloying elements, impurities, and constituent phases. The cooling rates of different atomizing processes are related to the dendrite arm spacings and to the microstructure of the atomized powders. The increased solubility limits and the formation of metastable compounds in splat-cooled alloys are discussed. Consolidation of the powders by hot isostatic compaction, hot extrusion, or hot forging and rolling processes yields billets with properties equivalent to or better than those of the wrought alloys. The application of this powder processing technology to high-performance alloys is reviewed.

  19. Canning Of Powdered Metal For Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Quality of specimen enhanced by improved canning process. Method developed for canning specimens for hot isostatic pressing. Specimen placed inside refractory-metal ring, then sandwiched between two refractory-metal face sheets. Assembly placed inside die, then positioned in vacuum hot press. Heated to set temperature at prescribed vacuum to burn off all of binder in specimen. Advantages: powder-metallurgy composite totally purged of binder sealed in can in single operation, maintains size, shape, and uniformity of specimen. Weld region does not recrystallize, and little possibility of cracking.

  20. Upgrading and dephosphorization of Western Australian iron ore using reduction roasting by adding sodium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, De-qing; Chun, Tie-jun; Pan, Jian; Lu, Li-ming; He, Zhen

    2013-06-01

    The technology of direct reduction by adding sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and magnetic separation was developed to treat Western Australian high phosphorus iron ore. The iron ore and reduced product were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that phosphorus exists within limonite in the form of solid solution, which cannot be removed through traditional ways. During reduction roasting, Na2CO3 reacts with gangue minerals (SiO2 and Al2O3), forming aluminum silicate-containing phosphorus and damaging the ore structure, which promotes the separation between iron and phosphorus during magnetic separation. Meanwhile, Na2CO3 also improves the growth of iron grains, increasing the iron grade and iron recovery. The iron concentrate, assaying 94.12wt% Fe and 0.07wt% P at the iron recovery of 96.83% and the dephosphorization rate of 74.08%, is obtained under the optimum conditions. The final product (metal iron powder) after briquetting can be used as the burden for steelmaking by an electric arc furnace to replace scrap steel.

  1. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  2. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOEpatents

    Ault, Earl R.; Alger, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  3. 12. Underside of Skew SpanHot Metal system on right, toward ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Underside of Skew Span-Hot Metal system on right, toward Rocker Bent. - Monongahela Connecting Railroad Company, Hot Metal Bridge, Spanning Monongahela River at mile post 3.1, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  4. EXPLORATION STRATEGY FOR HOT-SPRING PRECIOUS-METAL DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Byron R.; Adams, Samuel S.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of economic precious-metal deposits related to physical-chemical processes in the near-surface portions of high-temperature hot-spring systems has led to intensive exploration efforts for this deposit type. To increase the probability of success, these exploration programs should (1) be based on the most important visually recognizable or readily measurable deposit-model criteria; (2) be able to identify specific targets within the best search areas; and (3) be able to rank the order of priority among the targets. We propose a process-recognition exploration strategy for hot-spring deposits that has been developed from data from precious-metal occurrences at several localities in the western United States. The exploration model is based on the degree to which recognizable geologic and geochemical criteria are favorable or unfavorable to the occurrence of an economic deposit, either through their presence or absence.

  5. Dependence of Temperature and Slag Composition on Dephosphorization at the First Deslagging in BOF Steelmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao-gang; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Zhang, Zhi-ming; Liu, Zhi-ming; Deng, Chang-fu

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature and slag composition on dephosphorization in a 120 ton top-bottom combined blown converter steelmaking process by double slag method were studied. The slag properties were determined by scanning electron microscope- energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the transition oxidation temperature between dephosphorization and decarbonization Tf is not the favorable temperature for the first deslagging. The optimum first deslagging temperature is confirmed to be approximately 1,673 K which is about 70 K higher than Tf. High melting temperatures phases (such as 3CaO·SiO2) in the slag with high basicity and MgO content are unfavorable to the dephosphorization. The optimum process condition for dephosphorization at the first deslagging in present work is approximately 1,673 K in temperature, 2.0 in slag basicity, 6 and 17 mass% in MgO and T.Fe content, 6 mass% ≤ MnO content.

  6. Amplification of hot electron flow by the surface plasmon effect on metal-insulator-metal nanodiodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhwan; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I; Lee, Young Keun; Ahn, Changui; Lee, Hyosun; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-11-01

    Au-TiO2-Ti nanodiodes with a metal-insulator-metal structure were used to probe hot electron flows generated upon photon absorption. Hot electrons, generated when light is absorbed in the Au electrode of the nanodiode, can travel across the TiO2, leading to a photocurrent. Here, we demonstrate amplification of the hot electron flow by (1) localized surface plasmon resonance on plasmonic nanostructures fabricated by annealing the Au-TiO2-Ti nanodiodes, and (2) reducing the thickness of the TiO2. We show a correlation between changes in the morphology of the Au electrodes caused by annealing and amplification of the photocurrent. Based on the exponential dependence of the photocurrent on TiO2 thickness, the transport mechanism for the hot electrons across the nanodiodes is proposed. PMID:26451470

  7. Amplification of hot electron flow by the surface plasmon effect on metal-insulator-metal nanodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhwan; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Lee, Young Keun; Ahn, Changui; Lee, Hyosun; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jeong Young

    2015-11-01

    Au-TiO2-Ti nanodiodes with a metal-insulator-metal structure were used to probe hot electron flows generated upon photon absorption. Hot electrons, generated when light is absorbed in the Au electrode of the nanodiode, can travel across the TiO2, leading to a photocurrent. Here, we demonstrate amplification of the hot electron flow by (1) localized surface plasmon resonance on plasmonic nanostructures fabricated by annealing the Au-TiO2-Ti nanodiodes, and (2) reducing the thickness of the TiO2. We show a correlation between changes in the morphology of the Au electrodes caused by annealing and amplification of the photocurrent. Based on the exponential dependence of the photocurrent on TiO2 thickness, the transport mechanism for the hot electrons across the nanodiodes is proposed.

  8. Metallic glass mold insert for hot embossing of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Zhang, X.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-07-01

    Molding of micro components from thermoplastic polymers (TPs) has become a routinely used industrial production process. To find hard, ductile and durable material for mold insert and to fabricate the mold insert are two big challenges for the thermoplastic polymers fabrication techniques. We report that a Pd-based metallic glass (MG) mold insert was readily fabricated in its supercooled liquid region, and the atomic force microscope measurement and time-temperature-transformation analysis show that the metallic glass mold insert has very fine surface quality and long service life. We show that the metallic glasses, which have remarkable mechanical properties and excellent thermoplastic forming ability, are new ideal materials for hot embossing mold insert of thermoplastic polymers.

  9. Hot-Electron Intraband Luminescence from Single Hot Spots in Noble-Metal Nanoparticle Films.

    PubMed

    Haug, Tobias; Klemm, Philippe; Bange, Sebastian; Lupton, John M

    2015-08-01

    Disordered noble-metal nanoparticle films exhibit highly localized and stable nonlinear light emission from subdiffraction regions upon illumination by near-infrared femtosecond pulses. Such hot spot emission spans a continuum in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. Strong plasmonic enhancement of light-matter interaction and the resulting complexity of experimental observations have prevented the development of a universal understanding of the origin of light emission. Here, we study the dependence of emission spectra on excitation irradiance and provide the most direct evidence yet that the continuum emission observed from both silver and gold nanoparticle aggregate surfaces is caused by recombination of hot electrons within the conduction band. The electron gas in the emitting particles, which is effectively decoupled from the lattice temperature for the duration of emission, reaches temperatures of several thousand Kelvin and acts as a subdiffraction incandescent light source on subpicosecond time scales. PMID:26296132

  10. Hot-Electron Intraband Luminescence from Single Hot Spots in Noble-Metal Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Tobias; Klemm, Philippe; Bange, Sebastian; Lupton, John M.

    2015-08-01

    Disordered noble-metal nanoparticle films exhibit highly localized and stable nonlinear light emission from subdiffraction regions upon illumination by near-infrared femtosecond pulses. Such hot spot emission spans a continuum in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. Strong plasmonic enhancement of light-matter interaction and the resulting complexity of experimental observations have prevented the development of a universal understanding of the origin of light emission. Here, we study the dependence of emission spectra on excitation irradiance and provide the most direct evidence yet that the continuum emission observed from both silver and gold nanoparticle aggregate surfaces is caused by recombination of hot electrons within the conduction band. The electron gas in the emitting particles, which is effectively decoupled from the lattice temperature for the duration of emission, reaches temperatures of several thousand Kelvin and acts as a subdiffraction incandescent light source on subpicosecond time scales.

  11. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  12. The Chemistry of Metal-Rich Hot Neptunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Richardson, M. R.; Madhusudhan, N.; Line, M. R.; Visscher, C.; Fortney, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    Neptune-mass planets with very high metallicities (100-3000 times solar) will exhibit an interesting continuum of atmospheric compositions in between the so-called “hot Neptune” and “Super Earth” exoplanet categories. If its metallicity is only slightly enhanced over solar, a Neptune-mass planet would have a photospheric composition similar to that predicted for any hydrogen-dominated, Jupiter-mass planet possessing a similar thermal structure and experiencing a similar incident stellar flux. Hydrogen-poor Super Earths, on the other hand, could have a variety of atmospheric compositions (e.g., Schaefer et al. 2011, arXiv:1108.4660), ranging from H2O-, CO2-, or N2-dominated atmospheres, to more exotic high-temperature SiO and metal-rich atmospheres, depending on the planet’s mass, evolutionary history, incident stellar flux, and effective temperature. A Neptune-mass planet can become metal rich through efficient hydrogen escape (e.g., for less-massive, close-in planets) or through inefficient accretion of H2, as has been suggested for our own solar-system “ice giant” Neptune, where carbon is enriched by 40-70 times solar (e.g., Karkoschka and Tomasko 2011, Icarus 211, 780) and oxygen may be enriched as much as 440 times solar (e.g., Lodders and Fegley 1994, Icarus 112, 368). We explore the predicted equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry of generic hot Neptunes with metallicities varying from 1-3000 times solar and discuss observational consequences. The models are applied to the case of GJ 436b, where we find that methane will be the dominant carbon carrier until very high metallicities, near 2000x solar, at which point the planet can have roughly equal proportions of CO, H2, and CO2, with methane becoming a more minor constituent. We compare our model results with Spitzer infrared secondary-eclipse data for GJ436b. This work was supported by the NASA PATM program.

  13. Optimization of microstructure development: Application to hot metal extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, E.A.; Venugopal, S.; Frazier, W.G.; Medeiros, S.; Mullins, W.M.; Chaudhary, A.; Malas, J.C.; Srinivasan, R.

    1996-12-01

    A new process design method for controlling microstructure development during hot metal deformation processes is presented. This approach is based on modern control theory and involves state-space models for describing the material behavior and the mechanics of the process. The challenge of effectively controlling the values and distribution of important microstructural features can now be systematically formulated and solved in terms of an optimal control problem. This method has been applied to the optimization of grain size and certain process parameters such as die geometry profile and ram velocity during extrusion of plain carbon steel. Various case studies have been investigated, and experimental results show good agreement with those predicted in the design stage.

  14. METAShield: Hot Metallic Aeroshell Concept for RLV/SOV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.; Poteet, Carl C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Nowak, Robert J.; Hsu, Su-Yuen; Schmidt, Irvin H.; Ku, Shih-Huei P.

    2003-01-01

    An innovative fuselage design approach that combines many desirable operational features with a simple and efficient structural approach is being developed by NASA. The approach, named METAShield for MEtallic TransAtmospheric Shield, utilizes lightly loaded, hot aeroshell structures surrounding integral propellant tanks that carry the primary structural loads. The aeroshells are designed to withstand the local pressure loads, transmitting them to the tanks with minimal restraint of thermal growth. No additional thermal protection system protects the METAShield, and a fibrous or multilayer insulation blanket, located in the space between the aeroshell and the tanks, serves as both high temperature and cryogenic insulation for the tanks. The concept is described in detail, and the performance and operational features are highlighted. Initial design results and analyses of the structural, thermal, and thermal-structural performance are described. Computational results evaluating resistance to hypervelocity impact damage, as well as some supporting aerothermal wind tunnel results. are also presented. Future development needs are summarized.

  15. Optimization of microstructure development: application to hot metal extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, E. A.; Venugopal, S.; Frazier, W. G.; Medeiros, S.; Mulhns, W. M.; Chaudhary, A.; Irwin, R. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Malas, J. C.

    1996-12-01

    A new process design method for controlling microstructure development during hot metal deformation processes is presented. This approach is based on modern control theory and involves state- space models for describing the material behavior and the mechanics of the process. The challenge of effectively controlling the values and distribution of important microstructural features can now be systematically formulated and solved in terms of an optimal control problem. This method has been applied to the optimization of grain size and certain process parameters such as die geometry profile and ram velocity during extrusion of plain carbon steel. Various case studies have been investigated, and experimental results show good agreement with those predicted in the design stage.

  16. Hot metal runner system with air pollution controls

    SciTech Connect

    La Bate, M.D.

    1982-10-26

    A runner for hot metal as from a blast furnace is formed of a series of interconnected modular units which are prefabricated, preferably from refractory based materials. A plurality of flat slab-like covers are positioned continuously on the runners formed of the interconnected modular units so as to confine fumes , gas, smoke and other air pollutants. Live steam is introduced at selected locations along the runners to collect, absorb and mix with the fumes, gases and air pollutants. Vacuum devices in communication with the covered runners remove the air, steam and pollutants and direct them through scrubbers and/or precipitron equipment to remove the air pollutants before the air entrained in the system is released to the atmosphere.

  17. Hot isostatic pressing of direct selective laser sintered metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlert, Martin Steven

    2000-10-01

    A new manufacturing process combining the benefits of Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) has been developed to permit Rapid Prototyping of high performance metal components. The new process uses Direct Metal SLS to produce a gas impermeable HIP container from the same powdered material that will eventually compose the bulk of the part. The SLS generated capsule performs the functions of the sheet metal container in traditional HIP, but unlike a sheet metal container, the SLSed capsule becomes an integral part of the final component. Additionally, SLS can produce a capsule of far greater geometric complexity than can be achieved by sheet metal forming. Two high performance alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 625, were selected for use in the development of the new process. HIP maps were constructed to predict the densification rate of the two materials during HIP processing. Comparison to experimentally determined densification behavior indicated that the maps provide a useful qualitative description of densification rates; however, the accuracy of quantitative predictions was greatly enhanced by tuning key material parameters based on a limited number of experimental HIP cycles. Microstructural characterization of SLS + HIP samples revealed two distinct regions within the components. The outer SLS processed capsule material exhibited a relatively coarse microstructure comparable to a cast, or multi-layer welded structure. No layer boundaries were discernible in the SLS material, with grains observed to grow epitaxially from previously deposited material. The microstructure of the HIP consolidated core material was similar to conventionally HIP processed powder materials, featuring a fine grain structure and preserved prior particle boundaries. The large variation in grain size between the capsule and core materials was reflected in hardness measurements conducted on the Alloy 625 material; however, the variation in hardness was less

  18. Separation Characteristics of Heavy Metal Compounds by Hot Gas Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect

    Sakano, T.; Kanaoka, C.; Furuuchi, M.; Yang, K-S.; Hata, M.

    2002-09-20

    The purpose of this research is the basic study for the development of separation technology of heavy metal compounds from hot flue gas. While the hot flue gas containing heavy metals from a melting furnace of industrial waste passes through the high temperature dust collector which can be varied the operating temperature. The heavy metals can be separated due to different boiling point of each heavy metal. On the basis of this concept, the concentration of heavy metals in the flue gas were sampled and measured at inlet, outlet of the ceramic filter housing in the actual industrial waste processing system. Speciation of heavy metals in collected ashes was clarified by separating heavy metals according to compounds using their elution characteristics. Moreover, equilibrium analysis was performed to determine the effect of temperature, flue gases conditions on heavy metals speciation, and it was compared with experimental data. From these results, we discussed about separation performance of heavy metal compounds by hot gas cleaning.

  19. Sintered metal candle filter for hot gas cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jinhu; Xu Yifeng; Cheng Hanshi; Zhang Jianmin; Ding Guishan

    1997-12-31

    A kind of sintered metal candle filter has been developed to enable the performance testing for use in hot coal gas clean-up. The intention of this paper is to provide a brief overview of development of the filter, and to provide a summary of experimental results that have been gained in testing at a pilot gasifier. Two different types of stainless steel were chosen as the material to build the filter. The operational temperature range is 460--650 C. The typical inlet dust concentration is 1.0--37.71g/Nm{sup 3}. Results show the average collection efficiency is higher than 99%, the outlet dust concentration is lower than 10mg/Nm{sup 3}, which reaches the requirement of gas turbines in IGCC. The pressure drop is about 8,300--17,400Pa, and the back blowing of the filter proves to be very good. At present only single-tube testing was conducted. The multi-tube testing facility will be established, and the authors will perform the tests under the condition of high pressure to obtain more experience for design and operation.

  20. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cesari, Franco G.; Conforti, Gianmario; Rogante, Massimo; Giostri, Angelo

    2006-07-01

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  1. Hot Electrons and Energy Transport in Metals at MK Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukes, Michael Lee

    Using a new technique involving the generation of hot carriers, we directly measure energy loss lifetimes for electrons in impure metals at mK temperatures. At these temperatures very weak inelastic scattering processes determine energy transport out of the electron gas. A temperature difference between the electron gas and the lattice can be induced by applying an extremely small electric field (of order 1 (mu)V/cm at 25 mK). This temperature difference reflects the rate at which electrons lose energy to the surroundings. The experiment is carried out using a pair of interdigitated thin film resistors mounted on a millidegree demagnetization cryostat: we obtain electron temperature directly by observing current fluctuations. Noise generated by the resistors is measured using an ultra-sensitive two -channel dc SQUID system, providing femtoamp resolution at KHz frequencies. A dc voltage applied across one resistor imposes the bias field causing electron heating. Phonon temperature in the metal lattice is obtained by measuring noise from a second (unbiased) resistor, which is tightly coupled thermally to the first (biased). Our measurements show that electron heating follows an E('2/5) power law in the regime where electron temperature is largely determined by the electric field, E. This implies a T('-3) law for the energy loss lifetime, suggesting electron -acoustic phonon processes dominate. In the mK temperature regime the conductivity is impurity limited and remains ohmic, even as the electrons heat. Assuming a T('3) dependence and extrapolating our measured rates to higher temperatures, we find agreement with electron-phonon rates measured above 1K in clean bulk metals. This contrasts with results from weak localization experiments showing a power law differing from T('3) and much faster rates. This difference arises because weak localization experiments measure the electron phase coherence lifetime; our electron heating experiments, however, measure an energy

  2. Ultrafast Hot Carrier Scattering and Generation from Surface Plasmons in Noble Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Non-equilibrium ``hot''carriers in materials are challenging to study experimentally as they thermalize at subpicosecond time and nanometer length scale. Recent experiments employed hot carriers generated by light absorption or surface plasmon annihilation in noble metals (e.g., Au and Ag) for catalysis and solar cells. The energy distribution and transport of the generated hot carriers play a key role in these experiments. We present ab initio calculations of the energy distribution of hot carriers generated by surface plasmons in noble metals, and the relaxation time and mean free path of the hot carriers along different crystal directions within 5 eV of the Fermi energy. Our calculations show the interplay of the noble metal s and d bands in determining the damping rate of the plasmon and the mean free path of the hot carriers. The trends we find as a function of surface plasmon momentum and frequency allow us to define optimal experimental conditions for hot carrier generation and extraction. Our approach combines density functional theory, GW, and electron-phonon calculations. Our work provides microscopic insight into hot carriers in noble metals, and their ultrafast dynamics in the presence of surface plasmons.

  3. Plasmon-induced Hot Carriers in Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Kulkarni, Vikram; Nordlander, Peter; LANP Team

    2015-03-01

    Plasmon-induced hot carrier formation is attracting an increasing research interest due to its potential for applications in photocatalysis, photodetection and solar energy harvesting. Here we develop a theoretical model for the plasmon-induced hot carrier process and apply it to spherical silver nanoparticles and nanoshells. We show that the inclusion of many-body interactions has only a minor influence on the results. Using the model we calculate the rate of hot carrier generation, finding that it closely follows the spectral profile of the plasmon. Our analysis reveals that particle size and hot carrier lifetime play a central role in determining both the production rate and the energy distribution of the hot carriers. We characterize the efficiency of the hot carrier generation process by introducing a figure of merit that measures the number of high energy carriers generated per plasmon. Furthermore, we analyze the spatial distribution and directionality of these excitations. A. M. acknowledges financial support from the Welch foundation through the J. Evans Attwell-Welch Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the Smalley Institute of Rice University (Grant No. L-C-004).

  4. Controlling surface-plasmon-polaritons launching with hot spot cylindrical waves in a metallic slit structure.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjie; Sun, Chengwei; Gong, Qihuang; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-09-23

    Plasmonic nanostructures, which are used to generate surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), always involve sharp corners where the charges can accumulate. This can result in strong localized electromagnetic fields at the metallic corners, forming the hot spots. The influence of the hot spots on the propagating SPPs are investigated theoretically and experimentally in a metallic slit structure. It is found that the electromagnetic fields radiated from the hot spots, termed as the hot spot cylindrical wave (HSCW), can greatly manipulate the SPP launching in the slit structure. The physical mechanism behind the manipulation of the SPP launching with the HSCW is explicated by a semi-analytic model. By using the HSCW, unidirectional SPP launching is experimentally realized in an ultra-small metallic step-slit structure. The HSCW bridges the localized surface plasmons and the propagating surface plasmons in an integrated platform and thus may pave a new route to the design of plasmonic devices and circuits. PMID:27533591

  5. ENGINEERING ASSESSMENT OF HOT-ACID TREATMENT OF MUNICIPAL SLUDGE FOR HEAVY METALS REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hot-acid method for treating sludge was developed by the Walden Division of Abcor, Inc., to remove heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludge. Investigations by Walden have demonstrated the degrees to which heavy metals are solubilized. Sulfuric acid dosage at about 20 to ...

  6. Hot-electron-based solar energy conversion with metal-semiconductor nanodiodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Changhwan; Hwang, Euyheon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-29

    Energy dissipation at metal surfaces or interfaces between a metal and a dielectric generally results from elementary excitations, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface/interface during exothermic chemical processes or an electromagnetic wave incident. In this paper, we outline recent research activities to develop energy conversion devices based on hot electrons. We found that photon energy can be directly converted to hot electrons and that hot electrons flow through the interface of metal-semiconductor nanodiodes where a Schottky barrier is formed and the energy barrier is much lower than the work function of the metal. The detection of hot electron flow can be successfully measured using the photocurrent; we measured the photoyield of photoemission with incident photons-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE). We also show that surface plasmons (i.e. the collective oscillation of conduction band electrons induced by interaction with an electromagnetic field) are excited on a rough metal surface and subsequently decay into secondary electrons, which gives rise to enhancement of the IPCE. Furthermore, the unique optical behavior of surface plasmons can be coupled with dye molecules, suggesting the possibility for producing additional channels for hot electron generation. PMID:27168177

  7. Hot, Massive Stars in the Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxy, I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.

    2010-01-01

    The extremely metal-poor galaxy I Zw 18, is the Rosetta Stone for understanding z=7-8 galaxies now being discovered by Hubb|e's Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). Using HST/STIS images and recently obtained HST/COS ultraviolet spectra, we derive information about the hot, massive stars in this galaxy including stellar abundances, constraints on the stellar IMF and mass distribution of young clusters containing hot, massive stars.

  8. Electrical contact resistance degradation of a hot-switched simulated metal MEMS contact.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2005-03-01

    Electrical contact resistance testing was performed by hot-switching a simulated gold-platinum metal microelectromechanical systems contact. The experimental objective was to determine the sensitivity of the contact resistance degradation to current level and environment. The contact resistance increased sharply after 100 hot-switched cycles in air. Hot-switching at a reduced current and in nitrogen atmosphere curtailed contact resistance degradation by several orders of magnitude. The mechanism responsible for the resistance degradation was found to be arc-induced decomposition of adsorbed surface contaminants.

  9. Metalizing reduction and magnetic separation of vanadium titano-magnetite based on hot briquetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuang-yin; Chu, Man-sheng

    2014-03-01

    To achieve high efficiency utilization of Panzhihua vanadium titano-magnetite, a new process of metalizing reduction and magnetic separation based on hot briquetting is proposed, and factors that affect the cold strength of the hot-briquetting products and the efficiency of reduction and magnetic separation are successively investigated through laboratory experiments. The relevant mechanisms are elucidated on the basis of microstructural observations. Experimental results show that the optimal process parameters for hot briquetting include a hot briquetting temperature of 475°C, a carbon ratio of 1.2, ore and coal particle sizes of less than 74 μm. Additionally, with respect to metalizing reduction and magnetic separation, the rational parameters include a magnetic field intensity of 50 mT, a reduction temperature of 1350°C, a reduction time of 60 min, and a carbon ratio of 1.2. Under these above conditions, the crushing strength of the hot-briquetting agglomerates is 1480 N, and the recovery ratios of iron, vanadium, and titanium are as high as 91.19%, 61.82%, and 85.31%, respectively. The new process of metalizing reduction and magnetic separation based on hot briquetting demonstrates the evident technological advantages of high efficiency separation of iron from other valuable elements in the vanadium titano-magnetite.

  10. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenig, C. L.

    1990-06-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  11. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  12. High density crystalline boron prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1993-08-31

    Boron powder is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid boron monolith with a bulk density at least 2.22 g/cc and up to or greater than 2.34 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1,800 C and 30 PSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.34 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  13. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  14. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1994-01-01

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  15. Ballistic Hot Electron Transport in Heteroepitaxial SrRuO3 Metal-Base Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Brian; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Takeaki; Bell, Christopher; Hwang, Harold

    Perovskite oxide heterostructures is a rapidly emerging field significant for interface-induced electronic and magnetic reconstructions, resulting in novel phases distinct from those found in the bulk counterparts. Notably, utilizing device structures is an effective way to probe these interface-induced phases. One of the most prevalent device structures that has been adopted so far is a three-terminal field-effect geometry, used to probe in-plane electronic transport properties. However, the out-of-plane three-terminal device geometry, though less studied due to its complexity, is also useful in many aspects. In the metal-base transistor (MBT), for instance, ballistic transport of hot electrons injected across a Schottky diode emitter can be used to probe hot electron properties of the metal-base, providing information on inelastic scattering mechanisms, electron confinement effects, and intervalley transfer. One promising model system for the metal-base is SrRuO3 (SRO), characterized by intermediate electron correlations with unusual transport properties. Here we present an all-perovskite oxide heteroepitaxial MBT using SRO as a metal-base layer. Successful MBT operation for various metal-base layer thicknesses was achieved, from which the hot electron attenuation length of SRO was deduced. These results form a foundation on which to examine the properties of hot electrons in strongly correlated systems using the out-of-plane three-terminal device geometry.

  16. Far-ultraviolet absorption spectra of quasars: How to find missing hot gas and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verner, D. A.; Tytler, David; Barthel, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    We show that some high-redshift QSO absorption systems that reveal only the H I Lyman series lines at wavelengths visible from the ground maybe a new class of ultra-high-ionization metal line systems, with metal lines in the far-UV region which is now being explored with satellites. At high temperatures or in intense radiation fields metal systems will not show the usual C IV absorption, and O VI will become the most prominent metal absorber. At still higher ionization, O IV also becomes weak and the strongest metal lines are from Ne VIII, Mg X and Si XII, which have doublets in the rangs 500-800 A. Hence very high ionization metal systems will not show metal lines in existing spectra. Recent X-ray observations show that galaxy halos contain hot gas, so we predict that far-UV spectra of QSOs will also show this gas.

  17. Study on Reaction Mechanism of Reducing Dephosphorization of Fe-Ni-Si Melt by CaO-CaF2 Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chu, Shao-Jun

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the dephosphorization of Fe-Ni-Si melt by CaO-saturated CaO-CaF2 slag was investigated, from which it was found that the dephosphorization efficiency increases as increasing the silicon content, meanwhile the increase rate becomes rapid when the silicon content is more than 10 mass pct. By analyzing the phase compositions of the dephosphorization slag of a high silicon Fe-Ni-Si melt, it was first found the dephosphorization products change with the silicon content. When Si contents are 10.5, 31.48, 34.71, and 43.15 mass pct, the de-P products are Ca2P2, Ca10+ x Si12-2 x P16, Ca4SiP4, and Ca10+ x Si12-2 x P16, as well as Ca4SiP4, respectively. The corresponding dephosphorization mechanism can be described as (2x)(CaO) + (x + 2y)[Si] + 2z[P] = x(SiO2 ) + 2(Cax Siy Pz ).

  18. Modeling and FE Simulation of Quenchable High Strength Steels Sheet Metal Hot Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Bao, Jun; Xing, Zhongwen; Zhang, Dejin; Song, Baoyu; Lei, Chengxi

    2011-08-01

    High strength steel (HSS) sheet metal hot forming process is investigated by means of numerical simulations. With regard to a reliable numerical process design, the knowledge of the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties is essential. In this article, tensile tests are performed to examine the flow stress of the material HSS 22MnB5 at different strains, strain rates, and temperatures. Constitutive model based on phenomenological approach is developed to describe the thermo-mechanical properties of the material 22MnB5 by fitting the experimental data. A 2D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element (FE) model is developed to simulate the HSS sheet metal hot forming process for U-channel part. The ABAQUS/explicit model is used conduct the hot forming stage simulations, and ABAQUS/implicit model is used for accurately predicting the springback which happens at the end of hot forming stage. Material modeling and FE numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of the processing parameters on the hot forming process. The processing parameters have significant influence on the microstructure of U-channel part. The springback after hot forming stage is the main factor impairing the shape precision of hot-formed part. The mechanism of springback is advanced and verified through numerical simulations and tensile loading-unloading tests. Creep strain is found in the tensile loading-unloading test under isothermal condition and has a distinct effect on springback. According to the numerical and experimental results, it can be concluded that springback is mainly caused by different cooling rats and the nonhomogengeous shrink of material during hot forming process, the creep strain is the main factor influencing the amount of the springback.

  19. Hot hydrogen testing of metallic turbo pump materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Inamdar, Rohit

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to expose heat resistant alloys to hydrogen at elevated temperatures and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate process involved in degradation of these materials due to hydrogen environment. Inconel 718 and NASA-23 (wrought and cast) are candidate materials. The degradation of these materials in the presence of 1 to 5 atmospheric pressure of hydrogen from 450 C to 1100 C was examined. The hydrogen facility at Auburn University was used for this purpose. Control experiments were also conducted wherein the samples were exposed to vacuum so that a direct comparison of the results would separate the thermal contribution from the hydrogen effects. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. A residual gas collection system was used to determine the gaseous species produced by any chemical reaction that may have occurred during the exposure. Analysis of this gas sample shows only the presence of H2 as expected. Analyses of the samples were conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. There appears to be no change in weight of the samples as a result of hydrogen exposure. In addition no visible change on the surface structure was detected. This indicates that the materials of interest do not have strong interaction with hot hydrogen. This is consistent with the microstructure results.

  20. Large structural, thin-wall castings made of metals subject to hot tearing, and their fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An article, such as a gas turbine engine mixer, is made by providing a mold structure defining a thin-walled, hollow article, and a base metal that is subject to hot tear cracking when cast in a generally equiaxed polycrystalline form, such as Rene' 108 and Mar-M247. The article is fabricated by introducing the molten base metal into the mold structure, and directionally solidifying the base metal in the mold structure to form a directionally oriented structure. The directionally oriented structure may be formed of a single grain or oriented multiple grains.

  1. Development of Metallic Filters for Hot Gas Cleanup in Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Gleeson, B.; Terpstra, R.L.

    2002-09-19

    Alternative alloys derived from the wide array of aerospace superalloys will be developed for hot gas filtration to improve on both ceramic filters and ''first-generation'' iron aluminide metallic filter materials. New high performance metallic filters should offer the benefits of non-brittle mechanical behavior at all temperatures, including ambient temperature, and improved resistance to thermal fatigue compared to ceramic filter elements, thus improving filter reliability. A new powder processing approach also will be established that results in lightweight metallic filters with high permeability and weldability for enhanced capability for filter system manufacturing.

  2. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  3. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  4. Enhanced Boiling-Metal Cooling Of Vanes Exposed To Hot Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osofsky, I. B.

    1995-01-01

    Incorporation of automatic, self-powered jet pumps proposed to enhance boiling-liquid-metal cooling of vanes exposed to hot gases. In original intended application, vanes and probes thrust-vector-control devices inserted in supersonic flows of hot gases in rocket-engine nozzles; this cooling concept also applicable to vanes and blades in high-performance turbine engines. In further improvement, additional axial and transverse slots added to coolant passages in vane or probe and to coolant reservoir. Slots reduce stresses caused by thermal expansion and contraction of solid coolant.

  5. An Approach for Simulation of Corex Process Smelter Gasifier for Prediction of Coal Rate and Silicon in Hot Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Brijendra; Roy, S. K.; Sen, P. K.

    2010-10-01

    A thermodynamic model for the Corex process smelter gasifier focusing on coal pyrolysis as well as on the wustite reduction has been proposed. The compositions of hot metal, slag, and the export gas of the Corex process have been simulated satisfactorily for a given degree of metallization of directly reduced iron (DRI). The minimum coal rate is linked to the given degree of prereduction of DRI and the desired final silicon content in the hot metal.

  6. Hot Hydrogen Testing of Refractory Metals and Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph; Chin, Bryan; Cohron, Jon

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a technique with which refractory metal carbide samples can be exposed to hydrogen containing gases at high temperatures, and to use various microstructural and analytical techniques to determine the chemical and rate processes involved in hydrogen degradation in these materials. Five types of carbides were examined including WC, NbC, HfC, ZrC, and TaC. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. The temperature range investigated was from 850 to 1600 C with a hydrogen pressure of one atmosphere. Control experiments, in vacuum, were also conducted for comparison so that the net effects due to hydrogen could be isolated. The samples were analyzed prior to and after exposure. Gas samples were collected in selected experiments and analyzed using gas chromography. Characterization of the resulting microstructure after exposure to hydrogen was conducted using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and weight change. The ceramics were purchased and were all monolithic in nature. It was found that all samples lost weight after exposure, both in hydrogen and vacuum. Results from the microstructure analyses show that the degradation processes are different among the five types of ceramics involved. In addition, the apparent activation energy for the degradation process is a function of temperature even within the same material. This indicates that there are more than one mechanism involved in each material, and that the mechanisms are temperature dependent.

  7. Distribution of seven heavy metals among hot pepper plant parts.

    PubMed

    Antonious, George F

    2016-05-01

    The main objective of this investigation was to monitor concentrations of seven metals (Cd, Pb, Ni, Mo, Cu, Zn, and Cr) in the fruits, leaves, stem, and roots of Capsicum annuum L. (cv. Xcatic) plants grown under four soil management practices: yard waste (YW), sewage sludge (SS), chicken manure (CM), and no-much (NM) bare soil. Elemental analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Pb and Cd concentrations in soil amended with YW, SS, and CM were not significantly different (P < 0.05) compared to NM soil, whereas Mo and Cu concentrations were significantly greater in YW compared to SS, CM, and NM treatments. Concentrations of Cd in the fruits of plants grown in NM soil were greater compared to the fruits of plants grown in other treatments. Total Ni concentration (sum of Ni in all plant parts) in plants grown in NM bare soil was greater than in plants grown in SS-, YW-, and CM-amended soils. Values of the bioaccumulation factor indicated that pepper fruits of plants grown in YW, SS, and CM did not show any tendency to accumulate Pb, Cr, and Ni in their edible fruits. PMID:26828959

  8. Hot electron-induced reduction of small molecules on photorecycling metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Noble metals are important photocatalysts due to their ability to convert light into chemical energy. Hot electrons, generated via the non-radiative decay of localized surface plasmons, can be transferred to reactants on the metal surface. Unfortunately, the number of hot electrons per molecule is limited due to charge–carrier recombination. In addition to the reduction half-reaction with hot electrons, also the corresponding oxidation counter-half-reaction must take place since otherwise the overall redox reaction cannot proceed. Here we report on the conceptual importance of promoting the oxidation counter-half-reaction in plasmon-mediated catalysis by photorecycling in order to overcome this general limitation. A six-electron photocatalytic reaction occurs even in the absence of conventional chemical reducing agents due to the photoinduced recycling of Ag atoms from hot holes in the oxidation half-reaction. This concept of multi-electron, counter-half-reaction-promoted photocatalysis provides exciting new opportunities for driving efficient light-to-energy conversion processes. PMID:26138619

  9. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1990-12-31

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a cansister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800{degrees}C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  10. High density hexagonal boron nitride prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOEpatents

    Hoenig, Clarence L.

    1992-01-01

    Boron nitride powder with less than or equal to the oxygen content of starting powder (down to 0.5% or less) is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce hexagonal boron nitride with a bulk density greater than 2.0 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed or chemical vapor deposited onto a powder compact. Hot isostatic pressing at 1800.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for four hours produces a bulk density of 2.21 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  11. Synthesis of metal selenide colloidal nanocrystals by the hot injection of selenium powder.

    PubMed

    Flamee, Stijn; Dierick, Ruben; Cirillo, Marco; Van Genechten, Dirk; Aubert, Tangi; Hens, Zeger

    2013-09-21

    We describe the synthesis of metal selenide nanocrystals, including CdSe, ZnSe, CuInSe2 and Cu2(Zn,Sn)Se4, by the hot injection of selenium powder dispersed in a carrier solvent. Since this results in a fast and high yield nanocrystal formation, we argue that the approach is well suited for the low cost, large volume production of nanocrystals. PMID:23657539

  12. A New Process for Hot Metal Production at Low Fuel Rate - Phase 1 Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wei-Kao Lu

    2006-02-01

    The project is part of the continuing effort by the North American steel industry to develop a coal-based, cokeless process for hot metal production. The objective of Phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of designing and constructing a pilot scale facility with the capacity of 42,000 mtpy of direct reduced iron (DRI) with 95% metallization. The primary effort is performed by Bricmont, Inc., an international engineering firm, under the supervision of McMaster University. The study focused on the Paired Straight Hearth furnace concept developed previously by McMaster University, The American Iron and Steel Institute and the US Department of Energy.

  13. Surface plasmon assisted hot electron collection in wafer-scale metallic-semiconductor photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Chou, Jeffrey B; Li, Xin-Hao; Wang, Yu; Fenning, David P; Elfaer, Asmaa; Viegas, Jaime; Jouiad, Mustapha; Shao-Horn, Yang; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-09-01

    Plasmon assisted photoelectric hot electron collection in a metal-semiconductor junction can allow for sub-bandgap optical to electrical energy conversion. Here we report hot electron collection by wafer-scale Au/TiO2 metallic-semiconductor photonic crystals (MSPhC), with a broadband photoresponse below the bandgap of TiO2. Multiple absorption modes supported by the 2D nano-cavity structure of the MSPhC extend the photon-metal interaction time and fulfill a broadband light absorption. The surface plasmon absorption mode provides access to enhanced electric field oscillation and hot electron generation at the interface between Au and TiO2. A broadband sub-bandgap photoresponse centered at 590 nm was achieved due to surface plasmon absorption. Gold nanorods were deposited on the surface of MSPhC to study localized surface plasmon (LSP) mode absorption and subsequent injection to the TiO2 catalyst at different wavelengths. Applications of these results could lead to low-cost and robust photo-electrochemical applications such as more efficient solar water splitting. PMID:27607726

  14. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS₂ and Metal/WSe₂ Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen B

    2015-06-10

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds and therefore make more "ideal" Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce Fermi energy pinning and recombination centers at the interface with bulk metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10× enhancement in the indirect band gap photoluminescence of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) deposited on various metals (e.g., Cu, Au, Ag), while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2 and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes in the TMDC. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5 eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier exists for the Σ-point band, making electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wave functions in the metal. This enhancement in the indirect emission only occurs for thick flakes of MoS2 and WSe2 (≥100 nm) and is completely absent in monolayer and few-layer (∼10 nm) flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures, which is consistent with the hot electron injection model. PMID:25993397

  15. Ab initio phonon coupling and optical response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ana M.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Goddard, William A.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast laser measurements probe the nonequilibrium dynamics of excited electrons in metals with increasing temporal resolution. Electronic structure calculations can provide a detailed microscopic understanding of hot electron dynamics, but a parameter-free description of pump-probe measurements has not yet been possible, despite intensive research, because of the phenomenological treatment of electron-phonon interactions. We present ab initio predictions of the electron-temperature dependent heat capacities and electron-phonon coupling coefficients of plasmonic metals. We find substantial differences from free-electron and semiempirical estimates, especially in noble metals above transient electron temperatures of 2000 K, because of the previously neglected strong dependence of electron-phonon matrix elements on electron energy. We also present first-principles calculations of the electron-temperature dependent dielectric response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals, including direct interband and phonon-assisted intraband transitions, facilitating complete theoretical predictions of the time-resolved optical probe signatures in ultrafast laser experiments.

