Science.gov

Sample records for hot-ion plasma heating

  1. Plasma heating and hot ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Agren, O.

    2012-06-19

    Possibilities of plasma heating and sloshing ion sustaining in mirror based hybrids are briefly reviewed. Sloshing ions, i.e. energetic ions with a velocity distribution concentrated to a certain pitch-angle, play an important role in plasma confinement and generation of fusion neutrons in mirror machines. Neutral beam injection (NBI) is first discussed as a method to generate sloshing ions. Numerical results of NBI modeling for a stellarator-mirror hybrid are analyzed. The sloshing ions could alternatively be sustained by RF heating. Fast wave heating schemes, i.e. magnetic beach, minority and second harmonic heating, are addressed and their similarities and differences are described. Characteristic features of wave propagation in mirror hybrid devices including both fundamental harmonic minority and second harmonic heating are examined. Minority heating is efficient for a wide range of minority concentration and plasma densities; it allows one to place the antenna aside from the hot ion location. A simple-design strap antenna suitable for this has good performance. However, this scenario is appropriate only for light minority ions. The second harmonic heating can be applied for the heavy ion component. Arrangements are similar for minority and second harmonic heating. The efficiency of second harmonic heating is influenced by a weaker wave damping than for minority heating. Numerical calculations show that in a hybrid reactor scaled mirror machine the deuterium sloshing ions could be heated within the minority heating scheme, while the tritium ions could be sustained by second harmonic heating.

  2. SUMMA hot-ion plasma heating research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SUMMA superconducting magnetic mirror facility and the associated hot-ion plasma research were described. SUMMA is characterized by intense magnetic fields and a large-diameter working bore (41 cm diameter) with room-temperature access. The goal of the plasma research program is to produce steady-state plasmas of fusion reactor densities and temperatures (but not confinement times). The program includes electrode development to produce a hot, dense, large-volume, steady-state plasma and diagnostics development to document the plasma properties. SUMMA and its hot-ion plasma are ideally suited to develop advanced plasma diagnostics methods. Two such methods whose requirements are well matched to SUMMA are: (1) heavy ion beam probing to measure plasma space potential; and (2) submillimeter wavelength laser Thomson scattering to measure local ion temperature.

  3. SUMMA hot-ion plasma heating research at NASA Lewis Research Center. [SUperconducting Magnetic Mirror Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.; Englert, G. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    This report describes the SUMMA superconducting magnetic mirror facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center and the hot-ion plasma research conducted therein. SUMMA is characterized by intense magnetic fields (designed for 8.6 T at the mirrors) and a large-diameter working bore (41 cm diameter) with room-temperature access. The goal of the plasma research program is to produce steady-state plasmas of fusion reactor densities and temperatures (but not confinement times). The program includes electrode development to produce a hot, dense, large-volume, steady-state plasma and diagnostics development to document the plasma properties. SUMMA and its hot-ion plasma are ideally suited to develop advanced plasma diagnostics methods. Two such methods whose requirements are well matched to SUMMA are: (1) heavy ion beam probing to measure plasma space potential, and (2) submillimeter wavelength laser Thomson scattering to measure local ion temperature. Two NASA University Grants were established to identify major requirements for developing these two diagnostic techniques in SUMMA.

  4. MHD stability of a hot-ion-mode plasma in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Inutake, M.; Hattori, K.; Furukawa, S.

    1995-04-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror is extensively studied in ICRF-heated, hot ion plasmas. Stability boundary for a flute interchange mode is predicted to depend on a pressure-weighted curvature integrated along the magnetic field line. It is found that the upper limit of the central-cell beta {beta}{sub C} increases linearly with the anchor-cell beta {beta}{sub A}. The critical beta ratio {beta}{sub C}/{beta}{sub A} above which the plasma cannot be sustained strongly depends on the pressure anisotropy P{sub PRP}/P{sub PLL} of hot ions. Stronger anisotropy greatly expands the stable region up to a higher critical beta ratio, owing to the reduction of the pressure weighting in the bad curvature region of the central cell. On both sides of the quadrupole anchor cells, there are flux-tube-recircularizing transition regions where the normal curvature is highly bad. Then the density and ion temperature of the cold plasma in the transition region are measured. Theoretical prediction on the flute stability boundary calculated by using the measured axial pressure profile of the hot-ion and the cold-plasma pressure can explain well the experimental results. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reports on hot-ion plasma experiments conducted in a magnetic mirror facility. A steady-state E x B plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasmas with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage.

  6. Hot ion plasma production in HIP-1 using water-cooled hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Layman, R. W.; Snyder, A.

    1975-01-01

    A steady-state ExB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the mirror throats. Most of the results were for hydrogen, but deuterium and helium plasmas were also studied. Three water-cooled hollow cathodes were operated in the hot-ion plasma mode with the following results: (1) thermally emitting cathodes were not required to achieve the hot-ion mode; (2) steady-state operation (several minutes) was attained; (3) input powers greater than 40 kW were achieved; (4) cathode outside diameters were increased from 1.2 cm (uncooled) to 4.4 cm (water-cooled); (5) steady-state hydrogen plasma with ion temperatures from 185 to 770 eV and electron temperatures from 5 to 21 eV were produced. Scaling relations were empirically obtained for discharge current, ion temperature, electron temperature, and relative ion density as a function of hydrogen gas feed rate, magnetic field, and cathode voltage. Neutrons were produced from deuterium plasma, but it was not established whether thay came from the plasma volume or from the electrode surfaces.

  7. Neutron monitoring and electrode calorimetry experiments in the HIP-1 Hot Ion Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Layman, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for two diagnostic procedures on HIP-1: neutron diagnostics to determine where neutrons originated within the plasma discharge chamber and electrode calorimetry to measure the steady-state power absorbed by the two anodes and cathodes. Results are also reported for a hot-ion plasma formed with a continuous-cathode rod, one that spans the full length of the test section, in place of the two hollow cathodes. The outboard neutron source strength increased relative to that at the midplane when (1) the cathode tips were moved farther outboard, (2) the anode diameters were increased, and (3) one of the anodes was removed. The distribution of neutron sources within the plasma discharge chamber was insensitive to the division of current between the two cathodes. For the continuous cathode, increasing the discharge current increased the midplane neutron source strength relative to the outboard source strength. Each cathode absorbed from 12 to 15 percent of the input power regardless of the division of current between the cathodes. The anodes absorbed from 20 to 40 percent of the input power. The division of power absorption between the anodes varied with plasma operating conditions and electrode placement.

  8. Ion kinetic instabilities and turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of a plasma with hot ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr St.; Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr; Lee, Hae June

    2015-11-01

    The results of the analytical and numerical investigations of the shear flow driven ion kinetic instabilities, excited due to the inverse ion Landau damping in the parallel shearing flow of plasmas with comparable ion and electron temperatures, that is the case relevant to a tokamak and space plasma, are presented. The levels of turbulence and the turbulent heating rates of ions and ion turbulent viscosity, resulted from the development of the electrostatic ion-temperature gradient and electromagnetic drift-Alfven turbulence, are determined and their consequences are discussed. This work was funded by National R&D Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea.Grants NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029878, NRF-2013R1A1A2005758.

  9. Effect of anode-cathode geometry on performance of the HIP-1 hot ion plasma. [magnetic mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Hot-ion hydrogen plasma experiments were conducted in the NASA Lewis HIP-1 magnetic mirror facility to determine how the ion temperature was influenced by the axial position of the cathode tips relative to the anodes. A steady-state EXB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the throats of the magnetic mirrors. The dc electric field was created between hollow cathode rods inside hollow anode cylinders, both concentric with the magnetic axis. The highest ion temperatures, 900 eV, were attained when the tip of each cathode was in the same plane as the end of its anode. These temperatures were reached with 22 kV applied to the electrodes in a field of 1.1 tesla. Scaling relations were empirically determined for ion temperature and the product of ion density and neutral particle density as a function of cathode voltage, discharge current, and electrode positions. Plasma discharge current vs voltage (I-V) characteristics were determined.

  10. Parametric dependence of ion temperature and electron density in the SUMMA hot-ion plasma using laser light scattering and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    Hot-ion plasma experiments were conducted in the NASA Lewis SUMMA facility. A steady-state modified Penning discharge was formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field of several kilovolts near the magnetic mirror maxima. Results are reported for a hydrogen plasma covering a wide range in midplane magnetic flux densities from 0.5 to 3.37 T. Input power greater than 45 kW was obtained with water-cooled cathodes. Steady-state plasmas with ion kinetic temperatures from 18 to 830 eV were produced and measured spectroscopically. These ion temperatures were correlated with current, voltage, and magnetic flux density as the independent variables. Electron density measurements were made using an unusually sensitive Thomson scattering apparatus. The measured electron densities range from 2.1 x 10 to the 11th to 6.8 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm.

  11. Renormalized theory of ion temperature gradient instability of the magnetic-field-aligned plasma shear flow with hot ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailenko, V. V. Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2015-10-15

    The developed kinetic theory for the stability of a magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) shear flow with inhomogeneous ion temperature [Mikhailenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 072117 (2014)] predicted that a kinetic instability arises from the coupled reinforcing action of the flow velocity shear and ion temperature gradient in the cases where comparable ion and electron temperatures exist. In the present paper, the nonlinear theory was developed for the instability caused by the combined effects of ion-temperature-gradient and shear-flow (ITG–SF). The level of the electrostatic turbulence is determined for the saturation state of the instability on the basis of the nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for a nonlinear scattering of ions by the developed turbulence in a sheared flow. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the turbulent scattering of ions by ITG–SF driven turbulence, was derived and employed for the estimation of the turbulent ion viscosity, the anomalous ion thermal conductivity, and anomalous ion heating rate at the saturation state of the instability.

  12. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; D. Spong; R. Majeski; M. Zarnstorff

    2003-02-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.

  13. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  14. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-15

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}<plasma heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  15. Plasma Heating: An Advanced Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Mercury and Apollo spacecraft shields were designed to protect astronauts from high friction temperatures (well over 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit) when re-entering the Earth's atmosphere. It was necessary to test and verify the heat shield materials on Earth before space flight. After exhaustive research and testing, NASA decided to use plasma heating as a heat source. This technique involves passing a strong electric current through a rarefied gas to create a plasma (ionized gas) that produces an intensely hot flame. Although NASA did not invent the concept, its work expanded the market for commercial plasma heating systems. One company, Plasma Technology Corporation (PTC), was founded by a member of the team that developed the Re-entry Heating Simulator at Ames Research Center (ARC). Dr. Camacho, President of PTC, believes the technology has significant environmental applications. These include toxic waste disposal, hydrocarbon, decomposition, medical waste disposal, asbestos waste destruction, and chemical and radioactive waste disposal.

  16. PLASMA HEATING AND CONFINING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, Al.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1962-02-13

    ABS> A device is designed for generating, heating, and containing a very pure electrical plasma. Plasma purity is maintained by preventing the hot plasma from contacting insulators, which are a principal source of impurities in prior constructions. An insulator is disposed at each end of a pair of long coaxial cylinders forming an annular chamber therebetween. High voltage is applied between the cylinders and an axial magnetic field is created therethrough. At a middle position on the inner cylinder, a fastopening valve releases a quantity of gas into the chamber, and before the gas can diffuse to the distant insulators, a discharge occurs between the cylinders and plasma is formed in the central region of the chamber away from the insulators. (AEC)

  17. Plasma heating of Io's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pospieszalska, M. K.; Johnson, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo, molecule-tracking program was constructed to describe the structure of Io's atmosphere in the region penetrated by ions from the plasma torus. This region is shown to exhibit high temperatures, consistent with corona observations, independent of whether significant UV heating also occurs. The atmospheric structure is determined near the exobase, which is the region responsible for the supply of the Io torus.

  18. The ion polytropic coefficient in a collisionless sheath containing hot ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Binbin; Xiang, Nong; Ou, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The fluid approach has been widely used to study plasma sheath dynamics. For a sheath containing hot ions whose temperature is greater than the electron's, how to truncate the fluid hierarchy chain equations while retaining to the fullest extent of the kinetic effects is always a difficult problem. In this paper, a one-dimensional, collisionless sheath containing hot ions is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. By analyzing the ion energy equation and taking the kinetic effects into account, we have shown that the ion polytropic coefficient in the vicinity of the sheath edge is approximately constant so that the state equation with the modified polytropic coefficient can be used to close the hierarchy chain of the ion fluid equations. The value of the polytropic coefficient strongly depends on the hot ion temperature and its concentration in the plasma. The semi-analytical model is given to interpret the simulation results. As an application, the kinetic effects on the ion saturation current density in the probe theory are discussed.

  19. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, F.W. Jr.; Chiu, S.C.; Parks, P.; Rawls, J.M.

    1984-01-10

    This invention relates generally to a method and apparatus for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a magnetic field, and relates particularly to an apparatus for heating a plasma of low atomic number ions to high temperatures by transfer of energy to plasma resonances, particularly the fundamental and harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions. This invention transfers energy from an oscillating radio-frequency field to a plasma resonance of a plasma immersed in a magnetic field.

  20. RF plasma heating in toroidal fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Golant, V.E.; Fedorov, V.I. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present book is to provide, in seven chapters, a unified overview of the methods for rf heating of plasmas in toroidal fusion experiments. In Chapter 1 the problem of plasma heating in tokamaks and stellarators is formulated and the requirements for auxiliary heating techniques are described. This chapter also contains a brief review of the results of research on tokamaks and stellarators. Chapter 2 is devoted to a theoretical description of the principal physical effects involved in the rf heating of plasmas, especially the characteristics of wave propagation, of the mechanisms by which waves are absorbed and plasma heating takes place, and of the nonlinear effects that accompany heating. The primary emphasis is on a qualitative physical picture of these effects. Chapters 3-6, in turn, deal with the major rf heating techniques currently under investigation, electron cyclotron (ECH), ion cyclotron (ICH), lower hybrid (LHH), and Alfven wave heating. In each of these chapters the main schemes for heating are described, the results of theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are discussed, the technology of the heating systems is briefly described, and experimental work published through the end of 1984 is reviewed. Finally, in Chapter 7 the different rf heating techniques are compared; they are contrasted with neutral beam injection, and the feasibility of adiabatic compression as a means of heating plasmas is examined. Separate abstracts were prepared for each chapter of this book. 246 refs.

  1. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  2. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  3. The second-order theory of electromagnetic hot ion beam instabilities. [in interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Tokar, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the application of a second-order theory for electromagnetic instabilities in a collisionless plasma to two modes which resonate with hot ion beams. The application of the theory is strictly limited to the linear growth phase. However, the application of the theory may be extended to obtain a description of the beam at postsaturation if the wave-beam resonance is sufficiently broad in velocity space. Under the considered limitations, it is shown that, as in the cold beam case, the fluctuating fields do not gain appreciable momentum and that the primary exchange of momentum is between the beam and main component.

  4. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  5. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  6. Electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the problem of electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), and propose a method for quantifying the level of collisionless and collisional heating in plasma simulations. The proposed procedure, based on the electron mechanical energy conservation equation, is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulations of a number of single and multi-frequency CCPs operated in regimes of research and industrial interest. In almost all cases tested, the total electron heating is comprised of collisional (ohmic) and pressure heating parts. This latter collisionless component is in qualitative agreement with the mechanism of electron heating predicted from the recent re-evaluation of theoretical models. Finally, in very electrically asymmetric plasmas produced in multi-frequency discharges, we observe an additional collisionless heating mechanism associated with electron inertia.

  7. Nanoparticle heating in atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Nicolaas; Aydil, Eray; Kortshagen, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    The plasma environment offers a number of attractive properties that allow for the generation of nanoparticle materials that are otherwise hard to produce by other means. Among these are the generally high temperatures that nanoparticles can attain within plasmas, enabling the generation of nanocrystals of high melting point materials. In low pressure discharges, these high temperatures are the result of energetic surface reactions that strongly heat the small nanoparticles combined with the relatively slow heat transfer to the neutral gas. At atmospheric pressure, the nanoparticle intrinsic temperature is much more closely coupled to the neutral gas temperature. We study the heating of nanoparticles in atmospheric pressure plasmas based on a Monte Carlo simulation that takes into account the most important plasma-surface reactions as well as the conductive cooling of nanoparticles through the neutral gas. We find that, compared to low pressure plasmas, significantly higher plasma densities and densities of reactive species are required in order to achieve nanoparticle temperatures comparable to those in low pressure plasmas. These findings have important implications for the application of atmospheric pressure plasmas for the synthesis of nanoparticle materials. This work was supported by the DOE Plasma Science Center for Predictive Control of Plasma Kinetics.

  8. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  9. APPARATUS FOR HEATING A PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.

    1962-01-01

    The system contemplates the use of ion cyclotron motions for transferring energy to a plasma immersed in a confining magnetic field such as is found in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. Oppositely directed windings are provided for producing ion-accelerating fields having a time and spatial periodicity and these have the advantage of producing ion cyclotron motions without the development of space charges which preclude the efficient energy transfer to the plasma. (AEC)

  10. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  11. RF plasma heating improvement with EBG surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadamuz, Saul; Milanesio, Daniele; Maggiora, Riccardo

    2008-11-01

    High impedance surfaces or electromagnetic band gap (EBG) surfaces have proved themselves to be useful in wireless communications applications due to their unique characteristics such as no propagating surface wave support, no conduction of RF current for a given bandwidth, in-phase electromagnetic reflection and non-inverted image of the electric charge in front of them [1]. These characteristics make possible to design compact antennas achieving better performance in terms of radiation and input impedance. ICRF plasma heating antennas in fusion experiments can take advantage of using EBG surfaces. One of the main issues in ICRF plasma heating is the low power coupling of the plasma facing antenna. The adoption of EBG surfaces in the antenna structure and the advantages offered by a predictive designing tool as TOPICA [2] offer the possibility to improve significantly the coupled power to plasma. [1] IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech., vol. 47, pp. 2059--2074, Nov. 1999. [2] Nucl. Fusion, 46 (2006) S476.

