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Sample records for house dust lead

  1. Assessment of in Vitro Lead Bioaccessibility in House Dust and Its Relationship to in Vivo Lead Relative Bioavailability

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    a mouse blood model. Lead bioaccessibility in 24 house dust samples varied significantly (23 Pb concentrations in house dust may result from leaded paint,8,9 tracked-in soil and street dustAssessment of in Vitro Lead Bioaccessibility in House Dust and Its Relationship to in Vivo Lead

  2. LEAD PAINT DISCLOSURE Housing built before 1978 may contain lead-based paint. Lead from paint, paint chips, and dust

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    LEAD PAINT DISCLOSURE Housing built before 1978 may contain lead-based paint. Lead from paint, paint chips, and dust can pose health hazards if not taken care of properly. Lead exposure is especially the presence of known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards in the dwelling. Tenants must also receive

  3. Canadian House Dust Study: Lead Bioaccessibility and Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    P Rasmussen; S Beauchemin; M Chenier; C Levesque; L MacLean; L Marrow; H Jones-Otazo; S Petrovic; L McDonald; H Gardner

    2011-12-31

    Vacuum samples were collected from 1025 randomly selected urban Canadian homes to investigate bioaccessible Pb (Pb{sub S}) concentrations in settled house dust. Results indicate a polymodal frequency distribution, consisting of three lognormally distributed subpopulations defined as 'urban background' (geomean 58 {micro}g g{sup -1}), 'elevated' (geomean 447 {micro}g g{sup -1}), and 'anomalous' (geomean 1730 {micro}g g{sup -1}). Dust Pb{sub S} concentrations in 924 homes (90%) fall into the 'urban background' category. The elevated and anomalous subpopulations predominantly consist of older homes located in central core areas of cities. The influence of house age is evidenced by a moderate correlation between house age and dust Pb{sub S} content (R{sup 2} = 0.34; n = 1025; p < 0.01), but it is notable that more than 10% of homes in the elevated/anomalous category were built after 1980. Conversely, the benefit of home remediation is evidenced by the large number of homes (33%) in the background category that were built before 1960. The dominant dust Pb species determined using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy were as follows: Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb sulfate, Pb chromate, Pb oxide, Pb citrate, Pb metal, Pb adsorbed to Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides, and Pb adsorbed to humate. Pb bioaccessibility estimated from solid phase speciation predicts Pb bioaccessibility measured using a simulated gastric extraction (R{sup 2} = 0.85; n = 12; p < 0.0001). The trend toward increased Pb bioaccessibility in the elevated and anomalous subpopulations (75% {+-} 18% and 81% {+-} 8%, respectively) compared to background (63% {+-} 18%) is explained by the higher proportion of bioaccessible compounds used as pigments in older paints (Pb carbonate and Pb hydroxyl carbonate). This population-based study provides a nationally representative urban baseline for applications in human health risk assessment and risk management.

  4. Lead and Other Heavy Metals in Dust Fall from Single-Family Housing Demolition

    PubMed Central

    Cali, Salvatore; Welch, Alison; Catalin, Bogdan; Dixon, Sherry L.; Evens, Anne; Mucha, Amy P.; Vahl, Nicole; Erdal, Serap; Bartlett, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective We measured lead and other heavy metals in dust during older housing demolition and effectiveness of dust suppression. Methods We used American Public Housing Association Method 502 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Methods SW3050B and SW6020 at 97 single-family housing demolition events with intermittent (or no) use of water to suppress dust at perimeter, non-perimeter, and locations without demolition, with nested mixed modeling and tobit modeling with left censoring. Results The geometric mean (GM) lead dust fall during demolition was 6.01 micrograms of lead per square foot per hour (?g Pb/ft2/hour). GM lead dust fall was 14.18 ?g Pb/ft2/hour without dust suppression, but declined to 5.48 ?g Pb/ft2/hour (p=0.057) when buildings and debris were wetted. Significant predictors included distance, wind direction, and main street location. At 400 feet, lead dust fall was not significantly different from background. GM lead concentration at demolition (2,406 parts per million [ppm]) was significantly greater than background (GM=579 ppm, p=0.05). Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, and manganese demolition dust fall was significantly higher than background (p<0.001). Demolition of approximately 400 old housing units elsewhere with more dust suppression was only 0.25 ?g Pb/ft2/hour. Conclusions Lead dust suppression is feasible and important in single-family housing demolition where distances between houses are smaller and community exposures are higher. Neighbor notification should be expanded to at least 400 feet away from single-family housing demolition, not just adjacent properties. Further research is needed on effects of distance, potential water contamination, occupational exposures, and water application. PMID:24179257

  5. The contribution of lead-contaminated house dust and residential soil to children`s blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphear, B.P.; Matte, T.D.; Rogers, J.

    1998-10-01

    In 1992, the US Congress passed the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, which requires the promulgation of health-based dust lead and soil lead standards for residential dwellings to prevent undue lead exposure in children. Unfortunately, the levels of lead in house dust and soil that are associated with elevated blood lead levels among US children remain poorly defined. This pooled analysis was done to estimate the contributions of lead-contaminated house dust and soil to children`s blood lead levels. The results of this pooled analysis, the most comprehensive existing epidemiologic analysis of childhood lead exposure, confirm that lead-contaminated house dust is the major source of lead exposure for children. These analyses further demonstrate that a strong relationship between interior dust lead loading and children`s blood lead levels persists at dust lead levels considerably below the US Department of Housing and urban Development`s current post-abatement standards and the Environmental Protection Agency`s guidance levels. Finally, these analyses demonstrate that a child`s age, race, mouthing behaviors, and study-site specific factors influence the predicted blood lead level at a given level of exposure. These data can be used to estimate the potential health impact of alternative health-based lead standards for residential sources of lead exposure.

  6. Dust Weight and Asthma Prevalence in the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (NSLAH)

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Leslie; Arbes, Samuel J.; Harvey, Eric S.; Lee, Robert C.; Salo, Päivi M.; Cohn, Richard D.; London, Stephanie J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Settled dust has been used in studies to assess exposures to allergens and other biologically active components, but it has not been considered in the aggregate in relation to respiratory health outcomes in the general population. Objective We addressed whether total house dust weight, an index of total dust exposure, was associated with respiratory health outcomes in the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (1998–1999) (NSLAH). Methods NSLAH was a cross-sectional survey designed to represent permanently occupied housing units in the United States. In each household, a questionnaire was administered and settled dust was vacuumed from five locations. Linear regression models were used to identify predictors of dust weight; logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between dust weight and asthma and wheeze. Results Dust weight samples were available for 829 households, and survey information was available for 2,456 participants (children and adults). Lower income, older homes, household pets, having a smoker in the house, and less frequent cleaning predicted higher dust weight levels in U.S. households. Higher levels of dust weight were associated with greater odds of current asthma and wheeze. The strongest associations were seen for wheeze [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.21–3.28 for bedroom bed dust; OR = 2.81; 95% CI, 1.52–5.21 for upholstery dust). These associations persisted when adjusting for allergen and endotoxin exposures. Conclusions Dust weight, an index of total dust exposure in the home, may contribute to respiratory outcomes independently of the exposure to specific components. PMID:17384767

  7. Lead in Chinese villager house dust: Geographical variation and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2015-12-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to Pb exposure of children. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decoration materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510 mg/kg, with a median concentration of 42 mg/kg. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195 mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decoration materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed that elemental compositions of the house dust were controlled by both anthropogenic and geogenic sources. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Pb bearing particles in the house dust were also studied. PMID:26381088

  8. The contribution of lead-contaminated house dust and residential soil to children's blood lead levels. A pooled analysis of 12 epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Lanphear, B P; Matte, T D; Rogers, J; Clickner, R P; Dietz, B; Bornschein, R L; Succop, P; Mahaffey, K R; Dixon, S; Galke, W; Rabinowitz, M; Farfel, M; Rohde, C; Schwartz, J; Ashley, P; Jacobs, D E

    1998-10-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, which requires the promulgation of health-based dust lead and soil lead standards for residential dwellings to prevent undue lead exposure in children. Unfortunately, the levels of lead in house dust and soil that are associated with elevated blood lead levels among U.S. children remain poorly defined. This pooled analysis was done to estimate the contributions of lead-contaminated house dust and soil to children's blood lead levels. The results of this pooled analysis, the most comprehensive existing epidemiologic analysis of childhood lead exposure, confirm that lead-contaminated house dust is the major source of lead exposure for children. These analyses further demonstrate that a strong relationship between interior dust lead loading and children's blood lead levels persists at dust lead levels considerably below the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's current postabatement standards and the Environmental Protection Agency's guidance levels. Finally, these analyses demonstrate that a child's age, race, mouthing behaviors, and study-site specific factors influence the predicted blood lead level at a given level of exposure. These data can be used to estimate the potential health impact of alternative health-based lead standards for residential sources of lead exposure. PMID:9756680

  9. House dust as possible route of environmental exposure to cadmium and lead in the adult general population.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Janneke; Plusquin, Michelle; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Nawrot, Tim; Cuypers, Ann; Van Hecke, Etienne; Roels, Harry A; Carleer, Robert; Staessen, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Contaminated soil particles and food are established routes of exposure. We investigated the relations between biomarkers of exposure to cadmium and lead, and the metal loading rates in house dust in the adult residents of an area with a soil cadmium concentration of > or = 3 mg/kg (n=268) and a reference area (n=205). We determined the metal concentrations in house dust allowed to settle for 3 months in Petri dishes placed in the participants' bedrooms. The continuously distributed vegetable index was the first principal component derived from the metal concentrations in six different vegetables. The biomarkers of exposure (blood cadmium 9.2 vs. 6.2 nmol/L; 24-h urinary cadmium 10.5 vs. 7.0 nmol; blood lead 0.31 vs. 0.24 micromol/L), the loading rates of cadmium and lead in house dust (0.29 vs. 0.12 and 7.52 vs. 3.62 ng/cm(2)/92 days), and the vegetable indexes (0.31 vs. -0.44 and 0.13 vs. -0.29 standardized units) were significantly higher in the contaminated area. A two-fold increase in the metal loading rate in house dust was associated with increases (P<0.001) in blood cadmium (+2.3%), 24-h urinary cadmium (+3.0%), and blood lead (+2.0%), independent of the vegetable index and other covariates. The estimated effect sizes on the biomarkers of internal exposure were three times greater for house dust than vegetables. In conclusion, in the adult population, house dust is potentially an important route of exposure to heavy metals in areas with contaminated soils, and should be incorporated in the assessment of health risks. PMID:16843453

  10. House dust as possible route of environmental exposure to cadmium and lead in the adult general population

    SciTech Connect

    Hogervorst, Janneke; Plusquin, Michelle; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Nawrot, Tim; Cuypers, Ann; Van Hecke, Etienne; Roels, Harry A.; Carleer, Robert; Staessen, Jan A. . E-mail: jan.staessen@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-01-15

    Contaminated soil particles and food are established routes of exposure. We investigated the relations between biomarkers of exposure to cadmium and lead, and the metal loading rates in house dust in the adult residents of an area with a soil cadmium concentration of >=3mg/kg (n=268) and a reference area (n=205). We determined the metal concentrations in house dust allowed to settle for 3 months in Petri dishes placed in the participants' bedrooms. The continuously distributed vegetable index was the first principal component derived from the metal concentrations in six different vegetables. The biomarkers of exposure (blood cadmium 9.2 vs. 6.2nmol/L; 24-h urinary cadmium 10.5 vs. 7.0nmol; blood lead 0.31 vs. 0.24{mu}mol/L), the loading rates of cadmium and lead in house dust (0.29 vs. 0.12 and 7.52 vs. 3.62ng/cm{sup 2}/92 days), and the vegetable indexes (0.31 vs. -0.44 and 0.13 vs. -0.29 standardized units) were significantly higher in the contaminated area. A two-fold increase in the metal loading rate in house dust was associated with increases (P<0.001) in blood cadmium (+2.3%), 24-h urinary cadmium (+3.0%), and blood lead (+2.0%), independent of the vegetable index and other covariates. The estimated effect sizes on the biomarkers of internal exposure were three times greater for house dust than vegetables. In conclusion, in the adult population, house dust is potentially an important route of exposure to heavy metals in areas with contaminated soils, and should be incorporated in the assessment of health risks.

  11. [House dust mite allergy].

    PubMed

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy. PMID:22477664

  12. Lead speciation in indoor dust: a case study to assess old paint contribution in a Canadian urban house

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; MacLean, Lachlan C.W.; Rasmussen, Pat E.

    2012-10-23

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 {micro}m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {micro}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  13. Lead Speciation in Indoor Dust: A Case Study to Assess Old Paint Contribution in a Canadian Urban House

    SciTech Connect

    S Beauchemin; L MacLean; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {mu}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  14. The association of lead-contaminated house dust and blood lead levels of children living on a former landfill in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Nazario, Elia Enid; Mansilla-Rivera, Imar; Derieux-Cortés, Jean-Claude; Pérez, Cynthia M; Rodríguez-Sierra, Carlos J

    2003-06-01

    Exposure to lead in children living on a former landfill in Vega Baja-Puerto Rico, a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) designated Superfund Site, is a major health concern. Direct contact with lead-contaminated soil is considered a major exposure source. However, there is a lack of information regarding the contribution of lead-contaminated house dust to children's blood lead concentrations. This study evaluated the relationship between lead contaminated-house dust and children's blood lead levels. Blood from 42 children, aged 6 years old or less, and dust from 29 houses were analyzed for lead, and face-to-face interviews were performed to gather information on potential risk factors for high blood lead levels. Blood lead levels ranged from 0.97 to 7.79 micrograms/dL. Lead values for floors fluctuated from 0.12 to 98.30 micrograms/ft2, with 17% of houses surpassing the USEPA standard of 40 micrograms/ft2. Multiple regression analysis showed that lead in window sills, toy chewing and soil eating habits were significant predictors of blood lead levels. Further investigations aimed at assessing the long-term effects of constant exposure to environmental lead in these children are warranted. PMID:12866140

  15. Garden soil and house dust as exposure media for lead uptake in the mining village of Stratoni, Greece.

    PubMed

    Argyraki, Ariadne

    2014-08-01

    The relationships between two exposure media, garden soil and house dust, were studied for Pb uptake in Stratoni village in northern Greece, an industrial area of mining and processing of sulphide ore. Lead data for the two media were assessed in terms of total and bioaccessible content, measurement and geochemical variability, and mineralogical composition. It was found that total Pb was enriched in house dust samples by a factor of 2 on average. Total Pb concentration in soil samples had a maximum of 2,040 mg/kg and reached a maximum of 7,000 mg/kg in house dust samples. The estimated variability due to measurement uncertainty was dominated by the sampling process, and the proportion of sampling variance was greater for soil samples, indicating a higher degree of Pb heterogeneity in soil on the given spatial scale of sampling strata. Although the same general spatial trend was observed for both sampling media with decreasing Pb concentration by increasing distance from the ore-processing plant, Pb in dust samples displayed the highest concentrations within a 300-600-m zone from the ore-processing facility. The significant differences which were observed in Pb speciation between the studied media were explained by differences in mineralogical composition of outdoor soil and indoor dust. Lead-enriched Fe and Mn oxides predominated in soil samples while fine galena grains (<10-20 ?m diameter) were the major Pb-bearing phase in dust samples. The integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model was used to predict the risk of elevated blood lead levels in children of Stratoni. Model prediction indicated an average probability of 61 % for blood-Pb to exceed 10 ?g/dl. The results underline the importance of house dust in risk assessment and highlight the effect of outdoor and indoor conditions on the fate of Pb in the particular environment of Stratoni. PMID:24292695

  16. Chemical speciation and bioaccessibility of lead in surface soil and house dust, Lavrion urban area, Attiki, Hellas.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, Alecos; Li, Xiangdong; Ramsey, Michael H; Thornton, Iain

    2010-12-01

    In the Lavrion urban area study, Hellas, a five-step sequential extraction method was applied on samples of 'soil' (n = 224), affected by long-term mining and metallurgical activities, and house dust (n = 127), for the purpose of studying the potential bioaccessibility of lead and other metals to humans. In this paper, the Pb concentrations in soil and house dust samples are discussed, together with those in rocks and children's blood. Lead is mainly associated with the carbonate, Fe-Mn oxides and residual fractions in soil and house dust. Considering the very low pH of gastric fluids (1-3), a high amount of metals, present in soil (810-152,000 mg/kg Pb) and house dust (418-18,600 mg/kg Pb), could be potentially bioaccessible. Consequently, children in the neighbourhoods with a large amount of metallurgical processing wastes have high blood-Pb concentrations (5.98-60.49 ?g/100 ml; median 17.83 ?g/100 ml; n = 235). It is concluded that the Lavrion urban and sub-urban environment is extremely hazardous to human health, and the Hellenic State authorities should urgently tackle this health-related hazard in order to improve the living conditions of local residents. PMID:20524052

  17. Lead Speciation in House Dust from Canadian Urban Homes Using EXAFS Micro-XRF and Micro-XRD

    SciTech Connect

    L MacLean; S Beauchemin; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF), and micro-X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD) were used to determine the speciation of Pb in house dust samples from four Canadian urban homes having elevated Pb concentrations (>1000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}). Linear combination fitting of the XAFS data, supported by {mu}XRF and {mu}XRD, shows that Pb is complexed in a variety of molecular environments, associated with both the inorganic and organic fractions of the dust samples. The inorganic species of lead identified were as follows: Pb metal, Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb oxide, and Pb adsorbed to iron oxyhydroxides. Pb carbonate and/or Pb hydroxyl carbonate occurred in all four dust samples and accounted for 28 to 75% of total Pb. Pb citrate and Pb bound to humate were the organic species identified. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of XAFS to identify Pb speciation in house dust and show the potential to identify Pb sources from new homes versus older homes. Understanding Pb speciation and how it influences bioaccessibility is important for human health risk assessment and risk management decisions which aim to improve indoor environmental health.

  18. Selecting a lead hazard control strategy based on dust lead loading and housing condition: II. Application of Housing Assessment Tool (HAT) modeling results.

    PubMed

    Breysse, Jill; Dixon, Sherry; Wilson, Jonathan; Kawecki, Carol; Green, Rodney; Phoenix, Janet; Galke, Warren; Clark, Scott

    2008-08-01

    In Part I in this issue, modeling was used to identify a Housing Assessment Tool (HAT) that can be used to predict relative intervention effectiveness for a range of intervention intensities and baseline dust lead loadings in occupied dwellings. The HAT predicts one year post-intervention floor and windowsill loadings and the probability that these loadings will exceed current federal lead hazard standards. This article illustrates the field application of the HAT, helping practitioners determine the minimum intervention intensity needed to reach "acceptable" one year post-intervention levels, with acceptability defined based on specific project needs, local needs, regulations, and resource constraints. The HAT is used to classify a dwelling's baseline condition as good or poor. If the average number of interior non-intact painted surfaces per room is >/=2, then the dwelling is rated as poor. If exterior windows/doors are deteriorated and the average number of exterior non-intact painted surfaces per building side is >/=5, then the dwelling is rated as poor. If neither of these conditions is true, then the dwelling's HAT rating is good. The HAT rating is then combined with baseline average floor loading to help select the treatment intensity. For example, if the baseline floor loading is 100 mug/ft(2) (1,075 mug/m(2) and the HAT rating is poor, the probability that the one-year floor loading exceeds the federal standard of 40 mug/ft(2) (430 mug/m(2) is 27% for a high-intensity strategy (i.e., window lead abatement with other treatments) but is 54% for a lower-intensity strategy (i.e., cleaning and spot painting). If the HAT rating is good, the probability that the one-year floor loading exceeds 40 mug/ft(2) is approximately the same for low- and high-intensity strategies (18% for window lead abatement with other treatments compared with 16% for cleaning and spot painting). Lead hazard control practitioners can use this information to make empirically based judgments about the treatment intensity needed to ensure that one year post-intervention loadings remain below federal standards. PMID:18569521

  19. Lead and other elements in house dust of Japanese residences--source of lead and health risks due to metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Jun; Yamasaki, Kumiko; Yonemura, Ayumi; Ishibashi, Yuri; Kaido, Takaya; Mizuno, Kodai; Takagi, Mai; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    The levels of 25 elements in house dust collected from 100 general Japanese residences were measured. Factor analysis was applied on the multi-element data to explore source of Pb (median concentration 49.1 mg/kg) in house dust. Six factors were extracted and Pb was found to have great loading on the fifth factor with Sb and Sn, suggesting solder (Sn), and plastic and metals (Sb) may be the sources of Pb in the house dust of Japanese residences. No significant loading was found on soil-related factors indicating non-significant contribution of Pb in track-in soil. Seven heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Sb, Sn, and Zn) were found in house dust at >10 times more condensed than crustal abundance. Health risk of these elements to children via the ingestion of house dust was estimated based on the comparison with tolerable daily intake and found to be non-significant for most of the elements. PMID:24682073

  20. Epidemiology of house-dust mites.

    PubMed

    Korsgaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Available epidemiologic data on the occurrence of house-dust mites in dwellings demonstrates a clear association between increased indoor air humidity and the increased occurrence of house-dust mites in house dust. Furthermore, in temperate climates, there is a threshold level of indoor air humidity of 7 g/kg (45% relative humidity at usual indoor air temperatures). Indoor air humidities below this level for extended periods will eradicate house-dust mites from dwellings. A reduction in inhabitant exposure to house-dust mites is implemented by reduction of indoor air humidity by controlled mechanical ventilation. Individual ventilation levels are estimated from the actual size of house, number of inhabitants, and average outdoor air humidity in winter. In contrast, more humid areas of the world with average outdoor humidities above 6-7 g/kg in winter will support uniformly large populations of house-dust mites, and reductions in indoor air humidity will have a comparatively minor effect on the occurrence of house-dust mites. Present-day building of energy-efficient houses with increased sealing of the building envelope, paralleled by a similar renovation of older houses, has increased indoor air humidity and is probably the cause of the almost fourfold increase in the occurrence of house-dust mites in Danish dwellings. PMID:10096805

  1. Polyfluoroalkyl chemicals in house dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kayoko; Calafat, Antonia M.; Needham, Larry L.

    2009-07-15

    We developed a high throughput analytical method using on-line solid phase extraction coupled with isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line SPE-HPLC-MS/MS) to simultaneously determine the concentrations of 17 polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) in house dust. The sample preparation includes dispersion of the dust samples in 0.1 M formic acid:MeOH (1:1), followed by agitation and filtration, addition of the isotope-labeled internal standard solution to the filtrate, and analysis by on-line SPE-HPLC-MS/MS. The limits of quantitation were <4.0 ng/g. The method accuracies ranged between 73.2% and 100.2% for the different analytes at two spike levels. We confirmed the validity of the method by analyzing 39 household dust samples collected in 2004. Of the 17 PFCs measured, 6 of them-perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBuS), N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamide, 2-(N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid (Et-PFOSA-AcOH), 2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) ethanol (Me-PFOSA-EtOH), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)-had detection frequencies >70%. We detected PFOS, PFBuS, and PFHxS at the highest median concentration, followed by Et-PFOSA-AcOH and Me-PFOSA-EtOH.

  2. Source contributions of lead in residential floor dust and within-home variability of dust lead loading.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jean-Paul; Bellanger, Lise; Le Strat, Yann; Le Tertre, Alain; Glorennec, Philippe; Le Bot, Barbara; Etchevers, Anne; Mandin, Corinne; Sébille, Véronique

    2014-02-01

    Evidence of the impact of exposure to low levels of lead on children's health is increasing. Residential floor dust is the assumed origin of lead exposure by young children. In this study, we estimate the contribution of different lead sources to household interior floor dust contamination. We also estimate the within-home variability of interior floor dust lead loadings. A multilevel model was developed based on data collected in a French survey in 2008-2009 (484 housing units, 1834 rooms). Missing data were handled by multiple imputation using chained equations. The intra-home correlation between interior floor Log dust lead loadings was approximately 0.6. Dust lead from the landing of an apartment, mostly originating outside the building, was the major contributor to interior floor dust lead. Secondary contributors included the lead-based paint on exterior railings, track-in of the exterior soil of the children's play area into the dwelling, smoking inside the home, demolition of nearby old buildings and sites of pollution in the vicinity. Interior lead-based paint contaminated interior floor dust only in old and non-renovated dwellings. To reduce interior floor dust lead levels in the general population of dwellings, common areas should be maintained, and track-in from the outside should be limited as much as possible. PMID:24184749

  3. The relationship between surface dust lead loadings on carpets and the blood lead of young children.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Bornschein, R L; Pan, W; Menrath, W; Roda, S; Grote, J

    1996-12-01

    The final clean-up of residential lead abatement projects in federally-supported housing, as well as in other housing in a number of states, must meet surface dust lead clearance levels expressed as ?g of lead per square foot. These clearance levels were established because hand-to-mouth ingestion of lead-contaminated dust is recognised as a major pathway through which many children are exposed. A dilemma exists because many floors in housing undergoing abatement are carpeted and the established clearance levels are generally not recommended for use on carpets. These clearance levels are also used as 'action levels' to determine whether exposure reduction activities are needed. The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently in the process of issuing standards for hazardous levels of lead in interior dust and bare soil under Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, 'The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992'. An effort to develop a potential surface dust lead clearance level for carpets was made using an existing vacuum dust collection method that has previously been shown to be a reliable indicator of childhood lead exposure. This method was designed for use on carpeted and non-carpeted surfaces. Using data from the Cincinnati Soil Lead Abatement Demonstration Project, the suggested floor-dust lead level where an estimated 95% of the population of children would be expected to have blood lead values below the national goal of 10 ?g dL(-1), was more than an order of magnitude lower than the current floor-dust lead clearance level of 1080 ?g m(-2) (100 ?g ft(-2)). Further comparisons of blood lead and carpet lead levels in other parts of the country should be performed before a risk-based lead loading clearance level is established. PMID:24194409

  4. Lead-Safe Housing Policy Guidance

    E-print Network

    Lead-Safe Housing Policy Guidance #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This guidance was prepared by the Alliance Gumm. The Alliance thanks the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch of the Centers for Disease..............................................................................................................................1 PART I Basic Lead-Safe Housing Standards

  5. Lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and house dust in the communities surrounding the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Timothy W; Lane, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the residential communities adjacent to the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds, the area considered Canada's worst contaminated site. The tar pond remediation policy has been limited to the site and some residential properties. We compared background concentrations in 91 soil samples taken 5-20 km from the coke oven site with those in soil samples from the three communities surrounding the tar ponds: Whitney Pier, Ashby, and North End. These surrounding communities were statistically different from background regarding arsenic, lead, and PAHs. Twenty percent of the background soil samples and 95% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian health-risk-based soil guidelines for arsenic (12 ppm), and 5% of the background samples and 80% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian guidelines for lead (140 ppm). Regarding dust lead and arsenic loading, the results provide no evidence that Whitney Pier is significantly different than Ashby and North End. Children in these communities are predicted to have a 1-15% chance of blood lead > 10 microg/dL. The results suggest that lead and arsenic found in the homes originate outside. The lead content of paint in the homes was not evaluated, but consideration of painted wood at the doorway did not confound the results of the study. The results indicate that the residential environment has been adversely affected by PAHs, lead, and arsenic and should be considered for remediation. PMID:14698928

  6. New information on lead in dirt and dust as related to the childhood lead problem.

    PubMed

    Haar, G T; Aronow, R

    1974-05-01

    It has been known for many years that the eating of leaded paint is the prime cause of lead poisoning and elevated blood leads of children living in deteriorated housing. Recently, there has been speculation that children may eat dirt and dust contaminated with lead exhausted from cars and that this amount of ingested lead is sufficient to contribute significantly to the childhood lead problem. This paper reports on a twopart study conducted to evaluate the validity of the dirt-and-dust hypotheses. The first part of the study was made to determine the source of lead in dirt to which children are normally exposed. Dirt samples were taken in old urban areas around 18 painted frame houses and 18 houses of brick construction. Samples also were taken around seven old frame farmhouses remote from traffic. Based on the fact that lead concentrations in the dirt were similar in city and rural yards at corresponding distances from the houses, it is clear that nearly all of the lead in dirt around these houses is due to paint from the houses. Lead antiknock additives are therefore not a significant contributor to the lead content of dirt around houses where children usually play. The second part of the study used a naturally occurring radioactive tracer (210)Pb to determine the relative amounts of dust and other lead-containing materials (e.g., paint) eaten by young children. This tracer is present in very low concentrations in paint and in significantly higher concentrations in fallout dust. Stable lead and (210)Pb were analyzed in fecal material from eight children suspected of having elevated body burdens of lead and ten children living in good housing where lead poisoning is not a problem. The normal children averaged 4 mug Pb/g dry feces, with a range of 2 to 7. Of the eight children suspected of having elevated lead body burdens, two had fecal lead values within the normal range. However, the remaining six were 4 to 400 times as high. Despite these differences in fecal lead between the two groups, the groups were essentially identified in the (210)Pb content of their feces. The "elevated" children averaged 0.040 pCi of (210)Pb dry feces, while the normal group averaged 0.044 pCi/g. The results provide sound evidence that these children suspected of elevated lead body burden were not ingesting dust or air-suspended particulate. PMID:4831152

  7. [House-dust mites as vectors of human diseases].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, G

    1982-01-01

    The genuine European house-dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, is the producer of the most common and most potent allergen in the house-dust in Central Europe. Such allergens causing asthma, rhinitis, tracheitis, bronchitis and/or conjunctivitis in man may also be produced by the other species of house-dust mites such as D. farinae and Euroglyphus maynei. House mites and mites of stored products rarely account for such diseases but more frequently for acarodermatitis--especially on farms. Allergies due to house-dust mites mainly occur in midsummer and in early autumn. Particularly children under 10 years of age are effected by these allergies. Textile articles such as mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets are breeding places of the genuine house-dust mites. Skin scales of humans, mammals and birds affected by mould provide the nutritional substrate of the mites. PMID:7184173

  8. House dust mite allergy: environment evaluation and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng-Jie; Liao, En-Chih; Tsai, Jaw-Ji

    2014-10-01

    There are two groups of dust mites, house dust mites (HDMs) and storage mites (SMs), that have been identified in the household environment. Both could induce airway inflammation through activation of innate and adaptive immunity and lead to asthma. In order to monitor environmental dust mite infestation, different methods can be used to detect their presence, such as the use of floating methods, monoclonal antibodies, and nanostructured biosensor. SM could be identified in the storage room, mainly in contaminated food such as mushrooms and corn starch. In HDM-sensitive subjects and mice that were challenged with HDM or SM after sensitization, these mites could up-regulate IgE levels, T helper 2 associated cytokine production and airway hypersensitivity. Different age groups of subjects were sensitized by different species of mites. More subjects above 70 years were sensitized by SM and more subjects below the age of 40 years were sensitized to HDM. Different allergenic components of dust mite extracts, such as Der p 1, Der p 2, could activate innate immunity through activating pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and then lead to allergic inflammation. The best modality to treat HDM allergy is immunomodulation through Treg cells and IgA production. In the recent years, many studies indicated probiotics could increase IgA secretion and the number of Treg cells. However, some studies conducted in adults have contradictory effects in reducing allergic symptoms. Therefore, probiotics confer inconclusive benefits on the allergic symptoms. PMID:25379484

  9. Residential dust lead loading immediately after intervention in the HUD lead hazard control grant program.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry L; Wilson, Jonathan W; Succop, Paul A; Chen, Mei; Galke, Warren A; Menrath, William; Clark, C Scott

    2004-11-01

    At the conclusion of most lead hazard control interventions in federally assisted housing built before 1978, a certified clearance examiner must verify that the lead hazard control work was completed as specified and that the area is safe for residents, a process referred to as clearance. This study explores the experience of 14 grantees participating in the Evaluation of the HUD Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program in passing clearance. The study also considers how preintervention lead levels (interior dust and paint), building condition/characteristics, and the scope of work influenced initial clearance dust lead loadings and clearance rates. At the initial clearance inspection, 80% of the 2682 dwellings achieved grantee-specific clearance standards on windowsills, window troughs (500 microg/ft2 and 800 microg/ft2, respectively), and floors (80, 100, or 200 microg/ft2 depending on state/local regulations at the dates of clearance in the mid-1990s), with individual grantee success rates ranging from 63 to 100%. Dwellings that failed initial clearance required an average of 1.13 retests to clear. The high level of success at clearance demonstrates that following methods for work site containment, lead hazard control, and cleaning similar to those recommended in the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint in Housing is effective. The most common lead hazard control intervention was window abatement accompanied by the repair or abatement of all other deteriorated lead-based paint (56% of dwellings). An additional 5% of dwellings were fully abated, 29% had lower intensity interventions. Interventions including window replacement are recommended to reduce dust lead loading on windowsills and troughs at clearance, but lower level interventions such as full paint stabilization are just as good at reducing floor dust lead loadings. Whatever lead hazard control activities are selected, the condition of the surfaces of interest should be in good condition at clearance. PMID:15673092

  10. POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HOUSE DUST AND CLOTHES DRYER LINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are now considered ubiquitous and persistent pollutants. Few studies have examined the concentrations of these chemicals in the home and here we report measurements of PBDEs in house dust samples collected from the Washington...

  11. [House dust mites and their allergens].

    PubMed

    Bessot, J-C; Pauli, G

    2011-02-01

    The taxonomy, anatomy, life cycle and ecology of Pyroglyphidae mites and storage mites (Acaridae, Glycyphagidae, B. tropicalis) are described. Pyroglyphidae and storage mites have similar morphologies: they are octopods, with characteristic gnathosoma and sensory hairs. Salivary glands and the mid gut produce most of the allergens excreted, which are enzymatic proteins. Biological cycles and development are similar, although fecundity is superior in storage mites compared to the Pyroglyphides. Relative humidity is the main parameter, which regulates mite development, with a higher degree of temperature and humidity required for storage mites. Bedding is the ecological niche of Pyroglyphidae, which feed on human skin. Moulds and food products are the storage mite biotope from which they spread in the dwelling. Initially considered as rural mites, storage mites are also present in urban dwellings. B. tropicalis, in tropical regions is a true domestic mite. Because of this, it is justified to denominate Pyroglyphidae "house dust mites" and storage mites "domestic mites". In addition to the respiratory allergic symptoms, the storage mites can also cause occupational contact dermatoses. PMID:21402236

  12. Seasonal dynamics and distribution of house dust mites in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Meng; Sun, Wenwen; Cheng, Xunjia

    2009-12-01

    House dust mites are widely distributed in the human habitat and work environment and produce very powerful allergens. The most important allergy-causing mites found in homes worldwide are the house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus and the storage mite Blomia tropicalis. It is important to know which mite species are present in a geographical area when performing diagnostic testing and prescribing immunotherapy. We classified the breeding situations of house dust mites in dwellings in northern China. Mites are detectable in March and their number increases from April or May, reaching a peak from July to September. The seasonal distribution of different acaroid mite species may differ: temperature, humidity, and eating habits were the major limiting factors determining species composition and diversity of acaroid mite communities in house ecosystems; comparing to the field and the forest, in human living area including house and working place, acaroid mites showed less bio-diversity. PMID:20103849

  13. House dust in seven Danish offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mřlhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjćrgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jřrgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 ?g g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is estimated to be relatively low. The storage of the bulk dust during the experiment had little effect on the specific biological and chemical composition.

  14. Estimating outdoor and indoor dust lead levels from accidental bridge repair containment releases

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.T.; Conway, R.F.

    1999-07-01

    A 1998 New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluated the proposed removal of deteriorated lead paint from NYCDOT-owned bridges. The EIS health risk assessment quantified the potential impact of particulate releases on blood lead levels among members of the public living and working near affected bridges. The risk assessment consisted of a fate and transport component and an exposure-dose component. The fate and transport component, modeled using the EPA's Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model, calculated the impact of paint removal activities on ambient air lead concentrations and dust lead deposition rates. The exposure-dose component, modeled using EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model, the Bowers et al. Adult Lead model, and the O'Flaherty lead model, calculated the impact of additional lead in air, street dust, interior house dust, and soil on blood lead levels, a conventional measure of body lead burden. The analysis was complicated because the ISC3 model provides a dust lead deposition rate ({micro}g/m{sup 2}-day), while the IEUBK, Bowers et al., and O'Flaherty models demand as input specification of dust lead concentrations ({micro}g lead per g dust). This paper describes a model developed for the EIS that quantifies long term average dust lead concentrations associated with typical bridge containment releases, and short term dust lead concentration spikes following worst case release events associated with bridge repair containment structure failures. The model reflects the influence of both lead and other debris associated with bridge repair activities, the contribution of background debris to street dust, and the impact of rainfall on removal of both lead and other material from the street dust reservoir.

  15. DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A LEAD DUST MONITORING, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION PROGRAM IN YOUR COMMUNITY/SYRACUSE LEAD DUST PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a technology transfer document (case-study) for the EMPACT Syracuse Lead Dust Project. The Lead Dust Project is designed to measure the lead dust content in homes and public buildings within the City of Syracuse, NY. The project also contains an educational comp...

  16. Enzymatic activity of allergenic house dust and storage mite extracts.

    PubMed

    Morales, Maria; Iraola, Víctor; Leonor, Jose R; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Proteases are involved in the pathogenicity of allergy, increasing epithelial permeability and acting as adjuvants. Enzymatic activity is therefore important for the allergenicity of an extract and also affects its stability and safety. However, the enzymatic activity of extracts is not usually evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic activity of the most allergenic mite extracts and to investigate their allergenic properties. Extracts from nine allergenic mite species (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes, Euroglyphus maynei, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank), Glycyphagus domesticus (DeGeer), Acarus siro L., Chortoglyphus arcuatus, and Blomia tropicalis) were characterized. Protein and allergen profiles were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western-blot, respectively. Gelatinolytic activity was evaluated with a zymogram and the activity of other enzymes (cysteine, serine proteases, and esterases) was evaluated individually or with the API-ZYM system. The main differences in protease activity were found between house dust mites and storage mites. House dust mites presented higher cysteine protease activity while storage mites presented higher serine protease activity. These differences are in line with their trophic specialization. A wide range of different activities was found in all the extracts analyzed, reflecting the fact that the extracts preserve the activity of many enzymes, this being necessary for a correct diagnosis. However, enzymes may act as adjuvants and, therefore, could lead to undesirable effects in immunotherapies, making this activity not suitable for treatment products. Modified extracts with lower enzymatic activity could be more appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:23427664

  17. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian; CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, North Ryde NSW 2113 ; Anderson, Phil; Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra ACT 2601 ; Taylor, Alan

    2013-10-15

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ?15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI ?0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=?0.003, 95% CI ?0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ?15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10 µg/dL. • High precision lead isotopic ratios in blood, house dust wipes, soil, water, paint. • Associations for isotopic measures of blood and dust, blood and soil, blood and paint. • Regressions gave significance for isotopic measures of blood/dust and dust/soil.

  18. Zinc in house dust: speciation, bioaccessibility, and impact of humidity.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; Rasmussen, Pat E; MacKinnon, Ted; Chénier, Marc; Boros, Kristina

    2014-08-19

    Indoor exposures to metals arise from a wide variety of indoor and outdoor sources. This study investigates the impact of humid indoor conditions on the bioaccessibility of Zn in dust, and the transformation of Zn species during weathering. House dust samples were subjected to an oxygenated, highly humid atmosphere in a closed chamber for 4 to 5 months. Zinc bioaccessibility before and after the experiment was determined using a simulated gastric acid extraction. Bulk and micro X-ray absorption structure (XAS) spectroscopy was used to speciate Zn in dust. Exposure to humid conditions led to a significant increase in Zn bioaccessibility in all samples, which was due to a redistribution of Zn from inorganic forms toward the organic pools such as Zn adsorbed on humates. ZnO readily dissolved under humid conditions, whereas ZnS persisted in the dust. Elevated humidity in indoor microenvironments may sustain higher Zn bioaccessibility in settled dust compared to drier conditions, and part of this change may be related to fungal growth in humid dust. These results help to explain the greater bioaccessibility of certain metals in house dust compared to soils. PMID:25041107

  19. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in house dust in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jing; Cheng, Si Min; Loganath, Annamalai; Chong, Yap Seng; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    2007-01-01

    The use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants in Singapore is not strictly regulated; therefore these compounds can be readily found in furniture, electronic devices, and building materials. This study was the first of its kind to be conducted in Singapore to measure concentrations of PBDEs in house dust. Samples were collected from 31 homes in various locations across the island-state of Singapore, and a total eight PBDEs congeners were measured. PBDEs were detected in all 31 dust samples and the number of BDE congener detected per home ranged between 3 and 8. The most abundant BDE congeners found were BDE 47, 99 and 209, with a median value of 20 ng g(-1) dust, 24 ng g(-1) dust and 1000 ng g(-1) dust, respectively. BDE 209 contributed 88% to the median of all the congeners, and BDE 47 and 99 contributed 1.8% and 3.5%, respectively. Different congener profiles were observed between this and studies conducted elsewhere, which is consistent with the use of different commercial PBDE around the world. No significant correlations between PBDE dust levels and residential characteristics (number of TVs and computers, floor area or flooring material) were observed. The daily intake of PBDEs via the inhalation pathway was estimated. House dust may be regarded as the most important exposure route of PBDEs for children. PMID:16949640

  20. Association of House Dust Allergen Concentrations With Residential Conditions in City and in Rural Houses

    PubMed Central

    Wardzy?ska, Aleksandra; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara; Pe?ka, Jolanta; Korzon, Leszek; Kacza?a, Magdalena; Jarz?bska, Marzanna; Gwardys, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between house dust mite, cat and dog allergen levels with household characteristics in the houses of children living in urban and rural areas in central Poland. Methods Dust samples were collected from 141 urban and 191 rural houses. Der f1 + Der p1, Can f 1, and Fel d1 levels were measured and associated with residential conditions and atopy-related health outcomes assessed by clinical examination and skin prick testing. Results Concentrations of mite allergens were lower, and cat and dog allergen levels were higher in urban houses. Fel d1 and Can f1 levels depended on the presence of a respective animal in the house. In urban houses, Der p1 + Der f1 concentration was lower in households with central heating, whereas Can f1 concentration was related to building age. Multivariate analyses revealed that the concentrations of house dust mite and dog allergens were associated with relative humidity, number of people in the household, and the presence of a dog at home. There was no significant association between allergen level and sensitization or atopic diseases. Conclusions Concentrations of indoor allergens in urban and rural houses differ significantly, and residential conditions associated with allergen levels seem to be different in both environments. PMID:23268467

  1. Determinants of manganese levels in house dust samples from the CHAMACOS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gunier, RB; Jerrett, M; Smith, DR; Jursa, T; Yousefi, P; Camacho, J; Hubbard, A; Eskenazi, B; Bradman, A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, but at high exposure levels Mn is a neurotoxicant. The fungicides maneb and mancozeb are approximately 21% Mn by weight and more than 150,000 kg are applied each year to crops in the Salinas Valley, California. It is not clear, however, whether agricultural use of these fungicides increases Mn levels in homes. Materials and methods We collected house dust samples from 378 residences enrolled in the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study with a second sample collected approximately nine months later from 90 of the residences. House dust samples were analyzed for Mn using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Information from interviews, home inspections, and pesticide use reports was used to identify potential predictors of Mn dust concentrations and loadings. Results Mn was detectable in all dust samples. The median Mn concentration was 171 ?g/g and median Mn loading was 1,910 ?g/m2 at first visit. In multivariable models, Mn dust concentrations and loadings increased with the number of farmworkers in the home and the amount of agricultural Mn fungicides applied within three kilometers of the residence during the month prior to dust sample collection. Dust concentrations of Mn and other metals (lead, cadmium and chromium) were higher in residences located in the southern Salinas Valley compared those located in other areas of the Salinas Valley. Dust loadings of Mn and other metals were also higher in residences located on Antioch Loam soil than other soil types, and in homes with poor or average housekeeping practices. Conclusions Agricultural use of Mn containing fungicides was associated with Mn dust concentrations and loadings in nearby residences and farmworker homes. Housekeeping practices and soil type at residence were also important factors related to dust metal concentrations and loadings. PMID:25146905

  2. The prevalence of lead-based paint hazards in U.S. housing.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David E; Clickner, Robert P; Zhou, Joey Y; Viet, Susan M; Marker, David A; Rogers, John W; Zeldin, Darryl C; Broene, Pamela; Friedman, Warren

    2002-01-01

    In this study we estimated the number of housing units in the United States with lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards. We included measurements of lead in intact and deteriorated paint, interior dust, and bare soil. A nationally representative, random sample of 831 housing units was evaluated in a survey between 1998 and 2000; the units and their occupants did not differ significantly from nationwide characteristics. Results indicate that 38 million housing units had lead-based paint, down from the 1990 estimate of 64 million. Twenty-four million had significant lead-based paint hazards. Of those with hazards, 1.2 million units housed low-income families (< 30,000 US dollars/year) with children under 6 years of age. Although 17% of government-supported, low-income housing had hazards, 35% of all low-income housing had hazards. For households with incomes greater than or equal to 30,000 US dollars/year, 19% had hazards. Fourteen percent of all houses had significantly deteriorated lead-based paint, and 16% and 7%, respectively, had dust lead and soil lead levels above current standards of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The prevalence of lead-based paint and hazards increases with age of housing, but most painted surfaces, even in older housing, do not have lead-based paint. Between 2% and 25% of painted building components were coated with lead-based paint. Housing in the Northeast and Midwest had about twice the prevalence of hazards compared with housing in the South and West. The greatest risk occurs in older units with lead-based paint hazards that either will be or are currently occupied by families with children under 6 years of age and are low-income and/or are undergoing renovation or maintenance that disturbs lead-based paint. This study also confirms projections made in 2000 by the President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children of the number of houses with lead-based paint hazards. Public- and private-sector resources should be directed to units posing the greatest risk if future lead poisoning is to be prevented. PMID:12361941

  3. Immunomodulation of Skin Cytokine Secretion by House Dust Mite Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Arlian, Larry G.; Morgan, Marjorie S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin contact with house dust mites may contribute to atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases. We sought to determine if molecules from house dust mites could influence the release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines from epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts grown in a human skin equivalent (HSE) model. Methods HSEs consisting of an epidermis of keratinocytes with stratum corneum over a dermis of fibroblasts in a collagen matrix were challenged with Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus and Euroglyphus maynei mite extracts. Results HSEs secreted interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-8, cutaneous T cell-attracting chemokine, transforming growth factor-?, granulocyte/macrophage and macrophage colony-stimulating factors and vascular endothelial cell growth factor in response to at least 1 mite extract. Extracts of different mite species stimulated HSEs to release different cytokines. Therefore, extracts of different species contained different molecules or different concentrations of similar molecules. The cytokine release profiles of cells in the HSEs were not the same as for monocultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Conclusions Molecules from house dust mites are capable of inducing the release of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines from epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Avoiding skin contact with house dust mites would reduce the possibility of mite-induced inflammation in the skin. Therefore, measures to reduce contact with mite molecules such as frequent vacuuming of upholstered furniture and carpets and laundering of clothing and bedding to remove mite molecules and allergens could reduce skin contact with mite molecules and diminish exacerbations of skin inflammation in patients with atopic dermatitis and other skin diseases. PMID:21576987

  4. Quantification of C. globosum spores in house dust samples.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunhua; Provost, Natacha B; Desroches, Tamara; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is one of the most common fungi that grows in damp buildings and occurs in agricultural and forestry workplaces. Using sera from atopic patients, we characterized and purified an extracellular chitosanase (Chg47) from C. globosum that is antigenic to humans. The study reports the production of monoclonal antibodies to the protein. Three capture ELISAs were developed for Chg47 for detection of spores and spore and mycelial fragments in dust samples using different mono- and polyclonal antibody combinations. One method is based on an enhanced biotinylated polyclonal antibody as the secondary antibody and coating anti-IgM to capture one of two clones of IgM monoclonal antibodies as the capture antibody. The other method makes use of an enhanced rabbit polyclonal antibody as both the primary and capture antibody. The detection limit of the double PAb method for the Chg47 antigen was 7.6 pg/ml. When the anti-IgM+10B3 clone was used, the detection limit was 61 pg/ml and for anti-IgM+5F12, 122 pg/ml. The detection limit of double PAb method is comparable to methods for the allergen and spores of Aspergillus versicolor in house dust and is more sensitive than other immunoassays for allergens in house including for Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata. All three methods had limited cross-reactivity to fungi common in house dust representing a diverse array of taxa. PMID:25292122

  5. Comparative efficacy of house dust mite extermination products.

    PubMed

    Schober, G; Kniest, F M; Kort, H S; De Saint Georges Gridelet, D M; Van Bronswijk, J E

    1992-06-01

    The acaricidal efficacy of nine marketed products, i.e. Acardust, Acarosan (foam and powder), Actelic 50, Artilin 3A (spirit and water base), liquid nitrogen, Paragerm AK, and Tymasil, and of intensive vacuum-cleaning have been compared on four different test surfaces: mattress, tufted carpet, gypsum board and rough wooden board, all covered with artificial house dust. They were inoculated with the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus or the house-dust fungus Aspergillus repens for evaluation of the fungistatic claims of some products. The acaricidal activity of Tymasil did not surpass that of vacuuming; its fungistatic effect was not apparent. The other products showed complete to almost complete eradication on at least one of the substrates tested. Taking into account the results of acaricidal efficacy as well as the data on safety and practicality acquired earlier, Acarosan powder was considered first choice for carpet treatment. Acarosan and liquid nitrogen, were found to be effective in the treatment of mattress, pillow, upholstered furniture and heavy curtains. On wooden surfaces Acarosan was found to be both effective and safe, while Acardust, Actelic 50, Artilin 3A (both fungistatic as well as acaricidal), liquid nitrogen and Paragerm also passed the efficiency test. PMID:1393759

  6. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paula I.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octaand deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  7. Application of Synchrotron Microprobe Methods to Solid-Phase Speciation of Metals and Metalloids in House Dust

    SciTech Connect

    S Walker; H Jamieson; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    Determination of the source and form of metals in house dust is important to those working to understand human and particularly childhood exposure to metals in residential environments. We report the development of a synchrotron microprobe technique for characterization of multiple metal hosts in house dust. We have applied X-ray fluorescence for chemical characterization and X-ray diffraction for crystal structure identification using microfocused synchrotron X-rays at a less than 10 {micro}m spot size. The technique has been evaluated by application to archived house dust samples containing elevated concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, and Pb and As in living room dust. The technique was also applied to a sample of soil from the corresponding garden to identify linkages between indoor and outdoor sources of metals. Paint pigments including white lead (hydrocerussite) and lithopone (wurtzite and barite) are the primary source of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, probably related to renovation activity in the home at the time of sampling. The much lower Pb content in the living room dust shows a relationship to the exterior soil and no specific evidence of Pb and Zn from the bedroom paint pigments. The technique was also successful at confirming the presence of chromated copper arsenate treated wood as a source of As in the living room dust. The results of the study have confirmed the utility of this approach in identifying specific metal forms within the dust.