  16. Solar energy conversion via hot electron internal photoemission in metallic nanostructures: Efficiency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Leenheer, Andrew J.; Narang, Prineha; Atwater, Harry A.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2014-04-07

    Collection of hot electrons generated by the efficient absorption of light in metallic nanostructures, in contact with semiconductor substrates can provide a basis for the construction of solar energy-conversion devices. Herein, we evaluate theoretically the energy-conversion efficiency of systems that rely on internal photoemission processes at metal-semiconductor Schottky-barrier diodes. In this theory, the current-voltage characteristics are given by the internal photoemission yield as well as by the thermionic dark current over a varied-energy barrier height. The Fowler model, in all cases, predicts solar energy-conversion efficiencies of <1% for such systems. However, relaxation of the assumptions regarding constraints on the escape cone and momentum conservation at the interface yields solar energy-conversion efficiencies as high as 1%–10%, under some assumed (albeit optimistic) operating conditions. Under these conditions, the energy-conversion efficiency is mainly limited by the thermionic dark current, the distribution of hot electron energies, and hot-electron momentum considerations.

  17. Theoretical analysis of hot electron injection from metallic nanotubes into a semiconductor interface.

    PubMed

    Kumarasinghe, Chathurangi S; Premaratne, Malin; Gunapala, Sarath D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-07-21

    Metallic nanostructures under optical illumination can generate a non-equilibrium high-energy electron gas (also known as hot electrons) capable of being injected into neighbouring media over a potential barrier at particle boundaries. The nature of this process is highly nanoparticle shape and size dependent. Here, we have derived an analytical expression for the frequency dependent rate of injection of these energetic electrons from a metallic nanotube into a semiconductor layer in contact with its inner boundary. In our derivation, we have considered the quantum mechanical motion of the electron gas confined by the particle boundaries in determining the electron energy spectrum and wave functions. We present a comprehensive theoretical analysis of how different geometric parameters such as the outer to inner radius ratio, length and thickness of a nanotube and illumination frequency affect the hot electron injection and internal quantum efficiency of the nanotube. We reveal that longer nanotubes with thin shells and high inner to outer radius ratios show better performance at visible and infrared frequencies. Our derivations and results provide the much needed theoretical insight for optimization of thin nanotubes for different hot electron based applications. PMID:27332556

  18. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-06-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron-phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron-phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals.

  19. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B; Louie, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron-phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron-phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals. PMID:26033445

  20. Theory and computation of hot carriers generated by surface plasmon polaritons in noble metals

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Marco; Mustafa, Jamal; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Hot carriers (HC) generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in noble metals are promising for application in optoelectronics, plasmonics and renewable energy. However, existing models fail to explain key quantitative details of SPP-to-HC conversion experiments. Here we develop a quantum mechanical framework and apply first-principles calculations to study the energy distribution and scattering processes of HCs generated by SPPs in Au and Ag. We find that the relative positions of the s and d bands of noble metals regulate the energy distribution and mean free path of the HCs, and that the electron–phonon interaction controls HC energy loss and transport. Our results prescribe optimal conditions for HC generation and extraction, and invalidate previously employed free-electron-like models. Our work combines density functional theory, GW and electron–phonon calculations to provide microscopic insight into HC generation and ultrafast dynamics in noble metals. PMID:26033445

  1. Indirect Band Gap Emission by Hot Electron Injection in Metal/MoS2 and Metal/WSe2 Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Ezhilarasu, Goutham; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Dhall, Rohan; Chen, Chun-Chung; Cronin, Stephen

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as MoS2 and WSe2, are free of dangling bonds, therefore make more `ideal' Schottky junctions than bulk semiconductors, which produce recombination centers at the interface with metals, inhibiting charge transfer. Here, we observe a more than 10X enhancement in the indirect band gap PL of TMDCs deposited on various metals, while the direct band gap emission remains unchanged. We believe the main mechanism of light emission arises from photoexcited hot electrons in the metal that are injected into the conduction band of MoS2 and WSe2, and subsequently recombine radiatively with minority holes. Since the conduction band at the K-point is 0.5eV higher than at the Σ-point, a lower Schottky barrier of the Σ-point band makes electron injection more favorable. Also, the Σ band consists of the sulfur pz orbital, which overlaps more significantly with the electron wavefunctions in the metal. This enhancement only occurs for thick flakes, and is absent in monolayer and few-layer flakes. Here, the flake thickness must exceed the depletion width of the Schottky junction, in order for efficient radiative recombination to occur in the TMDC. The intensity of this indirect peak decreases at low temperatures. Reference: DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b00885

  2. Colliding Planetary and Stellar Winds: Charge Exchange and Metal Absorption in Hot Jupiter Exospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Hot Jupiters unleash photoevaporative winds that are powered by ionizing radiation from their parent stars. Spectral signatures of such winds have been observed with HST STIS and COS in various UV absorption lines from H I, O I, C II, Mg II, and Si III. Interpretation of these absorption signatures is still debated, and the metal line observations have seen little modeling. Absorption by H I Lyman-alpha occurs at velocities of +/- 100 km/s; such large velocities are difficult to explain because thermal outflows from hot Jupiters have speeds < 30 km/s. Holmstrom et al. {2009} proposed that the anomalously energetic H I arises from charge exchange between planetary H I and protons from the incident stellar wind. If true, then basic quantities-e.g., the planetary mass loss rate, which we hope to infer from the HST data-would need re-calculation to account for the influence of the stellar wind. Charge exchange has not yet been integrated into models of photoevaporative winds. We propose to carry out hydrodynamic simulations of colliding planetary and stellar winds, including charge exchange, that would explain the HST Ly-a observations, thereby clarifying how the inferred planetary mass loss rate depends on stellar wind parameters. We also propose to incorporate photoionization heating by metals, and radiative line cooling by metals, both of which have not been simultaneously treated. The goal will be to reproduce the many HST line spectra of neutral and ionized metals and determine their import for the metallicity and mass loss rate of the planetary wind.

  3. Strong and highly asymmetrical optical absorption in conformal metal-semiconductor-metal grating system for plasmonic hot-electron photodetection application

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Shaolong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    We propose an architecture of conformal metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device for hot-electron photodetection by asymmetrical alignment of the semiconductor barrier relative to the Fermi level of metals and strong energy localization through plasmonic resonances. Compared with the conventional grating design, the multi-layered grating system under conformal configuration is demonstrated to possess both optical and electrical advantages for high-sensitivity hot-electron photodetection. Finite-element simulation reveals that a strong and highly asymmetrical optical absorption (top metal absorption >99%) can be realized under such a conformal arrangement. An analytical probability-based electrical simulation verifies the strong unidirectional photocurrent, by taking advantage of the extremely high net absorption and a low metal/semiconductor barrier height, and predicts that the corresponding photoresponsivity can be ~3 times of that based on the conventional grating design in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) configuration. PMID:26387836

  4. Strong and highly asymmetrical optical absorption in conformal metal-semiconductor-metal grating system for plasmonic hot-electron photodetection application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Shaolong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    We propose an architecture of conformal metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device for hot-electron photodetection by asymmetrical alignment of the semiconductor barrier relative to the Fermi level of metals and strong energy localization through plasmonic resonances. Compared with the conventional grating design, the multi-layered grating system under conformal configuration is demonstrated to possess both optical and electrical advantages for high-sensitivity hot-electron photodetection. Finite-element simulation reveals that a strong and highly asymmetrical optical absorption (top metal absorption >99%) can be realized under such a conformal arrangement. An analytical probability-based electrical simulation verifies the strong unidirectional photocurrent, by taking advantage of the extremely high net absorption and a low metal/semiconductor barrier height, and predicts that the corresponding photoresponsivity can be ~3 times of that based on the conventional grating design in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) configuration. PMID:26387836

  5. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  6. Processes of conversion of a hot metal particle into aerogel through clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, B. M.

    2015-10-15

    Processes are considered for conversion into a fractal structure of a hot metal micron-size particle that is located in a buffer gas or a gas flow and is heated by an external electric or electromagnetic source or by a plasma. The parameter of this heating is the particle temperature, which is the same in the entire particle volume because of its small size and high conductivity. Three processes determine the particle heat balance: particle radiation, evaporation of metal atoms from the particle surface, and heat transport to the surrounding gas due to its thermal conductivity. The particle heat balance is analyzed based on these processes, which are analogous to those for bulk metals with the small particle size, and its high temperature taken into account. Outside the particle, where the gas temperature is lower than on its surface, the formed metal vapor in a buffer gas flow is converted into clusters. Clusters grow as a result of coagulation until they become liquid, and then clusters form fractal aggregates if they are removed form the gas flow. Subsequently, associations of fractal aggregates join into a fractal structure. The rate of this process increases in medium electric fields, and the formed fractal structure has features of aerogels and fractal fibers. As a result of a chain of the above processes, a porous metal film may be manufactured for use as a filter or catalyst for gas flows.

  7. A Solvent-Free Hot-Pressing Method for Preparing Metal-Organic-Framework Coatings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifa; Li, Siqing; Pei, Xiaokun; Zhou, Junwen; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Shenghan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Li, Haiwei; Han, Ruodan; Wang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), with their well-defined pores and rich structural diversity and functionality, have drawn a great deal of attention from across the scientific community. However, industrial applications are hampered by their intrinsic fragility and poor processability. Stable and resilient MOF devices with tunable flexibility are highly desirable. Herein, we present a solvent- and binder-free approach for producing stable MOF coatings by a unique hot-pressing (HoP) method, in which temperature and pressure are applied simultaneously to facilitate the rapid growth of MOF nanocrystals onto desired substrates. This strategy was proven to be applicable to carboxylate-based, imidazolate-based, and mixed-metal MOFs. We further successfully obtained superhydrophobic and "Janus" MOF films through layer-by-layer pressing. This HoP method can be scaled up in the form of roll-to-roll production and may push MOFs into unexplored industrial applications. PMID:26847472

  8. Mobility of heavy metals from soil into hot pepper fruits: a field study.

    PubMed

    Antonious, G F; Kochhar, T S

    2009-01-01

    Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin contribute to pungency as well as having health-promoting properties, in peppers. Twenty-three genotypes (four spp.) of hot pepper from the USDA germplasm collection were grown in the field to identify accessions having increased concentrations of these two compounds and determine the concentrations of heavy metals, in mature fruits. Concentrations and relative proportions of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and seven heavy metals varied between and within pepper species. Plant Introduction 547069 (C. annuum) contained the greatest concentrations of the two pungent compounds. Fruits of PI-439381 and PI-267729 (C. baccatum) accumulated the greatest concentrations of Pb, while PI-246331 (C. annuum) accumulated the greatest concentration of Cd among accessions tested. PMID:18758679

  9. Photoelectric energy conversion of plasmon-generated hot carriers in metal-insulator-semiconductor structures.

    PubMed

    García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Mihi, Agustín; Kufer, Dominik; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2013-04-23

    Plasmonic excitation in metals has received great attention for light localization and control of light-matter interactions at the nanoscale with a plethora of applications in absorption enhancement, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, or biosensing. Electrically active plasmonic devices, which had remained underexplored, have recently become a growing field of interest. In this report we introduce a metal-insulator-semiconductor heterostructure for plasmo-electric energy conversion, a novel architecture to harvest hot-electrons derived from plasmonic excitations. We demonstrate external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 4% at 460 nm using a Ag nanostructured electrode and EQE of 1.3% at 550 nm employing a Au nanostructured electrode. The insulator interfacial layer has been found to play a crucial role in interface passivation, a requisite in photovoltaic applications to achieving both high open-circuit voltages (0.5 V) and fill-factors (0.5), but its introduction simultaneously modifies hot-electron injection and transport. We investigate the influence passivation has on these processes for different material configurations, and characterize different types of transport depending on the initial plasmon energy band, reporting power conversion efficiencies of 0.03% for nanopatterned silver electrodes. PMID:23495769

  10. Investigation of surface topography effects on metal flow under lubricated hot compression of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurk, Justin Irvin

    An investigation was conducted to study the effects of die surface topography, specifically surface roughness and lay, on metal flow and the friction factor under lubricated hot compression. 6061-T6 aluminum rings and square bar stock specimens were compressed on H-13 tool steel platens machined with a unidirectional lay pattern to six different roughnesses between a R 0 10 and 240 muin. A lab based hydraulic press mounted with an experimental die set was used for all testing. Repeated trials were conducted using high temperature vegetable oil and boron nitride lubricants. Metal flow was quantified as a function of surface roughness, lay orientation, and die temperature. Approximate plane strain cigar test specimens were compressed at platen temperatures of 300 °F and 400 °F and at orientations of 0°, 45°, and 90° between the longitudinal axis and unidirectional platen surface lay. The friction factor was assessed using the ring compression test under varying platen roughness conditions and die temperatures between 250 °F and 400 °F. Results indicate metal flow is optimized at low platen roughnesses and orientations parallel to the surface lay of the platen. Die temperature was not found to influence metal flow within the temperature range investigated. The friction factor was observed to be minimized at lower die temperatures and platen roughnesses.

  11. EFFECT OF METALLICITY ON X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Ursino, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Roncarelli, M.

    2010-09-20

    Hydrodynamic simulations predict that a significant fraction of the gas in the current universe is in the form of high temperature, highly ionized plasma emitting and absorbing primarily in the soft X-ray and UV bands, dubbed the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). Its signature should be observable in redshifted emission and absorption lines from highly ionized elements. To determine the expected WHIM emission in the soft X-ray band we used the output of a large scale smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulation to generate images and spectra with angular resolution of 14'' and energy resolution of 1 eV. The current biggest limit of any hydrodynamic simulation in predicting the X-ray emission comes from metal diffusion. In our investigation, by using four different models for the WHIM metallicity we have found a strong dependence of the emission on the model used, with differences up to almost an order of magnitude. For each model, we have investigated the redshift distribution and angular scale of the emission, confirming that most photons come from redshift z < 1.2 and that the emission has a typical angular scale of less than a few arcminutes. We also compared our simulations with the few currently available observations and found that, within the variation of the metallicity models, our predictions are in good agreement with current constraints on the WHIM emission, and at this time the weak experimental constraints on the WHIM emission are not sufficient to exclude any of the models used.

  12. Hot-electron relaxation in metals within the Götze-Wölfle memory function formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-04-01

    We consider nonequilibrium relaxation of electrons due to their coupling with phonons in a simple metal. In our model, electrons are living at a higher temperature than that of the phonon bath, mimicking a nonequilibrium steady-state situation. We study the relaxation of such hot electrons proposing a suitable generalization of the memory function formalism formulated by Götze and Wölfle (GW) [W. Götze and P. Wölfle, Phys. Rev. B 6, 1226 (1972)]. We derive analytical expressions for both the DC or zero frequency scattering rates and the optical scattering rates in various temperature and frequency regimes. Limiting cases are in accord with the previous studies. An interesting feature that the DC scattering rate at high temperatures and optical scattering rate at high frequencies are independent of the temperature difference between the electrons and the phonons is found in this study. The present formalism forms a basis which can also be extended to study hot-electron relaxation in variety of complex materials.

  13. KEPLER-6b: A TRANSITING HOT JUPITER ORBITING A METAL-RICH STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Edward W.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Furesz, Gabor; Geary, John C.; Latham, David W.; Brown, Timothy M.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Fischer, Debra; Gautier, Thomas N.; Gould, Alan; Howell, Steve B.; Kjeldsen, Hans

    2010-04-20

    We announce the discovery of Kepler-6b, a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting a star with unusually high metallicity, [Fe/H]= +0.34{+-}0.04. The planet's mass is about 2/3 that of Jupiter, M {sub P} = 0.67 M {sub J}, and the radius is 30% larger than that of Jupiter, R {sub P} = 1.32 R {sub J}, resulting in a density of {rho}{sub P} = 0.35 g cm{sup -3}, a fairly typical value for such a planet. The orbital period is P = 3.235 days. The host star is both more massive than the Sun, M {sub *} = 1.21 M {sub sun}, and larger than the Sun, R {sub *} = 1.39 R {sub sun}.

  14. Strength and toughness of ceramic-metal composites prepared by reactive hot pressing

    SciTech Connect

    ELLERBY,DONALD T.; LOEHMAN,RONALD E.; FAHRENHOLTZ,WILLIAM G.

    2000-03-10

    Metal-reinforced Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-matrix composites were prepared using reactive hot pressing. The volume fraction of the reinforcing phase was controlled by the stoichiometry of the particular displacement reaction used. Dense Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}-Ni and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Nb composites were fabricated using this technique. The best combination of strength, 610 MPa, and toughness, 12 MPam{sup 1/2}, was found for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Ni composites. Indentation cracks and fracture surfaces showed evidence of ductile deformation of the Ni phase. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Nb composites had high strength, but the toughness was lower than expected due to the poor bonding between the Nb and A1{sub 2}0{sub 3}phases.

  15. Nonequilibrium theory of a hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, Dmitri; Kuzmin, Leonid

    2001-06-01

    The operation of the hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junction as a temperature sensor is analyzed theoretically. The responsivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the bolometer are obtained numerically for typical experimental parameters. Relatively simple approximate analytical expressions for these values are derived. The time constant of the device is also found. We demonstrate that the effect of the electron cooling by the NIS junction, which serves as a thermometer, can improve the sensitivity. This effect is also useful in the presence of the finite background power load. We discuss the effect of the correlation of the shot noise and the heat flow noise in the NIS junction. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Applications of "Hot" and "Cold" Bis(thiosemicarbazonato) Metal Complexes in Multimodal Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cortezon-Tamarit, Fernando; Sarpaki, Sophia; Calatayud, David G; Mirabello, Vincenzo; Pascu, Sofia I

    2016-06-01

    The applications of coordination chemistry to molecular imaging has become a matter of intense research over the past 10 years. In particular, the applications of bis(thiosemicarbazonato) metal complexes in molecular imaging have mainly been focused on compounds with aliphatic backbones due to the in vivo imaging success of hypoxic tumors with PET (positron emission tomography) using (64) CuATSM [copper (diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone))]. This compound entered clinical trials in the US and the UK during the first decade of the 21(st) century for imaging hypoxia in head and neck tumors. The replacement of the ligand backbone to aromatic groups, coupled with the exocyclic N's functionalization during the synthesis of bis(thiosemicarbazones) opens the possibility to use the corresponding metal complexes as multimodal imaging agents of use, both in vitro for optical detection, and in vivo when radiolabeled with several different metallic species. The greater kinetic stability of acenaphthenequinone bis(thiosemicarbazonato) metal complexes, with respect to that of the corresponding aliphatic ATSM complexes, allows the stabilization of a number of imaging probes, with special interest in "cold" and "hot" Cu(II) and Ga(III) derivatives for PET applications and (111) In(III) derivatives for SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) applications, whilst Zn(II) derivatives display optical imaging properties in cells, with enhanced fluorescence emission and lifetime with respect to the free ligands. Preliminary studies have shown that gallium-based acenaphthenequinone bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes are also hypoxia selective in vitro, thus increasing the interest in them as new generation imaging agents for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:27149900

  17. Hot subdwarf stars in close-up view. III. Metal abundances of subdwarf B stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are considered to be core helium-burning stars with very thin hydrogen envelopes situated on or near the extreme horizontal branch. The formation of sdBs is still unclear as well as the chemical composition of their atmospheres. The observed helium depletion is attributed to atmospheric diffusion. Metal abundances have been determined for about a dozen sdBs only resulting in puzzling patterns with enrichment of heavy metals and depletion of lighter ones. Aims: We present a detailed metal abundance analysis of 106 sdBs. Methods: From high resolution spectra we measured elemental abundances of up to 24 different ions per star. A semi-automatic analysis pipeline was developed to calculate and fit LTE models to a standard set of spectral lines. Results: A general trend of enrichment was found with increasing temperature for most of the heavier elements. The lighter elements like carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are depleted and less affected by temperature. Although there is considerable scatter from star to star, the general abundance patterns in most sdBs are similar. State-of-the-art diffusion models predict such patterns and are in qualitative agreement with our results. However, the highest enrichments measured cannot be explained with these models. Peculiar line shapes of the strongest metal lines in some stars indicate vertical stratification to be present in the atmospheres. Such effects are not accounted for in current diffusion models and may be responsible for some of the yet unexplained abundance anomalies. Tables A.1-A.3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr(130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A110

  18. INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIAL DILUTION OF THE METAL CONTENT OF HOT GAS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES BY ACCRETED COLD GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yuanyuan; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2013-03-20

    The measured emission-weighted metal abundance of the hot gas in early-type galaxies has been known to be lower than theoretical expectations for 20 years. In addition, both X-ray luminosity and metal abundance vary significantly among galaxies of similar optical luminosities. This suggests some missing factors in the galaxy evolution process, especially the metal enrichment process. With Chandra and XMM-Newton, we studied 32 early-type galaxies (kT {approx}< 1 keV) covering a span of two orders of L{sub X,gas}/L{sub K} to investigate these missing factors. Contrary to previous studies that X-ray faint galaxies show extremely low Fe abundance ({approx}0.1 Z{sub Sun }), nearly all galaxies in our sample show an Fe abundance at least 0.3 Z{sub Sun }, although the measured Fe abundance difference between X-ray faint and X-ray bright galaxies remains remarkable. We investigated whether this dichotomy of hot gas Fe abundances can be related to the dilution of hot gas by mixing with cold gas. With a subset of 24 galaxies in this sample, we find that there is virtually no correlation between hot gas Fe abundances and their atomic gas content, which disproves the scenario that the low metal abundance of X-ray faint galaxies might be a result of the dilution of the remaining hot gas by pristine atomic gas. In contrast, we demonstrate a negative correlation between the measured hot gas Fe abundance and the ratio of molecular gas mass to hot gas mass, although it is unclear what is responsible for this apparent anti-correlation. We discuss several possibilities including that externally originated molecular gas might be able to dilute the hot gas metal content. Alternatively, the measured hot gas Fe abundance may be underestimated due to more complex temperature and abundance structures and even a two-temperature model might be insufficient to reflect the true value of the emission weighted mean Fe abundance.

  19. Antenna induced hot restrike of a ceramic metal halide lamp recorded by high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, P.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.

    2016-03-01

    The hot restrike is one of the biggest challenges in operating ceramic metal halide lamps with mercury as buffer gas. Compared to a cold lamp, the pressure within a ceramic burner is two orders of magnitude higher during steady state operation due to the high temperature of the ceramic tube and the resulting high mercury vapour pressure. Room temperature conditions are achieved after 300 s of cooling down in a commercial burner, enclosed in an evacuated outer bulb. At the beginning of the cooling down, ignition voltage rises up to more than 14 kV. A significant reduction of the hot-restrike voltage can be achieved by using a so called active antenna. It is realized by a conductive sleeve surrounding the burner at the capillary of the upper electrode. The antenna is connected to the lower electrode of the lamp, so that its potential is extended to the vicinity of the upper electrode. An increased electric field in front of the upper electrode is induced, when an ignition pulse is applied to the lamp electrodes. A symmetrically shaped ignition pulse is applied with an amplitude, which is just sufficient to re-ignite the hot lamp. The re-ignition, 60 s after switching off the lamp, when the mercury pressure starts to be saturated, is recorded for both polarities of the ignition pulse with a high-speed camera, which records four pictures within the symmetrically shaped ignition pulse with exposure times of 100 ns and throws of 100 ns. The pictures show that the high electric field and its temporal variation establish a local dielectric barrier discharge in front of the upper electrode inside the burner, which covers the inner wall of the burner with a surface charge. It forms a starting point of streamers, which may induce the lamp ignition predominantly within the second half cycle of the ignition pulse. It is found out that an active antenna is more effective when the starting point of the surface streamer in front of the sleeve is a negative surface charge on the

  20. Design of nanophotonic, hot-electron solar-blind ultraviolet detectors with a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-12-01

    Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection refers to photon detection specifically in the wavelength range of 200 nm-320 nm. Without background noises from solar radiation, it has broad applications from homeland security to environmental monitoring. The most commonly used solid state devices for this application are wide band gap (WBG) semiconductor photodetectors (Eg > 3.5 eV). However, WBG semiconductors are difficult to grow and integrate with Si readout integrated circuits (ROICs). In this paper, we design a nanophotonic metal-oxide-semiconductor structure on Si for solar-blind UV detectors. Instead of using semiconductors as the active absorber, we use Sn nano-grating structures to absorb UV photons and generate hot electrons for internal photoemission across the Sn/SiO2 interfacial barrier, thereby generating photocurrent between the metal and the n-type Si region upon UV excitation. Moreover, the transported hot electron has an excess kinetic energy >3 eV, large enough to induce impact ionization and generate another free electron in the conduction band of n-Si. This process doubles the quantum efficiency. On the other hand, the large metal/oxide interfacial energy barrier (>3.5 eV) also enables solar-blind UV detection by blocking the less energetic electrons excited by visible photons. With optimized design, ˜75% UV absorption and hot electron excitation can be achieved within the mean free path of ˜20 nm from the metal/oxide interface. This feature greatly enhances hot electron transport across the interfacial barrier to generate photocurrent. The simple geometry of the Sn nano-gratings and the MOS structure make it easy to fabricate and integrate with Si ROICs compared to existing solar-blind UV detection schemes. The presented device structure also breaks through the conventional notion that photon absorption by metal is always a loss in solid-state photodetectors, and it can potentially be extended to other active metal photonic devices.

  1. Multi-Objective Optimization in Hot Machining of Al/SiCp Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, M. R.; Dabade, U. A.

    2016-02-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have been found to be useful in a number of engineering applications and particle reinforced MMCs have received considerable attention due to their excellent engineering properties. These materials are generally regarded as extremely difficult to machine, because of the abrasive characteristics of the reinforced particulates. These characteristics of MMCs affect the machined surface quality and integrity. This paper presents use of Taguchi Grey Relational Analyses (GRA) for optimization of Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs produced by stir casting. Experiments are performed using L16 orthogonal array by using hot machining technique. The objective of this study is to identify the optimum process parameters to improve the surface integrity on Al/SiCp MMCs. The machined surface integrity has been analyzed by process parameters such as speed, feed, depth of cut and preheating temperature. The significance of the process parameters on surface integrity has been evaluated quantitatively by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method and AOM plots. The grey relational analysis shows optimum machining conditions as 0.05 mm/rev feed, 0.4 mm depth of cut and 60 °C preheating temperature to enhance surface integrity for both Al/SiCp/10p (220 and 600 mesh) MMCs except for cutting speed 50 and 25 m/min respectively.

  2. Analysis of hot forming of a sheet metal component made of advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkaya, Sinem; Darendeliler, Haluk; Gökler, Mustafa İlhan; Ayhaner, Murat

    2013-05-01

    To provide reduction in weight while maintaining crashworthiness and to decrease the fuel consumption of vehicles, thinner components made of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are being increasingly used in automotive industry. However, AHSS cannot be formed easily at the room temperature (i.e. cold forming). The alternative process involves heating, hot forming and subsequent quenching. A-pillar upper reinforcement of a vehicle is currently being produced by cold forming of DP600 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.8 mm. In this study, the possible decrease in the thickness of this particular part by using 22MnB5 as appropriate AHSS material and applying this alternative process has been studied. The proposed process involves deep drawing, trimming, heating, sizing, cooling and piercing operations. Both the current production process and the proposed process are analyzed by the finite element method. The die geometry, blank holding forces and the design of the cooling channels for the cooling process are determined numerically. It is shown that the particular part made of 22MnB5 steel sheet with a thickness of 1.2 mm can be successfully produced by applying the proposed process sequence and can be used without sacrificing the crashworthiness. With the use of the 22MnB5 steel with a thickness of 1.2 mm instead of DP600 sheet metal with a thickness of 1.8 mm, the weight is reduced by approximately 33%.

  3. Kinetic Study on Desulfurization of Hot Metal Using CaO and CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, David; Sichen, Du

    2015-02-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of hot metal desulfurization using CaO and CaC2 were studied in a well-controlled atmosphere with a lab scale high temperature furnace. The growths of CaS around CaO and CaC2 were measured and compared at 1773 K (1500 °C). The parabolic rate constant was evaluated to be 5 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaO particles, and 2.4 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaC2. The bigger parabolic constant of CaO resulted in more efficient desulfurization. Agglomerates and big CaO particles led to 2CaO·SiO2 formation which hindered further utilization of CaO for desulfurization. The 2CaO·SiO2 formation was favoured by a high oxygen potential. Since the desulfurization reaction of CaO not only produced CaS but also oxygen, the local oxygen concentration around big CaO particles was higher than around small particles.

  4. Kinetic Study on Desulfurization of Hot Metal Using CaO and CaC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindström, David; Sichen, Du

    2014-09-01

    The kinetics and reaction mechanisms of hot metal desulfurization using CaO and CaC2 were studied in a well-controlled atmosphere with a lab scale high temperature furnace. The growths of CaS around CaO and CaC2 were measured and compared at 1773 K (1500 °C). The parabolic rate constant was evaluated to be 5 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaO particles, and 2.4 × 10-7 (cm s-1) on CaC2. The bigger parabolic constant of CaO resulted in more efficient desulfurization. Agglomerates and big CaO particles led to 2CaO·SiO2 formation which hindered further utilization of CaO for desulfurization. The 2CaO·SiO2 formation was favoured by a high oxygen potential. Since the desulfurization reaction of CaO not only produced CaS but also oxygen, the local oxygen concentration around big CaO particles was higher than around small particles.

  5. The effect of a coating material on mist cooling of hot metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Saka, Mitsuo; Tatsuta, Koichi

    1996-08-01

    The accurate knowledge of mist cooling characteristics is important for analyzing emergency cooling system under loss-of-coolant-accident conditions. Heat transfer characteristics of mist cooling are affected by many factors (Carbajo, 1985). Attention should be given to the effect of thermal conductance of surface materials on the cooling process of used fuels whose surfaces are oxided or contaminated by some impurities in the coolant. This paper deals with transient boiling heat transfer to mist flow of air-water mixture from hot metals coated with a thin layer of insulating (low thermal conductivity) material. The test specimens selected for the present experiment are silver and stainless steel disks whose heat transfer surface is coated with a refractory paint. The heated disk is plunged vertically into the mist flow and is cooled down to the saturation temperature of water under atmospheric pressure. The coating produces a great enhancement in heat transfer, especially in transition and film boiling regions. This enhancement becomes higher with increasing coating thickness. Heat transfer is more enhanced as mass velocity of water increases although it has a weak dependency on linear velocity of air.

  6. Collective excitation of plasmonic hot-spots for enhanced hot charge carrier transfer in metal/semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, Adrien; Earl, Stuart K.; Ng, Charlene; Dligatch, Svetlana; Roberts, Ann; Davis, Timothy J.; Gómez, Daniel E.

    2015-04-01

    We show how a combination of near- and far-field coupling of the localised surface plasmon resonances in aluminium nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 films greatly enhances the visible light photocatalytic activity of the semiconductor material. We demonstrate two orders of magnitude enhancement in the rate of decomposition of methylene blue under visible light illumination when the surface of TiO2 films is decorated with gratings of Al nanoparticle dimers.We show how a combination of near- and far-field coupling of the localised surface plasmon resonances in aluminium nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 films greatly enhances the visible light photocatalytic activity of the semiconductor material. We demonstrate two orders of magnitude enhancement in the rate of decomposition of methylene blue under visible light illumination when the surface of TiO2 films is decorated with gratings of Al nanoparticle dimers. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed information on estimates of hot-electron injection efficiencies, electrodynamic simulations, sample preparation, spectroscopic and structural characterization and photocatalytic experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01592h

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of hip-consolidated Rene 95 powders. [hot-isostatic pressed nickel-based powder metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimanuki, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Masui, M.; Doi, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of heat-treatments on the microstructure of P/M Rene 95 (a nickel-based powder metal), consolidated by the hot-isostatic pressing (HIP), were examined. The microstructure of as-HIP'd specimen was characterized by highly serrated grain boundaries. Mechanical tests and microstructural observations reveal that the serrated grain boundaries improved ductility at both room and elevated temperatures by retarding crack propagation along grain boundaries.

  8. Heavy metal accumulation in hot water tanks in a region experiencing coal waste pollution and comparison between regional water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, A.; McSpirit, S.; Sims, C.D.

    2007-10-15

    In 2000, a coal slurry impoundment failure in Martin County, Kentucky, caused concerns about contaminants entering municipal water supplies. Water samples taken from impacted and reference area hot water tanks often exceeded US EPA drinking water guidelines. Concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Pb had maxima of 119; 51.9; 154; 170,000; 976,000; 8,710; and 12,700 {mu}g/L, respectively. Significantly different metal accumulation between counties indicated this procedure's utility for assessing long-term municipal water quality. Correlations between metal concentrations were strong and consistent for As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Co, and Fe indicating that some metals accumulate proportionally with others.

  9. Analysis of microstructure-dependent shock dissipation and hot-spot formation in granular metalized explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Sunada; Gonthier, Keith A.

    2016-07-01

    Variations in the microstructure of granular explosives (i.e., particle packing density, size, shape, and composition) can affect their shock sensitivity by altering thermomechanical fields at the particle-scale during pore collapse within shocks. If the deformation rate is fast, hot-spots can form, ignite, and interact, resulting in burn at the macro-scale. In this study, a two-dimensional finite and discrete element technique is used to simulate and examine shock-induced dissipation and hot-spot formation within low density explosives (68%-84% theoretical maximum density (TMD)) consisting of large ensembles of HMX (C4H8N8O8) and aluminum (Al) particles (size ˜ 60 -360 μm). Emphasis is placed on identifying how the inclusion of Al influences effective shock dissipation and hot-spot fields relative to equivalent ensembles of neat/pure HMX for shocks that are sufficiently strong to eliminate porosity. Spatially distributed hot-spot fields are characterized by their number density and area fraction enabling their dynamics to be described in terms of nucleation, growth, and agglomeration-dominated phases with increasing shock strength. For fixed shock particle speed, predictions indicate that decreasing packing density enhances shock dissipation and hot-spot formation, and that the inclusion of Al increases dissipation relative to neat HMX by pressure enhanced compaction resulting in fewer but larger HMX hot-spots. Ensembles having bimodal particle sizes are shown to significantly affect hot-spot dynamics by altering the spatial distribution of hot-spots behind shocks.

  10. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  11. Imaging challenges in 20nm and 14nm logic nodes: hot spots performance in Metal1 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshkov, V.; Rio, D.; Liu, H.; Gillijns, W.; Wang, J.; Wong, P.; Van Den Heuvel, D.; Wiaux, V.; Nikolsky, P.; Finders, J.

    2013-10-01

    The 20nm Metal1 layer, based on ARM standard cells, has a 2D design with minimum pitch of 64nm. This 2D design requires a Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE) double patterning. The whole design is divided in 2 splits: Me1A and Me1B. But solution of splitting conflicts needs stitching at some locations, what requires good Critical Dimension (CD) and overlay control to provide reliable contact between 2 stitched line ends. ASML Immersion NXT tools are aimed at 20 and 14nm logic production nodes. Focus control requirements become tighter, as existing 20nm production logic layouts, based on ARM, have about 50-60nm focus latitude and tight CD Uniformity (CDU) specifications, especially for line ends. IMEC inspected 20nm production Metal1 ARM standard cells with a Negative Tone Development (NTD) process using the Process Window Qualification-like technique experimentally and by Brion Tachyon LMC by simulations. Stronger defects were found thru process variations. A calibrated Tachyon model proved a good overall predictability capability for this process. Selected defects are likely to be transferred to hard mask during etch. Further, CDU inspection was performed for these critical features. Hot spots showed worse CD uniformity than specifications. Intra-field CDU contribution is significant in overall CDU budget, where reticle has major impact due to high MEEF of hot spots. Tip-to-Tip and tip-to-line hot spots have high MEEF and its variation over the field. Best focus variation range was determined by best focus offsets between hot spots and its variation within the field.

  12. Hot Carrier Transport at the Graphene-Metal Interface Induced by Strong Lateral Photo-Dember Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Hua; Chang, You-Chia; Dissanayake, Nanditha; Zhang, Yaozhong; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-03-01

    Ultrafast photo-excitation in a semiconductor can lead to transient spatial charge gradient if electrons and holes have different drift velocities. The charge gradient builds up the transient electric field and causes the subsequent terahertz pulse emission. This phenomenon, known as the photo-Dember effect, was typically considered insignificant in graphene due to its similar electron and hole mobilities. Here, we observe hot carrier transport at the graphene-metal interface driven by the photo-Dember electric field under femtosecond pulse laser excitation. The polarity of hot carrier transport is determined by the asymmetry of electron and hole mobilities of the graphene device and cannot be flipped sign by tuning graphene doping level. This indicates the formation of strong photo-Dember field, dominating over the graphene/metal built-in electric field or thermal electric field. We further analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the transient electric field near the contact edge by using the drift-diffusion model. The modeling results suggest that strong photo-Dember effect is caused by the low electronic specific heat of graphene and a huge charge gradient near the graphene-metal interface under pulse laser excitation. This work was supported from the Donors of the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund and the U-M/SJTU Collaborative Research Program in Renewable Energy Science and Technology.

  13. Monte Carlo calculations for metal-semiconductor hot-electron injection via tunnel-junction emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Narayanamurti, V.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed description of a scheme to calculate the injection current for metal-semiconductor systems using tunnel-junction electron emission. We employ a Monte Carlo framework for integrating over initial free-electron states in a metallic emitter and use interfacial scattering at the metal-semiconductor interface as an independent parameter. These results have implications for modeling metal-base transistors and ballistic electron emission microscopy and spectroscopy.

  14. BROAD H I ABSORBERS AS METALLICITY-INDEPENDENT TRACERS OF THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; Shull, J. Michael E-mail: john.stocke@colorado.ed

    2010-02-10

    Thermally broadened Lyalpha absorbers (BLAs) offer an alternative method to highly ionized metal lines for tracing the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) at T>10{sup 5} K. However, observing BLAs requires data of high quality and accurate continuum definition to detect the low-contrast features, and a good knowledge of the velocity structure to differentiate multiple blended components from a single broad line. Even for well-characterized absorption profiles, disentangling the thermal line width from the various thermal and non-thermal contributors to the observed line width is ambiguous. We compile a catalog of reliable BLA candidates along seven active galactic nucleus sight lines from a larger set of Lyalpha absorbers observed by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We compare our measurements based on independent reduction and analysis of the data to those published by other research groups. We examine the detailed structure of each absorber and determine a reliable line width and column density. Purported BLAs are grouped into probable (15), possible (48), and non-BLA (56) categories. Combining the first two categories, we infer a line frequency (dN/dz){sub BLA}=18+-11, comparable to observed O VI absorbers, also thought to trace the WHIM. We discuss the overlap between BLA and O VI absorbers (20%-40%) and the distribution of BLAs in relation to nearby galaxies (O VI detections in BLAs are found closer to galaxies than O VI nondetections). We assume that the line width determined through a multi-line curve of growth (COG) is a close approximation to the thermal line width. Based on 164 measured COG H I line measurements, we statistically correct the observed line widths via a Monte Carlo simulation. Gas temperature and neutral fraction f{sub H{sub I}} are inferred from these statistically corrected line widths and lead to a distribution of total hydrogen columns. Summing the total column density over the total

  15. Thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface under controlled parametric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Purna Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper. The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures, plate thickness, water flow rate, nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface. The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate, heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined. Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length, 120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm, 6 mm, and 8 mm respectively were tested. The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface. Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e, 4 mm thick plates. Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling. At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar, maximum cooling rates 670°C/s and average cooling rate of 305.23°C/s were achieved for a temperature of 850°C of the steel plate.

  16. The study of metal sulphide nanomaterials obtained by chemical bath deposition and hot-injection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraeva, E. V.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Forostyanaya, N. A.; Levitskiy, V. S.; Mazing, D. S.; Maskaeva, L. N.; Markov, V. Ph; Moshnikov, V. A.; Shupta, A. A.; Spivak, Yu M.; Tulenin, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study lead sulphide - cadmium sulphide based layers were obtained through chemical deposition of water solutions and cadmium sulphide quantum dots were formed through hot-injection technique. The article discusses the results of surface investigations with the use of atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurements.

  17. Valley-Coherent Hot Carriers and Thermal Relaxation in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Kallatt, Sangeeth; Umesh, Govindarao; Majumdar, Kausik

    2016-06-01

    We show room-temperature valley coherence in MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, and WSe2 monolayers using linear polarization-resolved hot photoluminescence (PL) at energies close to the excitation, demonstrating preservation of valley coherence before sufficient scattering events. The features of the copolarized hot luminescence allow us to extract the lower bound of the binding energy of the A exciton in monolayer MoS2 as 0.42 (±0.02) eV. The broadening of the PL peak is found to be dominated by a Boltzmann-type hot luminescence tail, and using the slope of the exponential decay, the carrier temperature is extracted in situ at different stages of energy relaxation. The temperature of the emitted optical phonons during the relaxation process is probed by exploiting the corresponding broadening of the Raman peaks due to temperature-induced anharmonic effects. The findings provide a physical picture of photogeneration of valley-coherent hot carriers and their subsequent energy relaxation pathways. PMID:27194380

  18. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  19. A HOT URANUS ORBITING THE SUPER METAL-RICH STAR HD 77338 AND THE METALLICITY-MASS CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, J. S.; Hoyer, S.; Jones, M. I.; Rojo, P.; Day-Jones, A. C.; Ruiz, M. T.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, M.; Barnes, J. R.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Pinfield, D. J.; Murgas, F.; Ivanyuk, O.; Jordan, A.