  12. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge. PMID:19044350

  13. Plasma treatment of heat-resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. A.; Kosmachev, P. V.; Skripnikova, N. K.; Bezukhov, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    Refractory lining of thermal generating units is exposed to chemical, thermal, and mechanical attacks. The degree of fracture of heat-resistant materials depends on the chemical medium composition, the process temperature and the material porosity. As is known, a shortterm exposure of the surface to low-temperature plasma (LTP) makes possible to create specific coatings that can improve the properties of workpieces. The aim of this work is to produce the protective coating on heat-resistant chamotte products using the LTP technique. Experiments have shown that plasma treatment of chamotte products modifies the surface, and a glass-ceramic coating enriched in mullite is formed providing the improvement of heat resistance. For increasing heat resistance of chamotte refractories, pastes comprising mixtures of Bacor, alumina oxide, and chamot were applied to their surfaces in different ratios. It is proved that the appropriate coating cannot be created if only one of heat-resistant components is used. The required coatings that can be used and recommended for practical applications are obtained only with the introduction of powder chamot. The paste composition of 50% chamot, 25% Bacor, and 25% alumina oxide exposed to plasma treatment, has demonstrated the most uniform surface fusion.

  14. Plasma heating with crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, Naren; Sircombe, Nathan; Ceurvorst, Luke; Kasim, Muhammad; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Trines, Raoul; Norreys, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams is a powerful tool with applications including the heating of inertial confinement fusion targets and the study of matter in extreme conditions. We discuss the use of two relativistic electron beams to efficiently heat the plasma ions where the beams cross by using beam-plasma instabilities and non-linear wave coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. Energy from the electron beams is coupled to the plasma ions as the beams become unstable and drive Langmuir waves which couple non-linearly to ion-acoustic waves which are then damped . Results of linear growth rate calculations are presented for the system of two crossing electron beams demonstrating a broad spectrum of unstable modes. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations in two space and two momentum dimensions have been performed which demonstrate the non-linear coupling of the electron beam energy into ion-acoustic waves and the energy cascade to the background ions. Time-frequency analysis is applied to analyze the non-linear coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in wave phase space. Structural properties of the strong turbulence produced at late times are analyzed.

  15. Ion heating in a plasma focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Gary, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Ion acceleration and heating in a plasma focus were investigated by the numerical integration of the three-dimensional equations of motion. The electric and magnetic fields given were derived from experimental data. The results obtained show that during the collapse phase of focus formation, ions are efficiently heated to temperatures of several keV. During the phase of rapid current reduction, ions are accelerated to large velocities in the axial direction. The results obtained with the model are in general agreement with experimental results.

  16. FREQUENCY CONTROL OF RF HEATING OF GASEOUS PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Herold, E.W.

    1962-09-01

    This invention relates to the heating of gaseous plasma by radiofrequency ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The cyclotron resonance frequencies are varied and this invention provides means for automatically controlling the frequency of the radiofrequency to maximize the rate of heating. To this end, a servo-loop is provided to sense the direction of plasma heating with frequency and a control signal is derived to set the center frequency of the radiofrequency energy employed to heat the plasma. (AEC)

  17. The heating of plasma focus electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, E.; Frignani, M.; Mannucci, S.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.; Tartari, A.

    2006-02-01

    Plasma focus (PF) technology development today is strictly related to the possibility of a high frequency repetitive working regime. One of the more relevant obstacles to this goal is the heating of structural components due to direct interaction with plasma. In this paper, temperature decay measurements of the inner electrode of a 7 kJ Mather type PF are presented. Data from several series of shots at different bank energies are analysed and compared with theoretical and numerical models. Two possible scale laws are derived from the experimental data to correlate thermal deposition with bank energy. It is found that a fraction of about 10% of total energy is released to the inner electrode. Finally, after some considerations about the cooling and heating mechanisms, an analysis on maximum temperature sustained by materials is presented.

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation losses and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic wave instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability. This instability develops in the wide range of angles and wavenumbers with the typical growth rate on the order of cs/LT (cs is the sound speed, LT is the temperature scale length). In addition to radiation dominated systems, a similar thermal transport driven ion acoustic instability was found before in plasmas where the thermal transport coefficient depends on electron density. However, under conditions of indirect drive ICF experiments the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered corresponding to a thermal conductivity coefficient that is inversely proportional to the square of local particle density. In the nonlinear regime this instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation.

  19. Heat and Products Induced by Plasma Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tadahiko Mizuno; Tadayoshi Ohmori; Tadashi Akimoto; Akito Takahashi

    2000-11-12

    Plasma is formed on an electrode surface when a metal cathode is polarized in high-voltage electrolysis in a liquid electrolyte. When a liquid electrolyte is polarized at high voltage (70 to 500 V), it gives rise to an electric discharge and a plasma state. We measured the output heat and input electric power in real time by a method that combined open cell isoperibolic calorimetry and flow calorimetry. Takahashi et al. hypothesize a nuclear reaction induced by photon activation on the cathode element. We have attempted to explain the experimental results by a mechanism that produces no radioactive materials or weak radioactive emission. We applied the Takahashi theory developed for Pd and Au electrodes to the case of a W electrode. We have first reported that the distribution for their reaction product showed clearly one or two peaks that consisted of the mass number around 52 for the case of Pd and 64 and 120 for Au. This paper mainly pertains to the metal electrode. With a tungsten electrode, one peak in the anomalous elements is for the major elements from 40 to 65, and the other is from 100 to 120. The total mass of elements generated during excess heat evolution was on the order of 1 mg. Based on this mass, according to conventional laws of fission and fusion, 'commensurate' heat would have been on the order of 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} J. The actual excess heat was typically estimated at 10{sup 5}-several orders of magnitude less than the expected value. It is still difficult to calculate the actual weight loss of the reactive material before and after the reaction. However, we can say that the total energy generated was much less than the value calculated from the produced weight. We conclude that the photofission mechanism explains the amount of excess heat and the distribution of the element generation during the electrochemical treatment.

  20. ICRF heating in reactor grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquinot, J.; Bhatnagar, V.P.; Bures, M.; Cottrell, G.A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Sack, C.H.; Start, D.F.H.; Taroni, A. ); Hellsten, T. ); Koch, R. ); Moreau, D. )

    1990-01-01

    Impurity influxes in JET discharges due to ICRH have been reduced to insignificant levels. This has allowed high quality H-modes to be produced with ICRH alone and has enhanced the density limit which is now the same as the NBI limit. Improvement in the deuterium fuel fraction has led to the generation of 100kW of non thermal {sup 3}He-D fusion power. Alpha-particle simulations using MeV ions created by ICRH show classical energy loss and suggest that {alpha}-heating in a reactor will be highly efficient. A clear demonstration of TTMP damping of the fast wave in high beta plasmas has been achieved. A broadband ICRH system is proposed for NET/ITER which will allow fast wave current drive and central ion heating for burn control and ignition. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Plasma heating for containerless and microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Emily W. (Inventor); Man, Kin F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for plasma heating of levitated samples to be used in containerless microgravity processing is disclosed. A sample is levitated by electrostatic, electromagnetic, aerodynamic, or acoustic systems, as is appropriate for the physical properties of the particular sample. The sample is heated by a plasma torch at atmospheric pressure. A ground plate is provided to help direct the plasma towards the sample. In addition, Helmholtz coils are provided to produce a magnetic field that can be used to spiral the plasma around the sample. The plasma heating system is oriented such that it does not interfere with the levitation system.

  2. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC'S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the energy principle' which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic 'ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager's principle.

  3. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  4. Electromagnetic hot ion beam instabilities - Quasi-linear theory and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, B.; Gary, S. P.; Winske, D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers the quasi-linear theory of the right- and left-hand resonant electromagnetic instabilities driven by a hot ion beam streaming parallel to a magnetic field in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma. Using the single-mode approximation, the time evolutions of important parameters are obtained to show that for the range of parameters considered, reduction of the beam speed and formation of temperature anisotropies are the most significant factors in the quasi-linear stabilization process. Combining both instabilities in a quasi-linear study is found to produce a roughly equal mixture of both polarizations and relatively isotropic conditions for tenuous beam densities and low initial beam drift speeds. Computer simulations are used to compare with the quasi-linear results. The simulations justify the single-mode assumption, verify that quasi-linear changes are the means of saturation for the parameter range of concern, and check the nonlinear evolution of the system when both modes are present.

  5. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  6. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  7. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M.; Bergeson, S. D.; Hart, G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  8. Strongly-coupled plasmas formed from laser-heated solids.

    PubMed

    Lyon, M; Bergeson, S D; Hart, G; Murillo, M S

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of ion temperatures in laser-produced plasmas formed from solids with different initial lattice structures. We show that the equilibrium ion temperature is limited by a mismatch between the initial crystallographic configuration and the close-packed configuration of a strongly-coupled plasma, similar to experiments in ultracold neutral plasmas. We propose experiments to demonstrate and exploit this crystallographic heating in order to produce a strongly coupled plasma with a coupling parameter of several hundred. PMID:26503293

  9. Cold ions in the hot plasma sheet of Earth's magnetotail.

    PubMed

    Seki, Kanako; Hirahara, Masafumi; Hoshino, Masahiro; Terasawa, Toshio; Elphic, Richard C; Saito, Yoshifumi; Mukai, Toshifumi; Hayakawa, Hajime; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2003-04-10

    Most visible matter in the Universe exists as plasma. How this plasma is heated, and especially how the initial non-equilibrium plasma distributions relax to thermal equilibrium (as predicted by Maxwell-Boltzman statistics), is a fundamental question in studies of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. Astrophysical plasmas are often so tenuous that binary collisions can be ignored, and it is not clear how thermal equilibrium develops for these 'collisionless' plasmas. One example of a collisionless plasma is the Earth's plasma sheet, where thermalized hot plasma with ion temperatures of about 5 x 10(7) K has been observed. Here we report direct observations of a plasma distribution function during a solar eclipse, revealing cold ions in the Earth's plasma sheet in coexistence with thermalized hot ions. This cold component cannot be detected by plasma sensors on satellites that are positively charged in sunlight, but our observations in the Earth's shadow show that the density of the cold ions is comparable to that of hot ions. This high density is difficult to explain within existing theories, as it requires a mechanism that permits half of the source plasma to remain cold upon entry into the hot turbulent plasma sheet. PMID:12686993

  10. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion.

    PubMed

    Betti, R; Christopherson, A R; Spears, B K; Nora, R; Bose, A; Howard, J; Woo, K M; Edwards, M J; Sanz, J

    2015-06-26

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ. PMID:26197131

  11. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  12. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  13. Turbulence and Proton–Electron Heating in Kinetic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, William H.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Wan, Minping; Wu, P.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of particle-in-cell simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence reveals a connection between the strength of cascade, the total heating rate, and the partitioning of dissipated energy into proton heating and electron heating. A von Karman scaling of the cascade rate explains the total heating across several families of simulations. The proton to electron heating ratio increases in proportion to total heating. We argue that the ratio of gyroperiod to nonlinear turnover time at the ion kinetic scales controls the ratio of proton and electron heating. The proposed scaling is consistent with simulations.

  14. ICRF Heated Long-Pulse Plasma Discharges in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Mutoh, T.; Saito, K.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Watanabe, T.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Oka, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Osakabe, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Miyazawa, J.; Morita, S.; Narihara, K.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Goto, M.; Morisaki, T.; Peterson, B. J.; Sato, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Ashikawa, N.; Nishimura, K.; Funaba, H.; Chikaraishi, H.; Notake, T.; Torii, Y.; Okada, H.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Takahashi, C.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Yanping; Yoon, J. S.; Kwak, J. G.; Yamada, H.; Kawahata, K.; Ohyabu, N.; Ida, K.; Nagayama, Y.; Noda, N.; Komori, A.; Sudo, S.; Motojima, O.; LHD Experimental Group

    2006-01-01

    A long-pulse plasma discharge for more than 30 min. was achieved on the Large Helical Device (LHD). A plasma of ne = 0.8× 1019 m-3 and Ti0 = 2.0 keV was sustained with PICH = 0.52 MW, PECH = 0.1 MW and averaged PNBI = 0.067 MW. Total injected heating energy was 1.3 GJ, which was a quarter of the prepared RF heating energy. One of the keys to the success of the experiment was a dispersion of the local plasma heat load to divertors, accomplished by shifting the magnetic axis inward and outward.

  15. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  16. Heating and cooling of the earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic-field models based on pressure equilibrium in the quiet magnetotail require nonadiabatic cooling of the plasma as it convects inward or a decrease of the flux tube content. Recent in situ observations of plasma density and temperature indicate that, during quiet convection, the flux tube content may actually increase. Thus the plasma must be cooled during quiet times. The earth plasma sheet is generally significantly hotter after the expansion phase of a substorm than before the plasma sheet thinning begins and cools during the recovery phase. Heating mechanisms such as reconnection, current sheet acceleration, plasma expansion, and resonant absorption of surface waves are discussed. It seems that all mechanisms are active, albeit in different regions of the plasma sheet. Near-earth tail signatures of substorms require local heating as well as a decrease of the flux tube content. It is shown that the resonant absorption of surface waves can provide both.

  17. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  18. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  19. Direct heating of imploded plasma in the fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunahara, Atsushi; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mori, Yohitaga; Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi

    2016-03-01

    We propose the direct heating of an imploded plasma core by ultra-intense lasers in inertial confinement fusion, to increase the heating coupling efficiency. In this scheme, both fast-electrons and fast-ions heat the plasma core. Experiments using this direct heating scheme has been carried out at GXII and LFEX laser facility at Osaka Univeristy. To model this direct heating scheme, we developed the 1D simulation model and carried out simulations using the experimental conditions. Comparison between results of the simulation and the experimental observations validates the simulation model. We show that even in the unoptimized experimental conditions used in simulations, our calculations show that the maximum temperature, 1.6 keV, of the CD plasma.

  20. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  1. Axial laser heating of three meter theta pinch plasma columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. L.; Lowenthal, D. D.

    1980-10-01

    A 3-m long plasma column formed and confined by a fast rising solenoidal field was irradiated from one end by a powerful pulsed CO2 laser. It was found that beam trapping density minima could be maintained for the length of the laser pulse if the plasma diameter exceeded about 1.5 cm. The erosion of the density minimum was governed by classical diffusion processes. Three meter long plasmas in 2.6 cm bore plasma tubes could be fairly uniformly heated by 3.0 kJ of CO2 laser irradiation. Best results were obtained when heating began before or during the theta pinch implosion phase and the plasma fill pressure exceeded 1.0 torr H2. Plasma line energies of about 1 kJ/m could be obtained in a magnetic field rising to 6 T in 4.7 microseconds.

  2. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  3. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  4. Plasma Heating Simulation in the VASIMR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Carter, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the recent development in the simulation of the ion-cyclotron acceleration of the plasma in the VASIMR experiment. The modeling is done using an improved EMIR code for RF field calculation together with particle trajectory code for plasma transport calculat ion. The simulation results correlate with experimental data on the p lasma loading and predict higher ICRH performance for a higher density plasma target. These simulations assist in optimizing the ICRF anten na so as to achieve higher VASIMR efficiency.

  5. Origin of hot ions observed in a modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Ions with a Maxwellian energy distriubtion and kinetic temperatures ranging from below 100 eV to several keV are observed in a steady state modified Penning discharge. Observations in the plasma, with capacitive probes at several azimuthal locations, are consistent with the existence of two distinct spokes rotating with different velocities in the sheath between the plasma and the anode ring. The faster (0.5 to 10 MHz) spoke consists of electrons rotating with the E/B drift velocity. The slow (0.1 to 1.0 MHz) spoke consists of ions whose measured thermal velocity is directly proportional to the spoke velocity. The interaction of the two spokes is apparently responsible for the observed electrostatic turbulence and ion thermalization. The anode sheath thickness is smaller than the ion gyrodiameter in this plasma. Thus the ions are in the electric field of the sheath for only a fraction of their orbit, and their E/B drift (spoke) velocity is smaller than that of the electrons.

  6. Neutral beam heating of detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, C.E.; Strachan, J.D.; Schivell, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Budny, R.; McNeill, D.H.; Bell, M.G.; Boody, F.P.

    1989-05-01

    Detached plasmas on TFTR have been heated with neutral beam auxiliary power for the first time. At beam powers above 2 MW the detached plasmas in TFTR expand and reattach to the limiters. Deuterium and/or impurity gas puffing can be used to maintain plasmas in the detached state at powers of over 5 MW. Transient events were observed in a number of these plasmas, including a confinement-related delay in evolution of the edge emissivity and some phenomena which appear similar to those seen in the H-mode. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Plasma Heating and Sustainment with ICRH on W7AS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; Hartmann, D. A.; Lyon, J. F.

    1996-11-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) has successfully been demonstrated on the W7AS stellarator. A novel antenna, located on the high-field side of the torus, was designed to excite a narrow spectrum of k_allel≈ 6 m-1 fast waves. About 80% of the power radiated from the antenna was accounted for in the plasma. No significant increase in the impurity content of the plasma was observed. In second harmonic heating the diamagnetic energy W_dia increased about 10% (0.6 kJ). For H-minority heating of an ECRH deuterium target plasma (H/D ≈ 10%), W_dia increased about 15% (1 kJ) and T_D(0) rose from 300 eV to 400 eV. With H-minority heating it was possible to sustain an ECRH-created plasma with ICRH alone. The duration was limited solely by arcing in the transmission lines or antenna feeds. A steady state condition was obtained about 200 msec into the ICRH-only phase of the discharge. Typical parameters were W_dia = 2 kJ, ≈ 4×10^19 m-3, T_e(0) = 300 eV, and T_D(0) = 350 eV. The plasma profile was narrower and had steeper edges than in comparable ECRH plasmas.