  8. Non-targeted screening of house dust samples using accurate mass TOFMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    House dust exists as an environmental repository of chemicals to which we are exposed in our homes. A growing number of studies have targeted select persistent organic and inorganic pollutants found in house dust. Many have concluded that dust exists as an important human expos...

  9. Flame retardant associations between children's handwipes and house dust.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Heather M; Misenheimer, John; Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F

    2014-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), flame retardants (FRs) have been ubiquitously detected at high concentrations in indoor environments; however, with their recent phase-out, more attention is being focused on measurements of exposure to alternative FRs such as organophosphate FRs (OPFRs). In our previous research, we found that PBDE residues measured on children's handwipes were a strong predictor of serum PBDE levels. Here we build upon this research to examine longitudinal changes in PBDEs in indoor dust and children's handwipes, and explore the associations between handwipes and dust for alternative FRs. Children from our previous study were re-contacted after approximately two years and new samples of indoor dust and handwipes were collected. PBDE dust-levels were significantly correlated between two different sampling rounds separated by two years; however, PBDE levels in handwipes were not correlated, perhaps suggesting that the sources of PBDEs remained relatively constant in the home, but that behavioral differences in children are changing with age and influencing handwipe levels. OPFRs [i.e. tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP)], 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, also known as TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP, also known as TBPH), and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were also ubiquitously detected in house dust samples and geometric mean levels were similar to PBDE levels, or higher in the case of the OPFRs. Significant associations between handwipes and house dust were observed for these alternative FRs, particularly for EH-TBB (rs=0.54; p<0.001). Increasing house dust levels and age were associated with higher levels of FRs in handwipes, and high hand washing frequency (>5 times d(-1)) was associated with lower FR levels in handwipes. Overall these data suggest that exposure to these alternative FRs will be similar to PBDE exposure, and the influence of hand-to-mouth behavior in children's exposure needs to be further examined to better estimate exposure potential. PMID:24485814

  10. Associations between bacterial communities of house dust and infant gut

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, T.; Koster, B.; Maughan, H.; Escobar, M.; Azad, M.B.; Guttman, D.S.; Sears, M.R.; Becker, A.B.; Brook, J.R.; Takaro, T.K.; Kozyrskyj, A.L.; Scott, J.A.

    2014-05-01

    The human gut is host to a diverse and abundant community of bacteria that influence health and disease susceptibility. This community develops in infancy, and its composition is strongly influenced by environmental factors, notably perinatal anthropogenic exposures such as delivery mode (Cesarean vs. vaginal) and feeding method (breast vs. formula); however, the built environment as a possible source of exposure has not been considered. Here we report on a preliminary investigation of the associations between bacteria in house dust and the nascent fecal microbiota from 20 subjects from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study using high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Despite significant differences between the dust and fecal microbiota revealed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis, permutation analysis confirmed that 14 bacterial OTUs representing the classes Actinobacteria (3), Bacilli (3), Clostridia (6) and Gammaproteobacteria (2) co-occurred at a significantly higher frequency in matched dust–stool pairs than in randomly permuted pairs, indicating an association between these dust and stool communities. These associations could indicate a role for the indoor environment in shaping the nascent gut microbiota, but future studies will be needed to confirm that our findings do not solely reflect a reverse pathway. Although pet ownership was strongly associated with the presence of certain genera in the dust for dogs (Agrococcus, Carnobacterium, Exiguobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Leifsonia and Neisseria) and cats (Escherichia), no clear patterns were observed in the NMDS-resolved stool community profiles as a function of pet ownership.

  11. MITE ANTIGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN HOUSE DUST AND THE OCCURRENCE OF WHEEZING IN CHILDREN WITH MITE DUST ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied the relationship between dust mite antigen concentrations in house dust samples and the occurrence and frequency of wheezing in 58 children with dust mite allergy (wheal > 4 mm. mean diameter in response to a prick test with either D-. farinae or D pteronyssinus antige...

  12. Control of house dust mites by electrical heating blankets.

    PubMed

    Mosbech, H; Korsgaard, J; Lind, P

    1988-04-01

    The contents of house dust mites, Dermatophagoides (D), in 10 beds supplied with electrical heating blankets (EHBs) and in 10 control beds were followed for 1 year. All beds were in regular use during the study period. Dust from mattresses and EHBs was collected monthly and analyzed for D by microscopy. Blankets were turned on during daytime and were washed every 3 months. For each bed the median concentration of D during the entire period was related to initial value. In the beds supplied with blankets, the overall median was 52% compared to 122% in the control beds (p less than 0.05). The difference between the two groups of beds was observed within the first month. Major antigens from D were reduced to 32% in the beds supplied with blankets and increased to 120% in the control beds (p less than 0.05). Climatic conditions were measured beneath the blanket in a spare bed. When beds were covered by eiderdown, temperature was increased by 26 degrees C, and the relative humidity was decreased by 24% within 3 hours. In conclusion, EHBs appear capable of reducing relative humidity and concentration of house dust mites on mattress surfaces. PMID:3356849

  13. Shellfish and House Dust Mite Allergies: Is the Link Tropomyosin?

    PubMed

    Wong, Lydia; Huang, Chiung Hui; Lee, Bee Wah

    2016-03-01

    Crustacean shellfish allergy is an important cause of food allergy and anaphylaxis in Asia. The major allergen in shellfish allergy is tropomyosin, a pan-allergen that is also found in house dust mites and cockroaches. Tropomyosins from house dust mites (HDMs) have a high sequence homology to shellfish tropomyosins, and cross-reactivity between HDM and shrimp tropomyosins has been demonstrated. Exposure to inhaled tropomyosins from house dust mites has been postulated to be the primary sensitizer for shellfish allergy, in a reaction analogous to the oral allergy (inhalant-food) syndrome. This notion is supported by indirect data from the effects of HDM immunotherapy on shellfish allergy, and strong correlations of shellfish and HDM sensitization. HDM immunotherapy has been reported to induce both shrimp allergy in non-allergic patients and shrimp tolerance in shrimp-allergic patients. Epidemiological surveys have also demonstrated a strong correlation between shellfish and HDM sensitization in both hospital-based and community-based studies. Unexposed populations have also been shown to develop sensitization-shellfish sensitization in orthodox Jews with no history of shellfish consumption was associated with HDM sensitization. Reciprocally, HDM sensitization in an Icelandic population living in a HDM-free environment was associated with shrimp sensitization. In vitro IgE inhibition studies on sera in shrimp-allergic Spanish patients indicate that mites are the primary sensitizer in shrimp-allergic patients living in humid and warm climates. Current data supports the hypothesis that tropomyosin is the link between HDM and shellfish allergies. The role of tropomyosin in HDM and shellfish allergies is a fertile field for investigation as it may provide novel immunotherapeutic strategies for shellfish allergy. PMID:26739402

  14. Impact of soil and dust lead on children's blood lead on Children's blood lead in contaminated areas of Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, M.; Lind, B.; Soerensen, S.; Vahter, M.

    2000-04-01

    The impact of lead in soil and dust on blood lead concentrations in young children and the risk of health effects were investigated in an urban and a mining areas of Sweden. Blood, soil, and indoor dust, as well as information on lead-exposure factors, were collected. The blood lead concentrations (total range = 9--77 {micro}g/l) the authors measured indicated a low risk for lead-induced health effects. Lead in soil and in dust had little effect on blood lead concentrations, given the present conditions and present concentration range--especially in the mining area. Urban children had significantly higher blood lead concentrations that children in the mining area, despite higher concentrations of lead in soil in the mining area. In the urban children, blood lead concentrations were influenced by parental smoking and lead in dust at day-care centers.

  15. A NEW HOUSE DUST COLLECTION SYSTEM AND ITS USE IN A STUDY OF ASTHMA IN DUST MITE SENSITIVE CHILDREN IN RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype dust collection system, the House Dust Vacuum One (HDVI), was designed for use in a study to investigate the relationship between house dust mite antigen levels and the presence of asthma in dust mite sensitive children. The HDVI was designed for the collection of dus...

  16. House dust mite and cat allergen in different indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Custovic, A; Taggart, S C; Woodcock, A

    1994-12-01

    Allergy to house dust mites (HDM) and domestic pets is a major cause of asthma. People in developed countries spend more than 90% of their time indoors. We have measured levels of HDM allergen Der pI and cat allergen Fel dI in public buildings and public transport. Dust samples were collected by vacuuming a 1 m2 area for 2 min from five schools, six hotels, four cinemas, six pubs, three buses, two trains and 12 domestic households without a cat. Der pI and Fel dI were assayed with monoclonal antibodies in a two-site immunometric ELISA. Der pI concentration was significantly higher in the private homes than in comparable sites in public places except for cinema seats (where high values were found) compared with domestic sofas. Der pI > 2000 ng/g of fine dust was found in 30% of the upholstered seats, 9% having a concentration > 10,000 ng/g. Fel dI levels were significantly higher in the dust from upholstered seats (geometric mean 14.88 micrograms/g) than in carpeted floors (geometric mean 0.73 micrograms/g), and in public places than in private homes. Fel dI > 8 micrograms/g was found in 79% of the upholstered seats or furniture sampled in public buildings or public transport. In conclusion, upholstered seats from public buildings and public transport constitute an allergen reservoir for continuous contamination of the indoor environment which could compromise the effects of allergen avoidance employed at home. PMID:7889431

  17. A User Manual Utah's Leading Advocate For Quality Rental Housing

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    A User Manual Utah's Leading Advocate For Quality Rental Housing 448 East 6400 South Suite 460 Murray , Utah 84107 801-506-0204 Fax 801-484-8649 www.uaahq.org #12;#12;Without quality rental housing the economy of Utah would not be able to grow and there would not be as many options for people to live

  18. Is permanent parasitism reversible?--critical evidence from early evolution of house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Klimov, Pavel B; OConnor, Barry

    2013-05-01

    Long-term specialization may limit the ability of a species to respond to new environmental conditions and lead to a higher likelihood of extinction. For permanent parasites and other symbionts, the most intriguing question is whether these organisms can return to a free-living lifestyle and, thus, escape an evolutionary "dead end." This question is directly related to Dollo's law, which stipulates that a complex trait (such as being free living vs. parasitic) cannot re-evolve again in the same form. Here, we present conclusive evidence that house dust mites, a group of medically important free-living organisms, evolved from permanent parasites of warm-blooded vertebrates. A robust, multigene topology (315 taxa, 8942 nt), ancestral character state reconstruction, and a test for irreversible evolution (Dollo's law) demonstrate that house dust mites have abandoned a parasitic lifestyle, secondarily becoming free living, and then speciated in several habitats. Hence, as exemplified by this model system, highly specialized permanent parasites may drastically de-specialize to the extent of becoming free living and, thus escape from dead-end evolution. Our phylogenetic and historical ecological framework explains the limited cross-reactivity between allergens from the house dust mites and "storage" mites and the ability of the dust mites to inhibit host immune responses. It also provides insights into how ancestral features related to parasitism (frequent ancestral shifts to unrelated hosts, tolerance to lower humidity, and pre-existing enzymes targeting skin and keratinous materials) played a major role in reversal to the free-living state. We propose that parasitic ancestors of pyroglyphids shifted to nests of vertebrates. Later the nest-inhabiting pyroglyphids expanded into human dwellings to become a major source of allergens. PMID:23417682

  19. 35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL TOWER No. 2 (NOTE: SKYLIGHT ABOVE; COAL CARS IN FAR BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  20. 39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. 1 (WEST) (NOTE: COAL CARS No. 9 & 5 IN BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  1. Removal of lead contaminated dusts from hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Roger D; Condoor, Sridhar; Batek, Joe; Ong, Kee Hean; Backer, Denis; Sterling, David; Siria, Jeff; Chen, John J; Ashley, Peter

    2006-01-15

    Government guidelines have widely recommended trisodium phosphate (TSP) or "lead-specific" cleaning detergents for removal of lead-contaminated dust (LCD) from hard surfaces, such as floors and window areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if low-phosphate, non-lead-specific cleaners could be used to efficiently remove LCD from 3 types of surfaces (vinyl flooring, wood, and wallpaper). Laboratory methods were developed and validated for simulating the doping, embedding, and sponge cleaning of the 3 surface types with 4 categories of cleaners: lead-specific detergents, nonionic cleaners, anionic cleaners, and trisodium phosphate (TSP). Vinyl flooring and wood were worn using artificial means. Materials were ashed, followed by ultrasound extraction, and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). One-way analysis of variance approach was used to evaluate the surface and detergent effects. Surface type was found to be a significant factor in removal of lead (p < 0.001). Vinyl flooring cleaned better than wallpaper by over 14% and wood cleaned better than wallpaper by 13%. There was no difference between the cleaning action of vinyl flooring and wood. No evidence was found to support the use of TSP or lead-specific detergents over all-purpose cleaning detergents for removal of lead-contaminated dusts. No-phosphate, non-lead-specific detergents are effective in sponge cleaning of lead-contaminated hard surfaces and childhood lead prevention programs should consider recommending all-purpose household detergents for removal of lead-contaminated dust after appropriate vacuuming. PMID:16468407

  2. Motivation to dust-bathe of laying hens housed in cages and in aviaries.

    PubMed

    Colson, S; Arnould, C; Michel, V

    2007-03-01

    New housing systems for commercial egg production, furnished cages and non-cage systems, should improve the welfare of laying hens. In particular, thanks to the presence of a litter area, these new housing systems are thought to satisfy the dust-bathing motivation of hens more than in conventional cages, in which no litter area is present. However, although apparently obvious, there is no concrete evidence that non-cage systems, particularly aviaries, satisfy hens' motivation to dust-bathe and thus improve hens' welfare in terms of dust-bathing behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare hens' dust-bathing motivation when housed for a long time under similar conditions to commercial conditions in laying aviaries (with litter) and in conventional cages (without litter). Three treatments were compared: hens reared in floor pens then housed in conventional cages, hens reared in furnished floor pens then housed in a laying aviary, and hens reared in rearing aviaries then housed in a laying aviary. All three treatments provided access to litter during the rearing period. After transfer to the laying systems, access to litter was maintained for the aviary hens but stopped for the cage hens. Twelve groups of four hens per treatment were tested 36 to 43 weeks after transfer. The hens were placed in sawdust-filled testing arenas, and latency to dust-bathe, duration and number of dust baths, and number of hens dust-bathing were recorded. Latency to dust-bathe was shorter, dust baths were longer and more numerous and more hens dust-bathed among cage hens than among aviary hens. Our results indicate that hens' motivation to dust-bathe was more satisfied in laying aviaries than in conventional cages. Thus, laying aviaries improve hens' welfare in term of dust-bathing behaviour compared with conventional cages. PMID:22444341

  3. Lead in residential soil and dust in a mining and smelting district in northern Armenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Orlova, Anna; Dunlap, Charles E; Babayan, Emil; Farfel, Mark; Von Braun, Margrit

    2004-03-01

    This pilot study of sources of lead exposure in residential settings was conducted in a mining and smelting district in northern Armenia. Samples of exterior soil and dust and interior house dust were collected in and around apartment buildings in Alaverdi where the country's largest polymetallic smelter is located, and in nearby mining towns of Aghtala and Shamlugh. The NITON XL-723 Multi-Element XRF analyzer was used for lead testing. Lead levels in samples from Alaverdi were higher than those in Shamlugh and Aghtala. In all three towns, the highest lead levels were found in loose exterior dust samples, and lead concentrations in yard soil were higher than those in garden soil. Many soil samples (34%) and the majority of loose dust samples (77%) in Alaverdi exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency standard of 400 mg/kg for bare soil in children's play areas. In addition, 36% of floor dust samples from apartments in Alaverdi exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency standard of 40 microg/ft(2) for lead loading in residential floor dust. The Armenian Ministry of Health and other interested agencies are being informed about the findings of the study so that they can consider and develop educational and preventive programs including blood lead screening among sensitive populations. PMID:15016598

  4. CHILDHOOD BLOOD LEAD LEVELS NOT AFFECTED BY HOUSING COMPLIANCE STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a secondary analysis of data from the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of Philadelphia (July 1, 1999 through September 1, 2004), the authors evaluated the effect of housing compliance status and time to achieve compliance on changes in children's blood lead levels. ...

  5. Do new wipe materials outperform traditional lead dust cleaning methods?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Roger D; Ong, Kee Hean; Emo, Brett; Kennedy, Jason; Brown, Christopher A; Condoor, Sridhar; Thummalakunta, Laxmi

    2012-01-01

    Government guidelines have traditionally recommended the use of wet mopping, sponging, or vacuuming for removal of lead-contaminated dust from hard surfaces in homes. The emergence of new technologies, such as the electrostatic dry cloth and wet disposable clothes used on mopheads, for removal of dust provides an opportunity to evaluate their ability to remove lead compared with more established methods. The purpose of this study was to determine if relative differences exist between two new and two older methods for removal of lead-contaminated dust (LCD) from three wood surfaces that were characterized by different roughness or texture. Standard leaded dust, <75 ?m, was deposited by gravity onto the wood specimens. Specimens were cleaned using an automated device. Electrostatic dry cloths (dry Swiffer), wet Swiffer cloths, paper shop towels with non-ionic detergent, and vacuuming were used for cleaning LCD from the specimens. Lead analysis was by anodic stripping voltammetry. After the cleaning study was conducted, a study of the coefficient of friction was performed for each wipe material. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the surface and cleaning methods. There were significant interactions between cleaning method and surface types, p = 0.007. Cleaning method was found be a significant factor in removal of lead, p <0.001, indicating that effectiveness of each cleaning methods is different. However, cleaning was not affected by types of surfaces. The coefficient of friction, significantly different among the three wipes, is likely to influence the cleaning action. Cleaning method appears to be more important than texture in LCD removal from hard surfaces. There are some small but important factors in cleaning LCD from hard surfaces, including the limits of a Swiffer mop to conform to curved surfaces and the efficiency of the wetted shop towel and vacuuming for cleaning all surface textures. The mean percentage reduction in lead dust achieved by the traditional methods (vacuuming and wet wiping) was greater and more consistent compared to the new methods (electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mop). Vacuuming and wet wiping achieved lead reductions of 92% ± 4% and 91%, ± 4%, respectively, while the electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mops achieved lead reductions of only 89 ± 8% and  81 ± 17%, respectively. PMID:22746281

  6. Is House-Dust Nicotine a Good Surrogate for Household Smoking?

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Ward, Mary H.; Nishioka, Marcia G.; Gunier, Robert; Colt, Joanne S.; Reynolds, Peggy; Selvin, Steve; Buffler, Patricia; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    The literature is inconsistent regarding associations between parental smoking and childhood leukemia, possibly because previous studies used self-reported smoking habits as surrogates for children's true exposures to cigarette smoke. Here, the authors investigated the use of nicotine concentrations in house dust as measures of children's exposure to cigarette smoke in 469 households from the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (1999–2007). House dust was collected by using high-volume surface samplers and household vacuum cleaners and was analyzed for nicotine via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Using multivariable linear regression, the authors evaluated the effects of self-reported parental smoking, parental demographics, house characteristics, and other covariates on house-dust nicotine concentrations. They observed that nicotine concentrations in house dust were associated with self-reported smoking for periods of months and years before dust collection. Furthermore, the authors found that the relation between nicotine dust levels and self-reported smoking varied by parental age and socioeconomic status. These findings suggest that house-dust nicotine concentrations reflect long-term exposures to cigarette smoke in the home and that they may be less biased surrogates for children's exposures to cigarette smoke than self-reported smoking habits. PMID:19299402

  7. Utilizing Pyrosequencing and Quantitative pCR to Characterize Fungal Populations among House Dust Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular techniques are an alternative to culturing and counting methods in quantifying indoor fungal contamination. Pyrosequencing offers the possibility of identifying unexpected indoor fungi. In this study, 50 house dust samples were collected from homes in the Yakima Valley,...

  8. METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND OTHER SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HOUSE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods were validated to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other semivolatile organic compounds in house dust. e also examined the storage stability of three potential markers (solanesol, nicotine, and continine) for particulate-phase environmental ...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR SPECIFIC LAWN- APPLIED PESTICIDES IN HOUSE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many pesticides have been developed for residential outdoor application, particularly for lawn care. Residues from these applications may be tracked into the home, where they become incorporated with house dust and persist for long periods of time. Consequently, potential human...

  10. Lead dust in Broken Hill homes: effect of remediation on indoor lead levels.

    PubMed

    Boreland, F; Lyle, D M

    2006-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether home remediation effectively reduced indoor lead levels in Broken Hill, a long-established silver-lead-zinc mining town in outback Australia. A before-after study of the effect of home remediation on indoor lead levels was embedded into a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of remediation for reducing elevated blood lead levels in young children. Moist towelettes were used to measure lead loading (microg/m2) on internal windowsills and internal and entry floors of 98 homes; samples were collected before, immediately after, and 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 months after remediation. Data were log(10) transformed for the analysis. Remediation reduced average indoor lead levels by approximately 50%, and lead levels remained low for the duration of the follow-up period (10 months). The greatest gains were made in homes with the highest initial lead levels; homes with low preremediation lead levels showed little or no benefit. Before remediation, homes located in areas with high soil lead levels or with "poor" dust proofing had higher lead levels than those in areas with lower soil lead levels or with "medium" or "good" dust proofing; these relative differences remained after remediation. There was no evidence that lead loading was reduced by an increased opportunity to become aware of lead issues. We conclude that remediation is an effective strategy for reducing the lead exposure of children living in homes with high indoor lead levels. PMID:16099450

  11. Efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for house dust mite allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Cingi, Cemal; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Ulusoy, Seçkin; Acar, Mustafa; ?irin, Seher; Çobano?lu, Bengü; Birdane, Leman; Kalayc?k, Çi?dem; Çak?r, Burak Ömür; O?han, Fatih; Aynac?, Sevilay; Erdo?mu?, Nagehan; Y?ld?r?m, Ömürsen; ?ahin, Ethem; Bulut, Fuat; Aksoy, Mehmet Akif; Türe, Nurullah; Bal, Cengiz

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the outcomes of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in house dust mite-induced allergic rhinitis (HDM-AR) patients. In this prospective, multicentric study, 186 patients with AR who had positive skin prick test results for HDMs were included. The patients were administered SLIT using Staloral 300 for 1 year. Evaluation of the patients regarding symptom scores, clinical findings and Rhinitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (RQLQ) scores was performed at baseline, and then at 6 and 12 months of therapy. Our results showed that, for all of the evaluated items (symptom scores, clinical findings and RQLQ scores), 12-month values were significantly lower than those at 6 months and baseline. Similarly, 6-month values were significantly lower than those at baseline. There were no complications in any of our patients. SLIT for HDM-AR is a treatment modality that can be used safely. We obtained better results than expected, and the treatment showed a positive psychological effect; the patients believed that SLIT was the final step of treatment and, which made them feel better. PMID:25516223

  12. Concentration and determinants of molds and allergens in indoor air and house dust of French dwellings.

    PubMed

    Dallongeville, Arnaud; Le Cann, Pierre; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Chevrier, Cécile; Costet, Nathalie; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Blanchard, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Molds and allergens are common indoor biocontaminants. The aims of this study were to assess the concentrations of common molds in indoor air and floor dust and the concentrations of house dust mite, cat and dog allergens in mattress dust in French dwellings, and to assess predictors of these concentrations. A sample of 150 houses in Brittany (western France) was investigated. Airborne Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in more than 90% of the dwellings, Aspergillus in 46% and Alternaria in only 6% of the housings. Regarding floor dust samples, Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in 92 and 80% of the housings respectively, Aspergillus in 49% and Alternaria in 14%. House dust mite allergens Der p1 and Der f1 were detected in 90% and 77% of the mattress dust samples respectively and Can f1 and Fel d1 in 37% and 89% of the homes. Airborne and dustborne mold concentrations, although not statistically correlated (except for Aspergillus) shared most of their predictors. Multivariate linear models for mold levels, explaining up to 62% of the variability, showed an influence of the season, of the age of the dwelling, of aeration habits, presence of pets, smoking, signals of dampness, temperature and relative humidity. Allergens in the dust of the mattress were strongly related to the presence of pets and cleaning practices of bedsheets, these factors accounting for 60% of the variability. This study highlights ubiquitous contamination by molds and underlines complex interaction between outdoor and indoor sources and factors. PMID:26094801

  13. Occurrence of Respiratory Symptoms Resulting from Exposure to House Dust Mites in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Zembala, Marek; Hajto, Barbara; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Perera, Frederica P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of house dust mite (HDM) allergens within homes of three-year-old children, to identify factors responsible for its variation and to test the hypothesis whether the content of HDM allergens exceeding 2 [mu]g/g dust may be regarded as a risk level of sensitization possibly affecting respiratory…

  14. Development of a Simultaneous Extraction and Cleanup Method for Pyrethroid Pesticides from Indoor House Dust Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ef?cient and reliable analytical method was developed for the sensitive and selective quanti?cation of pyrethroid pesticides (PYRs) in house dust samples. The method is based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) of the dust-bound PYRs into dichloromethane (DCM) wi...

  15. Assessing remedial effectiveness through the blood lead:soil/dust lead relationship at the Bunker Hill Superfund Site in the Silver Valley of Idaho.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, Ian; Spalinger, Susan; Petroysan, Varduhi; von Braun, Margrit

    2003-02-15

    The 21 square mile Bunker Hill Superfund Site in northern Idaho includes several thousand acres of contaminated hillsides and floodplain, a 365-acre abandoned lead/zinc smelter and is home to more than 7000 people in 5 residential communities. Childhood lead poisoning was epidemic in the 1970s with >75% of children exceeding 40 microg/dl blood lead. Health response activities have been ongoing for three decades. In 1991, a blood lead goal of 95% of children with levels less than 10 microg/dl was adopted. The cleanup strategy, based on biokinetic pathways models, was to reduce house dust lead exposure through elimination of soil-borne sources. An interim health intervention program, that included monitoring blood lead and exposures levels, was instituted to reduce exposures through parental education during the cleanup. In 1989 and 2001, 56% and 3% of children, respectively, exceeded the blood lead criteria. More than 4000 paired blood lead/environmental exposure observations were collected during this period. Several analyses of these data were accomplished. Slope factors derived for the relationship between blood lead, soil and dust concentrations are age-dependent and similar to literature reported values. Repeat measures analysis assessing year to year changes found that the remediation effort (without intervention) had approximately a 7.5 microg/dl effect in reducing a 2-year-old child's mean blood lead level over the course of the last ten years. Those receiving intervention had an additional 2-15 microg/dl decrease. Structural equations models indicate that from 40 to 50% of the blood lead absorbed from soils and dusts is through house dust with approximately 30% directly from community-wide soils and 30% from the home yard and immediate neighborhood. Both mean blood lead levels and percent of children to exceed 10 microg/dl have paralleled soil/dust lead intake rates estimated from the pathways model. Application of the IEUBK model for lead indicates that recommended USEPA default parameters overestimate mean blood lead levels, although the magnitude of over-prediction is diminished in recent years. Application of the site-specific model, using the soil and dust partitions suggested in the pathways model and an effective bioavailability of 18%, accurately predicts mean blood lead levels and percent of children to exceed 10 microg/dl throughout the 11-year cleanup period. This reduced response rate application of the IEUBK is consistent with the analysis used to originally develop the cleanup criteria and indicates the blood lead goal will be achieved. PMID:12568769

  16. Organotin compounds, including butyltins and octyltins, in house dust from Albany, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Takahashi, Shin; Fujiwara, Naohiro; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-05-01

    Organotin compounds (OTs) have been used in a wide variety of consumer products. Despite this, very few studies have reported the occurrence of OTs in house dust or exposure of humans to OTs through the ingestion of house dust. In the present study, concentrations of monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monooctyltin (MOT), dioctyltin (DOT), trioctyltin (TOT), diphenyltin (DPT), and triphenyltin (TPT) were measured in dust collected from 24 houses in Albany, New York, USA. In addition, a few household products, such as wallpaper, floor tile, vinyl window blinds, and handbags were analyzed for the presence of OTs. Organotins were found in all of the house dust samples analyzed, and total OT concentrations varied from 390 to 28,000 ng/g (mean +/- SD: 6700 +/- 6200; median: 5000). Relative abundances of OTs in house dust were in the order MBT >MOT >DBT >DOT >TBT. TOT, DPT, and TPT were not found in any of the samples at concentrations above their corresponding detection limits. MBT accounted for, on average, 51% of the total OT concentrations. Mean concentrations of total OTs found in house dust samples from our study were two to five times higher than concentrations that have been reported for dust samples from several European countries. Calculations indicate that dust ingestion by children account for, on average, 15-18% of the tolerable daily intake proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The estimated rates of OT intake by children via dust ingestion were, on average, eightfold higher than the intake rates calculated for adults. Household products, such as wallpaper, contained total OT concentrations as high as 780,000 ng/g. PMID:20379706

  17. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF LEAD PAINT ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN RESIDENTIAL HOUSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to demonstrate lead-based paint (LBP) removal from architectural wood components in CO2 unoccupied residential housing using four technologies: granular carbon dioxide (CO2 blasting), pelletized CO2 blasting, encapsulant paint remover, and wet abrasive bl...

  18. Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Wayne R

    2015-10-01

    The allergenic load of house dust mite allergy is largely constituted by a few proteins with a hierarchical pattern of allergenicity. The serodominant specificities are the group 1&2 and the group 23 faecal allergens. The collective IgE binding to the group 1&2 allergens can measure unequivocal HDM sensitisation better than HDM extracts although discrepancies have been found in regions with complex acarofauna suggesting a need to investigate the specificity with allergen components. The group 4, 5, 7&21 allergens that each induce responses in about 40% of subjects are mid-tier allergens accounting for most of the remaining IgE binding. Their titres are proportional to the concomitant responses to Der p1&2. Group 2 allergen variants have different antibody binding. Body proteins only occasionally induce sensitisation although a higher prevalence of binding by atopic dermatitis patients provides a new avenue of research. A broad spectrum of IgE binding has been associated with diverse symptoms but not with the severity of asthma which is associated with low IgG antibody. Some allergens such as the group 14 large lipid binding proteins and the recently described proteins Der f 24-33, need further investigation but with the cognoscence that other denominated allergens have been found to be minor sensitisers by comparative quantitative analyses. Scabies is a confounder for diagnosis with extracts, inducing cross-reactive antibodies with Der p 4&20 as is seafood allergy with cross reactivity to Der p 10 a minor HDM allergen. The HDM genome sequence can now be used to verify allelic and paralogous variations. PMID:26433526

  19. Application of neutral electrolyzed water spray for reducing dust levels in a layer breeding house.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weichao; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Yang, Zhanyong

    2012-11-01

    Reducing airborne dust is an essential process for improving hen housing environment. Dust reduction effects of neutral electrolyzed water (pH 8.2) spray were investigated in a commercial tunnel-ventilated layer breeding house during production in northern China. A multipoint sampler was used to measure airborne dust concentration to study the dust reduction effects and distribution in the house. Compared with the control treatment (without spray), airborne dust level was reduced 34% in the 3 hr after spraying 216 mL m(-2) neutral electrolyzed water in the breeding house. The dust concentration was significantly higher during the periods of feed distribution (1.13 +/- 0.13 mg m(-3)) and artificial insemination (0.72 +/- 0.13 mg m(-3)) compared with after spray (0.47 +/- 0.09 mg m(-3)) and during lights-off period (0.29 +/- 0.08 mg m(-3)) in the three consecutive testing days (P <0.05). The experimental cage area was divided into four zones along the length of the house, with zone 1 nearest to the evaporative cooling pad and zone 4 nearest to the fans. The air temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, and dust concentration were measured at the sampling points of the four zones in 3 consecutive days and mortality of the birds for the duration of a month were investigated. The results showed that the air temperature, airflow rate, dust concentration, and number of dead birds increase from zone 1 to zone 4 in the tunnel-ventilated layer breeding house. PMID:23210224

  20. Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) concentrations in house dust are related to hormone levels in men

    PubMed Central

    Meeker, John D.; Johnson, Paula I.; Camann, David; Hauser, Russ

    2009-01-01

    Despite documented widespread human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) through dietary intake and contact or inhalation of indoor dust, along with growing laboratory evidence for altered endocrine function following exposure, human studies of PBDE exposure and endocrine effects remain limited. We conducted a preliminary study within an ongoing study on the impact of environmental exposures on male reproductive health. We measured serum hormone levels and PBDE concentrations (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust from 24 men recruited through a US infertility clinic. BDE 47 and 99 were detected in 100% of dust samples, and BDE 100 was detected in 67% of dust samples, at concentrations similar to those reported in previous US studies. In multivariable regression models adjusted for age and BMI, there was a statistically significant inverse relationship between dust PBDE concentrations and free androgen index. Dust PBDE concentrations were also strongly and inversely associated with luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and positively associated with inhibin B and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Finally, consistent with limited recent human studies of adults, PBDEs were positively associated with free T4. In conclusion, the present study provides compelling evidence of altered hormone levels in relation to PBDE exposures estimated as concentrations in house dust, and that house dust is an important source of human PBDE exposure, but more research is urgently needed. PMID:19211133

  1. Relationships between Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Concentrations in House Dust and Serum

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paula I.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Sjodin, Andreas; Meeker, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been measured in the home environment and in humans, but studies linking environmental levels to body burdens are limited. This study examines the relationship between PBDE concentrations in house dust and serum from adults residing in these homes. We measured PBDE concentrations in house dust from 50 homes and in serum of male-female couples from 12 of the homes. Detection rates, dust-serum and within-matrix correlations varied by PBDE congener. There was a strong correlation (r = 0.65–0.89, p < 0.05) between dust and serum concentrations of several predominant PBDE congeners (BDE 47, 99 and 100). Dust and serum levels of BDE 153 were not correlated (r < 0.01). The correlation of dust and serum levels of BDE 209 could not be evaluated due to low detection rates of BDE 209 in serum. Serum concentrations of the sum of BDE 47, 99, and 100 were also strongly correlated within couples (r = 0.85, p = 0.0005). This study provides evidence that house dust is a primary exposure pathway of PBDEs and supports the use of dust PBDE concentrations as a marker for exposure to PBDE congeners other than BDE 153. PMID:20521814

  2. Human Exposure Assessment: Development of methods to assess the bioaccessibility of organic contaminants sorbed to soils and house dusts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research task- Are physicochemical properties of soil and house dust predictive of the bioaccessibility of sorbed organic compoundsGoalIdentify dust and soil characteristics that influence the bioaccessibility of organic compounds and provide chemical specific data on the fractio...

  3. A survey of spatially distributed exterior dust lead loadings in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Caravanos, Jack; Weiss, Arlene L.; Blaise, Marc J.; Jaeger, Rudolph J. . E-mail: jaegerr@envmed.com

    2006-02-15

    This work documents ambient lead dust deposition values (lead loading) for the boroughs of New York City in 2003-2004. Currently, no regulatory standards exist for exterior concentrations of lead in settled dust. This is in contrast to the clearance and risk assessment standards that exist for interior residential dust. The reported potential for neurobehavioral toxicity and adverse cognitive development in children due to lead exposure prompts public health concerns about undocumented lead sources. Such sources may include settled dust of outdoor origin. Dust sampling throughout the five boroughs of NYC was done from the top horizontal portion of pedestrian traffic control signals (PTCS) at selected street intersections along main thoroughfares. The data (n=214 samples) show that lead in dust varies within each borough with Brooklyn having the highest median concentration (730{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), followed in descending order by Staten Island (452{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), the Bronx (382{mu}g/ft{sup 2}), Queens (198{mu}g/ft{sup 2}) and finally, Manhattan (175{mu}g/ft{sup 2}). When compared to the HUD/EPA indoor lead in dust standard of 40{mu}g/ft{sup 2}, our data show that this value is exceeded in 86% of the samples taken. An effort was made to determine the source of the lead in the dust atop of the PTCS. The lead in the dust and the yellow signage paint (which contains lead) were compared using isotopic ratio analysis. Results showed that the lead-based paint chip samples from intact signage did not isotopically match the dust wipe samples taken from the same surface. We know that exterior dust containing lead contributes to interior dust lead loading. Therefore, settled leaded dust in the outdoor environment poses a risk for lead exposure to children living in urban areas, namely, areas with elevated childhood blood lead levels and background lead dust levels from a variety of unidentified sources.

  4. Determinants, reproducibility, and seasonal variation of bacterial cell wall components and viable counts in house dust.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, H K; Täubel, M; Roponen, M; Vepsäläinen, A; Rantakokko, P; Pekkanen, J; Nevalainen, A; von Mutius, E; Hyvärinen, A

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the determinants that affect concentrations of the bacterial cell wall components 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) and muramic acid and of total viable bacteria and actinomycetes in house dust; and (ii) to examine the seasonal variation and reproducibility of these bacterial cell wall components in house dust. A number of lifestyle and environmental factors, mostly not consistent for different bacterial measures but commonly including the type of dwelling and farming (number of livestock), explained up to 37% of the variation of the bacterial concentrations in 212 homes in Eastern Finland. The reproducibility of 3-OH FAs and muramic acid measurements in house dust were studied in five urban homes and were found to be generally high (ICC 74-84%). Temporal variation observed in repeated sampling of the same home throughout a year was more pronounced for 3-OH FAs determinations (ICC 22%) than for muramic acid (ICC 55-66%). We conclude that determinants vary largely for different types of bacterial measurements in house dust; the measured parameters represent different aspects of the bacterial content indoors. More than one sample is needed to describe bacterial concentrations in house dust in the home environment due to large temporal variation. PMID:24992650

  5. The impact of drinking water, indoor dust and paint on blood lead levels of children aged 1–5 years in Montréal (Québec, Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Levallois, Patrick; St-Laurent, Julie; Gauvin, Denis; Courteau, Marilčne; Prévost, Michčle; Campagna, Céline; Lemieux, France; Nour, Shokoufeh; D'Amour, Monique; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2014-01-01

    Lead is neurotoxic at very low dose and there is a need to better characterize the impact of domestic sources of lead on the biological exposure of young children. A cross-sectional survey evaluated the contribution of drinking water, house dust and paint to blood lead levels (BLLs) of young children living in old boroughs of Montréal (Canada). Three hundred and six children aged 1 to 5 years and currently drinking tap water participated in the study. For each participant, residential lead was measured in kitchen tap water, floor dust, windowsill dust and house paint and a venous blood sample was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between elevated BLL in the children (? 75th percentile) and indoor lead contamination by means of odds ratios (OR) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was an association between BLL ?75th percentile (1.78??g/dL) and water lead when the mean water concentration was >3.3??g/L: adjusted OR=4.7 (95% CI: 2.1–10.2). Windowsill dust loading >14.1??g/ft2 was also associated with BLL ?1.78??g/dL: adjusted OR=3.2 (95% CI: 1.3–7.8). Despite relatively low BLLs, tap water and house dust lead contribute to an increase of BLLs in exposed young children. PMID:23361441

  6. The impact of drinking water, indoor dust and paint on blood lead levels of children aged 1-5 years in Montréal (Québec, Canada).

    PubMed

    Levallois, Patrick; St-Laurent, Julie; Gauvin, Denis; Courteau, Marilčne; Prévost, Michčle; Campagna, Céline; Lemieux, France; Nour, Shokoufeh; D'Amour, Monique; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2014-01-01

    Lead is neurotoxic at very low dose and there is a need to better characterize the impact of domestic sources of lead on the biological exposure of young children. A cross-sectional survey evaluated the contribution of drinking water, house dust and paint to blood lead levels (BLLs) of young children living in old boroughs of Montréal (Canada). Three hundred and six children aged 1 to 5 years and currently drinking tap water participated in the study. For each participant, residential lead was measured in kitchen tap water, floor dust, windowsill dust and house paint and a venous blood sample was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between elevated BLL in the children (? 75th percentile) and indoor lead contamination by means of odds ratios (OR) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was an association between BLL ?75th percentile (1.78??g/dL) and water lead when the mean water concentration was >3.3??g/L: adjusted OR=4.7 (95% CI: 2.1-10.2). Windowsill dust loading >14.1??g/ft(2) was also associated with BLL ?1.78??g/dL: adjusted OR=3.2 (95% CI: 1.3-7.8). Despite relatively low BLLs, tap water and house dust lead contribute to an increase of BLLs in exposed young children. PMID:23361441

  7. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  12. Investigating A Novel Flame Retardant Known as V6: Measurements in Baby Products, House Dust and Car Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Gooden, David; Cooper, Ellen M.; McClean, Michael D.; Carignan, Courtney; Makey, Colleen; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    With the phase-out of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, the use of new and alternate flame retardants has been increasing. 2,2-bis(chloromethyl)propane-1,3-diyltetrakis(2-chloroethyl) bisphosphate, known as V6, is a flame retardant applied to polyurethane foam commonly found in furniture and automobile foam. However, to the authors’ knowledge, no research has been conducted on V6 levels in the environment. The intention of this study was to measure the concentration of V6 in foam collected from baby products where it was recently detected, and measure levels in dust samples collected from homes and automobiles in the Boston, MA area. To accomplish this a pure V6 commercial standard was purchased from a Chinese manufacturer and purified (> 98%). An analytical method to measure V6 in dust samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was developed. Extraction was conducted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and extracts were purified using an ENVI-Florisil SPE column (500 mg, 3mL). V6 was measured in foam samples collected from baby products with a concentration ranging from 24,500,000 to 59,500,000 ng/g of foam (n = 12, average ± sd: 46,500,000 ± 12,000,000 ng/g; i.e., on average, 4.6 % of the foam mass was V6). V6 was also detected in 19 of 20 car dust samples and 14 of 20 house dust samples analyzed. The concentration of V6 in the house dust ranged from < 5 ng/g to 1,110 ng/g with a median of 12.5 ng/g, and < 5 ng/g to 6,160 ng/g in the car dust with a median of 103.0 ng/g. Concentrations in car dust were significantly higher than the house dust, potentially indicating higher use of V6 in automobiles compared to products found in the home. Furthermore, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), a known carcinogen, was found in the V6 commercial mixture (14% by weight) as an impurity and was consistently detected with V6 in the foam samples analyzed. A significant correlation was also observed between V6 and TCEP in the dust samples, suggesting that the use of V6 is a significant source of TCEP in the indoor environment. PMID:23565680

  13. Investigating a novel flame retardant known as V6: measurements in baby products, house dust, and car dust.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Gooden, David; Cooper, Ellen M; McClean, Michael D; Carignan, Courtney; Makey, Colleen; Stapleton, Heather M

    2013-05-01

    With the phase-out of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, the use of new and alternate flame retardants has been increasing. 2,2-bis(chloromethyl)propane-1,3-diyltetrakis(2-chloroethyl) bisphosphate, known as V6, is a flame retardant applied to polyurethane foam commonly found in furniture and automobile foam. However, to the authors' knowledge, no research has been conducted on V6 levels in the environment. The intention of this study was to measure the concentration of V6 in foam collected from baby products where it was recently detected and measure levels in dust samples collected from homes and automobiles in the Boston, MA area. To accomplish this, a pure V6 commercial standard was purchased from a Chinese manufacturer and purified (>98%). An analytical method to measure V6 in dust samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was developed. Extraction was conducted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and extracts were purified using an ENVI-Florisil SPE column (500 mg, 3 mL). V6 was measured in foam samples collected from baby products with a concentration ranging from 24,500,000 to 59,500,000 ng/g of foam (n = 12, average ± sd: 46,500,000 ± 12,000,000 ng/g; i.e., on average, 4.6% of the foam mass was V6). V6 was also detected in 19 of 20 car dust samples and 14 of 20 house dust samples analyzed. The concentration of V6 in the house dust ranged from <5 ng/g to 1110 ng/g with a median of 12.5 ng/g, and <5 ng/g to 6160 ng/g in the car dust with a median of 103.0 ng/g. Concentrations in car dust were significantly higher than in the house dust potentially indicating higher use of V6 in automobiles compared to products found in the home. Furthermore, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), a known carcinogen, was found in the V6 commercial mixture (14% by weight) as an impurity and was consistently detected with V6 in the foam samples analyzed. A significant correlation was also observed between V6 and TCEP in the dust samples suggesting that the use of V6 is a significant source of TCEP in the indoor environment. PMID:23565680

  14. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...than 20 milligrams of freshly generated lead-oxide fume, calculated as lead...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...than 20 milligrams of freshly generated lead-oxide fume, calculated as lead...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...than 20 milligrams of freshly generated lead-oxide fume, calculated as lead...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...than 20 milligrams of freshly generated lead-oxide fume, calculated as lead...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators...than 20 milligrams of freshly generated lead-oxide fume, calculated as lead...

  19. Levels of house dust mite allergen in cars / Razine alergena prašinskih grinja u automobilima.

    PubMed

    Mason, Howard J; Smith, Ian; Anua, Siti Marwanis; Tagiyeva, Nargiz; Semple, Sean; Devereux, Graham

    2015-09-01

    This small study investigated house dust mite (HDM) allergen levels in cars and their owners' homes in north-east Scotland. Dust samples from twelve households and cars were collected in a standardised manner. The dust samples were extracted and measured for the Dermatophagoides group 2 allergens (Der p 2 and Der f 2) and total soluble protein. Allergen levels at homes tended to be higher than in the cars, but not significantly. However, they significantly correlated with paired car dust samples expressed either per unit weight of dust or soluble protein (rho=0.657; p=0.02 and 0.769; p=0.003, respectively). This points to house-to-car allergen transfer, with the car allergen levels largely reflecting levels in the owner's home. Car HDM allergen levels were lower than those reported in Brazil and the USA. Twenty-five percent of the houses and none of the cars had allergen levels in dust greater than 2000 ng g-1. This value is often quoted as a threshold for the risk of sensitisation, although a number of studies report increased risk of sensitisation at lower levels. This small study does not allow for characterisation of the distribution of HDM allergen in vehicles in this geographic area, or of the likely levels in other warmer and more humid areas of the UK. Cars and other vehicles are an under-investigated micro-environment for exposure to allergenic material. PMID:26444342

  20. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) and plasticizers in house and car dust and the influence of electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Sicco H; de Boer, Jacob; van Velzen, Martin J M; Leonards, Pim E G

    2014-12-01

    All nine PFRs studied were detected in house and car dust from the Netherlands with the exception of tris(butyl) phosphate (TNBP) and tris(isobutyl) phosphate (TIBP) in car dust. Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP, median 22 ?g g(-1)) was dominant in house dust collected around and on electronics followed by tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP, median 1.3 ?g g(-1)), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP, median 1.3 ?g g(-1)) and tris(phenyl) phosphate (TPHP, median 0.8 ?g g(-1)). Levels of TPHP and tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP, also known as TCP) in house dust on electronics were significantly higher than in house dust collected around electronics, suggesting that electronic equipment has limited contribution to the PFR levels in house dust, with the exception of TPHP and TMPP. Car dust was dominated by tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) with the highest levels found in dust collected from the car seats (1100 ?g g(-1)). The mean TDCIPP and TCIPP levels observed in car dust were significantly higher than the levels observed in dust collected around electronics. Significantly higher mean TMPP levels in dust taken from car seats were found compared to dust collected around the equipment (p<0.05). This is probably influenced by the use of TDCIPP, TCIPP in polyurethane foam (car seats) and the use of TMPP as plasticizer in car interiors. Worldwide four PFR patterns were observed in house dust. The PFR pattern in the Netherlands of TDCIPP, TMPP, TCEP, TCIPP and TPHP in house dust is comparable to the pattern found in six other countries, which may point to identical sources of these PFRs in the indoor environment. However, the PFR levels between the countries and within countries showed high variation. PMID:24703013

  1. The relative allergenicity of Stachybotrys chartarum compared to house dust mite extracts in a mouse model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. The authors compared the ability of the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum (SCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to i...

  2. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  3. Environmental and childhood lead contamination in the proximity of boat-repair yards in southern Thailand--I: pattern and factors related to soil and household dust lead levels.

    PubMed

    Maharachpong, Nipa; Geater, Alan; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2006-07-01

    High blood lead levels have recently been documented in schoolchildren living in communities adjacent to boat-repair yards in southern Thailand. In this study, the spatial pattern of lead contamination of soil and household dust in an area surrounding several boat-repair yards is described, and household factors associated with elevated dust lead are identified. A cross-sectional spatial study was conducted in a coastal residential area within a distance of 2 km from three major boat-repair yards situated on the east coast of peninsular Thailand. Household dust specimens were collected from an undisturbed position in the residences of children, aged 4-14 years, sampled randomly from all children living in the study area. Soil specimens were obtained from the interstices of a square grid, 70 x 70 m2, superimposed on the area. Geographic coordinates of residence and soil sampling positions were recorded and semivariograms and kriging used to contour the spatial distribution of lead in dust and soil. Environmental lead levels were also modeled in terms of direction and minimum distance from a boat-repair yard and, for household dust lead content, in terms of household variables, including occupation of household members in boat-repair work, type of house construction, and general cleanliness. Household dust and soil lead content ranged from 10 to 3025 mg/kg and from 1 to 7700 mg/kg, respectively. The distribution of soil lead peaked at the location of the boat-repair yards, but outside the yards the distribution was generally below 400 mg/kg and irregular. About 24% of household dust lead specimens were equal to or above 400 mg/kg, but showed significant decrease with increasing distance from the boat-repair yards, at rates of between 7% and 14% per 100 m. In houses where a family member was a worker in one of the major boatyards and in houses where occasional repair of small boats was undertaken, household dust lead levels were significantly elevated, by 65% (95% CI: 18-130%) and 31% (95% CI: 5-63%), respectively. Siting of boat-repair yards at a distance from residential areas and measures to reduce the spread of lead-containing dust are recommended to alleviate the problem of elevated household dust lead levels. PMID:16832871

  4. 77 FR 16796 - Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ...EPA-R06-OPPT-2011-0989; FRL-9649-6] Lead Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Activities in Target Housing and Child-Occupied...accreditation requirements, and work practice standards for lead-based paint activities in target housing and...

  5. Analysis of soil and house dust for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, July 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    It has been conjectured that jet turbine exhaust near airplane flight paths may result in significant human exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). The EPA Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) arranged access to a household located approximately eight miles from the end of a runway at the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Airport, and collected soil, wipe, and dust samples in and around the household. A total of 19 PAH ranging from naphthalene (2-ring) to coronene (7-ring) were measured. The general concentration trend for the 19 PAH is house dust > entryway dust > soil. The house dust samples were colleted inside the household and the entryway dust and soil samples were collected outside. Seven of the target PAH are ranked as probable human carcinogens (B2) in the U.S. EPA`s Integrated Risk Information System. The concentrations of B2 PAH account for roughly half of the concentrations of the sums of 19 PAH in most soil and dust samples but not in wipe samples.

  6. ANALYSIS OF SOIL AND HOUSE DUST FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been conjectured that jet turbine exhaust near airplane flight paths may result in significant human exposure to PAH. The fallout from the aerosol plume could be introduced into the residence directly as drafts through the interior of the house or through accumulation of ...