    2013-04-01

    We announce the discovery of a low-mass planet orbiting the super metal-rich K0V star HD 77338 as part of our ongoing Calan-Hertfordshire Extrasolar Planet Search. The best-fit planet solution has an orbital period of 5.7361 {+-} 0.0015 days and with a radial velocity semi-amplitude of only 5.96 {+-} 1.74 ms{sup -1}, we find a minimum mass of 15.9{sup +4.7}{sub -5.3} M{sub Circled-Plus }. The best-fit eccentricity from this solution is 0.09{sup +0.25}{sub -0.09}, and we find agreement for this data set using a Bayesian analysis and a periodogram analysis. We measure a metallicity for the star of +0.35 {+-} 0.06 dex, whereas another recent work finds +0.47 {+-} 0.05 dex. Thus HD 77338b is one of the most metal-rich planet-host stars known and the most metal-rich star hosting a sub-Neptune-mass planet. We searched for a transit signature of HD 77338b but none was detected. We also highlight an emerging trend where metallicity and mass seem to correlate at very low masses, a discovery that would be in agreement with the core accretion model of planet formation. The trend appears to show that for Neptune-mass planets and below, higher masses are preferred when the host star is more metal-rich. Also a lower boundary is apparent in the super metal-rich regime where there are no very low mass planets yet discovered in comparison to the sub-solar metallicity regime. A Monte Carlo analysis shows that this low-mass planet desert is statistically significant with the current sample of 36 planets at the {approx}4.5{sigma} level. In addition, results from Kepler strengthen the claim for this paucity of the lowest-mass planets in super metal-rich systems. Finally, this discovery adds to the growing population of low-mass planets around low-mass and metal-rich stars and shows that very low mass planets can now be discovered with a relatively small number of data points using stable instrumentation.

  20. Trap Profiling Based on Frequency Varied Charge Pumping Method for Hot Carrier Stressed Thin Gate Oxide Metal Oxide Semiconductors Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pyungho; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Sangsub; Kim, Soonkon; Javadi, Reza; Park, Hyoungsun; Choi, Byoungdeog

    2016-05-01

    In this study, pulse frequency and reverse bias voltage is modified in charge pumping and advanced technique is presented to extract oxide trap profile in hot carrier stressed thin gate oxide metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). Carrier trapping-detrapping in a gate oxide was analyzed after hot carrier stress and the relationship between trapping depth and frequency was investigated. Hot carrier induced interface traps appears in whole channel area but induced border traps mainly appears in above pinch-off region near drain and gradually decreases toward center of the channel. Thus, hot carrier stress causes interface trap generation in whole channel area while most border trap generation occurs in the drain region under the gate. Ultimately, modified charge pumping method was performed to get trap density distribution of hot carrier stressed MOSFET devices, and the trapping-detrapping mechanism is also analyzed. PMID:27483833

  1. Hot electron transport in a strongly correlated transition-metal oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Kumari Gaurav; Yajima, Takeaki; Parui, Subir; Kemper, Alexander F.; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Banerjee, Tamalika

    2013-01-01

    Oxide heterointerfaces are ideal for investigating strong correlation effects to electron transport, relevant for oxide-electronics. Using hot-electrons, we probe electron transport perpendicular to the La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO)- Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb:STO) interface and find the characteristic hot-electron attenuation length in LSMO to be 1.48 ± 0.10 unit cells (u.c.) at −1.9 V, increasing to 2.02 ± 0.16 u.c. at −1.3 V at room temperature. Theoretical analysis of this energy dispersion reveals the dominance of electron-electron and polaron scattering. Direct visualization of the local electron transport shows different transmission at the terraces and at the step-edges. PMID:23429420

  2. Observations of the Hot Horizontal Branch Stars in the Metal-Rich Bulge Globular Cluster NGC 6388

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moehler, S.; Sweigart, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-rich bulge globular cluster NGC 6388 shows a distinct blue horizontal-branch tail in its colour-magnitude diagram (Rich et al. 1997) and is thus a strong case of the well-known 2nd Parameter Problem. In addition, its horizontal branch (HB) shows an upward tilt toward bluer colours, which cannot be explained by canonical evolutionary models. Several non-canonical scenarios have been proposed to explain these puzzling observations. In order to test the predictions of these scenarios, we have obtained medium resolution spectra to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of the blue HB stars in NGC 6388.Using the medium resolution spectra, we determine effective temperatures, surface gravities and helium abundances by fitting the observed Balmer and helium lines with appropriate theoretical stellar spectra. As we know the distance to the cluster, we can verify our results by determining masses for the stars. During the data reduction we took special care to correctly subtract the background, which is dominated by the overlapping spectra of cool stars. The cool blue tail stars in our sample with T(sub eff) approximately 10000 K have lower than canonical surface gravities, suggesting that these stars are, on average, approximately equal to 0.4 mag brighter than canonical HB stars in agreement with the observed upward slope of the HB in NGC 6388. Moreover, the mean mass of these stars agrees well with theoretical predictions. In contrast, the hot blue tail stars in our sample with T(sub eff) greater than or equal to 12000 K show significantly lower surface gravities than predicted by any scenario, which can reproduce the photometric observations. Their masses are also too low by about a factor of 2 compared to theoretical predictions. The physical parameters of the blue HB stars at about 10,000 K support the helium pollution scenario. The low gravities and masses of the hot blue tail stars, however, are probably caused by problems with the data reduction

  3. Hot Electron Scattering in Thin Metal Films Utilizing Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durcan, Christopher; Nolting, Westly; Balsano, Robert; Labella, Vincent

    Electron scattering in nm-thick metal films has fundamental and technological importance. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM) an STM based technique can be utilized to measure the scattering rate and understand the scattering mechanisms. By injecting electrons from the STM tip in the energy range of 0.2 eV- 1.5 eV into the metal base of a metal semiconductor diode and measuring the amount of current collected in the semiconductor a Schottky barrier height can be measured. In addition, by measuring the decay in the collector or BEEM current vs. metal film thickness, an electron attenuation length can be measured. One question has always been; what are these BEEM attenuation lengths sensitive to? Intrinsic properties of the metal, or extrinsic effects such as the structure of the film? By measuring the attenuation length of W and Cr and comparing to prior measurements of Cu, Ag, Au a comparison between the BEEM attenuation length and resistivity can be achieved over an order of magnitude in resistivity. The results show an inverse relationship that one expects for mean free path and resistivity, indicating that BEEM measurements are sensitive to the intrinsic properties of the metal and not solely the structure of the films.

  4. Automated nondestructive evaluation method for characterizing ceramic and metallic hot gas filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Deemer, C.; Pastilla, P.; Wheeler, B.; Forster, G. A.

    2002-06-03

    In advanced coal-fired power generation, one technology under development to clean up hot gases before their use as fuel for gas turbines is rigid ceramic candle filters. These porous filters are typically 1.5 m long and 60 mm in diameter and are made of various ceramic materials, including clay-bonded SiC. The high costs of downtime in a large utility demands that nondestructive evaluation/characterization (NDE/C) methods be available. At shutdowns, data from such analysis are needed to decide which filters are still usable and which need to be replaced, and if possible, to estimate the remaining lifetimes. Thus our objective was to develop reliable low-cost NDE technology for these filters. Our approach was to develop NDE/C technology, referred to as acousto-ultrasonics (AU), for application to hot gas filters. Lamb waves generated by the AU method were analyzed to derive a stress wave factor (SWF). This technology was tested by comparing SWF data with the measured strength for a variety of rigid ceramic filters and was shown to work on iron-aluminide filters as well but no strength data have been obtained on the iron-aluminides at this time.

  5. Hot, Massive Stars in the Extremely Metal-Poor Galaxy, I Zw 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-enhanced metal-poor galaxy, I Zw 18, is the Rosetta Stone for understanding galaxies in the early universe by providing constraints on the IMF of massive stars, the role of galaxies in reionization of the universe, mixing of newly synthesized material in the ISM, and gamma-ray bursts at low metallicity, and on the earliest generations of stars producing the observed abundance pattern. We describe these constraints as derived from analyses of HST/COS spectra of I Zw 18 including stellar atmosphere analysis and photo-ionization modeling of both the emission and absorption spectra of the nebular material and interstellar medium.

  6. Identifying Hot-Spots of Metal Contamination in Campus Dust of Xi'an, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Lu, Xinwei; Gao, Tianning; Chang, Yuyu

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in campus dust from kindergartens, elementary schools, middle schools, and universities in the city of Xi'an, China, were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The pollution levels and hotspots of metals were analyzed using a geoaccumulation index and Local Moran's I, an indicator of spatial association, respectively. The dust samples from the campuses had metal concentrations higher than background levels, especially for Pb, Zn, Co, Cu, Cr, and Ba. The pollution assessment indicated that the campus dusts were not contaminated with As, Mn, Ni, or V, were moderately or not contaminated with Ba and Cr and were moderately to strongly contaminated with Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Local Moran's I analysis detected the locations of spatial clusters and outliers and indicated that the pollution with these 10 metals occurred in significant high-high spatial clusters, low-high, or even high-low spatial outliers. As, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn had important high-high patterns in the center of Xi'an. The western and southwestern regions of the study area, i.e., areas of old and high-tech industries, have strongly contributed to the Co content in the campus dust. PMID:27271645

  7. Identifying Hot-Spots of Metal Contamination in Campus Dust of Xi’an, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Lu, Xinwei; Gao, Tianning; Chang, Yuyu

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in campus dust from kindergartens, elementary schools, middle schools, and universities in the city of Xi’an, China, were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The pollution levels and hotspots of metals were analyzed using a geoaccumulation index and Local Moran’s I, an indicator of spatial association, respectively. The dust samples from the campuses had metal concentrations higher than background levels, especially for Pb, Zn, Co, Cu, Cr, and Ba. The pollution assessment indicated that the campus dusts were not contaminated with As, Mn, Ni, or V, were moderately or not contaminated with Ba and Cr and were moderately to strongly contaminated with Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Local Moran’s I analysis detected the locations of spatial clusters and outliers and indicated that the pollution with these 10 metals occurred in significant high-high spatial clusters, low-high, or even high-low spatial outliers. As, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn had important high-high patterns in the center of Xi’an. The western and southwestern regions of the study area, i.e., areas of old and high-tech industries, have strongly contributed to the Co content in the campus dust. PMID:27271645

  8. Electron-electron scattering-induced channel hot electron injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors with high-k/metal gate stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Ho, Szu-Han; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-10-06

    This work investigates electron-electron scattering (EES)-induced channel hot electron (CHE) injection in nanoscale n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (n-MOSFETs) with high-k/metal gate stacks. Many groups have proposed new models (i.e., single-particle and multiple-particle process) to well explain the hot carrier degradation in nanoscale devices and all mechanisms focused on Si-H bond dissociation at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. However, for high-k dielectric devices, experiment results show that the channel hot carrier trapping in the pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. Therefore, we propose a model of EES-induced CHE injection to illustrate the trapping-dominant mechanism in nanoscale n-MOSFETs with high-k/metal gate stacks.

  9. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  10. [Study of physical-mechanic characteristics of prosthetic construction after their adjustment with the use of laser welding and hot metal adding].

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, R Sh; Rusanov, F S; Mikhas'kov, S V

    2011-01-01

    Study of physical-mechanic characteristics of connecting joints of beam construction after laser welding and hot metal adding was performed. Increase of microhardness of joints as well as small reduction of bending strength of prosthetic constructions was established. PMID:21983619

  11. Stress-and-Strain Analysis Of Hot Metal/Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Macroscopic mechanical properties derived from micromechanics. Stress-and-strain equations developed to express microscopic and macroscopic mechanical properties of metals reinforced by unidirectional fibers, over range of temperatures. New equations reduce computational load by providing approximate, closed-form expressions for microscopic and pseudohomogeneous anisotropic properties of single ply reinforced by unidirectional fibers. Typical application is calculation of residual stress in newly manufactured article.

  12. Triangulum II: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Hot Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Rich, R. Michael; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chapman, Scott C.; Koch, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (< {v}{{r}}> =-{383.7}-3.3+3.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1) that translates to < {v}{{r},{gsr}}> ≃ -264 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from {4.4}-2.0+2.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 in the central 2\\prime to {14.1}-4.2+5.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be {σ }{vr}={9.9}-2.2+3.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity < {{[Fe/H]}}> =-2.6+/- 0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.

  13. Investigation of surface roughness and lay on metal flow in hot forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, David J.

    A study was conducted to explore the possibility of using machining marks (i.e. surface roughness and lay) as a parameter for die design. The study was performed using 6061-T6 aluminum 1.25" diameter rounds and 0.25" square bar stock to investigate the effects of temperature, surface roughness, and lay on metal flow and friction factor. Metal flow was assessed using component true strains and spread ratio. Compression testing was performed using an instrumented die set that was mounted on a 10 ton hydraulic pres. Cigar tests were performed where the axis of the specimen were oriented at angles of 0 o, 45o and 90o with respect to the surface lay on the compression platens. Ring tests were completed to quantify friction factor at different die temperatures and surface roughness values. Results indicate that die temperature has a strong effect on bulge radius and friction factor. Lay and surface roughness were found to exhibit an effect on metal flow but surface lay of the dies was not discernible on friction factor. The study was repeated under limited conditions using graphite lubricant in order to discover if the trend was repeatable using conditions observed in industry. This was found to be the case.

  14. XO-2b: Transiting Hot Jupiter in a Metal-rich Common Proper Motion Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Janes, Kenneth A.; Heasley, J. N.; Summers, F. J.; Stys, J. E.; Bissinger, R.; Fleenor, Michael L.; Foote, Cindy N.; García-Melendo, Enrique; Gary, Bruce L.; Howell, P. J.; Mallia, F.; Masi, G.; Taylor, B.; Vanmunster, T.

    2007-12-01

    We report on a V=11.2 early K dwarf, XO-2 (GSC 03413-00005), that hosts a Rp=0.98+/-0.030.01 RJ, Mp=0.57+/-0.06 MJ transiting extrasolar planet, XO-2b, with an orbital period of 2.615857+/-0.000005 days. XO-2 has high metallicity, [Fe/H]=0.45+/-0.02, high proper motion, μtot=157 mas yr-1, and a common proper motion stellar companion with 31" separation. The two stars are nearly identical twins, with very similar spectra and apparent magnitudes. Due to the high metallicity, these early K dwarf stars have a mass and radius close to solar, M*=0.98+/-0.02 Msolar and R*=0.97+/-0.020.01 Rsolar. The high proper motion of XO-2 results from an eccentric orbit (Galactic pericenter, Rper<4 kpc) well confined to the Galactic disk (Zmax~100 pc). In addition, the phase-space position of XO-2 is near the Hercules dynamical stream, which points to an origin of XO-2 in the metal-rich, inner thin disk and subsequent dynamical scattering into the solar neighborhood. We describe an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for calculating the Bayesian posterior probability of the system parameters from a transit light curve.

  15. Elemental Abundance Analyses with DAO Spectrograms. XXXVI. The Hot Metallic Line Stars Theta Leonis and Omicron Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Gulliver, Austin F.; Heaton, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    This series contains high-quality LTE elemental abundance analyses of sharp-lined and moderately rotating normal and peculiar Main Sequence Band B, A, and F stars. Their compositions were determined for comparison with analyses of somewhat similar stars and with theoretical predictions. Here we provide new and improved elemental abundances analyses for the well-studied hot metallic line stars θ Leonis and o Pegasi to better understand their relationship with other A stars. The analyses, which employ Kurucz's ATLAS9 model atmospheres and WIDTH9 codes and high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectrograms obtained with Reticon and CCD detectors, are consistent with our previous analyses based upon coadded photographic plates. The spectral synthesis program STELLAR is used with the fluxes, the Hγ profiles, and the spectra to provide better estimates of the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity. The agreement of the results for two species of the same element are usually improved. The errors have been slightly reduced compared to those of their previous analyses using DAO spectrograms. Abundances of additional elements have been determined. The very high S/N (>=500) spectra of o Peg (used previously for the stellar atlas of Gulliver et al.) were critical to finding the weakest lines and to defining the profiles of all lines. High-quality spectrograms of additional regions especially those longward of Hβ can be used to obtain some missing elemental abundances in both stars.

  16. Efficient and Robust Thermoelectric Power Generation Device Using Hot-Pressed Metal Contacts on Nanostructured Half-Heusler Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Giri; Poudel, Bed

    2016-06-01

    We report an efficient thermoelectric device with power density of 8.9 W/cm2 and efficiency of 8.9% at 678°C temperature difference using hot-pressed titanium metal contact layers on nanostructured half-Heusler materials. The high power density and efficiency are due to the efficient nanostructured materials and very low contact resistance of ~1 μΩ cm2 between the titanium layer and half-Heusler material. Moreover, the bonding strength between the titanium and half-Heusler is more than 50 MPa, significantly higher compared with conventional contact metallization methods. The low contact resistance and high bonding strength are due to thin-layer diffusion of titanium (<100 μm) into the half-Heusler at high temperature (>600°C). The low contact resistance and high bonding strength result in a stable and efficient power generation device with great potential for use in recovery of waste heat, e.g., in automotive and industrial applications.

  17. Vapor Explosion of Coolant Jet When Penetrating a Hot Molten Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Perets, Y.; Harari, R.; Sher, E.

    2005-06-15

    The vapor explosion phenomenon is investigated experimentally for a geometrical arrangement in which a cold liquid (water) jet is injected into a hot liquid surface (tin). Medium-scale experiments using 1 kg of molten tin were performed in an open geometry experiment system. In the first phase of the research, the influence of the injection mass flow rate on the likelihood of vapor explosion was investigated in order to map the various relevant regimes. In the second phase, the influence of some selected parameters on the interaction was studied to characterize the relevant parameters of the vapor explosion phenomenon.The range of the initial tin and water temperatures that leads to vapor explosion has been determined in order to define the thermal interaction zone. It is noticed that vapor explosion can occur at high water temperatures even near the saturation point. The delay time for the explosion to occur and the degree of the interaction violence were correlated with the initial tin and water temperatures. We also clarified the triggering point and noted a correlation between the quench temperature and the likelihood of the vapor explosion occurrence.

  18. Fused-salt-liquid-metal corrosion of refractory alloys in the presence of hot cell impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.; Raraz, A.G.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1997-09-01

    The pyrochemical conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is currently being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). One aspect of this program is to develop a lithium preprocessing stage for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF). Furthermore, a pilot scale of this preprocessing stage is being designed by ANL-W to demonstrate the in situ hot cell capability of this process. In this pilot scale system, fused lithium chloride salt is saturated with molten lithium to form a powerful fluxing compound with a vigorous reducing agent. During this stage of the fuel conditioning, the reduction will take place at a nominal temperature of 650 C in an argon-cell atmosphere contaminated with up to 10,000 ppm nitrogen, 100 ppm oxygen and 100 ppm of moisture. The maximum local temperature was calculated to be 725 C on the inner shell of the reduction vessel during operation. One of the significant concerns of this project is the system`s corrosion response in the presence of irradiated commercial fuel as well as atmospheric impurities. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the potential corrosivity of the salt matrix in a worse case environment as well as provide a boundary for allowable impurities in the system during operation.

  19. Hot isostatic pressing of SiC particulate reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, N.L.; Wei, Z.; Xu, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Two as-cast SiC particulate reinforced A359-based composites were hot isostatically pressed for a fixed length of time but at various pressures (in the range 100--150 MPa) and temperatures (in the range 450--550 C). It was found that HIP treatment generally increased the ductility but reduced the yield stress drastically. The improvement of ductility was attributed to a reduction of the porosity levels. Quantitative image analyses showed that the HIP treatment reduced the porosity levels significantly. It is of interest to observe that increasing HIP temperature is more effective than increasing HIP pressure in terms of improvement in strength and ductility. Another interesting observation is that most eutectic Si particles were spheroidized during HIP. The spheroidization of Si was believed to contribute to the improvement of mechanical properties, because fracture initiation of the composites was observed to be related to either the breaking of Si particles or the debonding of Si particles from the nearby SiC particles.

  20. Hot gas metallicity and the history of supernova activity in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael; Mathews, William G.

    1991-01-01

    Calculations of the dynamical evolution of the hot interstellar medium (ISM) in a massive elliptical galaxy are described, with a variety of past variations of the SN rate being assumed. The investigation focuses on iron enrichment in the ISM. The equivalent widths of the 6.7-keV iron line are calculated as a function of redshift and of galactic projected radius. The present-day interstellar gas in elliptical galaxies contains a fossil record of past SN activity that can be determined from measurements of iron line equivalent widths at several projected radii in the galaxy. It is proposed that the ISM iron abundance is likely to be quite inhomogeneous. The hydrogen-free ejecta of type Ia SN also result in pronounced ISM abundance inhomogeneities that probably eventually cool and move in pressure equilibrium with the local ISM flow velocity. The 6.7-keV iron line emission is greater if the iron is confined to ionized regions of pure iron.

  1. Literature review of metal corrosion sensitivity in high temperature, high impurity hot cell atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.S.

    1997-09-01

    The pyrochemical conditions of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). One aspect of this program is to develop a lithium preprocessing stage for the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF). One of the design considerations under investigation in this program is the system`s corrosion response in the presence of irradiated commercial fuel as well as atmospheric impurities. Static corrosion coupon tests have been completed which demonstrate the potential corrosivity of the salt matrix in a worse case environment as well as provide a boundary for allowable impurities in the system during operation. The literature concerning corrosion of either fused salts or molten metals consistently emphasizes three similar features which are common to both systems: (1) the overall corrosion rate is strongly dependent on temperature, impurity concentration and flow velocity; (2) many different mechanisms can be involved in a specific corrosion process; and (3) corrosion rates will significantly increase as all three of these independent variables are increased. The qualitative and quantitative understanding of these corrosion results is important for this spent fuel program since all of these variables will increase as the process scale increases. The purpose of this work was to determine if any data existed which could provide a quantitative expectation for corrosion rates of refractory metals in a lithium chloride salt bath.

  2. The Hanford spent nuclear metal fuel multi-canister overpack and vacuum drying {ampersand} hot conditioning process

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.J.

    1996-05-15

    Nuclear production reactors operated at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site from 1944 until 1988 to produce plutonium. Most of the irradiated fuel from these reactors was processed onsite to separate and recover the plutonium. When the processing facilities were closed in 1992, about 1,900 metric tons of unprocessed irradiated fuel remained in storage. Additional fuel was irradiated for research purposes or was shipped to the Hanford Site from offsite reactor facilities for storage or recovery of nuclear materials. The fuel inventory now in storage at the Hanford Site is predominantly N Reactor irradiated fuel, a metallic uranium alloy that is coextruded into zircaloy-2 cladding. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has rommitted to an accelerated schedule for removing spent nuclear fuel from the Hanford Site K Basins to a new interim storage facility in the 200 Area. Under the current proposed accelerated schedule, retrieval of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K East and West Basins must begin by December 1997 and be completed by December 1999. A key part of this action is retrieving fuel canisters from the water-filled K Basin storage pools and transferring them into multi@ister overpacks (MCOS) that will be used to handle and process the fuel, then store it after conditioning. The Westinghouse Hanford Company has developed an integrated process to deal with the K Basin spent fuel inventory. The process consists of cleaning the fuel, packaging it into MCOS, vacuum drying it at the K Basins, then transporting it to the Canister Storage Building (CSB) for staging, hot conditioning, and interim storage. This presentation dekribes the MCO function, design, and life-cycle, including an overview of the vacuum drying and hot conditioning processes.

  3. Synergistic effects of plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 and immobilizers on the growth and heavy metal accumulation of edible tissues of hot pepper.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; He, Lin-Yan; Wang, Qi; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2016-07-15

    A plant growth-promoting Neorhizobium huautlense T1-17 was evaluated for its immobilization of Cd and Pb in solution. Meanwhile, the impacts of T1-17, immobilizers (vermiculite and peat) and their combination on the fruit biomass and heavy metal accumulation of hot pepper were characterized. T1-17 could significantly reduced water-soluble Cd and Pb in solution. T1-17, vermiculite+T1-17, peat, and peat+T1-17 significantly increased the fruit biomass (ranging from 45% to 269%) and decreased the fruit Cd (ranging from 66% to 87%) and Pb (ranging from 30% to 56%) contents and water-soluble Cd and Pb (ranging from 23% to 59%) contents of the rhizosphere soils compared to the controls. T1-17+vermiculite or peat had higher ability to increase the fruit biomass than T1-17 or vermiculite or peat. Furthermore, T1-17+peat had higher ability to reduce the water-soluble Cd and Pb contents of the rhizosphere soil and the fruit Pb uptake of hot pepper. The results showed that T1-17 and the immobilizers alleviated the heavy metal toxicity and decreased the fruit heavy metal uptake of hot pepper. The results also showed the synergistic effects of T1-17 and the immobilizers on the growth and Cd and Pb accumulation of hot pepper. PMID:27017398

  4. XO-2b: A Transiting Hot Jupiter in a Metal-rich Common Proper Motion Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher J.; McCullough, P. R.; Valenti, J. A.; Summers, F. J.; Stys, J. E.; Johns-Krull, C. M.; Janes, K. A.; Heasley, J. N.; Bissinger, R.; Fleenor, M.; Foote, C. N.; Garcia-Melendo, E.; Gary, B. L.; Howell, P. J.; Mallia, F.; Masi, G.; Vanmunster, T.

    2007-05-01

    XO-2b, the second transiting extrasolar planet from the XO Project (McCullough et al. 2005), is approximately Jupiter-size and 0.6 Jupiter-mass with an orbital period of 2.6 days. The stellar host, XO-2, is a V=11.2, early K dwarf which is metal rich, [Fe/H]=+0.44. XO-2 has a high proper motion, 157 mas/yr, and has a common proper motion stellar companion with half arcmin separation. The two stars are nearly identical twins, with very similar spectra and apparent magnitudes. The global network of amateur and professional astronomers organized by the XO project confirmed the XO-2b transit light curve two days after being notified that it was a high-priority candidate, and radial velocities confirmed its planetary mass eight days after that.

  5. HATS-4b: A dense hot Jupiter transiting a super metal-rich G star

    SciTech Connect

    Jordán, Andrés; Brahm, Rafael; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Bhatti, W.; De Val Borro, M.; Bayliss, D.; Zhou, G.; Mancini, L.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Ciceri, S.; Csák, B.; Henning, T.; Sato, B.; Buchhave, L.; and others

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P ≈ 2.5167 days, mass of M{sub p} ≈ 1.32 M {sub Jup}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 1.02 R {sub Jup}, and density of ρ {sub p} = 1.55 ± 0.16 g cm{sup –3} ≈1.24 ρ{sub Jup}. The host star has a mass of 1.00 M {sub ☉}, a radius of 0.92 R {sub ☉}, and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]=0.43 ± 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1 and 2 M {sub J} and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 M {sub ⊕}. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurements, and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique for simultaneously estimating vsin i and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.

  6. Multiscale and Fractal Analysis of Silicon Content Time Series Observed in Blast Furnace Hot Metal Using Hurst Exponent Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shihua; Guo, Fan; Lai, Dejian; Yan, Fang; Tang, Feilai

    2015-09-01

    Hurst exponent is an important measure of nonlinearity of dynamical time series. In this paper, using rescaled-range (R/S) analysis, multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) methods, the multiscale Hurst exponent (MHE) and the multiscale generalized Hurst exponent (MGHE) of coarse-grained silicon content ([Si]) time series in blast furnace (BF) hot metal were calculated. First, we collected these [Si] time series from No. 1 BF of Nanchang Iron and Steel Co. and No. 10 BF of Xinyu Iron and Steel Co. in Jiangxi Province, China. Then, we analyzed and compared the estimated Hurst exponents and the generalized Hurst exponent of these observed time series with some simulated time series. Our results show that the observed time series from these BFs have negative correlation with the Hurst exponent less than 0.5, the generalized Hurst exponent H(q) is a nonlinear function of q, and such negative correlation and local various structure persist in their moving averages of the observed time series up to lag 5 or 10.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy of hot helium-rich white dwarfs: metal abundances along the cooling sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreizler, S.

    1999-12-01

    Metal abundances are the indicators of the chemical evolution in white dwarfs, which is dominated by the element separation due to the strong gravitational field. A reliable analysis and interpretation requires high resolution and high signal-to-noise UV spectroscopy. For hot helium rich DO white dwarfs this is currently only feasible with the Hubble Space Telescope. In this paper I report on our HST spectroscopy of DO white dwarfs and describe our model atmospheres employed for the analysis. This includes an introduction to our new self-consistent, chemically stratified non-LTE model atmospheres, which take into account gravitational sedimentation and radiative levitation. The results of the analysis shows that DO white dwarfs can best be fitted with chemically homogeneous models, whereas stratified models show significant deviations. Several possible reasons for this unexpected result are discussed. At the current stage, weak mass loss is the most plausible explanation. Based on observations obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555

  8. Carbon formation and metal dusting in hot-gas cleanup systems of coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, H.J.; Judkins, R.R.

    1995-06-01

    The product gas resulting from the partial oxidation of carboniferous materials in a gasifier consists predominantly of CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and, for air-blown units, N{sub 2} in various proportions at temperatures ranging from about 400 to 1000{degree}C. Depending on the source of the fuel, smaller concentrations of H{sub 2}S, COS, and NH{sub 3} can also be present. The gas phase is typically characterized by high carbon and sulfur, but low oxygen, activities and, consequently, severe degradation of the structural and functional materials used in the gasifier can occur. Therefore, there are numerous concerns about materials performance in coal gasification systems, particularly at the present time when demonstration-scale projects are in or nearing the construction and operation phases. This study focused on the subset of materials degradation phenomena resulting from carbon formation and carburization processes, which are related to potential operating problems in certain gasification components and subsystems. More specifically, it examined the current state of knowledge regarding carbon deposition and a carbon-related degradation phemonenon known as metal dusting as they affect the long-term operation of the gas clean-up equipment downstream of the gasifier and addressed possible means to mitigate the degradation processes. These effects would be primarily associated with the filtering and cooling of coal-derived fuel gases from the gasifier exit temperature to as low as 400{degree}C. However, some of the consideratins are sufficiently general to cover conditions relevant to other parts of gasification systems.

  9. Trap state passivation improved hot-carrier instability by zirconium-doping in hafnium oxide in a nanoscale n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistors with high-k/metal gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hsi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Chen, Ching-En; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lin, Chien-Yu; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Ye, Yi-Han

    2016-04-01

    This work investigates the effect on hot carrier degradation (HCD) of doping zirconium into the hafnium oxide high-k layer in the nanoscale high-k/metal gate n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. Previous n-metal-oxide semiconductor-field effect transistor studies demonstrated that zirconium-doped hafnium oxide reduces charge trapping and improves positive bias temperature instability. In this work, a clear reduction in HCD is observed with zirconium-doped hafnium oxide because channel hot electron (CHE) trapping in pre-existing high-k bulk defects is the main degradation mechanism. However, this reduced HCD became ineffective at ultra-low temperature, since CHE traps in the deeper bulk defects at ultra-low temperature, while zirconium-doping only passivates shallow bulk defects.

  10. Plasmon Mapping in Metallic Nanostructures and its Application to Single Molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering: Imaging Electromagnetic Hot-Spots and Analyte Location

    SciTech Connect

    Camden, Jon P

    2013-07-16

    A major component of this proposal is to elucidate the connection between optical and electron excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. These accomplishments are reported: developed a routine protocol for obtaining spatially resolved, low energy EELS spectra, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra from the same nanostructures.; correlated optical scattering spectra and plasmon maps obtained using STEM/EELS.; and imaged electromagnetic hot spots responsible for single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS).

  11. An optical transmission spectrum of the transiting hot Jupiter in the metal-poor WASP-98 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giordano, M.; Mollière, P.; Southworth, J.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.

    2016-09-01

    The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multiband photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98 b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g', r', i', z'), using the telescope-defocusing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, [Fe/H] = -0.49 ± 0.10, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.19. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multiband light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98 b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z' compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r' and z' bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6σ and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98 b, of unknown chemical nature.

  12. An optical transmission spectrum of the transiting hot Jupiter in the metal-poor WASP-98 planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.; Giordano, M.; Mollière, P.; Southworth, J.; Brahm, R.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, Th.

    2016-06-01

    The WASP-98 planetary system represents a rare case of a hot Jupiter hosted by a metal-poor main-sequence star. We present a follow-up study of this system based on multi-band photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy. Two new transit events of WASP-98 b were simultaneously observed in four passbands (g', r', i', z'), using the telescope-defocussing technique, yielding eight high-precision light curves with point-to-point scatters of less than 1 mmag. We also collected three spectra of the parent star with a high-resolution spectrograph, which we used to remeasure its spectral characteristics, in particular its metallicity. We found this to be very low, [Fe/H] = -0.49 ± 0.10, but larger than was previously reported, [Fe/H] = -0.60 ± 0.19. We used these new photometric and spectroscopic data to refine the orbital and physical properties of this planetary system, finding that the stellar and planetary mass measurements are significantly larger than those in the discovery paper. In addition, the multi-band light curves were used to construct an optical transmission spectrum of WASP-98 b and probe the characteristics of its atmosphere at the terminator. We measured a lower radius at z' compared with the other three passbands. The maximum variation is between the r' and z' bands, has a confidence level of roughly 6σ and equates to 5.5 pressure scale heights. We compared this spectrum to theoretical models, investigating several possible types of atmospheres, including hazy, cloudy, cloud-free, and clear atmospheres with titanium and vanadium oxide opacities. We could not find a good fit to the observations, except in the extreme case of a clear atmosphere with TiO and VO opacities, in which the condensation of Ti and V was suppressed. As this case is unrealistic, our results suggest the presence of an additional optical-absorbing species in the atmosphere of WASP-98 b, of unknown chemical nature.

  13. Detection of hot, metal-enriched outflowing gas around z ≈ 2.3 star-forming galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Monica L.; Schaye, Joop; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.; Strom, Allison L.

    2015-06-01

    We use quasar absorption lines to study the physical conditions in the circumgalactic medium of redshift z ≈ 2.3 star-forming galaxies taken from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey. In Turner et al. we used the pixel optical depth technique to show that absorption by H I and the metal ions O VI, N V, C IV, C III, and Si IV is strongly enhanced within |Δv| ≲ 170 km s-1 and projected distances |d| ≲ 180 proper kpc from sightlines to the background quasars. Here we demonstrate that the O VI absorption is also strongly enhanced at fixed H I, C IV, and Si IV optical depths, and that this enhancement extends out to ˜350 km s-1. At fixed H I the increase in the median O VI optical depth near galaxies is 0.3-0.7 dex and is detected at 2-3σ confidence for all seven H I bins that have log _{10}τ_{H I} ≥ -1.5. We use ionization models to show that the observed strength of O VI as a function of H I is consistent with enriched, photoionized gas for pixels with τ_{H I} ≳ 10. However, for pixels with τ_{H I} ≲ 1 this would lead to implausibly high metallicities at low densities if the gas were photoionized by the background radiation. This indicates that the galaxies are surrounded by gas that is sufficiently hot to be collisionally ionized (T > 105 K) and that a substantial fraction of the hot gas has a metallicity ≳10-1 of solar. Given the high metallicity and large velocity extent (out to ˜1.5 vcirc) of this gas, we conclude that we have detected hot, metal-enriched outflows arising from star-forming galaxies.

  14. Effects of Hot Carriers on DC and RF Performances of Deep Submicron p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors with Various Oxide Layer Thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mao-Chyuan; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Liao, Wen-Shiang; Chen, David C.; Yeh, Chune-Sin; Chien, Shan-Chieh

    2008-04-01

    In this work, the effects of hot carriers on the DC and RF performances of 45 nm p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (PMOSFETs) with various oxide layer thicknesses were investigated in detail by RF automatic measurements. It was found that a PMOSFET with a thinner oxide layer suffers more serious damage from hot carriers than that with a thicker oxide layer. Also, the greatest degradation occurs at the bias condition when gate stress voltage Vgstr is equal to drain stress voltage Vdstr, and it was found that the degradation of the cutoff frequency fT is dependent on transconductance gm only. This is different from conventional long-channel devices, in which the greatest degradation takes place at Vgstr = Vdstr/2 and when fT is dependent on both gm and the total gate capacitance Cgg (=Cgs+Cgd).

  15. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot-forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.

    1987-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground AISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  16. Surface fatigue and failure characteristics of hot forged powder metal AISI 4620, AISI 4640, and machined AISI 4340 steel spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    Spur gear surface fatigue endurance tests were conducted to investigate hot forged powder metal AISI 4620 and 4640 steel for use as a gear material, to determine endurance characteristics and to compare the results with machined AISI 4340 and 9310 steel gear materials. The as-forged and unground SISI 4620 gear exhibited a 10 percent fatigue life that was approximately one-fourth of that for AISI 9310 and less than one-half that for the AISI 4340 gears. The forged and finish ground AISI 4620 gears exhibited a 10 percent life, approximately 70 percent that of AISI 9310 and slightly better than that of AISI 4340. The AISI 4640 hot forged gears had less fracture toughness and slightly less fatigue life than the AISI 4620 test gears.

  17. Mass Transfer Behavior of Phosphorus from the Liquid Slag Phase to Solid 2CaO·SiO2 in the Multiphase Dephosphorization Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Senlin; Wang, Wanlin; Luo, Zhican; Huang, Daoyuan

    2016-06-01

    The mass transfer behavior of phosphorus in the multiphase dephosphorization slag at 1623 K (1350 °C) is investigated in this article by adding the reagent P2O5 powders into the CaO-FeOt-SiO2 slag saturated with a directly precipitated 2CaO·SiO2 phase. The results show that the phosphorus was first quickly dissolved and transferred from the liquid slag to the precipitated solid 2CaO·SiO2 particle; then it reacted with the solid 2CaO·SiO2 particle to form (2CaO·SiO2-3CaO·P2O5) solid solution at the edge of a large solid particle. The further diffusion of phosphorus from the formed (2CaO·SiO2-3CaO·P2O5) solid solution reaction layer into the core of the 2CaO·SiO2 particle is the limiting step during the enrichment-phosphorus process. It is observed that the enrichment-phosphorus process is changed when the amount of added P2O5 content is increased and the formed solid solution phase is torn and peeled off from the surface of the 2CaO·SiO2 particle. In addition, the study shows that the solid solution structure is changed and becomes more compacted with the addition of P2O5 content, leading to the increment of solid solution density.

  18. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  19. Hot Gas Particulate Cleaning Technology Applied for PFBC/IGFC -The Ceramic Tube Filter (CTF) and Metal Filter-

    SciTech Connect

    Sasatsu, H; Misawa, N; Kobori, K; Iritani, J

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a fossil fuel abundant and widespread all over world. It is a vital resource for energy security, because the supply is stable. However, its CO2 emission per unit calorific value is greater than that of other fossil fuels. It is necessary to develop more efficient coal utilization technologies to expand the coal utilization that meets the social demand for better environment. The Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined cycle has become a subject of world attention in terms of better plant operation, improved plant efficiency, lower flue gas emission and fuel flexibility. The gas turbine, one of the most important components in the PFBC, is eager for a hot gas (approximately 650-850C) cleaning system in order to eliminate the severe erosion problem with the less thermal loss. The cyclone is most popular system for a hot gas cleaning, however, the severe damage for gas turbine blades by highly concentrated fine fly ash from PFBC boiler is reported.

  20. Guidance from an in situ hot stage in TEM to synthesize magnetic metal nanoparticles from a MOF.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhang, Daliang; Zou, Houbing; Zhu, Liangkui; Xue, Ming; Fang, Qianrong; Qiu, Shilun

    2016-08-18

    A series of in situ hot stage experiments using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were studied to directly observe the transition of a Ni-MOF to Ni nanoparticles wrapped in carbon (Ni-NPC) over temperatures ranging from ambient temperature to 700 °C. Ni-NPC-600 displays high catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction and high conversion, even after 10 cycles. PMID:27491946

  1. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  2. Effect of metal ions in a heated nitric acid solution on the corrosion behavior of a titanium-5% tantalum alloy in the hot nitric acid condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Hirano, H.; Uchiyama, G.; Nojima, Y.; Fujine, S.; Matsumoto, S.

    2013-01-01

    For evaluating the application of titanium and its alloys as components of equipment for storing nitric acid condensate in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, the corrosion behavior of titanium-5% tantalum alloy (Ti-5Ta) in a continuously renewed hot nitric acid condensate, and particularly the effect of metal ions in the heated nitric acid solution, was investigated. Corrosion experiments in an apparatus designed to renew the condensate at regular intervals showed that the corrosion rate of Ti-5Ta in the condensate increased linearly with the nitric acid concentration. The surface morphology of Ti-5Ta coupons after the corrosion experiments indicated uniform corrosion under any condition. The oxide film on the coupons had nearly constant thickness, and it was composed of mainly lower Ti oxides, such as TiO and Ti2O3, regardless of the nitric acid concentration in the condensate. The experimental results also showed that the addition of metal ions into the heated nitric acid solution increased the nitric acid concentration in the condensate, which resulted in a higher corrosion rate of Ti-5Ta. The corrosion rate increased noticeably as the valence of the metal ion increased and its ionic radius decreased. This effect of metal ions in the heated nitric acid solution on the corrosion rate of Ti-5Ta in the condensate was evaluated quantitatively based on the Gibbs free energy of hydration of the metal ions, and the calculated corrosion rates of Ti-5Ta in the condensate were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values.

