Science.gov

Sample records for house dust lead

  1. Exterior surface dust lead, interior house dust lead and childhood lead exposure in an urban environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, R.L.; Succop, P.A.; Krafft, K.M.; Clark, C.S.; Peace, B.; Hammond, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of urban lead exposure is being examined in a prospective study of several hundred children followed from birth to five years of age. A wide range of social, behavioral, biological and environmental factors are being assessed at approximately one year intervals beginning at birth. Previous analyses on this cohort have indicated a strong relationship between hand lead and hand-to-mouth activity and suggests that this is an important mechanism of inadvertent ingestion of lead in infants and young children. The present analyses was undertaken to examine the joint influence of lead in exterior surface dust and interior lead-containing painted surfaces on lead levels in house dust. In addition the joint influence of exterior and interior surface dust lead on children's hand lead content and blood lead concentration was examined. At 18 months of age 38% of the observed variation in blood lead was accounted for by hand lead and dust lead. Interior paint lead and exterior surface dust lead accounted for 52% of the observed variation in interior surface dust lead concentration. Exterior surface dust lead, obtained from exterior surface scrapings, indirectly influenced blood lead through its impact on interior house dust lead and children's hand lead content, but had no observable direct impact on blood lead. 13 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Lead-contaminated house dust and urban children's blood lead levels.

    PubMed Central

    Lanphear, B P; Weitzman, M; Winter, N L; Eberly, S; Yakir, B; Tanner, M; Emond, M; Matte, T D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the relationship between lead-contaminated house dust and urban children's blood lead levels. METHODS: A random-sample survey was used to identify and enroll 205 children, 12 to 31 months of age, who had resided in the same house since at least 6 months of age. Children's blood and household dust, water, soil, and paint were analyzed for lead, and interviews were conducted to ascertain risk factors for elevated blood lead (> or = 10 micrograms/dL). RESULTS: Children's mean blood lead level was 7.7 micrograms/dL. In addition to dust lead loading (micrograms of lead per square foot), independent predictors of children's blood lead were Black race, soil lead levels, ingestion of soil or dirt, lead content and condition of painted surfaces, and water lead levels. For dust lead standards of 5 micrograms/sq ft, 20 micrograms/sq ft, and 40 micrograms/sq ft on noncarpeted floors, the estimated percentages of children having blood lead levels at or above 10 micrograms/dL were 4%, 15%, and 20%, respectively, after adjusting for other significant covariates. CONCLUSIONS: Lead-contaminated house dust is a significant contributor to lead intake among urban children who have low-level elevations in blood lead. A substantial proportion of children may have blood lead levels of at least 10 micrograms/dL at dust lead levels considerably lower than current standards. PMID:8876511

  3. Northern Idaho house dust and soil lead levels compared to the Bunker Hill Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, Susan M; von Braun, Margrit C; Petrosyan, Varduhi; von Lindern, Ian H

    2007-07-01

    House dust has been identified as a major exposure medium for lead (Pb) in children. High levels of Pb in soil and house dust have been recorded at the Bunker Hill Superfund Site (BHSS) in northern Idaho, an historic mining and smelting district. Soil and dust remediation at the site was required; however, regional background soil and dust Pb levels had not been well characterized. The objective of this survey was to determine background house dust Pb levels and to compare those levels with concentrations, and dust and Pb loading rates measured at the BHSS. Soil and house dust samples were collected in five towns demographically similar to the BHSS but unaffected by the mining industry. The background concentrations and loading rates were significantly lower than those observed at the site. House age was a significant factor affecting background soil and house dust Pb concentrations and loading rates. PMID:17171279

  4. Canadian House Dust Study: Lead Bioaccessibility and Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    P Rasmussen; S Beauchemin; M Chenier; C Levesque; L MacLean; L Marrow; H Jones-Otazo; S Petrovic; L McDonald; H Gardner

    2011-12-31

    Vacuum samples were collected from 1025 randomly selected urban Canadian homes to investigate bioaccessible Pb (Pb{sub S}) concentrations in settled house dust. Results indicate a polymodal frequency distribution, consisting of three lognormally distributed subpopulations defined as 'urban background' (geomean 58 {micro}g g{sup -1}), 'elevated' (geomean 447 {micro}g g{sup -1}), and 'anomalous' (geomean 1730 {micro}g g{sup -1}). Dust Pb{sub S} concentrations in 924 homes (90%) fall into the 'urban background' category. The elevated and anomalous subpopulations predominantly consist of older homes located in central core areas of cities. The influence of house age is evidenced by a moderate correlation between house age and dust Pb{sub S} content (R{sup 2} = 0.34; n = 1025; p < 0.01), but it is notable that more than 10% of homes in the elevated/anomalous category were built after 1980. Conversely, the benefit of home remediation is evidenced by the large number of homes (33%) in the background category that were built before 1960. The dominant dust Pb species determined using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy were as follows: Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb sulfate, Pb chromate, Pb oxide, Pb citrate, Pb metal, Pb adsorbed to Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides, and Pb adsorbed to humate. Pb bioaccessibility estimated from solid phase speciation predicts Pb bioaccessibility measured using a simulated gastric extraction (R{sup 2} = 0.85; n = 12; p < 0.0001). The trend toward increased Pb bioaccessibility in the elevated and anomalous subpopulations (75% {+-} 18% and 81% {+-} 8%, respectively) compared to background (63% {+-} 18%) is explained by the higher proportion of bioaccessible compounds used as pigments in older paints (Pb carbonate and Pb hydroxyl carbonate). This population-based study provides a nationally representative urban baseline for applications in human health risk assessment and risk management.

  5. Lead and Other Heavy Metals in Dust Fall from Single-Family Housing Demolition

    PubMed Central

    Cali, Salvatore; Welch, Alison; Catalin, Bogdan; Dixon, Sherry L.; Evens, Anne; Mucha, Amy P.; Vahl, Nicole; Erdal, Serap; Bartlett, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective We measured lead and other heavy metals in dust during older housing demolition and effectiveness of dust suppression. Methods We used American Public Housing Association Method 502 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Methods SW3050B and SW6020 at 97 single-family housing demolition events with intermittent (or no) use of water to suppress dust at perimeter, non-perimeter, and locations without demolition, with nested mixed modeling and tobit modeling with left censoring. Results The geometric mean (GM) lead dust fall during demolition was 6.01 micrograms of lead per square foot per hour (μg Pb/ft2/hour). GM lead dust fall was 14.18 μg Pb/ft2/hour without dust suppression, but declined to 5.48 μg Pb/ft2/hour (p=0.057) when buildings and debris were wetted. Significant predictors included distance, wind direction, and main street location. At 400 feet, lead dust fall was not significantly different from background. GM lead concentration at demolition (2,406 parts per million [ppm]) was significantly greater than background (GM=579 ppm, p=0.05). Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, and manganese demolition dust fall was significantly higher than background (p<0.001). Demolition of approximately 400 old housing units elsewhere with more dust suppression was only 0.25 μg Pb/ft2/hour. Conclusions Lead dust suppression is feasible and important in single-family housing demolition where distances between houses are smaller and community exposures are higher. Neighbor notification should be expanded to at least 400 feet away from single-family housing demolition, not just adjacent properties. Further research is needed on effects of distance, potential water contamination, occupational exposures, and water application. PMID:24179257

  6. The contribution of lead-contaminated house dust and residential soil to children`s blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Lanphear, B.P.; Matte, T.D.; Rogers, J.

    1998-10-01

    In 1992, the US Congress passed the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, which requires the promulgation of health-based dust lead and soil lead standards for residential dwellings to prevent undue lead exposure in children. Unfortunately, the levels of lead in house dust and soil that are associated with elevated blood lead levels among US children remain poorly defined. This pooled analysis was done to estimate the contributions of lead-contaminated house dust and soil to children`s blood lead levels. The results of this pooled analysis, the most comprehensive existing epidemiologic analysis of childhood lead exposure, confirm that lead-contaminated house dust is the major source of lead exposure for children. These analyses further demonstrate that a strong relationship between interior dust lead loading and children`s blood lead levels persists at dust lead levels considerably below the US Department of Housing and urban Development`s current post-abatement standards and the Environmental Protection Agency`s guidance levels. Finally, these analyses demonstrate that a child`s age, race, mouthing behaviors, and study-site specific factors influence the predicted blood lead level at a given level of exposure. These data can be used to estimate the potential health impact of alternative health-based lead standards for residential sources of lead exposure.

  7. Dust Weight and Asthma Prevalence in the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (NSLAH)

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Leslie; Arbes, Samuel J.; Harvey, Eric S.; Lee, Robert C.; Salo, Pivi M.; Cohn, Richard D.; London, Stephanie J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2007-01-01

    Background Settled dust has been used in studies to assess exposures to allergens and other biologically active components, but it has not been considered in the aggregate in relation to respiratory health outcomes in the general population. Objective We addressed whether total house dust weight, an index of total dust exposure, was associated with respiratory health outcomes in the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing (19981999) (NSLAH). Methods NSLAH was a cross-sectional survey designed to represent permanently occupied housing units in the United States. In each household, a questionnaire was administered and settled dust was vacuumed from five locations. Linear regression models were used to identify predictors of dust weight; logistic regression models were used to examine the relationship between dust weight and asthma and wheeze. Results Dust weight samples were available for 829 households, and survey information was available for 2,456 participants (children and adults). Lower income, older homes, household pets, having a smoker in the house, and less frequent cleaning predicted higher dust weight levels in U.S. households. Higher levels of dust weight were associated with greater odds of current asthma and wheeze. The strongest associations were seen for wheeze [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.213.28 for bedroom bed dust; OR = 2.81; 95% CI, 1.525.21 for upholstery dust). These associations persisted when adjusting for allergen and endotoxin exposures. Conclusions Dust weight, an index of total dust exposure in the home, may contribute to respiratory outcomes independently of the exposure to specific components. PMID:17384767

  8. Lead in Chinese villager house dust: Geographical variation and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan; Yang, Wenlin

    2015-12-01

    House dust has been recognized as an important contributor to Pb exposure of children. Here we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate geographical variation of Pb in Chinese villager house dust. The influences of outdoor soil Pb concentrations, dates of construction, house decoration materials, heating types, and site specific pollution on Pb concentrations in house dust were evaluated. The concentrations of Pb in 477 house dust samples collected from twenty eight areas throughout China varied from 12 to 2510mg/kg, with a median concentration of 42mg/kg. The median Pb concentrations in different geographical areas ranged from 16 (Zhangjiakou, Hebei) to 195mg/kg (Loudi, Hunan). No correlations were found between the house dust Pb concentrations and the age of houses, as well as house decoration materials. Whereas outdoor soil, coal combustion, and site specific pollution may be potential Pb sources. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed that elemental compositions of the house dust were controlled by both anthropogenic and geogenic sources. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the Pb bearing particles in the house dust were also studied. PMID:26381088

  9. Selecting a lead hazard control strategy based on dust lead loading and housing condition: I. Methods and results.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry; Wilson, Jonathan; Kawecki, Carol; Green, Rodney; Phoenix, Janet; Galke, Warren; Clark, Scott; Breysse, Jill

    2008-08-01

    A methodology was developed to classify housing conditions and interior dust lead loadings, using them to predict the relative effectiveness of different lead-based paint hazard control interventions. A companion article in this issue describes how the methodology can be applied. Data from the National Evaluation of the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant Program, which covered more than 2800 homes in 11 U.S. states, were used. Half these homes (1417) met the study's inclusion criteria. Interior interventions ranged from professional cleaning with spot painting to lead abatement on windows, and enclosure, encapsulation, or removal of other leaded building components. Modeling was used to develop a visual Housing Assessment Tool (HAT), which was then used to predict relative intervention effectiveness for a range of intervention intensities and baseline floor and windowsill dust lead loadings in occupied dwellings. More than 117,000 potential HATs were considered. To be deemed successful, potential HATs were required to meet these criteria: (1) the effect of interior strategy had to differ for HAT ratings of good vs. poor building condition and/or baseline dust lead loadings; (2) the HAT rating had to be a predictor of one year post-intervention loadings; (3) interior intervention strategy had to be a predictor of one-year loadings; (4) higher baseline loadings could not be associated with lower one-year loadings; and (5) neither exterior work nor site/soil work could result in higher predicted one-year loadings for either HAT rating. Of the 1299 HATs that met these criteria, one was selected because it had the most significant differences between strategy intensities when floors and sills were considered together. For the selected HAT, site/soil work was a predictor of one-year loadings for floors (p = 0.009) but not for sills (p = 0.424). Hazard control work on the building exterior was a predictor of both sill and floor one-year loadings (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). Regardless of the type of interior intervention strategy, interior work was a predictor of both floor and sill one-year loadings (each p < or = 0.001). PMID:18569520

  10. House dust as possible route of environmental exposure to cadmium and lead in the adult general population.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, Janneke; Plusquin, Michelle; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Nawrot, Tim; Cuypers, Ann; Van Hecke, Etienne; Roels, Harry A; Carleer, Robert; Staessen, Jan A

    2007-01-01

    Contaminated soil particles and food are established routes of exposure. We investigated the relations between biomarkers of exposure to cadmium and lead, and the metal loading rates in house dust in the adult residents of an area with a soil cadmium concentration of > or = 3 mg/kg (n=268) and a reference area (n=205). We determined the metal concentrations in house dust allowed to settle for 3 months in Petri dishes placed in the participants' bedrooms. The continuously distributed vegetable index was the first principal component derived from the metal concentrations in six different vegetables. The biomarkers of exposure (blood cadmium 9.2 vs. 6.2 nmol/L; 24-h urinary cadmium 10.5 vs. 7.0 nmol; blood lead 0.31 vs. 0.24 micromol/L), the loading rates of cadmium and lead in house dust (0.29 vs. 0.12 and 7.52 vs. 3.62 ng/cm(2)/92 days), and the vegetable indexes (0.31 vs. -0.44 and 0.13 vs. -0.29 standardized units) were significantly higher in the contaminated area. A two-fold increase in the metal loading rate in house dust was associated with increases (P<0.001) in blood cadmium (+2.3%), 24-h urinary cadmium (+3.0%), and blood lead (+2.0%), independent of the vegetable index and other covariates. The estimated effect sizes on the biomarkers of internal exposure were three times greater for house dust than vegetables. In conclusion, in the adult population, house dust is potentially an important route of exposure to heavy metals in areas with contaminated soils, and should be incorporated in the assessment of health risks. PMID:16843453

  11. House dust as possible route of environmental exposure to cadmium and lead in the adult general population

    SciTech Connect

    Hogervorst, Janneke; Plusquin, Michelle; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Nawrot, Tim; Cuypers, Ann; Van Hecke, Etienne; Roels, Harry A.; Carleer, Robert; Staessen, Jan A. . E-mail: jan.staessen@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-01-15

    Contaminated soil particles and food are established routes of exposure. We investigated the relations between biomarkers of exposure to cadmium and lead, and the metal loading rates in house dust in the adult residents of an area with a soil cadmium concentration of >=3mg/kg (n=268) and a reference area (n=205). We determined the metal concentrations in house dust allowed to settle for 3 months in Petri dishes placed in the participants' bedrooms. The continuously distributed vegetable index was the first principal component derived from the metal concentrations in six different vegetables. The biomarkers of exposure (blood cadmium 9.2 vs. 6.2nmol/L; 24-h urinary cadmium 10.5 vs. 7.0nmol; blood lead 0.31 vs. 0.24{mu}mol/L), the loading rates of cadmium and lead in house dust (0.29 vs. 0.12 and 7.52 vs. 3.62ng/cm{sup 2}/92 days), and the vegetable indexes (0.31 vs. -0.44 and 0.13 vs. -0.29 standardized units) were significantly higher in the contaminated area. A two-fold increase in the metal loading rate in house dust was associated with increases (P<0.001) in blood cadmium (+2.3%), 24-h urinary cadmium (+3.0%), and blood lead (+2.0%), independent of the vegetable index and other covariates. The estimated effect sizes on the biomarkers of internal exposure were three times greater for house dust than vegetables. In conclusion, in the adult population, house dust is potentially an important route of exposure to heavy metals in areas with contaminated soils, and should be incorporated in the assessment of health risks.

  12. Lead Speciation in Indoor Dust: A Case Study to Assess Old Paint Contribution in a Canadian Urban House

    SciTech Connect

    S Beauchemin; L MacLean; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {mu}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  13. Lead speciation in indoor dust: a case study to assess old paint contribution in a Canadian urban house

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; MacLean, Lachlan C.W.; Rasmussen, Pat E.

    2012-10-23

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 {micro}m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {micro}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  14. Garden soil and house dust as exposure media for lead uptake in the mining village of Stratoni, Greece.

    PubMed

    Argyraki, Ariadne

    2014-08-01

    The relationships between two exposure media, garden soil and house dust, were studied for Pb uptake in Stratoni village in northern Greece, an industrial area of mining and processing of sulphide ore. Lead data for the two media were assessed in terms of total and bioaccessible content, measurement and geochemical variability, and mineralogical composition. It was found that total Pb was enriched in house dust samples by a factor of 2 on average. Total Pb concentration in soil samples had a maximum of 2,040 mg/kg and reached a maximum of 7,000 mg/kg in house dust samples. The estimated variability due to measurement uncertainty was dominated by the sampling process, and the proportion of sampling variance was greater for soil samples, indicating a higher degree of Pb heterogeneity in soil on the given spatial scale of sampling strata. Although the same general spatial trend was observed for both sampling media with decreasing Pb concentration by increasing distance from the ore-processing plant, Pb in dust samples displayed the highest concentrations within a 300-600-m zone from the ore-processing facility. The significant differences which were observed in Pb speciation between the studied media were explained by differences in mineralogical composition of outdoor soil and indoor dust. Lead-enriched Fe and Mn oxides predominated in soil samples while fine galena grains (<10-20 ?m diameter) were the major Pb-bearing phase in dust samples. The integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model was used to predict the risk of elevated blood lead levels in children of Stratoni. Model prediction indicated an average probability of 61 % for blood-Pb to exceed 10 ?g/dl. The results underline the importance of house dust in risk assessment and highlight the effect of outdoor and indoor conditions on the fate of Pb in the particular environment of Stratoni. PMID:24292695

  15. The association of lead-contaminated house dust and blood lead levels of children living on a former landfill in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Nazario, Elia Enid; Mansilla-Rivera, Imar; Derieux-Corts, Jean-Claude; Prez, Cynthia M; Rodrguez-Sierra, Carlos J

    2003-06-01

    Exposure to lead in children living on a former landfill in Vega Baja-Puerto Rico, a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) designated Superfund Site, is a major health concern. Direct contact with lead-contaminated soil is considered a major exposure source. However, there is a lack of information regarding the contribution of lead-contaminated house dust to children's blood lead concentrations. This study evaluated the relationship between lead contaminated-house dust and children's blood lead levels. Blood from 42 children, aged 6 years old or less, and dust from 29 houses were analyzed for lead, and face-to-face interviews were performed to gather information on potential risk factors for high blood lead levels. Blood lead levels ranged from 0.97 to 7.79 micrograms/dL. Lead values for floors fluctuated from 0.12 to 98.30 micrograms/ft2, with 17% of houses surpassing the USEPA standard of 40 micrograms/ft2. Multiple regression analysis showed that lead in window sills, toy chewing and soil eating habits were significant predictors of blood lead levels. Further investigations aimed at assessing the long-term effects of constant exposure to environmental lead in these children are warranted. PMID:12866140

  16. Chemical speciation and bioaccessibility of lead in surface soil and house dust, Lavrion urban area, Attiki, Hellas.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, Alecos; Li, Xiangdong; Ramsey, Michael H; Thornton, Iain

    2010-12-01

    In the Lavrion urban area study, Hellas, a five-step sequential extraction method was applied on samples of 'soil' (n=224), affected by long-term mining and metallurgical activities, and house dust (n=127), for the purpose of studying the potential bioaccessibility of lead and other metals to humans. In this paper, the Pb concentrations in soil and house dust samples are discussed, together with those in rocks and children's blood. Lead is mainly associated with the carbonate, Fe-Mn oxides and residual fractions in soil and house dust. Considering the very low pH of gastric fluids (1-3), a high amount of metals, present in soil (810-152,000mg/kg Pb) and house dust (418-18,600mg/kgPb), could be potentially bioaccessible. Consequently, children in the neighbourhoods with a large amount of metallurgical processing wastes have high blood-Pb concentrations (5.98-60.49?g/100ml; median 17.83?g/100ml; n=235). It is concluded that the Lavrion urban and sub-urban environment is extremely hazardous to human health, and the Hellenic State authorities should urgently tackle this health-related hazard in order to improve the living conditions of local residents. PMID:20524052

  17. Factors affecting lead, cadmium, and arsenic levels in house dust in a smelter town in eastern Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, I.; Heinrich, J. . Inst. fuer Epidemiologie); Lippold, U. )

    1999-07-01

    Hettstedt, a city in eastern Germany with a long history of mining and smelting of nonferrous ores, has several industrial sources of heavy metals. The indoor exposure to metals of children (5 to 14 years old) in the Hettstedt area was assessed by measuring the levels of lead, cadmium, and arsenic contamination in sedimented house dust. Factors which influence the dust loading rate and the surface loading rates of these contaminants in house dust were investigated. The geometric mean of the dust loading rate was 8.9 mg/m[sup 2] day. The geometric means of surface loading rates were 1.14, 0.024, and 0.023 [micro]g/m[sup 2] day for lead, cadmium, and arsenic, respectively. Factors that were significantly associated with surface loading rates included the city area of residence, automobile traffic near home, parent with occupational exposure to heavy metals, type of heating, housing characteristics, whether child's home is damp, number of persons living in the child's home,and parents' education. The most significant of these factors was the city area of residence, which reflects the distance from the metal sources; this factor accounted for about half of the variances explained by the regression models.

  18. Lead Speciation in House Dust from Canadian Urban Homes Using EXAFS Micro-XRF and Micro-XRD

    SciTech Connect

    L MacLean; S Beauchemin; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF), and micro-X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD) were used to determine the speciation of Pb in house dust samples from four Canadian urban homes having elevated Pb concentrations (>1000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}). Linear combination fitting of the XAFS data, supported by {mu}XRF and {mu}XRD, shows that Pb is complexed in a variety of molecular environments, associated with both the inorganic and organic fractions of the dust samples. The inorganic species of lead identified were as follows: Pb metal, Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb oxide, and Pb adsorbed to iron oxyhydroxides. Pb carbonate and/or Pb hydroxyl carbonate occurred in all four dust samples and accounted for 28 to 75% of total Pb. Pb citrate and Pb bound to humate were the organic species identified. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of XAFS to identify Pb speciation in house dust and show the potential to identify Pb sources from new homes versus older homes. Understanding Pb speciation and how it influences bioaccessibility is important for human health risk assessment and risk management decisions which aim to improve indoor environmental health.

  19. Selecting a lead hazard control strategy based on dust lead loading and housing condition: II. Application of Housing Assessment Tool (HAT) modeling results.

    PubMed

    Breysse, Jill; Dixon, Sherry; Wilson, Jonathan; Kawecki, Carol; Green, Rodney; Phoenix, Janet; Galke, Warren; Clark, Scott

    2008-08-01

    In Part I in this issue, modeling was used to identify a Housing Assessment Tool (HAT) that can be used to predict relative intervention effectiveness for a range of intervention intensities and baseline dust lead loadings in occupied dwellings. The HAT predicts one year post-intervention floor and windowsill loadings and the probability that these loadings will exceed current federal lead hazard standards. This article illustrates the field application of the HAT, helping practitioners determine the minimum intervention intensity needed to reach "acceptable" one year post-intervention levels, with acceptability defined based on specific project needs, local needs, regulations, and resource constraints. The HAT is used to classify a dwelling's baseline condition as good or poor. If the average number of interior non-intact painted surfaces per room is >/=2, then the dwelling is rated as poor. If exterior windows/doors are deteriorated and the average number of exterior non-intact painted surfaces per building side is >/=5, then the dwelling is rated as poor. If neither of these conditions is true, then the dwelling's HAT rating is good. The HAT rating is then combined with baseline average floor loading to help select the treatment intensity. For example, if the baseline floor loading is 100 mug/ft(2) (1,075 mug/m(2) and the HAT rating is poor, the probability that the one-year floor loading exceeds the federal standard of 40 mug/ft(2) (430 mug/m(2) is 27% for a high-intensity strategy (i.e., window lead abatement with other treatments) but is 54% for a lower-intensity strategy (i.e., cleaning and spot painting). If the HAT rating is good, the probability that the one-year floor loading exceeds 40 mug/ft(2) is approximately the same for low- and high-intensity strategies (18% for window lead abatement with other treatments compared with 16% for cleaning and spot painting). Lead hazard control practitioners can use this information to make empirically based judgments about the treatment intensity needed to ensure that one year post-intervention loadings remain below federal standards. PMID:18569521

  20. Lead in household dust.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H

    1992-04-01

    The lead content of 55 samples of dust collected from vacuum cleaner bags from various parts of Denmark has been determined. The concentrations found ranged from 1.5-48.9 ppm lead in the dry dust, the geometric mean being 9 ppm which is comparable to the mean concentration of lead in Danish arable soil. No correlation was found between traffic density and concentration of lead in the dusts. PMID:1594917

  1. Exposure of U.S. Children to Residential Dust Lead, 1999–2004: I. Housing and Demographic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gaitens, Joanna M.; Dixon, Sherry L.; Jacobs, David E.; Nagaraja, Jyothi; Strauss, Warren; Wilson, Jonathan W.; Ashley, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lead-contaminated house dust is a major source of lead exposure for children in the United States. In 1999–2004, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected dust lead (PbD) loading samples from the homes of children 12–60 months of age. Objectives In this study we aimed to compare national PbD levels with existing health-based standards and to identify housing and demographic factors associated with floor and windowsill PbD. Methods We used NHANES PbD data (n = 2,065 from floors and n = 1,618 from windowsills) and covariates to construct linear and logistic regression models. Results The population-weighted geometric mean floor and windowsill PbD were 0.5 μg/ft2 [geometric standard error (GSE) = 1.0] and 7.6 μg/ft2 (GSE = 1.0), respectively. Only 0.16% of the floors and 4.0% of the sills had PbD at or above current federal standards of 40 and 250 μg/ft2, respectively. Income, race/ethnicity, floor surface/condition, windowsill PbD, year of construction, recent renovation, smoking, and survey year were significant predictors of floor PbD [the proportion of variability in the dependent variable accounted for by the model (R2) = 35%]. A similar set of predictors plus the presence of large areas of exterior deteriorated paint in pre-1950 homes and the presence of interior deteriorated paint explained 20% of the variability in sill PbD. A companion article [Dixon et al. Environ Health Perspect 117:468–474 (2009)] describes the relationship between children’s blood lead and PbD. Conclusion Most houses with children have PbD levels that comply with federal standards but may put children at risk. Factors associated with PbD in our population-based models are primarily the same as factors identified in smaller at-risk cohorts. PbD on floors and windowsills should be kept as low as possible to protect children. PMID:19337523

  2. Polyfluoroalkyl chemicals in house dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kayoko; Calafat, Antonia M.; Needham, Larry L.

    2009-07-15

    We developed a high throughput analytical method using on-line solid phase extraction coupled with isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (on-line SPE-HPLC-MS/MS) to simultaneously determine the concentrations of 17 polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFCs) in house dust. The sample preparation includes dispersion of the dust samples in 0.1 M formic acid:MeOH (1:1), followed by agitation and filtration, addition of the isotope-labeled internal standard solution to the filtrate, and analysis by on-line SPE-HPLC-MS/MS. The limits of quantitation were <4.0 ng/g. The method accuracies ranged between 73.2% and 100.2% for the different analytes at two spike levels. We confirmed the validity of the method by analyzing 39 household dust samples collected in 2004. Of the 17 PFCs measured, 6 of them-perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBuS), N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamide, 2-(N-ethyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) acetic acid (Et-PFOSA-AcOH), 2-(N-methyl-perfluorooctane sulfonamido) ethanol (Me-PFOSA-EtOH), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)-had detection frequencies >70%. We detected PFOS, PFBuS, and PFHxS at the highest median concentration, followed by Et-PFOSA-AcOH and Me-PFOSA-EtOH.