  7. The house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus is the most important allergen on the island of Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Guerin, B; Levy, D A; Lemao, J; Leynadier, F; Baligadoo, G; Fain, A; Dry, J

    1992-05-01

    To determine the relative importance of mites as a cause of allergic sensitivity and asthma on the western Indian Ocean island of Mauritius, we measured specific IgE antibodies to common inhalant allergens in sera from Mauritians claiming to have allergic symptoms and we examined house dust samples for evidence of mites and their allergens. Seventy-two of the 110 sera tested (65%) contained detectable IgE antibody to at least one mite, mould or pollen allergenic extract. By far the most prevalent was antibody to one or both of the common house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, being present in 67 (61%) of the 110 sera. Allergy to pollens, including the locally prevalent Bermuda grass and sugar cane, was infrequent. Antibody to a limited number of moulds was detected in 22% of the sera tested. Of 81 subjects whose clinical history was known, 60 were asthmatic, and 75% of these asthmatic individuals had IgE antibody to mites. In contrast, only 35% of the subjects with rhinitis without asthma were sensitive to mites. Different mite species, including D. pteronyssinus but not D. farinae, were identified microscopically in samples of local house dust. Mite antigen Der p I but not antigen Der f I was detected with specific monoclonal antibodies in extracts of these dust samples. On the bases of this serological and environmental survey, we conclude that our data support the hypothesis that the house dust mite D. pteronyssinus is the principal cause of allergic sensitivity and asthma in that tropical environment. PMID:1628251

  8. Allergic and nonallergic interactions between house dust mite allergens and airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Roche, N; Chinet, T C; Huchon, G J

    1997-03-01

    Asthma and allergy are extremely frequent diseases, affecting 5-10% and 30% of the population, respectively. The prevalence of asthma has increased in many developed countries, which may be due to several factors, including increased exposure to house dust mite (HDM) allergens. HDM to which humans are most frequently sensitized are Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and Euroglyphus maynei. These mites multiply in carpets, bedding and upholstered furniture in a hot and humid atmosphere. The allergens are digestive enzymes of the mites. Several epidemiological studies have shown that an increase in exposure to HDMs is associated with an increase in the prevalence of sensitization and asthma, whereas mite avoidance leads to a decrease in respiratory symptoms of sensitized asthmatic subjects. Sensitized subjects have specific immunoglobulin G and E (IgG and IgE) humoral responses, as well as proliferative T-cell responses to HDM allergens. Experimental exposure to HDM allergens induces bronchoalveolar inflammatory responses, that are characterized by the recruitment and activation of eosinophils, mastocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. The cysteine protease activity of Der p 1 (a major allergen of D. pteronyssinus) has been shown to increase airway mucosal permeability, and may thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by nonimmunological mechanisms. These epidemiological and experimental data support the recommendations for mite avoidance, especially in persons at high risk of developing asthma. PMID:9073012

  9. Distribution of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust as a function of particle size.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R G; Fortune, C R; Willis, R D; Camann, D E; Antley, J T

    1999-01-01

    House dust is a repository for environmental pollutants that may accumulate indoors from both internal and external sources over long periods of time. Dust and tracked-in soil accumulate most efficiently in carpets, and the pollutants associated with dust and soil may present an exposure risk to infants and toddlers, who spend significant portions of their time in contact with or in close proximity to the floor and who engage in frequent mouthing activities. The availability of carpet dust for exposure by transfer to the skin or by suspension into the air depends on particle size. In this study, a large sample of residential house dust was obtained from a commercial cleaning service whose clients were homeowners residing in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill (Research Triangle) area of North Carolina. The composite dust was separated into seven size fractions ranging from < 4 to 500 microm in diameter, and each fraction was analyzed for 28 pesticides and 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Over 20% of the fractionated dust sample consisted of particles < 25 microm in diameter. Fourteen pesticides and all 10 of the target PAHs were detected in one or more of the seven size-fractionated samples. Sample concentrations reported range from 0.02 to 22 microg/g; the synthetic pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin were the most abundant pesticide residue. The concentrations of nearly all of the target analytes increased gradually with decreasing particle size for the larger particles, then increased dramatically for the two smallest particle sizes (4-25 microm and < 4 microm). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10464072

  10. [Exposition and sensitisation to indoor allergens, house dust mite allergen and cat allergens].

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, S; Felder-Kennel, A; Gabrio, T; Kouros, B; Link, B; Maisner, V; Piechotowski, I; Schick, K-H; Schrimpf, M; Schwenk, M; Weidner, U; Zöllner, I

    2003-07-01

    The study examined the exposure to biological indoor air agents and their possible role for allergies and respiratory tract illnesses of children. It was conducted as a case control study (atopic vs non-atopic children) at the four surveillance public health departments in Baden-Württemberg in the winter season 1999/2000 and included 379 children of the fourth class. The concentrations of the house dust mite antigens Der F1, Der p1, and Der Gr2 as well as cat allergen Fel d1 were determined in the children's bedrooms on the ground and in the mattress. Specific IgE-antibodies against allergens from house dust, mites and cat were determined in the serum of the children. For mite allergens the following medians ( micro g/g) were estimated in floor dust: Der p1 = 0.6, Der f1 = 2.3, Gr2 = 0.1; in mattresses: Der p1 = 1.2, Der f1 = 3.4, Gr2 = 0.3. The median of Fel d1 in floor dust was 0.2 microg/g, in mattresses 0.1 microg/g. Sensitisation to dust mite allergen was found to be more prevalent than sensitisation to cat. The distribution of sensitisation among the cases and controls is different. Among the cases, more subjects were sensitised to dust mites (32.9 %) and cat (13.1 %). Among the controls, 17.1 % were sensitised to dust mites and 4.1 % to cat. The results showed no direct association between the prevalence of allergies or respiratory tract illnesses and the indoor concentrations of the allergens. Possible reasons for these findings are discussed. PMID:12891478

  11. Development of a simultaneous extraction and cleanup method for pyrethroid pesticides from indoor house dust samples.

    PubMed

    Van Emon, Jeanette M; Chuang, Jane C

    2012-10-01

    An efficient and reliable analytical method was developed for the sensitive and selective quantification of pyrethroid pesticides (PYRs) in house dust samples. The method is based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) of the dust-bound PYRs into dichloromethane (DCM) with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Various adsorbents and combinations of extraction solvents and temperatures were evaluated to achieve a high-throughput sample preparation that eliminates the post-extraction cleanup step. The final method used sulfuric acid-impregnated silica (acid silica) and neutral silica together in the extraction cell with the dust sample to provide both extraction and cleanup simultaneously. The optimal ratio of dust/acid silica/silica was 1:0.8:8. The extraction was performed at 2000 psi, at 100°C with DCM for 5 min in three cycles. Method precision and accuracy were evaluated by the analysis of triplicate aliquots of the dust samples and the samples fortified with the target PYRs. The accuracy measured as the recoveries of the PYRs in the fortified samples ranged from 85% to 120%. The precision measured as the relative standard deviation of replicate samples was within ±25%. The SPLE method was applied to 20 house dust samples collected from households that participated in two field studies regarding exposures to pesticides and other pollutants. Similar concentrations of target PYRs were obtained for the SPLE and a stepwise extraction/cleanup procedure. The SPLE procedure reduces organic solvent consumption and increases the sample throughput when compared with a traditional stepwise extraction and cleanup procedure. This study demonstrates that the SPLE procedure can be applied to complex dust matrices for analysis of PYRs for large scale exposure or environmental monitoring studies. PMID:22938604

  12. Detection of Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Furniture Foam and US House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Klosterhaus, Susan; Eagle, Sarah; Fuh, Jennifer; Meeker, John D.; Blum, Arlene; Webster, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have resulted in the increased use of alternate flame retardant chemicals to meet flammability standards. However, it has been difficult to determine which chemical formulations are currently being used in high volumes to meet flammability standards since the use of flame retardant formulations in consumer products is not transparent (i.e. not provided to customers). To investigate chemicals being used as replacements for PentaBDE in polyurethane foam, we analyzed foam samples from 26 different pieces of furniture purchased in the United States primarily between 2003 and 2009 using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Samples included foam from couches, chairs, mattress pads, pillows, and, in one case, foam from a sound proofing system of a laboratory grade dust sieve. Fifteen of the foam samples contained the flame retardant tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP; 1–5% by weight), four samples contained tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP; 0.5 –2.2 % by weight), one sample contained brominated chemicals found in a new flame retardant mixture called Firemaster 550 (4.2% by weight), and one foam sample collected from a futon likely purchased prior to 2004 contained PentaBDE (0.5% by weight). Due to the high frequency of detection of the chlorinated phosphate compounds in furniture foam, we analyzed extracts from 50 house dust samples collected between 2002 and 2007 in the Boston, MA area for TDCPP, TCPP, and another high volume use organophosphate-based flame retardant used in foam, triphenylphosphate (TPP). Detection frequencies for TDCPP and TPP in the dust samples were >96% and were log normally distributed, similar to observations for PBDEs. TCPP was positively detected in dust in only 24% of the samples, but detection was significantly limited by a co-elution problem. The geometric mean concentrations for TCPP, TDCPP and TPP in house dust were 570, 1890, and 7360 ng/g, respectively, and maximum values detected in dust were 5490, 56,080 and 1,798,000 ng/g, respectively. These data suggest that levels of these organophosphate flame retardants are comparable, or in some cases, greater than, levels of PBDEs in house dust. The high prevalence of these chemicals in foam and the high concentrations measured in dust (as high as 1.8 mg/g), warrant further studies to evaluate potential health effects from dust exposure, particularly for children. PMID:19848166

  13. Characterization of lead, chromium, and cadmium in dust emitted from municipal solid waste incineration plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, K.; Imai, G.; Oshita, K.; Takaoka, M.

    2013-04-01

    The dust is emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). Volatile toxic heavy metals are abundant in smaller dust particles and influence the toxicity of particulate matter such as fine particles <2.5 ?m (PM2.5). However, little is known about the properties of these metals in fine dust particles. Therefore, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical states of lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and cadmium (Cd) in MSWI dust collected for nine particle size fractions at the inlet of the dust collector and the stacks of two MSWI plants. XAFS spectroscopy of the dust in the inlet of the dust collectors showed that finer dust contained predominantly Pb as PbCl2 with some PbSiO3, coarser dust consisted of Cr forms, including more toxic Cr(VI) species, and all dust contained CdCl2. Although the dust collector removed almost all of the Pb, trace amounts of PbCl2 remained in the stack gas after passing through the dust collector.

  14. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Lead is a very strong poison. When a person swallows a lead object or breathes in lead dust, some of the poison can stay in ... Lead used to be very common in gasoline and house paint in the U.S. Children living in ...

  15. New house dust collection system and its use in a study of asthma in dust mite sensitive children in Raleigh, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, A.B.; Beck, M.A.; Henry, M.M.; Barnes, D.M.; Henderson, F.W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype dust collection system, the House Dust Vacuum One (HDVI), was designed for use in a study to investigate the relationship between house dust mite antigen levels and the presence of asthma in dust mite sensitive children. The HDVI was designed for the collection of dust samples from all potentially relevant domestic substrates, with the primary sampling objective being the retrieval at least 100 mg of sample material. During the winter of 1991-92, dust samples were collected from six different microenvironments in the homes of 49 dust mite sensitive children living in the Raleigh, NC metropolitan area. In addition to the standard antigen immunoassay, the performance of the HDVI was assessed by conducting side by side comparison tests using two alternative antigen collection systems. Microenvironmental antigen concentrations were found to be lognormally distributed within the test homes and within each microenvironment. With the relatively large quantity of sample material collected and the ease with which the HDVI was able to collect samples from a wide variety of substrates, the new unit was determined to be well suited for surface dust and dust mite antigen collection studies.

  16. Molecular identification of house dust mites and storage mites.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shew Fung; Chong, Ai Ling; Mak, Joon Wah; Tan, Jessie; Ling, Suk Jiun; Ho, Tze Ming

    2011-10-01

    Mites are known causes of allergic diseases. Currently, identification of mites based on morphology is difficult if only one mite is isolated from a (dust) sample, or when only one gender is found, or when the specimen is not intact especially with the loss of the legs. The purpose of this study was to use polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the ITS2 gene, to complement the morphological data for the identification of mites to the species level. For this, six species were cultured: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Aleuroglyphus ovatus and Glycycometus malaysiensis. Genomic DNA of the mites was extracted, quantified, amplified and digested individually with restriction enzymes. Hinf I and Ple I differentiated the restriction patterns of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae. Bfa I and Alu I enzymes differentiated B. tropicalis and G. malaysiensis. Ple I enzyme was useful for the differentiation between T. putrescentiae and A. ovatus. Bfa I was useful for the differentiation of G. malaysiensis from the rest of the species. In conclusion, different species of mites can be differentiated using PCR-RFLP of ITS2 region. With the established PCR-RFLP method in this study, identification of these mites to the species level is possible even if complete and intact adult specimens of both sexes are not available. As no study to date has reported PCR-RFLP method for the identification of domestic mites, the established method should be validated for the identification of other species of mites that were not included in this study. PMID:21468750

  17. STUDENT WORKER JOB DESCRIPTION FORM -[to be retained in departmental files] NAME OF EMPLOYEE: WORKING TITLE: Housing Office Lead

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    : WORKING TITLE: Housing Office Lead NAME OF DEPARTMENT: Student Housing NAME OF SUPERVISOR: Jennifer Maitland TELEPHONE NUMBER: (949) 824-4641 HOUSING OFFICE LEAD THE OFFICE LEAD IS RESPONSIBLE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL SUPPORT FOR CAMPUS VILLAGE HOUSING OFFICE. THE OFFICE LEAD WILL WORK

  18. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF METHOD EVALUATION MATERIALS FOR LEAD IN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The procedure used to prepare lead (Pb) in dust method evaluation materials from real-world dusts is described. aterials prepared using this procedure have been found suitable for use as quality control check samples as well as for evaluation of new methods. rocedures described i...

  19. Flame Retardant Associations Between Children’s Handwipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Misenheimer, John; Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants (FRs) have been ubiquitously detected at high concentrations in indoor environments; however, with their recent phase-out, more attention is being focused on measurements of exposure to alternative FRs such as organophosphate FRs (OPFRs). In our previous research, we found that PBDE residues measured on children’s handwipes were a strong predictor of serum PBDE levels. Here we build upon this research to examine longitudinal changes in PBDEs in indoor dust and children’s handwipes, and explore the associations between handwipes and dust for alternative FRs. Children from our previous study were re-contacted after approximately two years and new samples of indoor dust and handwipes were collected. PBDE dust-levels were significantly correlated between two different sampling rounds separated by two years; however, PBDE levels in handwipes were not correlated, perhaps suggesting that the sources of PBDEs remained relatively constant in the home, but that behavioral differences in children are changing with age and influencing handwipe levels. OPFRs [i.e. tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP)], 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, also known as TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP, also known as TBPH), and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were also ubiquitously detected in house dust samples and geometric mean levels were similar to PBDE levels, or higher in the case of the OPFRs. Significant associations between handwipes and house dust were observed for these alternative FRs, particularly for EH-TBB (rs= 0.54; p<0.001). Increasing house dust levels and age were associated with higher levels of FRs in handwipes, and high hand washing frequency (>5 times/day) was associated with lower FR levels in handwipes. Overall these data suggest that exposure to these alternative FRs will be similar to PBDE exposure, and the influence of hand-to-mouth behavior in children’s exposure needs to be further examined to better estimate exposure potential. PMID:24485814

  20. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Lead-Based Paint, Lead-Contaminated Dust, and Lead-Contaminated Soil; the EPA Residential Sampling for Lead: Protocols for Dust and Soil Sampling (EPA report number 7474-R-95-001); Regulations, guidance... facility where one or more children, age 6 and under, are likely to come into contact with dust. (8)...

  1. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Lead-Based Paint, Lead-Contaminated Dust, and Lead-Contaminated Soil; the EPA Residential Sampling for Lead: Protocols for Dust and Soil Sampling (EPA report number 7474-R-95-001); Regulations, guidance... facility where one or more children, age 6 and under, are likely to come into contact with dust. (8)...

  2. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Lead-Based Paint, Lead-Contaminated Dust, and Lead-Contaminated Soil; the EPA Residential Sampling for Lead: Protocols for Dust and Soil Sampling (EPA report number 7474-R-95-001); Regulations, guidance... facility where one or more children, age 6 and under, are likely to come into contact with dust. (8)...

  3. Levels of phthalate esters in settled house dust from urban dwellings with young children in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Lu, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Sun, Yong-Gang; Zhu, Dong-Mei; Wang, Bing-Ling; Zhao, Ren-Zheng; Zhang, Zheng-Dong

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the levels and possible determinants of phthalate esters (PEs) in settled house dust from urban dwellings with young children, dust was collected from 215 urban houses in Nanjing, China, and 145 outdoor settled dust samples were collected nearby. Six PEs were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All PEs were detected in the dust from approximately 90% of the houses, with the exception of dioctyl phthalate (DOP), which had only a 59% detection rate. Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were the most abundant PEs, with geometric means of 110 and 16.4 ?g g-1, respectively, and maximal concentrations 9950 and 2150 ?g g-1. Factor analysis showed that DBP, DEHP and benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) might come from the same source and were significantly influenced by the use of solid-wood floor wax. High BBP, DEHP, DOP and total PE levels were associated with indices of dampness, and high DOP was associated with humidifier use. In conclusion, six PEs are ubiquitous in urban settled house dust in Nanjing, China, and both plastic materials and cosmetic and personal care products are important sources. Flooring material, dampness and humidifier use potentially influence house dust PE levels.

  4. Detection and intake assessment of organophosphate flame retardants in house dust in Japanese dwellings.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shuji; Araki, Atsuko; Kawai, Toshio; Tsuboi, Tazuru; Ait Bamai, Yu; Yoshioka, Eiji; Kanazawa, Ayako; Cong, Shi; Kishi, Reiko

    2014-04-15

    The demand for phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) has recently increased as an alternative to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE). PFRs have been detected in house dust, but little is known about the concentrations of PFRs in private homes and the effects on human health. We measured the levels of 10 PFRs in indoor floor dust and upper surface dust from 128 Japanese dwellings of families with children in elementary school. The median (min-max) concentrations (?g/g) of PFRs were as follows: tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), 30.88 (<0.61-936.65); tris(2-chloro-iso-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), 0.74 (<0.56-392.52); and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), 0.87 (<0.80-23.35). These values exceeded 50% detection rates, and the rates are median over the LOD in floor dust. The concentrations (?g/g) of TBOEP 26.55 (<0.61-1933.24), TCIPP 2.23 (<0.56-621.23), TPHP 3.13 (<0.80-27.47), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) 1.17 (<0.65-92.22), and tributyl phosphate (TNBP) 0.74 (<0.36-60.64) exceeded 50% detection rates in the upper surface dust. A significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between the concentrations of TCIPP and TBOEP was shown in floor dust and upper surface dust (n=48). Estimated median and 95th percentile daily intake was calculated for toddlers and elementary school children and was compared with reference dose values (RfD) from the literature. For TBOEP, the estimated 95th percentile intake from floor dust was 14% of RfD for toddlers and 4% for school children. The estimated intake from upper surface dust was somewhat lower. Estimated median intake of TBOEP and median intake for the other PFRs were less than 1% of the RfD. TBOEP, TCIPP and TPHP were the main PFRs in the dust. The median levels of PFRs are well below the RfD values. PMID:24531310

  5. Effects of physical interventions on house dust mite allergen levels in carpet, bed, and upholstery dust in low-income, urban homes.

    PubMed

    Vojta, P J; Randels, S P; Stout, J; Muilenberg, M; Burge, H A; Lynn, H; Mitchell, H; O'Connor, G T; Zeldin, D C

    2001-08-01

    House dust mite allergen exposure is a postulated risk factor for allergic sensitization, asthma development, and asthma morbidity; however, practical and effective methods to mitigate these allergens from low-income, urban home environments remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of physical interventions to mitigate house dust mite allergens in this setting. Homes with high levels of house dust mite allergen (Der f 1 + Der p 1 > or = 10 microg/g dust by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in the bed, bedroom carpet, and/or upholstered furniture were enrolled in the study. Carpets and upholstered furniture were subjected to a single treatment of either dry steam cleaning plus vacuuming (carpet only) or intensive vacuuming alone. Bed interventions consisted of complete encasement of the mattress, box spring, and pillows plus either weekly professional or in-home laundering of nonencased bedding. Dust samples were collected at baseline and again at 3 days (carpet and upholstery only) and 2, 4, and 8 weeks posttreatment. We compared pretreatment mean allergen concentrations and loads to posttreatment values and performed between-group analyses after adjusting for differences in the pretreatment means. Both dry steam cleaning plus vacuuming and vacuuming alone resulted in a significant reduction in carpet house dust mite allergen concentration and load (p < 0.05). Levels approached pretreatment values by 4 weeks posttreatment in the intensive vacuuming group, whereas steam cleaning plus vacuuming effected a decrease that persisted for up to 8 weeks. Significant decreases in bed house dust mite allergen concentration and load were obtained in response to encasement and either professional or in-home laundering (p < 0.001). Between-group analysis revealed significantly less postintervention house dust mite allergen load in professionally laundered compared to home-laundered beds (p < 0.05). Intensive vacuuming and dry steam cleaning both caused a significant reduction in allergen concentration and load in upholstered furniture samples (p < 0.005). Based on these data, we conclude that physical interventions offer practical, effective means of reducing house dust mite allergen levels in low-income, urban home environments. PMID:11564617

  6. Acarosan and the Acarex test in the control of house dust mite allergens in the home.

    PubMed

    Ridout, S; Twiselton, R; Matthews, S; Stevens, M; Matthews, L; Arshad, S H; Hide, D W

    1993-01-01

    House dust mites are believed to be major triggers for allergic disease in atopic individuals. As part of a programme controlling dietary and aero-allergen exposure in high-risk infants, an acaricidal foam and powder (Acarosan) was applied to bedroom and main living room carpets, as well as upholstered furniture, on four occasions in the first year of life. Dust was assayed for mite antigen (Der p1) and these results compared with the semi-quantitative assay of guanine content (Acarex Test). After nine months mean Der p1 levels had decreased by 70% in the treatment group. Proportionally, the greatest fall occurred in those items that had the highest initial mite antigen content. The Acarex score does show a correlation with Der p1 levels, but cannot replace antigen assay when accurate data is required. A chemical acaricide may help reduce house dust mite antigen levels, but is not by itself sufficient to reduce levels below that considered critical for sensitisation. PMID:8347439

  7. COST ESTIMATES OF USING THREE LEAD-BASED PAINT ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES ON RESIDENTIAL HOUSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated blood lead levels in children of the US due to exposure to flaking lead-based paint continues to be an important health concern. Approximately 57M housing units, which represent 75% of all privately owned and occupied housing built before 1980 in the US are contaminated ...

  8. Monitoring Indoor Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants: Hand Wipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Garantziotis, Stavros; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) are becoming popular replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures, and they are now commonly detected in indoor environments. However, little is known about human exposure to PFRs because they cannot be easily measured in blood or serum. Objectives: To investigate relationships between the home environment and internal exposure, we assessed associations between two PFRs, tris(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), in paired hand wipe and dust samples and concentrations of their metabolites in urine samples (n = 53). We also assessed short-term variation in urinary metabolite concentrations (n = 11 participants; n = 49 samples). Methods: Adult volunteers in North Carolina, USA, completed questionnaires and provided urine, hand wipe, and household dust samples. PFRs and PBDEs were measured in hand wipes and dust, and bis(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), metabolites of TDCIPP and TPHP, were measured in urine. Results: TDCIPP and TPHP were detected frequently in hand wipes and dust (> 86.8%), with geometric mean concentrations exceeding those of PBDEs. Unlike PBDEs, dust TDCIPP and TPHP levels were not associated with hand wipes. However, hand wipe levels were associated with urinary metabolites. Participants with the highest hand wipe TPHP mass, for instance, had DPHP levels 2.42 times those of participants with the lowest levels (95% CI: 1.23, 4.77). Women had higher levels of DPHP, but not BDCIPP. BDCIPP and DPHP concentrations were moderately to strongly reliable over 5 consecutive days (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.81 and 0.51, respectively). Conclusions: PFR exposures are widespread, and hand-to-mouth contact or dermal absorption may be important pathways of exposure. Citation: Hoffman K, Garantziotis S, Birnbaum LS, Stapleton HM. 2015. Monitoring indoor exposure to organophosphate flame retardants: hand wipes and house dust. Environ Health Perspect 123:160–165;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408669 PMID:25343780

  9. Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Musgrove, M.; Burbank, T.L.; Ennis, T.E.; Bashara, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coaltar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 ??g/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 ??g/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 ??g/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 ??g/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR?) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPAR? ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPAR? ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPAR?. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPAR? ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 ?M. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPAR? binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPAR? ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPAR? binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR?) ligand binding potential of several major flame retardants, their metabolites, and chemical mixtures in house dust. Environ Health Perspect 123:166–172;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408522 PMID:25314719

  11. Differences in Metal Concentration by Particle Size in House Dust and Soil

    PubMed Central

    Elish, Christina A.; Roe, Denise J.; Loh, Miranda; Layton, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of particles that adhere to hands are <63 ?m in diameter yet risk assessments for soil remediation are typically based on soil samples sieved to <250 ?m. The objective of our study was to determine if there is a significant difference in metal concentration by particle size in both house dust and soil. We obtained indoor dust and yard soil samples from 10 houses in Tucson, Arizona. All samples were sieved to <63 ?m and 63 to <150 ?m and analyzed for 30 elements via ICP-MS following nitric acid digestion. We conducted t-tests of the log-transformed data to assess for significant differences that were adjusted with a Bonferroni correction to account for multiple comparisons. In house dust significant differences in concentration were observed for Be, Al, and Mo between particles sizes, with a higher concentration observed in the smaller particles size. Significant differences were also determined for Mg, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Ge, Zr, Ag, Ba, and Pb concentration in yard soil samples, with the higher concentration observed in the smaller particles size for each element. The results of this exploratory study indicate that current risk assessment practices for soil remediation may under estimate non-dietary ingestion exposure. This is of particular concern for young children who are more vulnerable to this exposure route due to their high hand mouthing frequencies. Additional studies with a greater number of samples and wider geographic distribution with different climates and soil types should be completed to determine the most relevant sampling practices for risk assessment. PMID:22245917

  12. Vacuum cleaning decreases the levels of mite allergens in house dust.

    PubMed

    Munir, A K; Einarsson, R; Dreborg, S K

    1993-08-01

    To investigate the capacity of chemical treatment of surfaces and the difference in capacity among common vacuum cleaners to reduce mite allergen content in house dust, we recruited 52 families with allergic children. Ten families used their central vacuum cleaners. Forty-two families were randomly divided into four groups with 10 or 11 families in each. These families used either new vacuum cleaners with either HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) or micro-filters, or their own vacuum cleaners with either tannic acid or placebo. Dust samples were collected from carpets and upholstered furniture in the living rooms and from the mattresses of the children at Days 0, 7, 21, and 35. Der pI and Der fI allergens were determined by sandwich ELISA. After one week, tannic acid reduced the concentration of mite allergens/g of dust and the total amount/sampling area by 30% and 34%, respectively (p < 0.05), but there was no significant decrease in relation to placebo. After 5 weeks, central, HEPA- and micro-filter vacuum cleaners decreased the mite allergen concentration by 10-50% (p < 0.05) and the total amount of mite allergen from the investigated areas by 50-85% (p < 0.01). In relation to the placebo group the decrease was significant for HEPA- and micro-filter vacuums (p < 0.05). The total amount of mite allergens/sampling area was more significantly (p < 0.05) reduced than the concentration/g of dust. We conclude, that tannic acid reduces mite allergen concentrations in dust and total amount/sampling area for a short period of time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220802

  13. Analysis of House Dust and Children’s Hair for Pesticides: A Comparison of Markers of Ongoing Pesticide Exposure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ostrea, Enrique M.; Villanueva-Uy, Esterlita; Bielawski, Dawn; Birn, Sarah; Janisse, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim The long term study of the adverse effects of pesticides on child neuro development requires monitoring not only of initial, but ongoing pesticide exposure. Our aim was to compare house dust and children’s hair as environmental and biological markers of ongoing pesticide exposure in children. Design/Methods In a continuing NIH study on the adverse effects of prenatal pesticide exposure on child neurodevelopment, ongoing pesticide exposure after birth was measured in swept house dust and hair in the children at 4 years of age for propoxur and pyrethroids (transfluthrin, bioallethrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The prevalence and concentration of pesticides in the two matrices were compared. Results Prevalence of propoxur was higher in hair compared to house dust (p<0.001) whereas prevalence of the pyrethroids was higher (p<0.001) in house dust. The overall concentrations of the pyrethroids were also higher (p<0.007) in house dust compared to hair. There was a significant (p<0.001) correlation between dust and hair for bioallethrin and cypermethrin. Conclusions Ongoing exposure of children to environmental pesticides is sensitively detected by analysis of children’s hair and house dust. However, prevalence of propoxur was higher in hair compared to swept house dust, but the opposite was found for the pyrethroids. Thus, both matrices should be analyzed. There was a significant (p<0.001) correlation between house dust and hair for bioallethrin and cypermethrin. PMID:24288586

  14. Dustborne Alternaria alternata antigens in U.S. homes: Results from the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Päivi M.; Yin, Ming; Arbes, Samuel J.; Cohn, Richard D.; Sever, Michelle; Muilenberg, Michael; Burge, Harriet A.; London, Stephanie J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Alternaria alternata is one of the most common fungi associated with allergic disease. However, Alternaria exposure in indoor environments is not well characterized. Objective: The primary goals of this study were to examine the prevalence of Alternaria exposure and identify independent predictors of Alternaria antigen concentrations in U.S. homes. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained from the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. A nationally representative sample of 831 housing units in 75 different locations throughout the U.S. completed the survey. Information on housing and household characteristics was obtained by questionnaire and environmental assessments. Concentrations of Alternaria antigens in dust collected from various indoor sites were assessed with a polyclonal anti-Alternaria antibody assay. Results: Alternaria antigens were detected in most (95-99%) of the dust samples. The geometric mean concentration, reflecting the average Alternaria concentration in homes, was 4.88 ?g/g (SE=0.13 ?g/g). In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the age of the housing unit, geographic region, urbanization, poverty, family race, observed mold and moisture problems, use of dehumidifier, and presence of cats and dogs were independent predictors of Alternaria antigen concentrations. Less frequent cleaning and smoking indoors also contributed to higher Alternaria antigen levels in homes. Conclusion: Exposure to Alternaria alternata antigens in U.S. homes is common. Antigen levels in homes are not only influenced by regional factors but also by residential characteristics. Preventing mold and moisture problems, avoiding smoking indoors, and regular household cleaning may help reduce exposure to Alternaria antigens indoors. PMID:16159634

  15. Inhaled house dust programs pulmonary dendritic cells to promote type 2 T-cell responses by an indirect mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moran, Timothy P; Nakano, Keiko; Whitehead, Gregory S; Thomas, Seddon Y; Cook, Donald N; Nakano, Hideki

    2015-11-15

    The induction of allergen-specific T helper 2 (Th2) cells by lung dendritic cells (DCs) is a critical step in allergic asthma development. Airway delivery of purified allergens or microbial products can promote Th2 priming by lung DCs, but how environmentally relevant quantities and combinations of these factors affect lung DC function is unclear. Here, we investigated the ability of house dust extract (HDE), which contains a mixture of environmental adjuvants, to prime Th2 responses against an innocuous inhaled antigen. Inhalational exposure to HDE conditioned lung conventional DCs, but not monocyte-derived DCs, to induce antigen-specific Th2 differentiation. Conditioning of DCs by HDE was independent of Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, indicating that environmental endotoxin is dispensable for programming DCs to induce Th2 responses. DCs directly treated with HDE underwent maturation but were poor stimulators of Th2 differentiation. In contrast, DCs treated with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from HDE-exposed mice induced robust Th2 differentiation. DC conditioning by BALF was independent of the proallergic cytokines IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin. BALF treatment of DCs resulted in upregulation of CD80 but low expression of CD40, CD86, and IL-12p40, which was associated with Th2 induction. These findings support a model whereby environmental adjuvants in house dust indirectly program DCs to prime Th2 responses by triggering the release of endogenous soluble factor(s) by airway cells. Identifying these factors could lead to novel therapeutic targets for allergic asthma. PMID:26386119

  16. The Effectiveness of Acupuncture Compared to Loratadine in Patients Allergic to House Dust Mites

    PubMed Central

    Hauswald, Bettina; Dill, Christina; Boxberger, Jürgen; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Zahnert, Thomas; Yarin, Yury M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture and its impact on the immune system in comparison to loratadine in the treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis caused by house dust mites. Methods. In this study, 24 patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis induced by house dust mites were treated either with acupuncture (n = 15) or with loratadine (n = 9). The evaluation of the data was based on the subjective and the objective rhinoconjunctivitis symptom scores, specific and total IgE, and interleukins (IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-?) as markers for the activity of Th1 or Th2 cells. Results. The treatments with acupuncture as well as with loratadine were considered effective in the patients' subjective assessment, whereby the effect of the acupuncture tended to be assessed as more persistent after the end of treatment. A change in the specific or the total IgE was not detectable in either group. The interleukin profile showed the tendency of an increasing IL-10 value in the acupuncture group. The results of the study show that the effectiveness of acupuncture is comparable to that of loratadine. Conclusion. Acupuncture is a clinically effective form of therapy in the treatment of patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis. The results indicate the probability of an immunomodulatory effect. PMID:24995021

  17. House dust mite induces direct airway inflammation in vivo: implications for future disease therapy?

    PubMed

    De Alba, J; Raemdonck, K; Dekkak, A; Collins, M; Wong, S; Nials, A T; Knowles, R G; Belvisi, M G; Birrell, M A

    2010-06-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is the major source of allergen in house dust and is strongly associated with the development of asthma. HDM can evoke a direct, nonallergic inflammatory reaction in vitro. We aimed to determine whether this apparent nonallergic, inflammatory response can be observed in a more complex in vivo setting. Vehicle, Alum or HDM (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 5 microg, i.p. with Alum) sensitised Brown-Norway rats were challenged intratracheally with vehicle (saline), HDM (Der p 10 microg) or heat-inactivated HDM on day 21. Lung function changes and the associated inflammatory response were evaluated. Tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage from Alum sensitised Der p challenged animals exhibited strong eosinophilia and neutrophilia associated with an early release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-13 and 1beta, eotaxin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine). This response was not attenuated by removal of HDM-associated protease activity. Interestingly, the vehicle sensitised group (no Alum) lacked this inflammatory response. HDM allergen evokes nonallergic airways inflammation with an inflammatory profile similar to that of the asthmatic airway. This response, independent of the protease activity of the HDM extract, appeared to be linked to prior administration of the adjuvant Alum and the subsequent increase in total immunoglobulin E. This finding could have important implications in the development of future asthma therapies. PMID:19840954

  18. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites: What do we really know?

    PubMed

    Calderón, Moisés A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; De Blay, Frédéric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search term to evaluate the current knowledge of HDM epidemiology and pathophysiology. Prevalence data for HDM allergen sensitization vary from 65 to 130 million persons in the general population worldwide to as many as 50% among asthmatic patients. Heterogeneity of populations, terminology, and end points in the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention measures to reduce allergen load. Inhaled mite aeroallergens are unusually virulent: they are able to activate both the adaptive and innate immune responses, potentially offering new avenues for intervention. The role of HDM allergens is crucial in the development of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but the translation of silent sensitization into symptomatic disease is still incompletely understood. Improved understanding of HDMs, their allergens, and their microhabitats will enable development of more effective outcomes for patients with HDM allergy. PMID:25457152

  19. [Acarex test and acarosan effect in house dust mite allergy in 2 year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Kersten, W; Stollewerk, D; von Wahl, P G

    1992-01-01

    Clinical investigations of the effect of the acaricide product Acarosan shows in a large collective of patients beneficial results, whereby the patients are examined up to three months after sanitation. The remaining patients of this study are followed up one and two years after sanitation in open clinical trials. Without exception Acarex test values decrease highly significant after three months, indicating the effective elimination of the house dust mites by Acarosan treatment and consequently the reduction of the allergen containing excreta. The values increase after one year, but after a repetition of the Acarosan treatment they decrease again to the level reached after the first sanitation. The best results are achieved by sanitation of carpets, less favourable results are obtained by treating matresses and upholstered furniture. After sanitation all patients with monovalent house dust mite sensitization report an improvement of their symptoms (eyes, nose, bronchi) up to two years. Drug consumption is variable and decreases over all for up to two years. Peak flow meter values improve in the first year and even further more in the second year. The clinical improvement does not depend on sex, living area or former immunotherapy. During the two year observation period immunologic parameters do not change. 25.6% of the patients show a negative provocation test after the first year and 57% after the second year. Side effects due to the sanitation or signs of sensitization against Acarosan are not observed. PMID:1546059

  20. Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    An, Su; Shen, Chuanbing; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lingling; Xu, Xuemei; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Zhigang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Main indoor allergens for humans are from house dust mites. There are more than 30 allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae but only fourteen allergens have been identified from this mite including Der f 1-3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13-18, and 22. A native allergen protein (Der f 24, 90 kDa) was purified from D. farinae by gel filtration and anionic exchange liquid chromatography combined with IgE immunodetection. Its primary structure was determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis and cDNA cloning. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition tests (ELISA-IT), immunoblots, basophil activation test (BAT) and skin prick test (SPT) were performed to evaluate the allergenicity. It was identified as an alpha (?)-actinin containing a CaM-like domain with EF-hand motifs. Der f 24 reacted to sera from 85.4% (35/41) of patients on western blot analysis. It reduced ?20% sera IgE reactivity to D. farinae extracts on a competitive ELISA. Eighty percent (8/10) of patients with D. farinae allergy showed positive reactions to Der f 24 in skin prick test. The expression of CD63 on basophils from patients was up-regulated by Der f 24 by ?5.4-fold. Alpha-actinin was identified as a new type of house dust mite allergen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ?-actinin as an allergen. PMID:24324688

  1. The effectiveness of acupuncture compared to loratadine in patients allergic to house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Hauswald, Bettina; Dill, Christina; Boxberger, Jürgen; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Zahnert, Thomas; Yarin, Yury M

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture and its impact on the immune system in comparison to loratadine in the treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis caused by house dust mites. Methods. In this study, 24 patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis induced by house dust mites were treated either with acupuncture (n = 15) or with loratadine (n = 9). The evaluation of the data was based on the subjective and the objective rhinoconjunctivitis symptom scores, specific and total IgE, and interleukins (IL-4, IL-10, and IFN- ? ) as markers for the activity of Th1 or Th2 cells. Results. The treatments with acupuncture as well as with loratadine were considered effective in the patients' subjective assessment, whereby the effect of the acupuncture tended to be assessed as more persistent after the end of treatment. A change in the specific or the total IgE was not detectable in either group. The interleukin profile showed the tendency of an increasing IL-10 value in the acupuncture group. The results of the study show that the effectiveness of acupuncture is comparable to that of loratadine. Conclusion. Acupuncture is a clinically effective form of therapy in the treatment of patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis. The results indicate the probability of an immunomodulatory effect. PMID:24995021

  2. Organophosphate and phthalate esters in standard reference material 2585 organic contaminants in house dust.

    PubMed

    Bergh, Caroline; Luongo, Giovanna; Wise, Stephen; Ostman, Conny

    2012-01-01

    The levels of 22 phthalate diesters (phthalates) and organophosphate triesters (organophosphates) have been investigated in standard reference material 2585 (SRM 2585) "organic contaminants in house dust." Ultrasonic-assisted solvent extraction and solid-phase extraction on a Florisil adsorbent were used as the extraction and cleanup steps combined with analysis using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in positive ion chemical ionization mode. Seven phthalates were detected in the concentration range 1-570 ?g/g. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate was the major phthalate present at 570 ?g/g. Ten organophosphates were detected in SRM 2585. Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate was the predominant organophosphate at 82 ?g/g, and nine organophosphates were determined at concentrations ranging from 0.19 to 2.3 ?g/g. Five organophosphates were below the method detection limit, of which two were in level with the procedural blank. The applied extraction and cleanup method was evaluated for the analysis of SRM 2585. The extraction yield was ?99%, except for tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (97%) and diethyl phthalate (98.5%). The problem of calibration curvature is addressed, and it is shown that the use of deuterated standards improves the analysis. The concentrations of ten organophosphate esters were determined in SRM 2585, and seven of these were compared with existing data. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the levels of the seven phthalates esters in SRM 2585 "organic contaminants in house dust." PMID:22065343

  3. The prevalence of house dust mites, Dermatophagoides spp, and associated environmental conditions in homes in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Arlian, L G; Bernstein, I L; Gallagher, J S

    1982-06-01

    Abundance of the house dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus, in various sites in the homes of dust-sensitive patients was sequentially monitored at approximately 3 wk intervals for 2 yr, and mite density was correlated with indoor physical and climatic factors. Significantly higher mite levels occurred on the most heavily used fabric-upholstered furniture and carpeted floor areas of the living/family room and bedrooms. Mattresses were not found to be the major foci for mites. No significant positive correlation was noted between mite abundance and frequency or thoroughness of cleaning, amount of dust, and age of furnishings or dwelling. Significantly higher mite levels occurred on carpeted floors than on noncarpeted floors. Successive vacuuming did not significantly reduce mite abundance. Mite density exhibited a seasonal fluctuation, with highest density occurring in the humid summer months and the lowest density during the dryer, late heating season. Live mites were more abundant than dead mites during the period when total abundance was high. In homes inhabited by both species, D. farinae was the dominant species, except in one home that had a significantly higher relative humidity. PMID:7076994

  4. Bioaccessibility of pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls from house dust: in-vitro methods and human exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Harald; Butte, Werner

    2012-11-01

    Semi-volatile chemicals like pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) tend to accumulate in house dust. This may result in residues of some parts per million (p.p.m.), closely associated with health impairments and diseases like cancer. To explain these associations, we must establish whether a relevant absorption from house dust into human organisms occurs, and most crucially the release of chemicals, that is, their bioaccessibility. Digestive as well as dermal bioaccessibilities were examined using in-vitro methods. On average, the digestive bioaccessibility was ~40% for the pesticides and ~60% for the PCB. The dermal penetration availability reached ~60% for the pesticides and ~70% for the PCB (percentages of the concentrations in the dust). Based on the bioaccessibility, an estimate of internal exposure was calculated and expressed as percentages of acceptable or tolerable daily intake (ADI/TDI) values. Exposure via the respiratory tract proved to be very low. Exposure via the digestive tract had maximum values of 4% for pesticides and 12% for PCB. Dermal exposure was much higher. Even for average concentrations in house dust (?0.5?p.p.m.), children exposed to DDT and PCB showed up to 300% of the ADI/TDI values, and adults about 60%. With high concentrations of contaminants in house dust, the maximum doses absorbed through the skin reached 5000%. PMID:22692365

  5. Potential for childhood lead poisoning in the inner cities of Australia due to exposure to lead in soil dust.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Mark A S; Taylor, Mark P

    2011-01-01

    This article presents evidence demonstrating that the historical use of leaded gasoline and lead (Pb) in exterior paints in Australia has contaminated urban soils in the older inner suburbs of large cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While significant attention has been focused on Pb poisoning in mining and smelting towns in Australia, relatively little research has focused on exposure to Pb originating from inner-city soil dust and its potential for childhood Pb exposures. Due to a lack of systematic blood lead (PbB) screening and geochemical soil Pb mapping in the inner cities of Australia, the risks from environmental Pb exposure remain unconstrained within urban population centres. PMID:20880621

  6. IN-HOUSE CORROSION RESEARCH EMPHASIZING LEAD, COPPER AND IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead and copper are directly regulated via the "Lead and Copper Rule;" however, water suppliers must balance all water treatment processes in order to simultaneously comply with all regulations. Specific research needs for copper and lead chemistry still exist, as applications o...

  7. Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lead Epidemiology Surveillance Program (ABLES) Lead in the environment Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Healthy Homes ...

  8. Lead exposure in young children from dust and soil in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, I.; Watt, J.M. ); Davies, D.J.A.; Quinn, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    A survey of metals in United Kingdom dusts and soils has confirmed widespread lead contamination with a geometric mean value for lead in surface (0-5 cm) garden soils of 266 {mu}g/g and in housedusts of 561 {mu}g/g (excluding old mining areas). A subsequent detailed survey of 97 householders in Birmingham with 2-year-old children showed dust lead loading in the home environment to be an important predictor of blood lead concentrations in young children, when both variables fell within the normal range for the UK. The total estimated lead uptake by the young child was 36 {mu}g/day of which 1 {mu}g was by inhalation and 35 {mu}g by ingestion.

  9. Lead exposure in young children from dust and soil in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Thornton, I; Davies, D J; Watt, J M; Quinn, M J

    1990-11-01

    A survey of metals in United Kingdom dusts and soils has confirmed widespread lead contamination with a geometric mean value for lead in surface (0-5 cm) garden soils of 266 micrograms/g and in housedusts of 561 micrograms/g (excluding old mining areas). A subsequent detailed survey of 97 householders in Birmingham with 2-year-old children showed dust lead loading in the home environment to be an important predictor of blood lead concentrations in young children, when both variables fell within the normal range for the U.K. The total estimated lead uptake by the young child was 36 micrograms/day of which 1 microgram was by inhalation and 35 micrograms by ingestion. PMID:2088756

  10. Relative exposure of children to lead from dust and drinking water.

    PubMed

    Alexander, L M; Heaven, A; Delves, H T; Moreton, J; Trenouth, M J

    1993-01-01

    The Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde Health Authority, in the North West of England, could be described as a "low-level lead exposure area." Primary sources of lead exposure are atmospheric fallout (both indoors and outdoors) and potable water consumption. Deciduous teeth were collected from children living in this area as were water samples and outdoor dust samples. Both total lead concentrations and 206Pb:207Pb ratios were determined for a defined subset of teeth. Significant differences in the total lead concentrations were found for teeth collected from children resident in different targeted areas (i.e., Blackpool, Fleetwood, and Garstang). No significant differences were found between the total lead concentrations or the 206Pb:207Pb ratios from dust and water samples in these areas. Examination of the 206Pb:207Pb ratios for dust, water, and teeth obtained from each area separately revealed differing patterns of exposure to lead. Determination of 206Pb:207Pb ratios, in addition to total lead concentrations, enabled the differences in sources of exposure to be identified in these communities. The authors conclude that isotopic analyses are an important aspect of community survey work, and these analyses can be helpful in accurately targeting intervention strategies aimed at reducing exposure to lead. PMID:8250590

  11. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I—Dust

    PubMed Central

    David, Bruce; Oppermann Moe, Randi; Michel, Virginie; Lund, Vonne; Mejdell, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages) or no access to litter (conventional cages). The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban. PMID:26479370

  12. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I-Dust.

    PubMed

    David, Bruce; Moe, Randi Oppermann; Michel, Virginie; Lund, Vonne; Mejdell, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages) or no access to litter (conventional cages). The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban. PMID:26479370

  13. Are You Pregnant? Prevent Lead Poisoning. Start Now.

    E-print Network

    in: Paint and dust in older homes, especially dust from renovation or repairs · Candy, make up. Most lead comes from paint in older homes. When old paint cracks and peels, it makes dangerous dust like sanding or scraping paint can make dangerous lead dust. Pregnant women should not be in the house

  14. Use of fluorinated polybrominated diphenyl ethers and simplified cleanup for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in house dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, cost-effective method is described for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in house dust using pressurized fluid extraction, cleanup with modified silica solid phase extraction tubes, and fluorinated internal standards. There are 14 PBDE congeners inc...

  15. The effect of sub-floor heating on house-dust-mite populations on floors and in furniture.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Rob

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that dehydrating conditions for house dust mites can be created by simply raising the temperature, causing loss of body water and eventually death. Thus, it can be expected that conditions for dust mites are less favourable on floors supplied with sub-floor heating. This was examined in a study of 16 houses with sub-floor heating and 21 without. The pattern of changes in air humidity and temperature on the floors was investigated and compared to known data of the tolerance of dust mites. Also the resident mite populations were compared. Floors with sub-floor heating had, on average, fewer mites, but the difference with unheated floors was small. It was remarkable that mite numbers were also lower in upholstered furniture. Another important observation was that some houses with sub-floor heating had high mite numbers, indicating that this type of heating is compatible with a thriving mite population. Temperature and humidity conditions of heated floors may allow mites not only to survive, but also to remain active in winter. A moderate increase in temperature, a moderate decrease in (absolute) air humidity, or a combination of both, will suffice to keep the humidity all winter below the Critical Equilibrium Humidity, the level of air humidity that is critical for mite growth and reproduction, hence for allergen production. However, it is argued that measures to suppress allergen production by house dust mites are likely to be far more effective if taken in summer rather than in winter. PMID:14635817

  16. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  17. Cytokine Responses to Specific Immunotherapy in House Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Rhinitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Xu, Enxiu; He, Mingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only immunomodulatory treatment that may alter the natural course of allergic disease. However, cytokine responses accompanying sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) responder phenotypes have not been fully understood. Herein, we examined the level of crucial plasma cytokines during SLIT and evaluated whether their changes correlated to symptom scores. We observed that the levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and complement components C3a and C5a as well as IL-4 at year 3 of SLIT were significantly decreased than those at baseline. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the levels of IL-5, IL-13, and interferon (IFN)-?. Notably, a significant positive correlation was found between the levels of IL-17 and the symptom scores at year 3. These results suggest that IL-17 could be considered a potential biomarker for the therapeutic effect of SLIT in allergic rhinitis caused by house dust mite. PMID:26122703

  18. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D.

    2012-07-11

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines.