  3. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  4. Fabrication and Analysis of the Wear Properties of Hot-Pressed Al-Si/SiCp + Al-Si-Cu-Mg Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongil; Oak, Jeong-Jung; Park, Yong Ho

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize microstructures and mechanical properties of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC's) prepared by powder metallurgy method. Consolidation of mixed powder with gas atomized Al-Si/SiCp powder and Al-14Si-2.5Cu-0.5Mg powder by hot pressing was classified according to sintering temperature and sintering time. Sintering condition was optimized using tensile properties of sintered specimens. Ultimate tensile strength of the optimized sintered specimen was 228 MPa with an elongation of 5.3% in longitudinal direction. In addition, wear properties and behaviors of the sintered aluminum-based MMC's were analyzed in accordance with vertical load and linear speed. As the linear speed and vertical load of the wear increased, change of the wear behavior occurred in order of oxidation of Al-Si matrix, formation of C-rich layer, Fe-alloying to matrix, and melting of the specimen

  5. Designing the Color of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Through Destructive Light Interference Using a Zn-Ti Liquid Metallic Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levai, Gabor; Godzsák, Melinda; Török, Tamas I.; Hakl, Jozsef; Takáts, Viktor; Csik, Attila; Vad, Kalman; Kaptay, George

    2016-07-01

    The color of hot-dip galvanized steel sheet was adjusted in a reproducible way using a liquid Zn-Ti metallic bath, air atmosphere, and controlling the bath temperature as the only experimental parameter. Coloring was found only for samples cooled in air and dipped into Ti-containing liquid Zn. For samples dipped into a 0.15 wt pct Ti-containing Zn bath, the color remained metallic (gray) below a 792 K (519 °C) bath temperature; it was yellow at 814 K ± 22 K (541 °C ± 22 °C), violet at 847 K ± 10 K (574 °C ± 10 °C), and blue at 873 K ± 15 K (600 °C ± 15 °C). With the increasing bath temperature, the thickness of the adhered Zn-Ti layer gradually decreased from 52 to 32 micrometers, while the thickness of the outer TiO2 layer gradually increased from 24 to 69 nm. Due to small Al contamination of the Zn bath, a thin (around 2 nm) alumina-rich layer is found between the outer TiO2 layer and the inner macroscopic Zn layer. It is proven that the color change was governed by the formation of thin outer TiO2 layer; different colors appear depending on the thickness of this layer, mostly due to the destructive interference of visible light on this transparent nano-layer. A complex model was built to explain the results using known relationships of chemical thermodynamics, adhesion, heat flow, kinetics of chemical reactions, diffusion, and optics. The complex model was able to reproduce the observations and allowed making predictions on the color of the hot-dip galvanized steel sample, as a function of the following experimental parameters: temperature and Ti content of the Zn bath, oxygen content, pressure, temperature and flow rate of the cooling gas, dimensions of the steel sheet, velocity of dipping the steel sheet into the Zn-Ti bath, residence time of the steel sheet within the bath, and the velocity of its removal from the bath. These relationships will be valuable for planning further experiments and technologies on color hot-dip galvanization of steel

  6. Designing the Color of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Through Destructive Light Interference Using a Zn-Ti Liquid Metallic Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levai, Gabor; Godzsák, Melinda; Török, Tamas I.; Hakl, Jozsef; Takáts, Viktor; Csik, Attila; Vad, Kalman; Kaptay, George

    2016-05-01

    The color of hot-dip galvanized steel sheet was adjusted in a reproducible way using a liquid Zn-Ti metallic bath, air atmosphere, and controlling the bath temperature as the only experimental parameter. Coloring was found only for samples cooled in air and dipped into Ti-containing liquid Zn. For samples dipped into a 0.15 wt pct Ti-containing Zn bath, the color remained metallic (gray) below a 792 K (519 °C) bath temperature; it was yellow at 814 K ± 22 K (541 °C ± 22 °C), violet at 847 K ± 10 K (574 °C ± 10 °C), and blue at 873 K ± 15 K (600 °C ± 15 °C). With the increasing bath temperature, the thickness of the adhered Zn-Ti layer gradually decreased from 52 to 32 micrometers, while the thickness of the outer TiO2 layer gradually increased from 24 to 69 nm. Due to small Al contamination of the Zn bath, a thin (around 2 nm) alumina-rich layer is found between the outer TiO2 layer and the inner macroscopic Zn layer. It is proven that the color change was governed by the formation of thin outer TiO2 layer; different colors appear depending on the thickness of this layer, mostly due to the destructive interference of visible light on this transparent nano-layer. A complex model was built to explain the results using known relationships of chemical thermodynamics, adhesion, heat flow, kinetics of chemical reactions, diffusion, and optics. The complex model was able to reproduce the observations and allowed making predictions on the color of the hot-dip galvanized steel sample, as a function of the following experimental parameters: temperature and Ti content of the Zn bath, oxygen content, pressure, temperature and flow rate of the cooling gas, dimensions of the steel sheet, velocity of dipping the steel sheet into the Zn-Ti bath, residence time of the steel sheet within the bath, and the velocity of its removal from the bath. These relationships will be valuable for planning further experiments and technologies on color hot-dip galvanization of steel

  7. Seaweeds as bioindicators of heavy metals off a hot spot area on the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast during 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Shams El-Din, N G; Mohamedein, L I; El-Moselhy, Kh M

    2014-09-01

    Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co, Fe, Mn, and Hg were measured successively in water, sediments, and six macroalgal species belonging to three algal classes during 3 years (2008-2010) from Abu Qir Bay, Alexandria, Egypt: Chlorophyceae (Enteromorpha compressa, Ulva fasciata), Phaeophyceae (Padina boryana), and Rhodophyceae (Jania rubens, Hypnea musciformis, Pterocladia capillacea). The study aimed to assess the bioaccumulation potential of the seaweeds, as well as to evaluate the extent of heavy metal contamination in the selected study site. Metals were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry coupled with MH-10 hydride system. The obtained data showed that the highest mean concentrations of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn were recorded in E. compressa; Cd, Ni, and Hg exhibited their highest mean concentrations in P. boryana, while Pb and Co were found in J. rubens. Abundance of the heavy metals in the algal species was as follow: Fe > Mn > Zn > Pb > Ni > Co > Cu > Cd > Hg. E. compressa showed the maximum metal pollution index (MPI) which was 11.55. Bioconcentration factor (BCF) for the metals in algae was relatively high with a maximum value for Mn. The Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) values for the recorded algal species were low, which ranged between 1.00 in P. boryana and 2.72 in E. compressa. Enrichment factors for sediments were low fluctuating between 0.43 for Hg to 2.33 for Mn. Accordingly, the green alga E. compressa, brown alga P. boryana, and red alga J. rubens can be nominated as bioindicators. Based on MPI and PLI indices, Abu Qir Bay in the present study is considered as low-contaminated area. PMID:24844431

  8. Theoretical Modelling of Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Hillier, D. J.; Figer, D. F.; Geballe, T. R.

    1999-06-01

    Recent progress towards model atmospheres for hot stars is discussed. A new generation of NLTE wind blanketed models, together with high S/N spectra of the hot star population in the central parsec, which are currently being obtained, will allow metal abundance determinations (Fe, Si, Mg, Na, etc). Metallicity studies of hot stars in the IR will provide major constraints not only on the theory of evolution of massive stars but also on our efforts to solve the puzzle of the central parsecs of the Galaxy. Preliminary results suggest that the metallicity of the Pistol Star is 3 times solar, thus indicating strong chemical enrichment of the gas in the Galactic Center.

  9. Investigation into the role of NaCL deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birks, N.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion to Na2SO4 of NaCl deposited on oxide substrates was studied as a function of temperature, in air with various SO2 and H2O partial pressures. The substrate was either a pure oxide or an oxide scale growing on a metal specimen. The progress of the reaction was observed using the SEM-EDAX technique to monitor morphological effects and, as far as possible, establish the rate of the process. The physical characteristics of the interaction between salt and substrate were also examined with particular reference to physical damage to the underlying oxide, especially when this is a scale on a metal specimen. An effort was also made to establish the conditions under which liquid phases may form and the mechanisms by which they form.

  10. Reactor hot spot analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    The principle methods for performing reactor hot spot analysis are reviewed and examined for potential use in the Applied Physics Division. The semistatistical horizontal method is recommended for future work and is now available as an option in the SE2-ANL core thermal hydraulic code. The semistatistical horizontal method is applied to a small LMR to illustrate the calculation of cladding midwall and fuel centerline hot spot temperatures. The example includes a listing of uncertainties, estimates for their magnitudes, computation of hot spot subfactor values and calculation of two sigma temperatures. A review of the uncertainties that affect liquid metal fast reactors is also presented. It was found that hot spot subfactor magnitudes are strongly dependent on the reactor design and therefore reactor specific details must be carefully studied. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. HOT GAS CLEANUP PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to identify and classify 22 hot gas cleanup (HGC) processes for desulfurizing reducing gases at above 430 C according to absorbent type into groups employing solid, molten salt, and molten metal absorbents. It describes each process in terms of...

  12. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  13. New Observations on Hot-Carrier Degradation in 0.1 μm Silicon-on-Insulator n-Type Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Han; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Yang, Fu-Liang

    2002-05-01

    This work investigates the hot-carrier effect (HCE) in partially depleted 0.1 μm SOI nMOSFETs. Hot-carrier degradation was investigated with respect to body-contact nMOSFET (BC-SOI) and floating-body nMOSFET without body contact (FB-SOI). It was found that hot-carrier-induced degradation exerts different influences on the drive capacities as well as subthreshold characteristics of FB-SOI and BC-SOI nMOSFETs. In FB-SOI nMOSFET, the floating body effect (FBE) and parasitic bipolar transistor effect (PBT) affect hot-carrier-induced degradation of device characteristics.

  14. Charge trapping induced drain-induced-barrier-lowering in HfO2/TiN p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors under hot carrier stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Dai, Chih-Hao; Chen, Ching-En; Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Hua-Mao; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2012-04-01

    This letter studies the channel hot carrier stress (CHCS) behaviors on high dielectric constant insulator and metal gate HfO2/TiN p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. It can be found that the degradation is associated with electron trapping, resulting in Gm decrease and positive Vth shift. However, Vth under saturation region shows an insignificant degradation during stress. To compare that, the CHC-induced electron trapping induced DIBL is proposed to demonstrate the different behavior of Vth between linear and saturation region. The devices with different channel length are used to evidence the trapping-induced DIBL behavior.

  15. Investigation of Hot Carrier Degradation in Shallow-Trench-Isolation-Based High-Voltage Laterally Diffused Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors by a Novel Direct Current Current-Voltage Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yandong; Zhang, Ganggang

    2012-04-01

    Shallow trench isolation (STI) based laterally diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) devices have become popular with its better tradeoff between breakdown voltage and on-resistance and its compatibility with the standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. A novel direct current current-voltage (DCIV) technique demonstrated with multiple sharp peak signals is proposed to characterize interface state generation in the channel and in the STI drift regions separately. Degradation of STI-based LDMOS transistors in various hot-carrier stress modes is investigated experimentally by proposed technique. A two-dimensional numerical device simulation is performed to obtain insight into the proposed technique and device degradation characteristics under hot-carrier stress conditions. The impact of interface state location on device electrical characteristics is analyzed from measurement and simulation. Our results show that the maximum Isub stress becomes the worst hot-carrier degradation mode in term of the on-resistance degradation, which is attributed to interface state generation under STI drift region.

  16. Hot Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  17. Hot Tickets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara; Kuzyk, Raya; McCormack, Heather; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the highlights of this year's BookExpo America (BEA) held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. The attendees at BEA had not minded that the air was recycled, the lighting was fluorescent, and the food was bad. The first hot book sighting came courtesy of Anne Rice. Michelle Moran, author of newly published novel, "The…

  18. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-03-01

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  19. Hot-electron mean free path of ErAs thin films grown on GaAs determined by metal-base transistor ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, K. J.; Narayanamurti, V.; Appelbaum, Ian; Hanson, M. P.; Gossard, A. C.

    2006-11-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the hot-electron mean free path in ErAs thin films grown on GaAs. Using an Al/Al2O3/Al tunnel junction as a hot-electron source for ballistic electron emission spectroscopy, we investigate ErAs films of thicknesses ˜100-˜300Å . Our results indicate a mean free path of order 100Å for electrons 1-2eV above the Fermi level at 80K .

  20. Hot tearing evaluation for aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůna, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing during solidification of aluminium alloys castings can be a serious problem. This phenomenon is well known but still insufficiently investigated. Hot tearing occurs in form of irregular cracks in metal castings that develop during solidification and cooling. The cause of hot tearing is generally attributed to the development of thermally induced tensile stresses and strains in a casting as the molten metal contracts during solidification and solid state shrinkage. Submited paper consists of two parts. The first part introduces the reader to the phenomenon of hot tearing. The second part describes newly developed method for assessing hot tearing susceptibility of aluminium alloys, and also gives the results on hot tearing for various aluminium alloys.

  1. Hot outflows in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The gas-phase metallicity distribution has been analysed for the hot atmospheres of 29 galaxy clusters using Chandra X-ray Observatory observations. All host brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with X-ray cavity systems produced by radio AGN. We find high elemental abundances projected preferentially along the cavities of 16 clusters. The metal-rich plasma was apparently lifted out of the BCGs with the rising X-ray cavities (bubbles) to altitudes between twenty and several hundred kiloparsecs. A relationship between the maximum projected altitude of the uplifted gas (the `iron radius') and jet power is found with the form R_Fe ∝ P_jet^{0.45}. The estimated outflow rates are typically tens of solar masses per year but exceed 100 M⊙ yr- 1 in the most powerful AGN. The outflow rates are 10-20 per cent of the cooling rates, and thus alone are unable to offset a cooling inflow. Nevertheless, hot outflows effectively redistribute the cooling gas and may play a significant role at regulating star formation and AGN activity in BCGs and presumably in giant elliptical galaxies. The metallicity distribution overall can be complex, perhaps due to metal-rich gas returning in circulation flows or being blown around in the hot atmospheres. Roughly 15 per cent of the work done by the cavities is expended lifting the metal-enriched gas, implying their nuclear black holes have increased in mass by at least ˜107-109 M⊙. Finally, we show that hot outflows can account for the broad, gas-phase metallicity distribution compared to the stellar light profiles of BCGs, and we consider a possible connection between hot outflows and cold molecular gas flows discovered in recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations.

  2. Hot Carrier Degradation in Deep Sub-Micron Nitride Spacer Lightly Doped Drain N-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Jun-lin; Huang, Kai-ye; Lai, Jinn-horng; Gong, Jeng; Yang, Fu-Jei; Lin, Sun-Yun

    2002-08-01

    Spacer bottom oxide in the nitride spacer lightly doped drain (LDD) device, which is used to prevent huge interfacial states between the nitride and silicon interface, plays an important role in the hot carrier test. Because of the stress due to atomic size mismatch between the nitride spacer and silicon, trap-assisted hot electron tunneling is more significant in a nitride spacer LDD device than in the oxide spacer counterpart. A thicker bottom oxide can eliminate this effect. However, the optimal thickness of the nitride spacer bottom oxide should be varied for different poly-silicon gate structures. The hot carrier stress in a nitride spacer LDD device causes multi-stage degradation under Isub,max stress. It is dominated by electron trapping at the early stage, interfacial state (Nit) creation at the second stage, and self-limiting hot carrier degradation at the final stage. The degradation for Ig,max stress in nitride spacer LDD devices is mostly caused by electrons trapped in the nitride/oxide interface.

  3. Hot Meetings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Mary

    2002-01-01

    A colleague walked by my office one time as I was conducting a meeting. There were about five or six members of my team present. The colleague, a man who had been with our institution (The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, a.k.a. APL) for many years, could not help eavesdropping. He said later it sounded like we we re having a raucous argument, and he wondered whether he should stand by the door in case things got out of hand and someone threw a punch. Our Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) team was a hot group, to invoke the language that is fashionable today, although we never thought of ourselves in those terms. It was just our modus operandi. The tenor of the discussion got loud and volatile at times, but I prefer to think of it as animated, robust, or just plain collaborative. Mary Chiu and her "hot" team from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory built the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft for NASA. Instruments on the spacecraft continue to collect data that inform us about what's happening on our most important star, the Sun.

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics with simultaneous electron and phonon excitations: Application to the relaxation of hot atoms and molecules on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2015-11-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot H, N, and N2 on Pd(100), Ag(111), and Fe(110), respectively, is studied by means of ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction. This method is adapted here to account for the electron density changes caused by lattice vibrations, thus treating on an equal footing both electron-hole (e -h ) pair and phonon excitations. We find that even if the latter increasingly dominate the heavier is the hot species, the contribution of e -h pairs is by no means negligible in these cases because it gains relevance at the last stage of the relaxation process. The quantitative details of energy dissipation depend on the interplay of the potential energy surface, electronic structure, and kinetic factors.

  5. Hot-electron cooling by acoustic and optical phonons in monolayers of MoS2 and other transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Bhargavi, K. S.; Kubakaddi, S. S.

    2014-10-01

    We study hot-electron cooling by acoustic and optical phonons in monolayer MoS2. The cooling power P (Pe=P /n ) is investigated as a function of electron temperature Te (0-500 K) and carrier density n (1010-1013 cm-2) taking into account all relevant electron-phonon (el-ph) couplings. We find that the crossover from acoustic phonon dominated cooling at low Te to optical phonon dominated cooling at higher Te takes place at Te˜50 -75 K. The unscreened deformation potential (DP) coupling to the TA phonon is shown to dominate P due to acoustic phonon scattering over the entire temperature and density range considered. The cooling power due to screened DP coupling to the LA phonon and screened piezoelectric (PE) coupling to the TA and LA phonons is orders of magnitude lower. In the Bloch-Grüneisen (BG) regime, P ˜Te4(Te6) is predicted for unscreened (screened) el-ph interaction and P ˜n-1 /2(Pe˜n-3 /2) for both unscreened and screened el-ph interaction. The cooling power due to optical phonons is dominated by zero-order DP couplings and the Fröhlich interaction, and is found to be significantly reduced by the hot-phonon effect when the phonon relaxation time due to phonon-phonon scattering is large compared to the relaxation time due to el-ph scattering. The Te and n dependence of the hot-phonon distribution function is also studied. Our results for monolayer MoS2 are compared with those in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) as well as monolayer and bilayer graphene.

  6. The Phosphorus Reaction in Oxygen Steelmaking: Thermodynamic Equilibrium and Metal Droplet Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Andre N.

    Phosphorus equilibrium between liquid metal and slag has been extensively studied since the 1940's. It is well known that CaO and FeO are the main slag constituents that help promote dephosphorization. On the other hand, dephosphorization decreases with temperature due to the endothermic nature of the reaction. Many correlations have been developed to predict the phosphorus partition ratio as a function of metal and slag composition as well as temperature. Nevertheless, there are still disagreements in the laboratory data and the equilibrium phosphorus partition can be predicted with an uncertainty of a factor of up to 5. The first part of the present work focuses on generating more reliable equilibrium data for BOF-type slags by approaching equilibrium from both sides of the reaction. The experimental results were combined with two other sets of data from different authors to produce a new correlation that includes the effect of SiO2 on the phosphorus partition coefficient, LP . Although the quantification of phosphorus equilibrium is extremely important, most industrial furnaces do not operate at equilibrium, usually due to liquid slag formation, kinetics and time constraints. Thus, it is important to know how close to equilibrium different furnaces operate in order to suggest optimal slag compositions to promote dephosphorization. The present work analyzed four large sets of data containing the chemical compositions of both slag and metal phase as well as the tapping temperature of each heat. Each set of data corresponded to different furnaces: one AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization), two top-blown BOFs and one Q-BOP or OBM. It was found that the bulk slag composition can greatly "mask" the data due to solid phases coexisting with the liquid slag. The author used the software package FactSage to estimate the amount of solids in the slag and liquid slag composition. It was found that the AOD is the reactor closest to equilibrium, followed by the Q-BOP (OBM) and

  7. Nanostructures: Drip painting on a hot canvas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Colin

    2007-06-01

    When droplets of water containing metal particles are deposited on a hot surface, they are supported by a thin layer of vapour that lets them slide, essentially friction free. The metal trails the droplets leave in their wake could be useful for making nanowires.

  8. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-30

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  9. Prometheus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribik, Anastasia M.; DiLorenzo, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  10. Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept

    SciTech Connect

    AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

    2006-01-24

    The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

  11. Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1983-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

  12. KELT-6b: A P ∼ 7.9 day hot Saturn transiting a metal-poor star with a long-period companion

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Karen A.; Kielkopf, John F.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Siverd, Robert J.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T {sub eff} = 6102 ± 43 K, log g{sub ⋆}=4.07{sub −0.07}{sup +0.04}, and [Fe/H] = –0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M {sub *} = 1.09 ± 0.04 M {sub ☉} and radius R{sub ⋆}=1.58{sub −0.09}{sup +0.16} R{sub ⊙}. The planetary companion has mass M{sub P} = 0.43 ± 0.05 M {sub Jup}, radius R{sub P}=1.19{sub −0.08}{sup +0.13} R{sub Jup}, surface gravity log g{sub P}=2.86{sub −0.08}{sup +0.06}, and density ρ{sub P}=0.31{sub −0.08}{sup +0.07} g cm{sup −3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22{sub −0.10}{sup +0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T {sub c}(BJD{sub TDB}) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ∼4)-7). KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ∼0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images.

  13. KELT-6b: A P ~ 7.9 Day Hot Saturn Transiting a Metal-poor Star with a Long-period Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Karen A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Pepper, Joshua; Kielkopf, John F.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Fischer, Debra A.; Manner, Mark; Bieryla, Allyson; Latham, David W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Gregorio, Joao; Buchhave, Lars A.; Jensen, Eric L. N.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Penev, Kaloyan; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Street, Rachel A.; Cargile, Phillip; Mack, Claude E.; Oberst, Thomas E.; Avril, Ryan L.; Mellon, Samuel N.; McLeod, Kim K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Stefanik, Robert P.; Berlind, Perry; Calkins, Michael L.; Mao, Qingqing; Richert, Alexander J. W.; DePoy, Darren L.; Esquerdo, Gilbert A.; Gould, Andrew; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Pogge, Richard W.; Trueblood, Mark; Trueblood, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    We report the discovery of KELT-6b, a mildly inflated Saturn-mass planet transiting a metal-poor host. The initial transit signal was identified in KELT-North survey data, and the planetary nature of the occulter was established using a combination of follow-up photometry, high-resolution imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and precise radial velocity measurements. The fiducial model from a global analysis including constraints from isochrones indicates that the V = 10.38 host star (BD+31 2447) is a mildly evolved, late-F star with T eff = 6102 ± 43 K, log g_\\star =4.07_{-0.07}^{+0.04}, and [Fe/H] = -0.28 ± 0.04, with an inferred mass M sstarf = 1.09 ± 0.04 M ⊙ and radius R_\\star =1.58_{-0.09}^{+0.16} \\,R_\\odot. The planetary companion has mass MP = 0.43 ± 0.05 M Jup, radius R_{P}=1.19_{-0.08}^{+0.13} \\,R_Jup, surface gravity log g_{P}=2.86_{-0.08}^{+0.06}, and density \\rho _{P}=0.31_{-0.08}^{+0.07}\\,g\\,cm^{-3}. The planet is on an orbit with semimajor axis a = 0.079 ± 0.001 AU and eccentricity e=0.22_{-0.10}^{+0.12}, which is roughly consistent with circular, and has ephemeris of T c(BJDTDB) = 2456347.79679 ± 0.00036 and P = 7.845631 ± 0.000046 days. Equally plausible fits that employ empirical constraints on the host-star parameters rather than isochrones yield a larger planet mass and radius by ~4}-7}. KELT-6b has surface gravity and incident flux similar to HD 209458b, but orbits a host that is more metal poor than HD 209458 by ~0.3 dex. Thus, the KELT-6 system offers an opportunity to perform a comparative measurement of two similar planets in similar environments around stars of very different metallicities. The precise radial velocity data also reveal an acceleration indicative of a longer-period third body in the system, although the companion is not detected in Keck adaptive optics images. KELT is a joint project of The Ohio State University, Vanderbilt University, and Lehigh University.

  14. The influence of Si addition in 55AlZn bath on the coating structures obtained in the batch hot-dip metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendala, J.

    2011-05-01

    One of the methods of increasing the corrosion resistance of zinc coatings is the application of zinc and aluminium alloy baths in the metallization process. The coatings obtained are characterized by much better corrosion resistance thanks to the combination of aluminium properties, i.e. the barrier protection provided by naturally created aluminium oxides, with the capacity to protect the steel substrate, which is characteristic of zinc coatings. Zinc coatings with 55 wt. % Al and an addition of Si have gained industrial importance. The introduction of a third alloying component into the metallization bath is a technological addition, the aim of which is to reduce and possibly inhibit the aluminium diffusion towards the substrate. The article presents the results of the examination of coatings obtained in a 55AlZn bath at varied parameters of the technological process, as well as the specification of silicon addition influence on the structure and chemical composition of the coatings, and on the kinetics of growth. The coatings were obtained in three temperatures: 620, 640 and 660°C, and the process was conducted in a 55 wt. % Al bath with Si content of 0, 0.8 and 1.6 wt. % respectively, the remaining content was Zn. For the purposes of evaluating the microstructure and thickness of the coatings obtained, examinations on a light microscope were conducted. In order to determine the chemical composition of the coatings obtained, an EDS analysis was conducted. Quantitative examination of the chemical composition was carried out on the selected cross-sections of samples with coatings considered to be representative ones, using a SEM with a microanalysis system. Moreover, the linear distribution of elements on the cross-sections of the chosen coatings was determined. It is possible to state that the addition of silicon to 55AlZn baths allows reducing the uncontrolled growth of a layer. The layers obtained are more uniform, continuous and they show good adhesion to

  15. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  16. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  17. Charge Pumping Profiling Technique for the Evaluation of Plasma-Charging-Enhanced Hot-Carrier Effect in Short-N-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shang-Jr; Chung, Steve Shao-Shiun; Lin, Horng-Chih

    2002-07-01

    Plasma etching of poly-silicon in a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) during the gate definition process induces edge damage at the gate-drain overlap edge. This edge damage will be further enhanced by the antenna effect and cause a more serious hot-carrier (HC) effect, particularly in short-channel devices. We call this phenomenon the plasma-charging-enhanced HC effect. In this paper, this plasma-charging-enhanced HC effect is evaluated by the charge pumping (CP) profiling technique, in which the enhanced damage at the gate-drain overlap gate oxide region can be identified. A three-phase plasma damage mechanism is then proposed to explain the observed effect. According to experimental results, it was shown that the interface traps generated at the gate-drain overlap edge are mainly attributed to the plasma-charging-enhanced HC effect. These interface traps (Nit) become the dominant mechanism of the drain current (ID) degradation, which increases with a reducing channel length (L). Again, the enhanced HC-effect-induced-degradation will dominate the device reliability under long-term operations.

  18. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  19. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  20. Secondary precious metal enrichment by steam-heated fluids in the Crofoot-Lewis hot spring gold-silver deposit and relation to paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebert, S.W.; Rye, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    controlled largely by basin and range fractures and a high geothermal gradient with H2S for Au complexing derived from organic matter in basin sediments. A wet climate resulted in the formation of a large inland lake which provided abundant recharge water for the hydrothermal system. A fluctuating water table controlled by changing climatic conditions enabled steam-heated acid sulfate fluids to overprint lower grade mineralization resulting in ore-grade precious metal enrichment.

  1. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  2. Plasmonically enhanced hot electron based photovoltaic device.

    PubMed

    Atar, Fatih B; Battal, Enes; Aygun, Levent E; Daglar, Bihter; Bayindir, Mehmet; Okyay, Ali K

    2013-03-25

    Hot electron photovoltaics is emerging as a candidate for low cost and ultra thin solar cells. Plasmonic means can be utilized to significantly boost device efficiency. We separately form the tunneling metal-insulator-metal (MIM) junction for electron collection and the plasmon exciting MIM structure on top of each other, which provides high flexibility in plasmonic design and tunneling MIM design separately. We demonstrate close to one order of magnitude enhancement in the short circuit current at the resonance wavelengths. PMID:23546103

  3. Corrosion Resistances of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals with Yttrium and Tungsten Additions in Hot Calcium Chloride Brine & Natural Seawater: Fe48Mo14CR15Y2C15B6 and Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peter, W; Payer, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, M B; Aprigliano, L

    2006-10-12

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of stainless steels and Ni-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022), based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Electrochemical studies of the passive film stability of SAM1651 are reported here. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). Yttrium-containing SAM1651, also known as SAM7 (Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0}), has a critical cooling rate (CCR) of approximately 80 Kelvin per second, while yttrium-free SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) has a higher critical cooling rate of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. SAM1651's low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. While the yttrium enables a low CCR to be achieved, it makes the material relatively difficult to atomize, due to increases in melt viscosity. Consequently, the powders have irregular shape, which makes pneumatic conveyance during thermal spray deposition difficult. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying, due to the formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which depletes the matrix of key alloy elements, whereas SAM1651 can be applied as coatings with the same corrosion resistance as a fully-dense completely amorphous melt-spun ribbon, provided that its amorphous

  4. Solutions for Hot Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    From the company that brought the world an integral heating and cooling food service system after originally developing it for NASA's Apollo Program, comes yet another orbital offshoot: a product that can be as thin as paper and as strong as steel. Nextel Ceramic Textiles and Composites from 3M Company offer space-age protection and innovative solutions for hot situations, ranging from NASA to NASCAR. With superior thermal protection, Nextel fabrics, tape, and sleevings outperform other high temperature textiles such as aramids, carbon, glass, and quartz, permitting engineers and manufacturers to handle applications up to 2,500 F (1,371 C). The stiffness and strength of Nextel Continuous Ceramic Fibers make them a great match for improving the rigidity of aluminum in metal matrix composites. Moreover, the fibers demonstrate low shrinkage at operating temperatures, which allow for the manufacturing of a dimensionally stable product. These novel fibers also offer excellent chemical resistance, low thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, low porosity, and unique electrical properties.

  5. Metal vapor Raman frequency shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, D.W.; Liu, C.; Weaver, L.A.

    1980-12-16

    Shifted Raman radiation for an all-hot Raman discharge cell is produced by external laser pumping of a metal halide medium in the cell during an afterglow period following dissociation of the metal halide medium into metal atoms and before recombination to form the original species of the metal halide medium.

  6. Corrosion in volcanic hot springs

    SciTech Connect

    Lichti, K.A.; Swann, S.J.; Sanada, N.

    1997-12-31

    Volcanic hot pool environments on White Island, New Zealand have been used to study the corrosion properties of materials which might be used for engineering plant for energy production from deep-seated and magma-ambient geothermal systems. The corrosion chemistry of hot pools encountered in natural volcanic features varies, from being of near neutral pH- or alkalie pH-chloride type waters to acidic-chloride/sulfate waters which are more aggressive to metals and alloys. Potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagram models of corrosion product phase stability for common alloy elements contained in engineering alloys have been developed for hot pool environments using thermodynamic principles and conventional corrosion theory. These diagramatic models give reasons for the observed corrosion kinetics and can be used to help to predict the performance of other alloys in similar environments. Deficiencies in the knowledge base for selection of materials for aggressive geothermal environments are identified, and directions for future research on materials having suitable corrosion resistance for deep-seated and magma-ambient production fluids which have acidic properties are proposed.

  7. Method for producing metallic microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-06-29

    Method for producing metallic particles. The method converts metallic nanoparticles into larger, spherical metallic particles. An aerosol of solid metallic nanoparticles and a non-oxidizing plasma having a portion sufficiently hot to melt the nanoparticles are generated. The aerosol is directed into the plasma where the metallic nanoparticles melt, collide, join, and spheroidize. The molten spherical metallic particles are directed away from the plasma and enter the afterglow where they cool and solidify.

  8. The nature of hot electrons generated by exothermic catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedrygailov, Ievgen I.; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-02-01

    We review recent progress in studies of the nature of hot electrons generated in metal nanoparticles and thin films on oxide supports and their role in heterogeneous catalysis. We show that the creation of hot electrons and their transport across the metal-oxide interface is an inherent component of energy dissipation accompanying catalytic and photocatalytic surface reactions. The intensity of hot electron flow is well correlated with turnover rates of corresponding reactions. We also show that controlling the flow of hot electrons crossing the interface can lead to the control of chemical reaction rates. Finally, we discuss perspectives of hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry that promise the capability to drive catalytic reactions with enhanced efficiency and selectivity through electron-mediated, non-thermal processes.

  9. The effect of hot electrons and surface plasmons on heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Si Woo; Moon, Song Yi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-29

    Hot electrons and surface-plasmon-driven chemistry are amongst the most actively studied research subjects because they are deeply associated with energy dissipation and the conversion processes at the surface and interfaces, which are still open questions and key issues in the surface science community. In this topical review, we give an overview of the concept of hot electrons or surface-plasmon-mediated hot electrons generated under various structural schemes (i.e. metals, metal-semiconductor, and metal-insulator-metal) and their role affecting catalytic activity in chemical reactions. We highlight recent studies on the relation between hot electrons and catalytic activity on metallic surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms for how hot electrons participate in chemical reactions. We also introduce controlled chemistry to describe specific pathways for selectivity control in catalysis on metal nanoparticles. PMID:27166263

  10. Evolution of Hot Gas in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, William G.

    2004-01-01

    This theory grant was awarded to study the curious nature, origin and evolution of hot gas in elliptical galaxies and their surrounding groups. Understanding the properties of this X-ray emitting gas has profound implications over the broad landscape of modern astrophysics: cosmology, galaxy formation, star formation, cosmic metal enrichment, galactic structure and dynamics, and the physics of hot gases containing dust and magnetic fields. One of our principal specific objectives was to interpret the marvelous new observations from the XMM and Chandru satellite X-ray telescopes.

  11. Hot Spot at Yellowstone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dress, Abby

    2005-01-01

    Within this huge national park (over two million acres spread across Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho) are steaming geysers, hot springs, bubbling mudpots, and fumaroles, or steam vents. Drives on the main roads of Yellowstone take tourists through the major hot attractions, which also include Norris Geyser Basin, Upper and Lower Geyser Basin, West…

  12. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  13. 6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. Hot Springs National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. HOT AIR PORTION OF DAMPERS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Lamar Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  14. Hot cracking during welding and casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoping

    Aluminum welds are susceptible to liquation cracking in the partially melted zone (PMZ). Using the multicomponent Scheil model, curves of temperature vs. fraction solid (T-fS) during solidification were calculated for the PMZ and weld metals (WMs). These curves were used to predict the crack susceptibility by checking if the harmful condition of WM fS > PMZ fS exists during PMZ solidification and reduce the susceptibility by minimizing this condition. This approach was tested against full-penetration welds of alloys 7075 and 2024 and it can be used to guide the selection or development of filler metals. Liquation cracking in the PMZ in welds of Al-Si cast alloys was also investigated. The crack susceptibility was evaluated by circular-patch test, and full-penetration welds made with filler metals 1100, 4043, 4047 and 5356. Liquation cracking was significant with filler metals 1100 and 5356 but slight with filler metals 4043 and 4047. In all welds, liquation cracks were completely backfilled, instead of open as in full-penetration welds of wrought alloys 2219 and 6061. The T-fS curves showed that alloy A357 has a much higher fraction liquid for backfilling before PMZ solidification was essentially over. Hot tearing in Mg-xAl-yCa alloys was studied by constrained rod casting (CRC) in a steel mold. The hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Ca content (y) but did not change much with the Al content (x). An instrumented CRC with a steel mold was developed to detect the onset of hot tearing. The secondary phases, eutectic content, solidification path, and freezing range were examined. Hot tearing in Mg-Al-Sr alloys was also studied by CRC in a steel mold. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-1.5Sr alloys, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Al content. With Mg-(4,6,8)Al-3Sr alloys, the trend was similar but not as significant. At the same Al content, the hot tearing susceptibility decreased significantly with increasing Sr

  15. Hot-Carrier Seebeck Effect: Diffusion and Remote Detection of Hot Carriers in Graphene.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Juan F; Neumann, Ingmar; Costache, Marius V; Valenzuela, Sergio O

    2015-06-10

    We investigate hot carrier propagation across graphene using an electrical nonlocal injection/detection method. The device consists of a monolayer graphene flake contacted by multiple metal leads. Using two remote leads for electrical heating, we generate a carrier temperature gradient that results in a measurable thermoelectric voltage V(NL) across the remaining (detector) leads. Due to the nonlocal character of the measurement, V(NL) is exclusively due to the Seebeck effect. Remarkably, a departure from the ordinary relationship between Joule power P and V(NL), V(NL) ∼ P, becomes readily apparent at low temperatures, representing a fingerprint of hot-carrier dominated thermoelectricity. By studying V(NL) as a function of bias, we directly determine the carrier temperature and the characteristic cooling length for hot-carrier propagation, which are key parameters for a variety of new applications that rely on hot-carrier transport. PMID:25950746

  16. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . XIII. CoRoT-13b: a dense hot Jupiter in transit around a star with solar metallicity and super-solar lithium content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Bruntt, H.; Ollivier, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Auvergne, M.; Baglin, A.; Barge, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Carone, L.; Carpano, S.; Deleuil, M.; Deeg, H. J.; Dvorak, R.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Fridlund, M.; Gandolfi, D.; Gazzano, J.-C.; Gillon, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Hatzes, A.; Havel, M.; Hébrard, G.; Jorda, L.; Léger, A.; Llebaria, A.; Lammer, H.; Lovis, C.; Mazeh, T.; Moutou, C.; Ofir, A.; von Paris, P.; Pätzold, M.; Queloz, D.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Tingley, B.; Titz-Weider, R.; Wuchterl, G.

    2010-11-01

    We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and the properties of the host star were obtained analyzing HIRES spectra from the Keck telescope. It is a hot Jupiter-like planet with an orbital period of 4.04 days, 1.3 Jupiter masses, 0.9 Jupiter radii, and a density of 2.34 g cm-3. It orbits a G0V star with T_eff = 5 945 K, M* = 1.09 M⊙, R_* = 1.01 R⊙, solar metallicity, a lithium content of + 1.45 dex, and an estimated age of between 0.12 and 3.15 Gyr. The lithium abundance of the star is consistent with its effective temperature, activity level, and age range derived from the stellar analysis. The density of the planet is extreme for its mass, implies that heavy elements are present with a mass of between about 140 and 300 {M}⊕. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics

  17. Role of interface band structure on hot electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garramone, John J.

    Knowledge of electron transport through materials and interfaces is fundamentally and technologically important. For example, metal interconnects within integrated circuits suffer increasingly from electromigration and signal delay due to an increase in resistance from grain boundary and sidewall scattering since their dimensions are becoming shorter than the electron mean free path. Additionally, all semiconductor based devices require the transport of electrons through materials and interfaces where scattering and parallel momentum conservation are important. In this thesis, the inelastic and elastic scattering of hot electrons are studied in nanometer thick copper, silver and gold films deposited on silicon substrates. Hot electrons are electron with energy greater than kBT above the Fermi level (EF). This work was performed utilizing ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) which is a three terminal scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique that measures the percentage of hot electrons transmitted across a Schottky barrier interface. Hot electron attenuation lengths of the metals were extracted by measuring the BEEM current as a function of metal overlayer thickness for both hot electron and hot hole injection at 80 K and under ultra high vacuum. The inelastic and elastic scattering lengths were extracted by fitting the energetic dependence of the measured attenuation lengths to a Fermi liquid based model. A sharp increase in the attenuation length is observed at low injection energies, just above the Schottky barrier height, only for metals on Si(001) substrates. In contrast, the attenuation length measured on Si(111) substrates shows a sharp decrease. These results indicate that interface band structure and parallel momentum conservation have significant impact upon the transport of hot electrons across non epitaxial metal-semiconductor interfaces. In addition, they help to separate effects upon hot electron transport that are inherent to the metal

  18. METAL SURFACE TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-12

    Improved flux baths are described for use in conjunction with hot dipped coatings for uranium. The flux bath consists of molten alkali metal, or alkaline earth metal halides. One preferred embodiment comprises a bath containing molten KCl, NaCl, and LiCl in proportions approximating the triple eutectic.

  19. In hot water, again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, Alastair; Watkins, Sheila

    2009-10-01

    Regarding Norman Willcox's letter about the problems of using solar panels for domestic heating (August p21), I also have thermal solar panels installed. However, contrary to his disappointing experience, I have found that they provide my family with a useful amount of hot water. In our system, the solar energy is used to heat a store of water, which has no other source of heat. Mains-pressure cold water passes through this store via a heat exchanger, removing heat from it and warming up. If the water becomes warm enough, an unpowered thermostatic valve allows it to go straight to the hot taps (mixing it with cold if it is too hot). However, if it is not hot enough, then the water is directed first through our previously installed gaspowered combination boiler and then to the taps.

  20. Saturn's Hot Plasma Explosions

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation based on data obtained by NASA's Cassini Spacecraft shows how the "explosions" of hot plasma on the night side (orange and white) periodically inflate Saturn's magnetic field (white ...

  1. Hot Oiling Spreadsheet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-10-22

    One of the most common oil-field treatments is hot oiling to remove paraffin from wells. Even though the practice is common, the thermal effectiveness of the process is not commonly understood. In order for producers to easily understand the thermodynamics of hot oiling, a simple tool is needed for estimating downhole temperatures. Such a tool has been developed that can be distributed as a compiled spreadsheet.

  2. Computational simulation of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  3. Computational simulation of hot composites structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Three different computer codes developed in-house are described for application to hot composite structures. These codes include capabilities for: (1) laminate behavior (METCAN); (2) thermal/structural analysis of hot structures made from high temperature metal matrix composites (HITCAN); and (3) laminate tailoring (MMLT). Results for select sample cases are described to demonstrate the versatility as well as the application of these codes to specific situations. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate cyclic life in high temperature metal matrix composites; HITCAN can be used to evaluate the structural performance of curved panels as well as respective sensitivities of various nonlinearities, and MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process in order to reduce residual stresses in the matrix upon cool-down.