  3. An investigation into porch dust lead levels.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan; Dixon, Sherry L; Jacobs, David E; Akoto, Judith; Korfmacher, Katrina S; Breysse, Jill

    2015-02-01

    Lead in porch dust can expose children through direct contact or track-in to the home, but has not been adequately evaluated. At homes undergoing lead hazard control in Rochester, NY, we sampled settled dust lead on exterior porch floors at baseline, immediately post-lead hazard control and one-year post-work (n=79 homes with complete data) via wipe sampling and collected housing, neighborhood and soil data. Baseline GM porch floor dust lead loading (PbPD) was 68 g/ft(2), almost four times more than baseline GM interior floor dust lead (18 g/ft(2)). Immediate post-work PbPD declined 55% after porch floor replacement and 53% after porch floor paint stabilization (p=0.009 and p=0.041, respectively). When no porch floor work was conducted but lead hazard control was conducted elsewhere, immediate post-work PbPD increased 97% (p=0.008). At one-year, GM PbPD continued to decline for porch replacement (77% below baseline) and paint stabilization (72% below baseline), but where no porch floor work was done, GM PbPD was not significantly different than baseline (p<0.001, p=0.028 and p=0.504, respectively). Modeling determined that porch floor replacement had significantly lower one-year PbPD than stabilization when baseline PbPD levels were higher than 148 g/ft(2) (the 77th percentile) but not at lower levels. Treatment of porches with lead paint results in substantial declines in PbPD levels. It is of concern that PbPD levels increased significantly at immediate post-work when lead hazard control was not conducted on the porch but was conducted elsewhere. Standards for porch lead dust should be adopted to protect children from inadequate clean-up after lead hazard control. PMID:25531817

  4. Lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil and house dust in the communities surrounding the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Timothy W; Lane, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated lead, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in the residential communities adjacent to the Sydney, Nova Scotia, tar ponds, the area considered Canada's worst contaminated site. The tar pond remediation policy has been limited to the site and some residential properties. We compared background concentrations in 91 soil samples taken 5-20 km from the coke oven site with those in soil samples from the three communities surrounding the tar ponds: Whitney Pier, Ashby, and North End. These surrounding communities were statistically different from background regarding arsenic, lead, and PAHs. Twenty percent of the background soil samples and 95% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian health-risk-based soil guidelines for arsenic (12 ppm), and 5% of the background samples and 80% of the tar pond soil samples were above the Canadian guidelines for lead (140 ppm). Regarding dust lead and arsenic loading, the results provide no evidence that Whitney Pier is significantly different than Ashby and North End. Children in these communities are predicted to have a 1-15% chance of blood lead > 10 microg/dL. The results suggest that lead and arsenic found in the homes originate outside. The lead content of paint in the homes was not evaluated, but consideration of painted wood at the doorway did not confound the results of the study. The results indicate that the residential environment has been adversely affected by PAHs, lead, and arsenic and should be considered for remediation. PMID:14698928

  5. The relationship between surface dust lead loadings on carpets and the blood lead of young children.

    PubMed

    Clark, S; Bornschein, R L; Pan, W; Menrath, W; Roda, S; Grote, J

    1996-12-01

    The final clean-up of residential lead abatement projects in federally-supported housing, as well as in other housing in a number of states, must meet surface dust lead clearance levels expressed as ?g of lead per square foot. These clearance levels were established because hand-to-mouth ingestion of lead-contaminated dust is recognised as a major pathway through which many children are exposed. A dilemma exists because many floors in housing undergoing abatement are carpeted and the established clearance levels are generally not recommended for use on carpets. These clearance levels are also used as 'action levels' to determine whether exposure reduction activities are needed. The US Environmental Protection Agency is currently in the process of issuing standards for hazardous levels of lead in interior dust and bare soil under Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992, 'The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992'. An effort to develop a potential surface dust lead clearance level for carpets was made using an existing vacuum dust collection method that has previously been shown to be a reliable indicator of childhood lead exposure. This method was designed for use on carpeted and non-carpeted surfaces. Using data from the Cincinnati Soil Lead Abatement Demonstration Project, the suggested floor-dust lead level where an estimated 95% of the population of children would be expected to have blood lead values below the national goal of 10 ?g dL(-1), was more than an order of magnitude lower than the current floor-dust lead clearance level of 1080 ?g m(-2) (100 ?g ft(-2)). Further comparisons of blood lead and carpet lead levels in other parts of the country should be performed before a risk-based lead loading clearance level is established. PMID:24194409

  6. Lead loadings in household dust in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Scott Clark, C

    2009-10-01

    Lead in household dust is dangerous to children who ingest lead from playing close to the ground, and having frequent hand-to-mouth contact. Although there have been several investigations of lead levels in India in air, blood and new paint, the literature is sparse on the levels of lead in household dust. This study analyzed 99 samples of dust taken from bare floors and 49 samples of dust taken from windowsills in a cross-section of Delhi, India houses for lead loadings. The arithmetic mean of lead loading for floor samples and windowsill dust samples was found to be 36.24 microg/ft(2) and 129.5 microg/ft(2), respectively. The geometric mean of dust lead loading for floor and interior windowsill samples was found to be 19.7 microg/ft(2) and 75.5 microg/ft(2), respectively. Comparing the results with US geometric mean dust lead levels from a national cross-section of US housing, which in 2000 were 1.1 microg/ft(2) and 9.4 microg/ft(2) on floors and windowsills, respectively as reported by Jacobs et al. (2002) suggests that the lead content of the dust in Delhi homes is much higher than that in the national data in the US and that the levels pose a hazard to children. Practical Implications The present study is first of its kind in this part of the world. In the context of ongoing efforts to eliminate lead from paints worldwide this research will help the scientists and policy makers in assessing the Children's exposure to lead in developing country as well. Since more than one half of the housing units tested had at least one dust lead sample exceeding US health-based standards, health care providers and public health officials need to give attention to possible lead poisoning in Delhi children. Routine blood lead screening of children should follow recommended public health practice for children at risk. Additional larger-scale studies are needed in Delhi and elsewhere to determine how representative these findings are and to attempt to delineate the sources of the high dust lead which are expected to vary depending on the location. Knowledge of the sources is needed to appropriately allocate resources. From other studies performed in India it is likely that lead-based paint is one of the sources and its continued use should be discontinued. PMID:19659889

  7. New information on lead in dirt and dust as related to the childhood lead problem.

    PubMed

    Haar, G T; Aronow, R

    1974-05-01

    It has been known for many years that the eating of leaded paint is the prime cause of lead poisoning and elevated blood leads of children living in deteriorated housing. Recently, there has been speculation that children may eat dirt and dust contaminated with lead exhausted from cars and that this amount of ingested lead is sufficient to contribute significantly to the childhood lead problem. This paper reports on a twopart study conducted to evaluate the validity of the dirt-and-dust hypotheses. The first part of the study was made to determine the source of lead in dirt to which children are normally exposed. Dirt samples were taken in old urban areas around 18 painted frame houses and 18 houses of brick construction. Samples also were taken around seven old frame farmhouses remote from traffic. Based on the fact that lead concentrations in the dirt were similar in city and rural yards at corresponding distances from the houses, it is clear that nearly all of the lead in dirt around these houses is due to paint from the houses. Lead antiknock additives are therefore not a significant contributor to the lead content of dirt around houses where children usually play. The second part of the study used a naturally occurring radioactive tracer (210)Pb to determine the relative amounts of dust and other lead-containing materials (e.g., paint) eaten by young children. This tracer is present in very low concentrations in paint and in significantly higher concentrations in fallout dust. Stable lead and (210)Pb were analyzed in fecal material from eight children suspected of having elevated body burdens of lead and ten children living in good housing where lead poisoning is not a problem. The normal children averaged 4 mug Pb/g dry feces, with a range of 2 to 7. Of the eight children suspected of having elevated lead body burdens, two had fecal lead values within the normal range. However, the remaining six were 4 to 400 times as high. Despite these differences in fecal lead between the two groups, the groups were essentially identified in the (210)Pb content of their feces. The "elevated" children averaged 0.040 pCi of (210)Pb dry feces, while the normal group averaged 0.044 pCi/g. The results provide sound evidence that these children suspected of elevated lead body burden were not ingesting dust or air-suspended particulate. PMID:4831152

  8. Streptomycetes in house dust: associations with housing characteristics and endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Elisabet; Vesper, Stephen; Levin, Linda; LeMasters, Grace; Grinshpun, Sergey; Reponen, Tiina

    2011-01-01

    In addition to mold, indoor bioaerosols also contain bacterial components that may have implications for human health. Endotoxin is a cell wall component in Gram-negative bacteria present at varying levels indoors that has been found to have respiratory health implications. Streptomyces is a large genus of Gram-positive bacteria, and some species have been shown to produce inflammatory reactions in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of streptomycetes levels in house dust, and to compare the variation in streptomycetes levels with that in endotoxin levels. Dust was collected by floor vacuuming from 178 homes in the Cincinnati metropolitan area. streptomycetes levels were measured by quantitative PCR and endotoxin was assayed by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method. Associations between home characteristics and bacterial contaminants, expressed as concentration and load, were investigated through multiple regression analyses. The presence of two or more dogs was a strong predictor of both streptomycetes and endotoxin levels. Season of dust collection and levels of outdoor molds were predictors of streptomycetes but not endotoxin levels. In contrast, number of inhabitants was a significant predictor of endotoxin load only. Neither streptomycetes nor endotoxin levels were associated with metrics of moisture damage. PMID:21204988

  9. Chemical speciation of lead dust associated with primary lead smelting.

    PubMed Central

    Spear, T M; Svee, W; Vincent, J H; Stanisich, N

    1998-01-01

    The research presented in this article assessed geochemical factors relating to dust produced during primary lead smelting. Bulk dust samples and size-selective airborne dust samples were collected from four areas of a primary lead smelter and analyzed by X-ray diffraction and sequential chemical extraction. X-ray diffraction showed that the smelter dusts were composed primarily of sulfides, oxides, sulfates, and silicates of metal ores, with galena being the primary dust component. Sequential extraction revealed the solubility of lead compounds at less than 7% in the exchangeable and mildly acidic steps for the bulk dusts collected from four smelter areas. The later steps of the extraction procedure were more effective in dissolving the lead compounds associated with the bulk dust samples, with 43%, 26%, and 8% of the total lead, in the ore storage, sinter, and blast/dross smelter areas, respectively, being extracted in the residual step. Sequential extraction of coarse airborne dust samples from the ore storage and sinter plant showed that 1.2% and 4.1% of the total lead, respectively, was exchangeable. The finer particle size fractions from these areas of the smelter showed higher percentages of exchangeable lead. Of the course airborne dust from the blast/dross furnace processes, 65% of the total lead was exchangeable. However, the largest percentage of lead from these areas was associated with the finer particle-size fractions. If lead bioavailability is related to its solubility as determined through sequential extraction, the health hazards associated with lead exposure may be appreciably enhanced in the blast and dross furnace processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9721256

  10. PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS IN ARCHIVED HOUSE-DUST SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Archived house-dust samples were analyzed for 13 perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). Results show that PFCs are found in house-dust samples, and the data are log-normally distributed. PFOS/PFOA were present in 94.6% and 96.4% of the samples respectively. Concentrations ranged fro...

  11. House dust mite allergy: environment evaluation and disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sheng-Jie; Liao, En-Chih

    2014-01-01

    There are two groups of dust mites, house dust mites (HDMs) and storage mites (SMs), that have been identified in the household environment. Both could induce airway inflammation through activation of innate and adaptive immunity and lead to asthma. In order to monitor environmental dust mite infestation, different methods can be used to detect their presence, such as the use of floating methods, monoclonal antibodies, and nanostructured biosensor. SM could be identified in the storage room, mainly in contaminated food such as mushrooms and corn starch. In HDM-sensitive subjects and mice that were challenged with HDM or SM after sensitization, these mites could up-regulate IgE levels, T helper 2 associated cytokine production and airway hypersensitivity. Different age groups of subjects were sensitized by different species of mites. More subjects above 70 years were sensitized by SM and more subjects below the age of 40 years were sensitized to HDM. Different allergenic components of dust mite extracts, such as Der p 1, Der p 2, could activate innate immunity through activating pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and then lead to allergic inflammation. The best modality to treat HDM allergy is immunomodulation through Treg cells and IgA production. In the recent years, many studies indicated probiotics could increase IgA secretion and the number of Treg cells. However, some studies conducted in adults have contradictory effects in reducing allergic symptoms. Therefore, probiotics confer inconclusive benefits on the allergic symptoms. PMID:25379484

  12. Dust levels and control methods in poultry houses.

    PubMed

    Ellen, H H; Bottcher, R W; von Wachenfelt, E; Takai, H

    2000-11-01

    This article summarizes information from the papers and posters presented at the international symposium on "Dust Control in Animal Production Facilities", held in Aarhus (Denmark) on 30 May-2 June 1999. Dust concentrations in poultry houses vary from 0.02 to 81.33 mg/m3 for inhalable dust and from 0.01 to 6.5 mg/m3 for respirable dust. Houses with caged laying hens showed the lowest dust concentrations, i.e., less than 2 mg/m3, while the dust concentrations in the other housing systems, e.g., perchery and aviary systems, were often four to five times higher. Other factors affecting the dust concentrations are animal category, animal activity, bedding materials and season. The most important sources of dust seem to be the animals and their excrements. Further studies on the effects of housing systems on dust sources and their compounds are desired for development of a healthier working environment in poultry production facilities. Adjustment of the relative humidity (RH) of the air in a broiler house to 75% will have an effect on inhalable dust, but not on respirable dust. A slight immediate effect on the respirable dust was observed after fogging with pure water or water with rapeseed oil. In an aviary system, a 50 to 65% reduction of the inhalable dust concentration was found after spraying water with 10% of oil and pure water, respectively. To obtain a higher dust reducing efficiency, improvement of techniques for application of droplets onto dust sources will be desired. PMID:11217692

  13. Screening housing to prevent lead toxicity in children.

    PubMed Central

    Lanphear, Bruce P.; Hornung, Richard; Ho, Mona

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Screening children to identify those with blood lead levels > or = 10 microg/dl fails to protect children from lead-associated cognitive deficits and behavioral problems. To broaden our efforts at primary prevention, screening criteria are needed to identify lead-contaminated housing before children are unduly exposed. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate housing characteristics associated with children having elevated blood lead levels (> or = 10 microg/dl). METHODS: Two existing studies were used to examine housing characteristics linked with undue lead exposure: a cross-sectional study of 205 children aged 12 to 31 months, and a random sample from a longitudinal study of 276 children followed from 6 to 24 months of age. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the association of children's blood lead levels > or = 10 microg/dl. RESULTS: The mean age of the 481 children was 17.8 months; 99 (20.6%) had a blood lead concentration of 10 microg/dl or higher. The following characteristics were associated with blood lead concentration > or = 10 microg/dl: floor lead loading > 15 microg/ft2 (odds ratio [OR]=2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3, 3.8); rental housing (OR=3.2; 95% CI 1.3, 7.6); poor housing condition (OR=2.1; CI 1.2, 3.6); African American race (OR=3.3; CI 1.9, 6.1); paint chip ingestion (OR=5.8; CI 1.3, 26.5); and soil ingestion (OR=2.2; CI 1.1, 4.2). Housing characteristics including rental status, lead-contaminated floor dust, and housing condition had a range of sensitivity from 47% to 92%; specificity from 28% to 76%; a positive predictive value from 25% to 34%; and a negative predictive value of 85% to 93%. CONCLUSIONS: Housing characteristics and floor dust lead levels can be used to screen housing to identify lead hazards prior to occupancy, before purchasing a home, or after renovation to prevent children's exposure to lead hazards. PMID:16134573

  14. POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HOUSE DUST AND CLOTHES DRYER LINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are now considered ubiquitous and persistent pollutants. Few studies have examined the concentrations of these chemicals in the home and here we report measurements of PBDEs in house dust samples collected from the Washington...

  15. House dust in seven Danish offices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølhave, L.; Schneider, T.; Kjærgaard, S. K.; Larsen, L.; Norn, S.; Jørgensen, O.

    Floor dust from Danish offices was collected and analyzed. The dust was to be used in an exposure experiment. The dust was analyzed to show the composition of the dust which can be a source of airborne dust indoors. About 11 kg of dust from vacuum cleaner bags from seven Danish office buildings with about 1047 occupants (12 751 m 2) was processed according to a standardized procedure yielding 5.5 kg of processed bulk dust. The bulk dust contained 130.000-160.000 CFU g -1 microorganisms and 71.000-90.000 CFU g -1 microfungi. The content of culturable microfungi was 65-123 CFU 30 g -1 dust. The content of endotoxins ranged from 5.06-7.24 EU g -1 (1.45 ng g -1 to 1.01 ng g -1). Allergens (ng g -1) were from 147-159 (Mite), 395-746 (dog) and 103-330 (cat). The macro molecular organic compounds (the MOD-content) varied from 7.8-9.8 mg g -1. The threshold of release of histamine from basophil leukocytes provoked by the bulk dust was between 0.3 and 1.0 mg ml -1. The water content was 2% (WGT) and the organic fraction 33%. 6.5-5.9% (dry) was water soluble. The fiber content was less than 0.2-1.5% (WGT) and the desorbable VOCs was 176-319 μg g -1. Most of the VOC were aldehydes. However, softeners for plastic (DBP and DEHP) were present. The chemical composition includes human and animal skin fragments, paper fibers, glass wool, wood and textilefibers and inorganic and metal particles. The sizes ranged from 0.001-1 mm and the average specific density was 1.0 g m -3. The bulk dust was resuspended and injected into an exposure chamber. The airborne dust was sampled and analyzed to illustrate the exposures that can result from sedimented dirt and dust. The airborne dust resulting from the bulk dust reached concentrations ranging from 0.26-0.75 mg m -3 in average contained 300-170 CFU m -3. The organic fraction was from 55-70% and the water content about 2.5% (WGT). The content of the dust was compared to the similar results reported in the literature and its toxic potency is estimated to be relatively low. The storage of the bulk dust during the experiment had little effect on the specific biological and chemical composition.

  16. Influence of social and environmental factors on dust, lead, hand lead, and blood lead levels in young children

    SciTech Connect

    Bornschein, R.L.; Succop, P.; Dietrich, K.N.; Clark, C.S.; Que Hee, S.; Hammond, P.B.

    1985-10-01

    The roles of environmental and behavioral factors in determining blood lead levels were studied in a cohort of young children living in an urban environment. The subjects were observed at 3-month intervals from birth to 24 months of age. Repeated measurements were made of the children's blood lead levels, environmental levels of lead in house dust, and in the dust found on the children's hands. A qualitative rating of the residence and of the socioeconomic status of the family was obtained. Interviews and direct observation of parent and child at home were used to evaluate various aspects of caretaker-child interactions. Data analysis consisted of a comparison of results obtained by (a) simple correlational analysis, (b) multiple regression analysis, and (c) structural equations analysis. The results demonstrated that structural equation modeling offers a useful approach to unraveling the complex interactions present in the data set. In this preliminary analysis, the suspected relationship between the levels of lead in house dust and on hands and the blood lead level was clearly demonstrated. Furthermore, the analyses indicated an important interplay between environmental sources and social factors in the determination of hand lead and blood lead levels in very young children.

  17. The influence of common area lead hazards and lead hazard control on dust lead loadings in multiunit buildings.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry L; Wilson, Jonathan W; Clark, C Scott; Galke, Warren A; Succop, Paul A; Chen, Mei

    2005-12-01

    Owners of multiunit buildings built before 1978 that have interior common areas, and who receive certain forms of federal assistance are generally required to address lead-based paint hazards in those common areas. This study examines the relationships between common area paint and dust lead levels and the floor dust lead loadings in associated dwelling units, as well as the effects of lead hazard control treatments in common areas. This article presents data from common areas in 145 low-income, mostly pre-1940, multiunit buildings with 342 associated dwellings in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Lead Hazard Control Grant Program at preintervention, clearance, and 1-year postintervention. Interior common areas in these multiunit buildings were not as well maintained as the dwellings in the buildings. At preintervention, a higher percent of the interior common areas had non-intact, lead-based paint on windows, doors and trim, and other interior components than in associated dwellings (95% versus 85%; 78% versus 67%; and 85% versus 62%). Common areas had preintervention entry and interior (i.e., nonentry) floor dust lead loadings more than four times higher than in dwelling units (128 versus 30 micro g/ft(2); 130 versus 28 micro g/ft(2)) while 1-year postintervention common area dust lead loadings are four to six times that of dwelling dust lead loadings (41 versus 11 micro g/ft(2); 44 versus 8 micro g/ft(2)). Windowsill dust lead loadings in common areas were twice the loadings in dwelling units at preintervention and 1-year postintervention (756 versus 383 mu g/ft(2); 154 versus 68 micro g/ft(2)). Interior common area treatments reduced geometric mean common entry dust lead loadings 71% from preintervention to clearance, and maintained those reduced levels from clearance to 1-year postintervention. Higher level interventions were not more effective than low-level interventions in reducing preintervention levels to clearance or 1-year postintervention. This study demonstrates that interior common areas in the multiunit buildings examined contain substantial amounts of deteriorated lead-based paint and dust. Remediation of common areas can effectively reduce those hazards. PMID:16298951

  18. Zinc in house dust: speciation, bioaccessibility, and impact of humidity.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; Rasmussen, Pat E; MacKinnon, Ted; Chnier, Marc; Boros, Kristina

    2014-08-19

    Indoor exposures to metals arise from a wide variety of indoor and outdoor sources. This study investigates the impact of humid indoor conditions on the bioaccessibility of Zn in dust, and the transformation of Zn species during weathering. House dust samples were subjected to an oxygenated, highly humid atmosphere in a closed chamber for 4 to 5 months. Zinc bioaccessibility before and after the experiment was determined using a simulated gastric acid extraction. Bulk and micro X-ray absorption structure (XAS) spectroscopy was used to speciate Zn in dust. Exposure to humid conditions led to a significant increase in Zn bioaccessibility in all samples, which was due to a redistribution of Zn from inorganic forms toward the organic pools such as Zn adsorbed on humates. ZnO readily dissolved under humid conditions, whereas ZnS persisted in the dust. Elevated humidity in indoor microenvironments may sustain higher Zn bioaccessibility in settled dust compared to drier conditions, and part of this change may be related to fungal growth in humid dust. These results help to explain the greater bioaccessibility of certain metals in house dust compared to soils. PMID:25041107

  19. DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING A LEAD DUST MONITORING, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION PROGRAM IN YOUR COMMUNITY/SYRACUSE LEAD DUST PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has developed a technology transfer document (case-study) for the EMPACT Syracuse Lead Dust Project. The Lead Dust Project is designed to measure the lead dust content in homes and public buildings within the City of Syracuse, NY. The project also contains an educational comp...

  20. Estimating outdoor and indoor dust lead levels from accidental bridge repair containment releases

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.T.; Conway, R.F.

    1999-07-01

    A 1998 New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluated the proposed removal of deteriorated lead paint from NYCDOT-owned bridges. The EIS health risk assessment quantified the potential impact of particulate releases on blood lead levels among members of the public living and working near affected bridges. The risk assessment consisted of a fate and transport component and an exposure-dose component. The fate and transport component, modeled using the EPA's Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model, calculated the impact of paint removal activities on ambient air lead concentrations and dust lead deposition rates. The exposure-dose component, modeled using EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model, the Bowers et al. Adult Lead model, and the O'Flaherty lead model, calculated the impact of additional lead in air, street dust, interior house dust, and soil on blood lead levels, a conventional measure of body lead burden. The analysis was complicated because the ISC3 model provides a dust lead deposition rate ({micro}g/m{sup 2}-day), while the IEUBK, Bowers et al., and O'Flaherty models demand as input specification of dust lead concentrations ({micro}g lead per g dust). This paper describes a model developed for the EIS that quantifies long term average dust lead concentrations associated with typical bridge containment releases, and short term dust lead concentration spikes following worst case release events associated with bridge repair containment structure failures. The model reflects the influence of both lead and other debris associated with bridge repair activities, the contribution of background debris to street dust, and the impact of rainfall on removal of both lead and other material from the street dust reservoir.

  1. Surface dust wipes are the best predictors of blood leads in young children with elevated blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect

    Gulson, Brian; CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, North Ryde NSW 2113 ; Anderson, Phil; Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra ACT 2601 ; Taylor, Alan

    2013-10-15

    Background: As part of the only national survey of lead in Australian children, which was undertaken in 1996, lead isotopic and lead concentration measurements were obtained from children from 24 dwellings whose blood lead levels were ≥15 µg/dL in an attempt to determine the source(s) of their elevated blood lead. Comparisons were made with data for six children with lower blood lead levels (<10 µg/dL). Methods: Thermal ionisation and isotope dilution mass spectrometry were used to determine high precision lead isotopic ratios ({sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb) and lead concentrations in blood, dust from floor wipes, soil, drinking water and paint (where available). Evaluation of associations between blood and the environmental samples was based on the analysis of individual cases, and Pearson correlations and multiple regression analyses based on the whole dataset. Results and discussion: The correlations showed an association for isotopic ratios in blood and wipes (r=0.52, 95% CI 0.19–0.74), blood and soil (r=0.33, 95% CI −0.05–0.62), and blood and paint (r=0.56, 95% CI 0.09–0.83). The regression analyses indicated that the only statistically significant relationship for blood isotopic ratios was with dust wipes (B=0.65, 95% CI 0.35–0.95); there were no significant associations for lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples. There is a strong isotopic correlation of soils and house dust (r=0.53, 95% CI 0.20–0.75) indicative of a common source(s) for lead in soil and house dust. In contrast, as with the regression analyses, no such association is present for bulk lead concentrations (r=−0.003, 95% CI −0.37–0.36), the most common approach employed in source investigations. In evaluation of the isotopic results on a case by case basis, the strongest associations were for dust wipes and blood. -- Highlights: • Children with elevated blood lead ≥15 µg/dL compared with a group with <10 µg/dL. • High precision lead isotopic ratios in blood, house dust wipes, soil, water, paint. • Associations for isotopic measures of blood and dust, blood and soil, blood and paint. • Regressions gave significance for isotopic measures of blood/dust and dust/soil.