  19. Gene silencing by RNA interference in the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed

    Marr, Edward J; Sargison, Neil D; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Burgess, Stewart T G

    2015-12-01

    This is the first report of gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in the European house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Trouessart, 1897. Using a non-invasive immersion method first developed for the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor, a significant reduction in the expression of D. pteronyssinus glutathione-S-transferase mu-class 1 enzyme (DpGST-mu1) was achieved following overnight immersion in double stranded RNA encoding DpGST-mu1. Although no detrimental phenotypic changes were observed following silencing, this technique can now be used to address fundamental physiological questions and assess the potential therapeutic benefit in silencing D. pteronyssinus target genes in selected domestic situations of high human-mite interface. PMID:26212476

  20. Rare adverse events due to house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric practice: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Galip, Nilufer; Bahceciler, Nerin

    2015-12-01

    Sublingual route, a noninjective way of allergen administration appears to be associated with a lower incidence of severe systemic reactions compared with the subcutaneous route. Local adverse reactions are reported which resolve spontaneously within a few days without need for discontinuation of treatment. Hereby, we report two pediatric cases, one with persistent asthma and the other one with persistent allergic rhinitis. Both were treated by house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy, one of whom developed severe wheezing (grade 2 systemic reaction based on World Allergy Organization subcutaneous systemic reaction grading system) and the other intractable vomiting (grade 3 local reaction based on World Allergy Organization sublingual immunotherapy local adverse events grading system) at the end of the build-up phase which repeated on re-administration of the same dose. Both of those two cases completed their 3-year immunotherapy successfully by patient-based adjustment of the highest tolerated dose of the maintenance. PMID:26427747

  1. AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled house dust mites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Lark Kyun; Morita, Rimpei; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack; Eynon, Elizabeth E.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, a component of the exoskeleton of many organisms including the house dust mite (HDM). Here we show that knockin mice expressing an enzymatically inactive acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), the dominant true chitinase in mouse lung, showed enhanced type 2 immune responses to inhaled HDM. We found that uncleaved chitin promoted the release of IL-33, whereas cleaved chitin could be phagocytosed and could induce the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent activation of caspase-7; this results in the resolution of type 2 immune responses, probably by promoting the inactivation of IL-33. These data suggest that AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled chitin-containing aeroallergens. PMID:26038565

  2. Pesticides in house dust from urban and farmworker households in California: an observational measurement study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies report that residential use of pesticides in low-income homes is common because of poor housing conditions and pest infestations; however, exposure data on contemporary-use pesticides in low-income households is limited. We conducted a study in low-income homes from urban and agricultural communities to: characterize and compare house dust levels of agricultural and residential-use pesticides; evaluate the correlation of pesticide concentrations in samples collected several days apart; examine whether concentrations of pesticides phased-out for residential uses, but still used in agriculture (i.e., chlorpyrifos and diazinon) have declined in homes in the agricultural community; and estimate resident children's pesticide exposures via inadvertent dust ingestion. Methods In 2006, we collected up to two dust samples 5-8 days apart from each of 13 urban homes in Oakland, California and 15 farmworker homes in Salinas, California, an agricultural community (54 samples total). We measured 22 insecticides including organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, diazinon-oxon, malathion, methidathion, methyl parathion, phorate, and tetrachlorvinphos) and pyrethroids (allethrin-two isomers, bifenthrin, cypermethrin-four isomers, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, imiprothrin, permethrin-two isomers, prallethrin, and sumithrin), one phthalate herbicide (chlorthal-dimethyl), one dicarboximide fungicide (iprodione), and one pesticide synergist (piperonyl butoxide). Results More than half of the households reported applying pesticides indoors. Analytes frequently detected in both locations included chlorpyrifos, diazinon, permethrin, allethrin, cypermethrin, and piperonyl butoxide; no differences in concentrations or loadings were observed between locations for these analytes. Chlorthal-dimethyl was detected solely in farmworker homes, suggesting contamination due to regional agricultural use. Concentrations in samples collected 5-8 days apart in the same home were strongly correlated for the majority of the frequently detected analytes (Spearman ? = 0.70-1.00, p < 0.01). Additionally, diazinon and chlorpyrifos concentrations in Salinas farmworker homes were 40-80% lower than concentrations reported in samples from Salinas farmworker homes studied between 2000-2002, suggesting a temporal reduction after their residential phase-out. Finally, estimated non-dietary pesticide intake for resident children did not exceed current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) recommended chronic reference doses (RfDs). Conclusion Low-income children are potentially exposed to a mixture of pesticides as a result of poorer housing quality. Historical or current pesticide use indoors is likely to contribute to ongoing exposures. Agricultural pesticide use may also contribute to additional exposures to some pesticides in rural areas. Although children's non-dietary intake did not exceed U.S. EPA RfDs for select pesticides, this does not ensure that children are free of any health risks as RfDs have their own limitations, and the children may be exposed indoors via other pathways. The frequent pesticide use reported and high detection of several home-use pesticides in house dust suggests that families would benefit from integrated pest management strategies to control pests and minimize current and future exposures. PMID:21410986

  3. Multi-analyte method for the analysis of various organohalogen compounds in house dust.

    PubMed

    Lankova, Darina; Svarcova, Andrea; Kalachova, Kamila; Lacina, Ondrej; Pulkrabova, Jana; Hajslova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a novel analytical approach for the simultaneous determination of 27 brominated flame retardants (BFRs), namely polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), isomers of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and several novel BFRs (NBFRs), together with 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in indoor dust was developed and validated. To achieve integrated isolation of analytes from the sample and their fractionation, a miniaturized method based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) was employed. Principally, after mixing the dust (<0.1 g) with the Florisil(®), the mixture was applied on the top of a sorbent (Florisil(®)) placed in glass column and then analytes were eluted using solvents with different polarities. For the identification/quantification of target compounds largely differing in polarity, complementary techniques represented by gas and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS) were used. The results of validation experiments, which were performed on the SRM 2585 material (for PBDEs, HBCDs and TBBPA), were in accordance with the certified/reference values. For other analytes (NBFRs and PFASs), the analysis of an artificially contaminated blank dust sample was realized. The method recoveries for all target compounds ranged from 81 to 122% with relative standard deviations lower than 21%. The quantification limits were in the range of 1-25 ng g(-1) for BFRs and 0.25-1 ng g(-1) for PFASs. Finally, 18 samples (6 households × 3 sampling sites) were analyzed. The high variability between concentrations of PFASs and BFRs in the dust samples from various households as well as collecting sites in a respective house was observed. The total amounts of PFASs and BFRs were in the range of 1.58-236 ng g(-1) (median 10.6 ng g(-1)) and 39.2-2320 ng g(-1) (median 325 ng g(-1)), respectively. It was clearly shown that dust from the indoor environment might be a significant source of human exposure to various organohalogen pollutants. PMID:25479868

  4. Acaricidal activities against house dust mites of spearmint oil and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Min-Gi; Lee, Sung-Eun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activities of spearmint oil and carvone derivatives against house dust mites using contact and fumigant toxicity bioassays to replace benzyl benzoate as a synthetic acaricide. Based on the LD50 values, the contact toxicity bioassay revealed that dihydrocarvone (0.95 and 0.88?µg/cm2) was 7.7 and 6.8 times more toxic than benzyl benzoate (7.33 and 6.01?µg/cm2) against Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively, followed by carvone (3.78 and 3.23?µg/cm2), spearmint oil (5.16 and 4.64?µg/cm2), carveol (6.00 and 5.80?µg/cm2), and dihydrocarveol (8.23 and 7.10?µg/cm2). Results of the fumigant toxicity bioassay showed that dihydrocarvone (2.73 and 2.16?µg/cm2) was approximately 4.0 and 4.8 times more effective than benzyl benzoate (11.00 and 10.27?µg/cm2), followed by carvone (6.63 and 5.78?µg/cm2), carveol (7.58 and 7.24?µg/cm2), spearmint oil (9.55 and 8.10?µg/cm2), and dihydrocarveol (9.79 and 8.14?µg/cm2). Taken together, spearmint oil and carvone derivatives are a likely viable alternative to synthetic acaricides for managing house dust mites. PMID:24488719

  5. Mobilization and distribution of lead originating from roof dust and wet deposition in a roof runoff system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianghua; Yu, Haixia; Huang, Xiaogu

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mobilization and distribution of lead originating in roof dust and wet deposition were investigated within a roof dust-rooftop-runoff system. The results indicated that lead from roof dust and wet deposition showed different transport dynamics in runoff system and that this process was significantly influenced by the rainfall intensity. Lead present in the roof dust could be easily washed off into the runoff, and nearly 60 % of the total lead content was present in particulate form. Most of the lead from the roof dust was transported during the late period of rainfall; however, the lead concentration was higher for several minutes at the rainfall beginning. Even though some of the lead from wet deposition, simulated with a standard isotope substance, was adsorbed onto adhered roof dust and/or retained on rooftop in runoff system, most of it (50-82 %) remained as dissolved lead in the runoff for rainfall events of varying intensity. Regarding the distribution of lead in the runoff system, the results indicated that it could be carried in the runoff in dissolved and particulate form, be adsorbed to adhered roof dust, or remain on the rooftop because of adsorption to the roof material. Lead from the different sources showed different distribution patterns that were also related to the rainfall intensity. Higher rainfall intensity resulted in a higher proportion of lead in the runoff and a lower proportion of lead remaining on the rooftop. PMID:26289339

  6. Can house dust mite-triggered atopic dermatitis be alleviated using acaricides?

    PubMed

    Cameron, M M

    1997-07-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens are the most important triggers for atopic dermatitis. Reducing exposure to these allergens may alleviate clinical symptoms. Chemicals with acaricidal activity have been used to treat upholstered furniture, carpets and bedding with the aim to reduce HDM allergen exposure. These chemicals, by reducing HDM, can decrease the concentration of mite allergens in dust but improvements in clinical symptoms are not always apparent. Clinical improvement is more likely to occur if bedding has been treated rather than carpets and upholstery. Future control strategies should be aimed at treating bedding. Permethrin is a very efficient killer of mites. It is used topically to treat scabies and head lice and is impregnated in bed nets to prevent mosquito bites. Even when applied to the skin in high concentrations, it has a very low toxicity in humans and other mammals. Permethrin-impregnated bedding may prove to be the best control method in the treatment of HDM allergen-triggered atopic conditions. PMID:9274618

  7. IN-HOUSE COPPER AND LEAD SOLUBILITY/CORROSION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting metal release from pipes of all sizes and types from the treatment plant to the consumer’s tap is critical, specifically for regulatory compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule, as well as the performance, corrosion morphology, and longevity of infras...

  8. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227... practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities... section are found in the following: The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)...

  9. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227... practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities... section are found in the following: The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)...

  10. Origin and patterns of distribution of trace elements in street dust: Unleaded petrol and urban lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Eduardo de; Llamas, Juan F.; Chacón, Enrique; Berg, Torunn; Larssen, Steinar; Rřyset, Oddvar; Vadset, Marit

    The elemental composition, patterns of distribution and possible sources of street dust are not common to all urban environments, but vary according to the peculiarities of each city. The common features and dissimilarities in the origin and nature of street dust were investigated through a series of studies in two widely different cities, Madrid (Spain) and Oslo (Norway), between 1990 and 1994. The most comprehensive sampling campaign was carried out in the Norwegian capital during the summer of 1994. An area of 14 km 2, covering most of downtown Oslo and some residential districts to the north of the city, was divided into 1 km2 mapping units, and 16 sampling increments of approximately 150 g were collected from streets and roads in each of them. The fraction below 100 ?m was acid-digested and analysed by ICP-MS. Statistical analyses of the results suggest that chemical elements in street dust can be classified into three groups: "urban" elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Pb, Sb, Ti, Zn), "natural" elements (Al, Ga, La, Mn, Na, Sr, Th, Y) and elements of a mixed origin or which have undergone geochemical changes from their original sources (Ca, Cs, Fe, Mo, Ni, Rb, Sr, U). Soil resuspension and/or mobilisation appears to be the most important source of "natural" elements, while "urban" elements originate primarily from traffic and from the weathering and corrosion of building materials. The data for Pb seem to prove that the gradual shift from leaded to unleaded petrol as fuel for automobiles has resulted in an almost proportional reduction in the concentration of Pb in dust particles under 100 ?m. This fact and the spatial distribution of Pb in the city strongly suggest that lead sources other than traffic (i.e. lead accumulated in urban soil over the years) may contribute as much lead, if not more, to urban street dust.

  11. The contribution of housing renovation to children’s blood lead levels: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine renovation of older housing is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning, but the contribution to children’s blood lead levels is poorly defined for children with lower exposure levels. Methods We examined a prospective cohort of 276 children followed from 6 to 24 months of age. We conducted surveys of renovation activities and residential lead hazards and obtained blood lead level (B-Pb) every six months. We analyzed B-Pb in a repeated measures design using a mixed effects linear model. Results Parent reported interior renovation ranged from 11 to 25% of housing units at the four, 6-month periods. In multivariable analysis, children whose housing underwent interior renovation had a 12% higher mean B-Pb by two years of age compared with children whose housing units were not renovated (p?lead sample was associated with higher B-Pb (p-value for trend <0.01); compared to children in non-renovated housing, children whose housing units underwent renovation in the prior month had a 17% higher mean B-Pb at two years of age, whereas children whose housing renovation occurred in the prior 2–6 months had an 8% higher mean B-Pb. We also found an association between higher paint lead loading, measured using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) based paint lead index, and child B-Pb (p?=?0.02); for every 10 mg/cm2 increase in paint lead loading index there was a 7.5% higher mean childhood B-Pb. Conclusions In an analysis of data collected before the recent changes to Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead, Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule, routine interior housing renovation was associated with a modest increase in children’s B-Pb. These results are important for the provision of clinical advice, for housing and public health professionals, and for policymakers. PMID:23981571

  12. Asthma, Airway Symptoms and Rhinitis in Office Workers in Malaysia: Associations with House Dust Mite (HDM) Allergy, Cat Allergy and Levels of House Dust Mite Allergens in Office Dust

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Lee; Hashim, Zailina; Than, Leslie Thian Lung; Md Said, Salmiah; Hisham Hashim, Jamal; Norbäck, Dan

    2015-01-01

    A prevalence study was conducted among office workers in Malaysia (N= 695). The aim of this study was to examine associations between asthma, airway symptoms, rhinitis and house dust mites (HDM) and cat allergy and HDM levels in office dust. Medical data was collected by a questionnaire. Skin prick tests were performed for HDM allergens (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) and cat allergen Felis domesticus. Indoor temperature and relative air humidity (RH) were measured in the offices and vacuumed dust samples were analyzed for HDM allergens. The prevalence of D. pteronyssinus, D. farinae and cat allergy were 50.3%, 49.0% and 25.5% respectively. Totally 9.6% had doctor-diagnosed asthma, 15.5% had current wheeze and 53.0% had current rhinitis. The Der p 1 (from D. pteronyssinus) and Der f 1 (from D. farinae) allergens levels in dust were 556 ng/g and 658 ng/g respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted by multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender, current smoking, HDM or cat allergy, home dampness and recent indoor painting at home. Office workers with HDM allergy had more wheeze (p= 0.035), any airway symptoms (p= 0.032), doctor-diagnosed asthma (p= 0.005), current asthma (p= 0.007), current rhinitis (p= 0.021) and rhinoconjuctivitis (p< 0.001). Cat allergy was associated with wheeze (p= 0.021), wheeze when not having a cold (p= 0.033), any airway symptoms (p= 0.034), doctor-diagnosed asthma (p= 0.010), current asthma (p= 0.020) and nasal allergy medication (p= 0.042). Der f 1 level in dust was associated with daytime breathlessness (p= 0.033) especially among those with HDM allergy. Der f 1 levels were correlated with indoor temperature (p< 0.001) and inversely correlated with RH (p< 0.001). In conclusion, HDM and cat allergies were common and independently associated with asthma, airway symptoms and rhinitis. Der f 1 allergen can be a risk factor for daytime breathlessness. PMID:25923543

  13. House dust and storage mite contamination of dry dog food stored in open bags and sealed boxes in 10 domestic households.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christina; McEwan, Neil; McGarry, John; Nuttall, Tim

    2011-04-01

    Dry pet food is a potential source of exposure to house dust and storage mite allergens in canine atopic dermatitis. This study evaluated contamination of house dust and dry dog food stored in paper bags, sealable plastic bags and sealable plastic boxes in 10 households for 90 days using Acarex(®) tests for guanine, a Der p 1 ELISA and mite flotation. Acarex(®) tests were negative in all the food samples but positive in all the house dust samples. The Der p 1 levels and mite numbers significantly increased in food from paper bags (P = 0.0073 and P = 0.02, respectively), but not plastic bags or boxes. Mite numbers and Der p 1 levels were 10-1000 times higher in house dust than the corresponding food samples (P < 0.0001). There were significant correlations between Der p 1 in house dust and food from the paper (P < 0.0001) and plastic bags (P = 0.003), and mite numbers in house dust and food from the paper bags (P = 0.0007). Bedding and carpets were significantly associated with Der p 1 levels in house dust (P = 0.015 and P = 0.01, respectively), and food from the paper (both P = 0.02) and plastic bags (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively). Mites were identified in six of 10 paper bag, three of 10 plastic bag, one of 10 plastic box and nine of 10 house dust samples. These comprised Dermatophagoides (54%), Tyrophagus (10%; all from food) and unidentified mites (36%). Storage of food in sealable plastic boxes largely prevented contamination for 3 months. Exposure to mites and mite proteins in all the stored food, however, appeared to be trivial compared with house dust. PMID:21106038

  14. A comparison of the effect of conventional and filter vacuum cleaners on airborne house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, J M; Rouhbakhsh, S; Warner, J A; Warner, J O

    1995-04-01

    The efficiency (dust collection and recirculation) of a conventional upright vacuum cleaner with a prototype vacuum bag (I) with pore size of 0.1 micron was compared with a standard vacuum cleaner bag (II), in the homes of 11 atopic asthmatic subjects with a known allergy to house dust mite. Four filter vacuum cleaners were assessed in pairs-the Vax 2000 with the Vorwerk VK121 ET340 (in 10 homes), and the Nilfisk GS90 'Allergy Vac' with the Bosch maxima 43 (in nine homes). All of the selected homes were vacuumed throughout (carpets and soft furnishings) for a 15 min period with each of the cleaners, and air was sampled simultaneously at 21 min-1 (Casella personal sampler). The weight of dust retrieved was recorded, and a sample of sieved dust (2 g) and the air filters were extracted to determine the concentrations of the major allergen, Der pI, by ELISA (ALK). No significant difference was observed in either total weight of dust, or airborne and dust concentrations of Der pI between using the conventional cleaner with vacuum bags I, or vacuum bags II. The Vax and the Vorwerk filter vacuum cleaners produced no measurable airborne Der pI concentrations during use in any of the 10 homes tested, whilst the Nilfisk produced airborne Der pI in two, and the Bosch in one of the nine homes tested. The Vorwerk retrieved significantly more dust from the floors than the Vax (P < 0.002). There was no significant difference in dust retrieval between the Nilfisk and the Bosch. All of the filter vacuum cleaners investigated produced lower concentrations of airborne Der pI, compared to the conventional cleaner with or without a special dust bag. However, the amount of dust and concentration/amount of Der pI that these cleaners actually retrieved, varied and the Vorwerk appeared most effective overall. PMID:7597267

  15. House dust mite regulate the lung inflammation of asthmatic mice through TLR4 pathway in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Qingling, Gai; Meiying, Lin; Weixuan, Wang; Lihong, Zhang; Yongsheng, Gao; Yanli, Li; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2010-10-01

    Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responsed to allergens and environmental pollutants lead to respiratory allergic disease such as asthma. In this study, we focused on toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) expressed on airway epithelium to identify house dust mite (HDM)-regulated allergic inflammation via TLR4 signaling pathway and the triggering to alveolar macrophages (AM)-driven adaptive immune response. The authors found that mouse exposed to HDM showed more eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes as well as total cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed by flow cytometry. Besides, the expression of TLR4 in airway epithelial cells was significantly increased in both mRNA and protein levels in mice treated with HDM and the expression of CD40 and CD86 in AM was also increased in mice exposed to HDM. Tight correlation between TLR4 protein and CD40, CD86 in AM was identified. This study demonstrates that TLR4 expression on airway epithelium played an essential role in HDM-induced activation of AM in immune responses and allergic inflammation. The airway epithelial TLR4 signaling pathway revealed tight connection between endotoxin exposure and asthma prevalence in the clinic. PMID:20941750

  16. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  17. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  18. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  19. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  20. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  1. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing...CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities §...

  2. Acaricidal activities of some essential oils and their monoterpenoidal constituents against house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae)

    PubMed Central

    Saad, El-Zemity; Hussien, Rezk; Saher, Farok; Ahmed, Zaitoon

    2006-01-01

    The acaricidal activities of fourteen essential oils and fourteen of their major monoterpenoids were tested against house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Five concentrations were used over two different time intervals 24 and 48 h under laboratory conditions. In general, it was noticed that the acaricidal effect based on LC 50 of either essential oils or monoterpenoids against the mite was time dependant. The LC 50 values were decreased by increasing of exposure time. Clove, matrecary, chenopodium, rosemary, eucalyptus and caraway oils were shown to have high activity. As for the monoterpenoids, cinnamaldehyde and chlorothymol were found to be the most effective followed by citronellol. This study suggests the use of the essential oils and their major constituents as ecofriendly biodegradable agents for the control of house dust mite, D. pteronyssinus. PMID:17111463

  3. The effects of a newsletter on bedding control on house dust mite allergen concentrations in childcare centers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Yang, Heasuk; Yum, Hye Yung; Lee, Seon Ah; Kim, Chae-Bong; Kim, Hyunjung; Lim, Wan Ryung; Hong, Soyoung; Kim, Kyoosang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bedding in childcare centers (CCCs) can hold house dust mite (HDM) allergens. This study examined whether HDM allergen levels can be reduced through the distribution of an educational newsletter on bedding control to parents of CCC children in Korea. Methods All 38 CCCs were measured for Der 1 (sum of Der f 1 and Der p 1) concentrations on classroom floors and bedding before the intervention. Educational newsletters on children’s bedding control were sent to 21 CCCs by mail, and teachers were asked to distribute the newsletters to the parents of the children (intervention group). The remaining 17 CCCs were not sent newsletters (control group). The measurement of Der 1 concentrations in 38 CCCs was repeated after the intervention. Dust samples were collected with a vacuum cleaner and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results The Der 1 concentrations on the bedding were significantly higher than those on the floors in 38 CCCs at baseline (p<0.05). Although changes of the Der 1 concentrations for the control group (n=17) were not significant, Der 1 concentrations for the intervention group (n=21) decreased significantly from 2077.9 ng/g dust to 963.5 ng/g dust on the floors and from 3683.9 ng/g dust to 610.4 ng/g dust on bedding (p<0.05). Conclusions The distribution of educational newsletters on bedding control to parents may be an effective means of controlling HDMs in CCCs. PMID:26602559

  4. House Dust Mite Induced Lung Inflammation Does Not Alter Circulating Vitamin D Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Perks, Kara L.; Stick, Stephen M.; Kicic, Anthony; Larcombe, Alexander N.; Zosky, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Low circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] are associated with chronic lung diseases such as asthma. However, it is unclear whether vitamin D is involved in disease pathogenesis or is modified by the inflammation associated with the disease process. We hypothesized that allergic inflammation decreases the level of circulating 25(OH)D and tested this using a mice model of house dust mite (HDM) induced allergic airway inflammation. Cellular influx was measured in bronchoalvelar lavage (BAL) fluid, and allergic sensitization and 25(OH)D levels were measured in serum. Exposure to HDM caused a robust inflammatory response in the lung that was enhanced by prior influenza infection. These responses were not associated with any change in circulating levels of 25(OH)D. These data suggest that alterations in circulating 25(OH)D levels induced by Th-2 driven inflammation are unlikely to explain the cross-sectional epidemiological association between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. PMID:25391140

  5. Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Azadirachta indica against house dust mites

    PubMed Central

    Hanifah, Azima Laili; Awang, Siti Hazar; Ming, Ho Tze; Abidin, Suhaili Zainal; Omar, Maizatul Hashima

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the acaricidal effects of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus leaf extract (lemongrass) and ethanolic Azadirachta indica leaf extract (neem) against house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus). Methods Twenty-five adults mites were placed onto treated filter paper that is soaked with plant extract and been tested at different concentrations (50.00%, 25.00%, 12.50%, 6.25% and 3.13%) and exposure times (24hrs, 48hrs, 72hrs and 96 hrs). All treatments were replicated 7 times, and the experiment repeated once. The topical and contact activities of the two herbs were investigated. Results Mortalities from lemongrass extract were higher than neem for both topical and contact activities. At 50 % concentration, both 24 hrs topical and contact exposures to lemongrass resulted in more than 91% mortalities for both species of mites. At the same concentration and exposure time, neem resulted in topical mortalities of 40.3% and 15.7% against D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae respectively; contact mortalities were 8.0% and 8.9% against the 2 mites, respectively. There was no difference in topical mortalities of D. pteronyssinus from exposure to concentrations of lemongrass and neem up to 12.50%; lemongrass was more effective than neem at the higher concentrations. Conclusions Generally, topical mortalities of D. farinae due to lemongrass are higher than that due to neem. Contact mortalities of lemongrass are always higher that neem against both species of mites. PMID:23569794

  6. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy: An Overview of Current Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan; De Blay, Frédéric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy treatment for known HDM-allergic patients is weaker. The standard diagnostic techniques-skin prick test and specific IgE testing-can be confounded by cross-reactivity. However, component-resolved diagnosis using purified and recombinant allergens can improve the accuracy of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease, as well as further development and improved access to molecular allergy diagnosis. Furthermore, there is a need for the development of better-designed clinical trials to explore the utility of allergen-specific approaches, and uptake of data into guidance for physicians on more effective diagnosis and therapy of HDM respiratory allergy in practice. PMID:26342746

  7. Essential oil components from Asarum sieboldii Miquel are toxic to the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiqiang; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fang; Li, Li; Liu, Zhigang; He, Zhendan

    2012-11-01

    In our effort to develop novel plant-derived acaricides, we examined the contact and fumigant toxicity of Asarum heterotropoides (Asarum sieboldii Miquel) essential oil constituents to the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Acari: Pyroglyphidae). Ten constituents, including methyl eugenol (relative amount 42.18 %), were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) in the A. sieboldii Miq. essential oil. In contact toxicity tests, methyl eugenol (4.2 ?g/cm(2), 24 h LD50) was most toxic to D. farinae, followed by benzyl benzoate (9.1 ?g/cm(2)), A. sieboldii Miq. essential oil (37.7 ?g/cm(2)), and dibutyl phthalate (DBP 57.9 ?g/cm(2)). The potency of methyl eugenol and A. sieboldii Miq. essential oil was higher than benzyl benzoate and DBP, with mortalities of 100, 100, 94.6, and 13.2 %, respectively, after 2.5 h of exposure. In the vapor phase mortality bioassay, methyl eugenol and A. sieboldii Miq. essential oil resulted in 100 % mortality in closed containers after 24-h exposure, but only 4.7 and 7.9 %, respectively, in open containers, indicating that the toxicity in these tests was largely due to the vapor phase. Methyl eugenol and A. sieboldii Miq. essential oil merit further study as potential D. farinae control compounds. PMID:22833176

  8. Attenuated allergic responses to house dust mite antigen in feed-restricted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, W; Kari, F W; Selgrade, M K; Gilmour, M I

    2000-01-01

    Caloric restriction has been shown to alter a broad range of immunological end points in both experimental animals and humans. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term moderate feed restriction (25% reduction) on allergic immune responses in Brown Norway rats. After 3 weeks of acclimation to their feed regimens, rats were sensitized and 2 weeks later challenged with house dust mite (HDM) antigen via intratracheal instillation. Feed restriction resulted in lower levels of antigen-specific IgE in serum and reduced antigen specific lymphoproliferative activity in pulmonary lymph nodes. Feed restriction also attenuated pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by lower levels of lactate dehydrogenase and total protein, decreased infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils, and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha] in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, feed restriction decreased TNF-[alpha] secretion in serum and decreased mRNA expression of TNF-[alpha] and interleukin-6 in pulmonary lymph nodes. We conclude that feed restriction strongly dampened the allergic immune responses to HDM in rats and that this attenuation was associated with decreased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:11133391

  9. Interleukin-21-Producing CD4(+) T Cells Promote Type 2 Immunity to House Dust Mites.

    PubMed

    Coquet, Jonathan M; Schuijs, Martijn J; Smyth, Mark J; Deswarte, Kim; Beyaert, Rudi; Braun, Harald; Boon, Louis; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Nutt, Steven L; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2015-08-18

    Asthma is a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-mediated disease; however, recent findings implicate Th17 and innate lymphoid cells also in regulating airway inflammation. Herein, we have demonstrated profound interleukin-21 (IL-21) production after house dust mite (HDM)-driven asthma by using T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice reactive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1 and an IL-21GFP reporter mouse. IL-21-producing cells in the mediastinal lymph node (mLN) bore characteristics of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, whereas IL-21(+) cells in the lung did not express CXCR5 (a chemokine receptor expressed by Tfh cells) and were distinct from effector Th2 or Th17 cells. Il21r(-/-) mice developed reduced type 2 responses and the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) enhanced Th2 cell function in a cell-intrinsic manner. Finally, administration of recombinant IL-21 and IL-25 synergistically promoted airway eosinophilia primarily via effects on CD4(+) lymphocytes. This highlights an important Th2-cell-amplifying function of IL-21-producing CD4(+) T cells in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:26287681

  10. After the PBDE Phase-Out: A Broad Suite of Flame Retardants in Repeat House Dust Samples from California

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Higher house dust levels of PBDE flame retardants (FRs) have been reported in California than other parts of the world, due to the state’s furniture flammability standard. However, changing levels of these and other FRs have not been evaluated following the 2004 U.S. phase-out of PentaBDE and OctaBDE. We analyzed dust collected in 16 California homes in 2006 and again in 2011 for 62 FRs and organohalogens, which represents the broadest investigation of FRs in homes. Fifty-five compounds were detected in at least one sample; 41 in at least 50% of samples. Concentrations of chlorinated OPFRs, including two (TCEP and TDCIPP) listed as carcinogens under California’s Proposition 65, were found up to 0.01% in dust, higher than previously reported in the U.S. In 75% of the homes, we detected TDBPP, or brominated “Tris,” which was banned in children’s sleepwear because of carcinogenicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on TDBPP in house dust. Concentrations of Firemaster 550 components (EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, and TPHP) were higher in 2011 than 2006, consistent with its use as a PentaBDE replacement. Results highlight the evolving nature of FR exposures and suggest that manufacturers continue to use hazardous chemicals and replace chemicals of concern with chemicals with uncharacterized toxicity. PMID:23185960

  11. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E.; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A.; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c+/CD11b+ and CD11c+/CD8+ cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION, STORAGE, AND SHIPMENT OF HOUSE DUST SAMPLES FOR METAL, PESTICIDE, AND PAH ANALYSIS (F04)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for collecting house dust samples. Dust from the floor was collected using a high-volume, small surface sampler (HVS3). Half of the sample was analyzed for metal content, and half was analyzed for pesticides and PAHs. Keywo...

  13. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF NEUTRAL PESTICIDES AND PAHS FROM HOUSE DUST AND SOIL (L11)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures to be used for the extraction of pesticides and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from house dust and soil. This procedure also describes the splitting of dust and soil samples for metal extractions for shipment to Emo...

  14. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust in major cities in Greece in relation to the use of lead in petrol.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, Maria A; Day, J Philip

    2006-08-31

    Until recently, the most important source of environmental lead pollution in cities was thought to come from the combustion of leaded petrol. A simple way to monitor the extent of this phenomenon, used in a number of studies in the past, has been to measure lead levels in street dust. Nowadays, it would be expected that lead concentrations in urban dust would have decreased from earlier values, following the progressive reduction of lead in petrol over the past few years, and this hypothesis has recently been confirmed in Manchester, UK. The object of the present work is to determine levels of lead pollution in cities in Greece on 1997 and, if possible, to discover whether similar reductions in lead concentrations have occurred there also. Surveys have been conducted in Thessaloniki, Athens and Piraeus. Samples of roadside dust were collected from streets (categorised by traffic density), national gardens and school playgrounds, and lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid. Lead concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and lead isotope ratios measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Thessaloniki showed that mean lead concentrations in all categories of location are similar to present levels in Manchester. Further, lead concentrations in dust in the busiest streets in Thessaloniki have fallen by about 55% since a previous study 17 years ago. In Athens and Piraeus, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between the various types of street. In particular, it was observed that lead levels in school playgrounds in these two cities were much higher than in similar locations in Thessaloniki and Manchester, with a possible hazard to children. Isotope ratio measurements showed that Thessaloniki's lead is isotopically distinct from that found in Athens and Piraeus, which presumably reflects differences in sources of supply. PMID:16687163

  15. Hexavalent chromium in house dust — A comparison between an area with historic contamination from chromate production and background locations

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Alan H.; Yu, Chang Ho; Black, Kathleen; Lin, Lin; Lioy, Paul J.; Gochfeld, Michael; Fan, Zhi-Hua (Tina)

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to Cr+ 3, Cr+ 6 is carcinogenic and allergenic. Although Cr+ 6 can occur naturally, it is thought that most soil Cr+ 6 is anthropogenic, however, the extent of Cr+ 6 in the background environment is unknown. Cr+ 6-containing chromite ore processing residue (COPR) from chromate manufacture was deposited in numerous locations in Jersey City (JC), New Jersey. In the 1990’s, significantly elevated concentrations of total Cr (Cr+ 6+Cr+ 3) were found in house dust near COPR sites. We undertook a follow-up study to determine ongoing COPR exposure. We compared Cr+6 in house dust in JC to selected background communities with no known sources of Cr+ 6. Samples were collected from living areas, basements and window wells. Cr+6 was detected in dust from all JC and background houses. In the JC homes, the mean (±SD) Cr+ 6 concentration for all samples was 3.9±7.0 ?g/g (range: non-detect–90.4 ?g/g), and the mean Cr+ 6 loading was 5.8±15.7 ?g/m2 (range: non-detect–196.4 ?g/m2). In background homes, the mean Cr+ 6 concentrations of all samples was 4.6±7.8 ? ?g/g, (range, 0.05–56.6 ?g/g). The mean loading was 10.0±27.9 ?g/m2 (range, 0.22–169.3 ?g/m2). There was no significant difference between Cr+ 6 dust concentrations in Jersey City and background locations. Stratification by sample location within houses and sampling method gave similar results. Samples exceeding 20 ?g/g were obtained only from single wood surfaces in different homes. Lower concentrations in window well samples suggests transport from outside is not the major source of indoor Cr+ 6. Landscaping and groundcover may influence indoor Cr+6. There appears to be a widespread low level background of Cr+ 6 that is not elevated in Jersey City homes despite its historic COPR contamination. It is possible that house dust, in general, is a source of Cr+ 6 exposure with potential implications for persistence of chromium allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:20692023

  16. Where's the dust? Characterizing locations of azinphos-methyl residues in house and vehicle dust among farmworkers with young children.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Gloria D; Griffith, William C; Vigoren, Eric M; Faustman, Elaine M; Thompson, Beti

    2010-12-01

    Organophosphate pesticides are commonly used in the United States, and farmworkers are at risk for chronic exposure. Using data from a community randomized trial to interrupt the take-home pathway of pesticide exposure, we examined the association between floor surface type (smooth floor, thin carpet, and thick carpet) and rooms in which dust samples were collected (living room vs. non-living room) and concentrations of azinphos-methyl residues in home environments. We also examined the association between vehicle type (truck, auto, or other) and footwell floor surfaces (carpeted, smooth surface, or no mat) and concentrations of azinphos-methyl in vehicle dust samples. Dust samples were collected from 203 and 179 households and vehicles, respectively. All households had at least one child aged 2-6. Vehicle dust samples were collected from footwells of the vehicle used for commuting to and from work. A total of 183 samples were collected from living rooms, and 20 were collected from other rooms in the home. Forty-two samples were collected from thick carpets, 130 from thin carpets, and 27 from smooth floor surfaces. Thick and thin carpets had a significantly greater dust mass than smooth floor surfaces (6.0 g/m(2) for thick carpets, 7.8 g/m(2) for thin carpets, and 1.5 g/m(2) for smooth surfaces). Of the 179 vehicle samples, 113 were from cars, 34 from trucks, and 32 from other vehicles. Vehicles with no mats had a significantly higher mass of dust (21.3 g) than those with hard mats (9.3 g) but did not differ from vehicles with plush mats (12.0 g). Further research is needed to characterize the environment in which children may be exposed to pesticides. PMID:20945243

  17. Cycling of Lead Through Soil, Air, and Household Dust in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J.; Amaya, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Elimination of leaded gasoline in the US is associated with a dramatic overall decrease in ambient lead in the environment and blood lead levels in our population. However, Pb is such a potent neurotoxin for children during the formative growth years that legislation for additional reduction of airborne lead levels is under consideration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of a suite of samples of local (El Paso) soil, airborne particulate matter, and household dust reveals that lead humate is the dominant Pb species in these diverse environmental materials. Lead humate is a stable complex of Pb with the humus component of soil, a product of interaction between the humus and such introduced contaminant lead species as lead oxide, lead sulfate, etc. Because lead humate forms only in soil, we conclude that the source of the majority of the lead in El Paso's airborne particulate matter and household dust is local soils. Analysis of lead isotopes in selected samples is consistent with this conclusion. Re-entrainment of low-density (relative to most Pb species) humus soil particles is the apparent pathway from soil to air. Deposition of airborne particulate matter and pedal traction are the presumed mechanisms for transfer to household interiors. Reduction of airborne lead in El Paso by reducing input from its dominant local source may require extensive soil remediation, a tedious and expensive prospect. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were conducted at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on beam lines 7-3, 10-2, and 11-2. Spectra were collected at the Pb L-III absorption edge in fluorescence mode using a 13-element or a 30-element Ge solid-state detector. This publication was made possible by grant numbers 1RO1-ES11367 and 1 S11 ES013339-04 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH. Partial travel support provided by SSRL-DOE- UTEP Gateway Program.

  18. Feather bedding and childhood asthma associated with house dust mite sensitisation: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Kemp, Andrew; Tovey, Euan; van Asperen, Peter; McKay, Karen; Forbes, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Observational studies report inverse associations between the use of feather upper bedding (pillow and/or quilt) and asthma symptoms but there is no randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence assessing the role of feather upper bedding as a secondary prevention measure. Objective To determine whether, among children not using feather upper bedding, a new feather pillow and feather quilt reduces asthma severity among house dust mite (HDM) sensitised children with asthma over a 1-year period compared with standard dust mite avoidance advice, and giving children a new mite-occlusive mattress cover. Design RCT. Setting The Calvary Hospital in the Australian Capital Territory and the Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales. Patients 197 children with HDM sensitisation and moderate to severe asthma. Intervention New upper bedding duck feather pillow and quilt and a mite-occlusive mattress cover (feather) versus standard care and a mite-occlusive mattress cover (standard). Main outcome measures The proportion of children reporting four or more episodes of wheeze in the past year; an episode of speech-limiting wheeze; or one or more episodes of sleep disturbance caused by wheezing; and spirometry with challenge testing. Statistical analysis included multiple logistic and linear regression. Results No differences between groups were found for primary end points – frequent wheeze (OR 1.51, 95% CI 0.83 to 2.76, p=0.17), speech-limiting wheeze (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.32 to 1.48, p=0.35), sleep disturbed because of wheezing (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.64 to 2.13, p=0.61) or for any secondary end points. Secondary analyses indicated the intervention reduced the risk of sleep being disturbed because of wheezing and severe wheeze to a greater extent for children who slept supine. Conclusion No differences in respiratory symptoms or lung function were observed 1 year after children with moderate–severe asthma and HDM sensitisation were given a mite-occlusive mattress cover and then received either feather upper bedding (pillow and quilt) or standard bedding care. PMID:21451166

  19. Lead (Pb) legacy from vehicle traffic in eight California urbanized areas: continuing influence of lead dust on children's health.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W; Laidlaw, Mark A S; Gonzales, Chris

    2010-09-01

    This article describes the magnitude of U.S. lead (Pb) additives in gasoline from 1927 to 1994 and estimated quantities of Pb dispersed by vehicle traffic in eight urbanized areas (UAs) of California from 1950 to 1982. The findings are the basis for predicting the health impact of Pb on children living in UA of California. Quantitative U.S. national data for 1927-1994 were from the U.S. Senate hearing of the 1984 Airborne Lead Reduction Act. Vehicle traffic data, fuel efficiency, percentage leaded gasoline, and quantities of Pb in gasoline were obtained for 1982 from public and corporate records to estimate vehicle Pb emissions for small to very large UAs of California. California fuel consumption records and yearly quantities of Pb additives per gallon were the basis for estimating the 1950-1982 dispersion of Pb in each UA. Lead additives were calculated by multiplying annual vehicle fuel used by average Pb per gallon. The proportion of Pb additive for each UA was calculated from vehicle miles traveled (VMT) driven in 1982 divided by miles per gallon fuel consumption times the ratio of leaded to unleaded fuel times Pb additive per gallon. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency calculations of the fates of Pb were used to estimate Pb aerosol dispersal in each UA. About 108 billion miles of travel in 1982 within 8 UAs accounts for 3200metric tons of Pb additives or approximately 60% total Pb additives in California. Between the 1950-1982 peak of Pb additives, about 258,000metric tons are accounted for out of the state 412,000metric tons total during the same time period. The estimates of the quantities of Pb dust that accumulated within various UAs in California assists with predicting the continuing influences of Pb on children's exposure. Mapping the soil Pb reservoir assists with establishing the priority for enhancing environments of children. PMID:20542539

  20. 77 FR 70179 - Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties and Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties...: Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties and Housing...

  1. Sensitivity to Five Types of House Dust Mite in a Group of Allergic Egyptian Children

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Shereen; Abdul-Rahman, Nahla

    2014-01-01

    Background: The published data on house dust mite (HDM) sensitization from Egypt are scanty. We sought to investigate the sensitization to five different types of HDM among a group of allergic children in a trial to outline the most frequent sensitizing strains in the Cairo Province. Methods: We consecutively enrolled 100 asthmatic patients, aged 1–7 years, of whom 22 had concomitant skin allergy. Skin prick testing was performed using allergen extracts of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Acarus siro. Results: Twenty-four patients (24%) were sensitized to one or more strains of HDM. Sensitization to one strain was revealed in 12% of the studied sample, while sensitization to two or three strains was detected in 8% and 4% respectively. Twelve percent of the enrolled children were sensitive to D. pteronyssinus, 11% to D. farinae, 7% to L. destructor, 6% to T. putrescentiae, and 4% to A. siro. Eight out of the 12 (66%) children sensitive to one strain had mild intermittent asthma, while five out of eight (62.5%) sensitive to two strains had moderate persistent asthma. All children sensitized to three strains of HDM had persistent rather than intermittent asthma. HDM sensitization did not correlate significantly to the history of sun exposure, bed mattresses and pillows, living in farms, or exposure to stored grains. The co-existence of atopic dermatitis tended to have a higher rate of HDM sensitization. Conclusion: D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae represent the most common sensitizing strains in the studied sample. Wider-scale population-based studies are needed to assess the prevalence of HDM allergy and its clinical correlates in our country. PMID:25276487

  2. Neonatal Exposure to Pneumococcal Phosphorylcholine Modulates the Development of House Dust Mite Allergy during Adult Life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Preeyam S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, ?20% of the global population suffers from an allergic disorder. Allergies and asthma occur at higher rates in developed and industrialized countries. It is clear that many human atopic diseases are initiated neonatally and herald more severe IgE-mediated disorders, including allergic asthma, which is driven by the priming of Th2 effector T cells. The hygiene hypothesis attempts to link the increased excessively sanitary conditions early in life to a default Th2 response and increasing allergic phenomena. Despite the substantial involvement of IgE Abs in such conditions, little attention has been paid to the effects of early microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire prior to the initiation of these diseases. In this study, we use Ab-binding assays to demonstrate that Streptococcus pneumoniae and house dust mite (HDM) bear similar phosphorylcholine (PC) epitopes. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice immunized with a PC-bearing pneumococcal vaccine expressed increased frequencies of PC-specific B cells in the lungs following sensitizing exposure to HDM as adults. Anti-PC IgM Abs in the lung decreased the interaction of HDM with pulmonary APCs and were affiliated with lowered allergy-associated cell infiltration into the lung, IgE production, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th2 T cell priming. Thus, exposure of neonatal mice to PC-bearing pneumococci significantly reduced the development of HDM-induced allergic disease during adult life. Our findings demonstrate that B cells generated against conserved epitopes expressed by bacteria, encountered early in life, are also protective against the development of allergic disease during adult life. PMID:25957171

  3. Gene expression in the skin of dogs sensitized to the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Schamber, Paz; Schwab-Richards, Rachel; Bauersachs, Stefan; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial allergic skin disease in humans and dogs. Genetic predisposition, immunologic hyperreactivity, a defective skin barrier, and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression in the skin of dogs sensitized to house dust mite antigens. Skin biopsy samples were collected from six sensitized and six nonsensitized Beagle dogs before and 6 hr and 24 hr after challenge using skin patches with allergen or saline as a negative control. Transcriptome analysis was performed by the use of DNA microarrays and expression of selected genes was validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Expression data were compared between groups (unpaired design). After 24 hr, 597 differentially expressed genes were detected, 361 with higher and 226 with lower mRNA concentrations in allergen-treated skin of sensitized dogs compared with their saline-treated skin and compared with the control specimens. Functional annotation clustering and pathway- and co-citation analysis showed that the genes with increased expression were involved in inflammation, wound healing, and immune response. In contrast, genes with decreased expression in sensitized dogs were associated with differentiation and barrier function of the skin. Because the sensitized dogs did not show differences in the untreated skin compared with controls, inflammation after allergen patch test probably led to a decrease in the expression of genes important for barrier formation. Our results further confirm the similar pathophysiology of human and canine atopic dermatitis and revealed genes previously not known to be involved in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:25098772

  4. Pim1 kinase activity preserves airway epithelial integrity upon house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Hesse, L; Jonker, M R; van den Berge, M; van Oosterhout, A J M; Heijink, I H; Nawijn, M C

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with allergic asthma are sensitized to house dust mite (HDM). The allergenicity of HDM largely depends on disruption of the integrity and proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that Pim1 kinase activity attenuates HDM-induced asthma by preserving airway epithelial integrity. The effects of Pim1 kinase activity on barrier function and release of the proinflammatory mediators IL-1? and CCL20 were studied in vitro in 16HBE and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs). Pim1-proficient and -deficient mice were exposed to a HDM-driven model of allergic asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured upon methacholine challenge. Airway inflammation and proinflammatory mediators in lung tissue and BAL fluid were determined. We observed that inhibition of Pim1 kinase prolongs the HDM-induced loss of barrier function in 16HBE cells and sensitizes PBECs to HDM-induced barrier dysfunction. Additionally, inhibition of Pim1 kinase increased the HDM-induced proinflammatory activity of 16HBE cells as measured by IL-1? secretion. In line herewith, HDM exposure induced an enhanced production of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL17 and CCL20 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. While we observed a marked increase in eosinophilic and neutrophilic granulocytes as well as mucus cell metaplasia and AHR to methacholine in mice exposed to HDM, these parameters were independent of Pim1 kinase activity. In contrast, levels of the Th2-cytokines IL-5 and IL-10 were significantly augmented in HDM-treated Pim1-deficient mice. Taken together, our study shows that Pim1 kinase activity maintains airway epithelial integrity and protects against HDM-induced proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. PMID:26453516

  5. Vitamin E Isoform ?-Tocotrienol Downregulates House Dust Mite-Induced Asthma.

    PubMed

    Peh, Hong Yong; Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Cheng, Chang; Chan, Tze Khee; Seow, Ann Ching Genevieve; Lim, Albert Y H; Fong, Chee Wai; Seng, Kok Yong; Ong, Choon Nam; Wong, W S Fred

    2015-07-15

    Inflammation and oxidative damage contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. Although corticosteroid is the first-line treatment for asthma, a subset of patients is steroid resistant, and chronic steroid use causes side effects. Because vitamin E isoform ?-tocotrienol possesses both antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, we sought to determine protective effects of ?-tocotrienol in a house dust mite (HDM) experimental asthma model. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with HDM. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, oxidative damage biomarkers, and cytokine levels. Lungs were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, as well as the expression of antioxidants and proinflammatory biomarkers. Sera were assayed for IgE and ?-tocotrienol levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness in response to methacholine was measured. ?-Tocotrienol displayed better free radical-neutralizing activity in vitro and inhibition of BAL fluid total, eosinophil, and neutrophil counts in HDM mouse asthma in vivo, as compared with other vitamin E isoforms, including ?-tocopherol. Besides, ?-tocotrienol abated HDM-induced elevation of BAL fluid cytokine and chemokine levels, total reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage biomarker levels, and of serum IgE levels, but it promoted lung-endogenous antioxidant activities. Mechanistically, ?-tocotrienol was found to block nuclear NF-?B level and enhance nuclear Nrf2 levels in lung lysates to greater extents than did ?-tocopherol and prednisolone. More importantly, ?-tocotrienol markedly suppressed methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in experimental asthma. To our knowledge, we have shown for the first time the protective actions of vitamin E isoform ?-tocotrienol in allergic asthma. PMID:26041537

  6. Effect of the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on allergic lung inflammation induced by repeated house dust mite administration in mice.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johannes D; Berkhout, Lea C; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Yang, Jack; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Meijers, Joost C M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-10-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways; asthma patients are hampered by recurrent symptoms of dyspnoea and wheezing caused by bronchial obstruction. Most asthma patients suffer from chronic allergic lung inflammation triggered by allergens such as house dust mite (HDM). Coagulation activation in the pulmonary compartment is currently recognized as a feature of allergic lung inflammation, and data suggest that coagulation proteases further drive inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we tested whether treatment with the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran attenuates allergic lung inflammation in a recently developed HDM-based murine asthma model. Mice were fed dabigatran (10 mg/g) or placebo chow during a 3-wk HDM airway exposure model. Dabigatran treatment caused systemic thrombin inhibitory activity corresponding with dabigatran levels reported in human trials. Surprisingly, dabigatran did not lead to inhibition of HDM-evoked coagulation activation in the lung as measured by levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer. Repeated HDM administration caused an influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into the lungs, mucus production in the airways, and a T helper 2 response, as reflected by a rise in bronchoalveolar IL-4 and IL-5 levels and a systemic rise in IgE and HDM-IgG1. Dabigatran modestly improved HDM-induced lung pathology (P < 0.05) and decreased IL-4 levels (P < 0.01), without influencing other HDM-induced responses. Considering the limited effects of dabigatran in spite of adequate plasma levels, these results argue against clinical evaluation of dabigatran in patients with asthma. PMID:26320153

  7. House dust mite allergens mediate the activation of c?kit in dendritic cells via Toll?like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Chun-Xia; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Jin-Zhao; Gao, Lin; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the c?kit proto?oncogene and its ligand, stem cell factor, are important in the development of asthma. House dust mite (HDM; Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) allergens are a major trigger in the development and exacerbation of asthma. HDM allergens can induce the activation of c?kit in dendritic cells (DCs), leading to the development of allergic asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of Toll?like receptor 2 (TLR2) evokes a T helper (Th)2 immune response and promotes experimental asthma. The aim of the present study was to assess whether HDM mediates the activation of c?kit in DCs via TLR2. Monocyte?derived DCs were generated from C57BL/6 mice, and cultured with interleukin (IL)?4 and granulocyte?macrophage colony?stimulating factor. The DCs were then sensitized with HDM (10 µg/ml) for 72 h. TLR2?specific small interfering (si)RNA was used to silence and inhibit the expression of TLR2 in the DCs. The expression levels of c?kit and B7 (CD80/CD86) were measured, by analyzing the DC culture supernatant for the presence of IL?6 and IL?12. Inhibition of TLR2 using specific siRNA downregulated the expression of c?kit in the HDM?activated DCs. In addition, silencing of TLR2 inhibited the expression of CD80/CD86, decreased the production of IL?6, and increased the production of IL?12. These results indicated that TRL2 are important in the activation of c?kit by HDM in DCs. PMID:26238189