  4. Theory of hot electron photoemission from graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Lay Kee; Liang, Shijun

    Motivated by the development of Schottky-type photodetectors, some theories have been proposed to describe how the hot carriers generated by the incident photon are transported over the Schottky barrier through the internal photoelectric effect. One of them is Fowler's law proposed as early as 1931, which studied the temperature dependence of photoelectric curves of clean metals. This law is very successful in accounting for mechanism of detecting photons of energy lower than the band gap of semiconductor based on conventional metal/semiconductor Schottky diode. With the goal of achieving better performance, graphene/silicon contact-based- graphene/WSe2 heterostructure-based photodetectors have been fabricated to demonstrate superior photodetection efficiency. However, the theory of how hot electrons is photo-excited from graphene into semiconductor remains unknown. In the current work, we first examine the photoemission process from suspended graphene and it is found that traditional Einstein photoelectric effect may break down for suspended graphene due to the unique linear band structure. Furthermore, we find that the same conclusion applies for 3D graphene analog (e.g. 3D topological Dirac semi-metal). These findings are very useful to further improve the performance of graphene-based photodetector, hot-carrier solar cell and other kinds of sensor.

  5. Hot Carrier Extraction with Plasmonic Broadband Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Charlene; Cadusch, Jasper J; Dligatch, Svetlana; Roberts, Ann; Davis, Timothy J; Mulvaney, Paul; Gómez, Daniel E

    2016-04-26

    Hot charge carrier extraction from metallic nanostructures is a very promising approach for applications in photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and photodetection. One limitation is that many metallic nanostructures support a single plasmon resonance thus restricting the light-to-charge-carrier activity to a spectral band. Here we demonstrate that a monolayer of plasmonic nanoparticles can be assembled on a multistack layered configuration to achieve broadband, near-unit light absorption, which is spatially localized on the nanoparticle layer. We show that this enhanced light absorbance leads to ∼40-fold increases in the photon-to-electron conversion efficiency by the plasmonic nanostructures. We developed a model that successfully captures the essential physics of the plasmonic hot electron charge generation and separation in these structures. This model also allowed us to establish that efficient hot carrier extraction is limited to spectral regions where (i) the photons have energies higher than the Schottky junctions and (ii) the absorption of light is localized on the metal nanoparticles. PMID:26982625

  6. Embedding plasmonic nanostructure diodes enhances hot electron emission.

    PubMed

    Knight, Mark W; Wang, Yumin; Urban, Alexander S; Sobhani, Ali; Zheng, Bob Y; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2013-04-10

    When plasmonic nanostructures serve as the metallic counterpart of a metal-semiconductor Schottky interface, hot electrons due to plasmon decay are emitted across the Schottky barrier, generating measurable photocurrents in the semiconductor. When the plasmonic nanostructure is atop the semiconductor, only a small percentage of hot electrons are excited with a wavevector permitting transport across the Schottky barrier. Here we show that embedding plasmonic structures into the semiconductor substantially increases hot electron emission. Responsivities increase by 25× over planar diodes for embedding depths as small as 5 nm. The vertical Schottky barriers created by this geometry make the plasmon-induced hot electron process the dominant contributor to photocurrent in plasmonic nanostructure-diode-based devices. PMID:23452192

  7. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. 2 SHOWS MANIPULATION INSTRUMENTS AND SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS. PENETRATIONS FOR OPERATING INSTRUMENTS GO THROUGH SHIELDING ABOVE WINDOWS. CONDUIT FOR UTILITIES AND CONTROLS IS BEHIND METAL CABINET BELOW WINDOWS NEAR FLOOR. CAMERA FACES WEST. WARNING SIGN LIMITS FISSILE MATERIAL TO SPECIFIED NUMBER OF GRAMS OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Hot-carrier-induced linear drain current and threshold voltage degradation for thin layer silicon-on-insulator field P-channel lateral double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Qiao, Ming; He, Yitao; Li, Zhaoji; Zhang, Bo

    2015-11-16

    Hot-carrier-induced linear drain current (I{sub dlin}) and threshold voltage (V{sub th}) degradations for the thin layer SOI field p-channel lateral double-diffused MOS (pLDMOS) are investigated. Two competition degradation mechanisms are revealed and the hot-carrier conductance modulation model is proposed. In the channel, hot-hole injection induced positive oxide trapped charge and interface trap gives rise to the V{sub th} increasing and the channel conductance (G{sub ch}) decreasing, then reduces I{sub dlin}. In the p-drift region, hot-electron injection induced negative oxide trapped charge enhances the conductance of drift doping resistance (G{sub d}), and then increases I{sub dlin}. Consequently, the eventual I{sub dlin} degradation is controlled by the competition of the two mechanisms due to conductance modulation in the both regions. Based on the model, it is explained that the measured I{sub dlin} anomalously increases while the V{sub th} is increasing with power law. The thin layer field pLDMOS exhibits more severe V{sub th} instability compared with thick SOI layer structure; as a result, it should be seriously evaluated in actual application in switching circuit.

  9. Development of iron-aluminide hot-gas filters

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Judkins, R.R.

    1996-06-01

    Removal of particles from hot synthesis gas produced by coal gasification is vital to the success of these systems. In Integrated [Coal] Gasification Combined Cycle systems, the synthesis gas is the fuel for gas turbines. To avoid damage to turbine components, it is necessary that particles be removed from the fuel gas prior to combustion and introduction into the turbine. Reliability and durability of the hot-gas filtering devices used to remove the particles is, of course, of special importance. Hot-gas filter materials include both ceramics and metals. Numerous considerations must be made in selecting materials for these filters. Constituents in the hot gases may potentially degrade the properties and performance of the filters to the point that they are ineffective in removing the particles. Very significant efforts have been made by DOE and others to develop effective hot-particle filters and, although improvements have been made, alternative materials and structures are still needed.

  10. The effect of hot electrons and surface plasmons on heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Si Woo; Moon, Song Yi; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Hot electrons and surface-plasmon-driven chemistry are amongst the most actively studied research subjects because they are deeply associated with energy dissipation and the conversion processes at the surface and interfaces, which are still open questions and key issues in the surface science community. In this topical review, we give an overview of the concept of hot electrons or surface-plasmon-mediated hot electrons generated under various structural schemes (i.e. metals, metal–semiconductor, and metal–insulator–metal) and their role affecting catalytic activity in chemical reactions. We highlight recent studies on the relation between hot electrons and catalytic activity on metallic surfaces. We discuss possible mechanisms for how hot electrons participate in chemical reactions. We also introduce controlled chemistry to describe specific pathways for selectivity control in catalysis on metal nanoparticles.

  11. Hot Oil Removes Wax

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1991-01-01

    Mineral oil heated to temperature of 250 degrees F (121 degrees C) found effective in removing wax from workpieces after fabrication. Depending upon size and shape of part to be cleaned of wax, part immersed in tank of hot oil, and/or interior of part flushed with hot oil. Pump, fittings, and ancillary tooling built easily for this purpose. After cleaning, innocuous oil residue washed off part by alkaline aqueous degreasing process. Serves as relatively safe alternative to carcinogenic and environmentally hazardous solvent perchloroethylene.

  12. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  13. Zen Hot Dog Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Dennis

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cycloalkanes with one branch illustrating each topic in an instructional unit can serve as summaries or reviews in courses of organic chemistry. The hungry Zen master told the hot dog vendor to make him one with everything. You can do the same for your students.

  14. Hot off the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole D.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, the newspaper was one of the world's most used sources of information. Recently, however, its use has declined due to the popularity of cable television and the Internet. Yet the idea of reading the morning paper with a hot cup of coffee holds many warm memories for children who watched their parents in this daily ritual. In this…

  15. Horseshoe pitchers' hot hands.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary

    2003-09-01

    Gilovich, Vallone, and Tversky's (1985) analysis of basketball data indicates that a player's chances of making a shot are not affected by the results of earlier shots. However, their basketball data do not control for several confounding influences. An analysis of horseshoe pitching, which does not have these defects, indicates that players do have modest hot and cold spells. PMID:14620374

  16. Hot piston ring tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David J.; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    As part of the DOE/NASA Automotive Stirling Engine Project, tests were made at NASA Lewis Research Center to determine whether appendix gap losses could be reduced and Stirling engine performance increased by installing an additional piston ring near the top of each piston dome. An MTI-designed upgraded Mod I Automotive Stirling Engine was used. Unlike the conventional rings at the bottom of the piston, these hot rings operated in a high temperature environment (700 C). They were made of a high temperature alloy (Stellite 6B) and a high temperature solid lubricant coating (NASA Lewis-developed PS-200) was applied to the cylinder walls. Engine tests were run at 5, 10, and 15 MPa operating pressure over a range of operating speeds. Tests were run both with hot rings and without to provide a baseline for comparison. Minimum data to assess the potential of both the hot rings and high temperature low friction coating was obtained. Results indicated a slight increase in power and efficiency, an increase over and above the friction loss introduced by the hot rings. Seal leakage measurements showed a significant reduction. Wear on both rings and coating was low.

  17. What's Hot? What's Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buczynski, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    When Goldilocks finds three bowls of porridge at different temperatures in the three bears' house, she accurately assesses the situation and comes up with one of the most recognizable lines in children's literature," This porridge is too hot; this porridge is too cold; aahh, this porridge is just right!" Goldilocks' famous line is a perfect…

  18. APPARATUS FOR HIGH PURITY METAL RECOVERY

    DOEpatents

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-02-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing high purity metal such as uranium, plutonium and the like from an impure mass of the same metal. The apparatus is arranged so that the impure metal is heated and swept by a stream of hydrogen gas bearing a halogen such as iodine. The volatiie metal halide formed is carried on to a hot filament where the metal halide is decomposed and the molten high purity metal is collected in a rceeiver below

  19. The Hot Gaseous Halos of Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, J.

    2016-06-01

    In the Milky Way, absorption and emission line measurements of O VII and O VIII show that the halo environment is dominated by a nearly spherical halo of temperature 2 × 10^6 K, metallicity of 0.3-0.5 solar, and with a density decreasing as r^{-3/2}. The mass of the hot gas, estimated through extrapolation to the virial radius, is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing mass. The Milky Way hot halo appears to be rotating at about 180 km/s, which is consistent with model expectations, depending on the time of infall. Around massive spiral galaxies, hot halos are seen in emission out to about 70 kpc in the best cases. These show similar gas density laws and metallicities in the range 0.1-0.5 solar. The gas mass is comparable to the stellar mass, but does not account for the missing baryons within the virial radius. If the density law can be extrapolated to about three virial radii, the missing baryons would be accounted for.

  20. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hot Tub Rash ( Pseudomonas Folliculitis) Information for adults A ... the skin and small pus-filled lesions. Overview Hot tub rash ( Pseudomonas folliculitis) is an infection of ...

  1. Exercising Safely in Hot Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising Safely in Hot Weather Many people enjoy outdoor activities—walking, gardening, ... older adults and people with health problems. Being hot for too long can cause hyperthermia—a heat- ...

  2. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section

  3. Hot Spring Metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, María Esperanza; González-Siso, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Hot springs have been investigated since the XIX century, but isolation and examination of their thermophilic microbial inhabitants did not start until the 1950s. Many thermophilic microorganisms and their viruses have since been discovered, although the real complexity of thermal communities was envisaged when research based on PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA genes arose. Thereafter, the possibility of cloning and sequencing the total environmental DNA, defined as metagenome, and the study of the genes rescued in the metagenomic libraries and assemblies made it possible to gain a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities—their diversity, structure, the interactions existing between their components, and the factors shaping the nature of these communities. In the last decade, hot springs have been a source of thermophilic enzymes of industrial interest, encouraging further study of the poorly understood diversity of microbial life in these habitats. PMID:25369743

  4. THE HOT CHOCOLATE EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Frank S.

    1980-12-01

    The "hot chocolate effect" was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the ten percent accuracy of the experiments.

  5. Hot chocolate effect

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S.

    1982-05-01

    The ''hot chocolate effect'' was investigated quantitatively, using water. If a tall glass cylinder is filled nearly completely with water and tapped on the bottom with a softened mallet one can detect the lowest longitudinal mode of the water column, for which the height of the water column is one-quarter wavelength. If the cylinder is rapidly filled with hot tap water containing dissolved air the pitch of that mode may descend by nearly three octaves during the first few seconds as the air comes out of solution and forms bubbles. Then the pitch gradually rises as the bubbles float to the top. A simple theoretical expression for the pitch ratio is derived and compared with experiment. The agreement is good to within the 10% accuracy of the experiments.

  6. Hot Billet Surface Qualifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tzyy-Shuh Chang

    2007-04-30

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), developed a prototype of a Hot Billet Surface Qualifier (“Qualifier”) based on OGT’s patented HotEye™ technology and other proprietary imaging and computing technologies. The Qualifier demonstrated its ability of imaging the cast billets in line with high definition pictures, pictures capable of supporting the detection of surface anomalies on the billets. The detection will add the ability to simplify the subsequent process and to correct the surface quality issues in a much more timely and efficient manner. This is challenging due to the continuous casting environment, in which corrosive water, temperature, vibration, humidity, EMI and other unbearable factors exist. Each installation has the potential of 249,000 MMBTU in energy savings per year. This represents a cost reduction, reduced emissions, reduced water usage and reduced mill scale.

  7. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  8. The ''hot'' patella

    SciTech Connect

    Kipper, M.S.; Alazraki, N.P.; Feiglin, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Increased patellar uptake on bone scans is seen quite commonly but the possible or probable etiologies of this finding have not been previously well described. A review of 100 consecutive bone scans showed that the incidence of bilateral ''hot'' patellae is 15%. Identified etiologies include osteoarthritic degenerative disease (35%), fracture, possible metastatic disease, bursitis, Paget's disease, and osteomyelitis. The value of careful history, physical examination, and radiographs is stressed.

  9. Solar Hot Water Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The solar panels pictured below, mounted on a Moscow, Idaho home, are part of a domestic hot water heating system capable of providing up to 100 percent of home or small business hot water needs. Produced by Lennox Industries Inc., Marshalltown, Iowa, the panels are commercial versions of a collector co-developed by NASA. In an effort to conserve energy, NASA has installed solar collectors at a number of its own facilities and is conducting research to develop the most efficient systems. Lewis Research Center teamed with Honeywell Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota to develop the flat plate collector shown. Key to the collector's efficiency is black chrome coating on the plate developed for use on spacecraft solar cells, the coating prevents sun heat from "reradiating," or escaping outward. The design proved the most effective heat absorber among 23 different types of collectors evaluated in a Lewis test program. The Lennox solar domestic hot water heating system has three main components: the array of collectors, a "solar module" (blue unit pictured) and a conventional water heater. A fluid-ethylene glycol and water-is circulated through the collectors to absorb solar heat. The fluid is then piped to a double-walled jacket around a water tank within the solar module.

  10. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  11. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  12. STRIPPING METAL COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Siefen, H.T.; Campbell, J.M.

    1959-02-01

    A method is described for removing aluminumuranium-silicon alloy bonded to metallic U comprising subjecting the Al-U -Si alloy to treatment with hot concentrated HNO/sun 3/ to partially dissolve and embrittle the alloy and shot- blasting the embrittled alloy to loosen it from the U.

  13. The Properties of Diffuse Warm and Hot Gas in I Zw 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomans, D. J.

    With their generally low metallicity and shallow potential wells, low mass galaxies are especially well suited laboratories for the interplay between gas and stars. Even moderate star formation events effect large parts of the host system and outflows of warm and hot gas with freshly produced metals appear to be relatively common. In addition the cooling rate of the hot gas in the outflows should be depressed as effect of the low metallicity. While the study of the creation and transport of the hot gas and the interaction between hot and colder gas needs X-ray data, relatively little data are available in the literature for dwarf galaxies, yet. Here we present a case study of the diffuse hot gas of I Zw 18 using CHANDRA ACIS-S imaging and spectroscopy. The X-ray results are compared with HST imaging and long-slit echelle spectroscopy of the warm diffuse gas. I Zw 18 is an especially well suited target due to extremely low metallicity, relatively high current star formation rate, and low mass. Narrow band imaging and echelle spectroscopy demonstrate that gas is flowing out of the galaxy. The low metallicity should aid the detection of metallicity differences between the galaxy and the hot, possibly metal-enriched gas on its way out of the host galaxy. The ACIS-S spectrum is discussed in this respect.

  14. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    2011-03-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  15. Hot Stars in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Upgren, Arthur R.; Adelman, Carol J.

    1994-08-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Part I. Introductory Papers: 1. What is the galaxy's halo population?; 2. Theoretical properties of horizontal-branch stars; 3. A review of A-type horizontal-branch stars; Part II. Surveys: 4. A progress report on the Edinburgh-Cape object survey; 5. A 300 square degree survey of young stars at high galactic latitudes; 6. The isolation of a new sample of B stars in the halo; 7. A northern catalog of FHB/A stars; 8. Recent progress on a continuing survey of galactic globular clusters for blue stragglers; 9. UV observations with FAUST and the galactic model; 10. Hot stars at the South Galactic Pole; Part III. Clusters: 11. Population II horizontal branches: a photometric study of globular clusters; 12. The period-shift effect in Oosterhoff type II globular clusters; 13. UV photometry of hot stars in omega centauri; 14. Spectroscopic and UBV observations of blue stars at the NGP; 15. Population I horizontal branches: probing the halo-to-disk transition; Part IV. Stars: 16. Very hot subdwarf O stars; 17. Quantitative spectroscopy of the very hot subluminous O-stars: K646, PG1159-035, and KPD0005+5106; 18. Analyzing the helium-rich hot sdO stars in the Palomar Green Survey; 19. Late type companions of hot sd O stars; 20. Hot stars in globular clusters; 21. Faint blue stars from the Hamburg Schmidt Survey; 22. Stellar winds and the evolution of sdB's to sdO's; 23. Halo stars in the Vilnius photometric system; 24. Horizontal branch stars in the geneva photometric system; 25. Zeeman observations of FHB stars and hot subdwarf stars; 26. What does a FHB star's spectrum look like?; 27. A technique for distinguishing FHB stars from A-type stars; 28. eEemental abundances of halo A and interloper stars; 29. The mass of blue horizontal branch stars in the globular cluster NGC6397; 30. IUE observations of blue HB stars in the globular clusters M3 and NGC6752; 31. Metallicities and kinematics of the local RR lyraes: lukewarm stars

  16. Filter for cleaning hot gases

    SciTech Connect

    Gresch, H.; Holter, H.; Hubner, K.; Igelbuscher, H.; Weber, E.

    1981-10-20

    In an apparatus for cleaning hot gases a filter housing has an inlet for unfiltered gas and an outlet for filtered gas. A plurality of filtered inserts are placed within the housing in a manner capable of filtering undesirable components from the gas feed stream. Each filter insert is made of a fibrous filter material. Silicic-acid glass fibers have a silicic acid content of at least 90%. Coated upon the fibers and absorbed into their pores is a metal oxide of aluminum, titanium, zirconium, cromium, nickle or cobalt. A honeycombed cage filled with high temperature resistant perlite is located within the housing between the gas inlet and the fiber inserts. The cage has an inlet and outlet external to the housing for replacing the perlite. A combustion chamber mounted in the housing has a discharge nozzle located so that the nozzle is directed at the filter inserts. Combusting materials in the chamber causes an explosive backflow of gases through the filter inserts.

  17. Evolution of Molecular Clouds in a Hot Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieser, Wolfgang; Hensler, Gerhard

    We are performing 2D hydrodynamic simulations to examine the evaporation and condensation of molecular clouds in the hot phase of the interstellar medium due to heat conduction. Heat conduction is a process that may not be neglected for clouds which are embedded in a hot gas, High-Velocity-Clouds falling through the hot galactic halo or clouds in a galactic chimney. The evolution of cold and dense clouds with different masses and radii is calculated in the subsonic streaming of a hot rarefied plasma. Our code includes self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. Simulations with and without heat conduction show significant differences. Heat conduction provides a possibility to stabilize clouds agains hydrodynamic instabilities. Molecular clouds become able to survive significantly longer in a violent stream of hot gas. Additionally, this hot gas condensates onto the cloud's surface and is mixed very efficiently with the cloud material. Therefore, heat conduction is an important process, which has to be considered in order to explain the existence and metallicity of clouds in a stream of hot gas.

  18. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Larry W.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  19. Hot oiling spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Mansure, A.J.

    1996-09-01

    One of the most common oil-field treatments is hot oiling to remove paraffin from wells. Even though the practice is common, the thermal effectiveness of the process is not commonly understood. In order for producers to easily understand the thermodynamics of hot oiling, a simple tool is needed for estimating downhole temperatures. Such a tool has been developed that was distributed as a compiled, public-domain-software spreadsheet. That spreadsheet has evolved into an interactive from on the World Wide Web and has been adapted into a Windows{trademark} program by Petrolite, St. Louis MO. The development of such a tools was facilitated by expressing downhole temperatures in terms of analytic formulas. Considerable algebraic work is required to develop such formulas. Also, the data describing hot oiling is customarily a mixture of practical units that must be converted to a consistent set of units. To facilitate the algebraic manipulations and to assure unit conversions are correct, during development parallel calculations were made using the spreadsheet and a symbolic mathematics program. Derivation of the formulas considered falling film flow in the annulus and started from the transient differential equations so that the effects of the heat capacity of the tubing and casing could be included. While this approach to developing a software product does not have the power and sophistication of a finite element or difference code, it produces a user friendly product that implements the equations solved with a minimum potential for bugs. This allows emphasis in development of the product to be placed on the physics.

  20. Hot cell examination table

    DOEpatents

    Gaal, Peter S.; Ebejer, Lino P.; Kareis, James H.; Schlegel, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A table for use in a hot cell or similar controlled environment for use in examining specimens. The table has a movable table top that can be moved relative to a table frame. A shaft is fixedly mounted to the frame for axial rotation. A shaft traveler having a plurality of tilted rollers biased against the shaft is connected to the table top such that rotation of the shaft causes the shaft traveler to roll along the shaft. An electromagnetic drive is connected to the shaft and the frame for controllably rotating the shaft.

  1. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOEpatents

    Black, Roger L.

    1981-01-01

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  2. MSFC hot air collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, K.

    1978-01-01

    A description of the hot air collector is given that includes a history of development, a history of the materials development, and a program summary. The major portion of the solar energy system cost is the collector. Since the collector is the heart of the system and the most costly subsystem, reducing the cost of producing collectors in large quantities is a major goal. This solar collector is designed to heat air and/or water cheaply and efficiently through the use of solar energy.

  3. ACCRETION OF ROCKY PLANETS BY HOT JUPITERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-11-01

    The observed population of Hot Jupiters displays a stunning variety of physical properties, including a wide range of densities and core sizes for a given planetary mass. Motivated by the observational sample, this Letter studies the accretion of rocky planets by Hot Jupiters, after the Jovian planets have finished their principal migration epoch and become parked in {approx}4 day orbits. In this scenario, rocky planets form later and then migrate inward due to torques from the remaining circumstellar disk, which also damps the orbital eccentricity. This mechanism thus represents one possible channel for increasing the core masses and metallicities of Hot Jupiters. This Letter determines probabilities for the possible end states for the rocky planet: collisions with the Jovian planets, accretion onto the star, ejection from the system, and long-term survival of both planets. These probabilities depend on the mass of the Jovian planet and its starting orbital eccentricity, as well as the eccentricity damping rate for the rocky planet. Since these systems are highly chaotic, a large ensemble (N {approx} 10{sup 3}) of simulations with effectively equivalent starting conditions is required. Planetary collisions are common when the eccentricity damping rate is sufficiently low, but are rare otherwise. For systems that experience planetary collisions, this work determines the distributions of impact velocities-both speeds and impact parameters-for the collisions. These velocity distributions help determine the consequences of the impacts, e.g., where energy and heavy elements are deposited within the giant planets.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  5. Radiations from hot nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1993-01-01

    The investigation indicates that nuclei with excitation energy of a few hundred MeV to BeV are more likely to radiate hot nuclear clusters than neutrons. These daughter clusters could, furthermore, de-excite emitting other hot nuclei, and the chain continues until these nuclei cool off sufficiently to evaporate primarily neutrons. A few GeV excited nuclei could radiate elementary particles preferentially over neutrons. Impact of space radiation with materials (for example, spacecraft) produces highly excited nuclei which cool down emitting electromagnetic and particle radiations. At a few MeV excitation energy, neutron emission becomes more dominant than gamma-ray emission and one often attributes the cooling to take place by successive neutron decay. However, a recent experiment studying the cooling process of 396 MeV excited Hg-190 casts some doubt on this thinking, and the purpose of this investigation is to explore the possibility of other types of nuclear emission which might out-compete with neutron evaporation.

  6. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K. G.; Jellison, James L.; Staley, David J.

    1995-01-01

    A system for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs.

  7. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  8. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system.

    The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles.

    Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone.

    This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged

  9. TRUEX hot demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  10. Response of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Broglia, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The dipole giant resonance is reviewed, as it is the only vibration which has been experimentally identified in the decay of hot nuclei. The mechanism of exciting the resonance and the mode of the resonance are described. The methods used to calculate the vibrations from the shell model are discussed, including the Hartree-Fock approximation and random phase approximation. Nuclei formed by compound nuclear reactions, which possess high excitation energy and angular momentum, are considered. It is argued that the stability of the dipole may be used to advantage in the study of other properties of nuclei at high excitation. It is also considered possible that the discussion of the dipole giant resonance may be extended to the gamma decay of the isovector quadrupole vibration. 26 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  11. How Deep and Hot was Earth's Magma Ocean? Combined Experimental Datasets for the Metal-silicate Partitioning of 11 Siderophile Elements - Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Since approximately 1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients (D) for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth. Initial conclusions were based on experiments and calculations for a small number of elements such as Ni and Co. However, for many elements only a limited number of experimental data were available then, and they only hinted at values of metal-silicate D's at high PT conditions. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements. At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in the earth's mantle: a) intermediate depth magma ocean; 25-30 GPa, b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa, and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to update the predictive expressions outlined by Righter et al. (1997) with new experimental data from the last decade, test the predictive ability of these expressions against independent datasets (there are more data now to do this properly), and to apply the resulting expressions to the siderophile element patterns in Earth's upper mantle. The predictive expressions have the form: lnD = alnfO2 + b/T + cP/T + d(1Xs) + e(1Xc) + SigmafiXi + g These expressions are guided by the thermodynamics of simple metal-oxide equilibria that control each element, include terms that mimic the activity coefficients of each element in the metal and silicate, and quantify the effect of

  12. How Deep and Hot was Earth's Magma Ocean? Combined Experimental Datasets for the Metal-Silicate Partitioning of 11 Siderophile Elements - Ni, Co, Mo, W, P, Mn, V, Cr, Ga, Cu and Pd.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.

    2008-12-01

    Since ~1990 high pressure and temperature (PT) experiments on metal-silicate systems have showed that partition coefficients (D) for siderophile (iron-loving) elements are much different than those measured at low PT conditions. The high PT data have been used to argue for a magma ocean during growth of the early Earth. Initial conclusions were based on experiments and calculations for a small number of elements such as Ni and Co. However, for many elements only a limited number of experimental data were available then, and they only hinted at values of metal-silicate D's at high PT conditions. In the ensuing decades there have been hundreds of new experiments carried out and published on a wide range of siderophile elements. At the same time several different models have been advanced to explain the siderophile elements in the earth's mantle: a) intermediate depth magma ocean; 25-30 GPa, b) deep magma ocean; up to 50 GPa, and c) early reduced and later oxidized magma ocean. Some studies have drawn conclusions based on a small subset of siderophile elements, or a set of elements that provides little leverage on the big picture (like slightly siderophile elements), and no single study has attempted to quantitatively explain more than 5 elements at a time. The purpose of this abstract is to update the predictive expressions outlined by Righter et al. (1997) with new experimental data from the last decade, test the predictive ability of these expressions against independent datasets (there are more data now to do this properly), and to apply the resulting expressions to the siderophile element patterns in Earth's upper mantle. The predictive expressions have the form: ln D = alnfO2 + b/T + cP/T + d(1-Xs) + e(1-Xc) + Σ fiXi + g. These expressions are guided by the thermodynamics of simple metal-oxide equilibria that control each element, include terms that mimic the activity coefficients of each element in the metal and silicate, and quantify the effect of variable

  13. Plasmon-induced hot carrier science and technology.

    PubMed

    Brongersma, Mark L; Halas, Naomi J; Nordlander, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the photoelectric effect by Heinrich Hertz in 1887 set the foundation for over 125 years of hot carrier science and technology. In the early 1900s it played a critical role in the development of quantum mechanics, but even today the unique properties of these energetic, hot carriers offer new and exciting opportunities for fundamental research and applications. Measurement of the kinetic energy and momentum of photoejected hot electrons can provide valuable information on the electronic structure of materials. The heat generated by hot carriers can be harvested to drive a wide range of physical and chemical processes. Their kinetic energy can be used to harvest solar energy or create sensitive photodetectors and spectrometers. Photoejected charges can also be used to electrically dope two-dimensional materials. Plasmon excitations in metallic nanostructures can be engineered to enhance and provide valuable control over the emission of hot carriers. This Review discusses recent advances in the understanding and application of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and highlights some of the exciting new directions for the field. PMID:25559968

  14. Plasmon-induced hot carrier science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brongersma, Mark L.; Halas, Naomi J.; Nordlander, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the photoelectric effect by Heinrich Hertz in 1887 set the foundation for over 125 years of hot carrier science and technology. In the early 1900s it played a critical role in the development of quantum mechanics, but even today the unique properties of these energetic, hot carriers offer new and exciting opportunities for fundamental research and applications. Measurement of the kinetic energy and momentum of photoejected hot electrons can provide valuable information on the electronic structure of materials. The heat generated by hot carriers can be harvested to drive a wide range of physical and chemical processes. Their kinetic energy can be used to harvest solar energy or create sensitive photodetectors and spectrometers. Photoejected charges can also be used to electrically dope two-dimensional materials. Plasmon excitations in metallic nanostructures can be engineered to enhance and provide valuable control over the emission of hot carriers. This Review discusses recent advances in the understanding and application of plasmon-induced hot carrier generation and highlights some of the exciting new directions for the field.

  15. Pilot scale experience on IGCC hot gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, K.; Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.

    1995-11-01

    In September 1993 Enviropower Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Department of Energy in order to develop and demonstrate the major components of an IGCC process such as hot gas cleanup systems. The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate: (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable metal oxide sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator, and (3) hot gas particulate removal using ceramic candle filters.

  16. SOURCE ASSESSMENT: ASPHALT HOT MIX

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes data on air emissions from the asphalt hot mix industry. A representative asphalt hot mix plant was defined, based on the results of an industrial survey, to assess the severity of emissions from this industry. Source severity was defined as the ratio of th...

  17. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  18. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  19. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  20. Hot-electron-mediated surface chemistry: toward electronic control of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Young; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Hyosun; Nedrygailov, Ievgen I

    2015-08-18

    Energy dissipation at surfaces and interfaces is mediated by excitation of elementary processes, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface during exothermic chemical processes. Nonadiabatic electronic excitation in exothermic catalytic reactions results in the flow of energetic electrons with an energy of 1-3 eV when chemical energy is converted to electron flow on a short (femtosecond) time scale before atomic vibration adiabatically dissipates the energy (in picoseconds). These energetic electrons that are not in thermal equilibrium with the metal atoms are called "hot electrons". The detection of hot electron flow under atomic or molecular processes and understanding its role in chemical reactions have been major topics in surface chemistry. Recent studies have demonstrated electronic excitation produced during atomic or molecular processes on surfaces, and the influence of hot electrons on atomic and molecular processes. We outline research efforts aimed at identification of the intrinsic relation between the flow of hot electrons and catalytic reactions. We show various strategies for detection and use of hot electrons generated by the energy dissipation processes in surface chemical reactions and photon absorption. A Schottky barrier localized at the metal-oxide interface of either catalytic nanodiodes or hybrid nanocatalysts allows hot electrons to irreversibly transport through the interface. We show that the chemicurrent, composed of hot electrons excited by the surface reaction of CO oxidation or hydrogen oxidation, correlates well with the turnover rate measured separately by gas chromatography. Furthermore, we show that hot electron flows generated on a gold thin film by photon absorption (or internal photoemission) can be amplified by localized surface plasmon resonance. The influence of hot charge carriers on the chemistry at the metal-oxide interface are discussed for the cases of Au, Ag, and Pt

  1. OT2_rvisser_2: Hot water in hot cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, R.

    2011-09-01

    As matter flows from the ice-cold envelope onto a forming protostar, it heats up from temperatures of 10 K to more than 100 K. The region where the temperature exceeds 100 K (the hot core or hot corino) is where the molecular envelope connects with both the seedling circumstellar disk and the bipolar outflow. As the envelope contracts from larger scales, a lot of material passes through the hot core before accreting onto the disk. The hot core is therefore a crucial step in establishing the physical and chemical properties of planetary building blocks. However, little is yet known about hot cores. How large and how massive are they? How hot are they? Are they exposed to strong UV or X-ray fluxes? We propose the rotationally excited 3(12)-3(03) line of H2-18O at 1095.6 GHz (E_up = 249 K) as a novel probe into the properties of hot cores. This line was detected as a narrow emission feature (FWHM ~4 km/s) in a deep integration (5 hr) in the Class 0 protostar NGC1333 IRAS2A. Comparing the line intensity to radiative transfer models, we find a tentative H2-16O hot core abundance of 4x10^-6. This is a factor of 50 lower than one would expect from simple evaporation of water ice above 100 K. Why is the hot core of IRAS2A so much "drier" than expected? Is most of the water destroyed by UV photons and/or X-rays? We propose to measure the water abundance in the hot cores of a sample of five additional Class 0 and I protostars by obtaining deep integrations of the 3(12)-3(03) lines of H2-16O and H2-18O. This mini-survey will reveal whether NGC1333 IRAS2A is unique in having a "dry" hot core, or whether "dry" hot cores are a common feature of low-mass embedded protostars. If they are a common feature, it means they are a more hostile environment than previously thought, with high fluxes of destructive UV photons and X-rays.

  2. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  3. Composite hot drape forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Thomas

    1994-02-01

    This program was initiated to replace labor-intensive ply-by-ply layup of composite I-beam posts and angle stiffeners used in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) rack structure. Hot drape forming (HDF) has been successfully implemented by BCAG for 777 composite I-stringers and by Bell Helicopter/Textron for the V-22 I-stingers. The two companies utilize two vastly different approaches to the I-beam fabrication process. A drape down process is used by Bell Helicopter where the compacted ply charge is placed on top of a forming mandrel and heated. When the heated ply charge reached a set temperature, vacuum pressure is applied and the plies are formed over the mandrel. The BCAG 777 process utilizes an inverted forming process where the ply stack is placed on a forming table and the mandrel is inverted and placed upon the ply stack. A heating and vacuum bladder underneath the ply stack form the play stack up onto the mandrels after reaching the temperature setpoint. Both methods have their advantages, but the drape down process was selected for SSF because it was more versatile and could be fabricated from readily available components.

  4. Saturn's Hot Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the sharpest image of Saturn's temperature emissions taken from the ground; it is a mosaic of 35 individual exposures made at the W.M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii on Feb. 4, 2004.

    The images to create this mosaic were taken with infrared radiation. The mosaic was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of the image is right at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected. The tropospheric temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    Ring particles are not at a uniform temperature everywhere in their orbit around Saturn. The ring particles are orbiting clockwise in this image. Particles are coldest just after having cooled down in Saturn's shadow (lower left). As they orbit Saturn, the particles increase in temperature up to a maximum (lower right) just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

    A small section of the ring image is missing because of incomplete mosaic coverage during the observing sequence.

  5. Composite hot drape forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This program was initiated to replace labor-intensive ply-by-ply layup of composite I-beam posts and angle stiffeners used in the Space Station Freedom (SSF) rack structure. Hot drape forming (HDF) has been successfully implemented by BCAG for 777 composite I-stringers and by Bell Helicopter/Textron for the V-22 I-stingers. The two companies utilize two vastly different approaches to the I-beam fabrication process. A drape down process is used by Bell Helicopter where the compacted ply charge is placed on top of a forming mandrel and heated. When the heated ply charge reached a set temperature, vacuum pressure is applied and the plies are formed over the mandrel. The BCAG 777 process utilizes an inverted forming process where the ply stack is placed on a forming table and the mandrel is inverted and placed upon the ply stack. A heating and vacuum bladder underneath the ply stack form the play stack up onto the mandrels after reaching the temperature setpoint. Both methods have their advantages, but the drape down process was selected for SSF because it was more versatile and could be fabricated from readily available components.

  6. Really Hot Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Spectacular VLT Photos Unveil Mysterious Nebulae Summary Quite a few of the most beautiful objects in the Universe are still shrouded in mystery. Even though most of the nebulae of gas and dust in our vicinity are now rather well understood, there are some which continue to puzzle astronomers. This is the case of a small number of unusual nebulae that appear to be the subject of strong heating - in astronomical terminology, they present an amazingly "high degree of excitation". This is because they contain significant amounts of ions, i.e., atoms that have lost one or more of their electrons. Depending on the atoms involved and the number of electrons lost, this process bears witness to the strength of the radiation or to the impact of energetic particles. But what are the sources of that excitation? Could it be energetic stars or perhaps some kind of exotic objects inside these nebulae? How do these peculiar objects fit into the current picture of universal evolution? New observations of a number of such unusual nebulae have recently been obtained with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). In a dedicated search for the origin of their individual characteristics, a team of astronomers - mostly from the Institute of Astrophysics & Geophysics in Liège (Belgium) [1] - have secured the first detailed, highly revealing images of four highly ionized nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds, two small satellite galaxies of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, only a few hundred thousand light-years away. In three nebulae, they succeeded in identifying the sources of energetic radiation and to eludicate their exceptional properties: some of the hottest, most massive stars ever seen, some of which are double. With masses of more than 20 times that of the Sun and surface temperatures above 90 000 degrees, these stars are truly extreme. PR Photo 09a/03: Nebula around the hot star AB7 in the SMC. PR Photo 09b/03: Nebula near the hot Wolf-Rayet star BAT99

  7. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W. David; Carmack, Jon; Werner, James E.; Pink, Robert J.; Haggard, DeLon C.; Johnson, Ryan

    2007-01-30

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISP. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant's absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500 deg. C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test low activity uranium containing materials but is also suited for testing cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  8. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere.

    The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO).

    Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  9. Techniques for hot structures testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, V. Michael; Fields, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    Hot structures testing have been going on since the early 1960's beginning with the Mach 6, X-15 airplane. Early hot structures test programs at NASA-Ames-Dryden focused on operational testing required to support the X-15 flight test program, and early hot structures research projects focused on developing lab test techniques to simulate flight thermal profiles. More recent efforts involved numerous large and small hot structures test programs that served to develop test methods and measurement techniques to provide data that promoted the correlation of test data with results from analytical codes. In Nov. 1988 a workshop was sponsored that focused on the correlation of hot structures test data with analysis. Limited material is drawn from the workshop and a more formal documentation is provided of topics that focus on hot structures test techniques used at NASA-Ames-Dryden. Topics covered include the data acquisition and control of testing, the quartz lamp heater systems, current strain and temperature sensors, and hot structures test techniques used to simulate the flight thermal environment in the lab.

  10. Hot "spoments" in river networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubeneau, A. F.; Aquino, T.; Bolster, D.; Tank, J. L.; Packman, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    Hot spots and hot moments are usually studied at small scales. These small patches or periods of abnormally high biogeochemical activity have been linked to the interface between the terrestrial and aquatic environments and to the benthic ecotone in streams. Here, we revisit the concepts of hot spots and moments in river networks. We specifically consider cases of carbon and nitrogen cycling and explore the interaction between spatial and temporal signals to identify "hot spoments" in the network. We present field data showing that biogeochemical and hydrological processes alternatively control dissolved carbon and nitrogen fluxes. Field experiments and numerical simulations show that both headwater streams and rivers can be efficient at removing nutrients and carbon from the flowing water, but typically under contrasting climatic forcing. We also present new analytical models leveraging graph theory that describe how different parts of the network are biogeochemically active at different times. Taken together, our results suggest that hot-moments depend on space and hot-spots on time, and vice versa. In other words, unusually high biogeochemical activity may be found in different places at different times along river networks. Our simulations suggest that hot "spoments" impact large scale (spatial and temporal) budgets of carbon and nitrogen export from watersheds.

  11. HOT STARS WITH HOT JUPITERS HAVE HIGH OBLIQUITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, Joshua N.; Albrecht, Simon; Fabrycky, Daniel; Johnson, John Asher

    2010-08-01

    We show that stars with transiting planets for which the stellar obliquity is large are preferentially hot (T{sub eff} > 6250 K). This could explain why small obliquities were observed in the earliest measurements, which focused on relatively cool stars drawn from Doppler surveys, as opposed to hotter stars that emerged more recently from transit surveys. The observed trend could be due to differences in planet formation and migration around stars of varying mass. Alternatively, we speculate that hot-Jupiter systems begin with a wide range of obliquities, but the photospheres of cool stars realign with the orbits due to tidal dissipation in their convective zones, while hot stars cannot realign because of their thinner convective zones. This in turn would suggest that hot Jupiters originate from few-body gravitational dynamics and that disk migration plays at most a supporting role.