  8. Auroral hot-ion dynamo model with finite gyroradii

    SciTech Connect

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    2006-07-15

    Discrete auroras have (1) narrow size s(less-or-similar sign)30 km in at least one dimension (e.g., north-south) and (2) often rapid variation of forms, especially where the size is extremely small, s{<=}1 km. These points mesh with spatial and temporal features observed at several Earth radii in earthward flows (bursts) of hot plasma along high-latitude geomagnetic field lines. The flows (include PSBL) usually have some filamentary structure with transverse widths of a few local gyroradii of the hot protons (kT{approx}1-30 keV), i.e., widths that encompass auroral-arc size when scaled by magnetic field-line separation. At these widths, modest density gradients ({delta}n{approx}0.01-0.1 cm{sup -3}) lead to charge separation by differential mirroring of hot protons and electrons and large perpendicular electric fields. Thermal escape of ionspheric electrons into positive charge layer builds up magnetic field-aligned potential difference that accelerates hot electrons from negative charge layer into the ionosphere within auroral arc thickness. As a corollary, the model delineates a mechanism for charge-driven plasma instabilities.

  9. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  10. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-01

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  11. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  12. Plasma rotation and rf heating in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Baker, D.R.; Burrell, K.H.

    1999-05-01

    In a variety of discharge conditions on DIII-D it is observed that rf electron heating reduces the toroidal rotation speed and core ion temperature. The rf heating can be with either fast wave or electron cyclotron heating and this effect is insensitive to the details of the launched toroidal wavenumber spectrum. To date all target discharges have rotation first established with co-directed neutral beam injection. A possible cause is enhanced ion momentum and thermal diffusivity due to electron heating effectively creating greater anomalous viscosity. Another is that a counter directed toroidal force is applied to the bulk plasma via rf driven radial current.

  13. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  14. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  15. Numerical simulation of plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Chan, C. B.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma processes driven by transverse ion heating in a diverging flux tube are investigated with numerical simulation. The heating is found to drive a host of plasma processes, in addition to the well-known phenomenon of ion conics. The downward electric field near the reverse shock generates a doublestreaming situation consisting of two upflowing ion populations with different average flow velocities. The electric field in the reverse shock region is modulated by the ion-ion instability driven by the multistreaming ions. The oscillating fields in this region have the possibility of heating electrons. These results from the simulations are compared with results from a previous study based on a hydrodynamical model. Effects of spatial resolutions provided by simulations on the evolution of the plasma are discussed.

  16. Strong electron heating in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Elena; Zelenyi, Lev; Kronberg, Elena; Daly, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Strong perturbations of the Plasma Sheet (PS) magnetic field in the course of magnetic dipolarization are often followed by the generation of magnetic turbulence and plasma heating. Various plasma instabilities and waves can be excited during these processes, which may affect ion and electron velocity distributions in a different way. We have analyzed 70 crossings of the central PS by Cluster spacecraft (s/c) at -19 < X < -8 Re in 2001-2005. We have found that in 32 intervals the ratio of Tion/Tele dropped in the central PS down to <3.0, which denotes significant electron heating. The detailed analysis of these crossings showed that in majority of these events strong magnetic dipolarizations and magnetic turbulence were observed. In the present study we discuss possible mechanisms of such strong electron heating.

  17. Parallel resistivity and ohmic heating of laboratory dipole plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, W.

    2012-08-15

    The parallel resistivity is calculated in the long-mean-free-path regime for the dipole plasma geometry; this is shown to be a neoclassical transport problem in the limit of a small number of circulating electrons. In this regime, the resistivity is substantially higher than the Spitzer resistivity due to the magnetic trapping of a majority of the electrons. This suggests that heating the outer flux surfaces of the plasma with low-frequency parallel electric fields can be substantially more efficient than might be naively estimated. Such a skin-current heating scheme is analyzed by deriving an equation for diffusion of skin currents into the plasma, from which quantities such as the resistive skin-depth, lumped-circuit impedance, and power deposited in the plasma can be estimated. Numerical estimates indicate that this may be a simple and efficient way to couple power into experiments in this geometry.

  18. ICRF Heating and Beta Enhancement of HBT-EP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R.; Cates, C.; Klein, A.; Liu, Y.; Mauel, M. E.; Maurer, D. A.; Navratil, G. A.; Pedersen, T. S.; Shilov, M.; Stillits, N.

    2004-11-01

    We describe experiments using the HBT-EP dual strap, inside launch ICRF heating system. RF heating is applied at 4.5MHz to deuterium discharges with 20 percent hydrogen minority species in order to heat electrons in the strongly damped mode-conversion regime. Experiments to date have shown antenna loading with plasmas pre-programmed to be strongly limited on the high field side (HFS) limiter. A HFS triple probe measures electron temperature and density near the antenna, and an RF pickup coil is employed to measure the fluctuating wave magnetic field. Experiments to date indicate that increased plasma density near the antenna improves coupling significantly. We will report on our progress in improving antenna-plasma coupling using the radial position feedback control system (RPFCS) in conjunction with the bias probe to achieve high plasma density near the antenna. Any bias probe induced H-modes may also help increase antenna coupling by increasing the plasma density near the edge. Progress on analysis and diagnosis of the antenna-oscillator circuit and loading measurements and current status of measurable RF heating will be presented.[1] [1] Collaboration with J. Hosea, R. Wilson, R. Budny, S. Paul et al., PPPL

  19. Laser production and heating of plasma for MHD application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments have been made on the production and heating of plasmas by the absorption of laser radiation. These experiments were performed to ascertain the feasibility of using laser-produced or laser-heated plasmas as the input for a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. Such a system would have a broad application as a laser-to-electricity energy converter for space power transmission. Experiments with a 100-J-pulsed CO2 laser were conducted to investigate the breakdown of argon gas by a high-intensity laser beam, the parameters (electron density and temperature) of the plasma produced, and the formation and propagation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. Experiments were also carried out using a 1-J-pulsed CO2 laser to heat the plasma produced in a shock tube. The shock-tube hydrogen plasma reached electron densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm and electron temperatures of approximately 1 eV. Absorption of the CO2 laser beam by the plasma was measured, and up to approximately 100 percent absorption was observed. Measurements with a small MHD generator showed that the energy extraction efficiency could be very large with values up to 56 percent being measured.

  20. About MHD heating of plasmaspheric and ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, V. A.; Buechner, J.; Kirchner, T.

    In recent years, the possibility has been considered to provide supplementary MHD heating to a Tokamak plasma on the basis of an approach involving resonant mode conversion of a magnetosonic wave into a kinetic Alfven wave. The present paper has the objective to study Alfven resonance heating under magnetospheric conditions. The conducted investigation takes into account the damping of an Alfven wave in the ionosphere, a phenomenon, which has not been considered in some previous studies. The employed model is not restricted to the consideration of an approximation of the plasma density by a linear profile, and arbitrary, smooth characteristics are contemplated. The employed model of the magnetosphere corresponds to the model described by Southwood (1974). The rate of energy dissipation at the point of Alfven resonance is calculated, and Joule heating of the ionosphere caused by dissipation of resonant Alfven waves is estimated. MHD waves of sufficient intensity can induce anomalous heating of plasmaspheric particles near the point of resonance.

  1. An RF heated tandem mirror plasma propulsion study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.F.; Yao, X.; Peng, S.; Krueger, W.A.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results on a tandem mirror hybrid plume rocket involving a three-stage system of plasma injection, heating, and subsequent injection through a magnetic nozzle are presented. In the experiments, a plasma is created by breaking down the gas with electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2 kW in the central cell, and the ion species is then heated to high temperatures with ion cyclotron resonance heating at 10 kW in the end cell. A Langmuir probe measured an electron density of 2.5 x 10 to the 16th/cu m and a temperature of 100 eV in the central cell and an ion density of 1.25 x 10 to the 17th/cu m and a temperature of 500 eV in the end cell. 6 refs.

  2. Dissipation and turbulent heating of plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 1 observations of plasma waves in the dayside Jovian magnetosphere which show a correlation with measurements of localized concentrations of cool thermal plasma are presented. This moderately intense broadband electrostatic noise is shown to be of sufficient intensity to accelerate superthermal ions to energies approximately 1 keV and higher. This process can account for the extensive heating of plasma in the magnetosphere and can energize a fraction of heavy ions to injection threshold for a high-energy second stage acceleration mechanism. A brief discussion of the relation of this noise to Jovian magnetospheric dynamics is included.

  3. Heating mechanisms and mode changes in helicon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingboe, Albert R.

    1996-10-01

    Measurements of plasma wave fields and time-dependent (within the rf cycle) warm electron density give insight into near-resonant transit time heating of electrons in a helicon plasma source. Experimentally, rf power and magnetic field are found to determine the mode of coupling (E, H, or Wave (A. R. Ellingboe and R. W. Boswell, Physics of Plasmas, July (1996).)) with significant warm electron density only in W mode. A second Wave mode which yields an order of magnitude increase in warm electron current is identified as the second axial eigenmode of the antenna. The turn-on of the second axial eigenmode prior to the second radial eigenmode is predicted by the ANTENA computer code(B. McVey, Plasma Fusion Center, Massachesetts Institute of Technology, Report No. PFC/RR-84-12). Orbit code modeling of the wave-particle interaction finds that increased plasma and/or neutral density significantly degrades interaction because of collisions.

  4. ICRF heating of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to heat D-T plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have been performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These experiments have two major objectives: to study the RF physics of ICRF-heated D-T plasmas and to enhance the performance of D-T discharges. Experiments have been conducted at 43 MHz with out-of-phase current strap excitation to explore n{sub T}/n{sub e} concentrations up to approximately 40%. In these experiments n{sub T}/n{sub e} was limited by D recycling from the carbon walls. The location of the T resonance was varied by changing the toroidal magnetic field, and the RF power was modulated (f{sub mod}=5-10 Hz) to elucidate competing heating mechanisms. Up to 5.8 MW of ICRF heating has been coupled into D-T plasmas. The addition of 5.5 MW of ICRF heating to a D-T supershot resulted in an increase in central ion temperature from 26 to 36 keV and an increase in central electron temperature from 8 to 10.5 keV. Up to 80% of the absorbed ICRF power was coupled directly to ions, in good agreement with computer code predictions. These results extrapolate to efficient T heating in future devices such as ITER.

  5. Lower hybrid heating and current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.E.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.

    1983-03-01

    800 MHz lower hybrid waves have been launched into PLT with a six waveguide coupler. Recent improvements have allowed powers up to 400 kW to be launched with good coupling (R approx. 10 to 25%). Experiments at low density (anti n/sub e/ < 7 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, i.e., ..omega../..omega../sub LH/ > 2) have demonstrated current drive and plasma heating. Experiments at higher densities have produced hot-ion tails, but so far have shown inefficient body heating. To date, only a limited parameters space has been investigated at high power.

  6. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral impurity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Eubank, H.P.; Firestone, M.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Singer, C.E.; Weisheit, J.

    1981-03-01

    The utility of neutral beams of A greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, accelerated to approx. 1 MeV/AMU and neutralized, is explored for heating toroidally confined plasmas. Such beams offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based upon positive or negative hydrogen ions at 100 to 200 keV/AMU.

  7. Advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, J. W.; Vogel, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Continuing research has resulted in significant advances in induction-heated plasma torch technology which extend and enhance its potential for broad range of uses in chemical processing, materials development and testing, and development of large illumination sources. Summaries of these advances are briefly described.

  8. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  9. Radio-frequency heating of the coronal plasma during flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed for the radio-frequency (RF) heating of soft X-ray emitting plasma in solar flares due to absorption of amplified cyclotron radiation. The radiation, carrying approximately 10 to the 27th to approximately 10 to the 30th erg/s, is generated through maser emission following partial precipitation of electrons in one or more flaring loops. The maser operates in a large number of small regions, each producing an 'elementary burst' (EB) of short duration. This radiation propagates either directly or after reflection to the second-harmonic absorption layer, where it is absorbed by thermal electrons. The properties of EBs and the heating of the electrons in the absorption layer are discussed in detail. RF heating and evaporation models for the production of soft X-ray emitting plasma are compared. Properties of the RF heating model that explain observed features are energy transport across field lines, rapid heating (in approximately 1 s) of coronal plasma to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th K, and instigation of turbulent velocities up to the ion sound speed.

  10. In-depth plasma-wave heating of dense plasma irradiated by short laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, M; Hill, E G; Evans, R G; Rose, S J; Rozmus, W

    2014-12-19

    We investigate the mechanism by which relativistic electron bunches created at the surface of a target irradiated by a very short and intense laser pulse transfer energy to the deeper parts of the target. In existing theories, the dominant heating mechanism is that of resistive heating by the neutralizing return current. In addition to this, we find that large amplitude plasma waves are induced in the plasma in the wake of relativistic electron bunches. The subsequent collisional damping of these waves represents a source of heating that can exceed the resistive heating rate. As a result, solid targets heat significantly faster than has been previously considered. A new hybrid model, capable of reproducing these results, is described. PMID:25554889

  11. Raman amplification in plasma: Wavebreaking and heating effects

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J. P.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2010-11-15

    A three-wave model has been developed to investigate the influence of wavebreaking and thermal effects on the Raman amplification in plasma. This has been benchmarked against a particle-in-cell code with positive results. A new regime, the 'thermal chirp' regime, has been identified and illustrated. Here the shift in plasma resonance due to heating of the plasma by a monochromatic pump allows a probe pulse to be amplified and compressed without significant pump depletion. In regimes where damping dominates, it is found that inverse bremsstrahlung dominates at high densities, and improved growth rates may be achieved by preheating the plasma. At low densities or high pump intensities, wavebreaking acts to limit amplification. The inclusion of thermal effects can dramatically reduce the peak attainable intensity because of the reduced wavebreaking limit at finite temperatures.

  12. Plasma heating and emission of runaway charged particles in a plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Hirose, A.; Xiao, C.

    2016-03-01

    The required experimental E-field across plasma to generate significant runaway electrons and hard X-rays during the pinch phase and the phase with anomalous resistance has been investigated in a dense plasma focus. The plasma voltage and inductance have been measured in a plasma focus with two different anode tip structures. The results show a significant generation of charged particles and hard X-rays at smaller E-field across the plasma column in the phase of anomalous resistances compared to the pinch phase. Plasma heating process may enhance the rate of runaway-charged-particle generation due to the combined effects of a reduced Dreicer field and the avalanche effects during the phase of anomalous resistance.

  13. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  14. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  15. Sawtooth stability in neutral beam heated plasmas in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Pinches, S. D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; TEXTOR Team; de Bock, M.

    2008-03-01

    The experimental sawtooth behaviour in neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas in TEXTOR is described. It is found that the sawtooth period is minimized with a low NBI power oriented in the same direction as the plasma current. As the beam power is increased in the opposite direction to the plasma current, the sawtooth period increases to a maximum before it begins to shorten once more. Results from both magnetohydrodynamic stability modelling including toroidal flows and modelling of the kinetic effects of the fast ions resulting from NBI heating are also presented. This model combining the gyroscopic and kinetic effects upon the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode—thought to be associated with sawtooth oscillations—qualitatively recovers the sawtooth behaviour exhibited in the experiment. It is proposed that the sawtooth period is minimized in the co-NBI direction at the point at which the stabilization of the kink mode due to rotation is weakest. This occurs when the plasma rotation induced by the NBI balances the intrinsic rotation of the plasma. The sawtooth behaviour in the counter-NBI regime is attributed to a subtle balance of the competing stabilization from the toroidal rotation and destabilization from the presence of energetic ions.

  16. Anomalous resistivity and heating in current-driven plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, E. Y.

    1999-05-01

    A theory is presented of anomalous resistivity and particle heating in current-driven plasma accelerators such as the magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (MPDT). An electromagnetic dielectric tensor is used for a current-carrying, collisional and finite-beta plasma and it is found that an instability akin to the generalized lower hybrid drift instability (GLHDI) exists for electromagnetic modes (i.e., with finite polarization). Weak turbulence theory is then used to develop a second-order description of the heating rates of particles by the waves and the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. It is found that the electron Hall parameter strongly scales the level of anomalous dissipation for the case of the MPDT plasma. This scaling has recently been confirmed experimentally [Phys. Plasmas 5, 3581 (1997)]. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for including microturbulence effects in numerical plasma fluid models used for thruster flow simulation.

  17. Cold plasma heating in the plasma sheet boundary layer - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, David; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1990-01-01

    Satellite observations in recent years have confirmed that the plasma sheet boundary layer is a permanent feature of the earth's magnetotail located between the lobe and central plasma sheet during both quiet and active magnetic periods. Distinct features of the boundary layer include field aligned ion beams and intense electrostatic emissions known as broadband electrostatic noise. Since the plasma sheet boundary layer is a spatial feature of the magnetotail, within it will occur thermal mixing of the resident warm boundary layer plasma with inflowing (convecting) cold ionospheric plasma. A theoretical study involving linear theory and nonlinear numerical particle simulations is presented which examines ion beam instabilities in the presence of a thermally mixed hot and cold background plasma. It is found that the free energy in the ion beams can heat the cool ionospheric plasma to ambient plasma sheet boundary layer temperatures via broadband electrostatic noise. These results, along with recent observational reports that ionospheric outflow can account for measured plasma sheet densities, suggest that the ionospheric role in plasma sheet dynamics and content may be as large as the solar wind.

  18. Interaction of adhered metallic dust with transient plasma heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Bykov, I.; Rudakov, D.; De Angeli, M.; Vignitchouk, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bardin, S.; van der Meiden, H.; Vernimmen, J.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-06-01

    The first study of the interaction of metallic dust (tungsten, aluminum) adhered on tungsten substrates with transient plasma heat loads is presented. Experiments were carried out in the Pilot-PSI linear device with transient heat fluxes up to 550 MW m‑2 and in the DIII-D divertor tokamak. The central role of the dust-substrate contact area in heat conduction is highlighted and confirmed by heat transfer simulations. The experiments provide evidence of the occurrence of wetting-induced coagulation, a novel growth mechanism where cluster melting accompanied by droplet wetting leads to the formation of larger grains. The physical processes behind this mechanism are elucidated. The remobilization activity of the newly formed dust and the survivability of tungsten dust on hot surfaces are documented and discussed in the light of implications for ITER.

  19. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  20. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-12-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  1. Plasma Heating and Ultrafast Semiconductor Laser Modulation Through a Terahertz Heating Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.