  8. Concentration of the genera Aspergillus, Eurotium and Penicillium in 63-?m house dust fraction as a method to predict hidden moisture damage in homes

    PubMed Central

    Baudisch, Christoph; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative measurements of mould enrichment of indoor air or house dust might be suitable surrogates to evaluate present but hidden moisture damage. Our intent was to develop a house-dust monitoring method to detect hidden moisture damage excluding the influence of outdoor air, accumulated old dust, and dust swirled up from room surfaces. Methods Based on standardized measurement of mould spores in the 63-?m fraction of house dust yielded by carpets, the background concentrations were determined and compared to simultaneously obtained colony numbers and total spore numbers of the indoor air in 80 non-mouldy living areas during summer and winter periods. Additionally, sampling with a vacuum-cleaner or manual sieve was compared to sampling with a filter holder or sieving machine, and the evaluative power of an established two-step assessment model (lower and upper limits) was compared to that of a one-step model (one limit) in order to derive concentration limits for mould load in house dust. Results Comparison with existing evaluation procedures proved the developed method to be the most reliable means of evaluating hidden moisture damage, yielding the lowest false-positive results (specificity 98.7%). Background measurements and measurements in 14 mouldy rooms show that even by evaluating just the indicator genera in summer and winter, a relatively certain assessment of mould infestation is possible. Conclusion A one-step evaluation is finally possible for house dust. The house-dust evaluation method is based on analysis of the indicator genera Aspergillus, Eurotium and Penicillium spp., which depend on the total fungal count. Inclusion of further moisture indicators currently appears questionable, because of outdoor air influence and the paucity of measurements. PMID:19615082

  9. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 ?g/dL in children aged 1-4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 ?g/m(2)) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 ?g/m(2)) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 ?g/m(2)) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. PMID:25462679

  10. Determination of synthetic musk compounds in indoor house dust by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, Cariton; Fan, Xinghua; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2012-08-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of 11 synthetic musks and one fragrance compound in house dust was developed. The nitro musks included musk ketone (MK, 4-tert-butyl-3,5-dinitro-2,6-dimethylacetophenone), musk xylene (MX, 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), musk ambrette (1-tert-butyl-2-methoxy-4-methyl-3,5-dinitrobenzene) and musk moskene (1,1,3,3,5-pentamethyl-4,6-dinitroindane). The polycyclic musk compounds were 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-(?)-2-benzopyran (HHCB), 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN), 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butylindane, 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindane, 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropylindane, 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanon. The one macrocyclic musk was 1,4-dioxacycloheptadecane-5,17-dione. The bicyclic hydrocarbon fragrance compound (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-2,3,8,8-tetramethylnaphthalen-2yl)ethan-1-one (OTNE) and HHCB-lactone (4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1H,3H,4H,6H,7H, 8H-indeno[5,6-c]pyran-1-one), a degradation product of HHCB, were also analysed. NIST SRM 2781 (domestic sludge) and SRM 2585 (organic contaminants in house dust) were analysed for these target compounds. The method was applied for the analysis of 49 paired samples collected using two vacuum sampling methods: a sample of fresh or "active" dust (FD) collected using a Pullman-Holt vacuum sampler, and a household dust (HD) sample taken from the participants' vacuum cleaners. Method detection limits and recoveries ranged from 12 to 48 ng/g and 54 to 117 %, respectively. AHTN, HHCB, OTNE and HHCB-lactone were detected in all samples, with median concentrations of 552, 676, 252 and 453 ng/g for FD samples, respectively; and 405, 992, 212 and 492 ng/g for HD samples, respectively. MX and MK were detected with high frequencies but with much lower concentrations. The two sampling methods produced comparable results for the target analytes. Widely scattered concentration levels were observed for target analytes from this set of 49 house dust samples, suggesting a wide variability in Canadian household exposure to synthetic musks. PMID:22684881

  11. Pyrethroids in house dust from the homes of farm worker families in the MICASA study

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    of the pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin, cypermethrin, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate and resmethrin in single dust at 67%, with median concentrations of 244 and 172 ng/g dust, respectively. Cypermethrin was detected frequencies and/or lower median concentrations of cis- and trans-permethrin and cypermethrin were observed

  12. A side-by-side comparison of three allergen sampling methods in settled house dust.

    PubMed

    Sandel, Megan; Murphy, Johnna S; Dixon, Sherry L; Adgate, John L; Chew, Ginger L; Dorevitch, Samuel; Jacobs, David E

    2014-11-01

    Understanding allergen exposure and potential relationships with asthma requires allergen sampling methods, but methods have yet to be standardized. We compared allergen measurements from dust collected from 200 households with asthmatics and conducted a side-by-side vacuum sampling of settled dust in each home's kitchen, living room and subject's bedroom by three methods (EMM, HVS4 and AIHA). Each sample was analyzed for dust mite, cockroach, mouse, rat, cat and dog allergens. The number of samples with sufficient dust mass for allergen analysis was significantly higher for Eureka Mighty Mite (EMM) and high volume small surface sampler (HVS4) compared with American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) in all rooms and surfaces tested (all P<0.05). The allergen concentration (weight of allergen divided by total weight of dust sampled) measured by the EMM and HVS4 methods was higher than that measured by the AIHA. Allergen loadings (weight of allergen divided by surface area sampled) were significantly higher for HVS4 than for AIHA and EMM. Cockroach and rat allergens were rarely detected via any method. The EMM method is most likely to collect sufficient dust from surfaces in the home and is relatively practical and easy. The AIHA and HVS4 methods suffer from insufficient dust collection and/or difficulty in use. PMID:24802556

  13. Gene-by-environment effect of house dust mite on purinergic receptor P2Y12 (P2RY12) and lung function in children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Boyce, Joshua A.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Distinct receptors likely exist for leukotriene(LT)E4, a potent mediator of airway inflammation. Purinergic receptor P2Y12 is needed for LTE4-induced airways inflammation, and P2Y12 antagonism attenuates house dust mite-induced pulmonary eosinophilia in mice. Although experimental data support a role for P2Y12 in airway inflammation, its role in human asthma has never been studied. Objective To test for association between variants in the P2Y12 gene (P2RY12) and lung function in human subjects with asthma, and to examine for gene-by-environment interaction with house dust mite exposure. Methods 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in P2RY12 were genotyped in 422 children with asthma and their parents (n=1266). Using family-based methods, we tested for associations between these SNPs and five lung function measures. We performed haplotype association analyses and tested for gene-by-environment interactions using house dust mite exposure. We used the false discovery rate to account for multiple comparisons. Results Five SNPs in P2RY12 were associated with multiple lung function measures (P values 0.006–0.025). Haplotypes in P2RY12 were also associated with lung function (P values 0.0055–0.046). House dust mite exposure modulated associations between P2RY12 and lung function, with minor allele homozygotes exposed to house dust mite demonstrating worse lung function than those unexposed (significant interaction P values 0.0028–0.040). Conclusions and clinical relevance P2RY12 variants were associated with lung function in a large family-based asthma cohort. House dust mite exposure caused significant gene-by-environment effects. Our findings add the first human evidence to experimental data supporting a role for P2Y12 in lung function. P2Y12 could represent a novel target for asthma treatment. PMID:22010907

  14. Organophosphorous pesticide breakdown products in house dust and children’s urine

    PubMed Central

    Quirós-Alcalá, Lesliam; Bradman, Asa; Smith, Kimberly; Weerasekera, Gayanga; Odetokun, Martins; Barr, Dana Boyd; Nishioka, Marcia; Castorina, Rosemary; Hubbard, Alan E.; Nicas, Mark; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to preformed dialkylphosphates (DAPs) in food or the environment may affect the reliability of DAP urinary metabolites as biomarkers of organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure. We conducted a study to investigate the presence of DAPs in indoor residential environments and their association with children’s urinary DAP levels. We collected dust samples from homes in farmworker and urban communities (40 homes total, n = 79 samples) and up to two urine samples from resident children ages 3–6 years. We measured six DAPs in all samples and eight DAP-devolving OP pesticides in a subset of dust samples (n = 54). DAPs were detected in dust with diethylphosphate (DEP) being the most frequently detected (?60%); detection frequencies for other DAPs were ?50%. DEP dust concentrations did not significantly differ between communities, nor were concentrations significantly correlated with concentrations of chlorpyrifos and diazinon, the most frequently detected diethyl-OP pesticides (Spearman ? = ?0.41 to 0.38, P>0.05). Detection of DEP, chlorpyrifos, or diazinon, was not associated with DEP and/or DEP + diethylthiophosphate detection in urine (Kappa coefficients = ?0.33 to 0.16). Finally, estimated non-dietary ingestion intake from DEP in dust was found to be ?5% of the dose calculated from DEP levels in urine, suggesting that ingestion of dust is not a significant source of DAPs in urine if they are excreted unchanged. PMID:22781438

  15. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply...

  16. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply...

  17. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply...

  18. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply...

  19. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements...housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply...

  20. [Effectiveness of a test for verification of the presence of acari in house dust for the prevention of respiratory allergies in children].

    PubMed

    Cantani, A; Arcese, G; Serra, A; Lucenti, P

    1995-01-01

    Respiratory allergy and bronchial asthma in particular can be serious afflictions in younger as well as in older children. Therefore interest has been focused on methods for the prevention of atopy. The role and allergenic importance of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) in house and other environments have been identified. This mite provokes asthma in children at an earlier age than pollens. However the most under-valued area of asthma prevention is environmental control. The steps may seem difficult at first, but the results will be well worth the efforts and the sacrifices. We report on the high effectiveness of the guanine detection test (Acarex) based on the colorimetric quantification of allergen sources in house dust (mattresses, pillows, upholstered furniture, carpets, moquettes, etc), which can be treated with house dust mite extermination products such as benzyl benzoate. The eradication measures will allow the parents to reduce the allergen exposure, to be monitored at 3-6 month intervals. The guanine detection test performed in our Division on house dust samples assembled by the patents of children with house dust mite induced asthma (study group) or pollen asthma (control group) yielded highly significant statistical differences. PMID:8545553

  1. Studies on the Occurrence, Identification and Control of House Dust Mites at Rural Houses of Shebin El-Kom Locality, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Heikal, H M

    2015-04-01

    The present study was conducted at Elkom Elakhdar village, Shebin El-Kom, Menoufia Governorate along 2012 year seasons, to calculate and identify the species composition and the occurrence frequency of the extracted dust mites collected from three building ages at rural houses, as well as to determine the toxicity limits of different concentrations of three plant essential oils against two species of the family Pyroglyphidae the main causal of allergy to humans. The obtained results revealed that there were eleven mite species belong to five families (Pyroglyphidae, Chortoglyphidae, Glycyphagidae, Acaridae and Cheyletidae). Of the total collected mites (5276) the highest dominant percentage species was the dust mites: Dermatophagoides farinae (66.1%), followed by D. pteronyssinus (23.3%), while the percentages of the rest species: Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Gohieria fusca, Tyrophagusputrescentiae, Caloglyphus sp, Cheyletus malaccensis, Blomia sp. and Acarus siro were ranged between 0.16-2.0%. Regarding to the effect of temperature degrees on mite population, high degrees more than 25 degrees C at summer season, decreased the numbers of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. Toxicological tests of the three plant essential oils against adult stages of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus showed that lemon grass oil gave the highest toxicity effect, in comparison with geranium and thyme oils, where mortality percentages were approximately around 100% at 800 ppm concentration on both species. The LC50 of lemon grass were 228.992 and 293.615 ppm against the two species, respectively. From the results of the research, it could be recommend that it is preferable to apply control operation during summer season where the mite population density is the least, moreover, the botanical oil extracts effectively controlled the parasitic dust mites, D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus and can be used in the biological control programs, as well as, it can play effective role in the integrated management programs. PMID:26506648

  2. Levels of Non-Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Brominated Flame Retardants in Residential House Dust Samples and Fire Station Dust Samples in California

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F Reber; Whitehead, Todd P; Park, June-Soo; Metayer, Catherine; Petreas, Myrto X

    2014-01-01

    Eleven novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were analyzed in dust samples from California homes as a part of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) and from the living quarters of California fire stations as a part of the Firefighter Occupational Exposure (FOX) study using high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The eleven NBFRs, were: ?- and ?-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (?- and ?-DBE-DBCH), 2-bromoallyl 2,3,6-tribromophenylether (BATE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE). Six of the seven NBFRs that are produced in relatively small quantities (i.e., ??, ??DBE-DBCH, BATE, PBEB, PBT, TBP-DBPE) were measured close to or below the limit of quantitation (0.64 ng/g) in both the NCCLS and FOX samples, and the seventh, HBB, was measured at median concentrations of 1.85 ng/g and 9.40 ng/g in the NCCLS and FOX samples, respectively. The remaining four NBFRs, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE, and DBDPE, are produced in higher quantities, and were detected at median concentrations of 337 ng/g, 186 ng/g, 22.3, ng/g, and 82.8 ng/g, respectively in the NCCLS samples, and at median concentrations of 2687 ng/g, 2076 ng/g, 28.4 ng/g, and 161 ng/g, respectively, in the FOX samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were several times lower than concentrations of PBDEs previously measured in the same samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were generally comparable to concentrations of NBFRs in other studies of house dust from the US and Canada. PMID:25261858

  3. Evaluation of errors and limits of the 63-?m house-dust-fraction method, a surrogate to predict hidden moisture damage

    PubMed Central

    Baudisch, Christoph; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyze possible random and systematic measurement errors and to detect methodological limits of the previously established method. Findings To examine the distribution of random errors (repeatability standard deviation) of the detection procedure, collective samples were taken from two uncontaminated rooms using a sampling vacuum cleaner, and 10 sub-samples each were examined with 3 parallel cultivation plates (DG18). In this two collective samples of new dust, the total counts of Aspergillus spp. varied moderately by 25 and 29% (both 9 cfu per plate). At an average of 28 cfu/plate, the total number varied only by 13%. For the evaluation of the influence of old dust, old and fresh dust samples were examined. In both cases with old dust, the old dust influenced the results indicating false positive results, where hidden moist was indicated but was not present. To quantify the influence of sand and sieving, 13 sites were sampled in parallel using the 63-?m- and total dust collection approaches. Sieving to 63-?m resulted in a more then 10-fold enrichment, due to the different quantity of inert sand in each total dust sample. Conclusion The major errors during the quantitative evaluation from house dust samples for mould fungi as reference values for assessment resulted from missing filtration, contamination with old dust and the massive influence of soil. If the assessment is guided by indicator genera, the percentage standard deviation lies in a moderate range. PMID:19852825

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD TEST METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF LEAD IN PAINT, AND PAINT-CONTAMINATED DUST AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid, simple, inexpensive, and relatively accurate field test method for the determination of lead (Pb) in paints, dusts, and soils has been developed. The method involves the ultrasonic leaching of 0.19 - 0.5g of the sample in 5 mL of 25% (v/v) nitric acid for 30 minutes foll...

  5. QUANTITATIVE PCR ANALYSIS OF HOUSE DUST CAN REVEAL ABNORMAL MOLD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold populations were measured in the dust of homes in Cleveland and Cincinnati, OH, by quantitative PCR (QPCR) and, in Cincinnati, also by culturing. QPCR assays for 82 species (or groups of species) were used to identify and quantify indoor mold populations in moldy home...

  6. Relationship between chicken cellular immunity and endotoxin levels in dust from chicken housing environments

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Katharine; Shin, Kyung-Min; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous biochemical agents in animal husbandry indoor environments are known to promote the occurrence of various illnesses among workers and animals. The relationship between endotoxin levels in dust collected from chicken farms and various immunological markers was investigated. Peripheral blood was obtained from 20 broiler chickens and 20 laying hens from four different chicken farms in Korea. Concentrations of total or respirable dust in the inside the chicken farm buildings were measured using a polyvinyl chloride membrane filter and mini volume sampler. Endotoxin levels in the dust were determined by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate Kinetic method. Interferon-? production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with concanavalin A was significantly lower in broilers or layers from the farms with higher endotoxin concentrations than the chickens from the farms with lower endotoxin levels. An opposite pattern was observed for plasma cortisol concentrations with higher cortisol levels found in chickens from the farms with higher endotoxin levels. When peripheral lymphocytes were examined, the percentage of CD3-Ia+ B cells was lower in layers from farms with higher endotoxin levels than those from locations with lower endotoxin levels. Overall, these results suggest a probable negative association between dust endotoxin levels and cell-mediated immunity in chickens. PMID:25549222

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF HOUSE DUST FOR ARSENIC (RTI/ACS-AP-209-121)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this protocol is to provide guidelines for the analysis of wipes that were used in Lioy-Wainman-Weisel (LWW) surface samplers to collect house dust for arsenic (As). This method involves the extraction of the analyte from wipe samples using 50% ultra-pure nitric ac...

  8. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR ANALYSIS OF SOIL OR HOUSE DUST SAMPLES USING CHLORPYRIFOS ELISA SAMPLES (BCO-L-1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract is included for completeness of documentation, but this SOP was not used in the study.

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for analyzing both Stage II and Stage III soil and vacuum-cleaner collected house dust samples, and Stage III air samples u...

  9. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  10. A recombinant fragment of human SP-D reduces allergic responses in mice sensitized to house dust mite allergens

    PubMed Central

    STRONG, P; TOWNSEND, P; MACKAY, R; REID, K B M; CLARK, H W

    2003-01-01

    C57Bl6 mice sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and challenged with D. pteronyssinus allergen extract given intranasally followed by treatment with intranasal applications of a 60-kDa truncated, trimeric recombinant form of human SP-D (rfhSP-D) showed a significant reduction in serum IgE, IgG1, peripheral blood eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness compared to saline or bovine serum albumin-treated controls. Intracellular cytokine staining of lung and spleen homogenates showed increases in interleukin (IL)-12 production in lung tissue and normalization of IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-? in spleen tissue. In previous studies we demonstrated the effectiveness of native SP-D and rfhSP-D in down-regulating allergic responses to allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus. The results reported here indicate that rfhSP-D can suppress the development of allergic symptoms in sensitized mice challenged with allergens of the common house dust mite. PMID:14616775

  11. A post-remediation assessment in Jersey City of the association of hexavalent chromium in house dust and urinary chromium in children.

    PubMed

    Black, Kathleen; Gochfeld, Michael; Lioy, Paul J; Fan, Zhi-Hua Tina; Yu, Chang Ho; Jeitner, Chris; Hernandez, Marta; Einstein, Stephanie A; Stern, Alan H

    2015-11-01

    Although all chromite ore processing residue (COPR) sites near residential neighborhoods in Jersey City, New Jersey have undergone remediation, recent studies found widespread, but low levels of hexavalent chromium (Cr(+6)) in house dust both in Jersey City and in communities with no known sources of Cr(+6). This study was designed as a follow-up to determine whether there is an association between current Cr(+6) levels in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations in young children. Dust samples (N=369) were collected from 123 homes. The median Cr(+6) concentration was 3.3??g/g (mean±SD 5.2±7.5) and the median Cr(+6) loading was 1.1??g/m(2) (1.9±3.1). These levels were not elevated compared with previously reported levels in background communities (median concentration=3.5??g/g; median loading=2.8??g/m(2)). Urinary chromium concentrations were measured in spot urine samples collected from 150 children, ages 3 months to 6 years. The median uncorrected urinary chromium concentration was 0.19??g/l (0.22±0.16). Current urinary chromium concentrations were significantly lower than those previously reported before and during remediation (t-test; P<0.001). Urinary chromium concentrations were not significantly higher in homes with high (75th or 90th percentile) Cr(+6) dust levels (concentration or loading) compared with other homes. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the relationship between Cr(+6) levels (concentration and loading) in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations (uncorrected and specific gravity corrected). Contrary to pre-remediation studies, we did not find a positive association between Cr(+6) levels in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations. The findings indicate that current Cr(+6) levels in house dust are not positively associated with children's chromium exposure as measured by urinary chromium, and the children's exposure to Cr(+6) in house dust is below the level that could be identified by urine sampling. PMID:26329141

  12. 5A, an Apolipoprotein A–I Mimetic Peptide, Attenuates the Induction of House Dust Mite-induced Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xianglan; Dai, Ciulian; Fredriksson, Karin; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Keeran, Karen J.; Zywicke, Gayle J.; Amar, Marcelo J. A.; Remaley, Alan T.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2010-01-01

    New treatment approaches are needed for patients with asthma. Apolipoprotein A–I (apoA-I), the major structural protein of high density lipoproteins, mediates reverse cholesterol transport and also has atheroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we hypothesized that an apolipoprotein A–I mimetic peptide might be effective at inhibiting asthmatic airway inflammation. A 5A peptide, which is a synthetic, bi-helical apoA-I mimetic, was administered to wild-type A/J mice via osmotic mini-pump prior to the induction of house dust mite (HDM)-induced asthma. HDM-challenged mice that received the 5A apoA-I mimetic peptide had significant reductions in the number of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils, as well as in histopathological evidence of airway inflammation. The reduction in airway inflammation was mediated by a reduction in expression of Th2- and Th17-type cytokines, as well as in chemokines that promote T cell and eosinophil chemotaxis, including CCL7, CCL17, CCL11 and CCL24. Furthermore, the 5A apoA-I mimetic peptide inhibited the alternative activation of pulmonary macrophages in the lungs of HDM-challenged mice. The 5A apoA-I mimetic peptide also abrogated the development of airway hyperreactivity and reduced several key features of airway remodeling, including goblet cell hyperplasia and the expression of collagen genes (Col1a1 and Col3a1). Our results demonstrate that the 5A apoA-I mimetic peptide attenuates the development of airway inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in an experimental murine model of house dust mite-induced asthma. These data support the conclusion that strategies utilizing apoA-I mimetic peptides, such as 5A, might be developed further as a possible new treatment approach for asthma. PMID:21115733

  13. A Framework for Action To Make Private Housing Lead-Safe: A Proposal To Focus National Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, Washington, DC.

    This framework sets forth detailed proposals that are crucial to eliminating the epidemic of childhood lead poisoning in the United States. Private housing units can and must be made lead-safe, and this framework is designed to achieve that goal through specific requirements for property owners, a workable schedule, and mechanisms that reinforce…

  14. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in settled house dust from urban dwellings with resident preschool-aged children in Nanjing, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing-Ling; Pang, Shu-tao; Zhang, Xiao-ling; Li, Xi-ling; Sun, Yong-gang; Lu, Xiao-mei; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the levels and possible determinants of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the settled house-dust (SHD) of urban dwellings with resident preschool-aged children in Nanjing, China. The possible neurodevelopmental effects of house-dust PBDEs were also explored. SHD was collected from 216 urban houses. Levels of 8 PBDEs were measured by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The Child Behavior Checklist and the Gesell Development Inventory were used to evaluate the child's development. BDE47, BDE99, BDE153, BDE18, and BDE209 were detected in the SHD of >90 % of houses, of which BDE209 predominated. Most PBDEs were found at significantly greater levels in indoor than in outdoor dust (P < 0.05). Levels of BDE28 and BDE154 in houses with solid-wood floors were significantly greater than those in houses with plywood floors (P < 0.05). BDE154 levels in houses with wallpaper were significantly greater than those without wallpaper (P < 0.05). Greater BDE47 concentrations were found in houses with less natural ventilation time (linear trend P < 0.05). After dichotomization at the geometric mean concentration, BDE209 and total BDEs showed significant risks for depressed behavior problems and lower personal social developmental quotients (DQs); BDE99 and BDE153 indicated a risk for lower personal social DQs. In conclusion, PBDEs (especially BDE209) are ubiquitous in urban SHD in Nanjing residences. Natural ventilation and floor materials potentially influence PBDE levels in SHD. The potential adverse effect of postnatal exposure to PBDEs on the behavior and neurodevelopment of preschool-age children requires follow-up in larger studies. PMID:25034333

  15. Risk assessment of non-dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via house PM2.5, TSP and dust and the implications from human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Min-juan; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the cancer risk due to non-dietary PAHs exposure in home environment (inhalation and ingestion), exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of PM2.5, total suspend particles (TSP) and dust in homes at two urban centers of Pearl River Delta were assessed. House PM2.5 bound PAHs in Guangzhou (GZ) ranged from 10.0 to 61.9 ng m-3 and 0.72 to 8.15 ng m-3 in Hong Kong (HK). PAH profiles found in PM2.5, TSP and dust were different than that in hair (dominated by Nap and Phe). Pyr and Flu in house dust significantly correlated with that in hair (r = 0.69; 0.55, p < 0.05) but no correlation was found between PAHs in hair and PM2.5. High correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.97/0.95, p < 0.01) were noted between dibenzo(a,h)anthracene (DBA) and Toxicity Equivalent Concentrations (TEQs) of dust and PM2.5. The lung cancer risks based on PM2.5 bound PAHs exposure in houses of GZ (10-5-10-4) were significantly higher than those of HK (10-6-10-5), which were also significantly higher than the cancer risks associated with house dust intake (10-7-10-5) in GZ. PAHs exposure via non-dietary route (PM2.5 and dust) was found to be 1-3 times higher than fish consumption for children and contributed to 52-76% of total PAHs intake for children and 24-50% for adults in GZ.

  16. Indirect contact with pets can confound the effect of cleaning procedures for reduction of animal allergen levels in house dust.

    PubMed

    Munir, A K; Einarsson, R; Dreborg, S K

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the capacity of common vacuum cleaners and chemical treatment to reduce cat (Fel d I) and dog (Can f I) allergen content in house dust, 52 families with allergic children and no pets at home were recruited. Five groups of 10-11 families used their central vacuum cleaners (n = 10), their own old vacuum cleaners plus either tannic acid (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10) applied to carpets and upholstry after the first sample was collected on Day 0 or new vacuum cleaners equipped with either HEPA (high efficiency particulate air)- (n = 11) or microfilters (n = 10). Dust samples were collected from carpets and upholstered furniture in the living rooms and from the mattresses of the children on Days 0, 7, 21, and 35. Fel d I and Can f I allergens were determined by sandwich ELISA methods. Central, micro-filter and HEPA-filter vacuum cleaners did not reduce the concentrations nor the total amount/sampling area of Fel d I or Can f I. Tannic acid initially reduced (p < 0.05) both the concentration and the total amount of Fel d I by 30% and Can f I by 10%, but only for one week. The levels increased to base-line after 21-35 days. The concentrations of Fel d I increased 10-30 times in homes visited by cats or cat owners. We conclude, that tannic acid treatment reduced pet allergen concentrations and total amounts in dust for one week only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8173637

  17. Total suspended dust and heavy metal levels emitted from a workplace compared with nearby residential houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Wahab, Sabah A.; Yaghi, Basma

    Total suspended particulate matter (TSP) were collected from the workplace in Sohar Industrial Estate (SIE) in Oman. The samples were taken from 19 different industrial activities that represent major sources of particulate matter in the SIE. The collected samples were analyzed for 9 heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, Cd, V and Mo) by using the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analysis (ICP-OES). Furthermore, the indoor TSP and heavy metal concentrations were measured inside 12 houses within Sohar residential area to determine the contributions of various industrial activities on nearby residential houses. The results indicated that the mean concentrations of heavy metals in the TSP were too low to yield any known environmental health effects. In general, the results showed that the concentrations of heavy metals in the workplaces of SIE and its nearby houses were low compared to the guideline values. In addition, the values were low in comparison with other known sites around the world. Moreover, significant contribution from industrial sources at SIE was evidenced at nearby houses.

  18. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces isolated from house dust samples collected around the world

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, C.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Tanney, J.B.; Whitfield, E.; Mwange, K.; Meijer, M.; Amend, A.S.; Seifert, K.A.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a worldwide survey of the indoor mycobiota, dust was collected from nine countries. Analyses of dust samples included the culture-dependent dilution-to-extinction method and the culture-independent 454-pyrosequencing. Of the 7?904 isolates, 2?717 isolates were identified as belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces. The aim of this study was to identify isolates to species level and describe the new species found. Secondly, we wanted to create a reliable reference sequence database to be used for next-generation sequencing projects. Isolates represented 59 Aspergillus species, including eight undescribed species, 49 Penicillium species of which seven were undescribed and 18 Talaromyces species including three described here as new. In total, 568 ITS barcodes were generated, and 391 ?-tubulin and 507 calmodulin sequences, which serve as alternative identification markers. PMID:25492981

  19. [Nursery schools, a site for exposure to house dust mite allergens?].

    PubMed

    Rebmann, H; Weller, A

    1989-10-01

    In June 1988, 110 dust samples from carpets, cushions, mattresses and upholstered furniture were collected by vacuum cleaner in 33 municipal nursery schools. All samples were assessed with guanine test strips (Acarex). In all samples giving moderately or strongly positive results in these tests (guanine stages 2 and 3) and in 10 random samples each from of stages 1 (weakly positive) and 0 (negative), mites were counted by light microscope. In 36% of the nursery schools, objects with guanine stages 2 or 3 were found, which indicates a high allergen burden. The high guanine stages were found only in mattresses, cushions and upholstered furniture. Nursery schools can be source areas of significant allergen exposure relevant for children with dust mite allergies. PMID:2586533

  20. Detection, identification, and quantification of hydroxylated bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate isomers in house dust.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Saunders, David M V; Sun, Jianxian; Codling, Garry; Wiseman, Steve; Jones, Paul D; Giesy, John P

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-High Resolution LC/mass spectrometry (LC-UHRMS; Thermo Fisher Q-Exactive) was used to identify two novel isomers of hydroxylated bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (OH-TBPH) which were unexpectedly observed in a commercial standard of TBPH. By combining ultra-high resolution (UHR) mass spectra (MS(1)), mass errors to theoretical [TBPH-Br+O](-) were 2.1 and 1.0 ppm for the two isomers, UHR-MS(2) spectra and NMR analysis; the structures of the two compounds were identified as hydroxylated TBPH with a hydroxyl group on the aromatic ring. Relatively great proportions of the two isomers of OH-TBPH were detected in two technical products, Firemaster 550 (FM-550; 0.1% and 6.2%, respectively) and Firemaster BZ 54 (BZ-54; 0.1% and 7.9%), compared to a commercial standard (0.4% and 0.9%). To simultaneously analyze OH-TBPH isomers and TBPH in samples of dust, a method based on LC-UHRMS was developed to quantify the two compounds, using negative and positive ion modes, respectively. The instrumental limit of detection for TBPH was 0.01 ?g/L, which was 200-300 times better than traditional methods (2.5 ?g/L) based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analytical method combined with a Florisil cleanup was successfully applied to analyze TBPH and OH-TBPH in 23 indoor dust samples from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Two OH-TBPH isomers, OH-TBPH1 and OH-TBPH2, were detected in 52% and 91% of dust samples, respectively. Concentrations of OH-TBPH2 (0.35 ± 1.0 ng/g) were 10-fold greater than those of OH-TBPH1 (0.04 ± 0.88 ng/g) in dust, which was similar to profiles in FM-550 and BZ-54. TBPH was also detected in 100% of dust samples with a mean concentration of 733 ± 0.87 ng/g. A significant (p < 0.001) log-linear relationship was observed between TBPH and OH-TBPH isomers, further supporting the hypothesis of a common source of emission. Relatively small proportions of OH-TBPH isomers were detected in dust (0.01% ± 0.67 OH-TBPH1 and 0.1% ± 0.60 OH-TBPH2), which were significantly less than those in technical products (p < 0.001). This result indicated different environmental behaviors of OH-TBPH and TBPH. Detection of isomers of OH-TBPH is important, since compounds with phenolic groups have often shown relatively greater toxicities than nonhydroxylated analogues. Further study is warranted to clarify the environmental behaviors and potential toxicities of OH-TBPH isomers. PMID:25621784

  1. Development and evaluation of monitoring methods for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust and track-in soil. Final report, June 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Callahan, P.J.; Katona, V.; Gordon, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    The analytical methods were developed for the determination of Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the dust and soil based on sonication with hexane and 10% ether/hexane, respectively, and analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Quantitative recoveries of spiked perdeuterated PAH and (13)C labeled PCB were obtained using the above methods. In an eight-home field evaluation, the concentrations of the sum of all target PAH in the house dust ranged from 16 to 550 ppm, from 41 to 580 ppm, and from 25 to 310 ppm in the samples collected during June 1992, October 1992, and April 1993, respectively. The PCB concentrations were lower than PAH concentrations in all samples; the sum of all target PCB varied from 210 to 1900 ppb in house dust, from 30 to 880 ppb in entryway soil, from 16 to 500 ppb in pathway soil, and from 18 to 210 ppb in foundation soil. Higher PCB concentrations were found in house dust samples than in entryway soil samples. Similar PCB concentrations were observed in the pathway soil samples and the foundation soil samples, which were lower than PCB found in entryway soil samples.

  2. House-dust mite allergy: mapping of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergens for dogs by two-dimensional immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andreia Grilo; Pereira, Luísa Maria Dotti Silva; Goicoa, Ana; Semiăo-Santos, Saul José; Bento, Ofélia Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Specific immunotherapy has shown to be very useful for allergy control in dogs, with a common success rate ranging from 65% to 70%. However, this efficacy could probably be improved and the identification of individual allergomes, with the choice of more adequate molecular allergen pools for specific immunotherapy, being the strategy. Aim To map Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) allergens for mite-sensitized atopic dogs, for better understanding how individual allergograms may influence the response to house-dust mite immunotherapy. Material and methods To identify the Der p mite allergome for dogs, 20 individuals allergic to dust-mites and sensitized to Der p, were selected. The extract from Der p was submitted to isoelectric focusing (IEF), one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Separated proteins were blotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes and immunoblottings were performed with patient sera. Allergen-bound specific IgE was detected. Results Eleven allergens were identified from isoelectric focusing (IEF), as well as from 1-D SDS PAGE. From 2-D SDS-PAGE, 24 spots were identified. Conclusions Several similarities were found between dog and human allergograms and no absolute correlation between sensitization and allergy was observed either. As in humans, different individual allergograms do not seem to implicate different clinical patterns, but may influence the response to specific immunotherapy. The molecular epidemiology approach in veterinary allergy management, by the characterization of individual patients’ allergoms and by choosing the best molecular allergen pool for each patient could also improve the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:26015775

  3. Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) from house-dust mites may cause covariation of sensitization to allergens from other invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Inam, Muhammad; Ismail, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz

    2012-01-01

    Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) have been assumed to be a major cause of cross-reactivity between house-dust mites (HDMs) and other invertebrates. Despite all of the published data regarding the epidemiology, percent IgE binding and level of sensitization in the population, the role of tropomyosin as a cross-reactive allergen in patients with multiple allergy syndrome still remains to be elucidated. Homology between amino acid sequences reported in allergen databases of selected invertebrate tropomyosins was determined with Der f 10 as the reference allergen. The 66.9 and 54.4% identities were found with selected crustacean and insect species, respectively, whereas only 20.4% identity was seen with mollusks. A similar analysis was performed using reported B-cell IgE-binding epitopes from Met e1 (shrimp allergen) and Bla g7 (cockroach allergen) with other invertebrate tropomyosins. The percent identity in linear sequences was higher than 35% in mites, crustaceans, and cockroaches. The polar and hydrophobic regions in these groups were highly conserved. These findings suggest that tropomyosin may be a major cause of covariation of sensitization between HDMs, crustaceans, and some species of insects and mollusks. PMID:23342293

  4. Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) from house-dust mites may cause covariation of sensitization to allergens from other invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Inam, Muhammad; Ismail, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz

    2012-01-01

    Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) have been assumed to be a major cause of cross-reactivity between house-dust mites (HDMs) and other invertebrates. Despite all of the published data regarding the epidemiology, percent IgE binding and level of sensitization in the population, the role of tropomyosin as a cross-reactive allergen in patients with multiple allergy syndrome still remains to be elucidated. Homology between amino acid sequences reported in allergen databases of selected invertebrate tropomyosins was determined with Der f 10 as the reference allergen. The 66.9 and 54.4% identities were found with selected crustacean and insect species, respectively, whereas only 20.4% identity was seen with mollusks. A similar analysis was performed using reported B-cell IgE-binding epitopes from Met e1 (shrimp allergen) and Bla g7 (cockroach allergen) with other invertebrate tropomyosins. The percent identity in linear sequences was higher than 35% in mites, crustaceans, and cockroaches. The polar and hydrophobic regions in these groups were highly conserved. These findings suggest that tropomyosin may be a major cause of covariation of sensitization between HDMs, crustaceans, and some species of insects and mollusks. PMID:23342293

  5. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Der f 2, a Potent Allergen Derived from the House Dust Mite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Takai, Toshiro; Okumura, Yasushi; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Although a number of allergens have been identified and isolated, the underlying molecular basis for the potent immune response is poorly understood. House dust mites (Dermatophugoides sp.) are particularly ubiquitous contributors to atopy in developed countries. The rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma associated with allergic reactions to these arthropods are often caused by relatively small (125-129 amino acids) mite proteins of unclear biological function. Der f 2, a major allergen from the mite Dermatophagoides farinae, has been recombinantly expressed and characterized. The Der f 2 protein has been crystallized in our laboratory and a native data set collected at a synchrotron source. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I422 with unit cell parameters of a = 95.2 Angstroms, b = 95.2 Angstroms, and c = 103.3 Angstroms. An essentially complete (97.2%) data set has been collected to 2.4 Angstroms. Attempts to solve the crystal structure of Der f 2 by molecular replacement using the available NMR coordinates for either Der f 2 or Der p 2 (the homologous protein from D. pterovssinus) failed to reveal a creditable solution.

  6. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-09-21

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatorymore »therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy.« less

  7. Diesel Exhaust Particles Induce Cysteine Oxidation and S-Glutathionylation in House Dust Mite Induced Murine Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gerald B.; Brandt, Eric B.; Xiao, Chang; Gibson, Aaron M.; Le Cras, Timothy D.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust particle (DEP) exposure enhances allergic inflammation and has been linked to the incidence of asthma. Oxidative stress on the thiol molecules cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) can promote inflammatory host responses. The effect of DEP on the thiol oxidation/reduction (redox) state in the asthmatic lung is unknown. Objective To determine if DEP exposure alters the Cys or GSH redox state in the asthmatic airway. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from a house dust mite (HDM) induced murine asthma model exposed to DEP. GSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG), Cys, cystine (CySS), and s-glutathionylated cysteine (CySSG) were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography. Results DEP co-administered with HDM, but not DEP or HDM alone, decreased total Cys, increased CySS, and increased CySSG without significantly altering GSH or GSSG. Conclusions DEP exposure promotes oxidation and S-glutathionylation of cysteine amino acids in the asthmatic airway, suggesting a novel mechanism by which DEP may enhance allergic inflammatory responses. PMID:23555996

  8. Dendritic cells induce Th2-mediated airway inflammatory responses to house dust mite via DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amarjit; Brown, Alexandra L.; Yao, Xianglan; Yang, Shutong; Park, Sung-Jun; Liu, Chengyu; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Jeffries, Kenneth R.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Levine, Stewart J.; Chung, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) mediates double stranded DNA break repair, V(D)J recombination, and immunoglobulin class switch recombination, as well as innate immune and pro-inflammatory responses. However, there is limited information regarding the role of DNA-PK in adaptive immunity mediated by dendritic cells (DCs), which are the primary antigen-presenting cells in allergic asthma. Here we show that house dust mite induces DNA-PK phosphorylation, which is a marker of DNA-PK activation, in DCs via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK, as well as the specific deletion of DNA-PK in DCs, attenuates the induction of allergic sensitization and Th2 immunity via a mechanism that involves the impaired presentation of mite antigens. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK following antigen priming similarly reduces the manifestations of mite-induced airway disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that DNA-PK may be a potential target for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25692509

  9. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatory therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy. PMID:26387548

  10. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-01-01

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatory therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy. PMID:26387548

  11. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-09-21

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatory therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy.

  12. House-dust mite allergen and ozone exposure decreases histamine H3 receptors in the brainstem respiratory nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sekizawa, Shin-ichi; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tham, Rick C.; Kott, Kayleen S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Joad, Jesse P.; Bonham, Ann C.

    2010-09-15

    Allergic airway diseases in children are a common and a growing health problem. Changes in the central nervous system (CNS) have been implicated in contributing to some of the symptoms. We hypothesized that airway allergic diseases are associated with altered histamine H3 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus, where lung/airway and nasal sensory afferents terminate, respectively. Immunohistochemistry for histamine H3 receptors was performed on brainstem sections containing the NTS and the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus from 6- and 12-month-old rhesus monkeys who had been exposed for 5 months to house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + O{sub 3} or to filtered air (FA). While histamine H3 receptors were found exclusively in astrocytes in the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus, they were localized to both neuronal terminals and processes in the NTS. HDMA + O{sub 3} exposure significantly decreased histamine H3 receptor immunoreactivity in the NTS at 6 months and in the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus at 12 months of age. In conclusion, exposing young primates to HDMA + O{sub 3} changed histamine H3 receptor expression in CNS pathways involving lung and nasal afferent nerves in an age-related manner. Histamine H3 receptors may be a therapeutic target for allergic asthma and rhinitis in children.

  13. Blood lead levels in preprimary school-age children in Nicosia, Cyprus, and their relationship with leaded soil dust exposure.

    PubMed

    Demoliou, Catherine D; Charalambous, Andreas

    2004-09-01

    The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to determine blood lead levels in children who attended kindergarten schools and nurseries in Nicosia, Cyprus, and to correlate their findings with (a) home and school environments, (b) behavior of the children, and (c) socioeconomic characteristics. Capillary blood for lead assay was collected from March 2001 to September 2001 from children who lived and attended school in Nicosia. Children who lived and attended school in a rural setting served as controls. Parental questionnaires and interviews yielded information about socioeconomic background, environment, and children's habits and health. Overall findings indicated that children in Nicosia had mean blood lead levels similar to controls (i.e., <10 microg/dl)--the level of concern defined by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings of our study likely represent high standards of hygiene adopted by parents and teachers, rather than knowledge embraced by parents and teachers about risks associated with lead exposure and sources of lead exposure. PMID:16381486

  14. Road Dust Lead (Pb) in Two Neighborhoods of Urban Atlanta, (GA, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Deocampo, Daniel M.; Reed, Jack; Kalenuik, Alexander P.

    2012-01-01

    Road dust continues to be a major potential reservoir of Pb in the urban environment, and an important potential component of child Pb exposure. This study presents ICP-AES analyses of metals in 72 samples of road dust (<250 µm) collected in the urban core of Atlanta, Georgia. In the Downtown area, median Pb concentrations are ~63 mg/kg Pb, with high values of 278 mg/kg. For comparison, median Pb values in a nearby residential neighborhood (also in the urban core) were ~93 mg/kg, with a high of 972 mg/kg. Geospatial variability is high, with significant variation observed over tens to hundreds of meters. Spearman Rank Correlation tests suggest that Pb and other metals (Cu, Ni, V, Zn) are associated with iron and manganese oxide phases in the residential area, as reported in other cities. However, Pb in the Downtown area is not correlated with the others, suggesting a difference in source or transport history. Given these complexities and the expected differences between road dust and soil Pb, future efforts to assess exposure risk should therefore be based on spatially distributed sampling at very high spatial resolution. PMID:22829787

  15. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  16. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research and Data Sets Economic Development HUD Homes Energy HUD's Budget Environment Information for Disabled Persons Fair ... Staff and Public Housing Agencies Policy Statement for Climate Change Adaptation [PDF] Print Friendly Version UPCOMING EVENTS ...

  17. Dioxin-related compounds in house dust from New York State: occurrence, in vitro toxic evaluation and implications for indoor exposure.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Takahashi, Shin; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Takigami, Hidetaka; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-10-01

    This study analysed sulphuric-acid-treated extracts of house dust from New York State with DR-CALUX assay and HRGC-HRMS to elucidate the total dioxin-like (DL) activities, the occurrence of various dioxin-related compounds (DRCs), including PBDD/Fs, and their toxic contribution. The DL activities were 30-8000, median 210 pg CALUX-TEQ/g. PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs and DL-PCBs were detected with a large variation in concentrations (0.12-80, 0.33-150, 0.46-35, medians 1.7, 2.1 and 5.6 ng/g, respectively) and profiles, indicating the existence of multiple contamination sources in homes. PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs and DL-PCBs with known potency theoretically contributed <1%-130%, <1%-21% and <1%-6.8%, respectively, of the measured CALUX-TEQs. These results and those from DR-CALUX assays with fractionated dust extracts indicated that a substantial portion of the CALUX-TEQs could be caused by unknown dust contaminants. Considering that the DRC intake from indoor dust ingestion can be significant, identification of unknown DL contaminants in indoor dust is necessary. PMID:23838483

  18. Evaluating the Bioaccessibility of Flame Retardants in House Dust Using an In Vitro Tenax Bead-Assisted Sorptive Physiologically Based Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to house dust is a significant source of exposure to flame retardant chemicals (FRs), particularly in the US. Given the high exposure there is a need to understand the bioaccessibility of FRs from dust. In this study, Tenax beads (TA) encapsulated within a stainless steel insert were used as an adsorption sink to estimate the dynamic absorption of a suite of FRs commonly detected in indoor dust samples (n = 17), and from a few polyurethane foam samples for comparison. Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) had the highest estimated bioaccessibility (?80%) compared to brominated compounds (e.g., PBDEs), and values generally decreased with increasing Log Kow, with <30% bioaccessibility measured for BDE209. These measurements were in very close agreement with reported PBDE bioavailability measures from an in vivo rat exposure study using indoor dust. The bioaccessibility of very hydrophobic FRs (Log Kow > 6) in foam was much less than that in house dust, and increasing bioaccessibility was observed with decreasing particle size. In addition, we examined the stability of more labile FRs containing ester groups (e.g., OPFRs and 2-ethylhexyl-tetrabromo-benzoate (EH-TBB)) in a mock-digestive fluid matrix. No significant changes in the OPFR concentrations were observed in this fluid; however, EH-TBB was found to readily hydrolyze to tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) in the intestinal fluid in the presence of lipases. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the bioaccessibility and stability of FRs following ingestion varies by chemical and sample matrix and thus should be considered in exposure assessments. PMID:25330458

  19. Acaricidal toxicities of 1-hydroxynaphthalene from Scutellaria barbata and its derivatives against house dust and storage mites.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Min-Gi; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2013-07-01

    The essential oil of Scutellaria barbata was extracted using a steam distillation and then evaluated via fumigant and contact toxicity bioassays against Dermatophagoides farinae, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, and Tyrophagus putrescentiae. The acaricidal toxicities of 1-hydroxynaphthalene from S. barbata oil and its derivatives were determined and compared with those of benzyl benzoate. Based on the LD50 values of 1-hydroxynaphthalene derivatives against D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and T. putrescentiae, obtained using a fumigant toxicity bioassay, the acaricidal activity of 1-hydroxynaphthalene (2.11, 2.37, and 4.50 µg/cm2) was 4.76, 6.00, and 2.68 times higher than that of benzyl benzoate (10.05, 9.50, and 12.50 µg/cm2) in the corresponding order, which was followed by that of 2-hydroxynaphthalene (9.50, 9.00, and 11.50 µg/cm2). On the contact toxicity bioassay, the acaricidal activity of 1-hydroxynaphthalene (0.79, 0.92, and 2.50 µg/cm2) was 9.49, 6.52, and 3.76 times higher than that of benzyl benzoate (7.50, 6.00, and 9.41 µg/cm2), which was followed by that of 2-hydroxynaphthalene (4.21, 4.80, and 6.50 µg/cm2). In conclusion, our results indicate that S. barbata oil and 1-hydroxynaphthalene derivatives might be effective natural agents for the management of house dust and storage mites. PMID:23757178

  20. Effect of high-dose sublingual immunotherapy on respiratory infections in children allergic to house dust mite

    PubMed Central

    Barberi, Salvatore; Verduci, Elvira; D'Auria, Enza; Poli, Piercarlo; Pietra, Benedetta; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Buttafava, Serena; Frati, Franco; Riva, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is characterized by eosinophil inflammation. Allergic inflammation may induce susceptibility to respiratory infections (RI). House dust mite (HDM) sensitization is very frequent in childhood. Allergen immunotherapy may cure allergy as it restores a physiologic immune and clinical tolerance to allergen and exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Objective This study investigated whether six-month high-dose, such as 300 IR (index of reactivity), HDM-sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) could affect RI in allergic children. Methods Globally, 40 HDM allergic children (18 males; mean age, 9.3 years) were subdivided in 2 groups: 20 treated by symptomatic drugs (group 1) and 20 by high-dose HDM-SLIT (group 2), since September 2012 to April 2013. The daily maintenance dose of HDM-SLIT was 4 pressures corresponding to 24, 4.8, and 60 µg, respectively of the major allergens Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 1, Der p 2, and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) 1. RI was diagnosed when at least 2 symptoms or signs, and fever were present for at least 48 hours. A family pediatrician provided diagnosis on a clinical ground. Results SLIT-treated children had significantly (p = 0.01) less RI episodes (3.5) than control group (5.45). About secondary outcomes, SLIT-treated children had less episodes of pharyngo-tonsillitis (p < 0.05) and bronchitis (p < 0.005), and snoring (p < 0.05) than control group. In addition, SLIT-treated children had less fever (p < 0.01) and took fewer medications, such as antibiotics (p < 0.05) and fever-reducers (p < 0.01), than control group. Conclusion This preliminary study might suggest that also a short course (6 months) of high-dose SLIT, titrated in µg of major allergens, could reduce RI in allergic children. PMID:26240793

  1. PARP is activated in human asthma and its inhibition by olaparib blocks house dust mite-induced disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Pyakurel, Kusma; Ibba, Salome V.; Wang, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Paulo; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Lammi, Matthew R.; Kim, Hogyoung; Zea, Arnold H.; Davis, Christian; Okpechi, Samuel; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Al-Ghareeb, Kamel; Mansy, Moselhy S.; Ochoa, Augusto; Naura, Amarjit S.