  12. Not so hot "hot spots" in the oceanic mantle.

    PubMed

    Bonath, E

    1990-10-01

    Excess volcanism and crustal swelling associated with hot spots are generally attributed to thermal plumes upwelling from the mantle. This concept has been tested in the portion of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 34 degrees and 45 degrees (Azores hot spot). Peridotite and basalt data indicate that the upper mantle in the hot spot has undergone a high degree of melting relative to the mantle elsewhere in the North Atlantic. However, application of various geothermometers suggests that the temperature of equilibration of peridotites in the mantle was lower, or at least not higher, in the hot spot than elsewhere. The presence of H(2)O-rich metasomatized mantle domains, inferred from peridotite and basalt data, would lower the melting temperature of the hot spot mantle and thereby reconcile its high degree ofmelting with the lack of a mantle temperature anomaly. Thus, some so-called hot spots might be melting anomalies unrelated to abnormally high mantle temperature or thermal plumes. PMID:17808242

  13. Nanomoulding with amorphous metals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Golden; Tang, Hong X; Schroers, Jan

    2009-02-12

    Nanoimprinting promises low-cost fabrication of micro- and nano-devices by embossing features from a hard mould onto thermoplastic materials, typically polymers with low glass transition temperature. The success and proliferation of such methods critically rely on the manufacturing of robust and durable master moulds. Silicon-based moulds are brittle and have limited longevity. Metal moulds are stronger than semiconductors, but patterning of metals on the nanometre scale is limited by their finite grain size. Amorphous metals (metallic glasses) exhibit superior mechanical properties and are intrinsically free from grain size limitations. Here we demonstrate direct nanopatterning of metallic glasses by hot embossing, generating feature sizes as small as 13 nm. After subsequently crystallizing the as-formed metallic glass mould, we show that another amorphous sample of the same alloy can be formed on the crystallized mould. In addition, metallic glass replicas can also be used as moulds for polymers or other metallic glasses with lower softening temperatures. Using this 'spawning' process, we can massively replicate patterned surfaces through direct moulding without using conventional lithography. We anticipate that our findings will catalyse the development of micro- and nanoscale metallic glass applications that capitalize on the outstanding mechanical properties, microstructural homogeneity and isotropy, and ease of thermoplastic forming exhibited by these materials. PMID:19212407

  14. Corrosion Resistances of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals with Yttrium and Tungsten Additions in Hot Calcium Chloride Brine & Natural Seawater: Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6 and W-Containing Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peter, W; Payer, J; Branagan, D J

    2006-10-20

    Yttrium-containing SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0}), has a critical cooling rate (CCR) of approximately 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) with no yttrium has a higher critical cooling rate of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. SAM1651's low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The passive film stability of these Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be superior to that of conventional stainless steels, and comparable to that of Ni-based alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates.

  15. Hierarchical nonlinear behavior of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Hierarchical computational procedures are described to simulate the multiple scale thermal/mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via METCAN (Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via MMLT (Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via HITCAN (High Temperature Composite Analyzer). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures and accompanying computer codes. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as the entire creep span; MMLT can be used to concurrently tailor the fabrication process and the interphase layer for optimum performance such as minimum residual stresses; and HITCAN can be used to predict the structural behavior such as the deformed shape due to component fabrication. These codes constitute virtual portable desk-top test laboratories for characterizing HT-MMC laminates, tailoring the fabrication process, and qualifying structural components made from them.

  16. Surface-plasmon enhanced photodetection at communication band based on hot electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-08-01

    Surface plasmons can squeeze light into a deep-subwavelength space and generate abundant hot electrons in the nearby metallic regions, enabling a new paradigm of photoconversion by the way of hot electron collection. Unlike the visible spectral range concerned in previous literatures, we focus on the communication band and design the infrared hot-electron photodetectors with plasmonic metal-insulator-metal configuration by using full-wave finite-element method. Titanium dioxide-silver Schottky interface is employed to boost the low-energy infrared photodetection. The photodetection sensitivity is strongly improved by enhancing the plasmonic excitation from a rationally engineered metallic grating, which enables a strong unidirectional photocurrent. With a five-step electrical simulation, the optimized device exhibits an unbiased responsivity of ˜0.1 mA/W and an ultra-narrow response band (FWHM = 4.66 meV), which promises to be a candidate as the compact photodetector operating in communication band.

  17. Red-Hot Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These side-by-side false-color images show Saturn's heat emission. The data were taken on Feb. 4, 2004, from the W. M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Both images were taken with infrared radiation. The image on the left was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The image on the right was taken at a wavelength of 8 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's stratosphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of each image is at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected.

    The troposphere temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole. Near 70 degrees latitude, the stratospheric temperature increases even more abruptly from 146 to 150 Kelvin (-197 to -189 degrees Fahrenheit) and then again to 151 Kelvin (-188 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    While the rings are too faint to be detected at 8 microns (right), they show up at 17.65 microns. The ring particles are orbiting Saturn to the left on the bottom and to the right on the top. The lower left ring is colder than the lower right ring, because the particles are just moving out of Saturn's shadow where they have cooled off. As they orbit Saturn, they warm up to a maximum just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

  18. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  19. Do scientists trace hot topics?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tian; Li, Menghui; Wu, Chensheng; Yan, Xiao-Yong; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2013-01-01

    Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries, among research works regarding different number of authors, different number of affiliations and different number of references. These observations could be valuable for policy makers when deciding research funding and also for individual researchers when searching for scientific projects. PMID:23856680

  20. Morpheus Lander Hot Fire Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a successful "hot fire" test of the Morpheus lander on February 27, 2012, at the VTB Flight Complex at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The engine burns for an extended period of time ...

  1. A deep XMM-Newton study of the hot gaseous halo around NGC 1961

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Churazov, Eugene; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We examine 11 XMM-Newton observations of the giant spiral galaxy NGC 1961, allowing us to study the hot gaseous halo of a spiral galaxy in unprecedented detail. We perform a spatial and a spectral analysis; with the former, the hot halo is detected to at least 80 kpc and with the latter its properties can be measured in detail up to 42 kpc. We find evidence for a negative gradient in the temperature profile as is common for elliptical galaxies. We measure a rough metallicity profile, which is consistent with being flat at Z ˜ 0.2 Z⊙. Converting to this metallicity, the deprojected density profile is consistent with previous parametric fits, with no evidence for a break within 42 kpc (˜0.1 Rvir). Extrapolating to the virial radius, we infer a hot halo mass comparable to the stellar mass of the galaxy, and a baryon fraction from the stars and hot gas of around 30 per cent. The cooling time of the hot gas is orders of magnitude longer than the dynamical time, making the hot halo stable against cooling instabilities, and we argue that an extended stream of neutral hydrogen seen to the NW of this galaxy is instead likely due to accretion from the intergalactic medium. The low metallicity of the hot halo suggests that it too was likely accreted. We compare the hot halo of NGC 1961 to hot haloes around isolated elliptical galaxies, and show that the total mass determines the hot halo properties better than the stellar mass.

  2. Hot Subdwarf Stars and the ZAHeMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D.

    2014-04-01

    The precise evolutionary mechanism for the production of hot subdwarf stars remains unsolved, though there are many plausible explanations. One general group of hypotheses proposes that sdB/EHB stars are the result of various processes typical of their single-star progeny, quite possibly very much affected by chemical environment and stellar wind mass loss. An alternative set of hypothesis proposes that such hot subdwarf/EHB objects are the result of binary interactions. Following the methodology of Han et al. (2002, 2003) in their binary population synthesis study of the evolutionary channels of sdB stars in the Galactic field for Z=0.02, this study has conducted a binary population synthesis investigation at various metallicities in order to examine the production of hot subwarf stars in different environments. Although it is found that metallicity is not a major factor in the production of such helium burning stars, there are a number of second-order effects. Results yield some hot subdwarf stars placed in areas below the ZAHeMS (in the log10g,log10 Teff diagram) which could give some information on the production of low-mass sdBs.

  3. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  4. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  5. HITCAN for actively cooled hot-composite thermostructural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.; Lackney, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    A computer code, high temperature composite analyzer (HITCAN), was developed to analyze/design hot metal matrix composite structures. HITCAN is a general purpose code for predicting the global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered (arbitrarily oriented) metal matrix structures both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structural level, including the fabrication process effects. The thermomechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters, including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interaction material behavior model, i.e., the material properties are expressed in terms of a product of several factors that affect the properties. HITCAN structural analysis capabilities (static, load stepping - a multistep static analysis with material properties updated at each step, modal, and buckling) for cooled hot structures are demonstrated through a specific example problem.

  6. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  7. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  8. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  9. Strategies for detecting the missing hot baryons in the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Joel N.; Alves, Guilherme Camargo; Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund

    2015-10-01

    About 30% to 50% of the baryons in the local universe are unaccounted for and are likely in a hot phase, 105.5 to 108 K. A hot halo (106.3 K) is detected around the Milky Way through the O VII and O VIII resonance absorption and emission lines in the soft x-ray band. Current instruments are not sensitive enough to detect this gas in absorption around other galaxies and galaxy groups, the two most likely sites. We show that resonant line absorption by this hot gas can be detected with current technology, with a collecting area exceeding ˜300 cm2 and a spectral resolution R>2000. For a few notional x-ray telescope configurations that could be constructed as Explorer or Probe missions, we calculate the differential number of O VII and O VIII absorbers as a function of equivalent width through redshift space, dN/dz. The hot halos of individual external galaxies produce absorption that should be detectable out to about their virial radii. For the Milky Way, one can determine the radial distribution of density, temperature, and metallicity after making optical depth corrections. Spectroscopic observations can determine the rotation of a hot gaseous halo.

  10. Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Greg; Leiser, Daniel; Bartlett, Jim; Lavine, Adrienne

    2003-01-01

    Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions. Fabricating hot-film substrates using low-thermal-conductivity ceramics can offer advantages over traditional quartz or polyester-film substrates. First, a low conductivity substrate increases the fraction of heat convected away by the fluid, thus increasing sensitivity to changes in flow conditions. Furthermore, the two-part, composite nature of the substrate allows the installation of thermocouple junctions just below the hot film, which can provide an estimate of the conduction heat loss.

  11. Mechanism of hot corrosion of IN-738

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Na2SO4 - induced hot corrosion of IN-738 in the temperature range 900 C to 1000 C is characterized by an initiation stage during which the corrosion rate is slow followed by a propagation stage during which the corrosion rate is markedly accelerated. In the second stage, corrosion is accelerated due essentially to a sulfidation/oxidation mechanism; in the third stage, the rate becomes catastrophic due to acid fluxing induced by an accumulation of refractory metal oxides (particularly MoO3) in the Na2SO4. The sequential stages in the corrosion process are described and a mechanism proposed. The influence of alloy microstructure on the corrosion mechanism is also discussed.

  12. Hot startup experience with electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Benedict, R.W.; Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.; Rigg, R.H.

    1997-10-01

    The treatment of spent metal fuel from the EBR-II fast reactor commenced in June of 1996 at the Fuel Conditioning Facility on the Argonne-West site in Idaho, USA. During the first year of hot operations, 20 fuel assemblies entered processing and 6 low enrichment uranium product ingots were produced. Results are presented for the various process steps with decontamination factors achieved and equipment operational history reported.

  13. Perpendicular hot electron transport in the spin-valve photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2006-08-01

    The spin-valve photodiode is a ferromagnetic metal multilayer/n-type semiconductor Schottky device operated by photoexciting hot electrons in the metal and causing internal photoemission (IPE) into the semiconductor. Simple IPE theory predicts that the magnitude of the spin-valve effect (modulation of the photocurrent) should monotonically increase as a metallic capping layer thickness increases. Experimentally, however, we observe a nonmonotonic behavior with cap layer thickness, where the magnetocurrent reaches an optimum value and then decreases. The disagreement between this experimental result and the previous theoretical model is discussed, leading to an alternative interpretation of transport including reflection from the air-metal interface. Calculations with this model are consistent with the observed phenomena.

  14. Effect of Some Parameters on the Cast Component Properties in Hot Chamber Die Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rupinder; Singh, Harvir

    2016-04-01

    Hot chamber die casting process is designed to achieve high dimensional accuracy for small products by forcing molten metal under high pressure into reusable moulds, called dies. The present research work is aimed at study of some parameters (as a case study of spring adjuster) on cast component properties in hot chamber die casting process. Three controllable factors of the hot chamber die casting process (namely: pressure at second phase, metal pouring temperature and die opening time) were studied at three levels each by Taguchi's parametric approach and single-response optimization was conducted to identify the main factors controlling surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the casting. Castings were produced using aluminium alloy, at recommended parameters through hot chamber die casting process. Analysis shows that in hot chamber die casting process the percentage contribution of second phase pressure, die opening time, metal pouring temperature for surface hardness is 82.48, 9.24 and 6.78 % respectively. While in the case of weight of cast component the contribution of second phase pressure is 94.03 %, followed by metal pouring temperature and die opening time (4.58 and 0.35 % respectively). Further for dimensional accuracy contribution of die opening time is 76.97 %, metal pouring temperature is 20.05 % and second phase pressure is 1.56 %. Confirmation experiments were conducted at an optimal condition showed that the surface hardness, dimensional accuracy and weight of the castings were improved significantly.

  15. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  16. Multi-field coupled numerical simulation of hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sendong; Zhang, Liwen; Ruan, Jinhua; Mei, Hongyu; Zhen, Yu; Shi, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, based on rolling technology of hot reversible rolling mill, a multi-filed coupled finite element (FE) model of hot reversible rolling process of large dimension cross-section GCr15 steel rod is established. Thermal, mechanical and microstructural phenomena during the rolling process are coupled in the model. By employing grain growth experiment, double and single hit hot compression experiments, the austenite grain size growth mathematical model and recrystallization behavior mathematical models are determined. And a designed subprogram is coupled in the FE model. Actual hot reversible rolling process of GCr15 steel is simulated using the model and the distribution and evolution of different filed-variables, such as temperature, effective strain and austenite grain size are obtained. To verify the model predictions, hot rolling experiments are carried out and the temperature and microstructure of the rolling metal are compared with the predicted results. The comparison between the two sets of data shows a good agreement.

  17. Experimental Study of Ignition by Hot Spot in Internal Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serruys, Max

    1938-01-01

    In order to carry out the contemplated study, it was first necessary to provide hot spots in the combustion chamber, which could be measured and whose temperature could be changed. It seemed difficult to realize both conditions working solely on the temperature of the cooling water in a way so as to produce hot spots on the cylinder wall capable of provoking autoignition. Moreover, in the majority of practical cases, autoignition is produced by the spark plug, one of the least cooled parts in the engine. The first procedure therefore did not resemble that which most generally occurs in actual engine operation. All of these considerations caused us to reproduce similar hot spots at the spark plugs. The hot spots produced were of two kinds and designated with the name of thermo-electric spark plug and of metallic hot spot.

  18. Coupled of thermal-mechanical-transformation numerical simulation on hot stamping with static explicit algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Shi, D. Y.; Ying, L.; Shen, G. Z.; Chang, Y.; Liu, W. Q.

    2013-05-01

    Thermal-mechanical-transformation coupled theoretical model for hot stamping and rheological behavior of high strength steel at elevated temperatures were obtained through non-isothermal and isothermal tensile tests respectively in this work. The static explicit finite element equations for hot stamping were proposed based on thermal-mechanical-transformation coupled constitutive laws and nonlinear, large deformation analysis. According to these equations, the hot stamping module of KMAS (King Mesh Analysis System) was developed for the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming at elevated temperatures. Afterwards, the hot stamping simulation of a typical B-pillar conducted by the KMAS software was compared to the experiment. The comparison consists of the following sides: temperature distribution, thickness distribution and martensite fraction. The good agreement between numerical simulation and the experiment confirms that the multi-field coupled constitutive laws and the KMAS software can predict hot stamping process accurately.

  19. Hot Massive Stars: The Impact of HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Paul A.

    We review the contribution of Hubble Space Telescope to the study of hot, luminous stars. Optical and IR imaging have permitted spatially resolved observations of young, massive clusters within Local Group galaxies, such as R136, NGC 3603 and Arches, revealing unprecedented concentrations of very massive O stars. UV spectroscopy of field OB stars in the Magellanic Clouds have provided suitable templates for interpretation of metal-poor star-forming galaxies at high-redshift. Spectacular imaging provides the detailed structure of ejecta nebulae from individual stars, including the Homunculus associated with η Carinae and M1-67, associated with a Wolf-Rayet star. HST has permitted individual massive stars to be spatially resolved in giant HII regions located beyond the Local Group, such as NGC 604, plus individual clusters, dominated by the light of massive stars within starburst galaxies at larger distances, such as NGC 3125. UV spectroscopy of young, massive clusters in the extremely metal-poor HII galaxy I Zw 18 include signatures of large numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars.

  20. Exploring Chemical Equilibrium in Hot Jovians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Challener, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Yung 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets(Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an up-dated thermodynamic library) is compared with the thermochemical model presented in Venotet al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis is then applied to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated and we compare both models' outputs using the open source codetransit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. Thiswork was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  1. Exploring Equilibrium Chemistry for Hot Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Mandell, Avi; Hébrard, Eric; Venot, Olivia; Cubillos, Patricio; Challener, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    It has been established that equilibrium chemistry is usually achieved deep in the atmosphere of hot Jovians where timescales are short (Line and Young 2013). Thus, equilibrium chemistry has been used as a starting point (setting initial conditions) for evaluating disequilibrium processes. We explore parameters of setting these initial conditions including departures from solar metallicity, the number of species allowed in a system, the types of species allowed in a system, and different thermodynamic libraries in an attempt to create a standard for evaluating equilibrium chemistry. NASA's open source code Chemical Equilibrium and Applications (CEA) is used to calculate model planet abundances by varying the metallicity, in the pressure regime of 0.1 to 1 bar. These results are compared to a variety of exoplanets (Teq between 600 and 2100K) qualitatively by color maps of the dayside with different temperature redistributions. Additionally, CEA (with an updated thermodynamic library) is validated with the thermochemical model presented in Venot et al. (2012) for HD 209458b and HD 189733b. This same analysis has then been extended to the cooler planet HD 97658b. Spectra are generated from both models’ abundances using the open source code transit (https://github.com/exosports/transit) using the opacities of 15 molecules. We make the updated CEA thermodyanamic library and supporting Python scripts to do the CEA analyses available open source. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  2. Post-irradiation-examination of irradiated fuel outside the hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn E. Janney; Adam B. Robinson; Thomas P. O'Holleran; R. Paul Lind; Marc Babcock; Laurence C. Brower; Julie Jacobs; Pamela K. Hoggan

    2007-09-01

    Because of their high radioactivity, irradiated fuels are commonly examined in a hot cell. However, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has recently investigated irradiated U-Mo-Al metallic fuel from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) project using a conventional unshielded scanning electron microscope outside a hot cell. This examination was possible because of a two-step sample-preparation approach in which a small volume of fuel was isolated in a hot cell and shielding was introduced during later stages of sample preparation. The resulting sample contained numerous sample-preparation artifacts but allowed analysis of microstructures from selected areas.

  3. A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN616). Contextual view, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Hot liquid waste treatment building (TAN-616). Contextual view, facing south. Wall of hot shop (TAN-607) with high bay at left of view. Lower-roofed building at left edge of view is TAN- 633, hot cell annex. Complex at center of view is TAN-616. Tall metal building with gable roof is TAN-615. Photographer: Ron Paarmann. Date: September 22, 1997. INEEL negative no. HD-20-2-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. EAST END OF BUILDING. CAMERA FACING WEST. TRUCK ENCLOSURE (1986) TO THE LEFT, SMALL ADDITION IN ITS SHADOW IS ENCLOSURE OVER METAL PORT INTO HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE OLDEST HOT CELL). NOTE PERSONNEL LADDER AND PLATFORM AT LOFT LEVEL USED WHEN SERVICING AIR FILTERS AND VENTS OF CELL NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-32-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mulchaey, John S.; Jeltema, Tesla E.

    2010-06-08

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

  6. Hot electron pump: a plasmonic rectifying antenna (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanik, Ahmet A.; Hossain, Golam I.

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures have been widely explored to improve absorption efficiency of conventional solar cells, either by employing them as a light scatterer, or as a source of local field enhancement. Unavoidable ohmic loss associated with the plasmonic metal nanostructures in visible spectrum, limits the efficiency improvement of photovoltaic devices by employing this local photon density of states (LDOS) engineering approach. Instead of using plasmonic structures as efficiency improving layer, recently, there has been a growing interest in exploring plasmoinc nanoparticle as the active medium for photovoltaic device. By extracting hot electrons that are created in metallic nanoparticles in a non-radiative Landau decay of surface plasmons, many novel plasmonic photovoltaic devices have been proposed. Moreover, these hot electrons in metal nanoparticles promises high efficiency with a spectral response that is not limited by the band gap of the semiconductors (active material of conventional solar cell). In this work, we will show a novel photovoltaic configuration of plasmonic nanoparticle that acts as an antenna by capturing free space ultrahigh frequency electromagnetic wave and rectify them through an ultrafast hot electron pump and eventually inject DC current in the contact of the device. We will introduce a bottom-up quantum mechanical approach model to explain fundamental physical processes involved in this hot electron pump rectifying antenna and it's ultrafast dynamics. Our model is based on non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, a robust theoretical framework to investigate transport and design nanoscale electronic devices. We will demonstrate some fundamental limitations that go the very foundations of quantum mechanics.

  7. Theoretical predictions for hot-carrier generation from surface plasmon decay

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Jermyn, Adam S.; Goddard III, William A.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2014-01-01

    Decay of surface plasmons to hot carriers finds a wide variety of applications in energy conversion, photocatalysis and photodetection. However, a detailed theoretical description of plasmonic hot-carrier generation in real materials has remained incomplete. Here we report predictions for the prompt distributions of excited ‘hot’ electrons and holes generated by plasmon decay, before inelastic relaxation, using a quantized plasmon model with detailed electronic structure. We find that carrier energy distributions are sensitive to the electronic band structure of the metal: gold and copper produce holes hotter than electrons by 1–2 eV, while silver and aluminium distribute energies more equitably between electrons and holes. Momentum-direction distributions for hot carriers are anisotropic, dominated by the plasmon polarization for aluminium and by the crystal orientation for noble metals. We show that in thin metallic films intraband transitions can alter the carrier distributions, producing hotter electrons in gold, but interband transitions remain dominant. PMID:25511713

  8. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  9. Menopausal hot flashes: Randomness or rhythmicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Fredi

    1991-10-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. Although hot flashes affect about 75% of women, and are the primary reason that women at menopause seek medical attention, the mechanism of hot flashes is still not understood. Hot flashes vary in frequency and intensity both within and between individuals, and have been thought of as occurring randomly. Yet, some women report that their hot flashes are worse at a particular time of day or year. Initial examination of subjects' recordings of their hot flashes showed diurnal patterns of hot flash occurrence. There also seems to be a diurnal rhythm of hot flash intensity. Continuous physiological monitoring of hot flashes is facilitating the analysis of these patterns, which is revealing circadian and ultradian periodicities. The occurrence of hot flashes can be modulated by external and internal factors, including ambient temperature and fever. Rhythms of thermoregulatory and endocrine functions also may influence hot flash patterns. Examination of the interrelationships between the various systems of the body involved in hot flashes, and a multidisciplinary approach to the analysis of hot flash patterns, will aid our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  10. Controlled metal-semiconductor sintering/alloying by one-directional reverse illumination

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1993-01-01

    Metal strips deposited on a top surface of a semiconductor substrate are sintered at one temperature simultaneously with alloying a metal layer on the bottom surface at a second, higher temperature. This simultaneous sintering of metal strips and alloying a metal layer on opposite surfaces of the substrate at different temperatures is accomplished by directing infrared radiation through the top surface to the interface of the bottom surface with the metal layer where the radiation is absorbed to create a primary hot zone with a temperature high enough to melt and alloy the metal layer with the bottom surface of the substrate. Secondary heat effects, including heat conducted through the substrate from the primary hot zone and heat created by infrared radiation reflected from the metal layer to the metal strips, as well as heat created from some primary absorption by the metal strips, combine to create secondary hot zones at the interfaces of the metal strips with the top surface of the substrate. These secondary hot zones are not as hot as the primary hot zone, but they are hot enough to sinter the metal strips to the substrate.

  11. Non-equilibrium hot carrier dynamics in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Jermyn, Adam; Cortes, Emiliano; Maier, Stefan A.; Goddard, William A., III

    Decay of surface plasmons to hot carriers is a new direction that has attracted considerable fundamental and application interest, yet a fundamental understanding of ultrafast plasmon decay processes and the underlying microscopic mechanisms remain incomplete. Ultrafast experiments provide insights into the relaxation of non-equilibrium carriers at the tens and hundreds of femtoseconds time scales, but do not yet directly probe shorter times with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we report the first ab initio calculations of non equilibrium transport of plasmonic hot carriers in metals and experimental observation of the injection of these carriers into molecules tethered to the metal surface. Specifically, metallic nanoantennas functionalized with a molecular monolayer allow for the direct probing of electron injection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of the original and reduced molecular species. We combine first principles calculations of electron-electron and electron-phonon scattering rates with Boltzmann transport simulations to predict the ultrafast dynamics and transport of carriers in real materials. We also predict and compare the evolution of electron distributions in ultrafast experiments on noble metal nanoparticles.

  12. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-21

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer. PMID:27128730

  13. Planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Hot-electron photodetectors are attracting increasing interest due to their capability in below-bandgap photodetection without employing classic semiconductor junctions. Despite the high absorption in metallic nanostructures via plasmonic resonance, the fabrication of such devices is challenging and costly due to the use of high-dimensional sub-wavelength nanostructures. In this study, we propose a planar microcavity-integrated hot-electron photodetector (MC-HE PD), in which the TCO/semiconductor/metal (TCO: transparent conductive oxide) structure is sandwiched between two asymmetrically distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) and a lossless buffer layer. Finite-element simulations demonstrate that the resonant wavelength and the absorption efficiency of the device can be manipulated conveniently by tailoring the buffer layer thickness and the number of top DBR pairs. By benefitting from the largely increased electric field at the resonance frequency, the absorption in the metal can reach 92%, which is a 21-fold enhancement compared to the reference without a microcavity. Analytical probability-based electrical calculations further show that the unbiased responsivity can be up to 239 nA mW-1, which is more than an order of magnitude larger than that of the reference. Furthermore, the MC-HE PD not only exhibits a superior photoelectron conversion ability compared to the approach with corrugated metal, but also achieves the ability to tune the near infrared multiband by employing a thicker buffer layer.

  14. Hot-electron-based solar energy conversion with metal–semiconductor nanodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Changhwan; Hwang, Euyheon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-06-01

    Energy dissipation at metal surfaces or interfaces between a metal and a dielectric generally results from elementary excitations, including phonons and electronic excitation, once external energy is deposited to the surface/interface during exothermic chemical processes or an electromagnetic wave incident. In this paper, we outline recent research activities to develop energy conversion devices based on hot electrons. We found that photon energy can be directly converted to hot electrons and that hot electrons flow through the interface of metal–semiconductor nanodiodes where a Schottky barrier is formed and the energy barrier is much lower than the work function of the metal. The detection of hot electron flow can be successfully measured using the photocurrent; we measured the photoyield of photoemission with incident photons-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE). We also show that surface plasmons (i.e. the collective oscillation of conduction band electrons induced by interaction with an electromagnetic field) are excited on a rough metal surface and subsequently decay into secondary electrons, which gives rise to enhancement of the IPCE. Furthermore, the unique optical behavior of surface plasmons can be coupled with dye molecules, suggesting the possibility for producing additional channels for hot electron generation.

  15. Solar Hot Water Hourly Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-12-31

    The Software consists of a spreadsheet written in Microsoft Excel which provides an hourly simulation of a solar hot water heating system (including solar geometry, solar collector efficiency as a function of temperature, energy balance on storage tank and lifecycle cost analysis).

  16. Solar hot-water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Design data brochure describes domestic solar water system that uses direct-feed system designed to produce 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day to meet needs of single family dwelling. Brochure also reviews annual movements of sun relative to earth and explains geographic considerations in collector orientation and sizing.

  17. Enviropower hot gas desulfurization pilot

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazanfari, R.; Feher, G.; Konttinen, J.; Ghazanfari, R.; Lehtovaara, A.; Mojtahedi, W.

    1994-11-01

    The objectives of the project are to develop and demonstrate (1) hydrogen sulfide removal using regenerable zinc titanate sorbent in pressurized fluidized bed reactors, (2) recovery of the elemental sulfur from the tail-gas of the sorbent regenerator and (3) hot gas particulate removal system using ceramic candle filters. Results are presented on pilot plant design and testing and modeling efforts.

  18. Production of hot-wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, S. C.

    1983-04-01

    Several methods for producing hot-wire probes are described. Discussion includes the manufacture of probe bodies, soldering plated wires to the prongs etching Walaston type wires, and finishing the probe. This report is written as an instruction manual for researchers who desire to produce or repair their own sensors.

  19. Solar Technician Program Blows Hot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Peg Moran

    1977-01-01

    A training program for solar heating technicians was initiated at Sonoma State College's School of Environmental Studies for CETA applicants. Among the projects designed and built were a solar alternative energy center, a solar hot water system, and a solar greenhouse. (MF)

  20. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  1. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protostellar disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protostellar disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. This formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. However, dynamical interactions during the early stages of planetary systems' evolutionary lifetimes tend to increase the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters, making transits rare. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  2. Origins of Hot Jupiters, Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Bodenheimer, Peter; Laughlin, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Hot Jupiters, giant extrasolar planets with orbital periods less than ~10 days, have long been thought to form at large radial distances (a > 2AU) in protoplanetary disks, only to subsequently experience large-scale inward migration to the small orbital radii at which they are observed. Here, we propose that a substantial fraction of the hot Jupiter population forms in situ, with the Galactically prevalent short-period super-Earths acting as the source population. Our calculations suggest that under conditions appropriate to the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, rapid gas accretion can be initiated for solid cores of 10-20 Earth masses, in line with the conventional picture of core-nucleated accretion. The planetary conglomeration process, coupled with subsequent gravitational contraction and spin down of the host star, drives sweeping secular resonances through the system, increasing the mutual inclinations of exterior, low-mass companions to hot Jupiters. Accordingly, this formation scenario leads to testable consequences, including the expectation that hot Jupiters should frequently be accompanied by additional non-transiting planets, reminiscent of those observed in large numbers by NASA’s Kepler Mission and Doppler velocity surveys. High-precision radial velocity monitoring provides the best prospect for their detection.

  3. Theoretical analysis of hot electron dynamics in nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kumarasinghe, Chathurangi S; Premaratne, Malin; Bao, Qiaoliang; Agrawal, Govind P

    2015-01-01

    Localised surface plasmons create a non-equilibrium high-energy electron gas in nanostructures that can be injected into other media in energy harvesting applications. Here, we derive the rate of this localised-surface-plasmon mediated generation of hot electrons in nanorods and the rate of injecting them into other media by considering quantum mechanical motion of the electron gas. Specifically, we use the single-electron wave function of a particle in a cylindrical potential well and the electric field enhancement factor of an elongated ellipsoid to derive the energy distribution of electrons after plasmon excitation. We compare the performance of nanorods with equivolume nanoparticles of other shapes such as nanospheres and nanopallets and report that nanorods exhibit significantly better performance over a broad spectrum. We present a comprehensive theoretical analysis of how different parameters contribute to efficiency of hot-electron harvesting in nanorods and reveal that increasing the aspect ratio can increase the hot-electron generation and injection, but the volume shows an inverse dependency when efficiency per unit volume is considered. Further, the electron thermalisation time shows much less influence on the injection rate. Our derivations and results provide the much needed theoretical insight for optimization of hot-electron harvesting process in highly adaptable metallic nanorods. PMID:26202823

  4. Fundamental Limitations to Plasmonic Hot-Carrier Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Schatz, George C

    2016-05-19

    Detailed balance between photon-absorption and energy loss constrains the efficiency of conventional solar cells to the Shockley-Queisser limit. However, if solar illumination can be absorbed over a wide spectrum by plasmonic structures, and the generated hot-carriers can be collected before relaxation, the efficiency of solar cells may be greatly improved. In this work, we explore the opportunities and limitations for making plasmonic solar cells, here considering a design for hot-carrier solar cells in which a conventional semiconductor heterojunction is attached to a plasmonic medium such as arrays of gold nanoparticles. The underlying mechanisms and fundamental limitations of this cell are studied using a nonequilibrium Green's function method, and the numerical results indicate that this cell can significantly improve the absorption of solar radiation without reducing open-circuit voltage, as photons can be absorbed to produce mobile carriers in the semiconductor as long as they have energy larger than the Schottky barrier rather than above the bandgap. However, a significant fraction of the hot-carriers have energies below the Schottky barrier, which makes the cell suffer low internal quantum efficiency. Moreover, quantum efficiency is also limited by hot-carrier relaxation and metal-semiconductor coupling. The connection of these results to recent experiments is described, showing why plasmonic solar cells can have less than 1% efficiency. PMID:27136049

  5. Theoretical analysis of hot electron dynamics in nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasinghe, Chathurangi S.; Premaratne, Malin; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2015-01-01

    Localised surface plasmons create a non-equilibrium high-energy electron gas in nanostructures that can be injected into other media in energy harvesting applications. Here, we derive the rate of this localised-surface-plasmon mediated generation of hot electrons in nanorods and the rate of injecting them into other media by considering quantum mechanical motion of the electron gas. Specifically, we use the single-electron wave function of a particle in a cylindrical potential well and the electric field enhancement factor of an elongated ellipsoid to derive the energy distribution of electrons after plasmon excitation. We compare the performance of nanorods with equivolume nanoparticles of other shapes such as nanospheres and nanopallets and report that nanorods exhibit significantly better performance over a broad spectrum. We present a comprehensive theoretical analysis of how different parameters contribute to efficiency of hot-electron harvesting in nanorods and reveal that increasing the aspect ratio can increase the hot-electron generation and injection, but the volume shows an inverse dependency when efficiency per unit volume is considered. Further, the electron thermalisation time shows much less influence on the injection rate. Our derivations and results provide the much needed theoretical insight for optimization of hot-electron harvesting process in highly adaptable metallic nanorods. PMID:26202823

  6. Graphene vertical hot-electron terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, V.; Satou, A.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-09-21

    We propose and analyze the concept of the vertical hot-electron terahertz (THz) graphene-layer detectors (GLDs) based on the double-GL and multiple-GL structures with the barrier layers made of materials with a moderate conduction band off-set (such as tungsten disulfide and related materials). The operation of these detectors is enabled by the thermionic emissions from the GLs enhanced by the electrons heated by incoming THz radiation. Hence, these detectors are the hot-electron bolometric detectors. The electron heating is primarily associated with the intraband absorption (the Drude absorption). In the frame of the developed model, we calculate the responsivity and detectivity as functions of the photon energy, GL doping, and the applied voltage for the GLDs with different number of GLs. The detectors based on the cascade multiple-GL structures can exhibit a substantial photoelectric gain resulting in the elevated responsivity and detectivity. The advantages of the THz detectors under consideration are associated with their high sensitivity to the normal incident radiation and efficient operation at room temperature at the low end of the THz frequency range. Such GLDs with a metal grating, supporting the excitation of plasma oscillations in the GL-structures by the incident THz radiation, can exhibit a strong resonant response at the frequencies of several THz (in the range, where the operation of the conventional detectors based on A{sub 3}B{sub 5} materials, in particular, THz quantum-well detectors, is hindered due to a strong optical phonon radiation absorption in such materials). We also evaluate the characteristics of GLDs in the mid- and far-infrared ranges where the electron heating is due to the interband absorption in GLs.

  7. The Detection of a Hot Molecular Core in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kawamura, Akiko; Aikawa, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    We report the first detection of a hot molecular core outside our Galaxy based on radio observations with ALMA toward a high-mass young stellar object (YSO) in a nearby low metallicity galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Molecular emission lines of CO, C17O, HCO+, H13CO+, H2CO, NO, SiO, H2CS, 33SO, 32SO2, 34SO2, and 33SO2 are detected from a compact region (˜0.1 pc) associated with a high-mass YSO, ST11. The temperature of molecular gas is estimated to be higher than 100 K based on rotation diagram analysis of SO2 and 34SO2 lines. The compact source size, warm gas temperature, high density, and rich molecular lines around a high-mass protostar suggest that ST11 is associated with a hot molecular core. We find that the molecular abundances of the LMC hot core are significantly different from those of Galactic hot cores. The abundances of CH3OH, H2CO, and HNCO are remarkably lower compared to Galactic hot cores by at least 1–3 orders of magnitude. We suggest that these abundances are characterized by the deficiency of molecules whose formation requires the hydrogenation of CO on grain surfaces. In contrast, NO shows a high abundance in ST11 despite the notably low abundance of nitrogen in the LMC. A multitude of SO2 and its isotopologue line detections in ST11 imply that SO2 can be a key molecular tracer of hot core chemistry in metal-poor environments. Furthermore, we find molecular outflows around the hot core, which is the second detection of an extragalactic protostellar outflow. In this paper, we discuss the physical and chemical characteristics of a hot molecular core in the low metallicity environment.

  8. Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M.; Jacobson, J.J.

    1983-08-01

    The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.

  9. Hyperthermia: Too Hot for Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected You are here Home Hyperthermia: too hot for your health NIH provides heat-related illness ... Calvin | (301) 496-1752 | nianews3@mail.nih.gov Hot summer weather can pose special health risks to ...

  10. OUT Success Stories: Solar Hot Water Technology

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Clyne, R.

    2000-08-01

    Solar hot water technology was made great strides in the past two decades. Every home, commercial building, and industrial facility requires hot water. DOE has helped to develop reliable and durable solar hot water systems. For industrial applications, the growth potential lies in large-scale systems, using flat-plate and trough-type collectors. Flat-plate collectors are commonly used in residential hot water systems and can be integrated into the architectural design of the building.

  11. Further Studies Of Hot-Wire Anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert; Logan, Pamela; Bershader, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses factors affecting readings of hot-wire anemometer in turbulent supersonic boundary layer. Represents extension of work described in "Hot-Wire Anemometry Versus Laser-Induced Fluorescence" (ARC-11802). Presents theoretical analysis of responses of hot-wire probe to changes in flow; also compares measurements by hot-wire probe with measurements of same flows by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF).

  12. Hydrologic indicators of hot spots and hot moments of mercury methylation along river corridors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Michael; Harrison, Lee; Donovan, Patrick; Blum, Joel; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals and other contaminants river-floodplain corridors is controlled by microbial activity is often affected by dynamic redox conditions. Riverine flooding thus has the potential to affect speciation of redox-sensitive metals such as mercury (Hg). Therefore, flow history over a period of decades potentially holds information on past production of bioavailable Hg. We investigate this process within a Northern California river system that has a legacy of industrial-scale 19th century hydraulic gold mining. In the first known application of this methodology, we combine hydraulic modeling, measurements of Hg species in sediment and biota, and first-order calculations to assess the role of river floodplains in producing monomethylmercury (MMHg), which accumulates in local and migratory biota. We identify areas that represent 'hot spots' (frequently inundated areas of floodplains) and 'hot moments' (floodplain areas inundated for consecutive long periods). We show that the probability of MMHg production in each sector of the river system is dependent on the spatial patterns of overbank flow and drainage, which affect its long-term redox history. MMHg bioaccumulation within the aquatic food web may pose a major risk to humans and waterfowl that eat migratory salmonids, which are being encouraged to come up these rivers to spawn, and there appears to be no end to MMHg production under a regime of increasingly common large floods with extended duration. These findings identify river floodplains as periodic, temporary, yet important, loci of biogeochemical transformation in which contaminants may undergo change during limited periods of the historical hydrologic record. We suggest that inundation is the primary driver of MMHg production in river corridors and that the entire flow history must be analyzed in terms of magnitude and frequency of inundation in order to accurately assess biogeochemical risks, rather than merely highlighting the

  13. Diamond film by hot filament CVD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Diamond synthesis by the hot filament CVD method is discussed. A hot filament decomposes gas mixtures and oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols. which are carbon sources. The resulting thin films, growth mechanisms, and characteristics and problems associated with the hot filament CVD method are analyzed and evaluated.

  14. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jothimurugesan, K.; Adeyiga, A.A.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop hot-gas desulfurization sorbent formulations for relatively lower temperature application, with emphasis on the temperature range from 343--538 C. The candidate sorbents include highly dispersed mixed metal oxides of zinc, iron, copper, cobalt, nickel and molybdenum. The specific objective was to develop suitable sorbents, that would have high and stable surface area and are sufficiently reactive and regenerable at the relatively lower temperatures of interest in this work. Stability of surface area during regeneration was achieved by adding stabilizers. To prevent sulfation, catalyst additives that promote the light-off of the regeneration reaction at lower temperature was considered. Another objective of this study was to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343 to 538 C and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.

  15. Refrigerator with anti-sweat hot liquid loop

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, S.J.; Cushing, D.S.; Jenkins, T.E.; Gerdes, K.W.; Sisler, R.R.

    1988-04-05

    A cabinet assembly for a refrigerator having a freezer compartment ontop with two top front corners, a fresh food compartment on the bottom, a mullion partition between the compartments and a hot liquid anti-sweat loop is described comprising; an outer sheet metal shell having a top panel, side panels and a front face, a brace located at each of the two top front corners of the cabinet and having two formed sections at right angles to each other and each section is formed as an inwardly open U-shaped channel having a base, a first leg and a second leg spaced apart and integrally joined to the base, fastening means for rigidly attaching each of the second leg of the corner braces to the flange of the third wall of the front face, and means to secure a portion of the hot liquid anti-sweat loop to the braces.

  16. Overview of Idaho National Laboratory's Hot Fuels Examination Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Adam B. Robinson; R. Paul Lind; Daniel M. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    The Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) of the Idaho National Laboratory was constructed in the 1960’s and opened for operation in the 1975 in support of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor research. Specifically the facility was designed to handle spent fuel and irradiated experiments from the Experimental Breeder Reactor EBRII, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). HFEF is a large alpha-gamma facility designed to remotely characterize highly radioactive materials. In the late 1980’s the facility also began support of the US DOE waste characterization including characterizing contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. A description of the hot cell as well as some of its primary capabilities are discussed herein.