  2. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Asthmatic Children Sensitized to House Dust Mite

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Hu, Qi; Shen, Lei-Lei; Hu, Ying; Tao, Hai-feng; Li, Hui-fan; Fan, Wen-ting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The house dust mite is one of the most common allergens worldwide. There is good evidence that house dust mite subcutaneous immunotherapy is efficacious and has long-term benefit in children. However, the evidence of the benefit of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is less convincing. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate that efficacy and safety of dust mite SLIT in children with asthma. Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases until February 2014 were searched. The primary outcome was mean change in asthma symptom score. Secondary outcomes included mean change in serum immunoglobulin G4 (sIgG4), specific Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, and medication score. Safety was also assessed. We found that SLIT significantly decreased asthma symptom score (P?=?0.007) and increased sIgG4 levels (P?=?0.011) greater than control in children (<18 years of age) with asthma. There was no difference between SLIT and control groups in specific D pteronyssinus IgE levels (P?=?0.076) and medication score (P?=?0.408). The safety profile was similar between groups. Our study indicates that dust mite SLIT therapy was effective in reducing asthma symptoms and in increasing sIgG4 but did not significantly reduce medication scores or specific D pteronyssinus IgE levels. Our findings are not enough to support the use of dust mite SLIT in children with asthma. PMID:26091451

  3. Determinants of manganese levels in house dust samples from the CHAMACOS cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gunier, RB; Jerrett, M; Smith, DR; Jursa, T; Yousefi, P; Camacho, J; Hubbard, A; Eskenazi, B; Bradman, A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, but at high exposure levels Mn is a neurotoxicant. The fungicides maneb and mancozeb are approximately 21% Mn by weight and more than 150,000 kg are applied each year to crops in the Salinas Valley, California. It is not clear, however, whether agricultural use of these fungicides increases Mn levels in homes. Materials and methods We collected house dust samples from 378 residences enrolled in the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study with a second sample collected approximately nine months later from 90 of the residences. House dust samples were analyzed for Mn using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Information from interviews, home inspections, and pesticide use reports was used to identify potential predictors of Mn dust concentrations and loadings. Results Mn was detectable in all dust samples. The median Mn concentration was 171 ?g/g and median Mn loading was 1,910 ?g/m2 at first visit. In multivariable models, Mn dust concentrations and loadings increased with the number of farmworkers in the home and the amount of agricultural Mn fungicides applied within three kilometers of the residence during the month prior to dust sample collection. Dust concentrations of Mn and other metals (lead, cadmium and chromium) were higher in residences located in the southern Salinas Valley compared those located in other areas of the Salinas Valley. Dust loadings of Mn and other metals were also higher in residences located on Antioch Loam soil than other soil types, and in homes with poor or average housekeeping practices. Conclusions Agricultural use of Mn containing fungicides was associated with Mn dust concentrations and loadings in nearby residences and farmworker homes. Housekeeping practices and soil type at residence were also important factors related to dust metal concentrations and loadings. PMID:25146905

  4. Innate Immune Responses in House Dust Mite Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Sensitizations to house dust mites (HDM) trigger strong exacerbated allergen-induced inflammation of the skin and airways mucosa from atopic subjects resulting in atopic dermatitis as well as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Initially, the Th2-biased HDM allergic response was considered to be mediated only by allergen B- and T-cell epitopes to promote allergen-specific IgE production as well as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 to recruit inflammatory cells. But this general molecular model of HDM allergenicity must be revisited as a growing literature suggests that stimulations of innate immune activation pathways by HDM allergens offer new answers to the following question: what makes an HDM allergen an allergen? Indeed, HDM is a carrier not only for allergenic proteins but also microbial adjuvant compounds, both of which are able to stimulate innate signaling pathways leading to allergy. This paper will describe the multiple ways used by HDM allergens together with microbial compounds to control the initiation of the allergic response through engagement of innate immunity. PMID:23724247

  5. Quantification of C. globosum spores in house dust samples.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunhua; Provost, Natacha B; Desroches, Tamara; Miller, J David

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is one of the most common fungi that grows in damp buildings and occurs in agricultural and forestry workplaces. Using sera from atopic patients, we characterized and purified an extracellular chitosanase (Chg47) from C. globosum that is antigenic to humans. The study reports the production of monoclonal antibodies to the protein. Three capture ELISAs were developed for Chg47 for detection of spores and spore and mycelial fragments in dust samples using different mono- and polyclonal antibody combinations. One method is based on an enhanced biotinylated polyclonal antibody as the secondary antibody and coating anti-IgM to capture one of two clones of IgM monoclonal antibodies as the capture antibody. The other method makes use of an enhanced rabbit polyclonal antibody as both the primary and capture antibody. The detection limit of the double PAb method for the Chg47 antigen was 7.6 pg/ml. When the anti-IgM+10B3 clone was used, the detection limit was 61 pg/ml and for anti-IgM+5F12, 122 pg/ml. The detection limit of double PAb method is comparable to methods for the allergen and spores of Aspergillus versicolor in house dust and is more sensitive than other immunoassays for allergens in house including for Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Alternaria alternata. All three methods had limited cross-reactivity to fungi common in house dust representing a diverse array of taxa. PMID:25292122

  6. Monitoring and reducing exposure of infants to pollutants in house dust.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John W; Wallace, Lance A; Camann, David E; Dickey, Philip; Gilbert, Steven G; Lewis, Robert G; Takaro, Tim K

    2009-01-01

    The health risks to babies from pollutants in house dust may be 100 times greater than for adults. The young ingest more dust and are up to ten times more vulnerable to such exposures. House dust is the main exposure source for infants to allergens, lead, and PBDEs, as well as a major source of exposure to pesticides, PAHs, Gram-negative bacteria, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, phthalates, phenols, and other EDCs, mutagens, and carcinogens. Median or upper percentile concentrations in house dust of lead and several pesticides and PAHs may exceed health-based standards in North America. Early contact with pollutants among the very young is associated with higher rates of chronic illness such as asthma, loss of intelligence, ADHD, and cancer in children and adults. The potential of infants, who live in areas with soil contaminated by automotive and industrial emissions, can be given more protection by improved home cleaning and hand washing. Babies who live in houses built before 1978 have a prospective need for protection against lead exposures; homes built before 1940 have even higher lead exposure risks. The concentration of pollutants in house dust may be 2-32 times higher than that found in the soil near a house. Reducing infant exposures, at this critical time in their development, may reduce lifetime health costs, improve early learning, and increase adult productivity. Some interventions show a very rapid payback. Two large studies provide evidence that home visits to reduce the exposure of children with poorly controlled asthma triggers may return more than 100% on investment in 1 yr in reduced health costs. The tools provided to families during home visits, designed to reduce dust exposures, included vacuum cleaners with dirt finders and HEPA filtration, allergy control bedding covers, high-quality door mats, and HEPA air filters. Infants receive their highest exposure to pollutants in dust at home, where they spend the most time, and where the family has the most mitigation control. Normal vacuum cleaning allows deep dust to build up in carpets where it can be brought to the surface and become airborne as a result of activity on the carpet. Vacuums with dirt finders allow families to use the three-spot test to monitor deep dust, which can reinforce good cleaning habits. Motivated families that receive home visits from trained outreach workers can monitor and reduce dust exposures by 90% or more in 1 wk. The cost of such visits is low considering the reduction of risks achieved. Improved home cleaning is one of the first results observed among families who receive home visits from MHEs and CHWs. We believe that proven intervention methods can reduce the exposure of infants to pollutants in house dust, while recognizing that much remains to be learned about improving the effectiveness of such methods. PMID:19484587

  7. Flame retardant associations between children's handwipes and house dust.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Heather M; Misenheimer, John; Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F

    2014-12-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), flame retardants (FRs) have been ubiquitously detected at high concentrations in indoor environments; however, with their recent phase-out, more attention is being focused on measurements of exposure to alternative FRs such as organophosphate FRs (OPFRs). In our previous research, we found that PBDE residues measured on children's handwipes were a strong predictor of serum PBDE levels. Here we build upon this research to examine longitudinal changes in PBDEs in indoor dust and children's handwipes, and explore the associations between handwipes and dust for alternative FRs. Children from our previous study were re-contacted after approximately two years and new samples of indoor dust and handwipes were collected. PBDE dust-levels were significantly correlated between two different sampling rounds separated by two years; however, PBDE levels in handwipes were not correlated, perhaps suggesting that the sources of PBDEs remained relatively constant in the home, but that behavioral differences in children are changing with age and influencing handwipe levels. OPFRs [i.e. tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP)], 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, also known as TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP, also known as TBPH), and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were also ubiquitously detected in house dust samples and geometric mean levels were similar to PBDE levels, or higher in the case of the OPFRs. Significant associations between handwipes and house dust were observed for these alternative FRs, particularly for EH-TBB (rs=0.54; p<0.001). Increasing house dust levels and age were associated with higher levels of FRs in handwipes, and high hand washing frequency (>5 times d(-1)) was associated with lower FR levels in handwipes. Overall these data suggest that exposure to these alternative FRs will be similar to PBDE exposure, and the influence of hand-to-mouth behavior in children's exposure needs to be further examined to better estimate exposure potential. PMID:24485814

  8. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paula I; Stapleton, Heather M; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  9. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paula I.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hauser, Russ; Meeker, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octaand deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. PMID:23333513

  10. Application of Synchrotron Microprobe Methods to Solid-Phase Speciation of Metals and Metalloids in House Dust

    SciTech Connect

    S Walker; H Jamieson; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    Determination of the source and form of metals in house dust is important to those working to understand human and particularly childhood exposure to metals in residential environments. We report the development of a synchrotron microprobe technique for characterization of multiple metal hosts in house dust. We have applied X-ray fluorescence for chemical characterization and X-ray diffraction for crystal structure identification using microfocused synchrotron X-rays at a less than 10 {micro}m spot size. The technique has been evaluated by application to archived house dust samples containing elevated concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, and Pb and As in living room dust. The technique was also applied to a sample of soil from the corresponding garden to identify linkages between indoor and outdoor sources of metals. Paint pigments including white lead (hydrocerussite) and lithopone (wurtzite and barite) are the primary source of Pb, Zn, and Ba in bedroom dust, probably related to renovation activity in the home at the time of sampling. The much lower Pb content in the living room dust shows a relationship to the exterior soil and no specific evidence of Pb and Zn from the bedroom paint pigments. The technique was also successful at confirming the presence of chromated copper arsenate treated wood as a source of As in the living room dust. The results of the study have confirmed the utility of this approach in identifying specific metal forms within the dust.

  11. How relevant are house dust mite-fungal interactions in laboratory culture to the natural dust system?

    PubMed

    Hay, D B; Hart, B J; Pearce, R B; Kozakiewicz, Z; Douglas, A E

    1992-11-01

    Both house dust and house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus contained a wider range of fungi than laboratory mite cultures. In total, nine species of fungi were isolated from D. pteronyssinus in house dust, and these included three xerophilic species (Eurotium amstelodami, Aspergillus penicillioides and Wallemia sebi) commonly found in laboratory cultures of D. pteronyssinus. It is concluded that mites do interact with a similar range of fungi in natural dust and in laboratory culture, but that the diversity of fungal species in the laboratory is reduced and the density of individual fungal species in culture exceeds that of house dust. In a second experiment, dust samples were incubated at room temperature with 75% relative humidity. The diversity of fungi invariably declined from up to 13 genera to the few species recorded in laboratory culture. This suggests that the dominance of xerophilic fungi in laboratory mite rearings is mediated primarily by low relative humidity, and the exclusion of air-borne spores. PMID:1493747

  12. Non-targeted screening of house dust samples using accurate mass TOFMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    House dust exists as an environmental repository of chemicals to which we are exposed in our homes. A growing number of studies have targeted select persistent organic and inorganic pollutants found in house dust. Many have concluded that dust exists as an important human expos...

  13. MITE ANTIGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN HOUSE DUST AND THE OCCURRENCE OF WHEEZING IN CHILDREN WITH MITE DUST ALLERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied the relationship between dust mite antigen concentrations in house dust samples and the occurrence and frequency of wheezing in 58 children with dust mite allergy (wheal > 4 mm. mean diameter in response to a prick test with either D-. farinae or D pteronyssinus antige...

  14. Control of house dust mites by electrical heating blankets.

    PubMed

    Mosbech, H; Korsgaard, J; Lind, P

    1988-04-01

    The contents of house dust mites, Dermatophagoides (D), in 10 beds supplied with electrical heating blankets (EHBs) and in 10 control beds were followed for 1 year. All beds were in regular use during the study period. Dust from mattresses and EHBs was collected monthly and analyzed for D by microscopy. Blankets were turned on during daytime and were washed every 3 months. For each bed the median concentration of D during the entire period was related to initial value. In the beds supplied with blankets, the overall median was 52% compared to 122% in the control beds (p less than 0.05). The difference between the two groups of beds was observed within the first month. Major antigens from D were reduced to 32% in the beds supplied with blankets and increased to 120% in the control beds (p less than 0.05). Climatic conditions were measured beneath the blanket in a spare bed. When beds were covered by eiderdown, temperature was increased by 26 degrees C, and the relative humidity was decreased by 24% within 3 hours. In conclusion, EHBs appear capable of reducing relative humidity and concentration of house dust mites on mattress surfaces. PMID:3356849

  15. The prevalence of lead-based paint hazards in U.S. housing.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David E; Clickner, Robert P; Zhou, Joey Y; Viet, Susan M; Marker, David A; Rogers, John W; Zeldin, Darryl C; Broene, Pamela; Friedman, Warren

    2002-01-01

    In this study we estimated the number of housing units in the United States with lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards. We included measurements of lead in intact and deteriorated paint, interior dust, and bare soil. A nationally representative, random sample of 831 housing units was evaluated in a survey between 1998 and 2000; the units and their occupants did not differ significantly from nationwide characteristics. Results indicate that 38 million housing units had lead-based paint, down from the 1990 estimate of 64 million. Twenty-four million had significant lead-based paint hazards. Of those with hazards, 1.2 million units housed low-income families (< 30,000 US dollars/year) with children under 6 years of age. Although 17% of government-supported, low-income housing had hazards, 35% of all low-income housing had hazards. For households with incomes greater than or equal to 30,000 US dollars/year, 19% had hazards. Fourteen percent of all houses had significantly deteriorated lead-based paint, and 16% and 7%, respectively, had dust lead and soil lead levels above current standards of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The prevalence of lead-based paint and hazards increases with age of housing, but most painted surfaces, even in older housing, do not have lead-based paint. Between 2% and 25% of painted building components were coated with lead-based paint. Housing in the Northeast and Midwest had about twice the prevalence of hazards compared with housing in the South and West. The greatest risk occurs in older units with lead-based paint hazards that either will be or are currently occupied by families with children under 6 years of age and are low-income and/or are undergoing renovation or maintenance that disturbs lead-based paint. This study also confirms projections made in 2000 by the President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children of the number of houses with lead-based paint hazards. Public- and private-sector resources should be directed to units posing the greatest risk if future lead poisoning is to be prevented. PMID:12361941

  16. An aerobiological perspective of dust in cage-housed and floor-housed poultry operations

    PubMed Central

    Just, Natasha; Duchaine, Caroline; Singh, Baljit

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian poultry production industry contributes nearly $10 billion to the Canadian economy and employs nearly 50,000 workers. However, modern poultry facilities are highly contaminated with airborne dust. Although there are many bioaerosols in the poultry barn environment, endotoxin is typically attributed with the negative respiratory symptoms observed in workers. These adverse respiratory symptoms have a higher prevalence in poultry workers compared to workers from other animal confinement buildings. Workers in cage-housed operations compared to floor-housed facilities report a higher prevalence of some respiratory symptoms. We review the current state of knowledge on airborne dust in poultry barns and respiratory dysfunction in poultry workers while highlighting the areas that need further investigation. Our review focuses on the aerobiological pathway of poultry dust including the source and aerosolization of dust and worker exposure and response. Further understanding of the source and aerosolization of dust in poultry operations will aid in the development of management practices to reduce worker exposure and response. PMID:19515256

  17. Lead and zinc dust depositions from ore trains characterised using lead isotopic compositions.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, L J; Taylor, M P; Morrison, A L

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates an unusual source of environmental lead contamination - the emission and deposition of lead and zinc concentrates along train lines into and out of Australia's oldest silver-lead-zinc mine at Broken Hill, Australia. Transport of lead and zinc ore concentrates from the Broken Hill mines has occurred for more than 125 years, during which time the majority was moved in uncovered rail wagons. A significant amount of ore was lost to the adjoining environments, resulting in soil immediately adjacent to train lines elevated with concentrations of lead (695 mg kg(-1)) and zinc (2230 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations of lead and zinc decreased away from the train line and also with depth shown in soil profiles. Lead isotopic compositions demonstrated the soil lead contained Broken Hill ore in increasing percentages closer to the train line, with up to 97% apportioned to the mined Broken Hill ore body. SEM examination showed ceiling dusts collected from houses along the train line were composed of unweathered galena particles, characteristic of the concentrate transported in the rail wagons. The loss of ore from the uncovered wagons has significantly extended the environmental footprint of contamination from local mining operations over an area extending hundreds of kilometres along each of the three train lines. PMID:25627173

  18. Associations between bacterial communities of house dust and infant gut

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, T.; Koster, B.; Maughan, H.; Escobar, M.; Azad, M.B.; Guttman, D.S.; Sears, M.R.; Becker, A.B.; Brook, J.R.; Takaro, T.K.; Kozyrskyj, A.L.; Scott, J.A.

    2014-05-01

    The human gut is host to a diverse and abundant community of bacteria that influence health and disease susceptibility. This community develops in infancy, and its composition is strongly influenced by environmental factors, notably perinatal anthropogenic exposures such as delivery mode (Cesarean vs. vaginal) and feeding method (breast vs. formula); however, the built environment as a possible source of exposure has not been considered. Here we report on a preliminary investigation of the associations between bacteria in house dust and the nascent fecal microbiota from 20 subjects from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study using high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Despite significant differences between the dust and fecal microbiota revealed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis, permutation analysis confirmed that 14 bacterial OTUs representing the classes Actinobacteria (3), Bacilli (3), Clostridia (6) and Gammaproteobacteria (2) co-occurred at a significantly higher frequency in matched dust–stool pairs than in randomly permuted pairs, indicating an association between these dust and stool communities. These associations could indicate a role for the indoor environment in shaping the nascent gut microbiota, but future studies will be needed to confirm that our findings do not solely reflect a reverse pathway. Although pet ownership was strongly associated with the presence of certain genera in the dust for dogs (Agrococcus, Carnobacterium, Exiguobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Leifsonia and Neisseria) and cats (Escherichia), no clear patterns were observed in the NMDS-resolved stool community profiles as a function of pet ownership.

  19. Variability of house dust mite allergen exposure in dwellings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, T; Kuhlisch, E; Soldan, W; Leupold, W

    1998-01-01

    The variability of repeated house dust mite (HDM) allergen determinations at the same site within 3-24 months was evaluated on previously collected samples. Between two and four repeated measurements of Der p 1, a major allergen of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Der f 1, a major allergen of D. farinae, on 46 carpets and 31 mattresses were analyzed. In 90% of carpets and mattresses, HDM allergen concentrations were clinically relevant (at least one measurement >0.1 microg Der p 1 + Der f 1/g dust). The coefficients of variation (CVs) for allergen concentrations in repeated samples over time (55.3-82.0% for the two allergens in beds and carpets) were clearly greater than the CVs for multiple samples collected at the same time (4.0-32.6%). Determination of allergen mass per square meter of surface instead of concentration per gram of dust resulted in an even greater CV (72.3-86.7%). The 95% range of expected values was about 10-fold above and below the result of a single determination. We conclude that single determinations of HDM allergen in dust give very limited information about long-term exposure of an individual to the allergen. Repeated measurements are recommended. Studies of factors that affect HDM allergen exposure must be planned with appropriate sample sizes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9755142

  20. Shellfish and House Dust Mite Allergies: Is the Link Tropomyosin?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lydia; Huang, Chiung Hui

    2016-01-01

    Crustacean shellfish allergy is an important cause of food allergy and anaphylaxis in Asia. The major allergen in shellfish allergy is tropomyosin, a pan-allergen that is also found in house dust mites and cockroaches. Tropomyosins from house dust mites (HDMs) have a high sequence homology to shellfish tropomyosins, and cross-reactivity between HDM and shrimp tropomyosins has been demonstrated. Exposure to inhaled tropomyosins from house dust mites has been postulated to be the primary sensitizer for shellfish allergy, in a reaction analogous to the oral allergy (inhalant-food) syndrome. This notion is supported by indirect data from the effects of HDM immunotherapy on shellfish allergy, and strong correlations of shellfish and HDM sensitization. HDM immunotherapy has been reported to induce both shrimp allergy in non-allergic patients and shrimp tolerance in shrimp-allergic patients. Epidemiological surveys have also demonstrated a strong correlation between shellfish and HDM sensitization in both hospital-based and community-based studies. Unexposed populations have also been shown to develop sensitization-shellfish sensitization in orthodox Jews with no history of shellfish consumption was associated with HDM sensitization. Reciprocally, HDM sensitization in an Icelandic population living in a HDM-free environment was associated with shrimp sensitization. In vitro IgE inhibition studies on sera in shrimp-allergic Spanish patients indicate that mites are the primary sensitizer in shrimp-allergic patients living in humid and warm climates. Current data supports the hypothesis that tropomyosin is the link between HDM and shellfish allergies. The role of tropomyosin in HDM and shellfish allergies is a fertile field for investigation as it may provide novel immunotherapeutic strategies for shellfish allergy. PMID:26739402

  1. Shellfish and House Dust Mite Allergies: Is the Link Tropomyosin?

    PubMed

    Wong, Lydia; Huang, Chiung Hui; Lee, Bee Wah

    2016-03-01

    Crustacean shellfish allergy is an important cause of food allergy and anaphylaxis in Asia. The major allergen in shellfish allergy is tropomyosin, a pan-allergen that is also found in house dust mites and cockroaches. Tropomyosins from house dust mites (HDMs) have a high sequence homology to shellfish tropomyosins, and cross-reactivity between HDM and shrimp tropomyosins has been demonstrated. Exposure to inhaled tropomyosins from house dust mites has been postulated to be the primary sensitizer for shellfish allergy, in a reaction analogous to the oral allergy (inhalant-food) syndrome. This notion is supported by indirect data from the effects of HDM immunotherapy on shellfish allergy, and strong correlations of shellfish and HDM sensitization. HDM immunotherapy has been reported to induce both shrimp allergy in non-allergic patients and shrimp tolerance in shrimp-allergic patients. Epidemiological surveys have also demonstrated a strong correlation between shellfish and HDM sensitization in both hospital-based and community-based studies. Unexposed populations have also been shown to develop sensitization-shellfish sensitization in orthodox Jews with no history of shellfish consumption was associated with HDM sensitization. Reciprocally, HDM sensitization in an Icelandic population living in a HDM-free environment was associated with shrimp sensitization. In vitro IgE inhibition studies on sera in shrimp-allergic Spanish patients indicate that mites are the primary sensitizer in shrimp-allergic patients living in humid and warm climates. Current data supports the hypothesis that tropomyosin is the link between HDM and shellfish allergies. The role of tropomyosin in HDM and shellfish allergies is a fertile field for investigation as it may provide novel immunotherapeutic strategies for shellfish allergy. PMID:26739402

  2. Associations between bacterial communities of house dust and infant gut.

    PubMed

    Konya, T; Koster, B; Maughan, H; Escobar, M; Azad, M B; Guttman, D S; Sears, M R; Becker, A B; Brook, J R; Takaro, T K; Kozyrskyj, A L; Scott, J A

    2014-05-01

    The human gut is host to a diverse and abundant community of bacteria that influence health and disease susceptibility. This community develops in infancy, and its composition is strongly influenced by environmental factors, notably perinatal anthropogenic exposures such as delivery mode (Cesarean vs. vaginal) and feeding method (breast vs. formula); however, the built environment as a possible source of exposure has not been considered. Here we report on a preliminary investigation of the associations between bacteria in house dust and the nascent fecal microbiota from 20 subjects from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study using high-throughput sequence analysis of portions of the 16S rRNA gene. Despite significant differences between the dust and fecal microbiota revealed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis, permutation analysis confirmed that 14 bacterial OTUs representing the classes Actinobacteria (3), Bacilli (3), Clostridia (6) and Gammaproteobacteria (2) co-occurred at a significantly higher frequency in matched dust-stool pairs than in randomly permuted pairs, indicating an association between these dust and stool communities. These associations could indicate a role for the indoor environment in shaping the nascent gut microbiota, but future studies will be needed to confirm that our findings do not solely reflect a reverse pathway. Although pet ownership was strongly associated with the presence of certain genera in the dust for dogs (Agrococcus, Carnobacterium, Exiguobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Leifsonia and Neisseria) and cats (Escherichia), no clear patterns were observed in the NMDS-resolved stool community profiles as a function of pet ownership. PMID:24637181

  3. Achieving dust lead clearance standards after lead hazard control projects: An evaluation of the HUD-recommended cleaning procedure and an abbreviated alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, S. ); Tohn, E. ); Rupp, R. ); Clark, S. . Dept. of Environmental Health)

    1999-05-01

    The US Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD's) Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing strongly recommend that after lead hazard control interventions all walls, ceiling, floors, and other horizontal surfaces be cleaned using a three-step process to reduce lead-contaminated dust and debris. The three steps are: an initial vacuuming using a machine equipped with a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter (HEPA vacuum), wet wash with a lead cleaner, and a final HEPA vacuum. This study evaluated the effectiveness of two cleaning protocols: (1) the HUD-recommended three-step procedure, and (2) an abbreviated two-step cleaning procedure that omits the final HEPA vacuum. Cleaning procedures were evaluated in 27 dwelling units that had undergone significant lead hazard control interventions likely to produce lead dust. Dust lead samples were collected on floors and in window sills and troughs prior to the lead control hazard intervention, after the wet wash step of the cleaning procedure, and after completion of the second HEPA vacuuming. The results of the study demonstrate that dust lead surface loading on smooth and cleanable surfaces following the three-step and two-step cleaning procedures can achieve 1995 federal guidance dust clearance levels and levels substantially lower. Although the dust lead clearance rates before and after the second HEPA vacuum were the same, the time saved by omitting the second HEPA is small relative to the other elements of the cleaning process.

  4. House dust mite control measures in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vallance, Gillian; McSharry, Charles; Wood, Stuart; Thomson, Neil C

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization to the house dust mite (Dermataphagoides pteronyssinus) (HDM) is the most common risk factor associated with the development of asthma in adults and children. The effectiveness of HDM control measures in the treatment of asthma is not yet proven. The strategies for control for avoidance depend on our understanding of the biology of the HDM. The evidence suggests a favorable effect of transferring allergic asthmatic children to naturally low dust mite environments, such as at altitude or in hospital, but little to suggest that this can be replicated in general practice by simple practical measures such as mattress covers. However, a recent multi-allergen reduction approach has suggested benefits may be achievable. HDM densities tend to be high in warm, humid conditions in the home, which may be modified by external factors, such as ventilation. However, ventilation control to reduce indoor humidity has had inconsistent effects on dust mite levels and asthma. The challenge is to further refine the interventions in large placebo-controlled trials such that clinical outcomes may be more easily demonstrated. PMID:18360647

  5. A NEW HOUSE DUST COLLECTION SYSTEM AND ITS USE IN A STUDY OF ASTHMA IN DUST MITE SENSITIVE CHILDREN IN RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype dust collection system, the House Dust Vacuum One (HDVI), was designed for use in a study to investigate the relationship between house dust mite antigen levels and the presence of asthma in dust mite sensitive children. The HDVI was designed for the collection of dus...

  6. Impact of soil and dust lead on children's blood lead on Children's blood lead in contaminated areas of Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, M.; Lind, B.; Soerensen, S.; Vahter, M.

    2000-04-01

    The impact of lead in soil and dust on blood lead concentrations in young children and the risk of health effects were investigated in an urban and a mining areas of Sweden. Blood, soil, and indoor dust, as well as information on lead-exposure factors, were collected. The blood lead concentrations (total range = 9--77 {micro}g/l) the authors measured indicated a low risk for lead-induced health effects. Lead in soil and in dust had little effect on blood lead concentrations, given the present conditions and present concentration range--especially in the mining area. Urban children had significantly higher blood lead concentrations that children in the mining area, despite higher concentrations of lead in soil in the mining area. In the urban children, blood lead concentrations were influenced by parental smoking and lead in dust at day-care centers.

  7. Orchestrating house dust mite-associated allergy in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Lisa G.; Lloyd, Clare M.

    2012-01-01

    House dust mites (HDM; Dermatophagoides sp.) are one of the commonest aeroallergens worldwide and up to 85% of asthmatics are typically HDM allergic. Allergenicity is associated both with the mites themselves and with ligands derived from mite-associated bacterial and fungal products. Murine models of allergic airways disease for asthma research have recently switched from the use of surrogate allergen ovalbumin together with adjuvant to use of the HDM extract. This has accelerated understanding of how adaptive and innate immunity generate downstream pathology. We review the myriad ways in which HDM allergic responses are orchestrated. Understanding the molecular pathways that elicit HDM-associated pathology is likely to reveal novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21783420

  8. 35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. BOILER HOUSE, TRACK FOR COAL CARS LEADING TO COAL TOWER No. 2 (NOTE: SKYLIGHT ABOVE; COAL CARS IN FAR BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  9. 39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. BOILER HOUSE, COAL CONVEYOR LEADING FROM COAL TOWER No. 1 (WEST) (NOTE: COAL CARS No. 9 & 5 IN BACKGROUND) - Delaware County Electric Company, Chester Station, Delaware River at South end of Ward Street, Chester, Delaware County, PA

  10. Eustachian tube obstruction after intranasal challenge with house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Skoner, D P; Doyle, W J; Chamovitz, A H; Fireman, P

    1986-08-01

    Past studies have shown that provocative intranasal pollen challenge in allergic subjects results in signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis, nasal obstruction, and eustachian tube obstruction. The study presented herein extends these observations to challenges with a perennial antigen, house dust mite. Twenty-three adult volunteers with confirmed sensitivity to Dermatophagoides farinae were challenged by intranasal inhalation of antigen in doses that were incremented from 0.5 to 10.0 mg. Eustachian tube function by the nine-step pressure-swallow test and nasal airway resistance by anterior rhinomanometry were evaluated before and after challenge. Twenty-two of the 40 ears showing normal tubal function before challenge were abnormal after challenge. Sixteen of the 23 subjects developed a nasal obstruction after challenge. The median specific serum IgE antibody titer for those individuals responding to the challenge was significantly greater than that of the individuals exhibiting no response. These results show that intranasal challenge with D farinae can provoke immune-mediated nasal obstruction and eustachian tube dysfunction in sensitized subjects. PMID:3718687

  11. POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS IN HOUSE DUST AND YARD SOIL NEAR A SUPERFUND SITE. (R825173)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in house dust and yard soil at 34 homes surrounding New Bedford Harbor during dredging of highly contaminated harbor sediments. PCBs can volatilize from sediments and seawater and subsequently deposit on surrounding soil, resulting i...

  12. Utilizing Pyrosequencing and Quantitative pCR to Characterize Fungal Populations among House Dust Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular techniques are an alternative to culturing and counting methods in quantifying indoor fungal contamination. Pyrosequencing offers the possibility of identifying unexpected indoor fungi. In this study, 50 house dust samples were collected from homes in the Yakima Valley,...