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory established a role for poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in asthma. To increase the clinical significance of our studies, it is imperative to demonstrate that PARP is actually activated in human asthma, to examine whether a PARP inhibitor approved for human testing such as olaparib blocks already-established chronic asthma traits in response to house dust mite (HDM), a true human allergen, in mice and to examine whether the drug modulates human cluster of differentiation type 4 (CD4+) T-cell function. To conduct the study, human lung specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a HDM-based mouse asthma model were used. Our results show that PARP is activated in PBMCs and lung tissues of asthmatics. PARP inhibition by olaparib or gene knockout blocked established asthma-like traits in mice chronically exposed to HDM including airway eosinophilia and hyper-responsiveness. These effects were linked to a marked reduction in T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine production without a prominent effect on interferon (IFN)-? or interleukin (IL)-10. PARP inhibition prevented HDM-induced increase in overall cellularity, weight and CD4+ T-cell population in spleens of treated mice whereas it increased the T-regulatory cell population. In CD3/CD28-stimulated human CD4 +T-cells, olaparib treatment reduced Th2 cytokine production potentially by modulating GATA binding protein-3 (gata-3)/IL-4 expression while moderately affecting T-cell proliferation. PARP inhibition inconsistently increased IL-17 in HDM-exposed mice and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD4+ T cells without a concomitant increase in factors that can be influenced by IL-17. In the present study, we provide evidence for the first time that PARP-1 is activated in human asthma and that its inhibition is effective in blocking established asthma in mice. PMID:26205779

  2. PARP is activated in human asthma and its inhibition by olaparib blocks house dust mite-induced disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghonim, Mohamed A; Pyakurel, Kusma; Ibba, Salome V; Wang, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Paulo; Al-Khami, Amir A; Lammi, Matthew R; Kim, Hogyoung; Zea, Arnold H; Davis, Christian; Okpechi, Samuel; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Al-Ghareeb, Kamel; Mansy, Moselhy S; Ochoa, Augusto; Naura, Amarjit S; Boulares, A Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Our laboratory established a role for poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in asthma. To increase the clinical significance of our studies, it is imperative to demonstrate that PARP is actually activated in human asthma, to examine whether a PARP inhibitor approved for human testing such as olaparib blocks already-established chronic asthma traits in response to house dust mite (HDM), a true human allergen, in mice and to examine whether the drug modulates human cluster of differentiation type 4 (CD4(+)) T-cell function. To conduct the study, human lung specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a HDM-based mouse asthma model were used. Our results show that PARP is activated in PBMCs and lung tissues of asthmatics. PARP inhibition by olaparib or gene knockout blocked established asthma-like traits in mice chronically exposed to HDM including airway eosinophilia and hyper-responsiveness. These effects were linked to a marked reduction in T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine production without a prominent effect on interferon (IFN)-? or interleukin (IL)-10. PARP inhibition prevented HDM-induced increase in overall cellularity, weight and CD4(+) T-cell population in spleens of treated mice whereas it increased the T-regulatory cell population. In CD3/CD28-stimulated human CD4 (+)T-cells, olaparib treatment reduced Th2 cytokine production potentially by modulating GATA binding protein-3 (gata-3)/IL-4 expression while moderately affecting T-cell proliferation. PARP inhibition inconsistently increased IL-17 in HDM-exposed mice and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD4(+) T cells without a concomitant increase in factors that can be influenced by IL-17. In the present study, we provide evidence for the first time that PARP-1 is activated in human asthma and that its inhibition is effective in blocking established asthma in mice. PMID:26205779

  3. Immunomodulation of Airway Epithelium Cell Activation by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ameliorates House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1? and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  4. Removal of lead by using Raschig rings manufactured with mixture of cement kiln dust, zeolite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Salem, A; Afshin, H; Behsaz, H

    2012-07-15

    The present investigation is a follow-up of study on manufacturing Raschig ring for removal of lead from aqueous solution. The mixtures were formulated using cement kiln dust, zeolite, and bentonite, normally used as natural adsorbents in the industrial scale, according to mixture design algorithm and response surface method. The pastes were prepared by addition of 28.0wt.% de-ionized water, containing 0.1wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose, with mixed powders. The adsorbents were fabricated by extrusion of the pastes in Raschig ring form and calcination at 500°C after drying in oven. The effects of starting materials on the mechanical behavior of rings were studied from view point of mixture design algorithm to optimize the adsorbent composition. This method demonstrated to yield valuable information on the effects of used materials on mechanical characteristics. The study concluded that the strength, reliability and sorption capacity of ring can be simultaneously optimized by the addition of 47.5wt.% cement kiln dust, 32.5wt.% zeolite, and 20.0wt.% bentonite. In the next part of work, the sorption kinetics was investigated. The kinetic study indicated that the modified model can successfully correlate the sorption data. The equilibrium result showed the possibility of lead immobilization by fabricated rings. PMID:22608209

  5. Blood lead levels among rural Thai children exposed to lead-acid batteries from solar energy conversion systems.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Sanreun, Cherd

    2013-11-01

    We evaluate blood lead levels among Thai children to determine if exposure to lead-acid batteries is associated with elevated blood lead levels (EBLL). We screened 254 children aged 1-14 years old from 2 rural Thai villages for blood lead levels. We also screened 18 of 92 houses in these 2 villages for the presence of environmental lead. The overall prevalence of EBLL (> or = 10 microg/dl) was 43.3% and the mean lead level among study subjects was 9.8 +/- 5.1 microg/dl. The blood lead levels significantly decreased with increasing age. Fifty point eight percent of children who lived in a house with vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL while 23.3% of children who lived in a house without vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between the presence of vented lead-acid batteries and EBLL, after adjusting for other variables. Forty-two point nine percent of house floor dust samples collected near the batteries had elevated lead levels, 7.1% of house floor dust samples collected from other areas in the house had elevated lead levels and 0% of the house floor dust samples collected in houses without vented lead-acid batteries had elevated lead levels. In the sampled houses with vented lead-acid batteries, lead contamination was found in the drinking-water kept in household containers, but not in the tap water or other village sources of water. Improper care and placement of vented lead-acid batteries can result in lead contamination in the home environment causing EBLL in exposed children. PMID:24450246

  6. Determinants of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in house dust samples from four areas of the United States.

    PubMed

    Deziel, N C; Nuckols, J R; Colt, J S; De Roos, A J; Pronk, A; Gourley, C; Severson, R K; Cozen, W; Cerhan, J R; Hartge, P; Ward, M H

    2012-09-01

    Determinants of levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in dust in U.S. homes are not well characterized. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the relationship between concentrations of PCDD/F in house dust and residential proximity to known sources, including industrial facilities and traffic. Samples from vacuum bag dust from homes of 40 residents of Detroit, Los Angeles, Seattle, or Iowa who participated in a population-based case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma conducted in 1998-2000 were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry for 7 PCDD and 10 PCDF congeners considered toxic by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Locations of 10 types of PCDD/F-emitting facilities were obtained from the EPA; however only 4 types were located near study homes (non-hazardous waste cement kilns, coal-fired power plants, sewage sludge incinerators, and medical waste incinerators). Relationships between concentrations of each PCDD/F and proximity to industrial facilities, freight routes, and major roads were evaluated using separate multivariate regression models for each congener. The median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) toxic equivalence (TEQ) concentration of these congeners in the house dust was 20.3 pg/g (IQR=14.3, 32.7). Homes within 3 or 5 km of a cement kiln had 2 to 9-fold higher concentrations of 5 PCDD and 5 PCDF (p<0.1 in each model). Proximity to freight routes and major roads was associated with elevated concentrations of 1 PCDD and 8 PCDF. Higher concentrations of certain PCDD/F in homes near cement kilns, freight routes, and major roads suggest that these outdoor sources are contributing to indoor environmental exposures. Further study of the contribution of these sources and other facility types to total PCDD/F exposure in a larger number of homes is warranted. PMID:22832089

  7. Determinants of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in house dust samples from four areas of the United States

    PubMed Central

    NC, Deziel; Nuckols; JS, Colt; AJ, De Roos; A, Pronk; C, Gourley; RK, Severson; W, Cozen; Cerhan; P, Hartge; MH, Ward

    2012-01-01

    Determinants of levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in dust in U.S. homes are not well characterized. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the relationship between concentrations of PCDD/F in house dust and residential proximity to known sources, including industrial facilities and traffic. Samples from vacuum bag dust from homes of 40 residents of Detroit, Los Angeles, Seattle, or Iowa who participated in a population-based case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma conducted in 1998–2000 were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry for 7 PCDD and 10 PCDF congeners considered toxic by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Locations of 10 types of PCDD/F-emitting facilities were obtained from the EPA; however only 4 types were located near study homes (non-hazardous waste cement kilns, coal-fired power plants, sewage sludge incinerators, and medical waste incinerators). Relationships between concentrations of each PCDD/F and proximity to industrial facilities, freight routes, and major roads were evaluated using separate multivariate regression models for each congener. The median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) toxic equivalence (TEQ) concentration of these congeners in the house dust was 20.3 pg/g (IQR=14.3, 32.7). Homes within 3 or 5 km of a cement kiln had 2 to 9-fold higher concentrations of 5 PCDD and 5 PCDF (p<0.1 in each model). Proximity to freight routes and major roads was associated with elevated concentrations of 1 PCDD and 8 PCDF. Higher concentrations of certain PCDD/F in homes near cement kilns, freight routes, and major roads suggest these outdoor sources are contributing to indoor environmental exposures. Further study of the contribution of these sources and other facility types to total PCDD/F exposure in a larger number of homes is warranted. PMID:22832089

  8. Effect of heat treatments on the house-dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in a mattress-like polyurethane foam block.

    PubMed

    de Boer, R

    1990-08-01

    The behaviour and survival of the house-dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae were studied under laboratory conditions in a mattress-like polyurethane foam block that was heated by an electric blanket. Mites obtained from a laboratory culture were introduced into the foam block which was sliced into seven horizontal layers and covered with an electric blanket. Measurements of temperature and relative humidity were taken between the layers and the number of living mites was established using the heat-escape method. PMID:2226071

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart): a novel gene arrangement among arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Vanholme, Bartel; Tirry, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background The apparent scarcity of available sequence data has greatly impeded evolutionary studies in Acari (mites and ticks). This subclass encompasses over 48,000 species and forms the largest group within the Arachnida. Although mitochondrial genomes are widely utilised for phylogenetic and population genetic studies, only 20 mitochondrial genomes of Acari have been determined, of which only one belongs to the diverse order of the Sarcoptiformes. In this study, we describe the mitochondrial genome of the European house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the most important member of this largely neglected group. Results The mitochondrial genome of D. pteronyssinus is a circular DNA molecule of 14,203 bp. It contains the complete set of 37 genes (13 protein coding genes, 2 rRNA genes and 22 tRNA genes), usually present in metazoan mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial gene order differs considerably from that of other Acari mitochondrial genomes. Compared to the mitochondrial genome of Limulus polyphemus, considered as the ancestral arthropod pattern, only 11 of the 38 gene boundaries are conserved. The majority strand has a 72.6% AT-content but a GC-skew of 0.194. This skew is the reverse of that normally observed for typical animal mitochondrial genomes. A microsatellite was detected in a large non-coding region (286 bp), which probably functions as the control region. Almost all tRNA genes lack a T-arm, provoking the formation of canonical cloverleaf tRNA-structures, and both rRNA genes are considerably reduced in size. Finally, the genomic sequence was used to perform a phylogenetic study. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analysis clustered D. pteronyssinus with Steganacarus magnus, forming a sistergroup of the Trombidiformes. Conclusion Although the mitochondrial genome of D. pteronyssinus shares different features with previously characterised Acari mitochondrial genomes, it is unique in many ways. Gene order is extremely rearranged and represents a new pattern within the Acari. Both tRNAs and rRNAs are truncated, corroborating the theory of the functional co-evolution of these molecules. Furthermore, the strong and reversed GC- and AT-skews suggest the inversion of the control region as an evolutionary event. Finally, phylogenetic analysis using concatenated mt gene sequences succeeded in recovering Acari relationships concordant with traditional views of phylogeny of Acari. PMID:19284646

  10. Prevention of childhood lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C; Osterhoudt, K C

    2000-10-01

    Although past national public health efforts have reduced lead exposure significantly, lead poisoning remains the most common environmental health problem affecting American children. Currently, lead exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of lead-contaminated household dust and soil in older housing containing lead-based paint; exposure can be increased with housing deterioration or renovation. Environmental prevention efforts focus on improvement in risk assessment, development of housing-based standards for lead-based paint hazards, and safe and cost-effective lead hazard remediation techniques. Educational efforts address parental awareness of lead exposure pathways, hygiene, and housekeeping measures to prevent ingestion of dust and soil. Blood lead screening is recommended either universally at ages 1 and 2 years or in a targeted manner where local health departments can document a low prevalence of elevated blood lead levels. Nutritional interventions involve provision of regular meals containing adequate amounts of calcium and iron and supplementation for iron deficiency. Lead chelation should complement environmental, nutritional, and educational interventions, when indicated. Collaboration of multiple federal agencies in a new strategy to eliminate childhood lead poisoning should further prevention efforts. PMID:11021406

  11. Environmental isolation of Cryptococcus gattii VGII from indoor dust from typical wooden houses in the deep Amazonas of the Rio Negro basin.

    PubMed

    Brito-Santos, Fábio; Barbosa, Gláucia Gonçalves; Trilles, Luciana; Nishikawa, Marília Martins; Wanke, Bodo; Meyer, Wieland; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a human fungal infection of significant mortality and morbidity, especially in the meningoencephalitis form. Cryptococcosis is distributed worldwide and its agents, C. neoformans and C. gattii, present eight major molecular types-VNI-VNIV and VGI-VGIV respectively. The primary cryptococcosis caused by molecular type VGII (serotype B, MAT alpha) prevails in immunocompetent patients in the North and Northeast of Brazil, revealing an endemic regional pattern to this molecular type. Since 1999, C. gattii VGII has been involved in an ongoing outbreak in Canada, and is expanding to the Northwest of the United States, two temperate regions. Exposure to propagules dispersed in the environment, related to various organic substrates, mainly decomposing wood in and around dwellings, initiates the infection process. The present study investigated the presence of the agents of cryptococcosis in dust from dwellings in the upper Rio Negro, municipality of Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in Amazonas state. Indoor dust was collected from 51 houses, diluted and plated on bird seed agar. Dark brown colonies were identified phenotypically, and genotypically by URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The mating type was identified using pheromone-specific primers. Three of the 51 houses were positive for C. gattii molecular type VGII, MAT? and MATa, showing a high prevalence of this agent. MLST studies identified eight subtypes, VGIIb (ST7), VGIIa (ST20), (ST5) and 5 new subtypes unique to the region. For the first time in the state of Amazonas, C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa were isolated from the environment and correlates with endemic cryptococcosis in this state. This is the first description of MLST subtypes on environmental isolates in the Brazilian Amazon, indicating domiciliary dust as a potential source for human infection with different subtypes of C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa. PMID:25688971

  12. Environmental Isolation of Cryptococcus gattii VGII from Indoor Dust from Typical Wooden Houses in the Deep Amazonas of the Rio Negro Basin

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Santos, Fábio; Barbosa, Gláucia Gonçalves; Trilles, Luciana; Nishikawa, Marília Martins; Wanke, Bodo; Meyer, Wieland; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a human fungal infection of significant mortality and morbidity, especially in the meningoencephalitis form. Cryptococcosis is distributed worldwide and its agents, C. neoformans and C. gattii, present eight major molecular types—VNI-VNIV and VGI-VGIV respectively. The primary cryptococcosis caused by molecular type VGII (serotype B, MAT alpha) prevails in immunocompetent patients in the North and Northeast of Brazil, revealing an endemic regional pattern to this molecular type. Since 1999, C. gattii VGII has been involved in an ongoing outbreak in Canada, and is expanding to the Northwest of the United States, two temperate regions. Exposure to propagules dispersed in the environment, related to various organic substrates, mainly decomposing wood in and around dwellings, initiates the infection process. The present study investigated the presence of the agents of cryptococcosis in dust from dwellings in the upper Rio Negro, municipality of Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in Amazonas state. Indoor dust was collected from 51 houses, diluted and plated on bird seed agar. Dark brown colonies were identified phenotypically, and genotypically by URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The mating type was identified using pheromone-specific primers. Three of the 51 houses were positive for C. gattii molecular type VGII, MAT? and MATa, showing a high prevalence of this agent. MLST studies identified eight subtypes, VGIIb (ST7), VGIIa (ST20), (ST5) and 5 new subtypes unique to the region. For the first time in the state of Amazonas, C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa were isolated from the environment and correlates with endemic cryptococcosis in this state. This is the first description of MLST subtypes on environmental isolates in the Brazilian Amazon, indicating domiciliary dust as a potential source for human infection with different subtypes of C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa. PMID:25688971

  13. Sources of halogenated brominated retardants in house dust in an industrial city in southern China and associated human exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, She-Jun; Ding, Nan; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-11-01

    Halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) are a class of ubiquitous pollutants in the environment and attract increasing attention. In the present study, HFR concentrations were measured in indoor and outdoor dust in an important industrial city (Dongguan) in southern China, in which their presence and associated human exposure are unknown. The HFRs were dominated by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), with mean concentrations of 2365 and 2441 ng/g in the indoor dust, respectively, which were 2-3 order of magnitude higher the concentrations of other HFRs. However elevated tri- to hepta-BDE concentrations (869 ng/g) were found in Houjie Town, a furniture manufacturing center. The mean indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios of HFR concentrations in the dust were all larger than one (1.55-16.4), suggesting the importance of indoors sources for HFRs in indoor dust in this industrial city. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the correlations among the HFRs in the indoor dust probably revealed differences in their commercial applications, while most HFRs in the outdoor dust have similar sources except for phased-out BDE47 and 99. The compositions of lower brominated PBDEs varied among the towns, probably due to their different sources or influence of photo-degradation. Nevertheless, the similar composition of highly brominated congeners indicated little photo-degradation encountered in the ambient environment. The non-cancer risk associated with indoor dust ingestion is low for the general population in Dongguan, but some children in the furniture manufacturing center have significantly high risk of exposure to banned PBDEs. PMID:25282276

  14. Retrofit wall system for insulation and lead encasement in older multi-family housing.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R. L.

    1998-08-11

    This paper presents an approach to modernization or rehabilitation of buildings with uninsulated masonry walls that have lead-based paint hazards or deteriorated plaster walls. The approach provides a solution to lead contamination on the walls, increased energy efficiency and comfort improvements associated with better insulated building envelopes. The system sheaths or replaces damaged or contaminated walls with a tight, well-insulated, durable interior surface. The costs of this system are estimated to be less than those of other insulated wall systems. Modeling of the impact of this system shows significant improvement in energy performance. The energy savings over the life of this durable system contribute to significantly offset the often-times sizeable cost of lead hazard remediation.

  15. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE FIELD ANALYSIS OF LEAD IN PAINT, BULK DUST, AND SOIL BY ULTRASONIC, ACID DIGESTION AND COLORIMETRIC MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative field method was developed for the analysis of lead (Pb) in paint, bulk dust, and soil. 5% (v/v) HNO3 ultrasonic digestion was followed by colorimetric measurement of the digest using a commercially available water Pb test kit. or paints, the range of the method is...

  16. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home » Discover & Explore » Pollution Print this page Share Lead Poisoning What is Lead, and why should I care? Lead is a ... you can avoid contact with it! Sources of Lead Poisoning HOUSE PAINTS: Before1950, lead-based paint was ...

  17. Reconsideration of methods and standards: Digestion of diaper wipes and use of matrix-matched calibration standards for dust lead analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, A.O.; Losh, L.N.; Bannon, D.I.; Lees, P.S.J.; Chisolm, J.J. Jr.; Farfel, M.R.

    1999-12-15

    Diaper wipes are widely used for sampling residential dust for lead analysis. A thicker type of diaper wipe was incompletely digested and had low recoveries of lead on stock solution spikes using existing protocols. A modified protocol was applied to various quality control samples prepared with thicker diaper wipes in 134 batches of field samples. Modifications included a larger reagent volume, more concentrated acid, 3 h on the hot plate, and squeezing wipe residues during filtration. Seventeen batches were reanalyzed using matrix-matched standards. Acceptable lead recoveries were obtained for stock solution spikes (88%) and spikes prepared with leaded dust-SRM 2582 (88%), SRM 2589 (96%), and CRMO 14-050 (99%). Matrix-matched calibration standards increased mean lead recoveries by an additional 8%. Their protocol may provide a basis for a standard operational procedure for wipe digestion and analysis. Differences in estimates of dust lead loadings attributable to the type of wipe and to sample preparation and calibration procedures have implications for risk assessment, clearance testing, and comparability of laboratory data. Reconsideration of current protocols for wipe materials, wipe digestion, and judging laboratory performance is warranted.

  18. Life in cellulose houses: Symbiotic bacterial biosynthesis of ascidian drugs and drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Donia, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    Ascidians (tunicates; sea squirts) are sources of diverse, bioactive natural products, one of which is an approved drug and many of which are potent drug leads. It has been shown that symbiotic bacteria living with ascidians produce some of the bioactive compounds isolated from whole animals, and indirect evidence strongly implicates symbiotic bacteria in the synthesis of many others. However, for the majority the producing organism has not been identified. In cases where a symbiotic origin has been definitively assigned, the resulting data lead to improved paths to drug discovery and development from marine animals. This review traces evidence for symbiotic production where such evidence exists and describes the strengths and limitations of that evidence. PMID:21050742

  19. The Discovery of Potent, Selective, and Reversible Inhibitors of the House Dust Mite Peptidase Allergen Der p 1: An Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the bioactivity of allergens is conceptually attractive as a small-molecule therapy for allergic diseases but has not been attempted previously. Group 1 allergens of house dust mites (HDM) are meaningful targets in this quest because they are globally prevalent and clinically important triggers of allergic asthma. Group 1 HDM allergens are cysteine peptidases whose proteolytic activity triggers essential steps in the allergy cascade. Using the HDM allergen Der p 1 as an archetype for structure-based drug discovery, we have identified a series of novel, reversible inhibitors. Potency and selectivity were manipulated by optimizing drug interactions with enzyme binding pockets, while variation of terminal groups conferred the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic attributes required for inhaled delivery. Studies in animals challenged with the gamut of HDM allergens showed an attenuation of allergic responses by targeting just a single component, namely, Der p 1. Our findings suggest that these inhibitors may be used as novel therapies for allergic asthma. PMID:25365789

  20. Effectiveness of house dust mite acaricide tri-n-butyl tin maleate on carpets, fabrics and mattress foam: a standardization of methodology.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Satiko; Franzolin, Marcia Regina; Chiesa, Soledad; Moreira, Débora; Gambale, Walderez; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the acaricide tri-n-butyl tin maleate, industrially applied to samples of carpets, mattress foam, and fabrics used for furniture upholstery, soft toys and shoe uppers. Approximately 100 adult house dust mites of the species Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were inoculated into a Petri dish containing the sample (a piece of carpet, mattress foam, or fabric), treated with the acaricide, randomly collected. Mite-maintenance culture medium was added on top of each sample. After one, two, three, seven and 30 days of incubation at 25 degrees C and 75% relative humidity, each dish was examined using a 40X stereoscopic microscope (40X). One hundred percent acaricide effectiveness was obtained in treated materials by the end of the 30th-day postinoculation period, under optimal conditions for mite maintenance. PMID:16847508

  1. Boltless Seal for Electronic Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawe, R. H.; Evans, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Spring clips seal housings for electronic circuitry, preventing electromagnetic interference from entering or leaving housings. Clips also keep dust out of housing. Since no bolts are used, housing can be opened quickly; unlike bolts, clips can be used on thin-walled housing. Seal was developed for an X-band array amplifier.

  2. Encasing lead hazards and adding energy efficiency in low-income housing

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, J.D.; Wendt, R.

    1997-03-01

    Field research has confirmed that the lower the incremental (marginal) cost of producing an outcome, the more likely that production will occur. In residential building rehabilitation the economic truth suggests that energy efficiency is likely to become part of the scope of work of a project when the additional cost of conservation measures are relatively small, i.e., comparing gut rehab to moderate rehab, replacement of a furnace with an energy efficient model, and low-cost solutions to address lead poisoning hazards. Energy efficiency must fit into the overall needs and opportunities of a building retrofit. If little is being done to the building, then few measures can be expected to be justified. If much must be done, however, the opportunities for conservation are likely to be great. An example of this is the composite wall system described, therein, that was developed to address the problem of lead poisoning hazards on wall surfaces while adding a tight, well-insulated, and strong interior surface to perimeter walls at the lowest possible cost.

  3. 75 FR 51808 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied Facilities; State...Protection Agency, Region 1 Library, 5 Post Office Sq., Boston...poisonings, especially in children under age 6, who are particularly...conducted in target housing and child- occupied facilities:...

  4. Lead Sampling Technician Training Course. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ICF, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document presents a model curriculum for use by trainers presenting training course in assessing and reporting dust and debris from deteriorated lead-based paint. The course, which was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is intended for use with housing quality standard inspectors, rehabilitation specialists, home…

  5. Identification of lead sources in residential environments: Sydney Australia.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, M A S; Zahran, S; Pingitore, N; Clague, J; Devlin, G; Taylor, M P

    2014-01-01

    Interior and exterior dust, soil and paint were analysed at five brick urban Sydney homes over 15 months to evaluate temporal variations and discriminate sources of lead (Pb) exposure. Exterior dust gauge Pb loading rates (?g/m(2)/28 days), interior vacuum dust Pb concentrations (mg/kg) and interior petri-dish Pb loading rates (?g/m(2)/28 days), were correlated positively with soil Pb concentrations. Exterior dust gauge Pb loading rates and interior vacuum dust Pb concentrations peaked in the summer. Lead isotope and Pb speciation (XAS) were analysed in soil and vacuum dust samples from three of the five houses that had elevated Pb concentrations. Results show that the source of interior dust lead was primarily from soil in two of the three houses and from soil and Pb paint in the third home. IEUBK child blood Pb modelling predicts that children's blood Pb levels could exceed 5 ?g/dL in two of the five houses. PMID:24071634

  6. Associations of allergic sensitization and clinical phenotypes with innate immune response genes polymorphisms are modified by house dust mite allergen exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kurowski, Marcin; Majkowska-Wojciechowska, Barbara; Wardzy?ska, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Polymorphisms within innate immunity genes are associated with allergic phenotypes but results are variable. These associations were not analyzed with respect to allergen exposure. We investigated associations of TLR and CD14 polymorphisms with allergy phenotypes in the context of house dust mite (HDM) exposure. Material and methods Children, aged 12-16 years (n=326), were recruited from downtown and rural locations and assessed by allergist. Skin prick tests, total and HDM-specific sIgE measurements were done. HDM allergen concentrations in dust were measured. Genetic polymorphisms were identified using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Results Allergic rhinitis, asthma and atopy were more prevalent in urban area. Although HDM allergen concentrations were higher in rural households, sIgE were present more frequently in urban children. In the whole population no association was found between HDM exposure and sensitization. In children with CD14/?159CC, CD14/?159TT and TLR9/2848GA genotypes increased exposure to HDM was associated with reduced incidence of allergic rhinitis. Significant associations of increased HDM exposure with reduced incidence of atopy were found for the whole population and subjects with CD14/?159CC, CD14/?1359GT, TLR4/896AA and TLR9/2848GA genotypes. Among children with CD14/?159CC and CD14/?1359GG significant positive correlation between HDM allergen concentrations in household and sensitization to HDM was observed. In contrast, protective effect of high HDM allergen exposure against specific sensitization was seen in subjects with TLR4/896 AG. Conclusions Development of specific sensitization and allergy may be associated with innate immune response genes polymorphisms and is modified by allergen exposure. PMID:22328887

  7. Children and lead: new findings and concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Fu, J.S.

    1982-09-02

    An editorial dealing with lead in the environment and its health risks to children is presented. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure. Through hand-to-mouth activities, such as thumb sucking, nail biting, or eating with dirty hands, lead in house dust and garden soil readily enters their bodies. Children with pica are exposed to more lead because they eat such items as paint chips, broken plaster, and dirt. Moreover, intestinal lead absorption is greater in children than in adults. The author recommends a concerted effort to reduce undue lead absorption in children. (JMT)

  8. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  9. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about 38 million homes in the US still contain some lead paint. While lead paint that is ... the nation's housing stock—some 24 million homes— contains significant lead-based paint hazards, i.e. deteriorating ...

  10. Pruni cortex ameliorates skin inflammation possibly through HMGB1-NF?B pathway in house dust mite induced atopic dermatitis NC/Nga transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Takashi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Fukumoto, Kyoko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Pruni cortex, the bark of Prunus jamasakura Siebold ex Koidzumi, has been used in the Japanese systems of medicine for many years for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitussive properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of pruni cortex on atopic dermatitis NC/Nga mouse model. Atopic dermatitis-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin. After induction of atopic dermatitis, pruni cortex aqueous extract (1 g/kg, p.o.) was administered daily for 2 weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes and cellular protein expression by Western blotting for nuclear and cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear factor ?B, apoptosis and inflammatory markers in the skin of atopic dermatitis mice. The clinical observation confirmed that the dermatitis score was significantly lower when treated with pruni cortex than in the atopic dermatitis group. Similarly pruni cortex inhibited hypertrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells as identified by histopathology. In addition, pruni cortex significantly inhibited the protein expression of cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear p-nuclear factor kappa B, apoptosis and inflammatory markers. These results indicate that pruni cortex may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by attenuating high mobility group box 1 and inflammation possibly through the nuclear factor ?B pathway. PMID:26060348

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Der f 2, a potent allergen derived from the house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Takai, Toshiro; Okumura, Yasushi; Scott, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Although a number of allergens have been identified and isolated, the underlying molecular basis for the potent immune response is poorly understood. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides sp.) are ubiquitous contributors to atopy in developed countries. The rhinitis, dermatitis and asthma associated with allergic reactions to these arthropods are frequently caused by relatively small (125-129 amino acids) mite proteins of unknown biological function. Der f 2, a major allergen from the mite D. farinae, has been recombinantly expressed, characterized and crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group I4(1)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.2, c = 103.3 A. An essentially complete (97.2%) data set has been collected to 2.4 A at a synchrotron source. Attempts to solve the crystal structure of Der f 2 by molecular replacement using the NMR coordinates for either Der f 2 or Der p 2 (the homologous protein from D. pteronyssinus) failed, but preliminary searches using the crystalline Der p 2 atomic coordinates appear to be promising.

  12. House dust mite allergen Der f 1 induces IL-8 in human basophilic cells via ROS-ERK and p38 signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Yi, Myung-hee; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kim, Chung-Ryul; Kim, Tae Yun; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2015-10-01

    Der f 1, a major house dust mite allergen and member of the papain-like cysteine protease family, can provoke immune responses with its proteolytic activity. To understand the role of Der f 1 in inflammatory immune responses, we studied the mechanism of the regulation of interleukin (IL)-8 expressions in human basophilic cell KU812 by proteolytically active recombinant Der f 1. Not only production of IL-8 mRNA was induced but also the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and phosphorylation of NF-?B p65 were increased in Der f 1-treated KU812. Furthermore, Der f 1 induction of IL-8 expression was sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Der f 1 also activated ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and rapidly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) inhibited phosphorylation of ERK, but not p38, suggesting that secretion of IL-8 in KU812 cells treated with Der f 1 is dependent on ROS, ERK MAPK and p38 MAPK. We describe the mechanism of Der f 1-induced IL-8 secretion from human basophilic cells, which are thought to be important for allergic inflammation independent of IgE antibodies. These findings improve our understanding of the inflammatory immune response in human basophils to protease allergens. PMID:26194066

  13. Application of the Phylogenetic Species Concept to Wallemia sebi from House Dust and Indoor Air Revealed by Multi-Locus Genealogical Concordance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai D. T.; Jan?i?, Sašo; Meijer, Martin; Tanney, Joey B.; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Seifert, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide survey of Wallemia occurring in house dust and indoor air was conducted. The isolated strains were identified as W. sebi and W. muriae. Previous studies suggested that the W. sebi phylogenetic clade contained cryptic species but conclusive evidence was lacking because only the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) marker was analyzed. The ITS and four protein-coding genes (MCM7, RPB1, RPB2, and TSR1) were sequenced for 85 isolates. Based on an initial neighbor joining analysis of the concatenated genes, W. muriae remained monophyletic but four clades were found in W. sebi, which we designated as W. sebi clades 1, 2, 3, and 4. We hypothesized that these clades represent distinct phylogenetic species within the Wallemia sebi species complex (WSSC). We then conducted multiple phylogenetic analyses and demonstrated genealogical concordance, which supports the existence of four phylogenetic species within the WSSC. Geographically, W. muriae was only found in Europe, W. sebi clade 3 was only found in Canada, W. sebi clade 4 was found in subtropical regions, while W. sebi clade 1 and 2 were found worldwide. Haplotype analysis showed that W. sebi clades 1 and 2 had multiple haplotypes while W. sebi clades 3 and 4 had one haplotype and may have been under sampled. We describe W. sebi clades 2, 3, and 4 as new species in a companion study. PMID:25799362

  14. Increased lead absorption in inner city children: where does the lead come from?

    PubMed

    Charney, E; Sayre, J; Coulter, M

    1980-02-01

    Pica for lead-containing paint has been questioned as the principal mechanism for the widespread moderately elevated blood lead levels (30 to 80 microgram/100 ml) in inner city children. This study explored the hypothesis that lead-contaminated household dust is a major source of lead for these children; hand contamination and repetitive mouthing is the proposed mechanism of ingestion. Forty-nine inner city children with blood lead 40 to 70 microgram/100 ml were matched with 50 children with blood lead less than or equal to 29 microgram/100 ml from the same inner city environment. House dust lead and lead on hands were found in significantly greater quantity among experimental subjects. Other factors differed between groups; lead content of peeling paint, soil lead, and pica affected more experimental than control children, but did not account for more than 50% of experimental cases. The cause of moderate blood lead elevation is multifactoral: no single source accounted for all children with elevated levels. However, lead contamination of house dust and hands appears to be a major factor in this condition. PMID:7354967

  15. "Worst-case" aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle ("worst case") size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method. PMID:2543198

  16. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... who suffer from lead poisoning are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or soil that gets into their mouths. • Homes that were ... lead, be especially careful to avoid exposure to soil. Is there a medical test for lead exposure? • Blood samples can be tested for exposure to lead. • ...

  17. Release of lead-containing particles from a wall enclosure.

    PubMed

    Harney, J; Trunov, M; Grinshpun, S; Willeke, K; Choe, K; Trakumas, S; Friedman, W

    2000-01-01

    The 1995 Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing discusses using interior and exterior wall enclosures for lead hazard control. Leaded dust may be aerosolized inside enclosures and released through gaps and cracks into a room. The effects of airflow and mechanical disturbances on dust release were studied using a laboratory wall enclosure model with dust collected from homes with lead-based paint hazards. Airflows relevant to residences were blown down the enclosure and out a 4-, 6-, or 8-mm horizontal gap at its bottom, simulating potential enclosure failure. Then, low-frequency mechanical vibrations also were applied to the enclosure. No significant dust release was found when blowing air down the enclosure even at 37 cm/sec (representing extremely high flow); release occurred only with this high flow and 3 Hz mechanical disturbances. Dust was released primarily from the floor area immediately adjacent to the enclosure gap; the release rate fluctuated over time. Most dust initially settled near the enclosure. Dust release for 1 hour at extreme conditions (high airflow with vibration) yields lead loading above the 1995 HUD clearance level of 100 microg/ft2 only within 3-4 cm of the wall; for the HUD standard (1 ft2) sampling area, the lead loading does not exceed 30 microg/ ft2. Redistributing dust over the room's 16 m2 floor space yields average extreme-condition loading rate of 2 microg/ft2/hour. At less-than-extreme conditions, dust would have to be released for years without cleaning to yield a hazard. PMID:11071428

  18. Evaluation of Autologous Serum Skin Test and Skin Prick Test Reactivity to House Dust Mite in Patients with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhiqiang; Zhai, Zhifang; Zhong, Hua; Zhou, Ziyuan; Chen, WenChieh; Hao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is a common skin disorder with etiology that is not well understood. Methods In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of autologous serum skin test (ASST) and skin prick testing (SPT) to house dust mite (HDM) in 862 CSU cases in China. Clinical features, courses and treatment responses were also recorded. Results The prevalence of positive ASST was 46.3%, and patients aged 30–39 years had the highest positive rate (52.1%). Positive SPT to HDM was seen in 153 patients (17.7%) with the highest positive rate (34.2%) in patients aged 20 or less. Patients with positive ASST had higher urticaria activity scores (UAS) (4.18±0.65 vs. 3.67±0.53) but lower positive rates of HDM (24.6% vs. 37.6%), as compared with those with negative ASST (odds ratio (OR) 1.84, 95% CI 1.38–2.47). Patients could be categorized into four groups based on the results of ASST and SPT to HDM and patients with positive ASST and positive SPT to HDM had the highest disease activity scores, experienced higher frequencies of angioedema, diseases duration, and required higher dosage of loratadine every month, compared with other subgroups (P<0.0001). Conclusions Patients with CSU showed varied responses of positive ASST and varied sensitivity to HDM, Patients with positive ASST and/or positive SPT had more disease activity compared with patients with negative ASST and/or negative SPT. Further classification can be made based on the result of SPT and ASST. PMID:23741306

  19. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  20. [EVALUATION OF THE CARCINOGENIC RISK OF LEAD IN THE COHORT STUDY OF MALE WORKERS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO INORGANIC LEAD IN 27 MOSCOW PRINTING-HOUSES].

    PubMed

    Ilychova, S A; Zaridze, D G

    2015-01-01

    As millions of people worldwide are expoed to inorganic lead, both in the workplace and in general environment, its potential carcinogenicity is an important health problem. Although lead has been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals, epidemiological studies have been inconclusive, and the relationship between lead and human cancer is still unclear. There were several limitations that complicated the analysis and evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of lead compounds. In particular, many of the cohort studies of lead and cancer, mostly among heavily lead-exposed workers, have been limited by a failure to identify and control for covariates, especially co-exposures to other metals such as arsenic, cadmium, and chromium, which have been shown to be carcinogenic. Most of the epidemiological studies unfortunately do not have data on dose-response. The scientific merit of our study is the virtual absence of confounding by other known carcinogens. Another advantage of our study is the presence of three occupational sub-cohorts with different levels and routes of lead exposure. Most previous studies have data on dose-response provided only by comparisons of exposed to unexposed persons. In summary, the results of this cohort study suggest that occupational exposure to lead may increase the risk of cancers of the pancreas, kidney and rectum. In conclusion, despite several limitations, the results of our study add to the evidence that carcinogenicity to humans may be an additional adverse health effect of lead. PMID:26625623

  1. Development and field trial of a household surface lead loading rate sampling device in a lead-contaminated community of southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Untimanon, Orrapan; Geater, Alan; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Thoumsang, Somkiat; Verkasalo, Pia K; Saetia, Wiyada

    2010-05-01

    A new dust-collecting device was developed to assess surface lead loading rates in houses in communities contaminated with lead oxide dust used for caulking in nearby boat-repair yards. The device consists of two small glass sheets with total area of 1,200 cm(2) placed in two plastic trays suspended from the ceiling in the house for 3 months before wiping and sending the dust specimen for determination of lead content using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After a pilot trial in four households, further data were collected from 43 matched pairs of boat-caulkers' and neighboring control households. All devices were retained in the house for 3 months without any complaint. Static measurements of lead dust levels were also assessed in all households. The values significantly discriminated high from low lead exposure households (p = 0.015) and provided good correlations with floor lead loading (Spearman rank correlation coefficient, r = 0.39 to 0.62) and dust lead content (r = 0.53 to 0.64). This sampling method is an alternative to others which consume more household space or require a longer collection period. PMID:19415518

  2. Peeling Lead Paint Turns into Poisonous Dust. Guess Where It Ends Up? A Media Campaign to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P.; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to…

  3. Peeling lead paint turns into poisonous dust. Guess where it ends up? A media campaign to prevent childhood lead poisoning in New York City.

    PubMed

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to increase parents' awareness of childhood lead poisoning, ways to protect their children, and property owners' legal responsibility to fix peeling lead paint safely, and increase awareness of regulatory changes and encourage enforcement of New York City's Local Law 1 of 2004. Campaign materials were focus group tested and the campaign was refined annually. The campaign ran city-wide and in targeted high-risk neighborhoods. Neighborhoods and media venue (bus, train, kiosk, and store) changed annually, based on population risk factors and venue availability. Exposure to the campaign, campaign-related knowledge, and behavior were assessed using pre- and postcampaign street intercept surveys. Results showed that campaign reached the targeted population, and had an impact on knowledge of lead poisoning prevention measures as evidenced by increased knowledge of lead paint exposures sources in one year and increased knowledge of preventive behaviors in another year; these improvements were observed for both genders and most ethnic, primary language, educational attainment, and age groups in each year. Lessons learned indicate that well-targeted media campaigns, designed with audience participation, can reach parents through various venues, and improve key knowledge areas. Evaluation challenges faced include high levels of knowledge at baseline, competing media messages, and balancing between program needs and evaluation design. PMID:25558876

  4. Identification of sources of lead in children in a primary zinc-lead smelter environment.

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, Brian L; Mizon, Karen J; Davis, Jeff D; Palmer, Jacqueline M; Vimpani, Graham

    2004-01-01

    We compared high-precision lead isotopic ratios in deciduous teeth and environmental samples to evaluate sources of lead in 10 children from six houses in a primary zinc-lead smelter community at North Lake Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia. Teeth were sectioned to allow identification of lead exposure in utero and in early childhood. Blood lead levels in the children ranged from 10 to 42 micro g/dL and remained elevated for a number of years. For most children, only a small contribution to tooth lead can be attributed to gasoline and paint sources. In one child with a blood lead concentration of 19.7 microg/dL, paint could account for about 45% of lead in her blood. Comparison of isotopic ratios of tooth lead levels with those from vacuum cleaner dust, dust-fall accumulation, surface wipes, ceiling (attic) dust, and an estimation of the smelter emissions indicates that from approximately 55 to 100% of lead could be derived from the smelter. For a blood sample from another child, > 90% of lead could be derived from the smelter. We found varying amounts of in utero-derived lead in the teeth. Despite the contaminated environment and high blood lead concentrations in the children, the levels of lead in the teeth are surprisingly low compared with those measured in children from other lead mining and smelting communities. PMID:14698931

  5. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also ... dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint. ...

  6. Lead in drinking water and human blood lead levels in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mary Jean; Margolis, Stephen

    2012-08-10

    Lead is a pervasive environmental contaminant. The adverse health effects of lead exposure in children and adults are well documented, and no safe blood lead threshold in children has been identified. Lead can be ingested from various sources, including lead paint and house dust contaminated by lead paint, as well as soil, drinking water, and food. The concentration of lead, total amount of lead consumed, and duration of lead exposure influence the severity of health effects. Because lead accumulates in the body, all sources of lead should be controlled or eliminated to prevent childhood lead poisoning. Beginning in the 1970s, lead concentrations in air, tap water, food, dust, and soil began to be substantially reduced, resulting in significantly reduced blood lead levels (BLLs) in children throughout the United States. However, children are still being exposed to lead, and many of these children live in housing built before the 1978 ban on lead-based residential paint. These homes might contain lead paint hazards, as well as drinking water service lines made from lead, lead solder, or plumbing materials that contain lead. Adequate corrosion control reduces the leaching of lead plumbing components or solder into drinking water. The majority of public water utilities are in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) of 1991. However, some children are still exposed to lead in drinking water. EPA is reviewing LCR, and additional changes to the rule are expected that will further protect public health. Childhood lead poisoning prevention programs should be made aware of the results of local public water system lead monitoring measurement under LCR and consider drinking water as a potential cause of increased BLLs, especially when other sources of lead exposure are not identified. PMID:22874873

  7. 77 FR 70179 - Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties and Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ...FR-5603-N-87] Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential...for notification of leadbased paint hazard in federally-owned residential...of Proposed: Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned...

  8. The relationship of environmental lead to blood-lead levels in children

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.D.; Quah, R.; Meigs, J.W.; DeLouise, E.R.

    1982-04-01

    An in-depth study of the distribution of lead sources in the residential environment of 377 children in New Haven, Connecticut, was carried out. Substantial amounts of lead were present in soil, paint, and house dust throughout New Haven, but not in air or water. Multiple regression modeling indicated that the most important contributors to variation in children's blood-lead levels were soil lead and exterior house paint lead. Using the best five-variable model only 11.7% of the variation in the children's blood-lead levels could be explained. This led to the conclusion that availability of lead in the residential environment did not account for most of the variation observed in the population.

  9. 75 FR 13127 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ...EPA-R07-OPPT-2010-0155; FRL-9128-4] Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting...that statute was the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992...EPA-authorized programs for lead-based paint activities training and...

  10. 76 FR 12106 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ...the exposures that cause serious lead poisonings, especially in children under age 6...Environment (KDHE) to operate a lead poisoning prevention program in Kansas to advance...order to advance the success of the lead poisoning prevention efforts in the state....

  11. Effect of inhaled dust mite allergen on regional particle deposition and mucociliary clearance in allergic asthmatics**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Acute exacerbations in allergic asthmatics may lead to impaired ability to clear mucus from the airways, a key factor in asthma morbidity. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhaled house dust mite challenge on the regional deposition of...

  12. Group 1 Allergen Genes in Two Species of House Dust Mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae): Direct Sequencing, Characterization and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Klimov, Pavel B.; Inam, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz; OConnor, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Group 1 allergens of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) and D. pteronyssinus (Der p 1) dominate overall allergic responses in house dust mite allergy patients. The need for accurate identification and characterization of representative variants of group 1 allergens in any given geographic locality has been emphasized for development of appropriate allergen extracts. Regional amino acid sequence polymorphism has been described but the extent of this polymorphism is not well understood. Such data are completely absent for the USA and many other countries. Most previous studies used cDNA libraries generated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and/or primers amplifying shorter fragments of this gene. Using novel species-specific primers and direct PCR, we document group 1 allergen gene sequence polymorphism in populations of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus from the USA and Pakistan. We report two novel introns (nt pos 87 and 291) in both species, and the absence of intron 3 in Der p 1. Thirteen silent and one novel non-synonymous mutation (Tryptophan W197 to Arginine R197) were detected in D. farinae. The potential medical significance of the latter mutation is discussed. Two haplotypes of the Der f 1 gene were identified, haplotype 1 (63%) was more frequent than haplotype 2 (18%). Polymorphism in Der f 1 displayed geographical localization, since both haplotypes were present in mite populations from Pakistan whereas haplotype 1 was observed only in the USA. In Der p 1, a silent mutation at nt (aa) position 1011(149) and four non-synonymous mutations at positions 589(50), 935(124), 971(136), 1268(215) were observed. These mutations were reported from many other geographic regions, suggesting that polymorphism in the Der p 1 gene is panmictic. The extent of polymorphism in both genes is substantially lower than that reported previously (0.10–0.16% vs 0.31–0.49%), indicating the need for careful evaluation of potential polymerase errors in studies utilizing RT-PCR. PMID:25494056

  13. Group 1 Allergen Genes in Two Species of House Dust Mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae): Direct Sequencing, Characterization and Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Klimov, Pavel B; Inam, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz; OConnor, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Group 1 allergens of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) and D. pteronyssinus (Der p 1) dominate overall allergic responses in house dust mite allergy patients. The need for accurate identification and characterization of representative variants of group 1 allergens in any given geographic locality has been emphasized for development of appropriate allergen extracts. Regional amino acid sequence polymorphism has been described but the extent of this polymorphism is not well understood. Such data are completely absent for the USA and many other countries. Most previous studies used cDNA libraries generated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and/or primers amplifying shorter fragments of this gene. Using novel species-specific primers and direct PCR, we document group 1 allergen gene sequence polymorphism in populations of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus from the USA and Pakistan. We report two novel introns (nt pos 87 and 291) in both species, and the absence of intron 3 in Der p 1. Thirteen silent and one novel non-synonymous mutation (Tryptophan W197 to Arginine R197) were detected in D. farinae. The potential medical significance of the latter mutation is discussed. Two haplotypes of the Der f 1 gene were identified, haplotype 1 (63%) was more frequent than haplotype 2 (18%). Polymorphism in Der f 1 displayed geographical localization, since both haplotypes were present in mite populations from Pakistan whereas haplotype 1 was observed only in the USA. In Der p 1, a silent mutation at nt (aa) position 1011(149) and four non-synonymous mutations at positions 589(50), 935(124), 971(136), 1268(215) were observed. These mutations were reported from many other geographic regions, suggesting that polymorphism in the Der p 1 gene is panmictic. The extent of polymorphism in both genes is substantially lower than that reported previously (0.10-0.16% vs 0.31-0.49%), indicating the need for careful evaluation of potential polymerase errors in studies utilizing RT-PCR. PMID:25494056

  14. Block Copolymer/DNA Vaccination Induces a Strong Allergen-Specific Local Response in a Mouse Model of House Dust Mite Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Roussey-Bihouée, Tiphaine; Hassoun, Dorian; Evrard, Justine; Cheminant, Marie-Aude; Chesné, Julie; Braza, Faouzi; Mahay, Guillaume; Portero, Vincent; Sagan, Christine; Pitard, Bruno; Magnan, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is caused by abnormal immunoreactivity against allergens such as house dust mites among which Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) is a common species. Currently, immunotherapy is based on allergen administration, which has variable effect from patient to patient and may cause serious side effects, principally the sustained risk of anaphylaxis. DNA vaccination is a promising approach by triggering a specific immune response with reduced allergenicity. Objective The aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of DNA immunization with Der f1 allergen specific DNA on allergic sensitization, inflammation and respiratory function in mice. Methods Mice were vaccinated 28 and 7 days before allergen exposure with a Der f1-encoding plasmid formulated with a block copolymer. Asthma was induced by skin sensitization followed by intra-nasal challenges with Der f extract. Total lung, broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and spleen cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for their surface antigen and cytokine expression. Splenocytes and lung cell IFN-? production by CD8+ cells in response to Der f CMH1-restricted peptides was assessed by ELISPOT. IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a were measured in serum by ELISA. Specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed by direct resistance measurements. Results Compared to animals vaccinated with an irrelevant plasmid, pVAX-Der f1 vaccination induced an increase of B cells in BAL, and an elevation of IL-10 and IFN-? but also of IL-4, IL-13 and IL-17 producing CD4+ lymphocytes in lungs and of IL-4 and IL-5 in spleen. In response to CD8-restricted peptides an increase of IFN-? was observed among lung cells. IgG2a levels non-specifically increased following block copolymer/DNA vaccination although IgE, IgG1 levels and airways resistances were not impacted. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance DNA vaccination using a plasmid coding for Der f1 formulated with the block copolymer 704 induces a specific immune response in the model of asthma used herein. PMID:24497934

  15. Lead intake and blood lead in two-year-old U.K. urban children.

    PubMed

    Davies, D J; Thornton, I; Watt, J M; Culbard, E B; Harvey, P G; Delves, H T; Sherlock, J C; Smart, G A; Thomas, J F; Quinn, M J

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive study of a group of 2-year-old urban children (n = 97), designed to provide quantitative information simultaneously for lead intakes via all identified pathways, has been carried out in Birmingham (U.K.). Results showed that for children whose blood levels and exposure to environmental lead were within the normal range for the U.K., blood lead concentration was significantly related to a combination of house dust lead loading and an overall rate of touching objects, to water lead concentration and to the parents' smoking habits. On the basis of assumptions used by the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution (RCEP), the estimated average total uptake of lead was 36 micrograms day-1; of this, 97% was from ingestion from dust, food and water and only 3% from inhalation. PMID:2305239

  16. EVALUATION OF PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN PAINT, SOIL AND DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three widely used commercially available portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometers were evaluated for precision and accuracy of measurement of lead in paint. ncluded were two direct reading instruments and one spectrum analyzer. est materials were prepared by spiking oil-based an...

  17. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...provided to EPA for any change in location of lead-based paint abatement activities at least 5 business...updated notification, in the event of changes to the original...individual shall engage in lead-based paint abatement activities, as defined...