  17. Update on the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bacca, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) Complex continues to provide primary postirradiation handling and examination support for the US, US/Japanese, and US/United Kingdom Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuels and materials development and reactor safety programs. For the last several years, such support has also been provided for other US nuclear programs. These include the Light Water Reactor Safety Program, the Three Mile Island No. 2 (TMI-2) reactor accident-recovery programs, the Light Water Breeder Reactor Program, the US Air Force Neutron Radiography Program, and Defense Nuclear Programs. The HFEF facilities have been refurbished and upgraded and capabilities have been added to accommodate these programs and to maintain the HFEF Complex as a world-class, state-of-the-art hot-cell complex.

  18. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials - Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    A materials testing program to determine whether automotive Stirling engine efficiency can be improved by locating 'hot piston rings' near the top of the pistons is described. Candidate materials were screened theoretically and experimentally by friction and wear tests. Based on the test results, a cobalt-based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring did reduce specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about three percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as backup lubricants for gas bearings are also described.

  19. COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF HOT NEPTUNES, WITH APPLICATION TO GJ 436b

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, J. I.; Line, M. R.; Visscher, C.; Richardson, M. R.; Nettelmann, N.; Fortney, J. J.; Barman, T. S.; Stevenson, K. B.; Madhusudhan, N.

    2013-11-01

    Neptune-sized extrasolar planets that orbit relatively close to their host stars—often called {sup h}ot Neptunes{sup —}are common within the known population of exoplanets and planetary candidates. Similar to our own Uranus and Neptune, inefficient accretion of nebular gas is expected produce hot Neptunes whose masses are dominated by elements heavier than hydrogen and helium. At high atmospheric metallicities of 10-10,000 times solar, hot Neptunes will exhibit an interesting continuum of atmospheric compositions, ranging from more Neptune-like, H{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres to more Venus-like, CO{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres. We explore the predicted equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry of generic hot Neptunes and find that the atmospheric composition varies strongly as a function of temperature and bulk atmospheric properties such as metallicity and the C/O ratio. Relatively exotic H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, and even O{sub 2}-dominated atmospheres are possible for hot Neptunes. We apply our models to the case of GJ 436b, where we find that a CO-rich, CH{sub 4}-poor atmosphere can be a natural consequence of a very high atmospheric metallicity. From comparisons of our results with Spitzer eclipse data for GJ 436b, we conclude that although the spectral fit from the high-metallicity forward models is not quite as good as the best fit obtained from pure retrieval methods, the atmospheric composition predicted by these forward models is more physically and chemically plausible in terms of the relative abundance of major constituents. High-metallicity atmospheres (orders of magnitude in excess of solar) should therefore be considered as a possibility for GJ 436b and other hot Neptunes.

  20. Spectropolarimetry of hot, luminous stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.

    1994-01-01

    I review polarimetric observations of presumably single, hot luminous stars. The stellar types discussed are OB stars. B(e) supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBV), Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, and type II supernovae (SN). It is shown that variable, intrinsic polarization is a common phenomenon in that part of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram which these stars occupy. However, much observational work remains to be done before we can answer the most basic, statistical questions about the polarimetric properties of different groups of hot, luminous stars. Insight into the diagnostic power of polarization observations has been gained, but cannot be exploited without detailed models. Thus, while polarimetric observations do tell us that the mass-loss processes of all types of massive stars are time-dependent and anisotropic, the significance that this might have for the accuracy of their stellar parameters and evolutionary paths remains elusive.

  1. Noise Generation in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Kenzakowski, Donald C.

    2007-01-01

    A prediction method based on the generalized acoustic analogy is presented, and used to evaluate aerodynamic noise radiated from high speed hot jets. The set of Euler equations are split into their respective non-radiating and residual components. Under certain conditions, the residual equations are rearranged to form a wave equation. This equation consists of a third-order wave operator, plus a number of nonlinear terms that are identified with the equivalent sources of sound and their statistical characteristics are modeled. A specialized RANS solver provides the base flow as well as turbulence quantities and temperature fluctuations that determine the source strength. The main objective here is to evaluate the relative contribution from various source elements to the far-field spectra and to show the significance of temperature fluctuations as a source of aerodynamic noise in hot jets.

  2. Numerical simulations of hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael L.

    Numerical simulations of hot spots and their associated jets are examined with emphasis on their dynamical variability. Attention is given to two-dimensional simulations, which incorporate dynamically passive and important magnetic fields in the ideal MHD limit. Distributions of total and polarized radio brightness have been derived for comparison with observations. The move toward three-dimensional simulations is documented, and hydrodynamical models for multiple hot spots are discussed. It is suggested that useful insights can be obtained from two-dimensional slab jet simulation, which relax the axisymmetric constraints while allowing high numerical resolution. In particular the dentist-drill model of Scheuer (1982) for working-surface variability is substantiated, and it is shown to result from self-excited jet instabilities near the working surface.

  3. Hot isostatic pressing of ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honma, K.

    1985-01-01

    A mixture containing glass 70 to 95 and BN or B4C powder (0.1-10 microns) 5 to 30 vol. % is used as a secondary pressure medium in hot isostatic pressing of ceramics. Thus, Pyrex beads were mixed with 15% vol. BN powder (average diameter 2 microns), fused at 1400 deg for 2 h, cooled, crushed, and put into a graphite crucible. A Si3N4 sintered body was embedded in the powder, heated in vacuum at 1200 deg for 2 h, treated in a hot isostatic press furnace at 1700 deg and 1000 atm. for 1 h, and cooled to give a Si3N4 ceramic. It was easily separated from the crucible.

  4. Hot subdwarfs with degenerate companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, Sandro

    2010-10-01

    Stellar evolutionary models predict that most of the hot sub-dwarfs in close binary systems have white dwarf companions. In a few cases even more massive compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) are suggested by the optical mass functions. The X-ray emission expected from accretion of the sub-dwarf's wind can reveal the nature of the compact companions and be used to derive other important information on these post-common envelope systems, as recently demonstrated by the discovery of a massive WD in HD 49798. We selected 3 promising targets from a sample of hot subdwarfs suspected to have degenerate companions. This proposal was accepted in AO9 with C priority.

  5. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  6. Hot gas engine heater head

    DOEpatents

    Berntell, John O.

    1983-01-01

    A heater head for a multi-cylinder double acting hot gas engine in which each cylinder is surrounded by an annular regenerator unit, and in which the tops of each cylinder and its surrounding regenerator are interconnected by a multiplicity of heater tubes. A manifold for the heater tubes has a centrally disposed duct connected to the top of the cylinder and surrounded by a wider duct connecting the other ends of the heater tubes with the regenerator unit.

  7. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  8. Hot atoms in cosmic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rossler, K; Jung, H J; Nebeling, B

    1984-01-01

    High energy chemical reactions and atom molecule interactions might be important for cosmic chemistry with respect to the accelerated species in solar wind, cosmic rays, colliding gas and dust clouds and secondary knock-on particles in solids. "Hot" atoms with energies ranging from a few eV to some MeV can be generated via nuclear reactions and consequent recoil processes. The chemical fate of the radioactive atoms can be followed by radiochemical methods (radio GC or HPLC). Hot atom chemistry may serve for laboratory simulation of the reactions of energetic species with gaseous or solid interstellar matter. Due to the effective measurement of 10(8)-10(10) atoms only it covers a low to medium dose regime and may add to the studies of ion implantation which due to the optical methods applied are necessarily in the high dose regime. Experimental results are given for the systems: C/H2O (gas), C/H2O (solid, 77 K), N/CH4 (solid, 77K) and C/NH3 (solid, 77 K). Nuclear reactions used for the generation of 2 to 3 MeV atoms are: N(p,alpha) 11C, 16O(p,alpha pn) 11C and 12C(d,n) 13N with 8 to 45 MeV protons or deuterons from a cyclotron. Typical reactions products are: CO, CO2, CH4, CH2O, CH3OH, HCOOH, NH3, CH3NH2, cyanamide, formamidine, guanidine etc. Products of hot reactions in solids are more complex than in corresponding gaseous systems, which underlines the importance of solid state reactions for the build-up of precursors for biomolecules in space. As one of the major mechanisms for product formation, the simultaneous or fast consecutive reactions of a hot carbon with two target molecules (reaction complex) is discussed. PMID:11537799

  9. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    1998-12-22

    Advanced, coal-based power plants will require durable and reliable hot gas filtration systems to remove particulate contaminants from the gas streams to protect downstream components such as turbine blades from erosion damage. It is expected that the filter elements in these systems will have to be made of ceramic materials to withstand goal service temperatures of 1600 F or higher. Recent demonstration projects and pilot plant tests have indicated that the current generation of ceramic hot gas filters (cross-flow and candle configurations) are failing prematurely. Two of the most promising materials that have been extensively evaluated are clay-bonded silicon carbide and alumina-mullite porous monoliths. These candidates, however, have been found to suffer progressive thermal shock fatigue damage, as a result of rapid cooling/heating cycles. Such temperature changes occur when the hot filters are back-pulsed with cooler gas to clean them, or in process upset conditions, where even larger gas temperature changes may occur quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the clay-bonded silicon carbide materials are susceptible to chemical attack of the glassy binder phase that holds the SiC particles together, resulting in softening, strength loss, creep, and eventual failure.

  10. Pouring 'Cold Water' on Hot Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. E.

    1995-09-01

    was concluded that the textures must have formed during cooling after hot accretion. However, because spinodal decomposition textures develop over the temperature range 1400-1100 K [14,15] and type-4 and -5 OC were probably not heated above 1000 K and 1050 K, respectively [16], these textures are probably relicts of chondrule formation. It was also suggested [14] that compositional zoning in pyroxenes indicates that type-3 OC cooled more rapidly than type-4 to -5 OC. However, OC metallographic cooling rates are not correlated with petrologic type [17]. Furthermore, experimental data [13] show that rare thick opx lamellae in H4 Conquista could not have formed during single stage cooling as expected in autometamorphism; a two-stage cooling history involving rapid cooling during chondrule formation followed by parent-body annealing is more plausible. Polycrystalline taenite. Polycrystalline taenite in H/L3 Tieschitz was interpreted as a relict solidification structure that failed to anneal into monocrystalline taenite because of rapid cooling (1700 to 1000 K within days to weeks) [18]; by analogy, it was proposed that all H3-6 chondrites containing polycrystalline taenite cooled rapidly from 1700 K [4], an idea inconsistent with prograde metamorphism. However, cooling rates in equilibrated chondrites that were slow enough to permit significant growth of kamacite would erase prior solidification zoning in taenite by solid-state diffusion [19,20]. This hypothesis, confirmed by computer modeling [21], invalidates the assumption that equilibrated OC containing polycrystalline taenite cooled rapidly. Polycrystalline taenite is most likely a pre-metamorphic relict. Heterogeneous metal grains. Compositionally and texturally heterogeneous metal grains in L6 Bruderheim are unlikely to have survived solid-state diffusion during prograde metamorphism [22]; these authors favored hot accretion followed by low-temperature annealing. However, Bruderheim is a fragmental breccia of shock

  11. Hot gas and the evolution of spiral-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtilek, Jan M.; O'Sullivan, E. J.; Giacintucci, S.; David, L. P.; Raychaudhury, S.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2014-01-01

    The group environment --- the locus of most galaxies in the present-day Universe --- is particularly suitable, owing to high galaxy densities and low velocity dispersions, for study of the merging of spirals to form ellipticals. In particular, little is known about how the resulting ellipticals acquire hot gas halos (whether from stellar mass loss or from accretion of group gas). We here discuss our examination, relying principally on Chandra and GMRT data, of two groups that are at once compact, spiral-dominated, sufficiently X-ray bright, nearby, and in early stages of merging. For HCG92 (Stephan’s Quintet), GMRT 610 and 327 MHz observations show diffuse extended radio emission. X-ray and radio emissions from the group are dominated by a bright north-south ridge associated with the interloper galaxy NGC 7318b, with the low temperature of X-ray gas (0.6 keV) indicating an oblique shock resulting from the interaction. Much of the gas now in the hot phase may have been produced by shock heating of cool material during galaxy interactions, with additional energy and metals injected by star formation. Radio spectral index mapping allows us to trace the relative contributions from the shock and from star formation. Within the ridge spectral information can also be used to estimate the radiative age of the electron population, providing information on the shock age. For HCG16 the nature and even the existence of a hot intragroup medium has been debated. With a combination of a very recent deep (150 ks) Chandra image and radio data already available, we expect to resolve questions about the existence, extent, and nature of hot gas in HCG 16; map the heavy element distribution; determine the hot gas mass compared to the HI deficit; examine the prevalence of shock heating and ram pressure stripping; and study the brightest point sources.

  12. Manufacturing of an aluminum alloy mold for micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, N. K.; Lam, Y. C.; Yue, C. Y.; Tan, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    In micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices, e.g. microfluidic devices, the quality of the mold plays an important role in determining not only the product quality but also the overall production cost. Often the mold is made of silicon, which is brittle and fails after producing a limited number of parts. Metallic molds produced by micro-machining have a much longer life; however, the surface finish of the mold is not ideal for producing polymeric devices that require good surface finish. The metallic glass mold produced by micro-hot embossing with a silicon master is a recent development, which could produce high quality and high strength molds with long life span. However, metallic glasses are rather costly. In an attempt to reduce the production cost of the mold with acceptable quality, strength and life span, we explore here the manufacture of an aluminum alloy (AA6061-T6) mold by hot embossing using a silicon master. Using a set of channels to be produced on the aluminum alloy as the benchmark, we examine the orientation effect of the channels on the AA6061-T6 mold produced by hot embossing. Finally, to examine the effectiveness of the AA6061-T6 mold, it is employed for the hot embossing of polymeric (TOPAS 8007) substrates.

  13. A case of familial hot tub lung

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yusuke; Nakano, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Hot tub lung is a lung disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex. We report the first case of familial hot tub lung appearing simultaneously in a husband and wife. Our case supports the consideration that hot tub lung is a hypersensitivity pneumonitis rather than an infectious lung disease. It also suggests that the state of hot tub lung changes seasonally depending on temperature variations, in a manner similar to summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This case demonstrates similarities between hot tub lung and summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis in regards to familial occurrence and seasonal changes in the disease state. PMID:27222790

  14. A case of familial hot tub lung.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Araki, Yusuke; Nakano, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Hot tub lung is a lung disease caused by Mycobacterium avium complex. We report the first case of familial hot tub lung appearing simultaneously in a husband and wife. Our case supports the consideration that hot tub lung is a hypersensitivity pneumonitis rather than an infectious lung disease. It also suggests that the state of hot tub lung changes seasonally depending on temperature variations, in a manner similar to summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis. This case demonstrates similarities between hot tub lung and summer-type hypersensitivity pneumonitis in regards to familial occurrence and seasonal changes in the disease state. PMID:27222790

  15. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when your body suddenly feels ... In some cases, hot flashes can make you sweat. Night sweats are hot flashes with sweating at ...

  16. ESA uncovers Geminga's `hot spot'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    16 July 2004 Astronomers using ESA’s X-ray observatory XMM-Newton have detected a small, bright ‘hot spot’ on the surface of the neutron star called Geminga, 500 light-years away. The hot spot is the size of a football field and is caused by the same mechanism producing Geminga’s X-ray tails. This discovery identifies the missing link between the X-ray and gamma-ray emission from Geminga. hi-res Size hi-res: 1284 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot This figure shows the effects of charged particles accelerated in the magnetosphere of Geminga. Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of particles kicked out by Geminga’s strong magnetic field, trail the neutron star as it moves about in space. Panel (b) shows how electrically charged particles interact with Geminga’s magnetic field. For example, if electrons (blue) are kicked out by the star, positrons (in red) hit the star’s magnetic poles like in an ‘own goal’. Panel (c) illustrates the size of Geminga’s magnetic field (blue) compared to that of the star itself at the centre (purple). The magnetic field is tilted with respect to Geminga’s rotation axis (red). Panel (d) shows the magnetic poles of Geminga, where charged particles hit the surface of the star, creating a two-million degrees hot spot, a region much hotter than the surroundings. As the star spins on its rotation axis, the hot spot comes into view and then disappears, causing the periodic colour change seen by XMM-Newton. An animated version of the entire sequence can be found at: Click here for animated GIF [low resolution, animated GIF, 5536 KB] Click here for AVI [high resolution, AVI with DIVX compression, 19128 KB] hi-res Size hi-res: 371 kb Credits: ESA, P. Caraveo (IASF, Milan) Geminga's hot spot, panel (a) Panel (a) shows an image taken with the EPIC instrument on board the XMM-Newton observatory. The bright tails, made of

  17. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  18. Ultrafast Surface-Enhanced Raman Probing of the Role of Hot Electrons in Plasmon-Driven Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Nathaniel C; Keller, Emily L; Frontiera, Renee R

    2016-08-18

    Hot electrons generated through plasmonic excitations in metal nanostructures show great promise for efficiently driving chemical reactions with light. However, the lifetime, yield, and mechanism of action of plasmon-generated hot electrons involved in a given photocatalytic process are not well understood. Here, we develop ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) as a direct probe of plasmon-molecule interactions in the plasmon-catalyzed dimerization of 4-nitrobenzenethiol to p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene. Ultrafast SERS probing of these molecular reporters in plasmonic hot spots reveals transient Fano resonances, which we attribute to near-field coupling of Stokes-shifted photons to hot electron-driven metal photoluminescence. Surprisingly, we find that hot spots that yield more photoluminescence are much more likely to drive the reaction, which indirectly proves that plasmon-generated hot electrons induce the photochemistry. These ultrafast SERS results provide insight into the relative reactivity of different plasmonic hot spot environments and quantify the ultrafast lifetime of hot electrons involved in plasmon-driven chemistry. PMID:27488515

  19. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  20. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  1. Process window limiting hot spot monitoring for high-volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jochemsen, Marinus; Anunciado, Roy; Timoshkov, Vadim; Hunsche, Stefan; Zhou, Xinjian; Jones, Chris; Callan, Neal

    2016-03-01

    As process window margins for cutting edge DUV lithography continue to shrink, the impact of systematic patterning defects on final yield increases. Finding process window limiting hot spot patterns and monitoring them in high volume manufacturing (HVM) is increasingly challenging with conventional methods, as the size of critical defects can be below the resolution of traditional HVM inspection tools. We utilize a previously presented computational method of finding hot spot patterns by full chip simulation and use this to guide high resolution review tools by predicting the state of the hot spots on all fields of production wafers. In experiments with a 10nm node Metal LELELE vehicle we show a 60% capture rate of after-etch defects down to 3nm in size, at specific hot spot locations. By using the lithographic focus and dose correction knobs we can reduce the number of patterning defects for this test case by ~60%.

  2. Plasmonic hot carrier dynamics in solid-state and chemical systems for energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Prineha; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-06-01

    Surface plasmons provide a pathway to efficiently absorb and confine light in metallic nanostructures, thereby bridging photonics to the nano scale. The decay of surface plasmons generates energetic `hot' carriers, which can drive chemical reactions or be injected into semiconductors for nano-scale photochemical or photovoltaic energy conversion. Novel plasmonic hot carrier devices and architectures continue to be demonstrated, but the complexity of the underlying processes make a complete microscopic understanding of all the mechanisms and design considerations for such devices extremely challenging.Here,we review the theoretical and computational efforts to understand and model plasmonic hot carrier devices.We split the problem into three steps: hot carrier generation, transport and collection, and review theoretical approaches with the appropriate level of detail for each step along with their predictions.We identify the key advances necessary to complete the microscopic mechanistic picture and facilitate the design of the next generation of devices and materials for plasmonic energy conversion.

  3. Chandra Grating Spectroscopy of Three Hot White Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG1159 (PG1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD246). Aims. The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods. The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results. No metals could be identified in LB1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to T(sub eff) = 150 000 +/- 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GWVir class (PG1159-035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GWVir instability region

  4. Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, J.; Werner, K.; Rauch, T.; Schuh, S.; Drake, J. J.; Kruk, J. W.

    2012-10-01

    Context. High-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopic observations of single hot white dwarfs are scarce. With the Chandra Low-Energy Transmission Grating, we have observed two white dwarfs, one is of spectral type DA (LB 1919) and the other is a non-DA of spectral type PG 1159 (PG 1520+525). The spectra of both stars are analyzed, together with an archival Chandra spectrum of another DA white dwarf (GD 246). Aims: The soft X-ray spectra of the two DA white dwarfs are investigated in order to study the effect of gravitational settling and radiative levitation of metals in their photospheres. LB 1919 is of interest because it has a significantly lower metallicity than DAs with otherwise similar atmospheric parameters. GD 246 is the only white dwarf known that shows identifiable individual iron lines in the soft X-ray range. For the PG 1159 star, a precise effective temperature determination is performed in order to confine the position of the blue edge of the GW Vir instability region in the HRD. Methods: The Chandra spectra are analyzed with chemically homogeneous as well as stratified NLTE model atmospheres that assume equilibrium between gravitational settling and radiative acceleration of chemical elements. Archival EUV and UV spectra obtained with EUVE, FUSE, and HST are utilized to support the analysis. Results: No metals could be identified in LB 1919. All observations are compatible with a pure hydrogen atmosphere. This is in stark contrast to the vast majority of hot DA white dwarfs that exhibit light and heavy metals and to the stratified models that predict significant metal abundances in the atmosphere. For GD 246 we find that neither stratified nor homogeneous models can fit the Chandra spectrum. The Chandra spectrum of PG 1520+525 constrains the effective temperature to Teff = 150 000 ± 10 000 K. Therefore, this nonpulsating star together with the pulsating prototype of the GW Vir class (PG 1159 - 035) defines the location of the blue edge of the GW Vir

  5. Aural stealth of portable HOT infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    Further reduction of size, weight and power consumption of the High Operating Temperature (HOT) infrared (IR) Integrated Detector-Dewar-Cooler Assemblies (IDDCA) eventually calls for development of high-speed cryocoolers. In case of integral rotary design, the immediate penalty is the more intensive slapping of compression and expansion pistons along with intensification of micro collisions inherent for the operation of crank-slide linkages featuring ball bearings. Resulting from this is the generation of impulsive vibration export, the spectrum of which features the driving frequency along with numerous multiples covering the entire range of audible frequencies. In a typical design of an infrared imager, the metal light-weight enclosure accommodates a directly mounted IDDCA and an optical train, thus serving as an optical bench and heat sink. This usually results in excitation of structural resonances in the said enclosure and, therefore, in excessive noise generation compromising the aural stealth. The author presents the complex approach to a design of aural undetectable infrared imagers in which the IDDCA is mounted upon the imager enclosure through a silent pad. Special attention is paid to resolving the line of sight stability and heat sinking issues. The demonstration imager relying on Ricor K562S based IDDCA meets the most stringent requirement to 10 meters aural non-detectability distance (per MIL-STD 1474D, Level II) even during boost cooldown phase of operation.

  6. Tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Hyosun; Park, Jeong Young

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell with double Schottky barriers. The tandem-structured, hot electron based photovoltaic cell is composed of two metal/semiconductor interfaces. Two types of tandem cells were fabricated using TiO2/Au/Si and TiO2/Au/TiO2, and photocurrent enhancement was detected. The double Schottky barriers lead to an additional pathway for harvesting hot electrons, which is enhanced through multiple reflections between the two barriers with different energy ranges. In addition, light absorption is improved by the band-to-band excitation of both semiconductors with different band gaps. Short-circuit current and energy conversion efficiency of the tandem-structured TiO2/Au/Si increased by 86% and 70%, respectively, compared with Au/Si metal/semiconductor nanodiodes, showing an overall solar energy conversion efficiency of 5.3%. PMID:24694838

  7. Coaxial Ag/ZnO/Ag nanowire for highly sensitive hot-electron photodetection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Yaohui; Li, Xiaofeng Wu, Kai; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia

    2015-02-23

    Single-nanowire photodetectors (SNPDs) are mostly propelled by p-n junctions, where the detection wavelength is constrained by the band-gap width. Here, we present a simple doping-free metal/semiconductor/metal SNPD, which shows strong detection tunability without such a material constraint. The proposed hot-electron SNPD exhibits superior optical and electrical advantages, i.e., optically the coaxial design leads to a strong asymmetrical photoabsorption and results in a high unidirectional photocurrent, as desired by the hot-electron collection; electrically the hot-electrons are generated in the region very close to the barrier, facilitating the electrical transport. Rigorous calculations predict an unbiased photoresponsivity of ∼200 nA/mW.

  8. Application of induction coil measurements to the study of superalloy hot corrosion and oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The assessment of the degree of hot corrosion attack on nickel based alloys is a difficult task, especially when the definition specifies that it must be in terms of metal consumed and even more difficult if the measurement must be nondestructive. The inductance of a solenoid coil responds to changes in volume of fill and composition of metal cores, therefore, it may be used for nondestructive measurement of hot corrosion. The hot corrosion of U700 was studied at 900 C in a Mach 0.3 flame doped with 0.85 wppm of sodium. The change of inductance was found to define the known corrosion behavior and to suggest its use as a tool with predictive capabilities. Sufficient sensitivity exists to detect oxidation of this alloy at 900 C.

  9. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Listerhill, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Solar system was installed into a new building and was designed to provide 79% of the estimated annual space heating load and 59% of the estimated annual potable hot water requirement. The collectors are flat plate, liquid manufactured by Reynolds Metals Company and cover a total area of 2344 square feet. The storage medium is water inhibited with NALCO 2755 and the container is an underground, unpressurized steel tank with a capacity of 5000 gallons. This report describes in considerable detail the solar heating facility and contains detailed drawings of the completed system.

  10. Hot electron injection, vertical transport, and electrical spin detection in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Huang, Biqin; Altfeder, Igor; Monsma, Douwe

    2007-03-01

    In our devices, spin-dependent hot electron transport through metallic ferromagnetic thin films is used to polarize a charge current injected into the conduction band of Si, and then to analyze the remaining polarization after vertical drift. Our measurements of a clear spin-valve signature indicate substantial electron spin polarization after transport through several microns of Si.

  11. Method for making hot-pressed fiber-reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Wallace Sr., Terry C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the chemical vapor deposition of a uniform coating of tantalum metal on fibers of a woven graphite cloth is described. Several layers of the coated cloth are hot pressed to produce a tantalum carbide-graphite composite having a uniformly dispersed, fine grained tantalum carbide in graphite with compositions in the range of 15 to 40 volume percent tantalum carbide.

  12. The effect of hot salt on the mechanical properties of several superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of sodium chloride on unstressed, transverse, tensile, metal specimens at elevated temperatures was determined. Results indicate that the mechanical properties of Inconel 718, Rene 41, titanium base alloy 13V-11Cr-3Al, Hastelloy X, HS25 (L605), HS188, and TDNiCr suffer degradation in tensile strength and ductility due to hot salt exposure.

  13. Metal aminoboranes

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Davis, Benjamin J.; Thorn, David L.; Gordon, John C.; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy Allen; Tumas, William; Diyabalanage, Himashinie Vichalya Kaviraj; Shrestha, Roshan P.

    2010-05-11

    Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit.

  14. Assessment of hot gas contaminant control

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

  15. Hot Flow Anomalies at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  16. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

    1999-04-01

    Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

  17. Hot flow anomalies at Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J. A.; Coates, A. J.; Zhang, T. L.; Sarantos, M.; Boardsen, S.; Moore, T. E.; Barabash, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  18. Study on load relaxation based on hot bending and sizing of Ti6Al4V alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po, Liu; Yingying, Zong; Debin, Shan; Bin, Guo

    2013-05-01

    The mechanism of hot sizing following sheet thermal forming of titanium alloy is considered as stress relaxation based on creep flow. A certain amount of internal stress in sheet metal parts can be relaxed during hot-sizing stage and hence the springback can be markedly reduced. Hot v-bending of Ti6Al4V sheet were carried out to study the behavior of load relaxation and springback in specimens after hot sizing, also known as shape retention. Experimental results reveal that load relaxation occurs during hot sizing following sheet v-bending. Reduction of springback angle obtained using hot sizing is obviously larger than that obtained without hot sizing under the same thermal environment. During hot sizing, springback angle decreases with increase in temperature and time, respectively. Load relaxation behavior is affected by loading method, namely constant velocity and two step loading. The linear relation between creep rate and load relaxation rate was deduced in hot-sizing stage. The calculated ratio shows good agreement with experimental data obtained by two-step loading. V-bending and sizing together with appropriate loading method are demonstrated as a good approach for stress relaxation analysis.

  19. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  20. Bulk photoemission from metal films and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhsanov, R Sh; Babicheva, V E; Protsenko, I E; Uskov, A V; Guzhva, M E

    2015-01-31

    Internal emission of photoelectrons from metal films and nanoparticles (nanowires and nanospheres) into a semiconductor matrix is studied theoretically by taking into account the jump of the effective electron mass at the metal – semiconductor interface and the cooling effect of hot electrons due to electron – electron collisions in the metal. The internal quantum efficiency of photoemission for the film and nanoparticles of two types (nanospheres and nanowires) is calculated. It is shown that the reduction of the effective mass of the electron during its transition from metal to semiconductor may lead to a significant (orders of magnitude and higher) decrease in the internal quantum efficiency of bulk photoemission. (nanostructures)

  1. Method of measuring metal coating adhesion

    DOEpatents

    Roper, J.R.

    A method for measuring metal coating adhesion to a substrate material comprising the steps of preparing a test coupon of substrate material having the metal coating applied to one surface thereof, applying a second metal coating of gold or silver to opposite surfaces of the test coupon by hot hollow cathode process, applying a coating to one end of each of two pulling rod members, joining the coated ends of the pulling rod members to said opposite coated surfaces of the test coupon by a solid state bonding technique and finally applying instrumented static tensile loading to the pulling rod members until fracture of the metal coating adhesion to the substrate material occurs.

  2. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  3. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOEpatents

    Leininger, Thomas F.; Robin, Allen M.; Wolfenbarger, James K.; Suggitt, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  4. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  5. Life in hot acid: pathway analyses in extremely thermoacidophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Cooper, Charlotte R; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaea are a particularly intriguing group of microorganisms that must simultaneously cope with biologically extreme pHs (< or = 4) and temperatures (Topt > or = 60 degrees C) in their natural environments. Their expanding biotechnological significance relates to their role in biomining of base and precious metals and their unique mechanisms of survival in hot acid, at both the cellular and biomolecular levels. Recent developments, such as advances in understanding of heavy metal tolerance mechanisms, implementation of a genetic system, and discovery of a new carbon fixation pathway, have been facilitated by the availability of genome sequence data and molecular genetic systems. As a result, new insights into the metabolic pathways and physiological features that define extreme thermoacidophily have been obtained, in some cases suggesting prospects for biotechnological opportunities. PMID:18760359

  6. Laboratory procedures used in the hot corrosion project

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.R.

    1980-04-08

    The objective of the Hot Corrosion Project in the LLNL Metals and Ceramics Division is to study the physical and chemical mechanisms of corrosion of nickel, iron, and some of their alloys when these metals are subjected to oxidizing or sulfidizing environments at temperatures between 850 and 950/sup 0/C. To obtain meaningful data in this study, we must rigidly control many parameters. Parameters are discussed and the methods chosen to control them in this laboratory. Some of the mechanics and manipulative procedures that are specifically related to data access and repeatability are covered. The method of recording and processing the data from each experiment using an LS-11 minicomputer are described. The analytical procedures used to evaluate the specimens after the corrosion tests are enumerated and discussed.

  7. Hot Forging of a Cladded Component by Automated GMAW Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad; Langlois, Laurent; Bigot, Régis

    2011-01-01

    Weld cladding is employed to improve the service life of engineering components by increasing corrosion and wear resistance and reducing the cost. The acceptable multi-bead cladding layer depends on single bead geometry. Hence, in first step, the relationship between input process parameters and the single bead geometry is studied and in second step a comprehensive study on multi bead clad layer deposition is carried out. This paper highlights an experimental study carried out to get single layer cladding deposited by automated Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process and to find the possibility of hot forming of the cladded work piece to get the final hot formed improved structure. GMAW is an arc welding process that uses an arc between a consumable electrode and the welding pool with an external shielding gas and the cladding is done by alongside deposition of weld beads. The experiments for single bead were conducted by varying the three main process parameters wire feed rate, arc voltage and welding speed while keeping other parameters like nozzle to work distance, shielding gas and its flow rate and torch angle constant. The effect of bead spacing and torch orientation on the cladding quality of single layer from the results of single bead deposition was studied. Effect of the dilution rate and nominal energy on the cladded layer hot bending quality was also performed at different temperatures.

  8. Hot spot management through design based metrology: measurement and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyeong; Yang, Hyunjo; Kim, Jungchan; Jung, Areum; Yoo, Gyun; Yim, Donggyu; Park, Sungki; Ishikawa, Akio; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Vikram, Abhishek

    2009-12-01

    Recently several Design Based Metrologies (DBMs) are introduced and being in use for wafer verification. The major applications of DBM are OPC accuracy improvement, DFM feed-back through Process Window Qualification (PWQ) and advanced process control. In general, however, the amount of output data from DBM is normally so large that it is very hard to handle the data for valuable feed-back. In case of PWQ, more than thousands of hot spots are detected on a single chip at the edge of process window. So, it takes much time and labor to review and analyze all the hot spots detected at PWQ. Design-related systematic defects, however, will be found repeatedly and if they can be classified into groups, it would be possible to save a lot of time for the analysis. We have demonstrated an EDA tool which can handle the large amount of output data from DBM by classifying pattern defects into groups. It can classify millions of patterns into less than thousands of pattern groups. It has been evaluated on the analysis of PWQ of metal layer in NAND Flash memory device and random contact hole patterns in a DRAM device. Also, verification was tuned to specific needs of the designer as well as defect analysis engineers by use of EDA tool's 'Pattern Matching Function'. The verification result was well within the required specification of the designer as well as the analysis engineer. The procedures of Hot Spot Management through Design Based Metrology are presented in detail.

  9. Hot electron spin transport in C60 fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Luis Eduardo; Gobbi, Marco; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Golmar, Federico; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Carbon-based molecular materials are interesting for spin transport application mainly due to their small sources of spin relaxation [1]. However, spin coherence lengths reported in many molecular films do not exceed a few tens of nanometers [2]. In this work we will present results showing how hot spin-polarized electrons injected well above the Fermi level in C60 fullerene films travel coherently for hundreds of nanometers. We fabricated hot-electron vertical transistors, in which the current created across an Al/Al2O3 junction is polarized by a metallic Co/Cu/Py spin valve trilayer and subsequently injected in the molecular thin film. This geometry allows us to determine the energy level alignment at each interface between different materials. Moreover, the collector magnetocurrent excess 85%, even for C60 films thicknesses of 300 nm. We believe these results show the importance of hot spin-polarized electron injection and propagation in molecular materials. [1] V. Dediu, L.E. Hueso, I. Bergenti, C. Taliani, Nature Mater. 8, 707 (2009) [2] M. Gobbi, F. Golmar, R. Llopis, F. Casanova, L.E. Hueso, Adv. Mater. 23, 1609 (2011)

  10. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown. The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO{sub 2}.

  11. Hot piston ring/cylinder liner materials: Selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    In current designs of the automotive (kinematic) Stirling engine, the piston rings are made of a reinforced polymer and are located below the pistons because they cannot withstand the high temperatures in the upper cylinder area. Theoretically, efficiency could be improved if hot piston rings were located near the top of the pistons. Described is a program to select piston ring and cylinder coating materials to test this theory. Candidate materials were screened, then subjected to a pin or disk friction and wear test machine. Tests were performed in hydrogen at specimen temperatures up to 760 C to simulate environmental conditions in the region of the hot piston ring reversal. Based on the results of these tests, a cobalt based alloy, Stellite 6B, was chosen for the piston rings and PS200, which consists of a metal-bonded chromium carbide matrix with dispersed solid lubricants, was chosen as the cylinder coating. Tests of a modified engine and a baseline engine showed that the hot ring reduced specific fuel consumption by up to 7 percent for some operating conditions and averaged about 3 percent for all conditions evaluated. Related applications of high-temperature coatings for shaft seals and as back-up lubricants are also described.

  12. Hot Gaseous Coronae around Spiral Galaxies: Probing the Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdán, Ákos; Vogelsberger, Mark; Kraft, Ralph P.; Hernquist, Lars; Gilfanov, Marat; Torrey, Paul; Churazov, Eugene; Genel, Shy; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Jones, Christine; Böhringer, Hans

    2015-05-01

    The presence of hot gaseous coronae around present-day massive spiral galaxies is a fundamental prediction of galaxy formation models. However, our observational knowledge remains scarce, since to date only four gaseous coronae have been detected around spirals with massive stellar bodies (≳ 2× {{10}11} {{M}⊙ }). To explore the hot coronae around lower mass spiral galaxies, we utilized Chandra X-ray observations of a sample of eight normal spiral galaxies with stellar masses of (0.7-2.0)× {{10}11} {{M}⊙ }. Although statistically significant diffuse X-ray emission is not detected beyond the optical radii (˜20 kpc) of the galaxies, we derive 3σ limits on the characteristics of the coronae. These limits, complemented with previous detections of NGC 1961 and NGC 6753, are used to probe the Illustris Simulation. The observed 3σ upper limits on the X-ray luminosities and gas masses exceed or are at the upper end of the model predictions. For NGC 1961 and NGC 6753 the observed gas temperatures, metal abundances, and electron density profiles broadly agree with those predicted by Illustris. These results hint that the physics modules of Illustris are broadly consistent with the observed properties of hot coronae around spiral galaxies. However, one shortcoming of Illustris is that massive black holes, mostly residing in giant ellipticals, give rise to powerful radio-mode active galactic nucleus feedback, which results in under-luminous coronae for ellipticals.

  13. Modeling of planetesimal compaction by hot pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, W.; Breuer, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-07-01

    Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius. On the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and, thus, in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modeled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ~650 K and 700 K [see e.g. 1--3]. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress. In the present study [see 4], we compare this ''parametrized'' method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a ''creep-related'' approach. We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies [5] to model compaction of an initially porous ordinary chondritic body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centered cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modeled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 and 700 K. Since we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrized approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the activation energy, the initial porosity, and the

  14. DOE hot dry rock program

    SciTech Connect

    Nunz, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been used to create and subsequently to enlarge the first hot dry rock heat-extraction loop at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. Encouraging results prompted the DOE to expand this project into a program of national scope. The elements of that Program and their present status are discussed. Emphasis is given the ongoing Fenton Hill Project where techniques and information developed in the existing research system will soon be used to produce a multiply-fractured engineering system in hotter rock at the same site. Recent results from research loop operation and progress in constructing the engineering system are reported. Although acoustic mapping and system geometry indicate that the primary hydraulic fractures are essentially vertical, relatively low fracturing pressure and absence of a sharp breakdown suggest that at Fenton Hill fracture initiation occurs by reopening of old natural fractures rather than by initiation of new ones. Flow patterns and temperature behavior suggest opening of additional old fractures as the loop is operated. Except where the hot fluid leaves the crack system to enter the production well, flow impedances are very low without either artificial propping or inflation by pressurization.

  15. Formation damage related to hot oiling

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, K.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Hot oil has been used to remove paraffin deposits almost as long as oil has been produced. It is still the most widely used procedure for paraffin removal in use today because of its relative simplicity of application, immediate results, and low cost per application. These apparent benefits have obscured the damage that hot oil can cause when used to clean downhole production equipment. Formation damage caused by hot oiling is related to the physical characteristics of the oil used, the source of the oil, the formation temperature, and the hot-oil process. Potential problems are discussed and suggestions made to minimize or to eliminate them. Laboratory tests are presented for determining whether a crude will cause formation damage during hot oiling. Case histories of successful cleaning of hot-oil formation damage are also given.

  16. Atmospheric circulation of hot Jupiters and super Earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataria, Tiffany

    This dissertation explores the atmospheric circulation of extrasolar planets ranging from hot Jupiters to super Earths. For each of these studies, I utilize a three-dimensional circulation model coupled to a state-of-the-art, plane-parallel, two-stream, non-grey radiative transfer model dubbed the SPARC/MITgcm. First, I present models of the atmospheric circulation of eccentric hot Jupiters, a population which undergoes large variations in flux throughout their orbits. I demonstrate that the eccentric hot Jupiter regime is qualitatively similar to that of planets on circular orbits. For a select number of model integrations, I generate full-orbit lightcurves and find that the timing of transit and secondary eclipse viewed from Earth with respect to periapse and apoapse can greatly affect what is seen in infrared (IR) lightcurves. Next, I present circulation models of WASP-43b, a transiting hot Jupiter that is joining the ranks of HD 189733b and HD 209458b as a 'benchmark' hot Jupiter, with a wide array of observational constraints from the ground and space. Here I utilize the robust dataset of spectrophotometric observations taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to interpret my model results. I find that an atmospheric composition of 5x solar provides the best match to the data, particularly in emission. Lastly, I present atmospheric simulations of the super Earth GJ 1214b, exploring the planet's circulation as a function of atmospheric metallicity and composition. I find that atmospheres with a low mean-molecular weight have strong day-night temperature variations at pressures above the infrared photosphere that lead to equatorial superrotation. For these atmospheres, the enhancement of atmospheric opacities with increasing metallicity leads to shallower atmospheric heating, larger day-night temperature variations and hence stronger superrotation. In comparison, atmospheres with a high mean-molecular weight have larger

  17. Hot spot and trench volcano separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Schubert, G.

    1974-01-01

    It is suggested that the distribution of separations between trench volcanos located along subduction zones reflects the depth of partial melting, and that the separation distribution for hot spot volcanoes near spreading centers provides a measure of the depth of mantle convection cells. It is further proposed that the lateral dimensions of mantle convection cells are also represented by the hot-spot separations (rather than by ridge-trench distances) and that a break in the distribution of hot spot separations at 3000 km is evidence for both whole mantle convection and a deep thermal plume origin of hot spots.