  13. METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND OTHER SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HOUSE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods were validated to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other semivolatile organic compounds in house dust. e also examined the storage stability of three potential markers (solanesol, nicotine, and continine) for particulate-phase environmental ...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR SPECIFIC LAWN- APPLIED PESTICIDES IN HOUSE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many pesticides have been developed for residential outdoor application, particularly for lawn care. Residues from these applications may be tracked into the home, where they become incorporated with house dust and persist for long periods of time. Consequently, potential human...

  15. Concentration and determinants of molds and allergens in indoor air and house dust of French dwellings.

    PubMed

    Dallongeville, Arnaud; Le Cann, Pierre; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Chevrier, Cécile; Costet, Nathalie; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Blanchard, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Molds and allergens are common indoor biocontaminants. The aims of this study were to assess the concentrations of common molds in indoor air and floor dust and the concentrations of house dust mite, cat and dog allergens in mattress dust in French dwellings, and to assess predictors of these concentrations. A sample of 150 houses in Brittany (western France) was investigated. Airborne Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in more than 90% of the dwellings, Aspergillus in 46% and Alternaria in only 6% of the housings. Regarding floor dust samples, Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in 92 and 80% of the housings respectively, Aspergillus in 49% and Alternaria in 14%. House dust mite allergens Der p1 and Der f1 were detected in 90% and 77% of the mattress dust samples respectively and Can f1 and Fel d1 in 37% and 89% of the homes. Airborne and dustborne mold concentrations, although not statistically correlated (except for Aspergillus) shared most of their predictors. Multivariate linear models for mold levels, explaining up to 62% of the variability, showed an influence of the season, of the age of the dwelling, of aeration habits, presence of pets, smoking, signals of dampness, temperature and relative humidity. Allergens in the dust of the mattress were strongly related to the presence of pets and cleaning practices of bedsheets, these factors accounting for 60% of the variability. This study highlights ubiquitous contamination by molds and underlines complex interaction between outdoor and indoor sources and factors. PMID:26094801

  16. Development of a Simultaneous Extraction and Cleanup Method for Pyrethroid Pesticides from Indoor House Dust Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ef?cient and reliable analytical method was developed for the sensitive and selective quanti?cation of pyrethroid pesticides (PYRs) in house dust samples. The method is based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) of the dust-bound PYRs into dichloromethane (DCM) wi...

  17. Occurrence of Respiratory Symptoms Resulting from Exposure to House Dust Mites in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Zembala, Marek; Hajto, Barbara; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Perera, Frederica P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of house dust mite (HDM) allergens within homes of three-year-old children, to identify factors responsible for its variation and to test the hypothesis whether the content of HDM allergens exceeding 2 [mu]g/g dust may be regarded as a risk level of sensitization possibly affecting respiratory…

  18. Occurrence of Respiratory Symptoms Resulting from Exposure to House Dust Mites in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Zembala, Marek; Hajto, Barbara; Flak, Elzbieta; Mroz, Elzbieta; Jacek, Ryszard; Sowa, Agata; Perera, Frederica P.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the distribution of house dust mite (HDM) allergens within homes of three-year-old children, to identify factors responsible for its variation and to test the hypothesis whether the content of HDM allergens exceeding 2 [mu]g/g dust may be regarded as a risk level of sensitization possibly affecting respiratory

  19. The high cost of improper removal of lead-based paint from housing: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, David E; Mielke, Howard; Pavur, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The costs of lead-based paint hazard control in housing are well documented, but the costs of cleanup after improper, inherently dangerous, methods of removing lead-based paint are not. In this article we report a case of childhood lead poisoning and document the costs of decontamination after uncontained power sanding was used to remove paint down to bare wood from approximately 3,000 ft(2) of exterior siding on a large, well-maintained 75-year-old house in a middle-income neighborhood. After the uncontrolled removal of lead-based paint, interior dust lead levels ranged from 390 to 27,600 micro g Pb/ft(2) (on floors and windowsills) and bare soil lead levels ranged from 360 ppm in the yard to 3,900 ppm along the foundation to 130,000 ppm in the child's play area, well above applicable U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. The hard costs of decontamination were over $195,000, which greatly exceeds the incremental cost of incorporating lead-safe work practices into repainting. This case report highlights the need to incorporate lead-safe work practices into routine repainting, remodeling, and other renovation and maintenance jobs that may disturb lead-based paint. PMID:12573903

  20. Do new wipe materials outperform traditional lead dust cleaning methods?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Roger D; Ong, Kee Hean; Emo, Brett; Kennedy, Jason; Brown, Christopher A; Condoor, Sridhar; Thummalakunta, Laxmi

    2012-01-01

    Government guidelines have traditionally recommended the use of wet mopping, sponging, or vacuuming for removal of lead-contaminated dust from hard surfaces in homes. The emergence of new technologies, such as the electrostatic dry cloth and wet disposable clothes used on mopheads, for removal of dust provides an opportunity to evaluate their ability to remove lead compared with more established methods. The purpose of this study was to determine if relative differences exist between two new and two older methods for removal of lead-contaminated dust (LCD) from three wood surfaces that were characterized by different roughness or texture. Standard leaded dust, <75?m, was deposited by gravity onto the wood specimens. Specimens were cleaned using an automated device. Electrostatic dry cloths (dry Swiffer), wet Swiffer cloths, paper shop towels with non-ionic detergent, and vacuuming were used for cleaning LCD from the specimens. Lead analysis was by anodic stripping voltammetry. After the cleaning study was conducted, a study of the coefficient of friction was performed for each wipe material. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate the surface and cleaning methods. There were significant interactions between cleaning method and surface types, p = 0.007. Cleaning method was found be a significant factor in removal of lead, p <0.001, indicating that effectiveness of each cleaning methods is different. However, cleaning was not affected by types of surfaces. The coefficient of friction, significantly different among the three wipes, is likely to influence the cleaning action. Cleaning method appears to be more important than texture in LCD removal from hard surfaces. There are some small but important factors in cleaning LCD from hard surfaces, including the limits of a Swiffer mop to conform to curved surfaces and the efficiency of the wetted shop towel and vacuuming for cleaning all surface textures. The mean percentage reduction in lead dust achieved by the traditional methods (vacuuming and wet wiping) was greater and more consistent compared to the new methods (electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mop). Vacuuming and wet wiping achieved lead reductions of 92% 4% and 91%, 4%, respectively, while the electrostatic dry cloth and wet Swiffer mops achieved lead reductions of only 89 8% and 81 17%, respectively. PMID:22746281

  1. Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Wayne R

    2015-10-01

    The allergenic load of house dust mite allergy is largely constituted by a few proteins with a hierarchical pattern of allergenicity. The serodominant specificities are the group 1&2 and the group 23 faecal allergens. The collective IgE binding to the group 1&2 allergens can measure unequivocal HDM sensitisation better than HDM extracts although discrepancies have been found in regions with complex acarofauna suggesting a need to investigate the specificity with allergen components. The group 4, 5, 7&21 allergens that each induce responses in about 40% of subjects are mid-tier allergens accounting for most of the remaining IgE binding. Their titres are proportional to the concomitant responses to Der p1&2. Group 2 allergen variants have different antibody binding. Body proteins only occasionally induce sensitisation although a higher prevalence of binding by atopic dermatitis patients provides a new avenue of research. A broad spectrum of IgE binding has been associated with diverse symptoms but not with the severity of asthma which is associated with low IgG antibody. Some allergens such as the group 14 large lipid binding proteins and the recently described proteins Der f 24-33, need further investigation but with the cognoscence that other denominated allergens have been found to be minor sensitisers by comparative quantitative analyses. Scabies is a confounder for diagnosis with extracts, inducing cross-reactive antibodies with Der p 4&20 as is seafood allergy with cross reactivity to Der p 10 a minor HDM allergen. The HDM genome sequence can now be used to verify allelic and paralogous variations. PMID:26433526

  2. Lead in residential soil and dust in a mining and smelting district in northern Armenia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Varduhi; Orlova, Anna; Dunlap, Charles E; Babayan, Emil; Farfel, Mark; Von Braun, Margrit

    2004-03-01

    This pilot study of sources of lead exposure in residential settings was conducted in a mining and smelting district in northern Armenia. Samples of exterior soil and dust and interior house dust were collected in and around apartment buildings in Alaverdi where the country's largest polymetallic smelter is located, and in nearby mining towns of Aghtala and Shamlugh. The NITON XL-723 Multi-Element XRF analyzer was used for lead testing. Lead levels in samples from Alaverdi were higher than those in Shamlugh and Aghtala. In all three towns, the highest lead levels were found in loose exterior dust samples, and lead concentrations in yard soil were higher than those in garden soil. Many soil samples (34%) and the majority of loose dust samples (77%) in Alaverdi exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency standard of 400 mg/kg for bare soil in children's play areas. In addition, 36% of floor dust samples from apartments in Alaverdi exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency standard of 40 microg/ft(2) for lead loading in residential floor dust. The Armenian Ministry of Health and other interested agencies are being informed about the findings of the study so that they can consider and develop educational and preventive programs including blood lead screening among sensitive populations. PMID:15016598

  3. CHILDHOOD BLOOD LEAD LEVELS NOT AFFECTED BY HOUSING COMPLIANCE STATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a secondary analysis of data from the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of Philadelphia (July 1, 1999 through September 1, 2004), the authors evaluated the effect of housing compliance status and time to achieve compliance on changes in children's blood lead levels. ...

  4. Effectiveness of lead-hazard control interventions on dust lead loadings: findings from the evaluation of the HUD Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry L; Wilson, Jonathan W; Scott Clark, C; Galke, Warren A; Succop, Paul A; Chen, Mei

    2005-07-01

    From 1994 to 1999, the Evaluation of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program studied the intervention experiences of over 2800 homes in 11 states in the USA. Each interior intervention was categorized as (in order of increasing intensity) (a) cleaning/spot painting; (b) complete repainting; (c) complete repainting plus window treatments; (d) window abatement plus treatments to other components; (e) abatement of all lead-based paint hazards; or (f) abatement of all lead-based paint. Complete dust testing and environmental data were available for 1034 and 278 dwellings through 12 and 36 months postintervention, respectively. Strategies ranging from complete repainting to window abatement plus other treatments reduced geometric mean preintervention windowsill and floor dust lead loadings up to 36 months postintervention (reductions for complete repainting, from 16 to 5 microg/ft2 on floors and 182 to 88 microg/ft2 on sills; for window abatement plus other treatments, 27-8 microg/ft2 on floors and 570-124 microg/ft2 on sills). Full abatement reduced windowsill and floor loadings from baseline to 12 months postintervention [95-6 microg/ft2 on floors and 518-30 microg/ft2 on sills (data were not available for this strategy at 36 months)]. Window lead-hazard abatement was the most effective measure to reduce dust lead loadings on windows, but this treatment would need to be performed in conjunction with treatments to floors as well as exterior and soil treatments for the most effective control of dust lead on floors. PMID:15910785

  5. Application of neutral electrolyzed water spray for reducing dust levels in a layer breeding house.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weichao; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Yang, Zhanyong

    2012-11-01

    Reducing airborne dust is an essential process for improving hen housing environment. Dust reduction effects of neutral electrolyzed water (pH 8.2) spray were investigated in a commercial tunnel-ventilated layer breeding house during production in northern China. A multipoint sampler was used to measure airborne dust concentration to study the dust reduction effects and distribution in the house. Compared with the control treatment (without spray), airborne dust level was reduced 34% in the 3 hr after spraying 216 mL m(-2) neutral electrolyzed water in the breeding house. The dust concentration was significantly higher during the periods of feed distribution (1.13 +/- 0.13 mg m(-3)) and artificial insemination (0.72 +/- 0.13 mg m(-3)) compared with after spray (0.47 +/- 0.09 mg m(-3)) and during lights-off period (0.29 +/- 0.08 mg m(-3)) in the three consecutive testing days (P <0.05). The experimental cage area was divided into four zones along the length of the house, with zone 1 nearest to the evaporative cooling pad and zone 4 nearest to the fans. The air temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, and dust concentration were measured at the sampling points of the four zones in 3 consecutive days and mortality of the birds for the duration of a month were investigated. The results showed that the air temperature, airflow rate, dust concentration, and number of dead birds increase from zone 1 to zone 4 in the tunnel-ventilated layer breeding house. PMID:23210224

  6. Exposure of U.S. Children to Residential Dust Lead, 1999–2004: II. The Contribution of Lead-Contaminated Dust to Children’s Blood Lead Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sherry L.; Gaitens, Joanna M.; Jacobs, David E.; Strauss, Warren; Nagaraja, Jyothi; Pivetz, Tim; Wilson, Jonathan W.; Ashley, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention collected health, housing, and environmental data in a single integrated national survey for the first time in the United States in 1999–2004. Objectives We aimed to determine how floor dust lead (PbD) loadings and other housing factors influence childhood blood lead (PbB) levels and lead poisoning. Methods We analyzed data from the 1999–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), including 2,155 children 12–60 months of age with PbB and PbD measurements. We used linear and logistic regression models to predict log-transformed PbB and the odds that PbB was ≥ 5 and ≥ 10 μg/dL at a range of floor PbD. Results The population-weighted geometric mean (GM) PbB was 2.0 μg/dL (geometric standard error = 1.0). Age of child, race/ethnicity, serum cotinine concentration, poverty-to-income ratio, country of birth, year of building construction, floor PbD by floor surface and condition, windowsill PbD, presence of deteriorated paint, home-apartment type, smoking in the home, and recent renovation were significant predictors in either the linear model [the proportion of variability in the dependent variable accounted for by the model (R2) = 40%] or logistic model for 10 μg/dL (R2 = 5%). At floor PbD = 12 μg/ft2, the models predict that 4.6% of children living in homes constructed before 1978 have PbB ≥ 10 μg/dL, 27% have PbB ≥ 5 μg/dL, and the GM PbB is 3.9 μg/dL. Conclusions Lowering the floor PbD standard below the current standard of 40 μg/ft2 would protect more children from elevated PbB. PMID:19337524

  7. Lead dust in Broken Hill homes: effect of remediation on indoor lead levels.

    PubMed

    Boreland, F; Lyle, D M

    2006-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether home remediation effectively reduced indoor lead levels in Broken Hill, a long-established silver-lead-zinc mining town in outback Australia. A before-after study of the effect of home remediation on indoor lead levels was embedded into a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of remediation for reducing elevated blood lead levels in young children. Moist towelettes were used to measure lead loading (microg/m2) on internal windowsills and internal and entry floors of 98 homes; samples were collected before, immediately after, and 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 months after remediation. Data were log(10) transformed for the analysis. Remediation reduced average indoor lead levels by approximately 50%, and lead levels remained low for the duration of the follow-up period (10 months). The greatest gains were made in homes with the highest initial lead levels; homes with low preremediation lead levels showed little or no benefit. Before remediation, homes located in areas with high soil lead levels or with "poor" dust proofing had higher lead levels than those in areas with lower soil lead levels or with "medium" or "good" dust proofing; these relative differences remained after remediation. There was no evidence that lead loading was reduced by an increased opportunity to become aware of lead issues. We conclude that remediation is an effective strategy for reducing the lead exposure of children living in homes with high indoor lead levels. PMID:16099450

  8. Contamination of houses by workers occupationally exposed in a lead-zinc-copper mine and impact on blood lead concentrations in the families.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaradia, M; Gulson, B L; MacDonald, K

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the pathway of leaded dust from a lead-zinc-copper mine to houses of employees, and the impact on blood lead concentrations (PbB) of children. METHODS: High precision lead isotope and lead concentration data were obtained on venous blood and environmental samples (vacuum cleaner dust, interior dustfall accumulation, water, paint) for eight children of six employees (and the employees) from a lead-zinc-copper mine. These data were compared with results for 11 children from occupationally unexposed control families living in the same city. RESULTS: The median (range) concentrations of lead in vacuum cleaner dust was 470 (21-1300) ppm. In the houses of the mine employees, vacuum cleaner dust contained varying higher proportions of mine lead than did airborne particulate matter measured as dustfall accumulated over a three month period. The median (range) concentrations of lead in soil were 30 (5-407) ppm and these showed no evidence of any mine lead. Lead in blood of the mine employees varied from 7 to 25 micrograms/dl and was generally dominated by mine lead (> 60%). The mean (SD) PbB in the children of the mine employees was 5.7 (1.7) micrograms/dl compared with 4.1 (1.4) micrograms/dl for the control children (P = 0.02). The PbB of all children was always < 10 micrograms/dl, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council goal for all Australians. Some of the control children had higher PbB than the children of mine employees, probably from exposure to leaded paint as six of the eight houses of the control children were > 50 years old. In five of the eight children of mine employees > 20% of PbB was from the lead mine. However, in the other three cases of children of mine employees, their PbB was from sources other than mine lead (paint, petrol, background sources). CONCLUSIONS: Houses of employees from a lead mine can be contaminated by mine lead even if they are not situated in the same place as the mine. Delineation of the mine to house pathway indicates that lead is probably transported into the houses on the clothes, shoes, hair, skin, and in some cases, motor vehicles of the workers. In one case, dust shaken from clothes of a mine employee contained 3000 ppm lead which was 100% mine lead. The variable contamination of the houses was not expected given the precautions taken by mine employees to minimise transportation of lead into their houses. Although five out of the eight children of mine employees had > 20% mine lead in their blood, in no case did the PbB of a child exceed the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council goal of 10 micrograms/dl. In fact, some children in the control families had higher PbB than children of mine employees. In two cases, this was attributed to a pica habit for paint. The PbB in the children of mine employees and controls was independent of the source of lead. The low PbB in the children of mine employees may reflect the relatively low solubility (bioavailability) of the mine dust in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid (< 40 %), behaviour--for example, limited mouthing activity--or diet. PMID:9072019

  9. Human Exposure Assessment: Development of methods to assess the bioaccessibility of organic contaminants sorbed to soils and house dusts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research task- Are physicochemical properties of soil and house dust predictive of the bioaccessibility of sorbed organic compoundsGoalIdentify dust and soil characteristics that influence the bioaccessibility of organic compounds and provide chemical specific data on the fractio...

  10. A pilot study of the measurement and control of deep dust, surface dust, and lead in 10 old carpets using the 3-spot test while vacuuming.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J W; Glass, G; Mickelson, L

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study measured and examined the relationship between surface dust, deep dust, lead (Pb), and the 3-spot test during vacuuming of carpets. The 3-spot test measures the total time in seconds for the indicator light on a Hoover vacuum with dirt detector (HVDD) to turn from red to green on three spots 3 feet apart at least 4 feet from an entrance door. Ten older carpets were sampled in the Seattle area by using the following: (1) a 3-spot test to estimate the deep dust; (2) measuring the surface dust in g/m(2) with the High-Volume Small Simplified Surface Sampler; (3) vacuuming with an HVDD to extract a portion of the deep dust in g/m(2); and (4) repeating this cycle of a 3-spot test, surface dust sample, and deep dust sample until the clean-carpet criteria was reached. Dust particles <150 mum were analyzed for Pb. The surface dust, deep dust, and dust collection rate (g/min) decreased rapidly at first and then much more slowly as vacuuming continued. The initial 3-spot test ranged from 12 to 110 seconds (median 40). The starting surface dust loading was 0.7 to 21.1 g/m(2) (median 2.9 g/m(2)), and it decreased by 84% to 99% when the deep dust was removed. Total dust-the sum of the surface dust and deep dust-ranged from 8.3 to 465 g/m(2) (median 63.2 g/m(2)). It took from 2.3 to 92 min/m(2) (median of 7.5 min/m(2)) to remove the total dust. The starting dust collection rate of 3.8 to 37 g/min decreased to final rates of 0.5 to 4.3 g/min. The 3-spot test (seconds) correlated with total dust (g/m(2)) (r = 0.63, p = 0.037) and cleaning time (min/m(2)) (r = 0.50, p = 0.12) when the data were log transformed. This study supports the utility of the 3-spot test. It tends to provide families and professional carpet cleaners with a quick and low-cost estimate of the deep dust present and the time required to clean carpets as well as indicating when the carpet is clean. Deep dust tends to accumulate in older carpets and becomes surface and airborne dust after activity on a carpet. Monitoring and removing the deep dust in old carpets may decrease the exposure of infants and sensitive adults to Pb, allergen, and other pollutants in house dust. PMID:15657801

  11. Determinants, reproducibility, and seasonal variation of bacterial cell wall components and viable counts in house dust.

    PubMed

    Leppnen, H K; Tubel, M; Roponen, M; Vepslinen, A; Rantakokko, P; Pekkanen, J; Nevalainen, A; von Mutius, E; Hyvrinen, A

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to assess the determinants that affect concentrations of the bacterial cell wall components 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) and muramic acid and of total viable bacteria and actinomycetes in house dust; and (ii) to examine the seasonal variation and reproducibility of these bacterial cell wall components in house dust. A number of lifestyle and environmental factors, mostly not consistent for different bacterial measures but commonly including the type of dwelling and farming (number of livestock), explained up to 37% of the variation of the bacterial concentrations in 212 homes in Eastern Finland. The reproducibility of 3-OH FAs and muramic acid measurements in house dust were studied in five urban homes and were found to be generally high (ICC 74-84%). Temporal variation observed in repeated sampling of the same home throughout a year was more pronounced for 3-OH FAs determinations (ICC 22%) than for muramic acid (ICC 55-66%). We conclude that determinants vary largely for different types of bacterial measurements in house dust; the measured parameters represent different aspects of the bacterial content indoors. More than one sample is needed to describe bacterial concentrations in house dust in the home environment due to large temporal variation. PMID:24992650

  12. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF LEAD PAINT ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES IN RESIDENTIAL HOUSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to demonstrate lead-based paint (LBP) removal from architectural wood components in CO2 unoccupied residential housing using four technologies: granular carbon dioxide (CO2 blasting), pelletized CO2 blasting, encapsulant paint remover, and wet abrasive bl...

  13. Investigating A Novel Flame Retardant Known as V6: Measurements in Baby Products, House Dust and Car Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Gooden, David; Cooper, Ellen M.; McClean, Michael D.; Carignan, Courtney; Makey, Colleen; Stapleton, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    With the phase-out of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants, the use of new and alternate flame retardants has been increasing. 2,2-bis(chloromethyl)propane-1,3-diyltetrakis(2-chloroethyl) bisphosphate, known as V6, is a flame retardant applied to polyurethane foam commonly found in furniture and automobile foam. However, to the authors knowledge, no research has been conducted on V6 levels in the environment. The intention of this study was to measure the concentration of V6 in foam collected from baby products where it was recently detected, and measure levels in dust samples collected from homes and automobiles in the Boston, MA area. To accomplish this a pure V6 commercial standard was purchased from a Chinese manufacturer and purified (> 98%). An analytical method to measure V6 in dust samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) was developed. Extraction was conducted using Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and extracts were purified using an ENVI-Florisil SPE column (500 mg, 3mL). V6 was measured in foam samples collected from baby products with a concentration ranging from 24,500,000 to 59,500,000 ng/g of foam (n = 12, average sd: 46,500,000 12,000,000 ng/g; i.e., on average, 4.6 % of the foam mass was V6). V6 was also detected in 19 of 20 car dust samples and 14 of 20 house dust samples analyzed. The concentration of V6 in the house dust ranged from < 5 ng/g to 1,110 ng/g with a median of 12.5 ng/g, and < 5 ng/g to 6,160 ng/g in the car dust with a median of 103.0 ng/g. Concentrations in car dust were significantly higher than the house dust, potentially indicating higher use of V6 in automobiles compared to products found in the home. Furthermore, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), a known carcinogen, was found in the V6 commercial mixture (14% by weight) as an impurity and was consistently detected with V6 in the foam samples analyzed. A significant correlation was also observed between V6 and TCEP in the dust samples, suggesting that the use of V6 is a significant source of TCEP in the indoor environment. PMID:23565680

  14. Identification of historical lead sources in roof dusts and recent lake sediments from an industrialized area: indications from lead isotopes.

    PubMed

    Chiaradia, M; Chenhall, B E; Depers, A M; Gulson, B L; Jones, B G

    1997-10-20

    X-ray fluorescence and stable lead (Pb) isotopic analyses have been undertaken on dusts, known from microscopic investigation to contain significant quantities of industrially- and urban-derived particulate matter, present in the roof cavities of houses in the Illawarra region (N.S.W., Australia), with the objective of examining the historic record of Pb pollution. All investigated houses contained in excess of 250 micrograms g-1 Pb, with dwellings close to a copper smelter, in a large industrial complex including a major steelworks, containing higher (> 2500 micrograms g-1) Pb concentrations. The isotopic composition in the dusts, expressed here as 206Pb/204Pb, is relatively constant at 17.0, irrespective of dwelling age or distance from the industrial complex. Contamination of the dusts by Pb sourced from paint cannot explain the isotopic uniformity of the dust samples. Isotopic modelling indicates that the dusts contain Pb derived from the copper smelter, gasoline-air Pb and a minor contribution from coal-utilising sources. Lead loading was also investigated in the adjacent lagoon, which acts as a natural sink for particulate matter in the Illawarra region. Isotopic data and modelling indicate that one natural and four anthropogenic sources contribute to the Pb burden of this lagoon. The natural source consists of Permian rocks cropping out in the catchment area which have a 206Pb/204Pb of approximately 18.7. The suggested anthropogenic sources are an old disbanded base-metal (Pb) smelter (206Pb/204Pb approximately 16.2-16.3), the copper smelter (206Pb/204Pb approximately 17.9), gasoline-air derived Pb (206Pb/204Pb approximately 16.4-16.5) and industries utilising coal, for example the recently closed thermal coal-fired power station (206Pb/204Pb approximately 18.9). The relative contributions of the base-metal (mainly lead) smelter and gasoline-air Pb in the sediment can only be partly assessed due to the isotopic similarity of these sources. Likewise the natural background and coal source (e.g. power station) contributions can only be estimated from historical data. Age estimations for sediment cores, using 137Cs, provide some control on these assessments. Near surface sediments in the lagoon have a relatively constant 206Pb/204Pb of 17.6-17.7, irrespective of sample location. Isotopic calculations, together with records of particulate matter pollution emissions, indicate a link between the Pb in roof dusts (206Pb/204Pb approximately 17.0) and Pb contamination of the near surface (upper 20 cm) lagoonal sediments via a homogeneous, non-unique source of lead whose isotopic composition closely matches that of the dusts. Over the last 5 decades, atmospheric fallout of Pb-bearing particulate matter appears to have been the dominant pathway for addition of Pb to the lagoon and dwellings in the Illawarra region. PMID:9372624

  15. Elemental composition of airborne dust in the Shale Shaker House during an offshore drilling operation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A B; Larsen, E; Hansen, L V; Lyngsaae, M; Kunze, H

    1991-12-01

    During 2 days of an offshore drilling operation in the North Sea, 16 airborne dust samples from the atmosphere of the Shale Shaker House were collected onto filters. During this operation, drilling mud composed of a water slurry of barite (BaSO4) together with minor amounts of additives, among them chrome lignosulphonate and chrome lignite, was circulated between the borehole and the Shale Shaker House. The concentration of airborne dust in the atmosphere was determined and the elemental composition of the particles analysed by both PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) and ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry). The total amount of dust collected varied from 0.04 to 1.41 mg m-3 with barium (Ba) as the single most abundant element. The open shale shakers turned out to be the major cause of generation of dust from the solid components of the drilling mud. PMID:1768013

  16. Levels of house dust mite allergen in cars / Razine alergena prainskih grinja u automobilima.

    PubMed

    Mason, Howard J; Smith, Ian; Anua, Siti Marwanis; Tagiyeva, Nargiz; Semple, Sean; Devereux, Graham

    2015-09-01

    This small study investigated house dust mite (HDM) allergen levels in cars and their owners' homes in north-east Scotland. Dust samples from twelve households and cars were collected in a standardised manner. The dust samples were extracted and measured for the Dermatophagoides group 2 allergens (Der p 2 and Der f 2) and total soluble protein. Allergen levels at homes tended to be higher than in the cars, but not significantly. However, they significantly correlated with paired car dust samples expressed either per unit weight of dust or soluble protein (rho=0.657; p=0.02 and 0.769; p=0.003, respectively). This points to house-to-car allergen transfer, with the car allergen levels largely reflecting levels in the owner's home. Car HDM allergen levels were lower than those reported in Brazil and the USA. Twenty-five percent of the houses and none of the cars had allergen levels in dust greater than 2000 ng g-1. This value is often quoted as a threshold for the risk of sensitisation, although a number of studies report increased risk of sensitisation at lower levels. This small study does not allow for characterisation of the distribution of HDM allergen in vehicles in this geographic area, or of the likely levels in other warmer and more humid areas of the UK. Cars and other vehicles are an under-investigated micro-environment for exposure to allergenic material. PMID:26444342

  17. Redecoration of external leaded paintwork and lead-in-dust concentrations in school playgrounds.

    PubMed

    Schwar, M J; Alexander, D J

    1988-01-01

    Playground lead-in-dust concentrations have been measured immediately after the external redecoration of 216 schools in 1983/4 and of 63 schools in 1984/5. Schools were divided into four age categories: A, pre-1914; B, 1914-1939; C, 1945-1965; and D, post-1965. The results show that concentrations can vary widely from school to school within a given age category. For each school, dust samples were collected from an area adjacent to the facade which had been redecorated, referred to here as the 'corridor' area, and from the 'remaining' playground area. The highest mean corridor concentrations were found in playgrounds of schools of age categories A and B, the highest mean value being 74,400 micrograms g-1. The highest value for age category D schools was 2600 micrograms g-1. The mean concentration for all schools in age categories A to D, was respectively 4720, 2820, 820 and 630 micrograms g-1 for the corridor area and 1180, 730, 400 and 440 micrograms g-1 for the remaining area. The highest lead-in-dust concentrations tended to occur within 2.5 m of the building facade. A limited number of measurements showed that concentrations in the corridor area tended to reduce with time, falling to half their initial value (after correcting for the local background level) in about 90-170 days. A model is suggested linking lead-in-dust concentrations in the corridor and remaining areas to lead-in-paint debris dust concentrations. PMID:3363323

  18. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and...