  18. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...provided to EPA for any change in location of lead-based paint abatement activities at least 5 business...updated notification, in the event of changes to the original...individual shall engage in lead-based paint abatement activities, as defined...

  19. Comparison of a wipe method with and without a rinse to recover wall losses in closed face 37-mm cassettes used for sampling lead dust particulates

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-millimeter (mm) polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for 3 consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8%–54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13%–33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16%–22%). Similarly we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4%–19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4%–39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  20. Comparison of a Wipe Method With and Without a Rinse to Recover Wall Losses in Closed Face 37-mm Cassettes used for Sampling Lead Dust Particulates.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-mm polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for three consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8-54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13-33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16-22%). Similarly, we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4-19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4-39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  1. Interstellar Medium: dust Interstellar dust

    E-print Network

    Estalella, Robert

    Interstellar Medium: dust Interstellar dust Dust grains (silicate/carbon cores, ice mantles) Sizes of ~0.1 m Effects in the visible domain: extinction, reddening, polarization Dust opacity , = 1-2 Thermal emission: mm, submm, FIR (optically thin) #12;Interstellar dust Dust grains (silicate

  2. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungroul Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2008-11-15

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure.

  3. Coal dust burner

    SciTech Connect

    Benninghoven, E.

    1984-08-14

    A burner is disclosed for alternatively burning coal dust or oil. An annular housing includes a blower at one end thereof for directing a rotating air stream through the housing. A chamber located downstream from the blower has a plurality of outlet pipes extending downstream therefrom in an annular configuration about an atomizing nozzle and an eddy plate. An adjustable burner head is mounted on the end of each of the outlet pipes, the burner heads being arranged for optimum mixture of coal dust and air, fed from the chamber through the outlet pipes to the burner heads, with the rotating air stream passing about and through a hole in the eddy plate to insure optimum combustion. An oil ignition auxiliary burner having a nozzle between the eddy plate and the outlet end of the chamber serves to ignite the coal dust and air mixture. An atomizing nozzle for feeding atomized oil into the burner is provided as an alternative fuel source.

  4. Lead poisoning among household members exposed to lead-acid battery repair shops in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Ostrowski, S; Burr, G; Jackson-Hunt, L; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the risk of lead poisoning among household members exposed to 'backyard' battery repair shops (BBRS) in Kingston, Jamaica, environmental and blood lead (PbB) were measured at 24 households (112 individuals) with a BBRS worker or located at a BBRS premises and at 18 neighbourhood control households (74 individuals). Elevated PbB (greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per decilitre [micrograms/dl]) was common among subjects of all ages living at BBRS premises, especially among children less than age 12, 43% of whom had PbB greater than 70 micrograms/dl. Potentially hazardous soil and house dust lead levels were also common at BBRS premises, where 84% of yards had soil lead levels above 500 parts per million (geometric mean 3388 parts per million [ppm] at BBRS premises households with a BBRS worker). Geometric mean blood and environmental lead levels were significantly lower at control households, where less than 10% of subjects in all age groups had elevated PbB (maximum 33 micrograms/dl). Sharing a premises with a BBRS was a stronger determinant of household blood lead and environmental contamination than was the presence of a BBRS worker in a household. Blood lead levels were associated with soil and house dust lead levels in all age groups. We conclude that small battery repair shops, which have also been described in other developing countries, create a high lead poisoning risk for nearby residents. PMID:2621024

  5. A coordinated relocation strategy for enhancing case management of lead poisoned children: outcomes and costs.

    PubMed

    McLaine, Pat; Shields, Wendy; Farfel, Mark; Chisolm, J Julian; Dixon, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    Controlling residential lead hazards is critical for case management of lead poisoned children. To attain this goal, permanent relocation of the family is sometimes necessary or advisable for many reasons, including poor housing conditions; extensive lead hazards; lack of abatement resources, landlord compliance and local enforcement capacity; and family eviction. During 1996-1998, the Kennedy Krieger Institute implemented a unique capitated program for case management of Baltimore City children with blood lead concentrations (PbB) >19 microg/dL. The Program provided financial, housing, and social work assistance to facilitate relocation as a means of providing safer housing. Nearly half of the Program families relocated with direct assistance, and 28% relocated on their own. The Program evaluation examined the costs and benefits of relocation. Average relocation cost per child was relatively inexpensive (<1,500 dollars). Average relocation time of 5 months (range <2 months to >12 months) was less than the 8-month average time to complete lead hazard control work in 14 city and state programs funded by U.S. HUD. Relocation was associated with (1) a statistically significant decrease in dust lead loadings on floors, windowsills and window troughs that persisted for one year, and (2) statistically significantly greater decreases in children's PbB compared to children who did not relocate from untreated homes. Children relocated to housing that met current Federal residential dust lead standards had statistically significant decreases in blood lead levels. Visual inspection did not consistently identify relocation houses with dust lead levels below current Federal standards, indicating that dust testing should be an essential component of future programs. This will require additional resources for dust testing and possibly cleaning and repairs but is expected to yield additional benefits for children. The findings support recent U.S. CDC case management recommendations suggesting that permanent relocation to safer housing is a viable means to reduce children's lead exposure. The benefits of relocation notwithstanding, 40% of families moved at least twice. Research is needed to better understand how to expedite relocation and encourage families to remain in safe housing. Relocation does not negate owners' and health authorities' responsibilities to address lead hazards in the child's original house in order to protect future occupants. PMID:16736359

  6. Health and environmental outcomes of traditional and modified practices for abatement of residential lead-based paint.

    PubMed Central

    Farfel, M R; Chisolm, J J

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated traditional and modified practices for abating lead-based paint in homes of children with blood-lead concentrations (PbB) greater than 1.4 mumol/L (greater than 29 micrograms/dl). Traditional abatement resulted in acute increases in: 1) lead contaminated house dust (generally 3 to 6-fold over pre-abatement levels, but at abated sites typically 10 to 100-fold); and 2) the PbBs of nearly half of the occupant children. Modified practices represented modest short-term improvement compared to traditional practices but were also inadequate. By six months, it was clear that neither form of abatement resulted in long-term reductions of PbB or house dust lead levels, leaving children at continued risk of excessive exposure to lead and permanent adverse neurobehavioral effects. Windows were found to be high sources of lead contaminated house dust. Recommendations are made for improved abatement practices including more complete abatement of window units and more effective clean-up to remove lead-bearing dust. Thirteen million US children live in lead-painted dwellings. Research is needed to identify abatement strategies that will be practical and well suited to the current understanding of low-level lead toxicity. PMID:2136329

  7. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... winds and dry conditions caused a massive blanket of dust from Australia's Outback to spread eastward across Queensland and New ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR ...

  8. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  9. Lead exposure assessment from study near a lead-acid battery factory in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laiguo; Xu, Zhencheng; Liu, Ming; Huang, Yumei; Fan, Ruifang; Su, Yanhua; Hu, Guocheng; Peng, Xiaowu; Peng, Xiaochun

    2012-07-01

    The production of lead-acid battery in China covered about one-third of the world total output and there are more than 2000 lead-acid battery factories. They may cause the major environment lead pollution. Blood lead levels of several hundreds of residents were over 100 ?g/L due to the waste discharges from a lead-acid battery factory in Heyuan, Guangdong province. This study aimed to find out the environmental lead sources, the human lead exposure pathways, and the amplitudes from a lead-acid battery factory. The study results showed that lead levels in soil, dust, tree leaves and human blood declined with the distances increased from the production site. Twenty nine of 32 participants had blood lead levels of over 100 ?g/L with an exceptional high value of 639 ?g/L for one child. This result suggested that the lead-acid battery production from this factory has caused the elevated lead levels in its neighboring environment and residents. Dust intake was the dominant exposure pathway for humans (over 90%). The lead levels found in adult and toddler (6.19 and 50.1 ?g/kg/d, respectively) in the polluted area were far higher than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 25 ?g/kg body weight (translated into 3.5 ?g/kg/d), which was established by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee. Blood lead levels within the family members were strongly correlated with the house dust lead levels. Our results in this study suggested that further studies in this area should be performed to assess human exposure and relevant human health risks from living close to lead-acid battery factories. PMID:22578522

  10. Galaxy formation by dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, Goerge B.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known since the early 1940's that radiation can cause an instability in the interstellar medium. Absorbing dust particles in an isotropic radiation field shadow each other by a solid angle which is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two particles, leading to an inverse-square attractive force - mock gravity. The effect is largest in an optically thin medium. Recently Hogan and White (HW, hereafter) proposed that if the pre-galactic universe contained suitable sources of radiation and dust, instability in the dust distribution caused by mock gravity may have led to the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In their picture of a well-coupled dust-gas medium, HW show that mock gravity begins to dominate gravitational instability when the perturbation becomes optically thin, provided that the radiation field at the time is strong enough. The recent rocket observation of the microwave background at submillimeter wavelengths by Matsumoto et al. might be from pre-galactic stars, the consequence of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by dust, and infrared reemission which is subsequently redshifted. HW's analysis omits radiative drag, incomplete collisional coupling of gas and dust, finite dust albedo, and finite matter pressure. These effects could be important. In a preliminary calculation including them, the authors have confirmed that mock gravitational instability is effective if there is a strong ultraviolet radiation at the time, but any galaxies that form would be substantially enriched in heavy elements because the contraction of the dust is more rapid than that of the gas. Moreover, since the dust moves with supersonic velocity through the gas soon after the perturbation becomes optically thin, the sputtering of dust particles by gas is significant, so the dust could disappear before the instability develops significantly. They conclude that the mock gravity by dust is not important in galaxy formations.

  11. Implications of different residential lead standards on children's blood lead levels in France: predictions based on a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Oulhote, Youssef; LeTertre, Alain; Etchevers, Anne; Le Bot, Barbara; Lucas, Jean-Paul; Mandin, Corinne; Le Strat, Yann; Lanphear, Bruce; Glorennec, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Despite the dramatic reductions in children's blood lead levels (BLLs), there is considerable evidence that low-level lead exposure is associated with intellectual deficits and behavioral problems, without apparent threshold. There are limited data, however, about the contribution of residential sources of lead to contemporary children's blood lead levels. The aim of this study is to calculate the contributions of residential sources of lead to assess the potential impact of setting new standards for lead levels in residential dust, soil and water. We enrolled 484 French children aged from 6 months to 6 years, and collected data on social, housing and individual characteristics. Lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples (water, soils, and dusts) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed using a multivariate generalized additive model accounting for the sampling design and the sampling weights. We found that exceedingly low concentrations of lead in dust, soil and water were significant predictors of children's BLLs, after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Lead-contaminated floor dust was the main source of lead in blood. BLLs (GM: 14?g/L) increased by 65%, 13%, 25%, and 5% when lead content in floor dust, loose soil, hard soil and water increased from their 25th percentile to their 95th percentile, respectively. We also observed that the steepest increase in BLLs occurred at the lowest levels of lead-contaminated floor dust, which indicates that lead contamination should be kept as low as possible. Impact of different possible standards on children's BLLs was also tabulated and indicated that unless standards are set low, they will only benefit a small proportion of children who have the highest exposures. PMID:23528234

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF DUST AND SOIL FOR LEAD, CADMIUM, AND CHROMIUM (RTI/ACS-AP-209-120)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol describes methodology and quality control measures used in the analysis of dust wipes, wet wipes, soil, and the rug/mat for metals. The samples were extracted with a 10% or greater concentration of ultra-pure nitric acid and diluted to a final concentration of 2% or...

  13. Dust control for draglines

    SciTech Connect

    Grad, P.

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

  14. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    ... title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm     View larger image ... 2003, near-surface winds carried a large amount of Saharan dust aloft and transported the material westward over the Atlantic Ocean. These ...

  15. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Elevated Dust over the Middle East     View ... on April 11, 2004 (top panels) contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom ... (MISR) depict both the abundance of airborne dust, and its height above the surface. The natural-color views at left ...

  16. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (? 10 µg/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 µg/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population. PMID:26466436

  17. Blood lead levels in children and environmental lead contamination in Miami inner city, Florida.

    PubMed

    Gasana, Janvier; Hlaing, WayWay M; Siegel, Kristy A; Chamorro, Armando; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2006-09-01

    Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL) as low as 10 microg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 microg/dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 microg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05). However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami. PMID:16968968

  18. Lead isotopes as a supplementary tool in the routine evaluation of household lead hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Gwiazda, R H; Smith, D R

    2000-01-01

    The advent of magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows rapid, accurate, and precise measurement of lead isotopes in environmental and biological samples at a lower cost than traditional methods. This may increase the feasibility of including lead isotope measurements as a routine tool to identify household sources of lead exposure to children. Here, we present three household case studies to illustrate how lead hazard evaluations by an environmental specialist could be supplemented with routine lead isotope analyses of potential lead sources and blood. Sampling for lead isotopes was undertaken following the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulatory guidelines for the evaluation of lead hazards in housing, and with the consideration of minimizing the additional costs associated with lead isotope measurements. The range of isotopic ratios within a single residence was large enough to allow the characterization of different lead sources, particularly when both major (e.g., (207)Pb/(206)Pb) and minor (e.g., (206)Pb/(204)Pb) isotope ratios were considered. These cases illustrate the utility of the lead isotope method to identify main source(s) of lead exposure to the child; discard unlikely sources of exposure to the child; point to sources of lead to dust; and substantiate or refine the environmental assessment based exclusively on lead concentrations and loadings. Thus, a more effective evaluation of household lead hazards would likely benefit from considering a) lead concentrations and loadings in and around the household environment; b) all isotopic ratios of potential lead sources within that environment; and c) information about behavioral habits, as well as an evaluation of viable pathways of exposure to the child. PMID:11102302

  19. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently being developed in a collaborative effort between Langley Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. The screens typically consist of spiral shaped conductive traces patterned on high dielectric substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, polyimide film, etc.). Two broad categories of substrate materials are being investigated for the screens. One category consists of transparent substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, sapphire, etc.), and the other non-transparent sub-strates (Kapton, polyimide films, metals, etc.). The transparent screens utilize patterns made from indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive material, on clear substrates while the non-transparent screens use copper patterns on a transluscent or opaque substrates. Further, the screen is coated with a high dielectric polyimide cover layer to protect the screen pattern. One promising cover layer material that is currently being investigated is Langley Research Center-Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI), a NASA LaRC developed polyimide. Lastly, a top-coat of hard, inorganic material is evaporated onto the cover layer for protection from scratches due to abrasive nature of the dust. Of note, several top-coat materials are under investigation and include: aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, titanium oxide, yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, and zinc sulfide. The electrostatic dust mitigation screens function when a high voltage (700V or greater) is applied to the screen electrodes, thus creating an electromagnetic wave across the surface of the screen that repels the dust. Lunar dust typically contains a high positive charge; therefore, the screens are charged with a higher positive charge that effectively repels dust from the surface (i.e. like charges repel, unlike charges attract). It is anticipated that full development and maturation of this technology will enable humans to sustain a long term presence on the moon, and other planets where dust may have negative implications.

  20. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-08-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  1. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  2. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  3. Size-Resolved Dust and Aerosol Contaminants Associated with Copper and Lead Smelting Emissions: Implications for Emissions Management and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Csavina, Janae; Taylor, Mark P.; Félix, Omar; Rine, Kyle P.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (< 1 ?m) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (< 1 ?m) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emissions management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. PMID:24995641

  4. Determination of numbers of lead-exposed American children as a function of lead source: Integrated summary of a report to the US Congress on childhood lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mushak, P.; Crocetti, A.F. )

    1989-12-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Congress (Section 118(f), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA)) directed the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to provide to it a quantitative assessment of the contributions of various sources of lead to childhood exposure. We provided both a quantitative response to the mandate and a critique of low-level lead sources for U.S. population segments. We also present here an integrated assessment of major and low-level lead sources. Significant sources of lead in childhood exposure include lead in paint, dust, soil, and drinking water. Approximately 6 million U.S. children less than 7 years old reside in the oldest housing, with highest exposure risk due to leaded paint. About 2 million in deteriorated units are at particularly high risk for exposure with ca. 1.2 million children in oldest, deteriorated housing estimated to have blood lead (PbB) levels above 15 micrograms/dl. Soil and dust lead are potential sources of exposure for 6-12 million children. Residential tap water lead is a measurable source for ca. 3.8 million children, of whom the U.S. EPA estimates ca. 240,000 have water-specific exposures at toxic levels. Leaded gasoline combustion mainly in past years has produced, and will continue to produce into the 1990s, significant numbers of exposed children with toxicologically elevated PbBs. For 1990, 1.25 million children will have their PbBs fall below 15 micrograms/dl. Food lead can cause significant exposure in certain cases.36 references.

  5. Andromeda's dust

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ? 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ?}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ? 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ? 0.026 at the center to ?0.0027 at R ? 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ?10, from Z/Z {sub ?} ? 3 at R = 0 to ?0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ? 35, declining to (U) ? 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ? 0.045 at R ? 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 ?m emission at R ? 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with ? ? 2.3 between 200 and 600 ?m) than in the model.

  6. Ceiling (attic) dust: a "museum" of contamination and potential hazard.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeffrey J; Gulson, Brian L

    2005-10-01

    Ceiling or attic dusts provide an indirect measure of air pollution integrated over varying time periods. We undertook an investigation into the particle-size distributions and sources and exposure pathways of metals in ceiling dusts from 38 houses in the city of Sydney, Australia. The houses ranged in age from 4 to 106 years and were grouped into three settings: industrial, semi-industrial, and non-industrial. The main roof types were terracotta tile (n=23), cement tile (n=8), and corrugated iron (n=4), with two slate and one asbestos. Soils and rocks from the Sydney area were also analyzed to provide "background" values and allow the estimation of enrichment factors. The bulk of the dusts contained particles derived from soil of crustal origin and organic plant material, with an anthropogenic component estimated at up to 25%. Particle sizes from selected dust samples showed a bimodal distribution, and the volumes of fine dusts were 50% <63 microm, 30%<38 microm, and 7%<10 microm; the highest metal concentrations were in the finest fractions. The geometric mean concentrations of important anthropogenic-derived metals from the industrial setting were 17294 microg/g Zn, 1660 microg/g Pb, 111 microg/g Cr, 261 microg/g Cu, and 26 microg/g As. The metals Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn were consistently higher in the industrial settings than in the other settings. Median regression analyses showed that there were significant differences in the urban setting for the metals Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Enrichment factors for metals in the dust from the industrial site houses compared with background soils and rocks from the Sydney area were As, x 5; Cr, x2; Co, x3; Cu, x 12; Pb, x10; Sb, x 26; and Zn, 596. For the three roof types of terracotta tile, cement, and iron, median regression analyses showed that there were no significant effects with respect to age. Median regression analyses for terracotta tile, cement tile, and corrugated iron roofs showed a "roof" effect for Cu and V. Significant correlations (P0.03) were observed between most of the metals As-Cd-Cu-Pb-Sb-Zn, especially from the industrial settings. Pathways of dust exposure in this study are classified as being passive or active based upon the probable route of dust infiltration. Ceiling dusts pose a probable health hazard if the dust is disturbed and allowed to plume within the living areas of a dwelling, thereby exposing the occupants, especially children, to elevated levels of metals and fine particulates. Modeling shows that exposure to the elevated levels of Pb in dust could give rise to blood lead concentrations exceeding current guidelines for the industrial and semi-industrial areas. PMID:16194668

  7. Potential for atmospheric-driven lead paint degradation in the South Coast Air Basin of California.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Alexander J; Edwards, Rufus D; Kleinman, Michael T; Dabdub, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to lead in paint or lead residues in house dust and soil is one of the leading environmental risks to the health of children in the United States. Components of photochemical smog can increase the degradation of binders in lead paint, leading to increased release of lead pigment granules to hands in surface contact or for deposition in house dust and soil. This study uses photochemical air quality modeling to map areas susceptible to increased lead paint degradation as a result of photochemical atmospheric pollutants to prioritize areas of concern. Typical air quality episodes in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) are modeled for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Results indicate that large areas of the SoCAB were susceptible to atmospheric-driven accelerated lead paint degradation. Inner city urban areas from central Los Angeles to Azusa and most of Orange County had the highest susceptibility to accelerated lead paint degradation, followed by inland locations near the San Bernardino Mountains. This study identifies photochemical oxidant gases as contributors to greater lead release from indoor painted surfaces in urban areas. PMID:19943661

  8. A multivariate linear regression model for predicting children's blood lead levels based on soil lead levels: A study at four Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.D.; Sarasua, S.; Jones, P.A. . Div. of Health Studies)

    1999-07-01

    For the purpose of examining the association between blood lead levels and household-specific soil lead levels, the authors used a multivariate linear regression model to find a slope factor relating soil lead levels to blood lead levels. They used previously collected data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's (ATSDR's) multisite lead and cadmium study. The data included in the blood lead measurements of 1,015 children aged 6--71 months, and corresponding household-specific environmental samples. The environmental samples included lead in soil, house dust, interior paint, and tap water. After adjusting for income, education or the parents, presence of a smoker in the household, sex, and dust lead, and using a double log transformation, they found a slope factor of 0.1388 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09--0.19 for the dose-response relationship between the natural log of the soil lead level and the natural log of the blood lead level. The predicted blood lead level corresponding to a soil lead level of 500 mg/kg was 5.99 [micro]g/kg with a 95% prediction interval of 2.08--17.29. Predicted values and their corresponding prediction intervals varied by covariate level. The model shows that increased soil lead level is associated with elevated blood leads in children, but that predictions based on this regression model are subject to high levels of uncertainty and variability.

  9. Fms-Like Tyrosine Kinase 3 Ligand Decreases T Helper Type 17 Cells and Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling Proteins in the Lung of House Dust Mite–Sensitized and –Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Halvor S.; Stallworth, Arthur L.; Agrawal, Tanupriya; Shao, Zhifei; Lorence, Lindsey; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported that Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3-L) reversed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation, and increased the number of regulatory CD11chighCD8?highCD11blow dendritic cells and CD4+CD25+ICOS+Foxp3+IL-10+ T-regulatory cells in the lung of allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Flt3-L on Th17 cells and expression of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins in the lungs of house dust mite (HDM)–sensitized and –challenged mice. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with HDM, and AHR to methacholine was established. Mice were treated with Flt3-L (5 ?g, intraperitoneal) daily for 10 days. Levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, and -13, and transforming growth factor (TGF)–? in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were examined by ELISA. Flt3-L treatment reversed existing AHR to methacholine and substantially decreased eosinophils, neutrophils, IL-5, -6, -8, and IL-13, and TGF-? levels in the BALF. HDM-sensitized and -challenged mice showed a significant increase in lung CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+CD25? T cells with high expression of retinoic acid–related orphan receptor (ROR)–?t transcripts. However, administration of Flt3-L substantially decreased the number of lung CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+CD25? T cells, with significantly decreased expression of ROR-?t mRNA in these cells. HDM sensitization caused a significant increase in the expression of SOCS-1, -3, and -5 in the lung. Flt3-L treatment abolished the increase in SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 proteins, whereas SOCS-5 expression was significantly reduced. These data suggest that the therapeutic effect of Flt3-L in reversing the hallmarks of allergic asthma in a mouse model is mediated by decreasing IL-6 and TGF-? levels in the BALF, which, in turn, decrease CD4+IL-17+IL-23R+ROR-?t+CD25? T cells and the expression of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 in the lung of HDM-sensitized and -challenged mice. PMID:19933379

  10. Streptomycetes in house dust: associations with housing characteristics and endotoxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to mold, indoor bioaerosols also contain bacterial components that may have implications for human health. Endotoxin is a cell wall component in Gram-negative bacteria present at varying levels indoors that has been found to have respiratory health implications. Stre...

  11. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Student Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This student manual comprises the United States Environmental Protection Agency's model renovation training course designed for renovation, remodeling, and painting contractors. It provides information regarding the containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb lead painted surfaces. Introductory material…

  12. Housing and child health.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Michael; Baten, Ahmareen; Rosenthal, David G; Hoshino, Risa; Tohn, Ellen; Jacobs, David E

    2013-09-01

    The connection between housing and health is well established. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the child's home, such as cleanliness, moisture, pests, noise, accessibility, injury risks, and other forms of housing environmental quality, all have the potential to influence multiple aspects of the health and development of children. Basic sanitation, reduced household crowding, other improvements in housing and expanded, and improved housing regulations have led to advances in children's health. For example, lead poisoning prevention policies have profoundly reduced childhood lead exposure in the United States. This and many other successes highlight the health benefits for families, particularly children, by targeting interventions that reduce or eliminate harmful exposures in the home. Additionally, parental mental health problems, food insecurity, domestic violence, and the presence of guns in children's homes all are largely experienced by children in their homes, which are not as yet considered part of the Healthy Homes agenda. There is a large movement and now a regulatory structure being put in place for healthy housing, which is becoming closely wedded with environmental health, public health, and the practice of pediatrics. The importance of homes in children's lives, history of healthy homes, asthma, and exposures to lead, carbon monoxide, secondhand/thirdhand smoke, radon, allergy triggers is discussed, as well as how changes in ambient temperature, increased humidity, poor ventilation, water quality, infectious diseases, housing structure, guns, electronic media, family structure, and domestic violence all affect children's health. PMID:23953987

  13. Working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization 15189 Standard: how to validate an in-house developed method an example of lead determination in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garcia Hejl, Carine; Ramirez, Jose Manuel; Vest, Philippe; Chianea, Denis; Renard, Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Laboratories working towards accreditation by the International Standards Organization (ISO) 15189 standard are required to demonstrate the validity of their analytical methods. The different guidelines set by various accreditation organizations make it difficult to provide objective evidence that an in-house method is fit for the intended purpose. Besides, the required performance characteristics tests and acceptance criteria are not always detailed. The laboratory must choose the most suitable validation protocol and set the acceptance criteria. Therefore, we propose a validation protocol to evaluate the performance of an in-house method. As an example, we validated the process for the detection and quantification of lead in whole blood by electrothermal absorption spectrometry. The fundamental parameters tested were, selectivity, calibration model, precision, accuracy (and uncertainty of measurement), contamination, stability of the sample, reference interval, and analytical interference. We have developed a protocol that has been applied successfully to quantify lead in whole blood by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). In particular, our method is selective, linear, accurate, and precise, making it suitable for use in routine diagnostics. PMID:25187889

  14. Historic Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Reviews some of the efforts of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA) to preserve, conserve, and interpret historic houses to the public. Examines the history and some of the specific preservation problems concerning the Beauport Cottage, the Sayward-Wheeler House, and the Gropius House. (MJP)

  15. Dust-Tolerant Intelligent Electrical Connection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark; Dokos, Adam; Perotti, Jose; Calle, Carlos; Mueller, Robert; Bastin, Gary; Carlson, Jeffrey; Townsend, Ivan, III; Immer, Chirstopher; Medelius, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Faults in wiring systems are a serious concern for the aerospace and aeronautic (commercial, military, and civilian) industries. Circuit failures and vehicle accidents have occurred and have been attributed to faulty wiring created by open and/or short circuits. Often, such circuit failures occur due to vibration during vehicle launch or operation. Therefore, developing non-intrusive fault-tolerant techniques is necessary to detect circuit faults and automatically route signals through alternate recovery paths while the vehicle or lunar surface systems equipment is in operation. Electrical connector concepts combining dust mitigation strategies and cable diagnostic technologies have significant application for lunar and Martian surface systems, as well as for dusty terrestrial applications. The dust-tolerant intelligent electrical connection system has several novel concepts and unique features. It combines intelligent cable diagnostics (health monitoring) and automatic circuit routing capabilities into a dust-tolerant electrical umbilical. It retrofits a clamshell protective dust cover to an existing connector for reduced gravity operation, and features a universal connector housing with three styles of dust protection: inverted cap, rotating cap, and clamshell. It uses a self-healing membrane as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required, while also combining lotus leaf technology for applications where a dust-resistant coating providing low surface tension is needed to mitigate Van der Waals forces, thereby disallowing dust particle adhesion to connector surfaces. It also permits using a ruggedized iris mechanism with an embedded electrodynamic dust shield as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required.

  16. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use of the CLOUDY code, we have showed that a high-density gas region can effectively stop most of the UV flux from the white dwarf and provide the observed dust shielding.

  17. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Doma?ska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mo?ocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis. PMID:8231799

  18. Aaron House From: Aaron House

    E-print Network

    1 Aaron House From: Aaron House Sent: Friday, December 19, 2014 4:55 PM To ­ Jan, Feb, March 2015 Good evening ­ Please see the information below for the next round of Research/16 @ 10am; details will be sent once the topic/presenter(s) are confirmed. Aaron House Assistant

  19. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a naturally occurring metal used in everything from construction materials to batteries, can cause serious health problems, ... your doctor about potential lead sources in your house or anywhere your kids spend long periods of ...

  20. 40 CFR 63.545 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Secondary Lead Smelting § 63.545 Standards for fugitive dust... in place to control fugitive dust emission sources within the areas of the secondary lead...

  1. 40 CFR 63.545 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Secondary Lead Smelting § 63.545 Standards for fugitive dust... in place to control fugitive dust emission sources within the areas of the secondary lead...

  2. Environmental Health Disparities in Housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The physical infrastructure and housing make human interaction possible and provide shelter. How well that infrastructure performs and which groups it serves have important implications for social equity and health. Populations in inadequate housing are more likely to have environmental diseases and injuries. Substantial disparities in housing have remained largely unchanged. Approximately 2.6 million (7.5%) non-Hispanic Blacks and 5.9 million Whites (2.8%) live in substandard housing. Segregation, lack of housing mobility, and homelessness are all associated with adverse health outcomes. Yet the experience with childhood lead poisoning in the United States has shown that housing-related disparities can be reduced. Effective interventions should be implemented to reduce environmental health disparities related to housing. PMID:21551378

  3. Impact of a More Stringent Blood Lead Level Recommendation for Children (Ages 1-5): Vulnerabilities Related to Housing, Food Security, Vitamins, and Environmental Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse health effects of lead (Pb) exposure in young children are well known. Non-Hispanic black children historically have higher blood Pb levels (BLL) compared to Mexican-Americans and non- Hispanic white children (CDC-MMWR). In the past, BLL tests below 10 µg/dL m...

  4. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  5. Spatial and temporal variations in Pb concentrations and isotopic composition in road dust, farmland soil and vegetation in proximity to roads since cessation of use of leaded petrol in the UK.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, G; MacKenzie, A B; Cook, G T; Pulford, I D; Duncan, H J; Scott, E M

    2011-11-01

    Results are presented for a study of spatial distributions and temporal trends in concentrations of lead (Pb) from different sources in soil and vegetation of an arable farm in central Scotland in the decade since the use of leaded petrol was terminated. Isotopic analyses revealed that in all of the samples analysed, the Pb conformed to a binary mixture of petrol Pb and Pb from industrial or indigenous geological sources and that locally enhanced levels of petrol Pb were restricted to within 10 m of a motorway and 3 m of a minor road. Overall, the dominant source of Pb was historical emissions from nearby industrial areas. There was no discernible change in concentration or isotopic composition of Pb in surface soil or vegetation over the decade since the ban on the sale of leaded petrol. There was an order of magnitude decrease in Pb concentrations in road dust over the study period, but petrol Pb persisted at up to 43% of the total Pb concentration in 2010. Similar concentrations and spatial distributions of petrol Pb and non petrol Pb in vegetation in both 2001 and 2010, with enhanced concentrations near roads, suggested that redistribution of previously deposited material has operated continuously over that period, maintaining a transfer pathway of Pb into the biosphere. The results for vegetation and soil transects near minor roads provided evidence of a non petrol Pb source associated with roads/traffic, but surface soil samples from the vicinity of a motorway failed to show evidence of such a source. PMID:21907389

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH VOLUME SURFACE SAMPLER FOR PESTICIDES IN FLOOR DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high volume surface sampler (HVS2) for the collection of house dust and the semivolatile organics (including pesticides) in house dust has been designed and tested. The sampler consists of an intake nozzle, cyclone, and filter. The position of the nozzle is regulated by the sta...

  7. ANALYSIS OF SOIL AND DUST SAMPLES FOR POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY (ELISA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in house dust and soil. Soil and house dust samples were analyzed for PCB by both gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD) and ELISA methods. A correlati...

  8. Contributions of Paint and Soil to Pb in Household Dust Wipes: An XAS Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J. W.; Amaya, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Speciation of Pb by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicated that Pb compounds associated with lead-based paint accounted for perhaps half of the Pb in 24 household dust wipes collected in El Paso, Texas. Soil-derived, sorbed Pb, likely Pb-humate, was also a major Pb species in many of the dust wipes. Household dust wipes are a standard technique for evaluating health risks of Pb to children, particularly toddlers, in public and private housing. The level of Pb in the wipes does not, however, indicate whether the source of the Pb is the house itself (peeling or powdering interior or exterior paint) or external, from contaminated soil or airborne particulate matter brought into the house by wind or foot traction. Understanding the origin of Pb in household dust is important in remediation: cover the old paint or remove the yard soil. XAS speciation can assist in understanding the source of Pb in household dust. The presence of significant Pb-humate requires a soil source, and suggests the need for soil remediation. Such species of Pb as hydrocerussite, lead sulfate, lead silicate, and lead chromate can be presumed to be components of lead-based paint. These may represent interior and/or exterior paint and thus do not uniquely identify the locus of the Pb source(s). Pb L-III edge XAFS data were collected on beam lines 7-3, 10-2, and 11-2 at SSRL at typical conditions of 3 GeV field and 80-200 mA current, using Si(220) water- or liquid-nitrogen-cooled monochromator crystals. Data were collected at ambient temperature in fluorescence mode using a 13- or 30-element Ge detector with a Se 3 or 6 filter and Soller slits to reduce scattered radiation. This publication was made possible by grant numbers 1RO1-ES11367 and 1 S11 ES013339-01A1 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH. Portions of this research were carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, a national user facility operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  9. 3. Credit PSR. View looks east (100°) down dust ditch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Credit PSR. View looks east (100°) down dust ditch near Fourth and B Streets in "the loop." In background are Building 4505, Building 4500 (Control Tower) and Building 4456 (Fire House No. 4). - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Dust Ditch System, Traversing North Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Comet Gas and Dust Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul A.; Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    This software models the gas and dust dynamics of comet coma (the head region of a comet) in order to support the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO) project. MIRO will study the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma system. The instrument will measure surface temperature, gas-production rates and relative abundances, and velocity and excitation temperatures of each species along with their spatial temporal variability. This software will use these measurements to improve the understanding of coma dynamics. The modeling tool solves the equation of motion of a dust particle, the energy balance equation of the dust particle, the continuity equation for the dust and gas flow, and the dust and gas mixture energy equation. By solving these equations numerically, the software calculates the temperature and velocity of gas and dust as a function of time for a given initial gas and dust production rate, and a dust characteristic parameter that measures the ability of a dust particle to adjust its velocity to the local gas velocity. The software is written in a modular manner, thereby allowing the addition of more dynamics equations as needed. All of the numerical algorithms are added in-house and no third-party libraries are used.

  11. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Moyer, R. A.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Smirnov, R.; West, W. P.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Hyatt, A. W.; Wong, C. P. C.; Groth, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-09-07

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  12. China Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:?? Fingerprints in the Dust ?? ?? ... Image These Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) nadir-camera images of eastern China compare a somewhat hazy summer view from ... from central Manchuria near the top to portions of North and South Korea at the bottom. They are approximately 380 kilometers in width. ...

  13. Associations of phthalate concentrations in floor dust and multi-surface dust with the interior materials in Japanese dwellings.

    PubMed

    Ait Bamai, Yu; Araki, Atsuko; Kawai, Toshio; Tsuboi, Tazuru; Saito, Ikue; Yoshioka, Eiji; Kanazawa, Ayako; Tajima, Shuji; Shi, Cong; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kishi, Reiko

    2014-01-15

    Phthalates are widely used as plasticizers in numerous products. However, there has been some concern about the various effects they may have on human health. Thus, household phthalate levels are an important public health issue. While many studies have assessed phthalate levels in house dust, the association of these levels with building characteristics has scarcely been examined. The present study investigated phthalate levels in house dust samples collected from the living areas of homes, and examined associations between these phthalate levels and the interior materials. Dust was collected from two portions of the living area: floor dust from the entire floor surface, and multi-surface dust from objects more than 35 cm above the floor. The levels of seven phthalates were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode. Phthalate levels were higher in multi-surface dust than in floor dust. Among floor dust samples, those from dwellings with compressed wooden flooring had significantly higher levels of di-iso-butyl phthalate compared to those with other floor materials, while polyvinyl chloride (PVC) flooring was associated with higher di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) levels. Among multi-surface dust samples, higher levels of DEHP and di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DINP) were found in samples from homes with PVC wallpaper than without. The number of PVC interior materials was significantly positively correlated with the levels of DEHP and DINP in multi-surface dust. The phthalate levels in multi-surface dust were associated with the interior surface materials, and those in floor dust were directly related to the flooring materials. Our findings show that when using house dust as an exposure assessment, it is very important to note where the samples were collected from. The present report provides useful information about the association between phthalates and dust inside dwellings, which will assist with establishing public health provisions. PMID:24012901

  14. 21. INTERIOR VIEW OF SIXTH FLOOR OF MILL HOUSE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR VIEW OF SIXTH FLOOR OF MILL HOUSE, SHOWING BLOWER AT RIGHT AND DUST CONTROL FILTER SYSTEM AT LEFT, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Sperry Corn Elevator Complex, Weber Avenue (North side), West of Edison Street, Stockton, San Joaquin County, CA

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--DUST SAMPLING WORKPLAN (RTI/ACS-AP-209-020)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes the work plan for collecting house dust samples. Wipe samples were collected to determine the concentrations (ug/g) and loadings (ug/cm2) of trace metals in house dust. The selection of the surfaces from which dust was collected was based upon the availab...

  16. BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF PBDES ADMINISTERED TO RATS IN HOUSEHOLD DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Household dust has recently been implicated as a source of PBDE exposure. This study investigated the bioavailability of PBDEs in house dust administered through the diet as compared to PBDEs in oil via the diet. PBDEs in household dust were just as bioavailabl...

  17. Interactive Soil Dust Aerosol Model in the GISS GCM. Part 1; Sensitivity of the Soil Dust Cycle to Radiative Properties of Soil Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Tegen, Ina; Miller, Ron L.

    2000-01-01

    The sensitivity of the soil dust aerosol cycle to the radiative forcing by soil dust aerosols is studied. Four experiments with the NASA/GISS atmospheric general circulation model, which includes a soil dust aerosol model, are compared, all using a prescribed climatological sea surface temperature as lower boundary condition. In one experiment, dust is included as dynamic tracer only (without interacting with radiation), whereas dust interacts with radiation in the other simulations. Although the single scattering albedo of dust particles is prescribed to be globally uniform in the experiments with radiatively active dust, a different single scattering albedo is used in those experiments to estimate whether regional variations in dust optical properties, corresponding to variations in mineralogical composition among different source regions, are important for the soil dust cycle and the climate state. On a global scale, the radiative forcing by dust generally causes a reduction in the atmospheric dust load corresponding to a decreased dust source flux. That is, there is a negative feedback in the climate system due to the radiative effect of dust. The dust source flux and its changes were analyzed in more detail for the main dust source regions. This analysis shows that the reduction varies both with the season and with the single scattering albedo of the dust particles. By examining the correlation with the surface wind, it was found that the dust emission from the Saharan/Sahelian source region and from the Arabian peninsula, along with the sensitivity of the emission to the single scattering albedo of dust particles, are related to large scale circulation patterns, in particular to the trade winds during Northern Hemisphere winter and to the Indian monsoon circulation during summer. In the other regions, such relations to the large scale circulation were not found. There, the dependence of dust deflation to radiative forcing by dust particles is probably dominated by physical processes with short time scales. The experiments show that dust radiative forcing can lead to significant changes both in the soil dust cycle and in the climate state. To estimate dust concentration and radiative forcing by dust more accurately, dust size distributions and dust single scattering albedo in the model should be a function of the source region, because dust concentration and climate response to dust radiative forcing are sensitive to dust radiative parameters.

  18. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  19. Halfway Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Harry E.; And Others

    This program model focuses on adult residential inmate aftercare programs. Critical issues in halfway house operations, a model for evaluation, and innovative variations are discussed. The facilities discussed include public and private halfway houses that provide residential services to adult offenders as a transitional step between their release…

  20. National Center for Healthy Housing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... entering your home. Any household member who does construction work or other work that may involve lead ... Blog Posts Bring Back Housecalls . . . And Fix the House by Jill Breysse Remembering Congressman Stokes by Phillip ...

  1. Seasonal influences on childhood lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Yiin, L M; Rhoads, G G; Lioy, P J

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a study to examine seasonal changes in residential dust lead content and its relationship to blood lead in preschool children. We collected blood and dust samples (floors, windowsills, and carpets) to assess lead exposure. The geometric mean blood lead concentrations are 10.77 and 7.66 microg/dL for the defined hot and cold periods, respectively (p < 0.05). Lead loading (milligrams per square meter) is the measure derived from floor and windowsill wipe samples that is most correlated with blood lead concentration, whereas lead concentration (micrograms per gram) is the best variable derived from carpet vacuum samples. The variation of dust lead levels for these three dust variables (floor lead loading, windowsill lead loading, and carpet lead concentration) are consistent with the variation of blood lead levels, showing the highest levels in the hottest months of the year, June, July, and August. The regression analysis, including the three representative dust variables in the equations to predict blood lead concentration, suggests that the seasonality of blood lead levels in children is related to the seasonal distributions of dust lead in the home. In addition, the outdoor activity patterns indicate that children are likely to contact high leaded street dust or soil during longer outdoor play periods in summer. Consequently, our results show that children appear to receive the highest dust lead exposure indoors and outdoors during the summer, when they have the highest blood lead levels. We conclude that at least some of the seasonal variation in blood lead levels in children is probably due to increased exposure to lead in dust and soil. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10656860

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF SOIL/HOUSE DUST FOR GC/MS ANALYSIS OF PESTICIDES (BCO-L-14.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe procedures for extracting and preparing dust or soil samples for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of pesticides. This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval during the Arizona NHEXAS project and the "...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF SOIL AND HOUSE DUST SAMPLES FOR GC/MS ANALYSIS OF PESTICIDE AND PAH (BCO-L-28.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe procedures for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retrieval durin...

  4. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF SOIL/HOUSE DUST SAMPLES FOR GC/MS ANALYSIS OF PESTICIDES AND PAH (BCO-L-28.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe procedures for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of pesticides and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This procedure was followed to ensure consistent data retriev...

  5. Tech House

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The members of the Swain family- Dr. Charles "Bill" Swain, wife Elaine, daughter Carol, 17, son "Chuck", 12, and dog Susie have an interesting assignment. They are active participants in an important NASA research program involving the application of space-age technology to home construction. b' Transplanted Floridians, the Swains now reside in NASA's Tech House, loatedat Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Their job is to use and help evaluate the variety of advanced technology systems in Tech House. A contemporary three-bedroom home, Tech House incorporates NASA technology, the latest commercial building techniques and other innovations, all designed to reduce energy and water consumption and to provide new levels of comfort, convenience, security and fire safety. Tech House equipment performed well in initial tests, but a house is not a home until it has people. That's where the Swains come in. NASA wants to see how the various systems work under actual living conditions, to confirm the effectiveness of the innovations or to determine necessary modifications for improvement. The Swains are occupying the house for a year, during which NASA engineers are computer monitoring the equipment and assembling a record of day-to-day performance. . Tech House is a laboratory rather than a mass production prototype, but its many benefits may influence home design and construction. In a period of sharply rising utility costs, widespread adoption of Tech House features could provide large-scale savings to homeowners and potentially enormous national benefit in resources conservation. Most innovations are aerospace spinoffs: Some of the equipment is now commercially available; other systems are expected to be in production within a few years. Around 1980, a Tech House-type of home could be built for $45-50,000 (1 976 dollars). It is estimated that the homeowner would save well over $20,000 (again 1976 dollars) in utility costs over the average mortgage span of 20 years.

  6. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin-Fu, Jane S.

    This publication is a guide to help social and health workers plan a preventive campaign against lead poisoning, a cause of mental retardation other neurological handicaps, and death among children. The main victims are 1- to 6-year-olds living in areas where deteriorating housing prevails. Among the causes of lead poisoning are: ingestion of…

  7. Galaxy formation by mock gravity with dust?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, George B.

    1989-01-01

    Absorbing dust immersed in an isotropic radiation field experiences an attractive force, 'mock gravity', due to mutual shadowing, and the resulting mock gravitational instability can lead to clumping of dust and gas. The effects of mock gravity in the pre-Galactic universe are studied here, including imcomplete coupling of dust and gas, finite gas pressure, radiative drag both by the radiation that causes the instability and by the cosmic microwave background radiation, and finite albedo of dust, all of which have been neglected in the previous calculations. It is concluded that the radiation field implied by the submillimeter background is not strong enough to cause clumping of gas on scales of interest.

  8. Arctic house

    E-print Network

    Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

    1999-01-01

    Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

  9. House Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Bette

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the "house" concept architectural design at Albert Lea High School (Minnesota) and how the design addresses the community's 21st Century educational goals. Photos and a floor plan are included. (GR)

  10. 40 CFR 63.1544 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1544 Standards for fugitive dust... in place to control fugitive dust emissions from the sources listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1544 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... fugitive dust sources. (a) Each owner or operator of a primary lead processor must prepare, and at all... that will be put in place to control fugitive dust emissions from the sources listed in paragraphs...

  12. 40 CFR 63.1544 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Lead Smelting § 63.1544 Standards for fugitive dust... in place to control fugitive dust emissions from the sources listed in paragraphs (a)(1) through...

  13. Metal dusting of nickel-containing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.

    1998-12-31

    Metal dusting is a catastrophic form of carburization which leads to pitting and grooves as the affected metal disintegrates into a mixture of powdery carbon, metallic particles, and possibly oxides and carbides. This high temperature carburization mode is not yet well understood and while relatively infrequent, can be economically disastrous when it does occur in large and complex chemical and petrochemical process streams. References in the literature show that all classes of heat resistant alloys are prone to metal dusting, given the necessary and specific environmental conditions. These same references describe the environments that plague nickel-containing alloys and are used as the basis for postulation on the probable corrosion mechanisms responsible for metal dusting. Using alloy 800 and other nickel-containing alloys and metal dusting atmospheres, an effort is made to examine the steps in the metal dusting process and the temperature ranges over which metal dusting occurs.

  14. Dust Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03677 Linear Clouds

    Dust slides are common in the dust covered region called Lycus Sulci. A large fracture is also visible in this image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1N, Longitude 226.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Dust agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  16. Potential Environmental Impacts of Dust Suppressants

    E-print Network

    Piechota, Thomas C.

    , asphalt emulsion, vegetable oils, molasses, synthetic polymers, mulches, and lignin products. Dust leads to the creation of a Superfund site. In 1972 and 1973 waste oil contaminated dioxin was sprayed

  17. Dust explosions-cases, causes, consequences, and control.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2007-02-01

    Dust explosions pose the most serious and widespread of explosion hazards in the process industry alongside vapour cloud explosions (VCE) and boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions (BLEVE). Dust explosions almost always lead to serious financial losses in terms of damage to facilities and down time. They also often cause serious injuries to personnel, and fatalities. We present the gist of the dust explosion state-of-the-art. Illustrative case studies and past accident analyses reflect the high frequency, geographic spread, and damage potential of dust explosions across the world. The sources and triggers of dust explosions, and the measures with which different factors associated with dust explosions can be quantified are reviewed alongside dust explosion mechanism. The rest of the review is focused on the ways available to prevent dust explosion, and on cushioning the impact of a dust explosion by venting when the accident does take place. PMID:17194531

  18. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  19. Assessing the human health risk for aluminium, zinc and lead in outdoor dusts collected in recreational sites used by children at an industrial area in the western part of the Bassin Minier de Provence, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, A. P.; Patinha, C.; Noack, Y.; Robert, S.; Dias, A. C.; Ferreira da Silva, E.

    2014-11-01

    The Western part of the “Bassin Minier de Provence”, a former coal mining area, is still occupied by old polluting industries such as a coal-fired power plant and an alumina factory. In 2011 a preliminary outdoor dust survey was carried out in the area as the first step to an exposure and health risk assessment study. Dust samples were taken at 19 sites distributed across the study area, depending on the location of recreational areas used by children to play outdoors. Pseudo-total concentrations of Al, Zn and Pb were determined by ICP-MS and bioaccessible concentrations were estimated using the Unified BARGE Method. Exposure was calculated according to a scenario evaluation approach for dust ingestion and dermal contact routes. Estimation of health risk for exposure to Al, Zn and Pb in outdoor dust was based on the summation of individual risks for the oral and dermal routes. Results show that Al occurs in very high concentrations but mainly innon-bioaccessible forms, especially near the alumina plant. Zinc and Pb occur in low-average levels but mainly in bioaccessible forms. The estimated potential risk decreases according to Pb ? Al > Zn and is lower for the ingestion route. The preliminary results presented in this study indicate that, for Al and Zn, the outdoor dusts of the BMP represent an acceptable risk to children's health. However, the estimated hazard quotients suggest that there is some health risk associated to environmental Pb.

  20. Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Lead can affect children's brains and developing nervous systems, causing reduced IQ, learning disabilities, and behavioral problems. Lead is also harmful to adults. Lead in dust is the most common way people are exposed to lead. People can also get lead in their bodies from lead in soil or paint chips. Lead dust is often invisible. Lead-based…

  1. Dust feed mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Milliman, Edward M. (Benton City, WA)

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

  2. China Dust and Sand

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China     ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) captured these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an indication of the probable dust source region are provided by these ...

  3. California Dust and Ash

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Airborne Dust and Ash over Southern California     ... during late fall and winter swept large amounts of dust and ash across the skies of San Diego and over the Pacific Ocean on ... while a 3-D stereo anaglyph image (right) accentuates the dust and indicates the relative height above the surface of the dust and ash ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS OF LEAD BURDENS IN CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead burdens in children were studied in relation to exposure to lead from soil and from automobile traffic in Charleston, SC. Preschool aged black children exposed to a variety of soil leads and traffic volumes were recruited in a house-to-house survey. Data regarding soil, traf...

  5. Simulating the effects of intergalactic grey dust

    E-print Network

    Rupert A. C. Croft; Romeel Dave'; Lars Hernquist; Neal Katz

    2000-02-23

    Using a high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, we present a method to constrain extinction due to intergalactic grey dust based on the observed magnitudes of distant Type IA supernovae. We apply several simple prescriptions to relate the intergalactic dust density to the gas density in the simulation, thereby obtaining dust extinctions that may be directly compared to the observed distribution of supernova magnitudes. Our analysis is sensitive to the spatial distribution of grey dust, but is not dependent on its intrinsic properties such as its opacity or grain size. We present an application of our technique to the supernova data of Perlmutter et al., who find that their high redshift sample is ~0.2 magnitudes fainter than the expectation for a non-accelerating, low-density universe. We find that for grey dust to be responsible, it must be distributed quite smoothly, e.g., tracing intergalactic gas. More realistic dust distributions, such as dust tracing the metal density, are inconsistent with observations at the 1.5-2 sigma level. Upcoming observations and improved modelling of the dust distribution should lead to stronger constraints on intergalactic grey dust extinction.