  18. Optimization of Plasmon Decay Through Scattering and Hot Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJarnette, Drew

    Light incident on metal nanoparticles induce localized surface oscillations of conductive electrons, called plasmons, which is a means to control and manipulate light. Excited plasmons decay as either thermal energy as absorbed phonons or electromagnetic energy as scattered photons. An additional decay pathway for plasmons can exist for gold nanoparticles situated on graphene. Excited plasmons can decay directly to the graphene as through hot electron transfer. This dissertation begins by computational analysis of plasmon resonance energy and bandwidth as a function of particle size, shape, and dielectric environment in addition to diffractive coupled in lattices creating a Fano resonance. With this knowledge, plasmon resonance was probed with incident electrons using electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Nanoparticles were fabricated using electron beam lithography on 50 nanometer thick silicon nitride with some particles fabricated with a graphene layer between the silicon nitride and metal structure. Plasmon resonance was compared between ellipses on and off graphene to characterize hot electron transfer as a means of plasmon decay. It was observed that the presence of graphene caused plasmon energy to decrease by as much as 9.8% and bandwidth to increase by 25%. Assuming the increased bandwidth was solely from electron transfer as an additional plasmon decay route, a 20% efficiency of plasmon decay to graphene was calculated for the particular ellipses analyzed.

  19. Growth of chromium carbide in a hot wall DLICVD reactor.

    PubMed

    Boisselier, G; Maury, F; Schuster, F

    2011-09-01

    Chromium carbide coatings were grown at 748 K in a hot wall CVD reactor fed by sublimation of bis(benzene)chromium, BBC (MOCVD) and by direct liquid injection using a BBC/toluene solution (DLICVD). The two types of coatings exhibit an amorphous structure and the same C content (22 at.%). DLICVD permits delivering higher mass flow rate of precursors and consequently the growth rate is 3 times higher and the thickness uniformity is better than using MOCVD. Chromium metal deposition has also been investigated by DLICVD in this hot wall reactor using BBC/toluene/additive as precursor. The purpose of the additive is to block carbide formation. Two additives have been studied: (i) hexachlorobenzene (C6Cl6) and (ii) thiophenol (C6H5SH). The ratio additive/BBC required for Cr metal deposition is a few percent. In this process, C6Cl6 is not decomposed and only traces of Cl (0.4 at.%) are found in the coatings. For a ratio C6Cl6/BBC > 27% the growth of any coating is blocked. The gas phase containing C6H5SH is more reactive since the onset of deposition occurs approximately 50 K before the temperature of the chlorinated compound. Furthermore, a sulfur contamination of 3 at.% has been analyzed in the coatings revealing a partial decomposition of the additive. The results are detailed and discussed in relation with previous works. PMID:22097571

  20. Bibliography on Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) technology. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilp, B.F.; Desai, P.D.; Radavich, J.F.; Ho, C.Y.

    1992-11-01

    This report contains an annotated bibliography of 950 documents on the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) Technology dealing with metals, alloys, and intermetallic compounds and covers over 450 materials. Documents published from 1966 to early 1992 are covered. Bibliographic information reported here are divided into three broad categories. The first category includes an annotated bibliography dealing with HIP technology as applied to powder metallurgy. The second category deals with casting and the third deals with miscellaneous materials which either are not properly identified or have a limited number of bibliographic citations. Within each category, bibliographic information is organized according to major alloy groups, e.g., aluminum alloys, beryllium alloys, cobalt alloys, etc., followed by bibliographies for miscellaneous alloys which are alloys either not properly identified or not having enough data to warrant a separate category. Each alloy group is further subdivided into individual commercial alloys, e.g., aluminum alloys AA 2024, AA 7075, AA 7090, etc., followed by miscellaneous aluminum alloys. Bibliography, Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP), Powder metallurgy, Castings, Metals, Alloys, Intermetallics, Mechanical properties, Processing, Beryllium alloys, Titanium alloys, Aluminum alloys, Cobalt alloys, Refractory alloys, Steels.

  1. Automatic simulation of a sequence of hot-former forging processes by a rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Joun, M.S.; Moon, H.K.; Shivpuri, R.

    1998-10-01

    A fully automatic forging simulation technique in hot-former forging is presented in this paper. A rigid-thermoviscoplastic finite element method is employed together with automatic simulation techniques. A realistic analysis model of the hot-former forging processes is given with emphasis on thermal analysis and simulation automation. The whole processes including forming, dwelling, ejecting, and transferring are considered in the analysis model and various cooling conditions are embedded in the analysis model. The approach is applied to a sequence of three-stage hot former forging process. Nonisothermal analysis results are compared with isothermal ones and the effect of heat transfer on predicted metal flows is discussed.

  2. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    2000-09-30

    DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests

  3. Red-Hot Library Lust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Benton (a pseudonym of an associate professor of English at a Midwestern liberal-arts college) describes most college libraries of today as being clean and well-lighted, with metal shelving, veneered tabletops, and banks of computers. He fears that in 20 years, college students will regard books as a "quaint technology"--the way they now…

  4. TRUEX hot demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1990-04-01

    In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

  5. Hot-solvent miscible displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Awang, M.; Farouq Ali, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    This work describes an experimental and theoretical investigation of miscible displacement under nonisothermal conditions. The hot miscible floods were performed in an adiabatic glass bead pack, displacing one hydrocarbon by a more viscous hydrocarbon, the latter being at an elevated temperature. As a result, dispersion of both mass and heat took place, and was determined by temperature and concentration measurements. The system was simulated by coupled convective-diffusion and thermal conduction-convection equations. The results of the numerical as well as an approximate analytical solution were compared with the experimentally observed behavior. The numerical and experimental results point to the factors which should be considered in the choice of a solvent for a thermal-miscible type oil recovery process.

  6. Cool systems for hot cities

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Bretz, Sarah

    1998-09-02

    On a hot summer day, Los Angeles, CA, like Baltimore, MD, Phoenix, AZ, Washington, D.C., and Tokyo, Japan, is c. 6-8 degrees F hotter than its surrounding areas. Dark buildings and pavement have replaced urban vegetation in these cities, absorbing more solar heat. The urban heat islands that are created result in increased air-conditioning costs, energy use, and pollution. Scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been studying the effects of roof system color and type on the energy used to cool a building. The results of this research indicate that roofing professionals should consider the reflectance (albedo) and emittance (release of absorbed heat) of the roof systems they install.

  7. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  8. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOEpatents

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  9. Hot electron production and heating by hot electrons in fast ignitor research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.H.; Estabrook, K.; Hammel, B.

    1997-12-01

    In an experimental study of the physics of fast ignition the characteristics of the hot electron source at laser intensities up to 10(to the 20th power) Wcm{sup -2} and the heating produced at depth by hot electrons have been measured. Efficient generation of hot electrons but less than the anticipated heating have been observed.

  10. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  11. Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2000-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

  12. Separation Of Metals Bonded With Two-Sided Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Procedure developed to separate, without pulling, bending, or prying, objects temporarily bonded together with two-sided tape. Ultrasonic cleaning in hot kerosene enables separation without damage. Procedure applicable in removal of protective backing from metals as received, or in removing temporary bonding tape from metal specimens.

  13. Hot Electron-Based Near-Infrared Photodetection Using Bilayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenyi; Klots, Andrey; Prasai, Dhiraj; Yang, Yuanmu; Bolotin, Kirill I; Valentine, Jason

    2015-11-11

    Recently, there has been much interest in the extraction of hot electrons generated from surface plasmon decay, as this process can be used to achieve additional bandwidth for both photodetectors and photovoltaics. Hot electrons are typically injected into semiconductors over a Schottky barrier between the metal and semiconductor, enabling generation of photocurrent with below bandgap photon illumination. As a two-dimensional semiconductor single and few layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been demonstrated to exhibit internal photogain and therefore becomes an attractive hot electron acceptor. Here, we investigate hot electron-based photodetection in a device consisting of bilayer MoS2 integrated with a plasmonic antenna array. We demonstrate sub-bandgap photocurrent originating from the injection of hot electrons into MoS2 as well as photoamplification that yields a photogain of 10(5). The large photogain results in a photoresponsivity of 5.2 A/W at 1070 nm, which is far above similar silicon-based hot electron photodetectors in which no photoamplification is present. This technique is expected to have potential use in future ultracompact near-infrared photodetection and optical memory devices. PMID:26426510

  14. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yuhuang; Hauge, Robert H.; Schmidt, Howard K.; Kim, Myung Jong; Kittrell, W. Carter

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  15. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter studies: 1, Comparison of SCB and hot-wire pyrotechnic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Schlobohm, S.L.; Ewick, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a means for igniting pyrotechnics, propellants and primary or secondary explosives using a semiconductor bridge (SCB) instead of the small metal bridgewires, called hot wires, conventionally used for explosive components. The SCB is a heavily n-doped silicon film, typically 100 ..mu..m long by 380 ..mu..m wide by 2 ..mu..m thick, which when driven with a short (20 ..mu..s), low-energy current pulse (less than 3 mJ), generates a hot plasma that ignites the explosives. We report in this paper a study of pyrotechnic actuators built with SCB igniters in which we obtained the Langlie All-Fire, Langlie No-Fire and Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) characteristics. Two SCB designs were tested. The first (designated as a type 3-2) was the rectangularly shaped bridge described above. The second (designated as a type 15) included a modification of the rectangular bridge consisting of a narrow waist region. We compare our data for these prototype SCB components with the same actuators built with conventional hot-wire igniters. The results obtained demonstrated the main characteristics of SCB devices: (1) the SCB actuators functioned at one-tenth the input energy of the hot-wire actuators, (2) had higher no-fire currents than the hot-wire devices, (3) passed ESD tests, and (4) functioned in a few tens of microseconds versus the millisecond response of the hot-wire components. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. A new avenue for high efficiency solar cells: interaction of hot electrons with plasmons (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael J.

    2015-09-01

    Hot electrons rapidly dissipate their extra free energy, typically into heat. This is the origin of the Shockley-Queisser efficiency limit of the single junction solar cells. An even faster mechanism of electron-plasmon scattering is available in metals. We demonstrate by detailed simulations, that an ultra-thin solar cell with a composite metamaterial/plasmonic collector could yield efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Quasar limit. The composite collector has a double function: firstly, it is designed to participate in efficiently trapping light, and secondly, it is a plasmonic resonator tuned to absorb the energy of hot electrons, thus protecting them from phonon losses.

  17. The effect of fuel-to-air ratio on burner-rig hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.; Kohl, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    Samples of a cobalt-base alloy, Mar M-509, were subjected to hot corrosion in a Mach-0.3 burner rig. The corrodent was NaCl added as an aqueous solution to the combustion products of a sulfur-containing Jet-A fuel. The metal temperature was fixed at 900 C. The extent of hot corrosion increased by a factor of three as the fuel-to-air mass ratio was increased from 0.033 to 0.050. Because the depositing salt was always Na2SO4, the increased attack appeared to be related to the gas composition.

  18. Perpendicular Hot Electron Transport in the Spin Valve Photo-Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian

    2006-03-01

    The spin valve photo diode (SVPD) provides a new way to explore perpendicular hot electron transport in ferromagnetic multilayers using photoexcitation and internal photoemission. Since electrons are excited everywhere in the metallic multilayer, structure geometry is vital to optimize the magnetocurrent (MC). Initial theoretical models indicate that the MC should increase by increasing the thickness of a capping layer at the surface, but experiments demonstrate a nonmonotonic dependence resulting in an optimum capping layer thickness to maximize MC. The inconsistency between experiment and this theoretical model is also discussed, leading to a new proposal for hot electron transport in the SVPD.

  19. Spin-polarized lithium diffusion in a glass hot-vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    We report diffusion coefficients of optically pumped lithium atoms in helium buffer gas. The free-induction decay and the spin-echo signals of ground-state atoms were optically detected in an external magnetic field with the addition of field gradient. Lithium hot vapor was produced in a borosilicate-glass cell at a temperature between 290 and 360°C. The simple setup using the glass cells enabled lithium atomic spectroscopy in a similar way to other alkali-metal atoms and study of the collisional properties of lithium atoms in a hot-vapor phase.

  20. Basics of Solar Heating & Hot Water Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Inst. of Architects, Washington, DC.

    In presenting the basics of solar heating and hot water systems, this publication is organized from the general to the specific. It begins by presenting functional and operational descriptions of solar heating and domestic hot water systems, outlining the basic concepts and terminology. This is followed by a description of solar energy utilization…

  1. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  2. DEMONSTRATING INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT OF HOT PEPPERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  3. Hot Spot Removal System: System description

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Hazardous wastes contaminated with radionuclides, chemicals, and explosives exist across the Department of Energy complex and need to be remediated due to environmental concerns. Currently, an opportunity is being developed to dramatically reduce remediation costs and to assist in the acceleration of schedules associated with these wastes by deploying a Hot Spot Removal System. Removing the hot spot from the waste site will remove risk driver(s) and enable another, more cost effective process/option/remedial alternative (i.e., capping) to be applied to the remainder of the site. The Hot Spot Removal System consists of a suite of technologies that will be utilized to locate and remove source terms. Components of the system can also be used in a variety of other cleanup activities. This Hot Spot Removal System Description document presents technologies that were considered for possible inclusion in the Hot Spot Removal System, technologies made available to the Hot Spot Removal System, industrial interest in the Hot Spot Removal System`s subsystems, the schedule required for the Hot Spot Removal System, the evaluation of the relevant technologies, and the recommendations for equipment and technologies as stated in the Plan section.

  4. HotSpot Software Configuration Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the software configuration management procedures used to ensure that the HotSpot dispersion model meets the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot for consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendations 1 and 3 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  5. The Hot Hand Belief and Framing Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMahon, Clare; Köppen, Jörn; Raab, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence of the hot hand in sport--where success breeds success in a positive recency of successful shots, for instance--indicates that this pattern does not actually exist. Yet the belief persists. We used 2 studies to explore the effects of framing on the hot hand belief in sport. We looked at the effect of sport experience and…

  6. The Time-Limited Hot Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loring, Marti Tamm; Wimberley, Edward T.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that media have become involved in creating programs and addressing issues that have been historically exclusive purview of mental health and human services agencies. Explains how time-limited hot line has been used to address specific issues raised by these programs. Provides overview of this type of hot line, offering triangular model of…

  7. Hot-Air Ballooning in Physics Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    1991-01-01

    Describes the modern hot-air balloon and the physics of ballooning. Proposes that students construct their own hot-air balloon and presents an experiment calculating the time needed for a balloon to rise to the ceiling of a gymnasium. (MDH)

  8. Solar Energy for Space Heating & Hot Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This pamphlet reviews the direct transfer of solar energy into heat, particularly for the purpose of providing space and hot water heating needs. Owners of buildings and homes are provided with a basic understanding of solar heating and hot water systems: what they are, how they perform, the energy savings possible, and the cost factors involved.…

  9. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Section Technology (HOST) Project Office of the Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine hot section durability problems. Presentations were made concerning hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes.

  10. Hot-dry-rock feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The hot-dry-rock project tasks are covered as follows: hot-dry-rock reservoir; generation facilities; water resources; transmission requirements; environmental issues; government and community institutional factors; leasing, ownership and management of facilities; regulations, permits, and laws; and financial considerations. (MHR)

  11. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  12. 16 CFR 1505.51 - Hot surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hot surfaces. 1505.51 Section 1505.51 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... CHILDREN Policies and Interpretations § 1505.51 Hot surfaces. (a) Test probe. Section 1505.6(g)(2)...

  13. 16 CFR 1505.51 - Hot surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hot surfaces. 1505.51 Section 1505.51 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... CHILDREN Policies and Interpretations § 1505.51 Hot surfaces. (a) Test probe. Section 1505.6(g)(2)...

  14. 16 CFR 1505.51 - Hot surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hot surfaces. 1505.51 Section 1505.51 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... CHILDREN Policies and Interpretations § 1505.51 Hot surfaces. (a) Test probe. Section 1505.6(g)(2)...

  15. 16 CFR 1505.51 - Hot surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hot surfaces. 1505.51 Section 1505.51 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS... CHILDREN Policies and Interpretations § 1505.51 Hot surfaces. (a) Test probe. Section 1505.6(g)(2)...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.14 - Hot work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.14 Hot work. (a) Hot work requiring testing by a Marine... or on any of the following confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, boundaries... in or on the following spaces or adjacent spaces or other dangerous atmospheres until they have...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.14 - Hot work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.14 Hot work. (a) Hot work requiring testing by a Marine... or on any of the following confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, boundaries... in or on the following spaces or adjacent spaces or other dangerous atmospheres until they have...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.14 - Hot work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.14 Hot work. (a) Hot work requiring testing by a Marine... or on any of the following confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, boundaries... in or on the following spaces or adjacent spaces or other dangerous atmospheres until they have...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.14 - Hot work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.14 Hot work. (a) Hot work requiring testing by a Marine... or on any of the following confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, boundaries... in or on the following spaces or adjacent spaces or other dangerous atmospheres until they have...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.14 - Hot work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment § 1915.14 Hot work. (a) Hot work requiring testing by a Marine... or on any of the following confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres, boundaries... in or on the following spaces or adjacent spaces or other dangerous atmospheres until they have...

  1. Variational Theory of Hot Dense Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherjee, Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variational theory of hot nuclear matter in neutron stars and supernovae. It can also be used to study charged, hot nuclear matter which may be produced in heavy-ion collisions. This theory is a generalization of the variational theory of cold nuclear and neutron star matter based on realistic models of nuclear forces and pair…

  2. Demonstrating Integrated Pest Management of Hot Peppers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of organic and synthetic chemical fertilizers on crop growth, yield and associated insect pests for two varieties of hot pepper, Capsicum chinense Jacquin (Solanaceae): “Scotch Bonnet” and “Caribbean Red” in north Florida. Hot peppers were grown under three treatments: poultr...

  3. HotSpot Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H; Homann, S G

    2009-03-12

    This Software Test Plan (STP) describes the procedures used to verify and validate that the HotSpot Health Physics Codes meet the requirements of its user base, which includes: (1) Users of the PC version of HotSpot conducting consequence assessment, hazard assessment and safety analysis calculations; and (2) Users of the NARAC Web and iClient software tools, which allow users to run HotSpot for consequence assessment modeling. This plan is intended to meet Critical Recommendation 2 from the Software Evaluation of HotSpot and DOE Safety Software Toolbox Recommendation for inclusion of HotSpot in the Department of Energy (DOE) Safety Software Toolbox. These users and sponsors of the HotSpot software and the organizations they represent constitute the intended audience for this document. HotSpot software is maintained for the Department of Energy Office of Emergency Operations by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An overview of HotSpot and NARAC are provided.

  4. Metal inks

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S; Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alex; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Kaydanova, Tatiana

    2014-02-04

    Self-reducing metal inks and systems and methods for producing and using the same are disclosed. In an exemplary embodiment, a method may comprise selecting metal-organic (MO) precursor, selecting a reducing agent, and dissolving the MO precursor and the reducing agent in an organic solvent to produce a metal ink that remains in a liquid phase at room temperature. Metal inks, including self-reducing and fire-through metal inks, are also disclosed, as are various applications of the metal inks.

  5. Ultrasonic hammer produces hot spots in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Sizhu; Chen, Ming-Wei; Dlott, Dana D.; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical action can produce dramatic physical and mechanochemical effects when the energy is spatially or temporally concentrated. An important example of such phenomena in solids is the mechanical initiation of explosions, which has long been speculated to result from ‘hot spot’ generation at localized microstructures in the energetic material. Direct experimental evidence of such hot spots, however, is exceptionally limited; mechanisms for their generation are poorly understood and methods to control their locations remain elusive. Here we report the generation of intense, localized microscale hot spots in solid composites during mild ultrasonic irradiation, directly visualized by a thermal imaging microscope. These ultrasonic hot spots, with heating rates reaching ~22,000 K s-1, nucleate exclusively at interfacial delamination sites in composite solids. Introducing specific delamination sites by surface modification of embedded components provides precise and reliable control of hot spot locations and permits microcontrol of the initiation of reactions in energetic materials including fuel/oxidizer explosives.

  6. User's Manual and Final Report for Hot-SMAC GUI Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrington, Phil

    2001-01-01

    A new software package called Higher Order Theory-Structural/Micro Analysis Code (HOT-SMAC) has been developed as an effective alternative to the finite element approach for Functionally Graded Material (FGM) modeling. HOT-SMAC is a self-contained package including pre- and post-processing through an intuitive graphical user interface, along with the well-established Higher Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials (HOTFGM) thermomechanical analysis engine. This document represents a Getting Started/User's Manual for HOT-SMAC and a final report for its development. First, the features of the software are presented in a simple step-by-step example where a HOT-SMAC model representing a functionally graded material is created, mechanical and thermal boundary conditions are applied, the model is analyzed and results are reviewed. In a second step-by-step example, a HOT-SMAC model of an actively cooled metallic channel with ceramic thermal barrier coating is built and analyzed. HOT-SMAC results from this model are compared to recently published results (NASA/TM-2001-210702) for two grid densities. Finally, a prototype integration of HOTSMAC with the commercially available HyperSizer(R) structural analysis and sizing software is presented. In this integration, local strain results from HyperSizer's structural analysis are fed to a detailed HOT-SMAC model of the flange-to-facesheet bond region of a stiffened panel. HOT-SMAC is then used to determine the peak shear and peel (normal) stresses between the facesheet and bonded flange of the panel and determine the "free edge" effects.

  7. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  8. Structure of Hot Flow Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2012-12-01

    Hot Flow Anomalies (HFAs) were first discovered in 1980s. These are active processes of hot plasma bulks formation that usually occur at planetary bow shocks. Though HFA were studied for long time it is still not clear if they are reforming structures and what defines particular internal structure of HFA. Our study is based on the Interball Tail Probe data. We used 10-sec measurements of complex plasma analyzer SCA-1 and 1-second magnetic field measurements, and ELECTRON spectrometer 2-dimensional measurements with 3,75-sec temporal resolution. Five anomalies that were observed on the basis of well resolved structure for which we obtained displacement velocity along bow shock, flow velocities within HFA, and estimated the size. We checked if main criteria of HFA formation were fulfilled for each case. The following criteria were satisfied: motional electric field direction was directed toward current sheet at least at one side of it, bow shock was quasi-perpendicular at least at one side of HFA, and angle between current sheet normal and solar wind velocity was large. Convection velocities of plasma within HFA were calculated by subtracting average velocity from measured ion convection velocities along spacecraft trajectory through anomaly. These convection velocities viewed in coordinate system of shock normal and calculated IMF current sheet normal clearly show separation of HFA region in 3 parts: leading part, narrow central part, and trailing part. Ion velocity distributions confirm this triple structure of HFA. Thomsen et al. [1986] identified the region within HFA that they called "internal recovery". It looks like central region that we call narrow central part. Vaisberg et al. [1999] discussed separation of HFA into 2 distinct parts that correspond to leading and trailing parts. Judging from plasma convection pattern within HFAs we assumed that "internal recovery" region is the source of energy and momentum around interplanetary current sheet crossing. HFA

  9. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  10. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  11. Silicone metalization

    DOEpatents

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  12. Probing Hot Electron Flow Generated on Pt Nanoparticles with Au/TiO2 Schottky Diodes during Catalytic CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Renzas, J. Russell; Zhang, Yawen; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-05-01

    Hot electron flow generated on colloid platinum nanoparticles during exothermic catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation was directly detected with Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes. Although Au/TiO{sub 2} diodes are not catalytically active, platinum nanoparticles on Au/TiO{sub 2} exhibit both chemicurrent and catalytic turnover rate. Hot electrons are generated on the surface of the metal nanoparticles and go over the Schottky energy barrier between Au and TiO{sub 2}. The continuous Au layer ensures that the metal nanoparticles are electrically connected to the device. The overall thickness of the metal assembly (nanoparticles and Au thin film) is comparable to the mean free path of hot electrons, resulting in ballistic transport through the metal. The chemicurrent and chemical reactivity of nanoparticles with citrate, hexadecylamine, hexadecylthiol, and TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide) capping agents were measured during catalytic CO oxidation at pressures of 100 Torr O{sub 2} and 40 Torr CO at 373-513 K. We found that chemicurrent yield varies with each capping agent, but always decreases with increasing temperature. We suggest that this inverse temperature dependence is associated with the influence of charging effects due to the organic capping layer during hot electron transport through the metal-oxide interface.

  13. Surface-plasmon enhanced photodetection at communication band based on hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai; Zhan, Yaohui E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn; Wu, Shaolong; Deng, Jiajia; Li, Xiaofeng E-mail: xfli@suda.edu.cn

    2015-08-14

    Surface plasmons can squeeze light into a deep-subwavelength space and generate abundant hot electrons in the nearby metallic regions, enabling a new paradigm of photoconversion by the way of hot electron collection. Unlike the visible spectral range concerned in previous literatures, we focus on the communication band and design the infrared hot-electron photodetectors with plasmonic metal-insulator-metal configuration by using full-wave finite-element method. Titanium dioxide-silver Schottky interface is employed to boost the low-energy infrared photodetection. The photodetection sensitivity is strongly improved by enhancing the plasmonic excitation from a rationally engineered metallic grating, which enables a strong unidirectional photocurrent. With a five-step electrical simulation, the optimized device exhibits an unbiased responsivity of ∼0.1 mA/W and an ultra-narrow response band (FWHM = 4.66 meV), which promises to be a candidate as the compact photodetector operating in communication band.

  14. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  15. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING THAT HOUSES THE HOT ROLL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING THAT HOUSES THE HOT ROLL MILL, ALSO KNOWN AS THE NO. 31 HOT ROLL MILL; LOOKING SOUTHWEST - American Brass Company, Kenosha Works, Hot Roll Mill, Kenosha, Kenosha County, WI

  16. Iron Aluminide Hot Gas Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.; Brosious, S.; Johnson, M.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, high temperature filter systems are in the demonstration phase with the first commercial scale hot filter systems being installed on integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluid bed combustion cycle (PBFC) systems (70 MW). They are dependent on the development of durable and economic high temperature filter systems. These filters are mostly ceramic tubes or candles. Ceramic filter durability has not been high. Failure is usually attributed to mechanical or thermal shock: they can also undergo significant changes due to service conditions. The overall objective of this project is to commercialize weldable, crack resistant filters which will provide several years service in advanced power processes. The specific objectives of this project are to develop corrosion resistant alloys and manufacturing processes to make Iron Aluminide filter media, and to use a ``short term`` exposure apparatus supported by other tests to identify the most promising candidate (alloy plus sintering cycle). The objectives of the next phases are to demonstrate long term corrosion stability for the best candidate followed by the production of fifty filters (optional).

  17. Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne

    2006-07-19

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

  18. Fragmentation of hot classical drops

    SciTech Connect

    Vicentini, A.; Jacucci, G.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1985-05-01

    Time evolution of hot drops of matter containing approx.230 or approx.130 particles is studied by classical molecular dynamics. Initially, the drops have uniform density and a sharp surface. The chosen initial conditions include three values of density and a range of temperatures wide enough to study the phenomena of evaporation, fragmentation, and total vaporization in a unified fashion. The average density and temperature of central matter is measured periodically to obtain trajectories of the evolution in the rho,T plane. These trajectories indicate that the matter expands almost adiabatically until it reaches the region of adiabatic instabilities. Density inhomogeneities develop in this region, but the matter fragments only if the expansion continues to average densities of less than one-fourth the liquid density, otherwise it recondenses into a single blob. The recondensed matter and fragments have very crooked surfaces. If the temperature is high enough, the expanding matter does not enter the region of adiabatic instabilities and totally vaporizes. For initial densities of the order of equilibrium density, matter does not fragment or develop large inhomogeneities in the region enclosed by the isothermal and adiabatic spinodals. Thus it appears unlikely that fragmentation of small drops (nuclei) can be used to study the isothermal critical region of gas-liquid phase transition. A detailed tabulation of the energies and number of monomers, dimers, light, and heavy fragments emitted in each event is presented.

  19. Hot Flow Anomaly Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hot Flow Anomaly observed on Interball-Tail on 03.14.1996 is investigated. The normal to the interplanetary current sheet interacting with bow shock was determined in assumption of tangential discontinuity. Calculated motional electric field was directed towards current sheet. The bow shock before HFA arrival to the spacecraft was quasi-perpendicular, and was quasi-parallel after HFA passage. Respectively, of the shocks, bracketing HFA, were quasi-perpendicular before HFA passage and quasi-parallel after it. With averaged velocity of plasma within the body of HFA and duration of HFA observation we determined its size in normal to the current sheet direction as ~ 2.5 RE. HFA consists of two regions separated by thin layer with different plasma characteristics. Convection of plasma within HFA, as observed along spacecraft trajectory by subtracting averaged velocity from observed velocities, show that plasma in each of two regions is moving from separating layer. It indicates that separating layer is the site of energy deposition from interaction of the solar wind with ions reflected from the shock. This is confirmed by analysis of ion velocity distributions in this layer.

  20. Building the Hot Intra-Group Medium in Spiral-Rich Compact Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Ewan

    2014-11-01

    Galaxy groups provide a natural laboratory for investigating the formation of the hot intergalactic medium (IGM). While galaxy clusters gain most of their hot gas through accretion and gravitational shocks, in groups the processes of galaxy evolution (stripping, collisions, star formation) play an important role in the initial build up of the hot halo. We present Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of groups still in the process of forming their IGM, including the well known compact groups HCG 16 and Stephan's Quintet (HCG 92). We show that starburst winds and shock-heating of stripped HI provide important contributions of gas and metals to the IGM, and discuss the impact of gas stripping, enhanced star formation and nuclear activity in the group member galaxies.

  1. Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. First quarterly report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state rea of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents.

  2. Ion acceleration by hot electrons in microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Breizman, Boris N.; Arefiev, Alexey V.

    2007-07-15

    A self-consistent analytical description is presented for collisionless expansion of a fully ionized cluster with a two-component electron distribution. The problem is solved for an initial 'water-bag' distribution of hot electrons with no angular momentum, which reflects the mechanism of electron heating. This distribution evolves in time due to adiabatic cooling of hot electrons. The solution involves a cold core of the cluster, a thin double layer at the cluster edge, and a quasineutral flow with a rarefaction wave. The presented analysis predicts a substantial number of accelerated ions with energies greater than the cutoff energy of the initial distribution of the hot electrons.

  3. Hot filament cvd of boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.

    1992-01-07

    This patent describes a method for coating a substrate with a boron nitride film. It comprises: providing a substrate and a hot filament in a gas chamber; and introducing a borazine gas into the gas chamber so as to heat the borazine gas with the hot filament and deposit the boron nitride film on the substrate, wherein the hot filament is heated to a temperature of from about 1000[degrees] to 1800[degrees] C and the substrate is maintained at a temperature of from 100[degrees]C to 400[degrees]C.

  4. Hot/Warm Gas Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Bissett, Larry A.

    2001-11-06

    Using regenerable sorbents and transport or fluid-bed contacting, the Gas Process Development Unit (GPDU) at NETL-Morgantown will be used to demonstrate the process feasibility of removing sulfur from coal gasification or other fuel gas streams at temperatures above dew point of the gas. This technology, also known as hot or warm gas desulfurization, is expected to remove sulfur to concentrations lower than conventional systems at comparable cost. The project was constructed under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power system program and is an ''enabling technology'' in the Vision 21 program. The GPDU was designed to be the smallest scale research and development facility capable of providing viable scale-up design data for new integrated transport or fluid-bed desulfurization processes. With the capability to test at process conditions representative of anticipated commercial applications in terms of temperatures, pressures, major compositions, velocities, and sorbent cycling, the unit is expected to generate important information on process control, configuration, and sorbent suitability. In this way, the GPDU fills a strategic role between past/current small-scale testing and large-scale demonstrations. A primary objective of the project is to gain insight into which reactor combination (i.e., both transport, both fluid bed, or mixed) is more suitable for desulfurization technology and why. Assuming process feasibility is demonstrated, this guides future development or commercial ventures by answering the question of what to build, and provides performance and scale-up data (e.g., required transport reactor densities). Another important objective, which naturally derives from the process development activities, is demonstration of sorbent suitability and readiness for commercial deployment (e.g., sorbent attrition and cycle life). In this sense, the GPDU can serve as a final testing ground to reduce the risks of

  5. Hot Electron Effects in Semiconductors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James Scott

    The high-field transport of electrons has been calculated for two semiconductor configurations: quasi -two-dimensional and bulk. All calculations are performed by solving the Boltzmann equation, assuming a displaced Maxwellian distribution function. In the case of quasi-two-dimensional semiconductors, this treatment is applied to a <100> inversion layer in silicon. Under a high electric field, energy levels become grouped into subbands, so that motion of carriers perpendicular to the surface becomes quantized; thus, the energy, momentum and population transfer relaxation rates appropriate to the individual levels must be considered in the calculations, along with their relation to velocity overshoot. Previous work was performed under the assumption that intervalley scattering is a local phenomenon, i.e., a function only of electron temperature of the initial valley. In the present work, this assumption has been relaxed, and the intervalley coupling of electron temperature is taken into account. dc and transient response characteristics for both uncoupled and coupled models are performed, and the results are compared. Due to the recent interest in GaAs/Al(,x)Ga(,1 -x)As superlattices, there exists a need for a theory of hot electron transport in these structures. Since GaAs is a polar semiconductor, a theory must first be derived for polar III-V compounds under inversion, the result then being easily extended to superlattices. In this work, such theory is derived but, due to the alignment of the subbands, the simultaneous balance equations cannot be solved numerically with the approach undertaken here (solution of the Boltzmann equation). A theory of transport in bulk III-V compounds is modified by some simplifying approximations to make the theory numerically tractable, this theory then being applied to model bulk III-V compounds (in particular dc and transient response characteristics), along with their ternary and quaternary alloys. These results are found to

  6. Thermal conductivity of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazem, Sayyed M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to familiarize students with steady and unsteady heat transfer by conduction and with the effect of thermal conductivity upon temperature distribution through a homogeneous substance. The elementary heat conduction experiment presented is designed for associate degree technology students in a simple manner to enhance their intuition and to clarify many confusing concepts such as temperature, thermal energy, thermal conductivity, heat, transient and steady flows. The equipment set is safe, small, portable (10 kg) and relatively cheap (about $1200): the electric hot plate 2 kg (4.4 lb) for $175: the 24 channel selector and Thermocouple Digital Readout (Trendicator) 4.5 kg (10 lb) for about $1000; the three metal specimens (each of 2.5 cm diameter and 11 cm length), base plate and the bucket all about 3 kg (7 lb) for about $25. The experiment may take from 60 to 70 minutes. Although the hot plate surface temperature could be set from 90 to 370 C (maximum of 750 watts) it is a good practice to work with temperatures of 180 to 200 C (about 400 watts). They may experiment in squads of 2, 3 or even 4, or the instructor may demonstrate it for the whole class.

  7. Prototype solar heating and hot water systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress made in the development of a solar hot water and space heating system is described in four quarterly reports. The program schedules, technical status and other program activities from 6 October 1976 through 30 September 1977 are provided.

  8. Diagenetic Changes in Common Hot Spring Microfacies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, N. W.; Kendall, T. A.; MacKenzie, L. A.; Cady, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    The friable nature of silica hot spring deposits makes them susceptible to mechanical weathering. Rapid diagenesis must take place for these rocks to persist in the geologic record. The properties of two microfacies at two deposits were compared.

  9. Design data brochure: Solar hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A design calculation is detailed for a single-family residence housing a family of four in a nonspecific geographical area. The solar water heater system is designed to provide 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day.

  10. Design data brochure: Solar hot air heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design, installation, performance, and application of a solar hot air heater for residential, commercial and industrial use is reported. The system has been installed at the Concho Indian School in El Reno, Oklahoma.

  11. Evolution of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. M.

    1998-05-01

    This review will cover a mystery story. Actually, two mysteries of the Structure and Evolution of the Universe involving the history of the baryons and the chemical elements synthesized in the first stars. When did the gas and metals first form? How did they evolve to their current distribution? The original crime scene is unknown, but evidence has been collected in the diffuse intergalactic medium and in hot intracluster gas. In these scattered locales, large amounts of gas has accumulated, contaminated by heavy elements from the first stars. Unfortunately, some of the evidence has been destroyed by gravity. Also, the earliest quasars, massive stars, and supernovae altered the physical state of the gas and transported the elements far from the original scene. I will briefly review current observations and theories relevant to these processes and suggest ways in which future NASA missions could constrain the many speculative ideas on this subject.

  12. Pore structure and reactivity changes in hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. Final report, September 1987--January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.

    1991-05-01

    The primary objective of the project was the investigation of the pore structure and reactivity changes occurring in metal/metal oxide sorbents used for desulfurization of hot coal gas during sulfidation and regeneration, with particular emphasis placed on the effects of these changes on the sorptive capacity and efficiency of the sorbents. Commercially available zinc oxide sorbents were used as model solids in our experimental investigation of the sulfidation and regeneration processes.

  13. THE HIGH ALBEDO OF THE HOT JUPITER KEPLER-7 b

    SciTech Connect

    Demory, Brice-Olivier; Seager, Sara; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Gillon, Michael; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Koch, David G.; Welsh, William F.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Dupree, Andrea; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig

    2011-07-01

    Hot Jupiters are expected to be dark from both observations (albedo upper limits) and theory (alkali metals and/or TiO and VO absorption). However, only a handful of hot Jupiters have been observed with high enough photometric precision at visible wavelengths to investigate these expectations. The NASA Kepler mission provides a means to widen the sample and to assess the extent to which hot Jupiter albedos are low. We present a global analysis of Kepler-7 b based on Q0-Q4 data, published radial velocities, and asteroseismology constraints. We measure an occultation depth in the Kepler bandpass of 44 {+-} 5 ppm. If directly related to the albedo, this translates to a Kepler geometric albedo of 0.32 {+-} 0.03, the most precise value measured so far for an exoplanet. We also characterize the planetary orbital phase light curve with an amplitude of 42 {+-} 4 ppm. Using atmospheric models, we find it unlikely that the high albedo is due to a dominant thermal component and propose two solutions to explain the observed planetary flux. First, we interpret the Kepler-7 b albedo as resulting from an excess reflection over what can be explained solely by Rayleigh scattering, along with a nominal thermal component. This excess reflection might indicate the presence of a cloud or haze layer in the atmosphere, motivating new modeling and observational efforts. Alternatively, the albedo can be explained by Rayleigh scattering alone if Na and K are depleted in the atmosphere by a factor of 10-100 below solar abundances.

  14. Applications of nanoimprint lithography/hot embossing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yifang

    2015-11-01

    This review concentrates on the applications of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and hot embossing for the fabrications of nanolectronic devices, nanophotonic metamaterials and other nanostructures. Technical challenges and solutions in NIL such as nanofabrication of templates, removal of residual resist, pattern displacement in thermal NIL arising from thermal expansion are first discussed. In the nanofabrication of templates, dry etch in plasma for the formation of multi-step structures and ultra-sharp tip arrays in silicon, nanophotonic chiral structures with high aspect ratio in SiC are demonstrated. A bilayer technique for nondestructive removal of residual resist in thermal NIL is described. This process is successfully applied for the fabrication of T-shape gates and functional high electron mobility transistors. However, pattern displacement intrinsically existing in thermal NIL/hot embossing owing to different thermal expansions in the template and substrate, respectively, limits its further development and scale-up. Low temperature even room temperature NIL (RTNIL) was then proposed on HSQ, trying to eliminate the pattern distortion by avoiding a thermal loop in the imprint. But, considerable pressure needed in RTNIL turned the major attentions to the development of UV-curing NIL in UV-curable monomers at low temperature. A big variety of applications by low-temperature UV-curing NIL in SU-8 are described, including high-aspect-ratio phase gratings, tagging technology by nanobarcode for DNA sequencing, nanofluidic channels, nanophotonic metamaterials and biosensors. Hot embossing, as a parallel technique to NIL, was also developed, and its applications on ferroelectric polymers as well as metals are reviewed. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize that this review is mainly attempted to review the applications of NIL/embossing instead of NIL technique advances.

  15. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown below: Sulfidation: Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2H{sub 2}S {yields} 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}O; Regeneration: 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 3O{sub 2} {yields} Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2SO{sub 2} The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO{sub 2}.

  16. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  17. The hot spot of vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Kanemasu, Edward T.

    1988-01-01

    A conventional radiometer is used to identify the hot spot (the peak in reflected radiation in the retrosolar direction) of vegetation. A multiwavelength-band radiometer collected radiances on fully grown dense wheat and maize canopies on several clear sunny days. It is noted that the hot spot is difficult to detect in the near IR wavelengths because the shadows are much darker. In general, the retrosolar brightness is found to be higher for smaller sun polar angles than for larger angles.

  18. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  19. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-03-02

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating incidents involving radioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  20. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Ensign, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project is a NASA-sponsored endeavor to improve the durability of advanced gas turbine engines for commercial and military aircraft. Through improvements in the analytical models and life prediction systems, designs for future hot section components, the combustor and turbine, will be more accurately analyzed and will incorporate features required for longer life in the more hostile operating environment of high performance engines.