    2000-01-01

    Electron-hole plasma heating and ultrafast modulation in a semiconductor laser under a terahertz electrical field are investigated using a set of hydrodynamic equations derived from the semiconductor Bloch equations. The self-consistent treatment of lasing and heating processes leads to the prediction of a strong saturation and degradation of modulation depth even at moderate terahertz field intensity. This saturation places a severe limit to bandwidth achievable with such scheme in ultrafast modulation. Strategies for increasing modulation depth are discussed.

  2. Fast collisionless reconnection and electron heating in strongly magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, N F; Schekochihin, A A; Zocco, A

    2013-07-12

    Magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized (low-beta), weakly collisional plasmas is investigated by using a novel fluid-kinetic model [Zocco and Schekochihin, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102309 (2011)] which retains nonisothermal electron kinetics. It is shown that electron heating via Landau damping (linear phase mixing) is the dominant dissipation mechanism. In time, electron heating occurs after the peak of the reconnection rate; in space, it is concentrated along the separatrices of the magnetic island. For sufficiently large systems, the peak reconnection rate is cE(∥)(max) ≈ 0.2v(A)B(y,0), where v(A) is the Alfvén speed based on the reconnecting field B(y,0). The island saturation width is the same as in magnetohydrodynamics models except for small systems, when it becomes comparable to the kinetic scales. PMID:23889411

  3. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  4. Generation and Sustainment of Plasma Rotation by ICRF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, F. W.

    2000-10-01

    When tokamak plasmas are heated by the fundamental minority ion-cyclotron process, they are observed to rotate toroidally, even though this heating process introduces negligable angular momentum. This work proposes and evaluates a physics mechanism which resolves this apparent conflict. The argument has two elements. First, it is assumed that angular momentum transport is governed by a diffusion equation with a v_tor = 0 boundary condition at the plasma surface and a torque-density source. When the source consists of separated regions of positive and negative torque density, a finite central rotation velocity results, even though the volume integrated torque density - the angular momentum input - vanishes. Secondly, ions energized by the ICRF process can generate separated regions of positive and negative torque density. Heating increases their banana widths which leads to radial energetic-particle transport that must be balanced by neutralizing radial currents and a j_rB_pR torque density in the bulk plasma. Additional, comparable torque density results from collisional transfer of mechanical angular momentum from energetic particles to the bulk plasma and particle loss through banana particles impacting the wall. Monte-Carlo calculations utilizing the ORBIT code evaluate all sources of torque density and rigorously assure that no net angular momentum is introduced. Two models of ICRF heating, diffusive and instantaneous, give similar results. When the resonance location is on the LFS, the calculated rotation has the magnitude, profile, and co-current sense of Alcator C-Mod observations. For HFS resonance locations, the model predicts counter-current rotation. Scans of rotational profiles vs. resonance location, initial energy, particle loss, pitch, and qm will be presented as will the location of the velocity shear layer its scaling to a reactor.

  5. Compound sawtooth study in ohmically heated TFTR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; McGuire, K.; Colchin, D.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Hill, K.; Kiraly, J.; Pare, V.; Taylor, G.; Sauthoff, N.

    1985-09-01

    Compound sawtooth activity has been observed in ohmically heated, high current, high density TFTR plasmas. Commonly called ''double sawteeth,'' such sequences consist of a repetitive series of subordinate relaxations followed by a main relaxation with a different inversion radius. The period of such compound sawteeth can be as long as 100 msec. In other cases, however, no compound sawteeth or bursts of them can be observed in discharges with essentially the same parameters.

  6. Heat transfer in a fissioning uranium plasma reactor cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    Two schemes are investigated by which a fission-heated uranium plasma located in the central cavity of a test reactor could be insulated to keep its temperature above condensation in a neutron flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/(sq cm)(sec) or less. The first scheme was to use a mirrored cavity wall to reflect the thermal radiation back into the plasma. The second scheme was to seed the transpirational cavity wall coolant so as to make it opaque to thermal radiation, thus insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall. The analysis showed that a mirrored cavity wall must have a reflectivity of over 95 percent or that seeded argon must be used as the wall coolant to give an acceptable operating margin above fuel condensation conditions.

  7. Nonlinear heating of underdense collisional plasma by a laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Abari, M. Etehadi; Shokri, B.

    2011-05-15

    The nonlinear interaction of a laser pulse with a homogenous unmagnetized underdense plasma, taking ohmic heating and the effects of ponderomotive force into account, is theoretically studied. Since the ponderomotive force modifies the electrons density and temperature distribution, the nonlinear dielectric permittivity of plasma is obtained in non-relativistic regime. Furthermore, electric and magnetic fields, electron density, temperature distribution, and the effective permittivity variations are obtained in terms of plasma length by making use the steady state solutions of the Maxwell and hydrodynamic equations. It is shown that the oscillations wave length of electric and magnetic fields decreases when the laser intensity increases. At the same time, in this case, electron density oscillations become highly peaked. Also, the amplitude of the electron temperature oscillations increase and their wavelength decreases.

  8. Influence of Multiple Ionization on Studies of Nanoflare Heated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2015-04-01

    The spectrum emitted by a plasma depends on the charge state distribution (CSD) of the gas. This, in turn, is determined by the corresponding rates for electron-impact ionization and recombination. Current CSD calculations for solar physics do not account for electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI), a process in which multiple electrons are ejected by a single electron-ion collision. We have estimated the EIMI cross sections for all charge states of iron using a combination of the available experimental data and semi-empirical formulae. We then modeled the CSD and observed the influence of EIMI compared to only including single ionization. One case of interest for solar physics is nanoflare heating. Recent work has attempted to predict the spectra of impulsively heated plasmas in order to identify diagnostics arising from non-equilibrium ionization that can constrain the nanoflare properties, but these calculations have ignored EIMI. Our findings suggest that EIMI can have a significant effect on the CSD of a nanoflare-heated plasma, changing the ion abundances by up to about 50%.

  9. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: Continuous transitions and plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledentsov, L. S.; Somov, B. V.

    2015-12-01

    The boundary conditions for the ideal MHD equations on a plane discontinuity surface are investigated. It is shown that, for a given mass flux through a discontinuity, its type depends only on the relation between inclination angles of a magnetic field. Moreover, the conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continuous) changes in the conditions of plasma flow. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of the complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found the expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the discontinuity. Firstly, this allows constructing a generalized scheme of possible continuous transitions between MHD discontinuities. Secondly, it enables the examination of the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near the discontinuity surface, i.e., by the type of the MHD discontinuity. It is shown that the best conditions for heating are carried out in the vicinity of a reconnecting current layer near the areas of reverse currents. The result can be helpful in explaining the temperature distributions inside the active regions in the solar corona during flares observed by modern space observatories in soft and hard X-rays.

  10. Analysis of a microwave-heated planar propagating hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, J.P.; Micci, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    The heating of a gas to high temperatures by absorption of microwave radiation has been proposed as a potential electrothermal rocket propulsion system. One possible mode of microwave energy absorption is by means of a planar plasma region propagating toward the source of the microwave radiation. Such a planar propagating plasma can be spatially stabilized by a gas stream flowing in the same direction as the microwave radiation with a velocity equal to the plasma propagation velocity. A one-dimensional analysis of the microwave-heated planar propagating plasma for hydrogen gas was developed to predict maximum gas temperatures and propagation velocities. The governing electromagnetic and energy equations were numerically integrated with temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of equilibrium hydrogen. The propagation velocity eigenvalue was solved by means of an iterative technique. Temperature distribution in the gas, propagation velocities, and percent power absorbed, reflected and transmitted, were obtained as a function of incident microwave power at a frequency of 2.45 GHza for hydrogen gas pressures of 1 and 10 atm. 19 references.

  11. Voyager observations of lower hybrid noise in the Io plasma torus and anomalous plasma heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kurth, W. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    A study of Voyager 1 electric field measurements obtained by the plasma wave instrument in the Io plasma torus has been carried out. A survey of the data has revealed the presence of persistent peaks in electric field spectra in the frequency range 100-600 Hz consistent with their identification as lower hybrid noise for a heavy-ion plasma of sulfur and oxygen. Typical wave intensities are 0.1 mV/m, and the spectra also show significant Doppler broadening, Delta omega/omega approximately 1. A theoretical analysis of lower hybrid wave generation by a bump-on-tail ring distribution of ions is given. The model is appropriate for plasmas with a superthermal pickup ion population present. A general methodology is used to demonstrate that the maximum plasma heating rate possible through anomalous wave-particle heat exchange is less than approximately 10 to the -14th ergs per cu cm per s. Although insufficient to meet the power requirement of the EUV-emitting warm torus, the heating rate is large enough to maintain a low-density (0.01-0.1 percent) superthermal electron population of keV electrons, which may lead to a small but significant anomalous ionization effect.

  12. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  13. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Zi = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×108 V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  14. Calibration experiments of 3He neutron detectors for analyzing neutron emissivity in the hot-ion mode on the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Watanabe, H.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ito, H.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Ogura, K.; Kondoh, T.; Nishitani, T.; Kwon, M.; England, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    Under the international fusion cooperating research, 3He neutron detectors in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror are calibrated by the use of a 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source (8.96×104 n/s). The calibration experiments are carried out with a "rail system" placed along the magnetic axis of the GAMMA 10 central-cell region, where hot ions in the plasma experiments with the bulk temperatures of ˜10 keV are produced. As compared to a previous neutron monitoring system with a BF3 detector in GAMMA 10, the present 3He systems are designed with about two orders-of-magnitude higher neutron-counting efficiency for analyzing a neutron emissivity from the plasmas in a single plasma discharge alone. Two 3He systems are installed near the middle and the end of the central cell so as to identify the central-cell hot-ion axial profile. The filling pressure of 3He, the effective length, and the diameter of the detector are designed as 5 bar, 300 mm, and 50 mm, respectively. The detector output spectra are carefully analyzed by the use of a preamplifier, a shaping amplifier, as well as a multichannel analyzer for each 3He detector. In the present article, the neutron-counting data from the two 3He detectors due to the on-axis 252Cf scan are interpreted in terms of the d-2 intensity dependence (d being the distance between the detector and the neutron source) as well as the effects of the central-cell magnetic coils and the other machine structural components.

  15. The Conversion of Large-Scale Turbulent Energy to Plasma Heat In Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of violent events and instabilities at large scales into plasma heat. The turbulent cascade transfers this energy from the large scales at which the motions are driven down to small scales, and this essentially fluid process can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions. At sufficiently small scales, for which the dynamics is often weakly collisional, collisionless mechanisms damp the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, and this essentially kinetic process can be understood in terms of linear wave-particle interactions. In this talk, I will summarize the possible channels of the turbulent dissipation in a weakly collisional plasma, and present recent results from kinetic numerical simulations of plasma turbulence. Finally, I will discuss strategies for the definitive identification of the dominant dissipation channels using spacecraft measurements of turbulence in the solar wind.

  16. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  17. Transverse ion heating in multicomponent plasmas. [in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.; Kim, S. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed for plasma modes which can occur only in a multicomponent plasma and not in pure electron-ion plasma. The addition of ions creates a new instability near the ion-ion hybrid mode whose frequency is adequate for the wave to interact with oxygen ions. To study heating of ions (such as ionospheric oxygen ions) in presence of auroral electrons, several numerical simulations were carried out using a one-dimensional electrostatic code in a magnetic field. It was found that in the presence of electrons drifting along auroral field lines into the ionosphere, the ion-ion hybrid mode can be driven unstable when the electron drift speed is too small to excite the lower hybrid instability. Since the ion-ion mode has a smaller frequency than that of the lower hybrid waves, it can couple to the heavy ions, resulting in a substantial heating of heavy ions; on the other hand, because of their frequencies, the lower hybrid waves can accelerate only light ion species.

  18. Alpha-Heating and a Burning Plasma State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Doeppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.

    2014-10-01

    L. R. BENEDETTI, D. BRADLEY, D. FITTINGHOFF, N. IZUMI, S. KHAN, R. TOWN (LLNL) G. GRIM, N. GULER, G. KYRALA, F. MERRILL, C. WILDE, P. VOLEGOV (LANL) High-foot implosions show net fuel gains and significant alpha-heating [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)] using a per shot analysis of NIF data with a static reconstruction of the implosion energetics [e.g. Cerjan et al., PoP 20 (2013)]. Inference of the alpha-heating contribution to the yield is made using a simulation database of DT implosions and the one-to-one correspondence of yield amplification and normalized Lawson criteria [Patel et al., APS-DPP, (2013); Patel et al. this conf.]. A dynamic semi-analytic model for the DT self-heating rate can be constructed that can more directly be used, with data, to determine the degree of bootstrapping occuring in implosions. Here we propose that the suite of high-foot data demonstrate a scaling of fusion yield performance versus energy absorbed that provides an alternate proof of significant alpha-particle self-heating. This analysis shows that recent high-foot implosions are alpha-heating dominated and thus have achieved a `burning-plasma' state. Work performed under the auspices of U.S. Dept. of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopherson, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    In inertial confinement fusion, a spherical capsule of cryogenic DT is accelerated inward at a high velocity. Near stagnation, a dense hot spot is formed where the deuterium and tritium ions begin to fuse, creating a 3.5-MeV alpha particle per reaction. These alpha particles deposit energy back into the plasma, thereby increasing the pressure, temperature, and reaction rate. This feedback process is called ``alpha heating,'' and ignition is a direct consequence of this thermal instability. The onset of a burning-plasma regime occurs when the total alpha-particle energy produced exceeds the shell compression work. Using an analytic compressible-shell model for the implosion, it is found that the onset of the burning-plasma regime is a unique function of the neutron yield enhancement caused by alpha particles for any target, direct or indirect drive. This yield enhancement can then be inferred from experimentally measureable quantities, such as the Lawson parameter. From this analysis, the onset of a burning plasma occurs at yields exceeding 50 kJ for implosions at the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  20. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  1. RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) accelerators for heating thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, R.H.; Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    The radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been developed to generate high-current ion beams for a wide variety of applications. It has also been suggested that this type of accelerator could be used to produce megawatt ion beams to heat thermonuclear reactor plasmas. For a tokamak reactor, an RFQ accelerator can be designed to provide negative deuterium ions that are neutralized before injection through the tokamak magentic field. Also, it may be possible to use singly charged, positive, heavier ions that trasverse the magnetic field with minimal deflection and then become multiply ionized upon striking the tokamak plasma. We present preliminary RFQ beam-dynamics designs for both deuterium and oxygen ions.

  2. Identification of higher frequency plasma waves inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex responsible for plasma heating and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfvén wave activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. For the first time we have determined from observations the dispersion relation of higher frequency waves responsible for plasma mixing and heating within a KH vortex.

  3. Plasma-ion Induced Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2007-05-01

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmospheric mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the use of Cassini data to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere provides an important end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that are used to interpret Cassini data at Titan. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasmadriven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann, "Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003).

  4. Application of rf-thruster technique for fusion plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freisinger, J.; Loeb, H. W.

    On the basis of RF ion thruster devices, a family of RF injector generators (RIGs) for the heating of fusion plasmas up to the temperature of thermonuclear burn has been developed. Hydrogen ion beams of 10-40 amps can be accelerated by means of the RIGs to 30 kV, so that ion beam densities of more than 250 mA/sq cm are achievable at uniform profiles within only 1 deg of divergence angle. The use of electrodeless quartz ionizers yields a very high atomic ion fraction, low admixture of impurities, long lifetime, high reliability, simple mechanical elements, and easy control.

  5. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  6. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak plasmas: enhanced heat loss due to cross-scale coupling of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is dominated by the complex nonlinear dynamics of plasma turbulence. In magnetically confined plasmas used for fusion energy research, turbulence is responsible for cross-field transport that limits the performance of tokamak reactors. We report a set of novel gyrokinetic simulations that capture ion and electron-scale turbulence simultaneously, revealing the dynamics of cross-scale energy transfer and zonal flow modification that give rise to heat losses. Multi-scale simulations are required to match experimental ion and electron heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness, establishing the applicability of the newly discovered physics to experiment. Importantly, these results provide a likely explanation for the loss of electron heat from tokamak plasmas, the ‘great unsolved problem’ (Bachelor et al (2007 Plasma Sci. Technol. 9 312-87)) in plasma turbulence and the projected dominant loss channel in ITER.

  8. Plasma-ion-induced sputtering and heating of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Michael, M.; Tucker, O. J.; Shematovich, V. I.; Luhmann, J. H.; Ledvina, S. A.

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmosphere mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the fact that data from the Cassini spacecraft can be used to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere by the plasma trapped in Saturn's magnetosphere provides an exciting end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that can, in principal, be employed in interpreting Cassini data at Titan. It is shown that the globally averaged flux of magnetospheric and pickup ions deposit more energy in Titan's upper atmosphere than solar radiation. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated and compared to available Cassini data. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasma- driven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175

  9. Accelerating piston action and plasma heating in high-energy density laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Wilks, S. C.; Baring, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    In the field of high-energy density physics (HEDP), lasers in both the nanosecond and picosecond regimes can drive conditions in the laboratory relevant to a broad range of astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray burst afterglows and supernova remnants. In the short-pulse regime, the strong light pressure (>Gbar) associated ultraintense lasers of intensity I > 1018 W/cm2 plays a central role in many HEDP applications. Yet, the behavior of this nonlinear pressure mechanism is not well-understood at late time in the laser-plasma interaction. In this paper, a more realistic treatment of the laser pressure 'hole boring' process is developed through analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. A simple Liouville code capturing the phase space evolution of ponderomotively-driven ions is employed to distill effects related to plasma heating and ion bulk acceleration. Taking into account these effects, our results show that the evolution of the laser-target system encompasses ponderomotive expansion, equipartition, and quasi-isothermal expansion epochs. These results have implications for light piston-driven ion acceleration scenarios, and astrophysical applications where the efficiencies of converting incident Poynting flux into bulk plasma flow and plasma heat are key unknown parameters.