  6. Simulating the Effects of Intergalactic Gray Dust.

    PubMed

    Croft; Davé; Hernquist; Katz

    2000-05-10

    Using a high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, we present a method to constrain extinction due to intergalactic gray dust based on the observed magnitudes of distant Type Ia supernovae. We apply several simple prescriptions to relate the intergalactic dust density to the gas density in the simulation, thereby obtaining dust extinctions that may be directly compared with the observed distribution of supernova magnitudes. Our analysis is sensitive to the spatial distribution of gray dust but is not dependent on its intrinsic properties, such as its opacity or grain size. We present an application of our technique to the supernova data of Perlmutter et al., who find that their high-redshift sample is approximately 0.2 mag fainter than the expectation for a nonaccelerating, low-density universe. We find that for gray dust to be responsible, it must be distributed quite smoothly (e.g., tracing intergalactic gas). More realistic dust distributions, such as dust tracing the metal density, are inconsistent with observations at the 1.5-2 sigma level. Upcoming observations and improved modeling of the dust distribution should lead to stronger constraints on intergalactic gray dust extinction. PMID:10813663

  7. Housing Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Georgann

    1985-01-01

    Building specifications for birdhouses (nesting boxes) are given for 11 species (chickadee, titmouse, nuthatch, Carolina wren, house wren, downy woodpecker, hairy woodpecker, flicker, bluebird, screech owl, and wood duck) including length, width, depth, entrance diameter, and height above the ground. Pointers for construction, materials, and…

  8. Yinyutang House

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi; Boyd, David

    2011-08-21

    furnishings--was shipped here to the Peabody Essex Museum and meticulously reassembled. Even a single chopstick was packed, unpacked and wedged into its original place between a column and a wall. Apparently, a house divided can stand. #boyd #ceas #china...

  9. Effect of manual feeding on the level of farmer's exposure to airborne contaminants in the confinement nursery pig house.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Youn; Ko, Han-Jong; Kim, Hyeon-Tae; Kim, Chi-Nyon; Kim, Yoon-Shin; Roh, Young-Man

    2008-04-01

    The objective of the study is to demonstrate an effect of manual feeding on the level of farmer's exposure to airborne contaminants in the confinement nursery pig house. The levels of all the airborne contaminants besides respirable dust, total airborne fungi and ammonia were significantly higher in the treated nursery pig house with feeding than the control nursery pig house without feeding. Although there is no significant difference in respirable dust and total airborne fungi between the treatment and the control, their concentrations in the treated nursery pig house were also higher than the control nursery pig house. The result that the level of ammonia in the treated nursery pig house is lower than the control nursery pig house would be reasoned by the mechanism of ammonia generation in the pig house and adsorption property of ammonia to dust particles. In conclusion, manual feeding by farmer increased the exposure level of airborne contaminants compared to no feeding activity. PMID:18413966

  10. Factors associated with elevated blood lead concentrations in children in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Mohammad Hossein; White, Franklin; Agboatwalla, Mubina; Hozhabri, Siroos; Luby, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To confirm whether blood lead concentrations in Karachi were as high as reported in 1989 and to identify which types of exposure to lead contribute most to elevated blood lead concentrations in children in Karachi. METHODS: A total of 430 children aged 36-60 months were selected through a geographically stratified design from the city centre, two suburbs, a rural community and an island situated within the harbour at Karachi. Blood samples were collected from children and a pretested questionnaire was administered to assess the effect of various types of exposure. Cooked food, drinking-water and house dust samples were collected from households. FINDINGS: About 80% of children had blood lead concentrations 10 g/dl, with an overall mean of 15.6 g/dl. At the 5% level of significance, houses nearer to the main intersection in the city centre, application of surma to children's eyes, father's exposure to lead at workplace, parents' illiteracy and child's habit of hand- to-mouth activity were among variables associated with elevated lead concentrations in blood. CONCLUSION: These findings are of public health concern, as most children in Karachi are likely to suffer some degree of intellectual impairment as a result of environmental lead exposure. We believe that there is enough evidence of the continuing problem of lead in petrol to prompt the petroleum industry to take action. The evidence also shows the need for appropriate interventions in reducing the burden due to other factors associated with this toxic element. PMID:12471396

  11. Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Crater wall dust avalanches in southern Arabia Terra.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (335.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. The discrete heat source approach to dust cloud combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Zadsirjan, Saeedreza; Mostafavi, Seyed Alireza

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, combustion of dust clouds from the discrete point heat source method has been addressed. Time-place temperature profile generated by single particle burning has been obtained to study the dust combustion. The summation of the temperature profiles of burned and burning particles predict the temperature in the preheating zone so that the ignition time of layer in flame front can be determined. Consequently the flame propagating speed was obtained based on the dust concentration corresponding to particles spacing and particle diameter. This method has been validated with aluminum dust cloud combustion. Decrease in the dust concentration leads to the lean limit of dust combustion. Increase in particles diameter or reduction in the dust concentration causes higher lean limit and also reduction in the flame propagating speed. Adding the ignition energy as igniter to this system, provides the path to study the effects of ignition energy in the dust combustion.

  13. Kinetic effects of the dust charge fluctuations on the instability of dust ion-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhani, M. R.; Jamshidi, M.; Hakimi Pajouh, H.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a kinetic description is used to derive the perturbed dust grain currents carried by the plasma particles, taking into account dust charge fluctuations. The longitudinal dielectric permittivity and the dispersion relation of dust ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma are obtained. It is shown that the dust charge fluctuations effectively modify the damping rate of these waves, which can lead to an excitation of instability in plasma. This instability is due to the thermal velocity of the plasma particles and dust charge fluctuations. It is different from the instability due to the drift speed of the plasma particles. It is found that there is a critical wave number above which these waves are unstable. In addition, the growth rate of these waves is numerically investigated for different plasma parameters. The present theory is applicable in astronomers and space scientists working on dusty plasmas, especially planetary ring systems and cometary tails, where dust charge fluctuations are important.

  14. Evolution of Dust Structures from Room to Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S. N.; Asinovskii, E. I.; Kirillin, A. V.; Markovets, V. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2008-09-07

    In this work dusty plasma of dc glow discharge at the temperatures in the range of 4.2-300 K was experimentally and numerically investigated. As it was shown in the experiments, the deep cooling of discharge tube walls leads to dramatic change of dusty plasma properties. In particular, sufficient increase of dust particle kinetic temperature (by about an order) and dust density (by several orders) was observed at low (cryogenic) temperatures. At 4.2 K, this can lead to the forming of a super dense dust structures with novel properties. Numerical simulations of charging process, dust charge fluctuation and screening of dust particle charge in plasma were made in dependence with the neutral gas temperature and dust density. The main attention was given to proper ion-atom collision analysis that allows us to investigate mechanisms of dust structure transformation observed in the cryogenic experiments.

  15. EFFECT OF AN ELECTROSTATIC SPACE CHARGE SYSTEM ON AIRBORNE DUST AND SUBSEQUENT POTENTIAL TRANSMISSION OF MICROORGANISMS TO BROILER BREEDER PULLETS BY AIRBORNE DUST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High levels of dust and bacteria are associated with animal housing. Many of the microorganisms are carried by dust particles. Two environmentally controlled rooms with litter floors containing female broiler breeder pullets were used to evaluate the effectiveness of an electrostatic space charge sy...

  16. Dust and Ocean Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Adding iron to the diet of marine plant life has been shown in shipboard experiments to boost the amount of carbon-absorbing phytoplankton in certain parts of the world's oceans. A new study promises to give scientists their first global picture of the extent of these unique 'iron-limited' ocean regions, an important step in understanding how the ocean's biology controls the flow of carbon between the atmosphere and the ocean. The new study by researchers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory was presented at the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting in San Francisco on Friday, Dec. 15, 2000. Oceanic phytoplankton remove nearly as much carbon from the atmosphere each year as all land-based plants. Identifying the location and size of nutrient-limited areas in the open ocean has challenged oceanographers for nearly a century. The study pinpointed iron-limited regions by seeing which phytoplankton-rich areas of the world's oceans were also areas that received iron from wind-blown dust. In this map, areas with high levels of chlorophyll from phytoplankton and high levels of dust deposition (high correlation coefficients) are indicated in dark brown. Dust deposition was calculated by a 3-year modelled climatology for the years 1996-1998. The chlorophyll measurements are from 1998 observations from the SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) instrument on the OrbView-2 satellite. 'Global, satellite-based analyses such as this gives us insight into where iron deposition may be limiting ocean biological activity,' says lead author David Erickson of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computer Science and Mathematics Division. 'With this information we will be able to infer how the ocean productivity/iron deposition relationship might shift in response to climate change.' Map Source: David Erickson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Computer Science and Mathematics Division

  17. Blood Test: Lead (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood lead test and when based on a child's risk for lead poisoning. Those who are considered at risk — such as kids who live in cities or in houses built before 1978 (the year that regulations began requiring that lead-containing paints could not ...

  18. Dust Distribution during Reionization

    E-print Network

    Erik Elfgren; Francois-Xavier Désert; Bruno Guiderdoni

    2007-10-22

    The dust produced by the first generation of stars will be a foreground to cosmic microwave background. In order to evaluate the effect of this early dust, we calculate the power spectrum of the dust emission anisotropies and compare it with the sensitivity limit of the Planck satellite. The spatial distribution of the dust is estimated through the distribution of dark matter. At small angular scales ($\\ell \\gtrsim 1000$) the dust signal is found to be noticeable with the Planck detector for certain values of dust lifetime and production rates. The dust signal is also compared to sensitivities of other instruments. The early dust emission anisotropies are finally compared to those of local dust and they are found to be similar in magnitude at mm wavelengths.

  19. Smart Houses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    GWS takes plans for a new home and subjects them to intensive computerized analysis that does 10,000 calculations relative to expected heat loss and heat gain, then provides specifications designed specifically for each structure as to heating, cooling, ventilation and insulation. As construction progresses, GWS inspects the work of the electrical, plumbing and insulation contractors and installs its own Smart House Radiant Barrier. On completion of the home, GWS technicians use a machine that creates a vacuum in the house and enables computer calculation of the air exchanged, a measure of energy efficiency. Key factor is the radiant barrier, borrowed from the Apollo program. This is an adaptation of a highly effective aluminized heat shield as a radiation barrier holding in or keeping out heat, cold air and water vapor.

  20. Conformal House

    E-print Network

    Thomas A Ryttov; Francesco Sannino

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the gauge dynamics of nonsupersymmetric SU(N) gauge theories featuring the simultaneous presence of fermionic matter transforming according to two distinct representations of the underlying gauge group. We bound the regions of flavors and colors which can yield a physical infrared fixed point. As a consistency check we recover the previously investigated conformal windows bounds when restricting to a single matter representation. The earlier conformal windows can be imagined to be part now of the new conformal house. We predict the nonperturbative anomalous dimensions at the infrared fixed points. We further investigate the effects of adding mass terms to the condensates on the conformal house chiral dynamics and construct the simplest instanton induced effective Lagrangian terms.

  1. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar System.

  2. Lead in paint and soil in Karnataka and Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Clark, C S; Thuppil, V; Clark, R; Sinha, S; Menezes, G; D'Souza, H; Nayak, N; Kuruvilla, A; Law, T; Dave, P; Shah, S

    2005-01-01

    Blood lead surveys in several areas of India have found very high percentages of children with elevated blood lead levels. Fifty-three percent of children under 12 years of age in a seven-city screening had blood lead levels equal to or greater than 10 microg/dL, the level currently considered elevated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A number of these surveys focused on populations near lead smelters or in areas with high lead levels from combustion of lead-containing gasoline. There is little information available, however, on the levels of lead in paint in India and in soil. Field portable X-ray fluorescence analyzers were used to determine environmental lead levels in paint, dust, air, soil, and other bulk samples near several lead-using industries and in the residential environments of children with very high blood lead levels, at least four times as high as the CDC limit. Soils near industrial operations, such as secondary lead smelters, and battery dismantling units contained levels up to 100,000 ppm of lead. Four of 29 currently available paints from five manufacturers measured 1.0 mg/cm2 or above--the current U.S. definition of lead-based paint in housing-after the application of a single coat; four others measured at least 1.0 after three coats, and three others likely reached this level after the application of an additional one or two coats. In 5 of 10 homes of the elevated blood lead children, three or more locations in or around the home were found to have lead paint levels of 1.0 mg/cm2 or higher. Soil exceeding the U.S. standard for residential areas (400 ppm) was found at only one of the houses. Other sources of lead exposure, including traditional ayurvedic medicine tablets, were also observed. Similar surveys would be useful elsewhere in India and in other developing countries. PMID:15764522

  3. Dust from AGB stars

    E-print Network

    Anja C. Andersen

    2007-02-22

    Dust is formed in the expanding atmosphere during late stages of stellar evolution. Dust influences the dynamics and thermodynamics of the stellar atmosphere by its opacity. The dust opacity depends both on the optical properties of the grain material as well as on the amount of dust present. A rich source of information on some mineral phases of dust in AGB stars comes from the study of presolar grains from meteorites. This paper presents a short overview of presolar grains studies and describes how the optical properties of dust grains are obtained in the laboratory.

  4. Investigations into the indoor environment and respiratory health in Boston public housing.

    PubMed

    Hynes, H Patricia; Brugge, Doug; Osgood, Neal-Dra; Snell, John; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John

    2004-01-01

    The self-reported prevalence of asthma in the United States increased by 75% from 1980 to 1994, a trend found to be significant and evident in every region of the country. The increase was most marked in children from birth to 14 years of age; and growing evidence indicates that, as with lead poisoning, inner-city and urban populations are most at risk. Attention has turned to the role of indoor environmental risk factors, especially in homes and schools. Such factors include moisture and mold growth, pest infestation, dust mites, the building envelope, heating systems, inadequate ventilation, nitrogen dioxide, and environmental tobacco smoke. The Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI) is a Boston-based community-centered research and intervention project designed to engage Boston Housing Authority residents in a collaborative process to improve respiratory health, quality of life, building conditions, and building maintenance in public housing. This article summarizes the significant research findings from four pilot studies in housing developments that laid the foundation for the larger HPHI asthma-related environmental intervention study. The research design for the pilot projects is informed by principles of community-collaborative research. The strengths of this model of research for our work are also discussed. PMID:15742674

  5. Guild House George James

    E-print Network

    Mucina, Ladislav

    114 136 129 126 118 135 Erica Underwood House Kurrajong Village 116 Guild House 111 107 113 115 154 308 308 306 305 300 303 302 301 311 312 309 314207 120 314 001A 001B 001 119 Vickery House 117 156 106 106E 106G 106C 106D 106A 106B 140 Don Watts House George James House Japan House Rotary House Sir

  6. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    MedlinePLUS

    ... shades. They will not collect as much dust. Dust particles collect in fabrics and carpets. If you can, get rid of fabric or upholstered furniture. Wood, leather, and vinyl are better. Avoid sleeping or ...

  7. Stearman with Dust Equipment 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Alpha and beta particles emitted from radioactive material collected on an air filter may be significantly attenuated by the mass (thickness) of collected dust. In this study, we determined the mass or thickness of the simulated dust deposit...

  8. Prevalence of childhood lead poisoning in a lead mining area

    SciTech Connect

    Murgueytio, A.M.; Evans, R.G.; Roberts, D.; Moehr, T.

    1996-06-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of lead poisoning among children six to seventy-one months of age who live in a lead mining area, compared to children not living in an area exposed to lead mining waste. Children were selected from a sampling frame based on a census of the study and control areas. Participants were interviewed and blood and urine were collected for lead and cadmium analysis. Environmental measurements of soil, dust, and paint were also made. Mean blood lead levels were significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group, 6.25 {mu}g/dl and 3.59 {micro}g/dl, respectively. Also, 14% of the study group compared to 0% of the control group had blood lead levels greater than 10 {micro}g/dl, the level of concern established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Soil, dust, and paint lead levels were significantly higher in the study area. There were no significant differences between groups in urine cadmium levels although environmental dust and soil cadmium levels were significantly higher in the study group. This study suggested that the increased prevalence of elevated blood lead levels in the study group is highly correlated to a combination of exposure to soil contaminated with lead mining and smelting waste and exposure to household lead paint.

  9. Deflagration to detonation transition fueled by dust layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.-C.; Harbaugh, A. S.; Alexander, C. G.; Kauffman, C. W.; Sichel, M.

    1995-12-01

    The roles which dust layers play in severe dust explosions were investigated in a 70 m long and 30 cm inside diameter horizontal Flame Acceleration Tube (FAT) with one end closed and the other end open to the atmosphere. A variety of dusts such as corn dust, cornstarch, Mira Gel starch, wheat dust, and wood flour were layered on the bottom half of the FAT. To initiate the combustion process, a detonation tube filled with a stoichiometric H2/O2 mixture at room temperature and 1 atm pressure was used to ignite a short presuspended dust cloud with a dust concentration of 500 600 g/m3. Combustion waves generated by this dust cloud travel toward the open end of the FAT and are continuously fueled by the dust/air mixtures. Flame propagation processes in the FAT were closely monitored by a variety of measuring instruments at different locations. The study demonstrates that stable quasi-detonation were reached in some runs, but self-sustained Chapman-Jouguet detonations were not observed possibly due to the limitation of the tube length. Attempts were made to determine the structure of dust detonations fueled by a dust layer. Preliminary evidence indicates that for Mira Gel starch the leading shock is essentially a triple shock configuration which involves a Mach stem and for wheat and wood dusts there possibly exists a multi-headed spin structure.

  10. TRW RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS OF INDOOR RESIDENTIAL DUST FOR THE IEUBK MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this guidance document is to recommend methods for collecting and analyzing residential dust lead data specifically for use in the IEUBK model. A discussion of other dust sampling methods is also included.

  11. Optical Properties of Dust

    E-print Network

    Aigen Li

    2008-08-29

    Except in a few cases cosmic dust can be studied in situ or in terrestrial laboratories, essentially all of our information concerning the nature of cosmic dust depends upon its interaction with electromagnetic radiation. This chapter presents the theoretical basis for describing the optical properties of dust -- how it absorbs and scatters starlight and reradiates the absorbed energy at longer wavelengths.

  12. Niamey Dust Observations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Flynn, Connor

    2008-10-01

    Niamey aerosol are composed of two main components: dust due to the proximity of the Sahara Desert, and soot from local and regional biomass burning. The purpose of this data product is to identify when the local conditions are dominated by the dust component so that the properties of the dust events can be further studied.

  13. Dust in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  14. The health impact of environmental pollutants: a special focus on lead exposure in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Harper, Carolyn C; Mathee, Angela; von Schirnding, Yasmin; De Rosa, Christopher T; Falk, Henry

    2003-08-01

    Studies have shown blood lead levels of some children in South Africa at levels of health concern. New studies show even relatively low lead levels to have detrimental effects on cognitive function in young children. Large numbers of South African inner-city and other children have been shown to have unacceptably high blood lead levels. Studies indicate that blood lead levels of children living in South Africa's urban areas are higher than those of children in most developed countries, including Great Britain, Europe, and the United States. Although data and reported studies are very sparse, mean blood lead levels of approximately 15 microg/dl have been reported in children. Elevated blood lead levels were associated with socioeconomic status and housing conditions. Key environmental risk factors for elevated blood levels were contaminated soil and dust in the urban environment, and the still large number of automobiles using leaded gasoline. In view of emerging evidence linking lead at increasingly lower levels to adverse effects in children, the South African government is taking actions to reduce lead exposure among vulnerable groups. Currently, South Africa has no national lead surveillance program. The government, therefore, has developed international and regional partnerships to prevent and address the problem of lead exposure. PMID:12971686

  15. Pesticide loadings of select organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides in urban public housing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the magnitude and distribution of pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide loadings within public housing dwellings in Boston, Massachusetts and compared the results using various sampling methods. We collected dust matrices from living room and kitchen in 42 apar...

  16. LEAD EXPOSURES IN THE HUMAN ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans consume lead by inhaling air, drinking beverages, eating food and ingesting dust. The natural source of this lead is primarily soil. Anthropogenic sources are lead in gasoline, fossil fuels and industrial products and processes. Lead is ubiquitous in the human environment,...

  17. Risk analysis of dust explosion scenarios using Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi; Khakzad, Nima; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a methodology has been proposed for risk analysis of dust explosion scenarios based on Bayesian network. Our methodology also benefits from a bow-tie diagram to better represent the logical relationships existing among contributing factors and consequences of dust explosions. In this study, the risks of dust explosion scenarios are evaluated, taking into account common cause failures and dependencies among root events and possible consequences. Using a diagnostic analysis, dust particle properties, oxygen concentration, and safety training of staff are identified as the most critical root events leading to dust explosions. The probability adaptation concept is also used for sequential updating and thus learning from past dust explosion accidents, which is of great importance in dynamic risk assessment and management. We also apply the proposed methodology to a case study to model dust explosion scenarios, to estimate the envisaged risks, and to identify the vulnerable parts of the system that need additional safety measures. PMID:25264172

  18. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-27

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites.

  19. Dust Mitigation Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Eric H.

    2011-01-01

    A document describes the development and demonstration of an apparatus, called a dust mitigation vehicle, for reducing the amount of free dust on the surface of the Moon. The dust mitigation vehicle would be used to pave surfaces on the Moon to prevent the dust from levitating or adhering to surfaces. The basic principle of operation of these apparatuses is to use a lens or a dish mirror to concentrate solar thermal radiation onto a small spot to heat lunar regolith. In the case of the prototype dust mitigation vehicle, a Fresnel lens was used to heat a surface layer of regolith sufficiently to sinter or melt dust grains into a solid mass. The prototype vehicle has demonstrated paving rates up to 1.8 square meters per day. The proposed flight design of the dust mitigation vehicle is also described.

  20. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  1. Toxicity of lunar dust

    E-print Network

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  2. Housing policy in China

    E-print Network

    Gao, Lu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    In the last three decades, the People's Republic of China (PRC) has managed to replace its welfare-based urban housing system with a market-based housing provision scheme. With such significant housing policy changes, the ...

  3. Lead pollution in urban and rural Saudi Arabian children

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, P.; Kutbi, I.I. )

    1989-11-01

    In the last two decades, vehicular traffic increased spectacularly in Saudi Arabia, from 243,000 registered motor vehicles in 1973 to over 5 million at present. All these vehicles use leaded gasoline, one of the major sources of lead contamination in the ambient air and dusts in the cities. To evaluate the impact of this high level of environmental lead, scalp hair of 200 school boys, aged 6-8 years, from each of the two cities (Makkah in the western region and Riyadh in the central region) and two Village Groups (one around Makkah city and the other around Riyadh city) were analyzed in this study for lead concentrations. Makkah is one of the oldest and most densely populated cities with congested housing and narrow winding streets. Riyadh on the other hand is the newly developing, planned capital city of Saudi Arabia. The Village Groups were chosen so as to reflect a control environment away from heavy traffic and industrial activity. The usefulness of hair as an important biopsy material for environmental pollution studies has been demonstrated in a large number of studies. Effect of lead on the central nervous system of the children may result in mental retardation and even death in case of acute encephalopathy.

  4. Efficiency of final cleaning for lead-based paint abatement in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Choe, Kyoo T; Trunov, Mikhaylo; Willeke, Klaus; Menrath, William; Friedman, Warren

    2002-03-01

    The effectiveness of procedures used for the final indoor cleaning after active lead-based paint abatement were evaluated in a 830 ft3 test chamber. Dry and wet scraping and dry machine sanding were applied to wooden doors obtained from lead-hazard control sites. The airborne particle concentration and size distribution were monitored using a real-time particle size spectrometer. Particulates were also collected on filters and analyzed for total dust and lead. The resulting airborne lead mass was determined for each cleaning procedure, and the potential floor lead loading resulting from the dust settling was calculated. Wipe samples were collected to measure the actual floor lead loading. The effectiveness of final cleaning was evaluated first for dry abatement methods. Various cleaning work practices were tested by applying wet and dry debris sweeping as well as no sweeping in combinations with wet and dry removal of plastic sheeting. Considerable resuspension of leaded particles was detected during dry sweeping: the airborne lead mass increase ranged between 65 and 220 percent. However, this increase did not exceed 22 percent when wet sweeping was applied. Minimal or no resuspension was found when the plastic was folded with leaded debris inside (no sweeping was performed prior to the sheeting removal). During folding activity, the "clean" (uncovered) floor surface may be significantly contaminated with leaded dust from workers' shoes and cleaning tools. The first HEPA vacuuming resulted in a 15- to 20-fold decrease of the airborne lead mass; however, it was not sufficient to reduce the floor lead loading to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance level of 40 microg/ft2, as determined by wipe sampling. Wet mopping following the first HEPA vacuuming was proven to be effective to reduce the lead loading significantly below 40 microg/ft2. The second HEPA vacuuming resulted in further reduction of the airborne lead mass concentration. The floor lead loading remained much lower than 40 microg/ft2. These results were confirmed in the tests when using wet scraping. Overall, the HUD-recommended cleaning protocol was found to be sufficient in reducing the floor lead loading below 40 microg/ft2. At the same time, several modifications are proposed in this study to further improve the cleaning effectiveness. PMID:11871758

  5. Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view to northwest of Burton Park Club House and Amphitheater. Steps lead up from wings of stage area to club house grade level (135mm lens). - Burton Park, Club House & Amphitheater, Adjacent ot south end of Chestnut Avenue, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  6. In situ dust measurements by the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer in 2014 and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 11 years in orbit around Saturn. Many discoveries like the Saturn nanodust streams or the large extended Ering were achieved. CDA provided unique results regarding Enceladus, his plume and the liquid water below the icy crust. In 2014 and 2015 CDA focuses on extended inclination and equatorial scans of the ring particle densities. Furthermore, scans are performed of the Pallene and Helene regions. Special attention is also given to the search of the dust cloud around Dione and to the Titan region. Long integration times are needed in order to characterize the flux and composition of exogenous dust (including interstellar dust) or possible retrograde dust particles. Finally, dedicated observation campaigns focus on the coupling of nanodust streams to Saturn's magnetosphere and the search of possible periodicities in the stream data. Saturn's rotation frequency was identified in the impact rate of nanodust particles at a Saturn distance of 40 Saturn radii. A special geometry in 2014-065 lead to an occultation of the dust stream by the moon Titan and its atmosphere when Titan crossed the line-of-sight between Saturn and Cassini. Here, CDA pointed towards Saturn for the measurement of stream particles. Around closest approach when Cassini was behind Titan, the flux of stream particles went down to zero (Fig. 1). This "dust occultation" is a new method to analyse the properties of the stream particles (speed, composition, mass) or the properties of Titans atmosphere (density). Furthermore, the particle trajectories can be constrained for a better analysis of their origin. In the final three years CDA performs exogenous and interstellar dust campaigns, studies of the composition and origin of Saturn's main rings by unique ring ejecta measurements, long-duration nano-dust stream observations, high-resolution maps of small moon orbit crossings, studies of the dust cloud around Dione and studies of the E-ring interaction with the large moon Titan.

  7. On dust emissions from the jovian system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, H. A.; Gruen, E.; Baguhl, M.; Balogh, A.; Bame, S. J.; Fechtig, H.; Forsyth, R.; Hanner, M. S.; Horanyi, M.; Kissel, J.

    1993-01-01

    As described by Gruen et al., the dust impact detector on the Ulysses spacecraft detected a totally unexpected series of dust streams in the outer solar system near the orbit of Jupiter. Five considerations lead us to believe that the dust streams emanate from the jovian system itself: the dust streams only occur within about 1 AU of the jovian system, with the strongest stream being the one closest to Jupiter (about 550 R(sub J) away); the direction from which they arrive is never far from the line-of-sight direction to Jupiter; the time period between streams is about 28 (+/- 3) days; the impact velocities are very high--mostly around 40 km/s; and we can think of no cometary, asteroidal, or interstellar source that could give rise to the above four phenomena (such streams have never before been detected).

  8. Dust reference frame in quantum cosmology

    E-print Network

    Viqar Husain; Tomasz Pawlowski

    2011-08-04

    We give a formulation of quantum cosmology with a pressureless dust and arbitrary additional matter fields. The system has the property that its Hamiltonian constraint is linear in the dust momentum. This feature provides a natural time gauge, leading to a physical hamiltonian that is not a square root. Quantization leads to Schr{\\"o}dinger equation for which unitary evolution is directly linked to geodesic completeness. Our approach simplifies the analysis of both Wheeler-deWitt and loop quantum cosmology (LQC) models, and significantly broadens the applicability of the latter. This is demonstrated for arbitrary scalar field potential and cosmological constant in LQC.

  9. ELECTROSTATIC SPACE CHARGE SYSTEM FOR AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT IN BROILER PRODUCTION HOUSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing airborne dust in enclosed animal housing has been shown to result in corresponding reductions in airborne bacteria, ammonia and odor. Technologies that have been shown to be effective for reducing airborne dust in animal areas include misting with an oil spray, water mists, extra ventilatio...

  10. Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992. Report together with Additional and Dissenting Views To Accompany 5730 (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office.) Part 1 [and] Part 2. House of Representatives, 102d Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This two-part report deals with the Lead Exposure Reduction Act of 1992 (H.R. 5730), an amendment to the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The amendment is intended to lead to the reduction of levels of lead in the environment and to lower the degree of childhood exposure to lead. The bill provides for a…

  11. Dust control research for SEI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Harris, Jeffrey R.

    A study, at NASA Johnson Space Center, of dust control requirements for surface habitats has focused on identification of the dust problem, identifying dust control techniques and dust control technology areas requiring research development. This research was performed for the Surface Habitats and Construction (SHAC) technology area. Dust control consists of two problems: (1) how to keep it out of the habitat; and (2) once the habitat or airlock is contaminated with dust, how to collect it. This paper describes the dust environment, the Apollo experience and dust control methods used, future EVA operational considerations, and dust control concepts for surface habitats.

  12. Interstellar Dust: Physical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dust is formed in stellar environments, and destroyed by sputtering, shattering and vaporization in shock waves due to cloud-cloud collisions and supernova blast waves. Dust is also destroyed during star formation. We review the dust formation and destruction balance. The calculated destruction time-scale is less than or equal to one billion years and the star dust injection time-scale is approx. 2.5 billion years. Hence, the fractions of elemental carbon and silicon locked up in stardust are less than 0.3 and less than 0.15, respectively. An efficient ISM dust formation route is therefore implied. In particular, in dense clouds dust grows; through the processes of coagulation and the accretion of gas phase molecules e.g. H20, CO, CH4. These icy materials may then be photoprocessed to refractory materials in more diffuse regions. The resulting carbonaceous grain mantle may actually be the glue that holds the coagulated grains together.

  13. Summertime Dust Devil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-464, 26 August 2003

    Dust devils are spinning, columnar vortices of air that move across a landscape, picking up dust as they go. They are common occurrences during summer on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer, shows a dust devil in the Phlegra region of Mars near 32.0oN, 182.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left; the dust devil is casting a columnar shadow toward the upper right. Some dust devils on Mars make streaks as they disrupt the fine coating of dust on the surface--but others do not make streaks. This one did not make a streak. The view shown here is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  14. 24 CFR 35.1130 - Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Child with an environmental intervention blood lead level. 35.1130 Section 35.1130 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Public Housing Programs...

  15. Lead Poisoning and Children. Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session (December 2, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    These hearings examine the problem of lead poisoning in children and explore the consequences of the transfer of funds for lead-screening efforts to the maternal child health block grant. Lead toxicity is described as probably the most significant and pervasive environmental illness in the United States. Testimony asserts that the effect of the…

  16. Interstellar Dust Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2004-01-01

    A viable interstellar dust model - characterized by the composition, morphology, and size distribution of the dust grains and by the abundance of the different elements locked up in the dust - should fit all observational constraints arising primarily from the interactions of the dust with incident radiation or the ambient gas. As a minimum, these should include the average interstellar extinction, the infrared emission from the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), and the observed interstellar abundances of the various refractory elements. The last constraint has been largely ignored, resulting in dust models that require more elements to be in the dust phase than available in the ISM. In this talk I will describe the most recent advances towards the construction of a comprehensive dust model made by Zubko, Dwek, and Arendt, who, for the first time, included the interstellar abundances as explicit constraints in the construction of interstellar dust models. The results showed the existence of many distinct models that satisfy the basic set of observational constraints, including bare spherical silicate and graphite particles, PAHs, as well as spherical composite particles containing silicate, organic refractories, water ice, and voids. Recently, a new interstellar dust constituent has emerged, consisting of metallic needles. These needles constitute a very small fraction of the interstellar dust abundance, and their existence is primarily manifested in the 4 to 8 micron wavelength region, where they dominate the interstellar extinction. Preliminary studies show that these models may be distinguished by their X-ray halos, which are produced primarily by small angle scattering off large dust particles along the line of sight to bright X-ray sources, and probe dust properties largely inaccessible at other wavelengths.

  17. Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 8 May 2002) The Science This image, centered near 50.0 S and 17.7 W displays dust devil tracks on the surface. Most of the lighter portions of the image likely have a thin veneer of dust settled on the surface. As a dust devil passes over the surface, it acts as a vacuum and picks up the dust, leaving the darker substrate exposed. In this image there is a general trend of many of the tracks running from east to west or west to east, indicating the general wind direction. There is often no general trend present in dust devil tracks seen in other images. The track patterns are quite ephemeral and can completely change or even disappear over the course of a few months. Dust devils are one of the mechanisms that Mars uses to constantly pump dust into the ubiquitously dusty atmosphere. This atmospheric dust is one of the main driving forces of the present Martian climate. The Story Vrrrrooooooooom. Think of a tornado, the cartoon Tasmanian devil, or any number of vacuum commercials that powerfully suck up swirls of dust and dirt. That's pretty much what it's like on the surface of Mars a lot of the time. Whirlpools of wind called

  18. Operational Dust Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  19. The dissolution of natural and artificial dusts in glutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Zhang; Faqin, Dong; Xiaochun, He

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the characteristics of natural dusts, industrial dusts, and artificial dusts, such as mineral phases, chemical components, morphological observation and size. Quartz and calcite are the main phases of natural dusts and industrial dusts with high SiO2 and CaO and low K2O and Na2O in the chemical composition. The dissolution and electrochemical action of dusts in glutamic acid liquor at the simulated human body temperature (37 °C) in 32 h was investigated. The potential harm that the dust could lead to in body glutamic acid acidic environment, namely biological activity, is of great importance for revealing the human toxicological mechanism. The changes of pH values and electric conductivity of suspension of those dusts were similar, increased slowly in the first 8 h, and then the pH values increased rapidly. The total amount of dissolved ions of K, Ca, Na, and Mg was 35.4 to 429 mg/kg, particularly Ca was maximal of 20 to 334 mg/kg. The total amount of dissolved ions of Fe, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Ba was 0.18 to 5.59 mg/kg and in Al and Si was 3.0 to 21.7 mg/kg. The relative solubility order of dusts in glutamic acid is wollastonite > serpentine > sepiolite, the cement plant industrial dusts > natural dusts > power plant industrial dusts. The wollastonite and cement plant industrial dusts have the highest solubility, which also have high content of CaO; this shows that there are a poorer corrosion-resisting ability and lower bio-resistibility. Sepiolite and power plant industrial dusts have lowest solubility, which also have high content of SiO2; this shows that there are a higher corrosion-resisting ability and stronger bio-resistibility.

  20. Chapter 6: Research Priorities Childhood Lead Poisoning

    E-print Network

    Chapter 6: Research Priorities 6 Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Research Priorities If we are to improve lead poisoning prevention strategies, we need additional research in the following areas: 1 to control lead hazards in housing. · The effectiveness of family education about lead poisoning prevention

  1. Modeling Agglomeration of Dust Particles in Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Land, Victor; Ma Qianyu; Perry, Jonathan D.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2011-11-29

    The charge on an aggregate immersed in a plasma environment distributes itself over the aggregate's surface; this can be approximated theoretically by assuming a multipole distribution. The dipole-dipole (or higher order) charge interactions between fractal aggregates lead to rotations of the grains as they interact. Other properties of the dust grains also influence the agglomeration process, such as the monomer shape (spherical or ellipsoidal) or the presence of magnetic material. Finally, the plasma and grain properties also determine the morphology of the resultant aggregates. Porous and fluffy aggregates are more strongly coupled to the gas, leading to reduced collisional velocities, and greater collisional cross sections. These factors in turn can determine the growth rate of the aggregates and evolution of the dust cloud. This paper gives an overview of the numerical and experimental methods used to study dust agglomeration at CASPER and highlights some recent results.

  2. Monitoring of aerial pollutants emitted from Swine houses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Y; Ko, Han J; Kim, Hyeon T; Kim, Yoon S; Roh, Young M; Lee, Cheol M; Kim, Chi N

    2007-10-01

    This on-site survey study was performed to determine the concentrations and emissions of aerial contaminants in the different types of swine houses in Korea and then to present beneficial information available for Korean pig producers to manage optimal air quality in swine house. The swine houses investigated in this research were selected based on three criteria; manure removal system, ventilation mode and growth stage of swine. Mean concentrations of aerial pollutants in swine houses were 8 ppm for ammonia, 300 ppb for hydrogen sulfide, 2 mg m(-3) for total dust, 0.6 mg m(-3) for respirable dust, 4 log(cfu m(-3)) for total airborne bacteria and 3 log(cfu m(-3)) for total airborne fungi, respectively. Mean emissions based on pig (liveweight; 75 kg) and area (m(2)) were 250 and 340 mg h(-1) for ammonia, 40 and 50 mg h(-1) for hydrogen sulfide, 40 and 50 mg h(-1) for total dust, 10 and 15 mg h(-1) for respirable dust, 1.0 and 1.3 log(cfu) h(-1) for total airborne bacteria and 0.7 and 1.0 log(cfu) h(-1) for total airborne fungi, respectively. In general concentrations and emissions of gases were relatively higher in the swine houses managed with deep-pit manure system with slats and mechanical ventilation mode than the different swine housing types whereas those of particulates and bioaerosol were highest in the naturally ventilated swine houses with deep-litter bed system. PMID:17268924

  3. Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Noting that lead poisoning is a preventable disease, this report details a coordinated federal program to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States. The report describes how lead poisoning harms children, how pervasive lead poisoning is, and how lead paint hazards in housing could be eliminated in 10 years. Following information on…

  4. 75 FR 4100 - Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ...FR-5376-N-01] Affirmative Fair Housing, Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Multifamily Housing, Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan-Single Family Housing and Affirmative Fair Housing Marketing (AFHM) Plan-...

  5. The Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser CDA - A 10 year exploration of Saturn's dust environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after seven years of cruise phase. Since then, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) was operated continuously for 10 years in orbit around Saturn. The first discovery of CDA related to Saturn was the measurement of nanometer sized dust particles ejected by its magnetosphere to interplanetary space with speeds higher than 100 km/s. Their origin and composition was analysed and an their dynamical studies showed a strong link to the conditions of the solar wind plasma flow. A recent surprising result was, that stream particles stem from the interior of Enceladus. Since 2004 CDA measured millions of dust impacts characterizing the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument showed strong evidence for ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the salt-rich water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system lead to the discovery of liquid water below the crust connected to an ocean at depth feeding the icy jets. CDA was even capable to derive a spatially resolved compositional profile of the plume during close Enceladus flybys. A determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring (at least twice as large as previously known) allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturns E ring describing the observed properties. Cassini performed shadow crossings in the ring plane and dust grain charges were measured in shadow regions delivering important data for dust-plasma interaction studies. In the last years, dedicated measurement campaigns were executed by CDA to monitor the flux of interplanetary and interstellar dust particles reaching Saturn.

  6. "Where does the damp come from?" Investigations into the indoor environment and respiratory health in Boston public housing.

    PubMed

    Hynes, H Patricia; Brugge, Doug; Osgood, Neal-Dra; Snell, John; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John

    2003-01-01

    The self-reported prevalence of asthma increased by 75% from 1980 to 1994, a trend found to be significant and evident in every region of the country. The increase has been most marked in children 0-14 years of age, and there is evidence that, as with lead poisoning, inner-city and urban populations are most at risk. Attention has turned to the role of indoor environment risk factors, especially in homes and schools. Such factors include moisture and mold growth, pest infestation, dust mites, the building envelope, heating systems, inadequate ventilation, NO2, and environmental tobacco smoke. The Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI) is a Boston-based community-centered research and intervention project designed to engage Boston Housing Authority residents in a collaborative process to improve respiratory health, quality of life, building conditions, and building maintenance in public housing. This article summarizes the significant research findings from four pilot studies in housing developments that lay the foundation for the larger HPHI asthma-related environmental intervention study. The research design for the pilot projects is informed by principles of community-collaborative research. The strengths of this model of research to our work are also discussed. PMID:15015872

  7. 24 CFR 35.130 - Lead hazard information pamphlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead hazard information pamphlet. 35.130...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and...

  8. 24 CFR 35.130 - Lead hazard information pamphlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lead hazard information pamphlet. 35.130...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and...

  9. 24 CFR 35.130 - Lead hazard information pamphlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead hazard information pamphlet. 35.130...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and...

  10. 24 CFR 35.130 - Lead hazard information pamphlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead hazard information pamphlet. 35.130...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and...

  11. 24 CFR 35.130 - Lead hazard information pamphlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead hazard information pamphlet. 35.130...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based Paint Requirements and...

  12. Kinetic theory of magnetized dusty plasmas with dust particles charged by collisional processes and by photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.

    2012-09-15

    In this work, we detail the derivation of a plasma kinetic theory leading to the components of the dielectric tensor for a magnetized dusty plasma with variable charge on the dust particles, considering that the dust component of the plasma contains spherical dust particles with different sizes, which are charged both by inelastic collisions of electrons and ions and by photoionization.

  13. Lagrangian-Eulerian Micromotion and Wave Heating in Nonlinear Self-Excited Dust-Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Teng, L.-W.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Io, C.-W.; I Lin

    2008-05-09

    We investigate particle-wave microdynamics in the large amplitude self-excited dust acoustic wave at the discrete level through direct visualization. The wave field induces dust oscillations which in turn sustain wave propagation. In the regular wave with increasing wave amplitude, dust-wave interaction with uncertain temporary crest trapping and dust-dust interaction lead to the transition from cyclic to disordered dust motion associated with the liquid to the gas transition, and anisotropic non-Gaussian heating. In the irregular wave, particle trough-trapping is also observed, and the heating is nearly Gaussian and less anisotropic.

  14. Supernovae. Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center.

    PubMed

    Lau, R M; Herter, T L; Morris, M R; Li, Z; Adams, J D

    2015-04-24

    Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 solar masses of warm (~100 kelvin) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000-year-old Sagittarius A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings indicate the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium (electron density ~10(3) centimeters(-3)) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may be the dominant dust-production mechanism in the dense environment of galaxies of the early universe. PMID:25791082

  15. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  16. Definition and measurement of dust aeolian thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, Jason A.; White, Bruce R.

    2004-03-01

    Dust suspension and particle "saltation threshold" speeds were measured in an environmental boundary layer wind tunnel located at the University of California, Davis. The results indicate that dust suspension threshold speeds occur at substantially lower friction speeds than "saltation threshold" speeds. Many of the dust suspension threshold values are half of the "saltation threshold" values. For example, surface soils from the most erodible areas of Owens (dry) Lake were tested in the wind tunnel, and we found that dust suspension thresholds varied from 50 to 75% of conventional "saltation threshold" values. Current regulatory models relying on "visual threshold" for estimating suspended dust may be incorrect and may lead to substantial underestimates of suspended material yield over large, expansive, erodible areas. Wind environments with average wind speeds at or around the "saltation threshold" speed values are especially susceptible to underestimation. Though this study focuses only on Owens (dry) Lake soils, we believe that the witnessed effect will occur in any soil with an abundance of dust particles interspersed among sand-sized particles.

  17. 24 CFR 982.618 - Shared housing: Housing quality standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shared housing: Housing quality standards. 982.618 Section 982.618 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  18. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  19. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  20. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  1. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  2. 24 CFR 35.1320 - Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead-based paint inspections, paint testing, risk assessments, lead-hazard screens, and reevaluations...Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  3. Source identification and health risk assessment of metals in indoor dust in the vicinity of phosphorus mining, Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Chen, Huaguo; Li, Baizhan

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was performed to identify the sources of arsenic (As) and heavy metals in house dust and to assess the associated human health risks in the vicinity of phosphorus (P) mining in Guizhou, China. The concentrations and spatial distributions of mercury (Hg), As, cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and P in 23 house dust samples from the study area were determined. Greater concentrations of As and Pb were found compared with values in other investigations in various countries. Pollution sources were identified using multivariate statistical analysis. As, Pb, Mn, and Hg pollution was mainly attributed to mining activities, and Mn and Cd levels were largely associated with automobile emissions. The dominant wind direction and the distance of the residence from the mining region were found to play an important role in element distributions. A health risk assessment showed that As and Pb should be paid more attention, although the noncancer risks of the studied elements were within the safe range and the cancer risks of As and Cd are within the acceptable range under present conditions. PMID:25038721

  4. Lunar Dust Levitation Joshua E. Colwell1

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Thus, there can be a transport of dust on both small and large spatial scales. Future manned properties. This can lead to a net transport as well as contamination of sensitive equipment. This paper transport has been proposed for aster- oids as well as for the Moon e.g. Pelizzari and Criswell 1978; Lee

  5. The Nature of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    The STARDUST mission is designed to collect dust the coma of comet Wild 2 and to collect interstellar dust on a second set of collectors. We have a reasonable idea of what to expect from the comet dust collection because the research community has been studying interplanetary dust particles for many years. It is less clear what we should expect from the interstellar dust. This presentation discusses what we might expect to find on the STARDUST interstellar dust collector.

  6. Dusts and Molds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevent dusts and molds from forming, e.g. drying feeds and cleaning animal areas regularly. • Prevent dusts and molds from becoming airborne, e.g. adding oils to feeds, wetting down bedding before chopping or spreading, and wetting grain storage areas prior to clean out. • Prevent inhalation, ...

  7. Combustible dust tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  8. FINGERPRINT DUSTING POWDER

    E-print Network

    Mucina, Ladislav

    FINGERPRINT DUSTING POWDER IP COMMERCIALISATION Russell Nicholls Deputy Director Make Tomorrow-infrared luminescent fingerprint dusting powder which adheres to latent fingermarks on non-porous surfaces has been with a simple filter. Using this technique to visualise fingerprints provides a high contrast image, even

  9. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Farrell, William M.; Stubbs, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    An analytic model for the motion of a positively charged lunar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum is presented. It is shown that the dust grain executes oscillatory trajectories, and an expression is derived for the period of oscillation. Simulations used to verify the analytic expression also show that because the trajectories are unstable, dust grains are either ejected from the crater's vicinity or deposited into the crater forming "dust ponds." The model also applies to other airless bodies in the solar system, such as asteroids, and predicts that under certain conditions, particularly near lunar sunset, oscillating dust "canopies" or "swarms" will form over negatively charged craters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of COSPAR.

  10. Simulating the Martian Dust Cycle with Prognostic surface dust deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Richardson, M.; Wilson, J.

    2004-12-01

    Changes in the surface distribution of dust as a result of dust storms have been observed from orbit [Christensen, 1988; Smith et al., 2004] and has been suggested as an important part of interannual variability of global dust storms [Haberle, 1986]. The observations of air and surface temperatures following the 2001 global dust storm provide the first direct evidence for climatic coupling between changes in surface dust and the atmosphere [Smith et al., 2004]. In this work, we examine the impact of finite dust sources on: the seasonal cycle of background dust; on the evolution of dust storms; on the pattern of global dust storm interannual variability; and to examine the response of circulation changes in the surface dust distribution (and hence albedo and surface temperature) following the 2001 global dust storm. The surface dust deposits are introduced in the model as 2 dimensional surface budgets(one for each dust size used). Dust is added to the surface in response to fluxes from the lowest atmospheric level predicted by the sedimentation scheme. Dust is removed from the surface so as to provide the injection amounts predicted by the lifting schemes. If a surface element is exhausted, dust is not injected into the atmosphere regardless of the injection rates required by the lifting schemes. In some cases, we couple the dust amount to the surface albedo using the MGS maps, and results of surface scattering models.

  11. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in indoor dust and human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuan; Wang, Hong Sheng; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, settled workplace dust ( n = 55) from commercial offices, secondary schools, shopping malls, hospitals, electronic factories and manufacturing plants in Hong Kong and settled home dust ( n = 23) from Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, around the Pearl River Delta were collected. Chemical analyses showed that the total PBDEs in workplace dust ranged from 397 to 40,236 ng g -1, with the dust samples from electronic factories having the highest levels (2122-40,236 ng g -1), and dust from homes ranging from 685 to 18,385 ng g -1. The most abundant BDE congeners found were BDE-209 in both workplace dust and home dust, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-47. No significant correlations were observed between total PBDE concentrations in home dust and the age or the house ( p > 0.05), concentrations of BDE-99 + BDE-47 and the number of furniture containing foam ( p > 0.05), and concentrations of BDE-209 and the number of electronic appliances ( p > 0.05). BDE-47, -99, -100 and -183 were found in most of the hair samples collected from occupants of these homes with BDE-47 being the dominant congener (0.86-5.24 ng g -1). The BDE-183 concentration in home dust was significantly correlated with that in human hair ( r = 0.55, p < 0.05, n = 18). Risk assessment indicated that daily intake of PBDEs for children via non-dietary ingestion of dust (101-404 ng day -1) was higher than that via food consumption (77-190 ng day -1).

  12. 24 CFR 92.355 - Lead-based paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 92.355 Section 92... HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.355 Lead-based paint. Housing assisted with HOME funds is subject to the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C....

  13. 24 CFR 891.325 - Lead-based paint requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint requirements. 891... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.325 Lead-based paint requirements. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential...

  14. 24 CFR 891.325 - Lead-based paint requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead-based paint requirements. 891... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.325 Lead-based paint requirements. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential...

  15. 24 CFR 92.355 - Lead-based paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 92.355 Section 92... HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.355 Lead-based paint. Housing assisted with HOME funds is subject to the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C....

  16. 24 CFR 92.355 - Lead-based paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 92.355 Section 92... HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.355 Lead-based paint. Housing assisted with HOME funds is subject to the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C....

  17. 24 CFR 92.355 - Lead-based paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 92.355 Section 92... HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.355 Lead-based paint. Housing assisted with HOME funds is subject to the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C....

  18. 24 CFR 891.325 - Lead-based paint requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lead-based paint requirements. 891... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.325 Lead-based paint requirements. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential...

  19. 24 CFR 891.325 - Lead-based paint requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead-based paint requirements. 891... Section 811 Supportive Housing for Persons With Disabilities § 891.325 Lead-based paint requirements. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential...

  20. 24 CFR 92.355 - Lead-based paint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lead-based paint. 92.355 Section 92... HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Other Federal Requirements § 92.355 Lead-based paint. Housing assisted with HOME funds is subject to the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C....