  3. Organophosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) and plasticizers in house and car dust and the influence of electronic equipment.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Sicco H; de Boer, Jacob; van Velzen, Martin J M; Leonards, Pim E G

    2014-12-01

    All nine PFRs studied were detected in house and car dust from the Netherlands with the exception of tris(butyl) phosphate (TNBP) and tris(isobutyl) phosphate (TIBP) in car dust. Tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP, median 22 ?g g(-1)) was dominant in house dust collected around and on electronics followed by tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP, median 1.3 ?g g(-1)), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP, median 1.3 ?g g(-1)) and tris(phenyl) phosphate (TPHP, median 0.8 ?g g(-1)). Levels of TPHP and tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP, also known as TCP) in house dust on electronics were significantly higher than in house dust collected around electronics, suggesting that electronic equipment has limited contribution to the PFR levels in house dust, with the exception of TPHP and TMPP. Car dust was dominated by tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) with the highest levels found in dust collected from the car seats (1100 ?g g(-1)). The mean TDCIPP and TCIPP levels observed in car dust were significantly higher than the levels observed in dust collected around electronics. Significantly higher mean TMPP levels in dust taken from car seats were found compared to dust collected around the equipment (p<0.05). This is probably influenced by the use of TDCIPP, TCIPP in polyurethane foam (car seats) and the use of TMPP as plasticizer in car interiors. Worldwide four PFR patterns were observed in house dust. The PFR pattern in the Netherlands of TDCIPP, TMPP, TCEP, TCIPP and TPHP in house dust is comparable to the pattern found in six other countries, which may point to identical sources of these PFRs in the indoor environment. However, the PFR levels between the countries and within countries showed high variation. PMID:24703013

  4. Prevalence of Lead Hazards and Soil Arsenic in U.S. Housing.

    PubMed

    Dewalt, F Gary; Cox, David C; O'Haver, Robert; Salatino, Brendon; Holmes, Duncan; Ashley, Peter J; Pinzer, Eugene A; Friedman, Warren; Marker, David; Viet, Susan M; Fraser, Alexa

    2015-12-01

    The American Healthy Homes Survey, June 2005-March 2006, measured levels of lead and arsenic in homes nationwide. Based on a three-stage cluster sample of 1,131 housing units, key statistically weighted estimates of the prevalence of lead-based paint (LBP) and LBP hazards associated with paint, dust, and soil, and arsenic in dust and soil, were as follows: 37.1 million homes (35%) had some LBP; 23.2 million (22%) had one or more LBP hazards; 93% of the homes with LBP were built before 1978. The highest prevalence of LBP and LBP hazards was in the Northeast and Midwest. Over three million homes with children under six years of age had LBP hazards, including 1.1 million low-income households (< $30,000/yr.). Less than 5% of homes had detectable levels of arsenic in dust (? 5 ?g/ft2). Arsenic in soil (for homes with yard soil) averaged 6.6 parts per million (ppm). Many homes had soil arsenic levels of 20 ppm or greater, including 16% of homes with wooden structures in the yard and 8% of homes without such structures. PMID:26738315

  5. House-dust mite exposure reduction in specially designed, mechanically ventilated "healthy" homes.

    PubMed

    Harving, H; Korsgaard, J; Dahl, R

    1994-10-01

    Exposure to house-dust mites (Dermatophagoides spp.) was investigated in 30 asthmatic patients before and after moving to homes with mechanical ventilation systems. Median house-dust mite concentration was 110 mites per gram of mattress dust at the initial investigation and 20 mites per gram at the first follow-up after a mean of 4.7 months in the new homes. This was lower (P < 0.05) than counts in a control group of 23 asthmatic patients that had unchanged counts. At a second follow-up, after 15.0 months, mite counts in the study group were further reduced (P < 0.01) from initial values. Among 16 patients, with initial mite counts above the recommended threshold limit value (TLV) of 100 mites per gram of dust, the mite counts fell, in most cases, below this TLV. Air-exchange rates increased (P < 0.001) from a median value of 0.40 air changes per hour (ach) to 1.52 ach at the second follow-up investigation. Furthermore, a reduction (P < 0.01) was found in indoor absolute air humidity, with a median value of 5.6 g of water/kg. No such changes were found in the control group. The present study indicates that reduction of air humidity through an increased supply of fresh air may significantly diminish and, in some cases, even eliminate house-dust mites in homes. PMID:7695059

  6. DIESEL AND CARBON PARTICLES ENHANCE HOUSE DUST MITE-INDUCED PULMONARY HYPERSENSITIVITY IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel and Carbon Particles Enhance House Dust Mite-Induced Pulmonary Hypersensitivity in Brown Norway Rats. P. Singh1, M.J. Daniels2, D. Winsett2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, M. Madden2 and M.I. Gilmour2. 1NCSU, Raleigh, NC and 2 USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

    Ep...

  7. The relative allergenicity of Stachybotrys chartarum compared to house dust mite extracts in a mouse model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. The authors compared the ability of the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum (SCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to i...

  8. ANALYSIS OF SOIL AND HOUSE DUST FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been conjectured that jet turbine exhaust near airplane flight paths may result in significant human exposure to PAH. The fallout from the aerosol plume could be introduced into the residence directly as drafts through the interior of the house or through accumulation of ...

  9. Microbial content of house dust samples determined with qPCR.

    PubMed

    Kaarakainen, Pasi; Rintala, Helena; Vepslinen, Asko; Hyvrinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Meklin, Teija

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to produce information about microbial concentrations using qPCR and their variation in different seasons and home environments with analyses of two types of house dust samples. Also the correlations between the two types of samples and the reproducibility of the parallel subsamples were studied. Two types of vacuumed house dust samples, rug dust and vacuum cleaner bag dust, were collected in 5 normal urban homes in four different seasons (N=20+20). From all dust samples, five parallel subsamples were subjected to qPCR analyses of 17 microbial species or assay groups of microbes. The highest fungal concentrations were found for the Penicillium/Aspergillus/Paecilomyces variotii group, and for the species Aspergillus penicillioides, Aureobasidium pullulans, Cladosporium cladosporioides and Cladosporium herbarum. These species/groups were present in almost all samples. The two types of dust samples gave similar results for most microbial species or groups analyzed, but in general, concentrations were slightly higher in rug dust than in dust from vacuum cleaner bag. Microbial concentrations varied significantly between different seasons and hence the similarity of samples within home was mainly low. The concentrations varied significantly also between different home environments. The reproducibility of the parallel subsamples was good or moderate for most of the analyzed species or assay groups. However, further studies are needed to fully understand the factors causing variation in these methods. Nevertheless, in order to show actual differences in fungal concentrations between urban homes with no known microbial sources, all dust samples to be compared should be taken during the same season. PMID:19473690

  10. Analysis of soil and house dust for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, July 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    It has been conjectured that jet turbine exhaust near airplane flight paths may result in significant human exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs). The EPA Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) arranged access to a household located approximately eight miles from the end of a runway at the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Airport, and collected soil, wipe, and dust samples in and around the household. A total of 19 PAH ranging from naphthalene (2-ring) to coronene (7-ring) were measured. The general concentration trend for the 19 PAH is house dust > entryway dust > soil. The house dust samples were colleted inside the household and the entryway dust and soil samples were collected outside. Seven of the target PAH are ranked as probable human carcinogens (B2) in the U.S. EPA`s Integrated Risk Information System. The concentrations of B2 PAH account for roughly half of the concentrations of the sums of 19 PAH in most soil and dust samples but not in wipe samples.

  11. An investigation of dust lead sampling locations and children's blood lead levels.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan; Dixon, Sherry; Galke, Warren; McLaine, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to provide guidance on where to collect dust lead wipe samples in homes to best characterize the risk of a resident child having a blood lead level at or above the CDC level of concern (10 microg/dl). In 1998, the Milwaukee Health Department enrolled 72 children living in pre-1950 buildings: 34 had elevated (i.e., > or = 10 microg/dl) blood lead levels (EBL); and 38 had non-elevated blood lead levels (non-EBL). This study explored dust lead sampling locations by examining loading differences between homes where children with EBL and non-EBL lived. Floor, windowsill, and window trough samples were collected in the living room, kitchen, bathroom, and child's bedroom and play area. Floor samples were collected at four locations: room entry; center of the room; under a window; and against the wall opposite the window (perimeter). Geometric mean floor dust lead levels were generally two to three times higher in homes of EBL children than homes of non-EBL children. Sampling the floor at the room entry or center is preferable to sampling under the window or from the perimeter of the room. When the central floor average was used, the room combinations that had the greatest differences between homes of EBL children and non-EBL children all included a sample from the child's bedroom and excluded the bathroom. When the entry floor average was used, the greatest differences also excluded bathrooms, but otherwise included a mix of all of the other rooms. Window samples did not distinguish where children with EBLs versus non-EBLs resided. This paper is based on Milwaukee alone, so generalizing results to other locations should be done with caution. PMID:16823397

  12. Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate Flame Retardants: Temporal Variability and Correlations with House Dust Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ellen M.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Hauser, Russ

    2013-01-01

    Background: A reduction in the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) because of human health concerns may result in an increased use of and human exposure to organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Human exposure and health studies of OPFRs are lacking. Objectives: We sought to define the degree of temporal variability in urinary OPFR metabolites in order to inform epidemiologic study design, and to explore a potential primary source of exposure by examining the relationship between OPFRs in house dust and their metabolites in urine. Methods: Nine repeated urine samples were collected from 7 men over the course of 3 months and analyzed for bis(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (BDCPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPP), metabolites of the OPFRs tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP), respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to characterize temporal reliability. Paired house dust and urine samples were collected from 45 men. Results: BDCPP was detected in 91% of urine samples, and DPP in 96%. Urinary BDCPP showed moderate-to-strong temporal reliability (ICC range, 0.550.72). ICCs for DPP were lower, but moderately reliable (range, 0.350.51). There was a weak [Spearman r (rS) = 0.31] but significant (p = 0.03) correlation between urinary BDCPP and TDCPP concentrations in house dust that strengthened when nondetects (rS = 0.47) were excluded. There was no correlation between uncorrected DPP and TPP measured in house dust (rS < 0.1). Conclusions: Household dust may be an important source of exposure to TDCPP but not TPP. Urinary concentrations of BDCPP and DPP were moderately to highly reliable within individuals over 3 months. PMID:23461877

  13. Mold populations and dust mite allergen concentrations in house dust samples from across Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Stephen; Choi, Hyunok; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Acosta, Luis M; Divjan, Adnan; Bolaños-Rosero, Benjamin; Rivera-Mariani, Felix; Chew, Ginger L

    2016-04-01

    Lifetime childhood asthma prevalence (LCAP) percentages in Puerto Rico Health Regions (HR) are substantially higher in northeastern vs. southwestern HR. Higher average relative humidity in the northeast might promote mold and mite exposures and possibly asthma prevalence. To test this hypothesis, mold contamination, Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values were measured in floor dust (n = 26) and dust mite allergen concentrations in bed dust (n = 14). For this analysis, the eight HR were divided into those with LCAP > 30 % (n = 3) and <  30 % (n = 5). The average ERMI value was significantly greater (Wilcoxon Rank Sum, p < 0.001) in high than in low LCAP HR (14.5 vs. 9.3). The dust mite antigens Der p 1, Der f 1, and Blo t 5 were detected in 90 % of bed samples, but the concentrations were not significantly different in high vs. low LCAP HR. Mold exposures might partially explain the differences in LCAP HR in Puerto Rico. PMID:26412677

  14. Distribution of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust as a function of particle size.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, R G; Fortune, C R; Willis, R D; Camann, D E; Antley, J T

    1999-01-01

    House dust is a repository for environmental pollutants that may accumulate indoors from both internal and external sources over long periods of time. Dust and tracked-in soil accumulate most efficiently in carpets, and the pollutants associated with dust and soil may present an exposure risk to infants and toddlers, who spend significant portions of their time in contact with or in close proximity to the floor and who engage in frequent mouthing activities. The availability of carpet dust for exposure by transfer to the skin or by suspension into the air depends on particle size. In this study, a large sample of residential house dust was obtained from a commercial cleaning service whose clients were homeowners residing in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill (Research Triangle) area of North Carolina. The composite dust was separated into seven size fractions ranging from < 4 to 500 microm in diameter, and each fraction was analyzed for 28 pesticides and 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Over 20% of the fractionated dust sample consisted of particles < 25 microm in diameter. Fourteen pesticides and all 10 of the target PAHs were detected in one or more of the seven size-fractionated samples. Sample concentrations reported range from 0.02 to 22 microg/g; the synthetic pyrethroids cis- and trans-permethrin were the most abundant pesticide residue. The concentrations of nearly all of the target analytes increased gradually with decreasing particle size for the larger particles, then increased dramatically for the two smallest particle sizes (4-25 microm and < 4 microm). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10464072

  15. Detection of Organophosphate Flame Retardants in Furniture Foam and US House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Klosterhaus, Susan; Eagle, Sarah; Fuh, Jennifer; Meeker, John D.; Blum, Arlene; Webster, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have resulted in the increased use of alternate flame retardant chemicals to meet flammability standards. However, it has been difficult to determine which chemical formulations are currently being used in high volumes to meet flammability standards since the use of flame retardant formulations in consumer products is not transparent (i.e. not provided to customers). To investigate chemicals being used as replacements for PentaBDE in polyurethane foam, we analyzed foam samples from 26 different pieces of furniture purchased in the United States primarily between 2003 and 2009 using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Samples included foam from couches, chairs, mattress pads, pillows, and, in one case, foam from a sound proofing system of a laboratory grade dust sieve. Fifteen of the foam samples contained the flame retardant tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP; 15% by weight), four samples contained tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP; 0.5 2.2 % by weight), one sample contained brominated chemicals found in a new flame retardant mixture called Firemaster 550 (4.2% by weight), and one foam sample collected from a futon likely purchased prior to 2004 contained PentaBDE (0.5% by weight). Due to the high frequency of detection of the chlorinated phosphate compounds in furniture foam, we analyzed extracts from 50 house dust samples collected between 2002 and 2007 in the Boston, MA area for TDCPP, TCPP, and another high volume use organophosphate-based flame retardant used in foam, triphenylphosphate (TPP). Detection frequencies for TDCPP and TPP in the dust samples were >96% and were log normally distributed, similar to observations for PBDEs. TCPP was positively detected in dust in only 24% of the samples, but detection was significantly limited by a co-elution problem. The geometric mean concentrations for TCPP, TDCPP and TPP in house dust were 570, 1890, and 7360 ng/g, respectively, and maximum values detected in dust were 5490, 56,080 and 1,798,000 ng/g, respectively. These data suggest that levels of these organophosphate flame retardants are comparable, or in some cases, greater than, levels of PBDEs in house dust. The high prevalence of these chemicals in foam and the high concentrations measured in dust (as high as 1.8 mg/g), warrant further studies to evaluate potential health effects from dust exposure, particularly for children. PMID:19848166

  16. Environmental and childhood lead contamination in the proximity of boat-repair yards in southern Thailand--I: pattern and factors related to soil and household dust lead levels.

    PubMed

    Maharachpong, Nipa; Geater, Alan; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2006-07-01

    High blood lead levels have recently been documented in schoolchildren living in communities adjacent to boat-repair yards in southern Thailand. In this study, the spatial pattern of lead contamination of soil and household dust in an area surrounding several boat-repair yards is described, and household factors associated with elevated dust lead are identified. A cross-sectional spatial study was conducted in a coastal residential area within a distance of 2 km from three major boat-repair yards situated on the east coast of peninsular Thailand. Household dust specimens were collected from an undisturbed position in the residences of children, aged 4-14 years, sampled randomly from all children living in the study area. Soil specimens were obtained from the interstices of a square grid, 70 x 70 m2, superimposed on the area. Geographic coordinates of residence and soil sampling positions were recorded and semivariograms and kriging used to contour the spatial distribution of lead in dust and soil. Environmental lead levels were also modeled in terms of direction and minimum distance from a boat-repair yard and, for household dust lead content, in terms of household variables, including occupation of household members in boat-repair work, type of house construction, and general cleanliness. Household dust and soil lead content ranged from 10 to 3025 mg/kg and from 1 to 7700 mg/kg, respectively. The distribution of soil lead peaked at the location of the boat-repair yards, but outside the yards the distribution was generally below 400 mg/kg and irregular. About 24% of household dust lead specimens were equal to or above 400 mg/kg, but showed significant decrease with increasing distance from the boat-repair yards, at rates of between 7% and 14% per 100 m. In houses where a family member was a worker in one of the major boatyards and in houses where occasional repair of small boats was undertaken, household dust lead levels were significantly elevated, by 65% (95% CI: 18-130%) and 31% (95% CI: 5-63%), respectively. Siting of boat-repair yards at a distance from residential areas and measures to reduce the spread of lead-containing dust are recommended to alleviate the problem of elevated household dust lead levels. PMID:16832871

  17. Assessment of cleaning to control lead dust in homes of children with moderate lead poisoning: treatment of lead-exposed children trial.

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Adrienne S; Bornschein, Robert L; Farfel, Mark; Campbell, Carla; Ragan, N Beth; Rhoads, George G; Brophy, Merrill; Wilkens, Sherry; Dockery, Douglas W

    2002-01-01

    In this article we describe the assessment and control of lead dust exposure in the Treatment of Lead-exposed Children (TLC) Trial, a clinical trial of the effects of oral chelation on developmental end points in urban children with moderately elevated blood lead levels. To reduce potential lead exposure from settled dust or deteriorated paint during the drug treatment phase of the trial, the homes of 765 (98%) of the randomized children (both active and placebo drug treatment groups) were professionally cleaned. Lead dust measurements were made in a sample of 213 homes before and after cleaning. Geometric mean dust lead loadings before cleaning were 43, 29, 308, and 707 micro g/ft2 in the kitchen floor, playroom floor, playroom windowsill, and playroom window well samples respectively. Following cleaning, floor dust lead loadings were reduced on average 32% for paired floor samples (p < 0.0001), 66% for windowsills (p < 0.0001), and 93% for window wells (p < 0.0001). Cleaning was most effective for 146 homes with precleaning dust lead levels above the recommended clearance levels, with average reductions of 44%, 74%, and 93% for floors (p < 0.0001), windowsills (p < 0.0001), and window wells (p < 0.0001), respectively. Despite these substantial reductions in dust lead loadings, a single professional cleaning did not reduce the lead loadings of all dust samples to levels below current federal standards for lead in residential dust. Attainment of dust levels below current standards will require more intensive cleaning and lead hazard reduction strategies. PMID:12460817

  18. Assessment of cleaning to control lead dust in homes of children with moderate lead poisoning: treatment of lead-exposed children trial.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Adrienne S; Bornschein, Robert L; Farfel, Mark; Campbell, Carla; Ragan, N Beth; Rhoads, George G; Brophy, Merrill; Wilkens, Sherry; Dockery, Douglas W

    2002-12-01

    In this article we describe the assessment and control of lead dust exposure in the Treatment of Lead-exposed Children (TLC) Trial, a clinical trial of the effects of oral chelation on developmental end points in urban children with moderately elevated blood lead levels. To reduce potential lead exposure from settled dust or deteriorated paint during the drug treatment phase of the trial, the homes of 765 (98%) of the randomized children (both active and placebo drug treatment groups) were professionally cleaned. Lead dust measurements were made in a sample of 213 homes before and after cleaning. Geometric mean dust lead loadings before cleaning were 43, 29, 308, and 707 micro g/ft2 in the kitchen floor, playroom floor, playroom windowsill, and playroom window well samples respectively. Following cleaning, floor dust lead loadings were reduced on average 32% for paired floor samples (p < 0.0001), 66% for windowsills (p < 0.0001), and 93% for window wells (p < 0.0001). Cleaning was most effective for 146 homes with precleaning dust lead levels above the recommended clearance levels, with average reductions of 44%, 74%, and 93% for floors (p < 0.0001), windowsills (p < 0.0001), and window wells (p < 0.0001), respectively. Despite these substantial reductions in dust lead loadings, a single professional cleaning did not reduce the lead loadings of all dust samples to levels below current federal standards for lead in residential dust. Attainment of dust levels below current standards will require more intensive cleaning and lead hazard reduction strategies. PMID:12460817

  19. First National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing: survey design and methods for the allergen and endotoxin components.

    PubMed Central

    Vojta, Patrick J; Friedman, Warren; Marker, David A; Clickner, Robert; Rogers, John W; Viet, Susan M; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Arbes, Samuel J; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2002-01-01

    From July 1998 to August 1999, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences conducted the first National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. The purpose of the survey was to assess children's potential household exposure to lead, allergens, and bacterial endotoxins. We surveyed a sample of 831 homes, representing 96 million permanently occupied, noninstitutional housing units that permit resident children. We administered questionnaires to household members, made home observations, and took environmental samples. This article provides general background information on the survey, an overview of the survey design, and a description of the data collection and laboratory methods pertaining to the allergen and endotoxin components. We collected dust samples from a bed, the bedroom floor, a sofa or chair, the living room floor, the kitchen floor, and a basement floor and analyzed them for cockroach allergen Bla g 1, the dust mite allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1, the cat allergen Fel d 1, the dog allergen Can f 1, the rodent allergens Rat n 1 and mouse urinary protein, allergens of the fungus Alternaria alternata, and endotoxin. This article provides the essential context for subsequent reports that will describe the prevalence of allergens and endotoxin in U.S. households, their distribution by various housing characteristics, and their associations with allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis. PMID:12003758

  20. First National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing: survey design and methods for the allergen and endotoxin components.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Patrick J; Friedman, Warren; Marker, David A; Clickner, Robert; Rogers, John W; Viet, Susan M; Muilenberg, Michael L; Thorne, Peter S; Arbes, Samuel J; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2002-05-01

    From July 1998 to August 1999, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences conducted the first National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. The purpose of the survey was to assess children's potential household exposure to lead, allergens, and bacterial endotoxins. We surveyed a sample of 831 homes, representing 96 million permanently occupied, noninstitutional housing units that permit resident children. We administered questionnaires to household members, made home observations, and took environmental samples. This article provides general background information on the survey, an overview of the survey design, and a description of the data collection and laboratory methods pertaining to the allergen and endotoxin components. We collected dust samples from a bed, the bedroom floor, a sofa or chair, the living room floor, the kitchen floor, and a basement floor and analyzed them for cockroach allergen Bla g 1, the dust mite allergens Der f 1 and Der p 1, the cat allergen Fel d 1, the dog allergen Can f 1, the rodent allergens Rat n 1 and mouse urinary protein, allergens of the fungus Alternaria alternata, and endotoxin. This article provides the essential context for subsequent reports that will describe the prevalence of allergens and endotoxin in U.S. households, their distribution by various housing characteristics, and their associations with allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis. PMID:12003758

  1. New house dust collection system and its use in a study of asthma in dust mite sensitive children in Raleigh, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, A.B.; Beck, M.A.; Henry, M.M.; Barnes, D.M.; Henderson, F.W.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype dust collection system, the House Dust Vacuum One (HDVI), was designed for use in a study to investigate the relationship between house dust mite antigen levels and the presence of asthma in dust mite sensitive children. The HDVI was designed for the collection of dust samples from all potentially relevant domestic substrates, with the primary sampling objective being the retrieval at least 100 mg of sample material. During the winter of 1991-92, dust samples were collected from six different microenvironments in the homes of 49 dust mite sensitive children living in the Raleigh, NC metropolitan area. In addition to the standard antigen immunoassay, the performance of the HDVI was assessed by conducting side by side comparison tests using two alternative antigen collection systems. Microenvironmental antigen concentrations were found to be lognormally distributed within the test homes and within each microenvironment. With the relatively large quantity of sample material collected and the ease with which the HDVI was able to collect samples from a wide variety of substrates, the new unit was determined to be well suited for surface dust and dust mite antigen collection studies.

  2. Characterization of lead, chromium, and cadmium in dust emitted from municipal solid waste incineration plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, K.; Imai, G.; Oshita, K.; Takaoka, M.

    2013-04-01

    The dust is emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). Volatile toxic heavy metals are abundant in smaller dust particles and influence the toxicity of particulate matter such as fine particles <2.5 ?m (PM2.5). However, little is known about the properties of these metals in fine dust particles. Therefore, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy was used to investigate the chemical states of lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and cadmium (Cd) in MSWI dust collected for nine particle size fractions at the inlet of the dust collector and the stacks of two MSWI plants. XAFS spectroscopy of the dust in the inlet of the dust collectors showed that finer dust contained predominantly Pb as PbCl2 with some PbSiO3, coarser dust consisted of Cr forms, including more toxic Cr(VI) species, and all dust contained CdCl2. Although the dust collector removed almost all of the Pb, trace amounts of PbCl2 remained in the stack gas after passing through the dust collector.