  10. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and flow generation in deuterium{endash}tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.C.; LeBlanc, B.; Majeski, R.; Nazikian, R.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Schilling, G.; von Goeler, S.; Bush, C.E.; Hanson, G.R.

    1998-05-01

    Recent radio-frequency heating experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Hawryluk {ital et al.}, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion {bold 33}, 1509 (1991)] have focused on developing tools for both pressure and current profile control in deuterium{endash}tritium (DT) plasmas. A new antenna was added to investigate pressure profile control utilizing direct ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating. This was the first time direct IBW heating was explored on TFTR. Plasma heating and driven poloidal flows are observed. Previously heating and current drive via mode-converted IBW waves had been demonstrated in non-DT plasmas but efforts in DT plasmas had been unsuccessful. This lack of success had been ascribed to the presence of a small {sup 7}Li minority ion population. In the most recent experiments {sup 6}Li was used exclusively for machine conditioning and mode-conversion heating consistent with theory is now observed in DT plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Ultra-rapid plasma freezing with halocarbon heat transfer liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Coelho, P.H.; Comerchero, V.

    1988-03-15

    A process of freezing plasma is described comprising the steps of exposing thin wall containers of plasma to be frozen to direct contact with a heat transfer liquid selected from the group consisting of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (CFC 113) and mixtures of the chlorofluorocarbon 1,1,2 trichloro-1,2,2, trifluoro-ethane (Freon 113) and at least one of the fluorocarbons perfluoropentane (C/sub 5/F/sub 12/), perfluorohexane (C/sub 6/F/sub 14/), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/), perfluoroheptane (C/sub 7/F/sub 16/), perfluoromonomethyldimethylcyclohexanes (C/sub 7/F/sub 14/C/sub 8/F/sub 16/), perfluorodecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/), mixed perfluorodecalin and methyldecalin isomers (C/sub 10/F/sub 18/+C/sub 11/F/sub 20/), and perfluorinatd polyethers ((OCF(CF/sub 3/)CF/sub 2/)/sub n/ - (OCF/sub 2/)/sub m/, and maintaining the liquid at a temperature sufficiently low enough to freeze the plasma in the desired amount of time.

  12. Negative specific heat of a magnetically self-confined plasma torus

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.-H.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic maximum-entropy principle predicts negative specific heat for a stationary, magnetically self-confined current-carrying plasma torus. Implications for the magnetic self-confinement of fusion plasma are considered. PMID:12576553

  13. Electron heating in capacitively coupled RF plasmas: a unified scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-02-01

    Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (RF-CCP) is studied from first principles. The starting points are the electron equations of continuity and motion, with ionization neglected but electric and pressure forces and elastic collisions with the neutral background taken into account. Poisson’s equation self-consistently calculates the electric field; the ion density is assumed as a given. Postulating that the Debye length {λ\\text{D}} is small compared to the sheath length scale l and the applied frequency {ω\\text{RF}} is small compared to the electron plasma frequency {ω\\text{pe}} , an asymptotic expansion in the smallness parameter ε ={λ\\text{D}}/l∼ {ω\\text{RF}}/{ω\\text{pe}} is conducted. As has been demonstrated before (Brinkmann 2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 064002), this ansatz gives an expression—the smooth step model (SSM)—which yields (i) the space charge field in the unipolar region, (ii) the generalized Ohmic field in the ambipolar region, and (iii) a smooth interpolation for the rapid transition in between. Using the SSM and formulas for the electron density and the electron flux, expressions for the electric force and the electric power density are established which hold up to O≤ft(ε \\right) . Integrating over the sheath and taking the phase average, a representation for the total dissipated power is found as a sum of four physically distinct contributions. All terms correspond to electron heating mechanisms which are (explicitly or implicitly) already known but were so far discussed only within mutually incompatible frameworks.

  14. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhihong; Xiao, Y.; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  15. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Xiao, Y.; Holod, I.; Zhang, W. L.; Deng, Wenjun; Klasky, Scott A; Lofstead, J.; Kamath, Chandrika; Wichmann, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  16. On the different regimes of gas heating in air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2015-10-01

    Simulations of the gas temperature in air (N2-20%O2) plasma discharges are presented for different values of the reduced electric field, E/N g, electron density n e, pressure and tube radius. This study is based on the solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance in a cylindrical geometry coupled to the electron, vibrational and chemical kinetics, for E/{{N}\\text{g}}=50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V cm2), 109  ⩽  n e  ⩽  1011 cm-3, pressure in the range 1-20 Torr, and also considering different tube radius, 0.5, 1 and 1.5 cm. The competing role of different gas heating mechanisms is discussed in detail within the time range 0.01-100 ms. For times below 1 ms, gas heating occurs from O2 dissociation by electron impact through pre-dissociative excited states, e + O2  →  e + \\text{O}2*   →  e + 2O(3P) and …  →  e + O(3P) + O(1D), as well as through the quenching of N2 electronically excited states by O2. For longer times, simulation results show that gas heating comes from processes N(4S) + NO(X)  →  N2(X, v ~ 3) + O, N2(A) + O  →  NO(X) + N(2D), V-T N2-O collisions and the recombination of oxygen atoms at the wall. Depending on the given E/N g and n e values, each one of these processes can be an important gas-heating channel. The contribution of V-T N2-O exchanges to gas heating is important in the analysis of the gas temperature for different pressures and values of the tube radius. A global picture of these effects is given by the study of the fraction of the discharge power spent on gas heating, which is always ~15%. The values for the fractional power transferred to gas heating from vibrational and electronic excitation are also presented and discussed.

  17. Radio Frequency Field Calculations for Plasma Heating Simulations in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Carter, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    (VASIMR)1 is plasma heating by ion-cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). Mathematical simulation helps to design an ICRF antenna, i.e. make maximal absorption of RF power into the plasma in the resonance area. Another goal of a particle simulation is design of a magnetic nozzle and optimize the performance of VASIMR2. field in the plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency electromagnetic field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collisionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. Carlo simulations for systems of million of particles in a reasonable time and without the need for a powerful supercomputer. The particle to grid weighting method is used for calculating the ion density, which is used for recalculation of the electric potential and RF field. dimensional problem to a weighted sum over two-dimensional solutions. Absorption is introduced in the cold plasma model by adding an imaginary collision frequency to the RF driven frequency, which is equivalent to adding an imaginary particle mass in the dielectric tensor elements. static and RF fields using the VASIMR code2. The VASIMR and EMIR codes are then iterated to estimate the ICRF effects on the plasma density. The iteration is performed by calculating the RF fields with the EMIR code, and using these fields to follow nonlinear ion trajectories with the VASIMR code on the gyro-frequency time scale. The ion trajectories are used to generate RF power absorption values and a density input for the next EMIR calculation. The codes are iterated until the density profile becomes reasonably stable, then the collisional absorption parameter in the EMIR code is adjusted and the iteration is continued until the power deposited by the RF system matches the power absorbed by the ion trajectories in a global sense. electric field. The solved algebraic system of equations is represented by ill-conditioned 18-diagonal matrix with complex elements. Since early development of the

  18. Plasma-ion-induced Sputtering And Heating Of Titan'S Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2006-09-01

    Plasma-ion-induced sputtering and heating of Titan's atmosphere O.J. Tucker (1), R.E. Johnson (1), M. Michael (1), V.I. Shematovich (1,2) J.H. Luhmann (3), S.A. Ledvina (3) (1) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA (2) Institute of Astronomy RAS, Moscow 109017, Russia, (3) University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere. Atmospheres equivalent in size similar to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that can be employed in interpreting Cassini data at Titan. It is shown that the globally averaged flux of magnetospheric and pickup ions deposit more energy in Titan's upper atmosphere than solar radiation. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated and compared to available Cassini data. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., “ The magnetospheric plasma-driven evolution of satellite atmospheres” Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann,"Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003). 1

  19. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  20. Isotopic mass and alpha heating effects in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Mansfield, D.K.

    1994-09-01

    Sets of similar TFTR discharges with varying amounts of D and T are compared. The T content is altered by varying the mix of D and T NBI at approximately constant total NBI power. The total plasma current, toroidal field, central Z{sub eff}, and wall conditions are very similar in each set. The electron density profiles are approximately similar. The sets contain pairs of discharges with D-only and DT-NBI. Several sets also contain discharges with T-only NBI. The discharges are analyzed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Good agreement with measured parameters is achieved. Profiles are computed for the isotopic mass of the hydrogenic thermal species A, and for the hydrogenic thermal plus beam species A{sub tot}. Their volume averages increase approximately linearly as the fraction of T-NBI power increases, and they are slightly peaked for DT and T-only NBI discharges. The total energy and the total energy confinement time increase approximately linearly with A{sub tot} up to 30%. The beam fraction of the total energy at 0.5 sec of NBI remains relatively constant, {approx} 40--50% as A{sub tot} varies. The thermal ion fraction increases slightly, and the electron fraction decreases. The isotopic and alpha heating effects contribute in roughly equal amounts to the increase in central T{sub e}.

  1. Glass Strengthening via High-Intensity Plasma-Arc Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Harper, David C; Duty, Chad E; Patel, P

    2010-01-01

    The use of a high-intensity plasma-arc lamp was used to irradiate the surface of soda-lime silicate glass tiles to determine if an increase in strength could be achieved. The lamp had a power density of 3500 W/cm2, a processing area of 1 cm x 10 cm, irradiated near-infrared heating at a wavelength between 0.2 1.4 m, and was controlled to unidirectionally sweep across 50-mm-square tiles at a constant speed of 8 mm/s. Ring-on-ring (RoR) equibiaxial flexure and 4 pt uni-directional flexure testings of entire tiles were used to measure and compare failure stress distributions of treated and untreated glass. Even with non-optimized processing conditions, RoR failure stress increased by approximately 25% and the 4 pt bend failure stress increased by approximately 65%. Strengthening was due to a fire-polishing-like mechanism. The arc-lamp heat-treatment caused the location of the strength-limiting flaws in the 4-pt-bend tiles to change; namely, failure initiation occurred on the gage section surface for the treated glass whereas it occurred at a gage section edge for the untreated. Arc-lamp heat-treatment is attractive not only because it provides strengthening, but because it can (non-contact) process large amounts of glass quickly and inexpensively, and is a process that either a glass manufacturer or end-user can readily employ.

  2. Thermodynamics of the interconversion of heat and work via plasma electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-12-15

    Thermodynamics of a system where a group of cold charged particles locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of temperature T and volume V (V{sub P}plasma. The interconversion of plasma heat and mechanical work via isothermal compression/expansion of plasma electric field (associated with charged particles) in a plasma heat pump and ES heat engine cycle is demonstrated. The efficiency of the plasma heat pump is discussed in terms of its power efficiency {eta}{sub P} and is shown to be close to unity

  3. Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, C. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and sweat sodium excretion after chronic exercise and heat acclimation was investigated, using subjects exercised, at 40 C and 45 percent humidity, for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days at 45 percent of their maximal oxygen uptake. The data indicate that, following heat acclimation, plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease, and that the eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augmented through exercise and heat acclimation.

  4. LHCD and ICRF heating experiments in H-mode plasmas on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2014-02-12

    An ICRF system with power up to 6.0 MW and a LHCD system up to 4MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments on EAST. Intensive lithium wall coating was intensively used to reduce particle recycling and Hydrogen concentration in Deuterium plasma, which is needed for effective ICRF and LHCD power absorption in high density plasmas. Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHW current drive for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. In 2010, H-mode was generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing launcher mouth were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas at high density of H-modes. During the last two experimental campaigns, ICRF Heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H Minority Heating (H-MH) mode, where electrons are predominantly heated by collisions with high energy minority ions. The H-MH mode gave the best plasma performance, and realized H-mode alone in 2012. Combination of ICRF and LHW power injection generated the H-mode plasmas with various ELMy characteristics. The first successful application of the ICRF Heating in the D (He3) plasma was also achieved. The progress on ICRF heating, LHCD experiments and their application in achieving H-mode operation from last two years will be discussed in this report.

  5. Heating of ions by low-frequency Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Chuanfei; Paty, Carol S.

    2011-03-15

    In the solar atmosphere, the chromospheric and coronal plasmas are much hotter than the visible photosphere. The heating of the solar atmosphere, including the partially ionized chromosphere and corona, remains largely unknown. In this letter, we demonstrate that the ions can be substantially heated by Alfven waves with very low frequencies in partially ionized low-beta plasmas. This differs from other Alfven wave related heating mechanisms such as ion-neutral collisional damping of Alfven waves and heating described by previous work on resonant Alfven wave heating. We find that the nonresonant Alfven wave heating is less efficient in partially ionized plasmas than when there are no ion-neutral collisions, and the heating efficiency depends on the ratio of the ion-neutral collision frequency to the ion gyrofrequency.

  6. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  7. Plasma heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Quest, K. B.; Tanaka, M.; Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    Heating at collisionless shocks due to the kinetic cross-field streaming instability, which is the finite beta (ratio of plasma to magnetic pressure) extension of the modified two stream instability, is studied. Heating rates are derived from quasi-linear theory and compared with results from particle simulations to show that electron heating relative to ion heating and heating parallel to the magnetic field relative to perpendicular heating for both the electrons and ions increase with beta. The simulations suggest that electron dynamics determine the saturation level of the instability, which is manifested by the formation of a flattop electron distribution parallel to the magnetic field. As a result, both the saturation levels of the fluctuations and the heating rates decrease sharply with beta. Applications of these results to plasma heating in simulations of shocks and the earth's bow shock are described.

  8. Heating dynamics and extreme ultraviolet radiation emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-06-28

    The impact of 1.064 mum laser absorption depth on the heating and in-band (2% bandwidth) 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emissions in Sn plasmas is investigated experimentally and numerically. In-band emission lasting longer than the laser pulse and separation between the laser absorption and in-band emission region are observed. Maximum efficiency is achieved by additional heating of the core of the plasma to allow the optimal temperature to expand to a lower and more optically thin density. This leads to higher temperature plasma that emits less in-band light as compared to CO{sub 2} produced plasma sources for the same application.

  9. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  10. The Development of RF Heating of Magnetically Confined Deuterium-Tritium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; R. Majeski; S. Bernabei

    1999-06-01

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q = 0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed.

  11. The development of RF heating of magnetically confined deuterium-tritium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J. C.; Bemabei, S.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson the TFTR Team, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    The experimental and theoretical development of ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating (ICRF) in toroidal magnetically-confined plasmas recently culminated with the demonstration of ICRF heating of D-T plasmas, first in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and then in the Joint European Torus (JET). Various heating schemes based on the cyclotron resonances between the plasma ions and the applied ICRF waves have been used, including second harmonic tritium, minority deuterium, minority helium-3, mode conversion at the D-T ion-ion hybrid layer, and ion Bernstein wave heating. Second harmonic tritium heating was first shown to be effective in a reactor-grade plasma in TFTR. D-minority heating on JET has led to the achievement of Q=0.22, the ratio of fusion power produced to RF power input, sustained over a few energy confinement times. In this paper, some of the key building blocks in the development of rf heating of plasmas are reviewed and prospects for the development of advanced methods of plasma control based on the application of rf waves are discussed. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Plasma self-heating and saturation due to numerical instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.; Maron, N.

    1980-06-01

    The cold-beam nonphysical instability due to the aliases produced by the numerical spatial grid is presented in detail for momentum-conserving linear weighting codes. Additions to previous work include: linear analysis dispersion diagrams showing large growth rates, ..omega../sub i/< or =0.2 ..omega../sub p/; methods for reducing ..omega../sub i/, effectively broadening the finite-size particle width; simulation results verifying the linear theory, plus plots showing the p=1 alias in phase space (..nu../sub x/, x); the growth of beam, thermal spread (..nu../sub t//sup 2/ in temperature) an loss of energy conservation; end-of-growth (saturation at small thermal spread (lambda/sub D//..delta..x=upsilon/sub t//..omega../sub p/..delta..xapprox. =0.046, for lambda/sub B//..delta..xequivalent upsilon/sub 0//..omega../sub p/..delta..x> or =0.3, i.e., upsilon/sub t/< or =0.14upsilon/sub 0/), with return to near energy conservation (stability); demonstration of no growth for a warm beam, with upsilon/sub t/(initial)> or =upsilon/sub t/(saturation); and the mechanism of stabilization (trapping). A thermal (Maxwellian) plasma, also nonphysically unstable at small lambda/sub D//..delta..x, is also found to approach stabilization by self-heating. The two-stream physical instability is affected by the grid, with the aliasing instability also present; the linear theory for this is presented, with guidelines for minimizing the effects of the grid.

  13. Electron heating in radio-frequency capacitively coupled atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. W.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2008-12-29

    In atmospheric-pressure plasmas the main electron heating mechanism is Ohmic heating, which has distinct spatial and temporal evolutions in the {alpha} and {gamma} modes. In {gamma} discharges, ionizing avalanches in the sheaths are initiated not only by secondary electrons but also by metastable pooling reactions. In {alpha} discharges, heating takes place at the sheath edges and in contrast with low-pressure plasmas, close to 50% of the power absorbed by the electrons is absorbed at the edge of the retreating sheaths. This heating is due to a field enhancement caused by the large collisionality in atmospheric-pressure discharges.

  14. Multiple ionization of metal ions by ECR heating of electrons in vacuum arc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Zorin, V. G.; Razin, S. V.; Vizir, A. V.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2004-05-01

    A joint research and development effort has been initiated, whose ultimate goal is the enhancement of the mean ion charge states in vacuum arc metal plasmas by a combination of a vacuum arc discharge and electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating. Metal plasma was generated by a special vacuum arc mini-gun. Plasma was pumped by high frequency gyrotron-generated microwave radiation. The results have demonstrated substantial multiple ionization of metal ions. For a lead plasma, ECR heating increased the maximum attainable ion charge state from Pb2+ up to Pb6+. The confinement parameter was as high as ˜109 cm-3 s. Further increase of the ion charge states will be attained by increasing the vacuum arc plasma density and optimizing the ECR heating conditions.