  3. Flame Retardant Associations Between Childrens Handwipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Heather M.; Misenheimer, John; Hoffman, Kate; Webster, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants (FRs) have been ubiquitously detected at high concentrations in indoor environments; however, with their recent phase-out, more attention is being focused on measurements of exposure to alternative FRs such as organophosphate FRs (OPFRs). In our previous research, we found that PBDE residues measured on childrens handwipes were a strong predictor of serum PBDE levels. Here we build upon this research to examine longitudinal changes in PBDEs in indoor dust and childrens handwipes, and explore the associations between handwipes and dust for alternative FRs. Children from our previous study were re-contacted after approximately two years and new samples of indoor dust and handwipes were collected. PBDE dust-levels were significantly correlated between two different sampling rounds separated by two years; however, PBDE levels in handwipes were not correlated, perhaps suggesting that the sources of PBDEs remained relatively constant in the home, but that behavioral differences in children are changing with age and influencing handwipe levels. OPFRs [i.e. tris (1,3-dichloroisopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP)], 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, also known as TBB), di(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP, also known as TBPH), and 1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were also ubiquitously detected in house dust samples and geometric mean levels were similar to PBDE levels, or higher in the case of the OPFRs. Significant associations between handwipes and house dust were observed for these alternative FRs, particularly for EH-TBB (rs= 0.54; p<0.001). Increasing house dust levels and age were associated with higher levels of FRs in handwipes, and high hand washing frequency (>5 times/day) was associated with lower FR levels in handwipes. Overall these data suggest that exposure to these alternative FRs will be similar to PBDE exposure, and the influence of hand-to-mouth behavior in childrens exposure needs to be further examined to better estimate exposure potential. PMID:24485814

  4. Serum PBDEs in a North Carolina Toddler Cohort: Associations with Handwipes, House Dust, and Socioeconomic Variables

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Sarah; Sjödin, Andreas; Webster, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent, bioaccumulative, and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Objectives: We used handwipes to estimate exposure to PBDEs in house dust among toddlers and examined sex, age, breast-feeding, race, and parents’ education as predictors of serum PBDEs. Methods: Eighty-three children from 12 to 36 months of age were enrolled in North Carolina between May 2009 and November 2010. Blood, handwipe, and house dust samples were collected and analyzed for PBDEs. A questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data. Results: PBDEs were detected in all serum samples (geometric mean for ΣpentaBDE in serum was 43.3 ng/g lipid), 98% of the handwipe samples, and 100% of the dust samples. Serum ΣpentaBDEs were significantly correlated with both handwipe and house dust ΣpentaBDE levels, but were more strongly associated with handwipe levels (r = 0.57; p < 0.001 vs. r = 0.35; p < 0.01). Multivariate model estimates revealed that handwipe levels, child’s sex, child’s age, and father’s education accounted for 39% of the variation in serum ΣBDE3 levels (sum of BDEs 47, 99, and 100). In contrast, age, handwipe levels, and breast-feeding duration explained 39% of the variation in serum BDE 153. Conclusions: Our study suggests that hand-to-mouth activity may be a significant source of exposure to PBDEs. Furthermore, age, socioeconomic status, and breast-feeding were significant predictors of exposure, but associations varied by congener. Specifically, serum ΣBDE3 was inversely associated with socioeconomic status, whereas serum BDE-153 was positively associated with duration of breast-feeding and mother’s education. PMID:22763040

  5. Detection and intake assessment of organophosphate flame retardants in house dust in Japanese dwellings.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shuji; Araki, Atsuko; Kawai, Toshio; Tsuboi, Tazuru; Ait Bamai, Yu; Yoshioka, Eiji; Kanazawa, Ayako; Cong, Shi; Kishi, Reiko

    2014-04-15

    The demand for phosphorus flame retardants (PFRs) has recently increased as an alternative to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE). PFRs have been detected in house dust, but little is known about the concentrations of PFRs in private homes and the effects on human health. We measured the levels of 10 PFRs in indoor floor dust and upper surface dust from 128 Japanese dwellings of families with children in elementary school. The median (min-max) concentrations (?g/g) of PFRs were as follows: tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP), 30.88 (<0.61-936.65); tris(2-chloro-iso-propyl) phosphate (TCIPP), 0.74 (<0.56-392.52); and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), 0.87 (<0.80-23.35). These values exceeded 50% detection rates, and the rates are median over the LOD in floor dust. The concentrations (?g/g) of TBOEP 26.55 (<0.61-1933.24), TCIPP 2.23 (<0.56-621.23), TPHP 3.13 (<0.80-27.47), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) 1.17 (<0.65-92.22), and tributyl phosphate (TNBP) 0.74 (<0.36-60.64) exceeded 50% detection rates in the upper surface dust. A significant positive correlation (P<0.05) between the concentrations of TCIPP and TBOEP was shown in floor dust and upper surface dust (n=48). Estimated median and 95th percentile daily intake was calculated for toddlers and elementary school children and was compared with reference dose values (RfD) from the literature. For TBOEP, the estimated 95th percentile intake from floor dust was 14% of RfD for toddlers and 4% for school children. The estimated intake from upper surface dust was somewhat lower. Estimated median intake of TBOEP and median intake for the other PFRs were less than 1% of the RfD. TBOEP, TCIPP and TPHP were the main PFRs in the dust. The median levels of PFRs are well below the RfD values. PMID:24531310

  6. In vitro evaluation of acaricidal and fungicidal activity of the house dust mite acaricide, Allerbiocid.

    PubMed

    Hart, B J; Guérin, B; Nolard, N

    1992-10-01

    The acaricidal and fungicidal activities of a new acaricide Allerbiocid, formulated for the control of house dust mites, were investigated. The components of the Allerbiocid formula are: 3% benzyl benzoate (acaricidal and fungicidal), 1% tannic acid (protein denaturant) and 0.5% Tween (surface active agent) in 70% isopropyl alcohol (antiseptic). At application rates of both 150 and 250 ml/m2, the acaricidal activity appeared to work by both ingestion and contact and remained active upon contact with mites for up to 10 weeks. When Sabouraud agar was treated with Allerbiocid at a concentration of 5 ml/20 ml medium, the preparation was also found to have fungicidal and fungistatic activities on various species of fungi commonly found in house dust. Allerbiocid contains tannic acid which is a protein denaturant. Levels of Der p I in dust were found to be reduced by over 90% after treatment with Allerbiocid. The importance of denaturation of mite faecal allergens and allergens associated with dead fungal spores is discussed. PMID:1464048

  7. Levels of phthalate esters in settled house dust from urban dwellings with young children in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Lu, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Sun, Yong-Gang; Zhu, Dong-Mei; Wang, Bing-Ling; Zhao, Ren-Zheng; Zhang, Zheng-Dong

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the levels and possible determinants of phthalate esters (PEs) in settled house dust from urban dwellings with young children, dust was collected from 215 urban houses in Nanjing, China, and 145 outdoor settled dust samples were collected nearby. Six PEs were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All PEs were detected in the dust from approximately 90% of the houses, with the exception of dioctyl phthalate (DOP), which had only a 59% detection rate. Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) were the most abundant PEs, with geometric means of 110 and 16.4 ?g g-1, respectively, and maximal concentrations 9950 and 2150 ?g g-1. Factor analysis showed that DBP, DEHP and benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP) might come from the same source and were significantly influenced by the use of solid-wood floor wax. High BBP, DEHP, DOP and total PE levels were associated with indices of dampness, and high DOP was associated with humidifier use. In conclusion, six PEs are ubiquitous in urban settled house dust in Nanjing, China, and both plastic materials and cosmetic and personal care products are important sources. Flooring material, dampness and humidifier use potentially influence house dust PE levels.

  8. Monitoring Indoor Exposure to Organophosphate Flame Retardants: Hand Wipes and House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kate; Garantziotis, Stavros; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate flame retardants (PFRs) are becoming popular replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures, and they are now commonly detected in indoor environments. However, little is known about human exposure to PFRs because they cannot be easily measured in blood or serum. Objectives: To investigate relationships between the home environment and internal exposure, we assessed associations between two PFRs, tris(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), in paired hand wipe and dust samples and concentrations of their metabolites in urine samples (n = 53). We also assessed short-term variation in urinary metabolite concentrations (n = 11 participants; n = 49 samples). Methods: Adult volunteers in North Carolina, USA, completed questionnaires and provided urine, hand wipe, and household dust samples. PFRs and PBDEs were measured in hand wipes and dust, and bis(1,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (BDCIPP) and diphenyl phosphate (DPHP), metabolites of TDCIPP and TPHP, were measured in urine. Results: TDCIPP and TPHP were detected frequently in hand wipes and dust (> 86.8%), with geometric mean concentrations exceeding those of PBDEs. Unlike PBDEs, dust TDCIPP and TPHP levels were not associated with hand wipes. However, hand wipe levels were associated with urinary metabolites. Participants with the highest hand wipe TPHP mass, for instance, had DPHP levels 2.42 times those of participants with the lowest levels (95% CI: 1.23, 4.77). Women had higher levels of DPHP, but not BDCIPP. BDCIPP and DPHP concentrations were moderately to strongly reliable over 5 consecutive days (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.81 and 0.51, respectively). Conclusions: PFR exposures are widespread, and hand-to-mouth contact or dermal absorption may be important pathways of exposure. Citation: Hoffman K, Garantziotis S, Birnbaum LS, Stapleton HM. 2015. Monitoring indoor exposure to organophosphate flame retardants: hand wipes and house dust. Environ Health Perspect 123:160165;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408669 PMID:25343780

  9. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF METHOD EVALUATION MATERIALS FOR LEAD IN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The procedure used to prepare lead (Pb) in dust method evaluation materials from real-world dusts is described. aterials prepared using this procedure have been found suitable for use as quality control check samples as well as for evaluation of new methods. rocedures described i...

  10. Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: an unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Barbara J; Metre, Peter C Van; Wilson, Jennifer T; Musgrove, Marylynn; Burbank, Teresa L; Ennis, Thomas E; Bashara, Thomas J

    2010-02-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coal-tar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 microg/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 microg/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 microg/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 microg/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. PMID:20063893

  11. Coal-Tar-Based Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of PAH to Settled House Dust

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coal-tar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 ?g/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 ?g/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 ?g/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 ?g/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. PMID:20063893

  12. Elevated house dust and serum concentrations of PBDEs in California: unintended consequences of furniture flammability standards?

    PubMed

    Zota, Ami R; Rudel, Ruthann A; Morello-Frosch, Rachel A; Brody, Julia Green

    2008-11-01

    Studies show higher house dust and body burden levels of PBDE flame retardants in North America than Europe; but little is known about exposure variation within North America, where California's furniture flammability standard affects PBDE use. We compared dust samples from 49 homes in two California communities with 120 Massachusetts homes and with other published studies. Dust concentrations [median (range) ng/g] in California homes of BDE-47, -99, and -100 were 2700 (112-107,000), 3800 (102-170,000), and 684 (dust. We then investigated whether human serum PBDE levels were also higher in California compared to other North American regions by analyzing the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the only data set available with serum from a representative sample of the U.S. population (n=2040). California residence was significantly associated with nearly 2-fold higher sigma PBDE serum levels [least square geometric mean (LSGM) ng/g lipid, 73.0 vs 38.5 (p = 0.002)]. Elevated PBDE exposures in California may result from the state's furniture flammability standards; our results suggest the need for further research in a larger representative sample. PMID:19031918

  13. Coal-tar-based parking lot sealcoat: An unrecognized source of PAH to settled house dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Wilson, J.T.; Musgrove, M.; Burbank, T.L.; Ennis, T.E.; Bashara, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite much speculation, the principal factors controlling concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in settled house dust (SHD) have not yet been identified. In response to recent reports that dust from pavement with coaltar-based sealcoat contains extremely high concentrations of PAH, we measured PAH in SHD from 23 apartments and in dust from their associated parking lots, one-half of which had coal-tar-based sealcoat (CT). The median concentration of total PAH (T-PAH) in dust from CT parking lots (4760 ??g/g, n = 11) was 530 times higher than that from parking lots with other pavement surface types (asphalt-based sealcoat, unsealed asphalt, concrete [median 9.0 ??g/g, n = 12]). T-PAH in SHD from apartments with CT parking lots (median 129 ??g/g) was 25 times higher than that in SHD from apartments with parking lots with other pavement surface types (median 5.1 ??g/g). Presence or absence of CT on a parking lot explained 48% of the variance in log-transformed T-PAH in SHD. Urban land-use intensity near the residence also had a significant but weaker relation to T-PAH. No other variables tested, including carpeting, frequency of vacuuming, and indoor burning, were significant. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  14. [The fauna, number and spatial distribution of mites (Acari) in house dust in Moscow].

    PubMed

    Zhëltikova, T M; Petrova, A D

    1990-01-01

    There is a wide and strong allergenic background in Moscow, which is determined by relatively high population density and regular frequency of the allergenic mites in various premises. 34 species have been identified, 5 of them are allergen producers. The mites of the family Pyroglyphidae are the main component of the house dust fauna. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae distributed all over the world are predominate. A comparative evaluation of the fauna structure, numbers and frequency of the allergenic mites in the flat dust of the allergic patients and healthy people as well as premises is given. Possible importance of the premises in prevalence and circulation of the allergenic mites in the modern town is estimated for the first time. PMID:2346769

  15. House dust mite allergy in Korea: the most important inhalant allergen in current and future.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2012-11-01

    The house-dust mite (HDM), commonly found in human dwellings, is an important source of inhalant and contact allergens. In this report, the importance of HDM allergy in Korea and the characteristics of allergens from dust mite are reviewed with an emphasis on investigations performed in Korea. In Korea, Dermatophagoides farinae is the dominant species of HDM, followed by D. pteronyssinus. Tyrophagus putrescentiae is also found in Korea, but its role in respiratory allergic disease in Korea is controversial. The relatively low densities of mite populations and concentrations of mite major allergens in dust samples from Korean homes, compared to westernized countries, are thought to reflect not only different climatic conditions, but also cultural differences, such as the use of 'ondol' under-floor heating systems in Korean houses. HDM are found in more than 90% of Korean houses, and the level of exposure to HDM is clinically significant. About 40%-60% of Korean patients suffering from respiratory allergies, and more than 40% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis, are sensitized to HDM. Mite allergens can be summarized according to their inherent auto-adjuvant activities and/or their binding affinities to the adjuvant-like substances: proteolytic enzymes, lipid binding proteins, chitin binding proteins, and allergens not associated with adjuvant-like activity. In general, allergens with a strong adjuvant-like activity or adjuvant-binding activity elicit potent IgE reactivity. In Korea, Der f 2 is the most potent allergen, followed by Der f 1. Immune responses are modulated by the properties of the allergen itself and by the adjuvant-like substances that are concomitantly administered with the antigens. Characterization of allergenic molecules and elucidation of mechanisms by which adjuvant-like molecules modulate allergic reactions, not only in Korea but also worldwide, will provide valuable information on allergic diseases, and are necessary for the development of diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23115727

  16. 419?IGE-mediated Responses Towards Fish Parasite Anisakis, Crab and House Dust Mite in Norwegian Shrimp Allergic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dooper, Maaike; Myrset, Heidi; Egaas, Eliann; van Do, Thien; Florvaag, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study investigated to what extent shrimp allergic individuals were IgE-sensitized to anisakis, crab and house dust mite and whether tropomyosin was responsible for IgE cross-reactivity. Methods 29 Individuals with self reported shrimp allergy were recruited by advertisements in local and national news-papers in Norway. Anamnesis was taken, skin prick tests (SPT) were performed and positive responders to shrimp were studied further with basophile activation test (BAT), ImmunoCAP analyses and western blotting. Results Of the 29 persons studied, 10 (34%) had positive SPT against shrimp and house dust mite, 9 (31%) against shrimp tropomyosin and 3 (10%) against anisakis. Individuals with positive SPT to shrimp all showed positive basophilic responses to house dust mite, while 43% responded to shrimp, 25% to anisakis and 36% to crab in BAT. Moreover, SPT, BAT as well as ImmunoCAP analyses showed a positive correlation of IgE-reactivity between anisakis and shrimp, house dust mite and crab. Immunoblot studies indicated that these responses are not completely explained by cross-reactivity towards tropomyosin. Conclusions The current study indicates a positive correlation between IgE-mediated reactions to shrimp, anisakis, house dust mite and crab, which may not be completely explained by cross-reactivity against tropomyosin.

  17. Beta(1-->3)-glucan in house dust of German homes: housing characteristics, occupant behavior, and relations with endotoxins, allergens, and molds.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, U; Douwes, J; Doekes, G; Koch, A; Bischof, W; Fahlbusch, B; Richter, K; Wichmann, H E; Heinrich, J

    2001-01-01

    beta(1-->3)-Glucans are potent proinflammatory agents that have been suggested to play a role in indoor-related respiratory health effects. The aim of this study was to assess whether beta(1-->3)-glucan concentrations in house dust are correlated with levels of endotoxins, allergens, and culturable mold spore counts in house dust. Further, the associations of beta(1-->3)-glucan with housing characteristics and occupant behavior were assessed. beta(1-->3)-Glucan was measured in settled house dust from living room floors of 395 homes of two German cities, Erfurt and Hamburg, with a specific enzyme immunoassay. Concentrations ranged from below the limit of detection to 19,013 microg/m(2) (22,588 microg/g dust). Concentrations per square meter were found to be correlated with endotoxins, mite and cat allergens, and culturable mold spores. Correlations were weaker when concentrations were expressed per gram of dust, indicating that variance in concentrations of all factors is largely determined by the amount of dust sampled. Associations between beta(1-->3)-glucan, housing characteristics, and occupant behavior were found for concentrations per square meter but not for concentrations per gram of dust. The following characteristics were associated with a significant increase in beta(1-->3)-glucan levels: carpets in the living room [means ratio (MR) = 1.9-2.1], keeping a dog inside (MR = 1.4), use of the home by four or more persons (MR = 1.4), use of the living room for > 180 hr/week (MR = 2.1), lower frequency of vacuum cleaning (MR = 1.6-3.0) and dust cleaning (MR = 1.2 and 1.4, respectively), and presence of mold spots during the past 12 months (MR = 1.4). We conclude that that the amount of dust sampled can be used as a proxy for hygiene and that beta(1-->3)-glucan concentrations per square meter are related to the amount of dust sampled. PMID:11266323

  18. Alpha-actinin is a new type of house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    An, Su; Shen, Chuanbing; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Lingling; Xu, Xuemei; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Zhigang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Main indoor allergens for humans are from house dust mites. There are more than 30 allergens in Dermatophagoides farinae but only fourteen allergens have been identified from this mite including Der f 1-3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13-18, and 22. A native allergen protein (Der f 24, 90 kDa) was purified from D. farinae by gel filtration and anionic exchange liquid chromatography combined with IgE immunodetection. Its primary structure was determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis and cDNA cloning. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition tests (ELISA-IT), immunoblots, basophil activation test (BAT) and skin prick test (SPT) were performed to evaluate the allergenicity. It was identified as an alpha (?)-actinin containing a CaM-like domain with EF-hand motifs. Der f 24 reacted to sera from 85.4% (35/41) of patients on western blot analysis. It reduced ?20% sera IgE reactivity to D. farinae extracts on a competitive ELISA. Eighty percent (8/10) of patients with D. farinae allergy showed positive reactions to Der f 24 in skin prick test. The expression of CD63 on basophils from patients was up-regulated by Der f 24 by ?5.4-fold. Alpha-actinin was identified as a new type of house dust mite allergen. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of ?-actinin as an allergen. PMID:24324688

  19. Respiratory allergy caused by house dust mites: What do we really know?

    PubMed

    Caldern, Moiss A; Linneberg, Allan; Kleine-Tebbe, Jrg; De Blay, Frdric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-07-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is a major perennial allergen source and a significant cause of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. However, awareness of the condition remains generally low. This review assesses the links between exposure to HDM, development of the allergic response, and pathologic consequences in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We investigate the epidemiology of HDM allergy to explore the interaction between mites and human subjects at the population, individual, and molecular levels. Core and recent publications were identified by using "house dust mite" as a key search term to evaluate the current knowledge of HDM epidemiology and pathophysiology. Prevalence data for HDM allergen sensitization vary from 65 to 130 million persons in the general population worldwide to as many as 50% among asthmatic patients. Heterogeneity of populations, terminology, and end points in the literature confound estimates, indicating the need for greater standardization in epidemiologic research. Exposure to allergens depends on multiple ecological strata, including climate and mite microhabitats within the domestic environment, with the latter providing opportunity for intervention measures to reduce allergen load. Inhaled mite aeroallergens are unusually virulent: they are able to activate both the adaptive and innate immune responses, potentially offering new avenues for intervention. The role of HDM allergens is crucial in the development of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but the translation of silent sensitization into symptomatic disease is still incompletely understood. Improved understanding of HDMs, their allergens, and their microhabitats will enable development of more effective outcomes for patients with HDM allergy. PMID:25457152

  20. The Effectiveness of Acupuncture Compared to Loratadine in Patients Allergic to House Dust Mites

    PubMed Central

    Hauswald, Bettina; Dill, Christina; Boxberger, Jrgen; Kuhlisch, Eberhard; Zahnert, Thomas; Yarin, Yury M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of acupuncture and its impact on the immune system in comparison to loratadine in the treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis caused by house dust mites. Methods. In this study, 24 patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis induced by house dust mites were treated either with acupuncture (n = 15) or with loratadine (n = 9). The evaluation of the data was based on the subjective and the objective rhinoconjunctivitis symptom scores, specific and total IgE, and interleukins (IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-?) as markers for the activity of Th1 or Th2 cells. Results. The treatments with acupuncture as well as with loratadine were considered effective in the patients' subjective assessment, whereby the effect of the acupuncture tended to be assessed as more persistent after the end of treatment. A change in the specific or the total IgE was not detectable in either group. The interleukin profile showed the tendency of an increasing IL-10 value in the acupuncture group. The results of the study show that the effectiveness of acupuncture is comparable to that of loratadine. Conclusion. Acupuncture is a clinically effective form of therapy in the treatment of patients suffering from persistent allergic rhinitis. The results indicate the probability of an immunomodulatory effect. PMID:24995021

  1. Effects of five insect growth regulators on laboratory populations of the North American house-dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae.

    PubMed

    Downing, A S; Wright, C G; Farrier, M H

    1990-08-01

    The potential of insect growth regulators (methoprene, hydroprene, fenoxycarb, diflubenzuron and triflumuron) to control populations of the North American house-dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Hughes) was assessed in laboratory bioassays. Methoprene was most effective at suppressing population growth, especially at concentrations of 1.0% (10,000 ppm) and 5.0% (5000 ppm) active ingredient. Hydroprene, structurally related to methoprene, also suppressed house-dust mite populations but not as consistently as methoprene. Fenoxycarb may be effective at controlling house-dust mites but at greater concentrations than were tested. Diflubenzuron and triflumuron, two chitin-synthesis inhibitors, failed to suppress mite numbers and may, in fact, stimulate reproduction in some cases. Almost all concentration of the insect growth regulators were shown to be ineffective when assayed 90 days after treatment. PMID:2226070

  2. Analysis of House Dust and Childrens Hair for Pesticides: A Comparison of Markers of Ongoing Pesticide Exposure in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ostrea, Enrique M.; Villanueva-Uy, Esterlita; Bielawski, Dawn; Birn, Sarah; Janisse, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim The long term study of the adverse effects of pesticides on child neuro development requires monitoring not only of initial, but ongoing pesticide exposure. Our aim was to compare house dust and childrens hair as environmental and biological markers of ongoing pesticide exposure in children. Design/Methods In a continuing NIH study on the adverse effects of prenatal pesticide exposure on child neurodevelopment, ongoing pesticide exposure after birth was measured in swept house dust and hair in the children at 4 years of age for propoxur and pyrethroids (transfluthrin, bioallethrin, cyfluthrin and cypermethrin) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The prevalence and concentration of pesticides in the two matrices were compared. Results Prevalence of propoxur was higher in hair compared to house dust (p<0.001) whereas prevalence of the pyrethroids was higher (p<0.001) in house dust. The overall concentrations of the pyrethroids were also higher (p<0.007) in house dust compared to hair. There was a significant (p<0.001) correlation between dust and hair for bioallethrin and cypermethrin. Conclusions Ongoing exposure of children to environmental pesticides is sensitively detected by analysis of childrens hair and house dust. However, prevalence of propoxur was higher in hair compared to swept house dust, but the opposite was found for the pyrethroids. Thus, both matrices should be analyzed. There was a significant (p<0.001) correlation between house dust and hair for bioallethrin and cypermethrin. PMID:24288586

  3. National Center for Healthy Housing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Health Benefits of Green Green Rehabilitation of Elder Apartment Treatments Health V Lead Lead Exterior Dust on Porches Venting for Health Archived Research Projects Training Demystifying Healthcare Financing Equipping States for Reimbursement Housing ...

  4. COST ESTIMATES OF USING THREE LEAD-BASED PAINT ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGIES ON RESIDENTIAL HOUSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated blood lead levels in children of the US due to exposure to flaking lead-based paint continues to be an important health concern. Approximately 57M housing units, which represent 75% of all privately owned and occupied housing built before 1980 in the US are contaminated ...

  5. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can become contaminated from household dust or exterior soil. Both are known lead sources. Regularly wet-mop ... entering the house to prevent bringing lead-contaminated soil in from outside. Prevent children from playing in ...

  6. A Controlled Challenge Study on Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) in House Dust and the Immune Response in Human Nasal Mucosa of Allergic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deutschle, Tom; Reiter, Rudolf; Butte, Werner; Heinzow, Birger; Keck, Tilman; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Few studies have yet addressed the effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in house dust on human nasal mucosa. Objectives We investigated the effects of house dust containing DEHP on nasal mucosa of healthy and house dust mite (HDM)–allergic subjects in a short-term exposure setting. Methods We challenged 16 healthy and 16 HDM-allergic subjects for 3 hr with house dust at a concentration of 300 μg/m3 containing either low (0.41 mg/g) or high (2.09 mg/g) levels of DEHP. Exposure to filtered air served as control. After exposure, we measured proteins and performed a DNA microarray analysis. Results Nasal exposure to house dust with low or high DEHP had no effect on symptom scores. Healthy subjects had almost no response to inhaled dust, but HDM-allergic subjects showed varied responses: DEHPlow house dust increased eosinophil cationic protein, granulocyte-colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-6, whereas DEHPhigh house dust decreased G-CSF and IL-6. Furthermore, in healthy subjects, DEHP concentration resulted in 10 differentially expressed genes, whereas 16 genes were differentially expressed in HDM-allergic subjects, among them anti-Müllerian hormone, which was significantly up-regulated after exposure to DEHPhigh house dust compared with exposure to DEHPlow house dust, and fibroblast growth factor 9, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β1, which were down-regulated. Conclusions Short-term exposure to house dust with high concentrations of DEHP has attenuating effects on human nasal immune response in HDM-allergic subjects, concerning both gene expression and cytokines. PMID:19057701

  7. The impact of drinking water, indoor dust and paint on blood lead levels of children aged 1–5 years in Montréal (Québec, Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Levallois, Patrick; St-Laurent, Julie; Gauvin, Denis; Courteau, Marilène; Prévost, Michèle; Campagna, Céline; Lemieux, France; Nour, Shokoufeh; D'Amour, Monique; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2014-01-01

    Lead is neurotoxic at very low dose and there is a need to better characterize the impact of domestic sources of lead on the biological exposure of young children. A cross-sectional survey evaluated the contribution of drinking water, house dust and paint to blood lead levels (BLLs) of young children living in old boroughs of Montréal (Canada). Three hundred and six children aged 1 to 5 years and currently drinking tap water participated in the study. For each participant, residential lead was measured in kitchen tap water, floor dust, windowsill dust and house paint and a venous blood sample was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between elevated BLL in the children (≥ 75th percentile) and indoor lead contamination by means of odds ratios (OR) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was an association between BLL ≥75th percentile (1.78 μg/dL) and water lead when the mean water concentration was >3.3 μg/L: adjusted OR=4.7 (95% CI: 2.1–10.2). Windowsill dust loading >14.1 μg/ft2 was also associated with BLL ≥1.78 μg/dL: adjusted OR=3.2 (95% CI: 1.3–7.8). Despite relatively low BLLs, tap water and house dust lead contribute to an increase of BLLs in exposed young children. PMID:23361441

  8. The impact of drinking water, indoor dust and paint on blood lead levels of children aged 1-5 years in Montréal (Québec, Canada).

    PubMed

    Levallois, Patrick; St-Laurent, Julie; Gauvin, Denis; Courteau, Marilène; Prévost, Michèle; Campagna, Céline; Lemieux, France; Nour, Shokoufeh; D'Amour, Monique; Rasmussen, Pat E

    2014-01-01

    Lead is neurotoxic at very low dose and there is a need to better characterize the impact of domestic sources of lead on the biological exposure of young children. A cross-sectional survey evaluated the contribution of drinking water, house dust and paint to blood lead levels (BLLs) of young children living in old boroughs of Montréal (Canada). Three hundred and six children aged 1 to 5 years and currently drinking tap water participated in the study. For each participant, residential lead was measured in kitchen tap water, floor dust, windowsill dust and house paint and a venous blood sample was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between elevated BLL in the children (≥ 75th percentile) and indoor lead contamination by means of odds ratios (OR) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was an association between BLL ≥75th percentile (1.78 μg/dL) and water lead when the mean water concentration was >3.3 μg/L: adjusted OR=4.7 (95% CI: 2.1-10.2). Windowsill dust loading >14.1 μg/ft(2) was also associated with BLL ≥1.78 μg/dL: adjusted OR=3.2 (95% CI: 1.3-7.8). Despite relatively low BLLs, tap water and house dust lead contribute to an increase of BLLs in exposed young children. PMID:23361441

  9. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I-Dust.

    PubMed

    David, Bruce; Moe, Randi Oppermann; Michel, Virginie; Lund, Vonne; Mejdell, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages) or no access to litter (conventional cages). The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban. PMID:26479370

  10. Air Quality in Alternative Housing Systems May Have an Impact on Laying Hen Welfare. Part I—Dust

    PubMed Central

    David, Bruce; Oppermann Moe, Randi; Michel, Virginie; Lund, Vonne; Mejdell, Cecilie

    2015-01-01

    The new legislation for laying hens in the European Union put a ban on conventional cages. Production systems must now provide the hens with access to a nest, a perch, and material for dust bathing. These requirements will improve the behavioral aspects of animal welfare. However, when hens are kept with access to litter, it is a concern that polluted air may become an increased threat to health and therefore also a welfare problem. This article reviews the literature regarding the health and welfare effects birds experience when exposed to barn dust. Dust is composed of inorganic and organic compounds, from the birds themselves as well as from feed, litter, and building materials. Dust may be a vector for microorganisms and toxins. In general, studies indicate that housing systems where laying hens have access to litter as aviaries and floor systems consistently have higher concentrations of suspended dust than caged hens with little (furnished cages) or no access to litter (conventional cages). The higher dust levels in aviaries and floor housing are also caused by increased bird activity in the non-cage systems. There are gaps in both the basic and applied knowledge of how birds react to dust and aerosol contaminants, i.e., what levels they find aversive and/or impair health. Nevertheless, high dust levels may compromise the health and welfare of both birds and their caretakers and the poor air quality often found in new poultry housing systems needs to be addressed. It is necessary to develop prophylactic measures and to refine the production systems in order to achieve the full welfare benefits of the cage ban. PMID:26479370

  11. Dustborne Alternaria alternata antigens in U.S. homes: Results from the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Pivi M.; Yin, Ming; Arbes, Samuel J.; Cohn, Richard D.; Sever, Michelle; Muilenberg, Michael; Burge, Harriet A.; London, Stephanie J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Alternaria alternata is one of the most common fungi associated with allergic disease. However, Alternaria exposure in indoor environments is not well characterized. Objective: The primary goals of this study were to examine the prevalence of Alternaria exposure and identify independent predictors of Alternaria antigen concentrations in U.S. homes. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained from the National Survey of Lead and Allergens in Housing. A nationally representative sample of 831 housing units in 75 different locations throughout the U.S. completed the survey. Information on housing and household characteristics was obtained by questionnaire and environmental assessments. Concentrations of Alternaria antigens in dust collected from various indoor sites were assessed with a polyclonal anti-Alternaria antibody assay. Results: Alternaria antigens were detected in most (95-99%) of the dust samples. The geometric mean concentration, reflecting the average Alternaria concentration in homes, was 4.88 ?g/g (SE=0.13 ?g/g). In the multivariable linear regression analysis, the age of the housing unit, geographic region, urbanization, poverty, family race, observed mold and moisture problems, use of dehumidifier, and presence of cats and dogs were independent predictors of Alternaria antigen concentrations. Less frequent cleaning and smoking indoors also contributed to higher Alternaria antigen levels in homes. Conclusion: Exposure to Alternaria alternata antigens in U.S. homes is common. Antigen levels in homes are not only influenced by regional factors but also by residential characteristics. Preventing mold and moisture problems, avoiding smoking indoors, and regular household cleaning may help reduce exposure to Alternaria antigens indoors. PMID:16159634

  12. Rare adverse events due to house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric practice: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Galip, Nilufer; Bahceciler, Nerin

    2015-12-01

    Sublingual route, a noninjective way of allergen administration appears to be associated with a lower incidence of severe systemic reactions compared with the subcutaneous route. Local adverse reactions are reported which resolve spontaneously within a few days without need for discontinuation of treatment. Hereby, we report two pediatric cases, one with persistent asthma and the other one with persistent allergic rhinitis. Both were treated by house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy, one of whom developed severe wheezing (grade 2 systemic reaction based on World Allergy Organization subcutaneous systemic reaction grading system) and the other intractable vomiting (grade 3 local reaction based on World Allergy Organization sublingual immunotherapy local adverse events grading system) at the end of the build-up phase which repeated on re-administration of the same dose. Both of those two cases completed their 3-year immunotherapy successfully by patient-based adjustment of the highest tolerated dose of the maintenance. PMID:26427747

  13. Pesticides in house dust from urban and farmworker households in California: an observational measurement study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies report that residential use of pesticides in low-income homes is common because of poor housing conditions and pest infestations; however, exposure data on contemporary-use pesticides in low-income households is limited. We conducted a study in low-income homes from urban and agricultural communities to: characterize and compare house dust levels of agricultural and residential-use pesticides; evaluate the correlation of pesticide concentrations in samples collected several days apart; examine whether concentrations of pesticides phased-out for residential uses, but still used in agriculture (i.e., chlorpyrifos and diazinon) have declined in homes in the agricultural community; and estimate resident children's pesticide exposures via inadvertent dust ingestion. Methods In 2006, we collected up to two dust samples 5-8 days apart from each of 13 urban homes in Oakland, California and 15 farmworker homes in Salinas, California, an agricultural community (54 samples total). We measured 22 insecticides including organophosphates (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, diazinon-oxon, malathion, methidathion, methyl parathion, phorate, and tetrachlorvinphos) and pyrethroids (allethrin-two isomers, bifenthrin, cypermethrin-four isomers, deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, imiprothrin, permethrin-two isomers, prallethrin, and sumithrin), one phthalate herbicide (chlorthal-dimethyl), one dicarboximide fungicide (iprodione), and one pesticide synergist (piperonyl butoxide). Results More than half of the households reported applying pesticides indoors. Analytes frequently detected in both locations included chlorpyrifos, diazinon, permethrin, allethrin, cypermethrin, and piperonyl butoxide; no differences in concentrations or loadings were observed between locations for these analytes. Chlorthal-dimethyl was detected solely in farmworker homes, suggesting contamination due to regional agricultural use. Concentrations in samples collected 5-8 days apart in the same home were strongly correlated for the majority of the frequently detected analytes (Spearman ? = 0.70-1.00, p < 0.01). Additionally, diazinon and chlorpyrifos concentrations in Salinas farmworker homes were 40-80% lower than concentrations reported in samples from Salinas farmworker homes studied between 2000-2002, suggesting a temporal reduction after their residential phase-out. Finally, estimated non-dietary pesticide intake for resident children did not exceed current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) recommended chronic reference doses (RfDs). Conclusion Low-income children are potentially exposed to a mixture of pesticides as a result of poorer housing quality. Historical or current pesticide use indoors is likely to contribute to ongoing exposures. Agricultural pesticide use may also contribute to additional exposures to some pesticides in rural areas. Although children's non-dietary intake did not exceed U.S. EPA RfDs for select pesticides, this does not ensure that children are free of any health risks as RfDs have their own limitations, and the children may be exposed indoors via other pathways. The frequent pesticide use reported and high detection of several home-use pesticides in house dust suggests that families would benefit from integrated pest management strategies to control pests and minimize current and future exposures. PMID:21410986

  14. AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lark Kyun; Morita, Rimpei; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack; Eynon, Elizabeth E; Flavell, Richard A

    2015-06-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, a component of the exoskeleton of many organisms including the house dust mite (HDM). Here we show that knockin mice expressing an enzymatically inactive acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), the dominant true chitinase in mouse lung, showed enhanced type 2 immune responses to inhaled HDM. We found that uncleaved chitin promoted the release of IL-33, whereas cleaved chitin could be phagocytosed and could induce the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent activation of caspase-7; this results in the resolution of type 2 immune responses, probably by promoting the inactivation of IL-33. These data suggest that AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled chitin-containing aeroallergens. PMID:26038565

  15. AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled house dust mites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Lark Kyun; Morita, Rimpei; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack; Eynon, Elizabeth E.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases are enzymes that cleave chitin, a component of the exoskeleton of many organisms including the house dust mite (HDM). Here we show that knockin mice expressing an enzymatically inactive acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), the dominant true chitinase in mouse lung, showed enhanced type 2 immune responses to inhaled HDM. We found that uncleaved chitin promoted the release of IL-33, whereas cleaved chitin could be phagocytosed and could induce the activation of caspase-1 and subsequent activation of caspase-7; this results in the resolution of type 2 immune responses, probably by promoting the inactivation of IL-33. These data suggest that AMCase is a crucial regulator of type 2 immune responses to inhaled chitin-containing aeroallergens. PMID:26038565

  16. Gene silencing by RNA interference in the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed

    Marr, Edward J; Sargison, Neil D; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Burgess, Stewart T G

    2015-12-01

    This is the first report of gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in the European house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Trouessart, 1897. Using a non-invasive immersion method first developed for the honey bee mite, Varroa destructor, a significant reduction in the expression of D. pteronyssinus glutathione-S-transferase mu-class 1 enzyme (DpGST-mu1) was achieved following overnight immersion in double stranded RNA encoding DpGST-mu1. Although no detrimental phenotypic changes were observed following silencing, this technique can now be used to address fundamental physiological questions and assess the potential therapeutic benefit in silencing D. pteronyssinus target genes in selected domestic situations of high human-mite interface. PMID:26212476

  17. Development of mass rearing technique of Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae) found in house dust.

    PubMed

    Ree, H I; Lee, I Y

    1997-09-01

    A storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, is recently known to be widely distributed in Korea, being commonly found in house dust, and may, therefore, be allergenically important. The purpose of this study was to develop mass rearing techniques for supplying a large quantity of allergens. The laboratory mouse food powder gave the highest yield, showing 1,251.5-fold increase in number after 10 weeks, and the mixed powder of laboratory mouse food and yeast (1:1) also gave same level of the production (1,203.1-fold increase in week 10). Several different combinations of temperature and relative humidity conditions were compared, and the maximum propagation was obtained at 25 degrees C and 64% RH, showing 960-fold increase in number. When the same amount of culture media was used, the size of the culture container did not significantly influence the quantitative yield of T. putrescentiae mites. PMID:9335179

  18. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens*

    PubMed Central

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines. PMID:22210776

  19. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D.

    2012-07-11

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines.

  20. Cytokine Responses to Specific Immunotherapy in House Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Rhinitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Xu, Enxiu; He, Mingqiang

    2015-12-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only immunomodulatory treatment that may alter the natural course of allergic disease. However, cytokine responses accompanying sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) responder phenotypes have not been fully understood. Herein, we examined the level of crucial plasma cytokines during SLIT and evaluated whether their changes correlated to symptom scores. We observed that the levels of interleukin (IL)-17 and complement components C3a and C5a as well as IL-4 at year 3 of SLIT were significantly decreased than those at baseline. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the levels of IL-5, IL-13, and interferon (IFN)-?. Notably, a significant positive correlation was found between the levels of IL-17 and the symptom scores at year 3. These results suggest that IL-17 could be considered a potential biomarker for the therapeutic effect of SLIT in allergic rhinitis caused by house dust mite. PMID:26122703

  1. Utilizing Pyrosequencing and Quantitative PCR to Characterize Fungal Populations among House Dust Samples

    PubMed Central

    Nonnenmann, Matthew W.; Coronado, Gloria; Thompson, Beti; Griffith, William C.; Hanson, John Delton; Vesper, Stephen; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular techniques are replacing culturing and counting methods in quantifying indoor fungal contamination. Pyrosequencing offers the possibility of identifying unexpected indoor fungi. In this study, 50 house dust samples were collected from homes in the Yakima Valley, WA. Each sample was analyzed by quantitative PCR (QPCR) for 36 common fungi and by fungal tag-encoded flexible (FLX) amplicon pyrosequencing (fTEFAP) for these and additional fungi. Only 24 of the samples yielded amplified results using fTEFAP but QPCR successfully amplified all 50 samples. Over 450 fungal species were detected by fTEFAP but most were rare. Twenty-two fungi were found by fTEFAP to occur with at least an average of ≥ 0.5% relative occurrence. Many of these fungi seem to be associated with plants, soil or human skin. Combining fTEFAP and QPCR can enhance studies of fungal contamination in homes. PMID:22767010

  2. Effect of a follow-up professional home cleaning on serial dust and blood lead levels of urban children.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Carla; Schwarz, Donald F; Rich, David; Dockery, Douglas W

    2003-12-01

    Children residing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who were enrolled in a clinical trial of oral chelation therapy (n=73) were studied to determine the effects of a follow-up professional lead dust cleaning of their homes 18 mo after an initial cleaning and commencement of therapy. Home dust lead levels were determined from dust-wipe specimens collected from the kitchen and playroom floors, and from a playroom windowsill, prior to, immediately following, and 3 and 6 mo after the second cleaning. Children's blood lead levels were assessed at 3-mo intervals before and after the follow-up cleaning. Professional cleaning produced immediate decreases in dust lead levels; however, dust lead re-accumulated to precleaning levels within 3-6 mo. Frequent, repeated cleanings may be required if blood lead or dust lead levels are to be reduced and sustained at low levels in urban homes. PMID:15859512

  3. IN-HOUSE CORROSION RESEARCH EMPHASIZING LEAD, COPPER AND IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead and copper are directly regulated via the "Lead and Copper Rule;" however, water suppliers must balance all water treatment processes in order to simultaneously comply with all regulations. Specific research needs for copper and lead chemistry still exist, as applications o...

  4. Acaricidal activities against house dust mites of spearmint oil and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Min-Gi; Lee, Sung-Eun; Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acaricidal activities of spearmint oil and carvone derivatives against house dust mites using contact and fumigant toxicity bioassays to replace benzyl benzoate as a synthetic acaricide. Based on the LD50 values, the contact toxicity bioassay revealed that dihydrocarvone (0.95 and 0.88?g/cm2) was 7.7 and 6.8 times more toxic than benzyl benzoate (7.33 and 6.01?g/cm2) against Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, respectively, followed by carvone (3.78 and 3.23?g/cm2), spearmint oil (5.16 and 4.64?g/cm2), carveol (6.00 and 5.80?g/cm2), and dihydrocarveol (8.23 and 7.10?g/cm2). Results of the fumigant toxicity bioassay showed that dihydrocarvone (2.73 and 2.16?g/cm2) was approximately 4.0 and 4.8 times more effective than benzyl benzoate (11.00 and 10.27?g/cm2), followed by carvone (6.63 and 5.78?g/cm2), carveol (7.58 and 7.24?g/cm2), spearmint oil (9.55 and 8.10?g/cm2), and dihydrocarveol (9.79 and 8.14?g/cm2). Taken together, spearmint oil and carvone derivatives are a likely viable alternative to synthetic acaricides for managing house dust mites. PMID:24488719

  5. The effect of sub-floor heating on house-dust-mite populations on floors and in furniture.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Rob

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that dehydrating conditions for house dust mites can be created by simply raising the temperature, causing loss of body water and eventually death. Thus, it can be expected that conditions for dust mites are less favourable on floors supplied with sub-floor heating. This was examined in a study of 16 houses with sub-floor heating and 21 without. The pattern of changes in air humidity and temperature on the floors was investigated and compared to known data of the tolerance of dust mites. Also the resident mite populations were compared. Floors with sub-floor heating had, on average, fewer mites, but the difference with unheated floors was small. It was remarkable that mite numbers were also lower in upholstered furniture. Another important observation was that some houses with sub-floor heating had high mite numbers, indicating that this type of heating is compatible with a thriving mite population. Temperature and humidity conditions of heated floors may allow mites not only to survive, but also to remain active in winter. A moderate increase in temperature, a moderate decrease in (absolute) air humidity, or a combination of both, will suffice to keep the humidity all winter below the Critical Equilibrium Humidity, the level of air humidity that is critical for mite growth and reproduction, hence for allergen production. However, it is argued that measures to suppress allergen production by house dust mites are likely to be far more effective if taken in summer rather than in winter. PMID:14635817

  6. Use of fluorinated polybrominated diphenyl ethers and simplified cleanup for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in house dust

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, cost-effective method is described for the analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in house dust using pressurized fluid extraction, cleanup with modified silica solid phase extraction tubes, and fluorinated internal standards. There are 14 PBDE congeners inc...

  7. Evidence refuting the contribution of the fungus Aspergillus penicillioides to the allergenicity of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus.

    PubMed

    Hay, D B; Hart, B J; Douglas, A E

    1992-01-01

    This communication demonstrates unequivocally that the fungi associated with house dust mites do not contribute to mite allergenicity. The evidence is twofold: first, larval mites which lack fungi have allergen profiles indistinguishable from fungus-bearing adult mites. Second, the allergen profile of experimentally-derived fungus-free adult mites and mites re-fed the fungus Aspergillus penicillioides are identical. PMID:1582703

  8. Comparison of the Allergic Responses Induced by PeniciIlium chrysogenum and House Dust Mite Extracts in a Mouse Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A report by the Institute of Medicine suggested that more research is needed to better understand mold effects on allergic disease, particularly asthma development. We compared the ability of the fungal Penicillium chrysogenum (PCE) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts to induce al...

  9. Persistent Organic Pollutants in Dust From Older Homes: Learning From Lead

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Gunier, Robert B.; Deziel, Nicole C.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to (1) evaluate the relation between home age and concentrations of multiple chemical contaminants in settled dust and (2) discuss the feasibility of using lead hazard controls to reduce childrens exposure to persistent organic pollutants. Methods. As part of the California Childhood Leukemia Study, from 2001 to 2007, we used a high-volume small surface sampler and household vacuum cleaners to collect dust samples from 583 homes and analyzed the samples for 94 chemicals with gas chromatographymass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We evaluated relations between chemical concentrations in dust and home age with Spearman rank correlation coefficients. Results. Dust concentrations of lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine insecticides, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were correlated with home age (??>?0.2; P?Dust in older homes contains higher levels of multiple, persistent chemicals than does dust in newer homes. Further development of strategies to reduce chemical exposures for children living in older homes is warranted. PMID:24832145

  10. Recovery of Zinc and Lead from Electric-Furnace Steelmaking Dust at Berzelius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczek, Helmut; Kola, Rolf

    1980-01-01

    The Waelz unit at the Berzelius Metallhtten GmbH plant in Duisburg, West Germany, was originally built to recover zinc and lead values in zinc retort residues and slags from lead shaft furnaces. The process has also proved suitable for recovering zinc and lead from steelmaking dusts. The metallurgical characteristics and information on operating costs encountered in the three decades over which this Waelz plant has been in operation at Berzelius are described and discussed.

  11. Potential for childhood lead poisoning in the inner cities of Australia due to exposure to lead in soil dust.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Mark A S; Taylor, Mark P

    2011-01-01

    This article presents evidence demonstrating that the historical use of leaded gasoline and lead (Pb) in exterior paints in Australia has contaminated urban soils in the older inner suburbs of large cities such as Sydney and Melbourne. While significant attention has been focused on Pb poisoning in mining and smelting towns in Australia, relatively little research has focused on exposure to Pb originating from inner-city soil dust and its potential for childhood Pb exposures. Due to a lack of systematic blood lead (PbB) screening and geochemical soil Pb mapping in the inner cities of Australia, the risks from environmental Pb exposure remain unconstrained within urban population centres. PMID:20880621

  12. Asthma, Airway Symptoms and Rhinitis in Office Workers in Malaysia: Associations with House Dust Mite (HDM) Allergy, Cat Allergy and Levels of House Dust Mite Allergens in Office Dust

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Fang Lee; Hashim, Zailina; Than, Leslie Thian Lung; Md Said, Salmiah; Hisham Hashim, Jamal; Norbäck, Dan

    2015-01-01

    A prevalence study was conducted among office workers in Malaysia (N= 695). The aim of this study was to examine associations between asthma, airway symptoms, rhinitis and house dust mites (HDM) and cat allergy and HDM levels in office dust. Medical data was collected by a questionnaire. Skin prick tests were performed for HDM allergens (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae) and cat allergen Felis domesticus. Indoor temperature and relative air humidity (RH) were measured in the offices and vacuumed dust samples were analyzed for HDM allergens. The prevalence of D. pteronyssinus, D. farinae and cat allergy were 50.3%, 49.0% and 25.5% respectively. Totally 9.6% had doctor-diagnosed asthma, 15.5% had current wheeze and 53.0% had current rhinitis. The Der p 1 (from D. pteronyssinus) and Der f 1 (from D. farinae) allergens levels in dust were 556 ng/g and 658 ng/g respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted by multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender, current smoking, HDM or cat allergy, home dampness and recent indoor painting at home. Office workers with HDM allergy had more wheeze (p= 0.035), any airway symptoms (p= 0.032), doctor-diagnosed asthma (p= 0.005), current asthma (p= 0.007), current rhinitis (p= 0.021) and rhinoconjuctivitis (p< 0.001). Cat allergy was associated with wheeze (p= 0.021), wheeze when not having a cold (p= 0.033), any airway symptoms (p= 0.034), doctor-diagnosed asthma (p= 0.010), current asthma (p= 0.020) and nasal allergy medication (p= 0.042). Der f 1 level in dust was associated with daytime breathlessness (p= 0.033) especially among those with HDM allergy. Der f 1 levels were correlated with indoor temperature (p< 0.001) and inversely correlated with RH (p< 0.001). In conclusion, HDM and cat allergies were common and independently associated with asthma, airway symptoms and rhinitis. Der f 1 allergen can be a risk factor for daytime breathlessness. PMID:25923543

  13. Lead exposure in young children from dust and soil in the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, I.; Watt, J.M. ); Davies, D.J.A.; Quinn, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    A survey of metals in United Kingdom dusts and soils has confirmed widespread lead contamination with a geometric mean value for lead in surface (0-5 cm) garden soils of 266 {mu}g/g and in housedusts of 561 {mu}g/g (excluding old mining areas). A subsequent detailed survey of 97 householders in Birmingham with 2-year-old children showed dust lead loading in the home environment to be an important predictor of blood lead concentrations in young children, when both variables fell within the normal range for the UK. The total estimated lead uptake by the young child was 36 {mu}g/day of which 1 {mu}g was by inhalation and 35 {mu}g by ingestion.

  14. Lead exposure in young children from dust and soil in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Thornton, I; Davies, D J; Watt, J M; Quinn, M J

    1990-11-01

    A survey of metals in United Kingdom dusts and soils has confirmed widespread lead contamination with a geometric mean value for lead in surface (0-5 cm) garden soils of 266 micrograms/g and in housedusts of 561 micrograms/g (excluding old mining areas). A subsequent detailed survey of 97 householders in Birmingham with 2-year-old children showed dust lead loading in the home environment to be an important predictor of blood lead concentrations in young children, when both variables fell within the normal range for the U.K. The total estimated lead uptake by the young child was 36 micrograms/day of which 1 microgram was by inhalation and 35 micrograms by ingestion. PMID:2088756

  15. Relative exposure of children to lead from dust and drinking water.

    PubMed

    Alexander, L M; Heaven, A; Delves, H T; Moreton, J; Trenouth, M J

    1993-01-01

    The Blackpool, Wyre and Fylde Health Authority, in the North West of England, could be described as a "low-level lead exposure area." Primary sources of lead exposure are atmospheric fallout (both indoors and outdoors) and potable water consumption. Deciduous teeth were collected from children living in this area as were water samples and outdoor dust samples. Both total lead concentrations and 206Pb:207Pb ratios were determined for a defined subset of teeth. Significant differences in the total lead concentrations were found for teeth collected from children resident in different targeted areas (i.e., Blackpool, Fleetwood, and Garstang). No significant differences were found between the total lead concentrations or the 206Pb:207Pb ratios from dust and water samples in these areas. Examination of the 206Pb:207Pb ratios for dust, water, and teeth obtained from each area separately revealed differing patterns of exposure to lead. Determination of 206Pb:207Pb ratios, in addition to total lead concentrations, enabled the differences in sources of exposure to be identified in these communities. The authors conclude that isotopic analyses are an important aspect of community survey work, and these analyses can be helpful in accurately targeting intervention strategies aimed at reducing exposure to lead. PMID:8250590

  16. A comparison of the effect of conventional and filter vacuum cleaners on airborne house dust mite allergen.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, J M; Rouhbakhsh, S; Warner, J A; Warner, J O

    1995-04-01

    The efficiency (dust collection and recirculation) of a conventional upright vacuum cleaner with a prototype vacuum bag (I) with pore size of 0.1 micron was compared with a standard vacuum cleaner bag (II), in the homes of 11 atopic asthmatic subjects with a known allergy to house dust mite. Four filter vacuum cleaners were assessed in pairs-the Vax 2000 with the Vorwerk VK121 ET340 (in 10 homes), and the Nilfisk GS90 'Allergy Vac' with the Bosch maxima 43 (in nine homes). All of the selected homes were vacuumed throughout (carpets and soft furnishings) for a 15 min period with each of the cleaners, and air was sampled simultaneously at 21 min-1 (Casella personal sampler). The weight of dust retrieved was recorded, and a sample of sieved dust (2 g) and the air filters were extracted to determine the concentrations of the major allergen, Der pI, by ELISA (ALK). No significant difference was observed in either total weight of dust, or airborne and dust concentrations of Der pI between using the conventional cleaner with vacuum bags I, or vacuum bags II. The Vax and the Vorwerk filter vacuum cleaners produced no measurable airborne Der pI concentrations during use in any of the 10 homes tested, whilst the Nilfisk produced airborne Der pI in two, and the Bosch in one of the nine homes tested. The Vorwerk retrieved significantly more dust from the floors than the Vax (P < 0.002). There was no significant difference in dust retrieval between the Nilfisk and the Bosch. All of the filter vacuum cleaners investigated produced lower concentrations of airborne Der pI, compared to the conventional cleaner with or without a special dust bag. However, the amount of dust and concentration/amount of Der pI that these cleaners actually retrieved, varied and the Vorwerk appeared most effective overall. PMID:7597267

  17. Mice housed on coal dust-contaminated sand: A model to evaluate the impacts of coal mining on health.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-03-01

    Coal dust is the most important air pollutant in coal mining in regards to producing deleterious health effects. It permeates the surrounding environment threatening public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects associated with exposure to sand contaminated with coal dust particles below 38μm in diameter, obtained from a mineral sample collected in the largest coal mine in South America, La Loma, Cesar, Colombia. Sterilized sand was spiked with coal dust to obtain concentrations ranging from zero to 4% coal dust. To model natural exposure, mice were housed for eight weeks in boxes containing this mixture as bedding after which, they were euthanized and blood and tissue samples were collected. Real time PCR analysis revealed an increase in Cyp1A1 mRNA for living on sand with coal dust concentrations greater than 2% compared to mice living on sand without coal dust. Unexpectedly, for mice on coal dust-polluted sand, Sod1, Scd1 and Nqo1 hepatic mRNA were downregulated. The Comet assay in peripheral blood cells and the micronucleus test in blood smears, showed a significant potential genotoxic effect only at the highest coal dust concentration. Histopathological analysis revealed vascular congestion and peribronchial inflammation in the lungs. A dose-response relationship for the presence of hepatic steatosis, vacuolization and nuclei enlargements was observed in the exposed animals. The data suggest living on a soil polluted with coal dust induces molecular, cellular and histopathological changes in mice. Accordingly, the proposed model can be used to identify deleterious effects of exposure to coal dust deposited in soils that may pose health risks for surrounding wildlife populations. PMID:26774687

  18. IN-HOUSE COPPER AND LEAD SOLUBILITY/CORROSION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding and predicting metal release from pipes of all sizes and types from the treatment plant to the consumers tap is critical, specifically for regulatory compliance with the Lead and Copper Rule, as well as the performance, corrosion morphology, and longevity of infras...

  19. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to...

  20. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to...

  1. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to...

  2. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to...

  3. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities under NAHASDA? Yes, lead-based paint requirements apply to...

  4. House dust and storage mite contamination of dry dog food stored in open bags and sealed boxes in 10 domestic households.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christina; McEwan, Neil; McGarry, John; Nuttall, Tim

    2011-04-01

    Dry pet food is a potential source of exposure to house dust and storage mite allergens in canine atopic dermatitis. This study evaluated contamination of house dust and dry dog food stored in paper bags, sealable plastic bags and sealable plastic boxes in 10 households for 90 days using Acarex() tests for guanine, a Der p 1 ELISA and mite flotation. Acarex() tests were negative in all the food samples but positive in all the house dust samples. The Der p 1 levels and mite numbers significantly increased in food from paper bags (P = 0.0073 and P = 0.02, respectively), but not plastic bags or boxes. Mite numbers and Der p 1 levels were 10-1000 times higher in house dust than the corresponding food samples (P < 0.0001). There were significant correlations between Der p 1 in house dust and food from the paper (P < 0.0001) and plastic bags (P = 0.003), and mite numbers in house dust and food from the paper bags (P = 0.0007). Bedding and carpets were significantly associated with Der p 1 levels in house dust (P = 0.015 and P = 0.01, respectively), and food from the paper (both P = 0.02) and plastic bags (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively). Mites were identified in six of 10 paper bag, three of 10 plastic bag, one of 10 plastic box and nine of 10 house dust samples. These comprised Dermatophagoides (54%), Tyrophagus (10%; all from food) and unidentified mites (36%). Storage of food in sealable plastic boxes largely prevented contamination for 3 months. Exposure to mites and mite proteins in all the stored food, however, appeared to be trivial compared with house dust. PMID:21106038

  5. House dust bioactivities predict skin prick test reactivity for children with high risk of allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haejin; Tse, Kevin; Levin, Linda; Bernstein, David; Reponen, Tiina; LeMasters, Grace; Lummus, Zana; Horner, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although evidence suggests that ambient exposures to endotoxin and other immunostimulants during early life influence allergic risk, efforts to understand this host-environment relationship have been hampered by a paucity of relevant assays. Objectives These investigations determined whether parameters of house dust extract (HDE) bioactivity were predictive of allergen skin prick test (SPT) reactivity for infants at high risk of allergy participating in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS). Methods We conducted a nested case-control study, selecting 99 CCAAPS children who had positive SPT results to at least 1 aeroallergen at age 3 years and 101 subjects with negative SPT results. HDEs were prepared from dust samples collected from the subjects' homes at age 1 year. Murine splenocytes and bone marrowderived dendritic cells were incubated with HDEs, and supernatant cytokine concentrations were determined by means of ELISA. Alternatively, bone marrowderived dendritic cells were preincubated with HDEs, and then LPS-induced IL-6 responses were assessed. HDE endotoxin levels were determined by using the limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Results HDEs derived from the homes of children with positive (cases) and negative (control subjects) SPT results had similar bioactivities. However, when cases were considered in isolation, HDEs with higher levels of bioactivity were significantly associated with children who had lower numbers of positive SPT results. Analogous statistical analyses did not identify any association between HDE endotoxin levels and the aeroallergen sensitization profiles of children included in this study. Conclusion HDE immunostimulatory activities predicted the aeroallergen sensitization status of CCAAPS subjects better than HDE endotoxin levels. These results provide the first published evidence that HDE bioassays have clinical relevance in predicting atopic risk. PMID:22385634

  6. Mobilization and distribution of lead originating from roof dust and wet deposition in a roof runoff system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianghua; Yu, Haixia; Huang, Xiaogu

    2015-12-01

    In this research, the mobilization and distribution of lead originating in roof dust and wet deposition were investigated within a roof dust-rooftop-runoff system. The results indicated that lead from roof dust and wet deposition showed different transport dynamics in runoff system and that this process was significantly influenced by the rainfall intensity. Lead present in the roof dust could be easily washed off into the runoff, and nearly 60% of the total lead content was present in particulate form. Most of the lead from the roof dust was transported during the late period of rainfall; however, the lead concentration was higher for several minutes at the rainfall beginning. Even though some of the lead from wet deposition, simulated with a standard isotope substance, was adsorbed onto adhered roof dust and/or retained on rooftop in runoff system, most of it (50-82%) remained as dissolved lead in the runoff for rainfall events of varying intensity. Regarding the distribution of lead in the runoff system, the results indicated that it could be carried in the runoff in dissolved and particulate form, be adsorbed to adhered roof dust, or remain on the rooftop because of adsorption to the roof material. Lead from the different sources showed different distribution patterns that were also related to the rainfall intensity. Higher rainfall intensity resulted in a higher proportion of lead in the runoff and a lower proportion of lead remaining on the rooftop. PMID:26289339

  7. Investigating relationships between biomarkers of exposure and environmental copper and manganese levels in house dusts from a Portuguese industrial city.