  15. Thin Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Canu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  16. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  17. MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1963-08-20

    More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

  18. Improving the efficiency of plasma heat treatment of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdrakhmanov, Az T.; Israphilov, I. H.; Galiakbarov, A. T.; Samigullin, A. D.; Gabdrakhmanov, Al T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective way of the plasma hardening the surface layer at the expense combined influence of the plasma jet and a cold air flow. After that influence occurs a distinctive by plasma treatment microstructure with increased microhardness (an increase of 35%) and depth. There is proposed an improved design of the vortex tube for receiving the air flow with a temperature of 20 C to - 120C.

  19. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding.

    PubMed

    van Eden, G G; Morgan, T W; Aussems, D U B; van den Berg, M A; Bystrov, K; van de Sanden, M C M

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants. PMID:27081983

  20. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Morgan, T. W.; Aussems, D. U. B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants.

  1. Density and temperature scaling of disorder-induced heating in ultracold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, S. D.; Denning, A.; Lyon, M.; Robicheaux, F.

    2011-02-15

    We report measurements and simulations of disorder-induced heating in ultracold neutral plasmas. Fluorescence from plasma ions is excited using a detuned probe laser beam while the plasma relaxes from its initially disordered nonequilibrium state. This method probes the wings of the ion velocity distribution. The simulations yield information on time-evolving plasma parameters that are difficult to measure directly and make it possible to connect the fluorescence signal to the rms velocity distribution. The disorder-induced heating signal can be used to estimate the electron and ion temperatures {approx}100 ns after the plasma is created. This is particularly interesting for plasmas in which the electron and ion temperatures are not known.

  2. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  3. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  4. Electron heating via self-excited plasma series resonance in geometrically symmetric multi-frequency capacitive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüngel, E.; Brandt, S.; Donkó, Z.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Schulze, J.

    2015-08-01

    The self-excitation of plasma series resonance (PSR) oscillations plays an important role in the electron heating dynamics in capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) plasmas. In a combined approach of PIC/MCC simulations and a theoretical model based on an equivalent circuit, we investigate the self-excitation of PSR oscillations and their effect on the electron heating in geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas driven by multiple consecutive harmonics. The discharge symmetry is controlled via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), i.e. by varying the total number of harmonics and tuning the phase shifts between them. It is demonstrated that PSR oscillations will be self-excited under both symmetric and asymmetric conditions, if (i) the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths deviates from a simple quadratic behavior and (ii) the inductance of the plasma bulk exhibits a temporal modulation. These two effects have been neglected up to now, but we show that they must be included in the model in order to properly describe the nonlinear series resonance circuit and reproduce the self-excitation of PSR oscillations, which are observed in the electron current density resulting from simulations of geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas. Furthermore, the effect of PSR self-excitation on the discharge current and the plasma properties, such as the potential profile, is illustrated by applying Fourier analysis. High-frequency oscillations in the entire spectrum between the applied frequencies and the local electron plasma frequency are observed. As a consequence, the electron heating is strongly enhanced by the presence of PSR oscillations. A complex electron heating dynamics is found during the expansion phase of the sheath, which is fully collapsed, when the PSR is initially self-excited. The nonlinear electron resonance heating (NERH) associated with the PSR oscillations causes a spatial asymmetry in the electron heating. By discussing the resulting ionization

  5. Coupled interactions between tungsten surfaces and transient high-heat-flux deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, S.; Uesugi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental studies on the interactions between transient deuterium-plasma heat pulses and tungsten surfaces were carried out in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal response in a compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology-Plasma Irradiation Device). Firstly, electron-emission-induced surface-temperature increase is discussed in the surface-temperature range near tungsten's melting point, which is accomplished by controlling the sheath voltage and power transmission factor. Secondly, anomalous penetration of tungsten atomic efflux into the surrounding plasma was observed in addition to a normal layered population; it is discussed in terms of the effect of substantial tungsten influx into the deuterium plasma, which causes dissipation of plasma electron energy. Thirdly, a momentum input from pulsed plasma onto a tungsten target was observed visually. The force is estimated numerically by the accelerated ion flow to the target as well as the reaction of tungsten-vapour efflux. Finally, a discussion follows on the effects of the plasma heat pulses on the morphology of tungsten surface (originally a helium-induced ‘fuzzy’ nanostructure). A kind of bifurcated effect is obtained: melting and annealing. Open questions remain for all the phenomena observed, although sheath-voltage-dependent plasma-heat input may be a key parameter. Discussions on all these phenomena are provided by considering their implications to tokamak fusion devices.

  6. Stochastic Ion Heating from Many Overlapping Laser Beams in Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Rozmus, W.; Williams, E. A.; Divol, L.; Berger, R. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (∝N2) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm3-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ˜4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems.

  7. Spatiotemporal evolution of ponderomotive electron heating in axially inhomogeneous collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sharma, A.

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a Gaussian laser pulse in preformed collisionless plasma subjected to an axial nonuniformity in the plasma density. In order to follow up the pulse dynamics, a nonlinear Schrödinger wave equation characterizing the beam spot size in space and time frame has been derived and solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics as the pulse advances in the plasma. The effect of inhomogeneity on focusing length and ponderomotive electron heating have been analyzed and illustrated graphically. It is seen that ponderomotive heating is quite sensitive to the inhomogeneity parameters and the energy gain by electrons can be optimized by suitable choice of parameters.

  8. Stochastic ion heating from many overlapping laser beams in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Rozmus, W; Williams, E A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Town, R P J; Glenzer, S H; Callahan, D A

    2012-11-01

    In this Letter, we show through numerical simulations and analytical results that overlapping multiple (N) laser beams in plasmas can lead to strong stochastic ion heating from many (~N(2)) electrostatic perturbations driven by beat waves between pairs of laser beams. For conditions typical of inertial-confinement-fusion experiment conditions, hundreds of such beat waves are driven in mm(3)-scale plasmas, leading to ion heating rates of several keV/ns. This mechanism saturates cross-beam energy transfer, with a reduction of linear gains by a factor ~4-5 and can strongly modify the overall hydrodynamics evolution of such laser-plasma systems. PMID:23215392

  9. Generalized parallel heat transport equations in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawaideh, Emad; Kim, N. S.; Najmabadi, Farrokh

    1988-11-01

    A new set of two-fluid heat-transport equations for heat conduction in collisional to weakly collisional plasmas was derived on the basis of gyrokinetic equations in flux coordinates. In these equations, no restrictions on the anisotropy of the ion distribution function or the collisionality are imposed. In the highly collisional limit, these equations reduce to the classical heat conduction equation of Spitzer and Haerm (1953), while in the weakly collisional limit, they describe a saturated heat flux. Numerical examples comparing these equations with conventional heat transport equations are presented.

  10. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  11. Effect of axial finiteness on electron heating in low-frequency inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aman-ur-Rehman; Pu, Y.-K.

    2006-10-15

    Total power absorption inside the plasma (by taking the thermal motion of the electrons into account) has been calculated using different inductively coupled plasma models. The comparison shows that in the low-frequency region the results of the semi-infinite plasma models are different from those of the finite-length plasma models. The semi-infinite plasma models show net reduction of heating in the low-frequency region, due to thermal motion of the electrons from inside the skin region to outside the skin region. The finite-length plasma models on the other hand (due to change in the skin depth owing to the boundary condition of E=0 at z=L, and reflection of electrons from the plasma boundary) show that the decrease in heating due to the motion of the electrons from inside the skin depth to outside the skin depth is recovered by the reflection of the electrons from the plasma boundary. Hence, it is concluded that the results of the semi-infinite plasma models presented by Tyshetskiy et al. [Phys Rev. Lett. 90, 255002 (2003)] can be misleading (in the low-frequency region), since they overlooked the effect of axial finiteness of the plasma.

  12. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  13. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  14. The behavior of neutron emissions during ICRF minority heating of plasma at EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Cao, Hongrui; Hu, Liqun; Zhou, Ruijie; Xiao, Min; Li, Kai; Pu, Neng; Huang, Juan; Liu, Guangzhu; Lin, Shiyao; Lyu, Bo; Liu, Haiqing; Zhang, Xinjun; EAST Team

    2016-07-01

    Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) wave heating is a primary method to heat ions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Through neutron diagnostics, effective ion heating was observed in hydrogenminority heating (MH) scenarios. At present, investigation of deuterium–deuterium (DD) fusion neutrons is mostly based on time-resolved flux monitor and spectrometer measurements. When the ICRF was applied, the neutron intensity became one order higher. The H/H  +  D ratio was in the range of 5–10%, corresponding to the hydrogen MH dominated scenario, and a strong high energy tail was not displayed on the neutron spectrum that was measured by a liquid scintillator. Moreover, ion temperature in the plasma center (T i) was inversely calculated by the use of neutron source strength (S n) and the plasma density based on classical fusion reaction equations. This result indicates that T i increases by approximately 30% in L-mode plasma, and by more than 50% in H-mode plasma during ICRF heating, which shows good agreement with x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) diagnostics. Finally, the DD neutron source strength scaling law, with regard to plasma current (I P) and ICRF coupling power (P RF) on the typical minority heating condition, was obtained by statistical analysis.

  15. Fast wave heating and current drive in tokamak plasmas with negative central shear

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Petty, C.C.; Baity, F.W.

    1996-07-01

    Fast waves provide an excellent tool for heating electrons and driving current in the central region of tokamak plasmas. In this paper, we report the use of centrally peaked electron heating and current drive to study transport in plasmas with negative central shear (NCS). Tokamak plasmas with NCS offer the potential of reduced energy transport and improved MHD stability properties, but will require non-inductive current drive to maintain the required current profiles. Fast waves, combined with neutral beam injection, provide the capability to change the central current density evolution and independently vary {ital T{sub e}}, and {ital T{sub i}} for transport studies in these plasmas. Electron heating also reduces the collisional heat exchange between electrons and ions and reduces the power deposition from neutral beams into electrons, thus improving the certainty in the estimate of the electron heating. The first part of this paper analyzes electron and ion heat transport in the L-mode phase of NCS plasmas as the current profile resistively evolves. The second part of the paper discusses the changes that occur in electron as well as ion energy transport in this phase of improved core confinement associated with NCS.

  16. Strong RF Heating in a Mirror During Plasma Build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Moiseenko, V. E.; Dreval, N. B.; Aagren, O.; Stepanov, K. N.; Tereshin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Kalinin, P. V.

    2007-09-28

    A heating method of partially onized plasma has been described in Ref. [1]. It exploits the collisional damping of the fast waves that is high owing to charge exchange collisions. Since the time of heating is limited by the duration of neutral gas ionization, the heating needs to be strong enough to achieve a high final ion temperature. This heating method has been studied numerically in the framework of the MHD approximaton in inhomogeneous cylindrical plasma. The influences of the ratio of the mean free path of the neutral atoms to the plasma radius, the initial ions concentration, the characteristics of the interaction of the neutral atoms with the chamber wall and of other parameters on the plasma heating dynamics are examined. A scenario of RF plasma heating in one of the central cells of the multi-mirror device GOL-3 at Novosibirsk in Russia is theoretically developed, in which the final ion temperature exceeds the ion oscilation energy in the RF field by one order of magnitude.

  17. High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Yang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2004-08-01

    High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on carbon substrates have been studied by annealing and cyclic heat loading. The recrystallization temperature and an activation energy QR=126 kJ/mol for grain growth of tungsten coating by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) were estimated, and the microstructural changes of multi-layer tungsten and rhenium interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) with anneal temperature were investigated. Cyclic load tests indicated that pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating could withstand 1000 cycles at 33-35 MW/m 2 heat flux and 3 s pulse duration, and inert gas plasma spray (IPS)-tungsten coating showed local cracks by 300 cycles but did not induce failure by further cycles. However, the failure of pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating by fatigue cracking was observed under higher heat load (55-60 MW/m 2) for 420 and 230 cycles, respectively.

  18. "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores Heated by Single Nanoflares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Will Thomas; Cargill, Peter; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    We use hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code, to investigate the properties expected of "hot" (i.e. between 106.7 and 107.2 K) non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions. Here we focus on single nanoflares and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between 1 MK and 10 MK. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  19. Impact of combined hydrogen plasma and transient heat loads on the performance of tungsten as plasma facing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, M.; Bardin, S.; Huber, A.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Morgan, T. W.; Pintsuk, G.; Reinhart, M.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments were performed in three different facilities in order to investigate the impact of combined steady state deuterium plasma exposure and ELM-like thermal shock events on the performance of ultra high purity tungsten. The electron beam facility JUDITH 1 was used to simulate pure thermal loads. In addition the linear plasma devices PSI-2 and Pilot-PSI have been used for successive as well as simultaneous exposure where the transient heat loads were applied by a high energy laser and the pulsed plasma operation, respectively. The results show that the damage behaviour strongly depends on the loading conditions and the sequence of the particle and heat flux exposure. This is due to hydrogen embrittlement and/or a higher defect concentration in the tungsten near surface region due to supersaturation of hydrogen. The different results in terms of damage formation from both linear plasma devices indicate that also the plasma parameters such as particle energy, flux and fluence, plasma impurities and the pulse shape have a strong influence on the damage performance. In addition, the different loading methods such as the scanning with the electron beam in contrast to the homogeneous exposure by the laser leads to an faster increase of the surface roughness due to plastic deformation.

  20. Multiple Ionization Of Metal Ions By ECR Heating Of Electrons In Vacuum Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Razin, S. V.; Savkin, K. P.

    2005-03-01

    A joint research and development effort has been initiated, whose ultimate goal is the enhancement the mean ion charge states in vacuum arc metal plasmas by a combination of a vacuum arc discharge and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating. Metal plasma was generated by a special vacuum arc mini-gun and injected into mirror magnetic trap. Plasma was pumped by high frequency gyrotron-generated microwave radiation (frequency 37.5 GHz, max power 100 kW, pulse duration 1.5 ms). Using of powerful microwaves makes it possible to sustain sufficient temperature of electrons needed for multiple ionizations at high plasma density (more then 1013 cm-3). Parameter of multiple ionization efficiency Neτi, where Ne is plasma density, τi, is ion lifetime, in such a case could reach rather high value ˜109 cm-3-s. In our situation τi = Ltrap/Vi, where Ltrap is trap length, Vi is plasma gun flow velocity. The results have demonstrated substantial multiple ionization of metal ions (including metals with high melting temperature). For a metal (lead, platinum) plasma, ECR heating shifted the average ion charge up to 5+. Further increase of the ion charge states will be attained by increasing the vacuum arc plasma density and optimizing the ECR heating conditions.

  1. Simulating Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating in Kinetic and Dielectric Plasma Models with VORPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roark, Christine; Smithe, David; Stoltz, Peter; Tech-X Corporation Team

    2011-10-01

    We present results of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a plasma sustained by microwaves using VORPAL. Specifically, we look at the electron temperature, sheath size, rate of plasma formation and power absorbed for simulations with an argon gas at 10s of mTorr pressure and 2.45 GHz. We look at the effects of including elastic, inelastic and ionizing Monte Carlo collisions on the formation of the kinetic plasma. We also discuss the use of higher-order particle algorithms for smoothing out the particle current and charge which can help reduce unphysical heating in PIC simulations of high pressure, low temperature plasmas and the effect this has on sheath size and electron temperature. We then compare these simulations to a method replacing the kinetic particles with an equivalent plasma dielectric model.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  3. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, S.F.; Mendonça, V.A.; Teles, M.C.; Ribeiro, V.G.C.; Tossige-Gomes, R.; Neves, C.D.C.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Leite, L.H.R.; Soares, D.D.; Coimbra, C.C.; Lacerda, A.C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H) and 8 normotensive (N) subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively). They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C) followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity). Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP). Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05), although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1) and lower TBARS (P<0.01) and FRAP (P<0.05) levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors), present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response. PMID:26840715

  4. Self-diffusion in a stochastically heated two-dimensional dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion in a two-dimensional dusty plasma liquid (i.e., a Yukawa liquid) is studied experimentally. The dusty plasma liquid is heated stochastically by a surrounding three-dimensional toroidal dusty plasma gas which acts as a thermal reservoir. The measured dust velocity distribution functions are isotropic Maxwellians, giving a well-defined kinetic temperature. The mean-square displacement for dust particles is found to increase linearly with time, indicating normal diffusion. The measured diffusion coefficients increase approximately linearly with temperature. The effective collision rate is dominated by collective dust–dust interactions rather than neutral gas drag, and is comparable to the dusty-plasma frequency.

  5. Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2014-08-15

    The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific

  6. Confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Bretz, N.L.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Boyd, D.; Bush, C.E.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.

    1985-03-01

    Systematic scans of density in large deuterium plasmas (a = 0.83 m) at several values of plasma current and toroidal magnetic field strength indicate that the total energy confinement time, tau/sub E/, is proportional to the line-average density anti n/sub e/ and the limiter q. Confinement times of approx. 0.3 s have been observed for anti n/sub e/ = 2.8 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/. Plasma size scaling experiments with plasmas of minor radii a = 0.83, 0.69, 0.55, and 0.41 m at constant limiter q reveal a confinement dependence on minor radius. The major-radius dependence of tau/sub E/, based on a comparison between TFTR and PLT results, is consistent with R/sup 2/ scaling. From the power balance, the thermal diffusivity chi/sub e/ is found to be significantly less than the INTOR value. In the a = 0.41 m plasmas, saturation of confinement is due to neoclassical ion conduction (chi/sub i/ neoclassical >> chi/sub e/).

  7. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  8. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction. PMID:26628137

  9. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  10. The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieser, W.; Hensler, G.

    2007-09-01

    Context: The interstellar medium contains warm clouds that are embedded in a hot dilute gas produced by supernovae. Because both gas phases are in contact, an interface forms where mass and energy are exchanged. Whether heat conduction leads to evaporation of these clouds or whether condensation dominates has been analytically derived. Both phases behave differently dynamically so that their relative motion has to be taken into account. Aims: Real clouds in static conditions that experience saturated heat conduction are stabilized against evaporation if self-gravity and cooling play a role. Here, we investigte to what extent heat conduction can hamper the dynamical disruption of clouds embedded in a streaming hot plasma. Methods: To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Results: Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the streaming plasma and the cloud, so that the timescale for the onset of KH instabilities increases, and the surface of the cloud becomes less susceptible to KH instabilities. The stabilisation effect of heat conduction against KH

  11. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  12. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Yu; Unno, Yasuko; Okazaki, Ken

    2001-12-01

    Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas were investigated extensively through energy balance analysis, emission spectroscopy of the rotational band of CH (A2Δ→X2Π), and gas chromatographic analysis. Two plasma sources were examined: methane-fed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APG). The DBD features filamentary microdischarges accompanied by surface discharge along a dielectric barrier. As a result, 60% of the input power was measured as heat transfer to the dielectric electrode, whereas 20% was to the metallic electrode. Consequently, feed gas average temperature was increased only by 20-40 K. On the other hand, rotational temperature of the corresponding emission region exceeded average gas temperature by 100 K. In APG, heat transfer to electrodes was dominated by formation of negative glow regardless of whether the electrode was covered by a dielectric. However, negative glow tended to be thinner and more intense when it formed on a metallic electrode, leading to slightly higher metallic heating. Rotational temperature in APG was close to average gas temperature since APG does not show radial localization of plasma. Energy efficiency for methane decomposition process to produce ethane, ethylene, and hydrogen was about 1% regardless of the plasma source. Energy distribution and heat transfer mechanisms depend strongly on the plasma spatial structure rather than flow fields or feed gas physical properties.

  13. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  14. Predictions of Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-01-06

    Predictions of alpha heating in L-mode and H-mode DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The baseline toroidal field of 5.3 T, plasma current ramped to 15 MA and a flat electron density profile ramped to Greenwald fraction 0.85 are assumed. Various combinations of external heating by negative ion neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance, and electron cyclotron resonance are assumed to start half-way up the density ramp. The time evolution of plasma temperatures and, for some cases, toroidal rotation are predicted assuming GLF23 and boundary parameters. Significant toroidal rotation and flow-shearing rates are predicted by GLF23 even in the L-mode phase with low boundary temperatures, and the alpha heating power is predicted to be significant if the power threshold for the transition to H-mode is higher than the planned total heating power. The alpha heating is predicted to be 8-76 MW in L-mode at full density. External heating mixes with higher beam injection power have higher alpha heating power. Alternatively if the toroidal rotation is predicted assuming that the ratio of the momentum to thermal ion energy conductivity is 0.5, the flow-shearing rate is predicted to have insignificant effects on the GLF23- predicted temperatures, and alpha heating is predicted to be 8-20 MW. In H-mode plasmas the alpha heating is predicted to depend sensitively on the assumed pedestal temperatures. Cases with fusion gain greater than 10 are predicted to have alpha heating greater than 80 MW.

  15. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, Amelia; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick

    2015-10-01

    A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls. For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  16. Reduction of trapped-ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Robert; Bruzewicz, Colin; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-08-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Although the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that noise due to surface contaminants is the limiting heating mechanism in some instances. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of 4 in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  17. Beam heated linear theta-pinch device for producing hot plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bohachevsky, Ihor O.

    1981-01-01

    A device for producing hot plasmas comprising a single turn theta-pinch coil, a fast discharge capacitor bank connected to the coil, a fuel element disposed along the center axis of the coil, a predetermined gas disposed within the theta-pinch coil, and a high power photon, electron or ion beam generator concentrically aligned to the theta-pinch coil. Discharge of the capacitor bank generates a cylindrical plasma sheath within the theta-pinch coil which heats the outer layer of the fuel element to form a fuel element plasma layer. The beam deposits energy in either the cylindrical plasma sheath or the fuel element plasma layer to assist the implosion of the fuel element to produce a hot plasma.

  18. Rapid heating of a strongly coupled plasma at the solid-liquid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, M. J.; Hasegawa, T.; Bollinger, J. J.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2004-11-01

    Between 10^4 and 10^6 ^9Be^+ ions are trapped in a 4.5 Tesla Penning trap and laser-cooled to ˜1 mK, where the ions form a crystalline plasma with an interparticle spacing of ˜20 μm. This system is a realization of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. Using Doppler laser spectroscopy on a single-photon transition, we measured the temperature and heating rate of this plasma when not being laser-cooled. We measured a slow heating rate of ≤ 100 mK/s due to residual gas collisions for the first 100-200 ms after turning off the cooling laser. This slow heating is followed by a rapid heating to 1-2 K in 100 ms as the plasma undergoes the solid-liquid phase transition at T=10 mK (Γ ˜ 170). We will present evidence that this rapid heating is due to a sudden release of energy from weakly cooled degrees of freedom involving the cyclotron motion of trapped impurity ions. We will also discuss the prospects for observing the latent heat associated with the phase transition.

  19. Characterization of Heat-Wave Propagation through Laser-Driven Ti-Doped Underdense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Ohnishi, N; Fournier, K B; Fujioka, S; Iwamae, A; Hansen, S B; Nagai, K; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Mima, K

    2009-02-23

    The propagation of a laser-driven heat-wave into a Ti-doped aerogel target was investigated. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature was derived by means of Ti K-shell x-ray spectroscopy, and compared with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations. Reasonable agreement was obtained in the early stage of the heat-wave propagation. In the later phase, laser absorption, the propagation of the heat wave, and hydrodynamic motion interact in a complex manner, and the plasma is mostly re-heated by collision and stagnation at the target central axis.

  20. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-01

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  1. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Wu Zhengwei; Cao Jintao; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-15

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  2. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  3. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  4. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  5. Observation of Ion Acceleration and Heating during Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E.

    2012-12-10

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high pressure downstream region.

  6. A quantitative model for heat pulse propagation across large helical device plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Dendy, R. O.; Chapman, S. C.; Inagaki, S.

    2015-06-01

    It is known that rapid edge cooling of magnetically confined plasmas can trigger heat pulses that propagate rapidly inward. These can result in large excursion, either positive or negative, in the electron temperature at the core. A set of particularly detailed measurements was obtained in Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas [S. Inagaki et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 52, 075002 (2010)], which are considered here. By applying a travelling wave transformation, we extend the model of Dendy et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 55, 115009 (2013), which successfully describes the local time-evolution of heat pulses in these plasmas, to include also spatial dependence. The new extended model comprises two coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the (x, t) evolution of the deviation from steady state of two independent variables: the excess electron temperature gradient and the excess heat flux, both of which are measured in the LHD experiments. The mathematical structure of the model equations implies a formula for the pulse velocity, defined in terms of plasma quantities, which aligns with empirical expectations and is within a factor of two of the measured values. We thus model spatio-temporal pulse evolution, from first principles, in a way which yields as output the spatiotemporal evolution of the electron temperature, which is also measured in detail in the experiments. We compare the model results against LHD datasets using appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Sensitivity of this nonlinear model with respect to plasma parameters, initial conditions, and boundary conditions is also investigated. We conclude that this model is able to match experimental data for the spatio-temporal evolution of the temperature profiles of these pulses, and their propagation velocities, across a broad radial range from r /a ≃0.5 to the plasma core. The model further implies that the heat pulse may be related mathematically to soliton solutions of the

  7. Excitation of kinetic Alfven waves by resonant mode conversion and longitudinal heating of magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Motohiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, A.

    1989-01-01

    The excitation of the kinetic Alfven wave by resonant mode conversion and longitudinal heating of the plasma by the kinetic Alfven wave were demonstrated on the basis of a macroscale particle simulation. The longitudinal electron current was shown to be cancelled by the ions. The kinetic Alfven wave produced an ordered motion of the plasma particles in the wave propagation direction. The electrons were pushed forward along the ambient magnetic field by absorbing the kinetic Alfven wave through the Landau resonance.

  8. Production of a large diameter hot-electron plasma by electron cyclotron resonance heating

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1982-05-01

    A large diameter hot-electron plasma is produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating, using a slotted Lisitano coil as a launcher. It is found from detailed measurements of the plasma parameters that n/sub e/< or approx. =3 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub e/< or approx. =40 eV, with a diameter roughly-equal14 cm. High-energy tails with temperatures of more than 100 eV are observed.

  9. Production of a large diameter hot-electron plasma by electron cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Y.; Sakamoto, K.

    1982-05-01

    A large diameter hot-electron plasma is produced by electron cyclotron resonance heating, using a slotted Lisitano coil as a launcher. It is found from detailed measurements of the plasma parameters that ne≲3×1011 cm-3 and Te≲40 eV, with a diameter ≊14 cm. High-energy tails with temperatures of more than 100 eV are observed.

  10. Collisionless electron heating in periodic arrays of inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnetzki, U.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2014-12-15

    A novel mechanism of collisionless heating in large planar arrays of small inductive coils operated at radio frequencies is presented. In contrast to the well-known case of non-local heating related to the transversal conductivity, when the electrons move perpendicular to the planar coil, we investigate the problem of electrons moving in a plane parallel to the coils. Two types of periodic structures are studied. Resonance velocities where heating is efficient are calculated analytically by solving the Vlasov equation. Certain scaling parameters are identified. The concept is further investigated by a single particle simulation based on the ergodic principle and combined with a Monte Carlo code allowing for collisions with Argon atoms. Resonances, energy exchange, and distribution functions are obtained. The analytical results are confirmed by the numerical simulation. Pressure and electric field dependences are studied. Stochastic heating is found to be most efficient when the electron mean free path exceeds the size of a single coil cell. Then the mean energy increases approximately exponentially with the electric field amplitude.

  11. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  12. Development of a 100 kW plasma torch for plasma assisted combustion of low heating value fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takali, S.; Fabry, F.; Rohani, V.; Cauneau, F.; Fulcheri, L.

    2014-11-01

    Most thermal power plants need an auxiliary power source to (i) heat-up the boiler during start up phases before reaching autonomy power and (ii) sustain combustion at low load. This supplementary power is commonly provided with high LHV fossil fuel burners which increases operational expenses and disables the use of anti-pollutant filters. A Promising alternative is under development and consists in high temperature plasma assisted AC electro-burners. In this paper, the development of a new 100 kW three phase plasma torch with graphite electrodes is detailed. This plasma torch is working at atmospheric pressure with air as plasma gas and has three-phase power supply and working at 680 Hz. The nominal air flow rate is 60 Nm3.h-1 and the outlet gas temperature is above 2 500 K. At the beginning, graphite electrodes erosion by oxidizing medium was studied and controlling parameters were identified through parametric set of experiments and tuned for optimal electrodes life time. Then, a new 3-phase plasma torch design was modelled and simulated on ANSYS platform. The characteristics of the plasma flow and its interaction with the environing elements of the torch are detailed hereafter.

  13. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Heat Transfer Between a Plasma Jet and a Metal Surface in a Cut Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veremeichik, A. N.; Sazonov, M. I.; Khvisevich, V. M.; Tsyganov, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Investigations are presented of the formation of a plasma jet and of the current-density and heat-flux distributions in the process of metal cutting along the cut cavity with direct and reverse polarities of the plasmatron connection. The study of the specific features of heat transfer of the arc with the surface of the cut cavity was carried out on the basis of the developed plasma unit which makes it possible to model the technological process of separating metal cutting. A sectional cut model is proposed which can be used to work out and optimize the methods of determination of cutting parameters.

  15. Development of fast steering mirror control system for plasma heating and diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, K. Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Ogasawara, S.; Nishiura, M.

    2014-11-15

    A control system for a fast steering mirror has been newly developed for the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launchers in the large helical device. This system enables two-dimensional scan during a plasma discharge and provides a simple feedback control function. A board mounted with a field programmable gate array chip has been designed to realize feedback control of the ECH beam position to maintain higher electron temperature by ECH. The heating position is determined by a plasma diagnostic signal related to the electron temperature such as electron cyclotron emission and Thomson scattering.

  16. Development of fast steering mirror control system for plasma heating and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Nishiura, M; Kubo, S; Shimozuma, T; Yoshimura, Y; Igami, H; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, K; Kobayashi, S; Ito, S; Mizuno, Y; Ogasawara, S

    2014-11-01

    A control system for a fast steering mirror has been newly developed for the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launchers in the large helical device. This system enables two-dimensional scan during a plasma discharge and provides a simple feedback control function. A board mounted with a field programmable gate array chip has been designed to realize feedback control of the ECH beam position to maintain higher electron temperature by ECH. The heating position is determined by a plasma diagnostic signal related to the electron temperature such as electron cyclotron emission and Thomson scattering. PMID:25430376

  17. Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-07-18

    There are many uses of predictions of ITER plasma performance. One is assessing requirements of different plasma regimes. For instance, what current drive and control are needed for steady state. The heating, current drive, and torque systems planned for initial DT operation are negative ion neutral beam injection (NB), ion cyclotron resonance (IC), and electron cyclotron resonance (EC). Which combinations of heating are optimal. What are benefits of the torques, current drive, and fueling using NB. What are the shine-through power and optimum voltage for the NB? What are optimal locations and aiming of the EC launchers? Another application is nuclear licensing (e.g. System integrity, how many neutrons).

  18. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating and current drive in deuterium-tritium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; Grek, B.; Hammett, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Hsuan, H.; Ignat, D.; Majeski, R.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.; Rogers, J. H.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J. E.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Zarnstorff, M. C.; Zweben, S. J.; Bush, C. E.; Goldfinger, R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.; Bettenhausen, M.; Lam, N. T.; Scharer, J.; Sund, R.; Sauter, O.

    1995-06-01

    The first experiments utilizing high-power radio waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies to heat deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas have been completed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [Fusion Technol. 21, 13 (1992)]. Results from the initial series of experiments have demonstrated efficient core second harmonic tritium (2ΩT) heating in parameter regimes approaching those anticipated for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor [D. E. Post, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 3, p. 239]. Observations are consistent with modeling predictions for these plasmas. Efficient electron heating via mode conversion of fast waves to ion Bernstein waves has been observed in D-T, deuterium-deuterium (D-D), and deuterium-helium-4 (D-4He) plasmas with high concentrations of minority helium-3 (3He) (n3He/ne≳10%). Mode conversion current drive in D-T plasmas was simulated with experiments conducted in D-3He-4He plasmas. Results show a directed propagation of the mode converted ion Bernstein waves, in correlation with the antenna phasing.

  19. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Siarkowski, M. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

  20. Blood volume and plasma protein responses to heat acclimatization in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, M.H.; Edwards, R.J.; Graveney, M.J.; Cochrane, L.A.; Davies, J.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of heat acclimatization on intravascular volume and protein responses to acute heat stress and exercise were studied in six male subjects. Absolute values for hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were lower after acclimatization, indicating hemodilution. Also, after acclimatization, the magnitude of the hemoconcentration response to exercise in the heat was significantly increased. There was no change in the concentration of plasma protein during or after acclimatization compared with before acclimatization, but there was a net increase in the total intravascular protein content. It is suggested that the hemodilution associated with heat acclimatization may be explained in terms of an increase in the intravascular oncotic pressure following an exercise-induced augmentation of protein, occurring at the expense of the interstitial compartment. It is concluded that this hemodilution is unlikely to be primarily responsible for the cardiovascular adjustment accompanying heat acclimatization and that it should be regarded as a secondary feature of adaptation to heat.

  1. Quasi-linear heating and acceleration in bi-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel M.

    2013-12-15

    Quasi-linear acceleration and heating rates are derived for drifting bi-Maxwellian distribution functions in a general nonrelativistic case for arbitrary wave vectors, propagation angles, and growth/damping rates. The heating rates in a proton-electron plasma due to ion-cyclotron/kinetic Alfvén and mirror waves for a wide range of wavelengths, directions of propagation, and growth or damping rates are explicitly computed.

  2. Plasma measurements of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter in the Venus ionosheath - Evidence for plasma heating near the ionopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-02-01

    A study of the angular spread of plasma fluxes detected in the Venus ionosheath is presented. It is shown that in the inner regions of the ionosheath, where the flux intensity is severely decreased with respect to solar wind values, the width of the azimuthal distribution of the local plasma is comparable to, or even larger than, that of the stronger fluxes measured in the outer ionosheath. The observed variation of the angular width suggests the existence of a source of heating near the ionopause but is not consistent with the overall cooling that would be expected if mass loading and charge exchange collisions were solely responsible for the interaction process at that boundary. Dissipative phenomena associated with local plasma turbulent processes seem to be required to account for the broad angular distributions seen near the ionopause.

  3. Plasma measurements of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter in the Venus ionosheath - Evidence for plasma heating near the ionopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-De-tejada, H.; Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the angular spread of plasma fluxes detected in the Venus ionosheath is presented. It is shown that in the inner regions of the ionosheath, where the flux intensity is severely decreased with respect to solar wind values, the width of the azimuthal distribution of the local plasma is comparable to, or even larger than, that of the stronger fluxes measured in the outer ionospheath. The observed variation of the angular width suggests the existence of a source of heating near the ionopause but is not consistent with the overall cooling that would be expected if mass loading and charge exchange collisions were solely responsible for the interaction process at that boundary. Dissipative phenomene associated with local plasma turbulence processes seem to be required to account for the broad angular distributions seen near the ionopause.

  4. Observation of spontaneous toroidal rotation inversion in Ohmically heated Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bortolon, A; Duval, B P; Pochelon, A; Scarabosio, A

    2006-12-01

    Bulk plasma toroidal rotation is observed to invert spontaneously from counter to cocurrent direction in TCV (Tokamak à Configuration Variable) Ohmically heated discharges, in low confinement mode, without momentum input. The inversion occurs in high current discharges, when the plasma electron density exceeds a well-defined threshold. The transition between the two rotational regimes has been studied by means of density ramps. The results provide evidence of a change of the balance of nondiffusive momentum fluxes in the core of a plasma without an external drive. PMID:17280210

  5. Grazing incidence technique to obtain spatially resolved spectra from laser heated plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behring, W. E.; Underwood, J. H.; Brown, C. M.; Feldman, U.; Seely, John F.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental method is described in which a grazing incidence spectrograph is used to obtain spatially resolved spectra of laser heated plasmas in the 6-370-A region. In the experiment, small target spheres were irradiated by tightly focused laser beams. A tilted grazing incidence elliptical mirror placed 1.3 m from the target focuses the plasma radiation on the spectrograph slit at a distance of 0.7 m producing a useful degree of spatial resolution in the recorded spectral lines. The spectrum from a copper target is presented together with an X-ray pinhole camera image of the plasma.

  6. Generation of plasma rotation by ion cyclotron resonance heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S.; Phillips, C.K.; White, R.; Zweben, S.; Bonoli, P.T.; Rice, J.E.; Greenwald, M.J.; deGrassie, J.

    1999-05-01

    A physical mechanism for generation of a plasma rotation and radial electric field by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is presented in a tokamak geometry. By breaking the omnigenity of resonant ion orbits, ICRH can induce a nonambipolar minor-radial transport of resonant ions. This yields a radial charge separation, a modification to radial electric field E{sub r}, and the generation of plasma rotation. It is estimated that the ICRH fast-wave power available in the present-day tokamak experiments can be large enough to give a significant modification to plasma rotation. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Kinetic dissipation and anisotropic heating in a turbulent collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, T. N.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2009-03-15

    The kinetic evolution of the Orszag-Tang vortex is studied using collisionless hybrid simulations. In magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) this configuration leads rapidly to broadband turbulence. At large length scales, the evolution of the hybrid simulations is very similar to MHD, with magnetic power spectra displaying scaling similar to a Kolmogorov scaling of -5/3. At small scales, differences from MHD arise, as energy dissipates into heat almost exclusively through the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum of the hybrid simulation shows a break where linear theory predicts that the Hall term in Ohm's law becomes significant, leading to dispersive kinetic Alfven waves. A key result is that protons are heated preferentially in the plane perpendicular to the mean magnetic field, creating a proton temperature anisotropy of the type observed in the corona and solar wind.

  8. Dissipative structures in a plasma with volume heat evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, G.A.; Shiryaev, A.A.

    1983-11-01

    We analyzed the system of parabolic equations with a nonlinear and nondiagonal transport-coefficient matrix and with a linear vector-function source. This system of equations corresponds, for example, to an interaction of multicomponent diffusion processes with the volume heat evolution in the cavity of a gas-phase nuclear reactor, a topic which has not been studied previously. This reactor holds promise for the development of power plants. (AIP)

  9. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 < 5 × 1014Wcm-2, v ei versus T e also exhibits so far unnoticed identical anomalous increase as v ei versus Io, even if the conventional k max ∝ v2 th, or k max ∝ v th is chosen. However, for higher T e > 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the

  10. Hot-ion Bernstein wave with large k{sub parallel}

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Ono, M.

    1995-01-01

    The complex roots of the hot plasma dispersion relation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies have been surveyed. Progressing from low to high values of perpendicular wave number k{perpendicular} we find first the cold plasma fast wave and then the well-known Bernstein wave, which is characterized by large dispersion, or large changes in k{perpendicular} for small changes in frequency or magnetic field. At still higher k{perpendicular} there can be two hot plasma waves with relatively little dispersion. The latter waves exist only for relatively large k{parallel}, the wave number parallel to the magnetic field, and are strongly damped unless the electron temperature is low compared to the ion temperature. Up to three mode conversions appear to be possible, but two mode conversions are seen consistently.

  11. Solar wind heavy ions from flare-heated coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Feldman, W. C.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gosling, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    Information concerning the coronal expansion is carried by solar-wind heavy ions. Distinctly different energy-per-charge ion spectra are found in two classes of solar wind having the low kinetic temperatures necessary for E/q resolution of the ion species. Heavy-ion spectra which can be resolved are most frequently observed in the low-speed interstream (IS) plasma found between high speed streams; the streams are thought to originate from coronal holes. Although the sources of the IS plasma are uncertain, the heavy-ion spectra found there contain identifiable peaks of O, Si, and Fe ions. Such spectra indicate that the IS ionization state of O is established in coronal gas at a temperature of approximately 1.6 million K, while that of Fe is frozen in farther out at about 1.5 million K. On occasion anomalous spectra are found outside IS flows in solar wind with abnormally depressed local kinetic temperatures. The anomalous spectra contain Fe(16+) ions, not usually found in IS flows, and the derived coronal freezing-in temperatures are significantly higher. The coronal sources of some of these ionizationally hot flows are identified as solar flares.

  12. Plasma heating, electric fields and plasma flow by electron beam ionospheric injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1990-01-01

    The electric fields and the floating potentials of a Plasma Diagnostics Payload (PDP) located near a powerful electron beam injected from a large sounding rocket into the auroral zone ionosphere have been studied. As the PDP drifted away from the beam laterally, it surveyed a region of hot plasma extending nearly to 60 m radius. Large polarization electric fields transverse to B were imbedded in this hot plasma, which displayed large ELF wave variations and also an average pattern which has led to a model of the plasma flow about the negative line potential of the beam resembling a hydrodynamic vortex in a uniform flow field. Most of the present results are derived from the ECHO 6 sounding rocket mission.

  13. Plasma heating, plasma flow and wave production around an electron beam injected into the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1986-01-01

    A brief historical summary of the Minnesota ECHO series and other relevant electron beam experiments is given. The primary purpose of the ECHO experiments is the use of conjugate echoes as probes of the magnetosphere, but beam-plasma and wave studies were also made. The measurement of quasi-dc electric fields and ion streaming during the ECHO 6 experiment has given a pattern for the plasma flow in the hot plasma region extending to 60m radius about the ECHO 6 electron beam. The sheath and potential well caused by ion orbits is discussed with the aid of a model which fits the observations. ELF wave production in the plasma sheath around the beam is briefly discussed. The new ECHO 7 mission to be launched from the Poker Flat range in November 1987 is described.

  14. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  15. Absolute stability in a collisionless electron-heat-conducting plasma in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Duhau, S.

    1989-02-01

    The dispersion relation obtained from a linear analysis of the hydrodynamic system of equations of Duhau is used to study the behaviour of the fast and slow magnetosonic and entropy modes in an electron-heat-flux-conducting plasma. The evolution of the hydrodynamic modes different from the Alfvén mode are studied as the electron heat flux is increased from zero as well as around the borders of overstable regions, for any anisotropy condition of the ions. The development of the domains of mirror and electron-heat-flux overstabilities are established and the regions of absolute stability are shown

  16. Heat treatment for endocrinological investigations on plasma positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, M R; Knapp, M L; Ghany, H C; Mayne, P D

    1987-01-01

    The effects of heat treatment of serum samples on the hormone analyses used in this laboratory were studied. Total T4, testosterone, progesterone, and growth hormone were not systematically affected by heat treatment over the whole range of analyte concentrations studied; for thyroid stimulating hormone, no effect was noted on serum samples with concentrations of less than 10 mU/l. Significant changes occurred in total T3, cortisol, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and prolactin. It is suggested that with appropriate preliminary study, heat treated plasma samples may be used in endocrinological investigations without adversely affecting the diagnostic validity of the results. PMID:3108328

  17. ECE diagnostic of high temperature ECRH heated plasmas on FTU

    SciTech Connect

    Zerbini, M; Buratti, P; Tudisco, O; Giruzzi, G; Bruschi, A; Cirant, S; Granucci, G; Simonetto, A; Sozzi, C; Gandini, F; Pacella, D; Fournier, K B; Finkenthal, M

    2000-01-31

    The Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic on FTU tokamak is routinely performed with a Michelson interferometer with spectral range extending up to 1300 GHz. The diagnostic allowed accurate electron temperature measurements during the recent 140 Ghz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on FTU. Very accurate measurements have been performed on a wide range of electron temperatures and profile peaking. The ECE measurements have been compared with Thomson Scattering and with observations of X-ray spectra from highly stripped molybdenum ions. The suprathermal emission in these conditions has been studied.

  18. Fast frequency-step-tunable gyrotrons for plasma heating and fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Heikkinen, J.

    1994-11-01

    Usefulness of frequency tunable sources for plasma heating and fusion diagnostics is studied. Applicability of fast frequency-step-tunable gyrotrons for these purposes is examined. A gyrotron based on a coaxial cavity with impedance rod is considered as an example.

  19. Simulation of High Power ICRF Wave Heating in the ITER Burning Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Barrett, R. F.; D'Azevedo, E. F.

    2007-11-01

    ITER relies on Ion-cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) power to heat the plasma to fusion temperatures. To heat effectively, the waves must couple efficiently to the core plasma. Recent simulations using AORSA [1] on the 120 TF Cray XT-4 (Jaguar) at ORNL show that the waves propagate radially inward and are rapidly absorbed with little heating of the plasma edge. AORSA has achieved 87.5 trillion calculations per second (87.5 teraflops) on Jaguar, which is 73 percent of the system's theoretical peak. Three dimensional visualizations show ``hot spots'' near the antenna surface where the wave amplitude is high. AORSA simulations are also being used to study how to best use ICRF to drive plasma currents for optimizing ITER performance and pulse length. Results for Scenario 4 show a maximum current of 0.54 MA for 20 MW of power at 57 MHz. [1] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, E. D'Azevedo, et al., Phys. Plasmas. 8, 1573 (2001).

  20. Extreme degree of ionization in homogenous micro-capillary plasma columns heated by ultrafast current pulses.

    PubMed

    Avaria, G; Grisham, M; Li, J; Tomasel, F G; Shlyaptsev, V N; Busquet, M; Woolston, M; Rocca, J J

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520-μm-diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40 kA. Current densities of up to 0.3  GA cm^{-2} greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe^{28+}, while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe^{30+}. The unique characteristics of these hot, ∼300:1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers. PMID:25793819

  1. Gyrokinetic simulations of momentum transport and fluctuation spectra for ICRF-heated L-Mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierchio, J. M.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Sung, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Candy, J.

    2014-10-01

    We examine ICRF-heated L-mode plasmas in Alcator C-Mod, with differing momentum transport (hollow vs. peaked radial profiles of intrinsic toroidal rotation) but similar heat and particle transport. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of heat and particle transport with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] have previously been compared with these experiments [White et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056106 (2013); Howard et al. PPCF submitted (2014)] as part of an effort to validate the gyrokinetic model for core turbulent transport in C-Mod plasmas. To further test the model for these plasmas, predicted core turbulence characteristics such as fluctuation spectra will be compared with experiment. Using synthetic diagnostics for the CECE, reflectometry, and PCI systems at C-Mod, synthetic spectra and, when applicable, fluctuation amplitudes, are generated. We compare these generated results with fluctuation measurements from the experiment. We also report the momentum transport results from simulations of these plasmas and compare them to experiment. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  2. Extreme Degree of Ionization in Homogenous Micro-Capillary Plasma Columns Heated by Ultrafast Current Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Grisham, M.; Li, J.; Tomasel, F. G.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Busquet, M.; Woolston, M.; Rocca, J. J.

    2015-03-01

    Homogeneous plasma columns with ionization levels typical of megaampere discharges are created by rapidly heating gas-filled 520 -μ m -diameter channels with nanosecond rise time current pulses of 40 kA. Current densities of up to 0.3 GA cm-2 greatly increase Joule heating with respect to conventional capillary discharge Z pinches, reaching unprecedented degrees of ionization for a high-Z plasma column heated by a current pulse of remarkably low amplitude. Dense xenon plasmas are ionized to Xe28 + , while xenon impurities in hydrogen discharges reach Xe30 + . The unique characteristics of these hot, ˜300 :1 length-to-diameter aspect ratio plasmas allow the observation of unexpected spectroscopic phenomena. Axial spectra show the unusual dominance of the intercombination line over the resonance line of He-like Al by nearly an order of magnitude, caused by differences in opacities in the axial and radial directions. These plasma columns could enable the development of sub-10-nm x-ray lasers.

  3. Development of High Power Vacuum Tubes for Accelerators and Plasma Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vishnu

    2012-11-01

    High pulsed power magnetrons and klystrons for medical and industrial accelerators, and high CW power klystrons and gyrotrons for plasma heating in tokamak, are being developed at CEERI. S-band 2.0MW pulsed tunable magnetrons of centre frequency 2856MHz and 2998 MHz were developed, and S-band 2.6MW pulsed tunable magnetron is being developed for medical LINAC, and 3MW pulsed tunable magnetron is being developed for industrial accelerator. S-band (2856MHz), 5MW pulsed klystron was developed for particle accelerator, and S-band 6MW pulsed klystron is under development for 10MeV industrial accelerator. 350MHz, 100kW (CW) klystron is being developed for proton accelerator, and C-band 250kW (CW) klystron is being developed for plasma heating. 42GHz, 200kW (CW/Long pulse) gyrotron is under development for plasma heating. Plasma filled tubes are also being developed for switching. 25kV/1kA and 40kV/3kA thyratrons were developed for high voltage high current switching in pulse modulators for magnetrons and klystrons. 25kV/3kA Pseudospark switch of current rise time of 1kA/|a-sec and pulse repetition rate of 500Hz is being developed. Plasma assisted high power microwave device is also being investigated.

  4. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  5. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-12-23

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a non-inductive current fraction, f{sub NI}{approx}0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI}{approx}0.35, when P{sub RF}{>=}2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  6. Heating efficiency evaluation with mimicking plasma conditions of integrated fast-ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Morace, Alessio; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Sakata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Hattori, Shoji; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Lee, Seung Ho; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Youichiro; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Mima, Kunioki; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki; Kawanaka, Junji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to evaluate the energy-coupling efficiency from heating laser to a fuel core in the fast-ignition scheme of laser-driven inertial confinement fusion. Although the efficiency is determined by a wide variety of complex physics, from intense laser plasma interactions to the properties of high-energy density plasmas and the transport of relativistic electron beams (REB), here we simplify the physics by breaking down the efficiency into three measurable parameters: (i) energy conversion ratio from laser to REB, (ii) probability of collision between the REB and the fusion fuel core, and (iii) fraction of energy deposited in the fuel core from the REB. These three parameters were measured with the newly developed experimental platform designed for mimicking the plasma conditions of a realistic integrated fast-ignition experiment. The experimental results indicate that the high-energy tail of REB must be suppressed to heat the fuel core efficiently. PMID:26172803

  7. Generation of high charge state platinum ions on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Nikolaev, A G; Izotov, I V; Savkin, K P; Golubev, S V; Oks, E M

    2014-02-01

    The hybrid high charge metal ion source based on vacuum arc plasma heated by gyrotron radiation into simple magnetic trap has been developed. Two types of magnetic traps were used: a mirror configuration and a cusp one with inherent "minimum-B" structure. Pulsed high power (>100 kW) gyrotrons with frequency 37.5 GHz and 75 GHz were used for heating the vacuum arc plasma injected into the traps. Two different ways were used for injecting the metal plasma-axial injection by a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and simultaneous radial injection by a number of sources mounted radially at the midplane of the traps. This article represents all data gathered for platinum ions, thus making comparison of the experimental results obtained with different traps and injections convenient and accurate. PMID:24593607

  8. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R. Anvari, A.; Yazdani, E.; Hora, H.

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  9. Plasma Heating in Highly Excited GaN/AlGaN Multiple Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Botchkarev, A; Chow, W W; Jiang, H X; Lin, J Y; Mair, R; Morkoc, H; Zeng, K C

    1998-10-09

    Plasma Heating in Highly Excited GaN/AIGaN Multiple Quantum @@lvEu Wells w f + 1998 %p, K. C. Zeng, R. Mair, J. Y. Liz and H. X. Jiang a) ` fabrication and understanding of MQW lasers [2-5]. For the design of these lasers, one on RT optical studies. Our results revealed that in the GaN/AIGaN MQWS, plasma heating strongly effects the carrier distribution between the confined and unconfined band-to-band and fke excitonic transitions [7]. In the MQW sample under low the unconfined states as determined from the band structure. sample under high Lxc, we varied the excitation intensity by one order of magnitude from 0.110 to IO. The carrier density is estimated to be about N=1012/cm2 (at UC= 0.1 Io) to 1013/cm2 (at 1=== l.). We plotted the PL spectra for four representative excitation fimction of injected carrier density N (open squares). The ratio starts at a value of about 18% for N=1012/cm2 (& = O. lb), and reaches a value over 64 `XO for N=1013/cm2 (& = regions is a loss to optical gain. The carrier density is ve~ high in our experiment and an electron-hole plasma (EHP) state is expected. Because the carrier transfer process plasma temperature. The laser pump energy is about 4.3 eV, which is far above the energy band gap of the sample studied here. This may result in a hot carrier population carrier densities and plasma temperatures. Using a phenomenological expression based The calculated ratio of carriers in the unconfked to the confined states (Ima~ kf) as a finction of carrier density at different temperatures are plotted in Fig. 3 (solid lines). The figure shows that the experiment results can only be explained by plasma heating of the injected carriers at high & ( TP > TJ. The transparency carrier densities for GaN/AIXGal.XN MQW structures with well thickness from 2 to 4 nm were calculated to be around 1x 1012/cm2 [10]. It is thus obvious from Fig. 3 that under high carrier injection density above the transparency density, the plasma temperature, TP, is no

  10. Ballooning Instability: A Possible Mechanism for Impulsive Heating of Plasma Trapped in a Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma confined in curved magnetic field are unstable when the plasma beta (= gas pressure / magnetic pressure) exceeds a critical value determined mainly by the loop geometry (~ loop thickness / curvature radius). In TOKAMAK (one type of fusion experiment device), sudden disruption of confined plasma are observed when plasma beta is high and is called high-beta disruption. The main cause of the disruption is ballooning instability (or localized interchange instability). This instability can happen also in the solar atmosphere when conditions are satisfied. Not only high gas pressure but also plasma flow along curved magnetic field triggers ballooning instability. The most probable location of the instability is around the loop top where the magnetic field is the weakest. Impulsive heating of confined plasma and particle acceleration can be expected by discharge process of the space charge which is created by drift motion of plasma particles perpendicular to the magnetic field. Associated with disruption, shock waves and turbulences will be generated due to sudden expansion of plasma. Recent high-resolution, high-cadence and multiple wavelength (visible-UV-EUV) observations by SDO show many of these events.