    PubMed

    Reis, A P; Costa, S; Santos, I; Patinha, C; Noack, Y; Wragg, J; Cave, M; Sousa, A J

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on data obtained from a pilot survey focusing on house dust and toenail metal(loids) concentrations in residents living in the industrial city of Estarreja. The study design hereby described aims at investigating relationships between human toenails and both copper and manganese levels in settledhouse dusts. A total of 21 households and 30 individuals were recruited for the pilot study: 19 households corresponding to 27 residents living near the industrial complex, forming the exposed group, plus 2 households and 3 residents from residential areas with no anticipated environmental contaminants that were used for comparison. Factorial analysis was used for source identification purposes. Investigation on the potential influence of environmental factors over copper and manganese levels in the toenails was carried out via questionnaire data and multiple correspondence analysis. The results show that copper concentrations are more elevated in the indoor dusts, while manganese concentrations are more elevated in the outdoor dust samples. The geometrical relationships in the datasets suggest that the backyard soil is a probable source of manganese to the indoor dust. Copper and manganese contents in the toenail clippings are more elevated in children than in adults, but the difference between the two age groups is not statistically significant (p>0.05). Investigation of environmental factors influencing the exposure-biomarker association indicates a probable relationship between manganese contents in indoor dust and manganese levels in toenail clippings, a result that is partially supported by the bioaccessibility estimates. However, for copper, no relationship was found between indoor dusts and the biomarkers of exposure. PMID:26055455

  8. OX40 blockade inhibits house dust mite driven allergic lung inflammation in mice and in vitro allergic responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Katie E; Dumont, Celine; Thompson, Clare L; Catley, Matthew C; Dixon, Kate L; Marshall, Diane

    2015-04-01

    The costimulatory receptor OX40 is expressed on activated T cells and regulates T-cell responses. Here, we show the efficacy and mechanism of action of an OX40 blocking antibody using the chronic house dust mite (HDM) mouse model of lung inflammation and in vitro HDM stimulation of cells from HDM allergic human donors. We have demonstrated that OX40 blockade leads to a reduction in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lavage fluid and lung tissue of HDM sensitized mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in activated and memory CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and further analysis revealed that both the Th2 and Th17 populations were inhibited. Improved lung function and decreased HDM-specific antibody responses were also noted. Significantly, efficacy was observed even when anti-OX40 treatment was delayed until after inflammation was established. OX40 blockade also inhibited the release of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 from cells isolated from HDM allergic human donors. Altogether, our data provide evidence of a role of the OX40/OX40L pathway in ongoing allergic lung inflammation and support clinical studies of a blocking OX40 antibody in Th2 high severe asthma patients. PMID:25545270

  9. House dust mite regulate the lung inflammation of asthmatic mice through TLR4 pathway in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Qingling, Gai; Meiying, Lin; Weixuan, Wang; Lihong, Zhang; Yongsheng, Gao; Yanli, Li; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2010-10-01

    Aberrant innate and adaptive immune responsed to allergens and environmental pollutants lead to respiratory allergic disease such as asthma. In this study, we focused on toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) expressed on airway epithelium to identify house dust mite (HDM)-regulated allergic inflammation via TLR4 signaling pathway and the triggering to alveolar macrophages (AM)-driven adaptive immune response. The authors found that mouse exposed to HDM showed more eosinophils, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes as well as total cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed by flow cytometry. Besides, the expression of TLR4 in airway epithelial cells was significantly increased in both mRNA and protein levels in mice treated with HDM and the expression of CD40 and CD86 in AM was also increased in mice exposed to HDM. Tight correlation between TLR4 protein and CD40, CD86 in AM was identified. This study demonstrates that TLR4 expression on airway epithelium played an essential role in HDM-induced activation of AM in immune responses and allergic inflammation. The airway epithelial TLR4 signaling pathway revealed tight connection between endotoxin exposure and asthma prevalence in the clinic. PMID:20941750

  10. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPARγ) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding potential of several major flame retardants, their metabolites, and chemical mixtures in house dust. Environ Health Perspect 123:166–172; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408522 PMID:25314719

  11. Origin and patterns of distribution of trace elements in street dust: Unleaded petrol and urban lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, Eduardo de; Llamas, Juan F.; Chacn, Enrique; Berg, Torunn; Larssen, Steinar; Ryset, Oddvar; Vadset, Marit

    The elemental composition, patterns of distribution and possible sources of street dust are not common to all urban environments, but vary according to the peculiarities of each city. The common features and dissimilarities in the origin and nature of street dust were investigated through a series of studies in two widely different cities, Madrid (Spain) and Oslo (Norway), between 1990 and 1994. The most comprehensive sampling campaign was carried out in the Norwegian capital during the summer of 1994. An area of 14 km 2, covering most of downtown Oslo and some residential districts to the north of the city, was divided into 1 km2 mapping units, and 16 sampling increments of approximately 150 g were collected from streets and roads in each of them. The fraction below 100 ?m was acid-digested and analysed by ICP-MS. Statistical analyses of the results suggest that chemical elements in street dust can be classified into three groups: "urban" elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Pb, Sb, Ti, Zn), "natural" elements (Al, Ga, La, Mn, Na, Sr, Th, Y) and elements of a mixed origin or which have undergone geochemical changes from their original sources (Ca, Cs, Fe, Mo, Ni, Rb, Sr, U). Soil resuspension and/or mobilisation appears to be the most important source of "natural" elements, while "urban" elements originate primarily from traffic and from the weathering and corrosion of building materials. The data for Pb seem to prove that the gradual shift from leaded to unleaded petrol as fuel for automobiles has resulted in an almost proportional reduction in the concentration of Pb in dust particles under 100 ?m. This fact and the spatial distribution of Pb in the city strongly suggest that lead sources other than traffic (i.e. lead accumulated in urban soil over the years) may contribute as much lead, if not more, to urban street dust.

  12. The effects of a newsletter on bedding control on house dust mite allergen concentrations in childcare centers in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeonghoon; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kwon, Ho-Jang; Yang, Heasuk; Yum, Hye Yung; Lee, Seon Ah; Kim, Chae-Bong; Kim, Hyunjung; Lim, Wan Ryung; Hong, Soyoung; Kim, Kyoosang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Bedding in childcare centers (CCCs) can hold house dust mite (HDM) allergens. This study examined whether HDM allergen levels can be reduced through the distribution of an educational newsletter on bedding control to parents of CCC children in Korea. Methods All 38 CCCs were measured for Der 1 (sum of Der f 1 and Der p 1) concentrations on classroom floors and bedding before the intervention. Educational newsletters on children’s bedding control were sent to 21 CCCs by mail, and teachers were asked to distribute the newsletters to the parents of the children (intervention group). The remaining 17 CCCs were not sent newsletters (control group). The measurement of Der 1 concentrations in 38 CCCs was repeated after the intervention. Dust samples were collected with a vacuum cleaner and analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Results The Der 1 concentrations on the bedding were significantly higher than those on the floors in 38 CCCs at baseline (p<0.05). Although changes of the Der 1 concentrations for the control group (n=17) were not significant, Der 1 concentrations for the intervention group (n=21) decreased significantly from 2077.9 ng/g dust to 963.5 ng/g dust on the floors and from 3683.9 ng/g dust to 610.4 ng/g dust on bedding (p<0.05). Conclusions The distribution of educational newsletters on bedding control to parents may be an effective means of controlling HDMs in CCCs. PMID:26602559

  13. CO2 sequestration using accelerated gas-solid carbonation of pre-treated EAF steel-making bag house dust.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; El Gamal, Maisa; Hameedi, Suhaib; Mohamed, Abdel-Mohsen O

    2015-06-01

    Mineral CO2 sequestration is a promising process for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. In this paper, alkaline calcium-rich dust particles collected from bag filters of electric arc furnaces (EAF) for steel making were utilized as a viable raw material for mineral CO2 sequestration. The dust particles were pre-treated through hydration, drying and screening. The pre-treated particles were then subjected to direct gas-solid carbonation reaction in a fluidized-bed reactor. The carbonated products were characterized to determine the overall sequestration capacity and the mineralogical structures. Leaching tests were also performed to measure the extracted minerals from the carbonated dust and evaluate the carbonation process on dust stabilization. The experimental results indicated that CO2 could be sequestered using the pre-treated bag house dust. The maximum sequestration of CO2 was 0.657 kg/kg of dust, based on the total calcium content. The highest degree of carbonation achieved was 42.5% and the carbonation efficiency was 69% at room temperature. PMID:25846002

  14. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy: An Overview of Current Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan; De Blay, Frédéric; Hernandez Fernandez de Rojas, Dolores; Virchow, Johann Christian; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy treatment for known HDM-allergic patients is weaker. The standard diagnostic techniques--skin prick test and specific IgE testing--can be confounded by cross-reactivity. However, component-resolved diagnosis using purified and recombinant allergens can improve the accuracy of specific IgE testing, but availability is limited. Treatment options for HDM allergy are limited and include HDM avoidance, which is widely recommended as a strategy, although evidence for its efficacy is variable. Clinical efficacy of pharmacotherapy is well documented; however, symptom relief does not extend beyond the end of treatment. Finally, allergen immunotherapy has a poor but improving evidence base (notably on sublingual tablets) and its benefits last after treatment ends. This review identifies needs for deeper physician knowledge on the extent and impact of HDM allergy in respiratory disease, as well as further development and improved access to molecular allergy diagnosis. Furthermore, there is a need for the development of better-designed clinical trials to explore the utility of allergen-specific approaches, and uptake of data into guidance for physicians on more effective diagnosis and therapy of HDM respiratory allergy in practice. PMID:26342746

  15. Induction of vascular remodeling in the lung by chronic house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    Rydell-Trmnen, Kristina; Johnson, Jill R; Fattouh, Ramzi; Jordana, Manel; Erjeflt, Jonas S

    2008-07-01

    Structural changes to the lung are associated with chronic asthma. In addition to alterations to the airway wall, asthma is associated with vascular modifications, although this aspect of remodeling is poorly understood. We sought to evaluate the character and kinetics of vascular remodeling in response to chronic aeroallergen exposure. Because many ovalbumin-driven models used to investigate allergic airway disease do so in the absence of persistent airway inflammation, we used a protocol of chronic respiratory exposure to house dust mite extract (HDME), which has been shown to induce persistent airway inflammation consistent with that seen in humans with asthma. Mice were exposed to HDME intranasally for 7 or 20 consecutive weeks, and resolution of the inflammatory and remodeling response to allergen was investigated 4 weeks after the end of a 7-week exposure protocol. Measures of vascular remodeling, including total collagen deposition, procollagen I production, endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation, smooth muscle area, and presence of myofibroblasts, were investigated histologically in lung vessels of different sizes and locations. We observed an increase in total collagen content, which did not resolve upon cessation of allergen exposure. Other parameters were significantly increased after 7 and/or 20 weeks of allergen exposure but returned to baseline after allergen withdrawal. We conclude that respiratory HDME exposure induces airway remodeling and pulmonary vascular remodeling, and, in accordance with airway remodeling, some components of these structural changes may be irreversible. PMID:18314535

  16. Production of Egg Yolk Antibodies Specific to House Dust Mite Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Han, Beom Ku; Han, Jae Yong; Hong, Jung Yeon; Kim, Mi Na; Heo, Won Il; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose House dust mites (HDMs) are an important source of indoor allergens associated with asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Chicken immunoglobulin (Ig) Y is known to be a good alternative to mice and rabbit antibody production. In this study, we produced IgYs specific to HDMs and investigated their IgE immunoreactivities. Materials and Methods Total IgYs were isolated from the yolks of White Leghorn hens immunized with either Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus or D. farinae protein extract. Control antibodies were separated from the yolks of immunized hens with phosphate buffered saline. IgYs specific to HDMs were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting analysis. Results The concentration of egg IgY specific to D. farinae in an immunized hen increased and the highest achieved was 661.3 ug/mg (per an egg) on day 47, compared with 760 ug/mg IgY specific to D. pteronyssinus on day 16. The D. pteronyssinus or D. farinae-specific IgY was detected by binding of each mite proteins, and their immunoreactivities were elevated dependent of the specific IgY concentration. Conclusion IgY specific to HDMs may be a promising antibody for immunological diagnosis as well as identification of possible resistance relating to HDM allergy. PMID:24954330

  17. Allergic Asthma Induced in Rhesus Monkeys by House Dust Mite (Dermatophagoides farinae)

    PubMed Central

    Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Miller, Lisa A.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Gerriets, Joan P.; Walby, William F.; Omlor, Amanda M.; Buckpitt, Alan R.; Tarkington, Brian K.; Wong, Viviana J.; Joad, Jesse P.; Pinkerton, Kent B.; Wu, Reen; Evans, Michael J.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Plopper, Charles G.

    2001-01-01

    To establish whether allergic asthma could be induced experimentally in a nonhuman primate using a common human allergen, three female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were sensitized with house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae) allergen (HDMA) by subcutaneous injection, followed by four intranasal sensitizations, and exposure to allergen aerosol 3 hours per day, 3 days per week for up to 13 weeks. Before aerosol challenge, all three monkeys skin-tested positive for HDMA. During aerosol challenge with HDMA, sensitized monkeys exhibited cough and rapid shallow breathing and increased airway resistance, which was reversed by albuterol aerosol treatment. Compared to nonsensitized monkeys, there was a fourfold reduction in the dose of histamine aerosol necessary to produce a 150% increase in airway resistance in sensitized monkeys. After aerosol challenge, serum levels of histamine were elevated in sensitized monkeys. Sensitized monkeys exhibited increased levels of HDMA-specific IgE in serum, numbers of eosinophils and exfoliated cells within lavage, and elevated CD25 expression on circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. Intrapulmonary bronchi of sensitized monkeys had focal mucus cell hyperplasia, interstitial infiltrates of eosinophils, and thickening of the basement membrane zone. We conclude that a model of allergic asthma can be induced in rhesus monkeys using a protocol consisting of subcutaneous injection, intranasal instillation, and aerosol challenge with HDMA. PMID:11141508

  18. Attenuated allergic responses to house dust mite antigen in feed-restricted rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, W; Kari, F W; Selgrade, M K; Gilmour, M I

    2000-01-01

    Caloric restriction has been shown to alter a broad range of immunological end points in both experimental animals and humans. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term moderate feed restriction (25% reduction) on allergic immune responses in Brown Norway rats. After 3 weeks of acclimation to their feed regimens, rats were sensitized and 2 weeks later challenged with house dust mite (HDM) antigen via intratracheal instillation. Feed restriction resulted in lower levels of antigen-specific IgE in serum and reduced antigen specific lymphoproliferative activity in pulmonary lymph nodes. Feed restriction also attenuated pulmonary inflammation, as evidenced by lower levels of lactate dehydrogenase and total protein, decreased infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils, and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-[alpha] in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, feed restriction decreased TNF-[alpha] secretion in serum and decreased mRNA expression of TNF-[alpha] and interleukin-6 in pulmonary lymph nodes. We conclude that feed restriction strongly dampened the allergic immune responses to HDM in rats and that this attenuation was associated with decreased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:11133391

  19. House Dust Mite Induced Lung Inflammation Does Not Alter Circulating Vitamin D Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Perks, Kara L.; Stick, Stephen M.; Kicic, Anthony; Larcombe, Alexander N.; Zosky, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Low circulating levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] are associated with chronic lung diseases such as asthma. However, it is unclear whether vitamin D is involved in disease pathogenesis or is modified by the inflammation associated with the disease process. We hypothesized that allergic inflammation decreases the level of circulating 25(OH)D and tested this using a mice model of house dust mite (HDM) induced allergic airway inflammation. Cellular influx was measured in bronchoalvelar lavage (BAL) fluid, and allergic sensitization and 25(OH)D levels were measured in serum. Exposure to HDM caused a robust inflammatory response in the lung that was enhanced by prior influenza infection. These responses were not associated with any change in circulating levels of 25(OH)D. These data suggest that alterations in circulating 25(OH)D levels induced by Th-2 driven inflammation are unlikely to explain the cross-sectional epidemiological association between vitamin D deficiency and asthma. PMID:25391140

  20. Interleukin-21-Producing CD4(+) T Cells Promote Type 2 Immunity to House Dust Mites.

    PubMed

    Coquet, Jonathan M; Schuijs, Martijn J; Smyth, Mark J; Deswarte, Kim; Beyaert, Rudi; Braun, Harald; Boon, Louis; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Nutt, Steven L; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2015-08-18

    Asthma is a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-mediated disease; however, recent findings implicate Th17 and innate lymphoid cells also in regulating airway inflammation. Herein, we have demonstrated profound interleukin-21 (IL-21) production after house dust mite (HDM)-driven asthma by using T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice reactive to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 1 and an IL-21GFP reporter mouse. IL-21-producing cells in the mediastinal lymph node (mLN) bore characteristics of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, whereas IL-21(+) cells in the lung did not express CXCR5 (a chemokine receptor expressed by Tfh cells) and were distinct from effector Th2 or Th17 cells. Il21r(-/-) mice developed reduced type 2 responses and the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) enhanced Th2 cell function in a cell-intrinsic manner. Finally, administration of recombinant IL-21 and IL-25 synergistically promoted airway eosinophilia primarily via effects on CD4(+) lymphocytes. This highlights an important Th2-cell-amplifying function of IL-21-producing CD4(+) T cells in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:26287681

  1. Acaricidal activity of Cymbopogon citratus and Azadirachta indica against house dust mites

    PubMed Central

    Hanifah, Azima Laili; Awang, Siti Hazar; Ming, Ho Tze; Abidin, Suhaili Zainal; Omar, Maizatul Hashima

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the acaricidal effects of the essential oil of Cymbopogon citratus leaf extract (lemongrass) and ethanolic Azadirachta indica leaf extract (neem) against house dust mites Dermatophagoides farinae (D. farinae) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus). Methods Twenty-five adults mites were placed onto treated filter paper that is soaked with plant extract and been tested at different concentrations (50.00%, 25.00%, 12.50%, 6.25% and 3.13%) and exposure times (24hrs, 48hrs, 72hrs and 96 hrs). All treatments were replicated 7 times, and the experiment repeated once. The topical and contact activities of the two herbs were investigated. Results Mortalities from lemongrass extract were higher than neem for both topical and contact activities. At 50 % concentration, both 24 hrs topical and contact exposures to lemongrass resulted in more than 91% mortalities for both species of mites. At the same concentration and exposure time, neem resulted in topical mortalities of 40.3% and 15.7% against D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae respectively; contact mortalities were 8.0% and 8.9% against the 2 mites, respectively. There was no difference in topical mortalities of D. pteronyssinus from exposure to concentrations of lemongrass and neem up to 12.50%; lemongrass was more effective than neem at the higher concentrations. Conclusions Generally, topical mortalities of D. farinae due to lemongrass are higher than that due to neem. Contact mortalities of lemongrass are always higher that neem against both species of mites. PMID:23569794

  2. Effects of the fungus Aspergillus penicillioides on the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus: an experimental re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hay, D B; Hart, B J; Douglas, A E

    1993-07-01

    In this report the widely-held view that house dust mites benefit from fungal contamination of the dietary substratum is re-examined. The performance of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) is documented over two successive generations in the presence or absence of the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus penicillioides (Hyphomycetales: Moniliaceae). This fungus reduced survival, development rate, adult length and fecundity of D. pteronyssinus. Detrimental effects of A. penicillioides were proportional to the fungal density. Despite the antagonistic effects of A. penicillioides, a requirement for the fungus was indicated by the poor performance of fungus-free mites in the second generation; sustained culture of D. pteronyssinus in the absence of fungi is probably not possible. It is suggested that fungi may alter the particulate nature of the substratum to the detriment of house dust mites, but also provide micronutrients deficient in the diet. PMID:8369562

  3. Exposure assessment of organophosphorus and organobromine flame retardants via indoor dust from elementary schools and domestic houses.

    PubMed

    Mizouchi, Shigekazu; Ichiba, Masayoshi; Takigami, Hidetaka; Kajiwara, Natsuko; Takamuku, Toshiyuki; Miyajima, Toru; Kodama, Hiroki; Someya, Takashi; Ueno, Daisuke

    2015-03-01

    To assess the exposure of flame retardants (FRs) for school-children, organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) and organobromine flame retardants (BFRs) were determined in the indoor dust samples collected from elementary schools and domestic houses in Japan in 2009 and 2010. PFRs were detected in all the dust samples analyzed and the highest concentration of total PFRs was thousand-fold higher than that of BFRs. Among the PFRs, tris(butoxyethyl)phosphate (TBOEP) showed the highest concentration with a median (med.) of 270,000 ng g(-1) dry weight (3700-5,500,000 ng g(-1) dry weight), followed by tris(methylphenyl)phosphate (TMPPs)>triphenyl phosphate (TPHP)=tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate (TDCIPP)=tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCIPP)=tris(2chloroethyl)phosphate (TCEP)>ethylhexyl diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP). Significantly higher concentrations of TBOEP, tri-n-butyl phosphate (TNBP), TPHP, TMPPs, and total-PFRs were found in dust samples from elementary schools than from domestic houses. It might be due to that higher concentrations of TBOEP (as leveling agent) were detected from the floor polisher/wax products collected in those elementary schools. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of TCEP, TCIPPs, and total chloroalkyl-PFRs were found in domestic houses than in elementary schools. Exposure assessments of PFRs via indoor dust from elementary schools and domestic houses were conducted by calculating the hazard quotient (HQ). Among PFRs, HQs for TBOEP exceeded 1 (higher than reference dose: RfD) and its highest value was 1.9. To reduce the intake of TBOEP by school-children, it is recommended that the use of floor polisher/wax containing TBOEP be reduced in schools. PMID:25532762

  4. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources. PMID:9581021

  5. The contribution of housing renovation to children’s blood lead levels: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine renovation of older housing is a risk factor for childhood lead poisoning, but the contribution to children’s blood lead levels is poorly defined for children with lower exposure levels. Methods We examined a prospective cohort of 276 children followed from 6 to 24 months of age. We conducted surveys of renovation activities and residential lead hazards and obtained blood lead level (B-Pb) every six months. We analyzed B-Pb in a repeated measures design using a mixed effects linear model. Results Parent reported interior renovation ranged from 11 to 25% of housing units at the four, 6-month periods. In multivariable analysis, children whose housing underwent interior renovation had a 12% higher mean B-Pb by two years of age compared with children whose housing units were not renovated (p < 0.01). The time between renovation and the child blood lead sample was associated with higher B-Pb (p-value for trend <0.01); compared to children in non-renovated housing, children whose housing units underwent renovation in the prior month had a 17% higher mean B-Pb at two years of age, whereas children whose housing renovation occurred in the prior 2–6 months had an 8% higher mean B-Pb. We also found an association between higher paint lead loading, measured using an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) based paint lead index, and child B-Pb (p = 0.02); for every 10 mg/cm2 increase in paint lead loading index there was a 7.5% higher mean childhood B-Pb. Conclusions In an analysis of data collected before the recent changes to Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead, Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule, routine interior housing renovation was associated with a modest increase in children’s B-Pb. These results are important for the provision of clinical advice, for housing and public health professionals, and for policymakers. PMID:23981571

  6. The Indoor Level of House Dust Mite Allergen Is Associated with Severity of Atopic Dermatitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Sangwoon; Woo, Sook-young; Han, Youngshin; Lee, Jung Hyun; Lee, In-Yong; Lim, In-Seok; Choi, Eung-Sang; Choi, Byoung-Whi; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lee, Sang-Il

    2013-01-01

    We attempted to investigate the correlation between the severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) in children and the indoor level of house dust mite (HDM) allergens. Ninety-five patients (31.1 19.5 months of age) with AD were enrolled in this study, and serum specific IgE against Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae was measured. The severity of AD was assessed using the visual analogue scale on the same day of house dust collection. Living rooms and mattresses where the child usually slept were vacuumed for 2 minutes and concentrations of Der f 1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The skin symptoms were more severe in patients with Der f 1 concentrations in living room > 2 g/g dust than ? 2 g/g dust (P = 0.018). This difference was noted in AD patients without sensitization to HDM (P = 0.004), but not in patients with sensitization. There was no difference in symptom severity according to Der f 1 concentrations in mattresses (P = 0.062). The severity of skin symptoms is associated with indoor concentrations of HDM in children with AD, and it is likely to act as nonspecific irritants as well as allergens in AD skin lesions. PMID:23341715

  7. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Kei E; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C; Boushey, Homer A; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-01-14

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c(+)/CD11b(+) and CD11c(+)/CD8(+) cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  8. After the PBDE phase-out: a broad suite of flame retardants in repeat house dust samples from California.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Robin E; Perovich, Laura J; Covaci, Adrian; Van den Eede, Nele; Ionas, Alin C; Dirtu, Alin C; Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2012-12-18

    Higher house dust levels of PBDE flame retardants (FRs) have been reported in California than other parts of the world, due to the state's furniture flammability standard. However, changing levels of these and other FRs have not been evaluated following the 2004 U.S. phase-out of PentaBDE and OctaBDE. We analyzed dust collected in 16 California homes in 2006 and again in 2011 for 62 FRs and organohalogens, which represents the broadest investigation of FRs in homes. Fifty-five compounds were detected in at least one sample; 41 in at least 50% of samples. Concentrations of chlorinated OPFRs, including two (TCEP and TDCIPP) listed as carcinogens under California's Proposition 65, were found up to 0.01% in dust, higher than previously reported in the U.S. In 75% of the homes, we detected TDBPP, or brominated "Tris," which was banned in children's sleepwear because of carcinogenicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on TDBPP in house dust. Concentrations of Firemaster 550 components (EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, and TPHP) were higher in 2011 than 2006, consistent with its use as a PentaBDE replacement. Results highlight the evolving nature of FR exposures and suggest that manufacturers continue to use hazardous chemicals and replace chemicals of concern with chemicals with uncharacterized toxicity. PMID:23185960

  9. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E.; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A.; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C.; Boushey, Homer A.; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c+/CD11b+ and CD11c+/CD8+ cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  10. House dust mites (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in the cities of Gdańsk and Gdynia (northern Poland).

    PubMed

    Racewicz, M

    2001-01-01

    277 samples of house dust collected in 1996-1998 from 17 flats, three hospitals, two hotels and one students' hostel situated in the cities of Gdansk and Gdynia were subjected to acarological examination. Acari were found in 50 (37.3%) of 134 samples from the flats, in 11 (15.5%) of 71 samples from the hospitals and in 13 (18.1%) of 72 samples from the hotels. The majority of mites (91.6%) was found in samples that originated from the private flats. 95.0% of mites from the flats, 35.0% mites from the hotels and 8.0% mites from the hospitals belonged to two dust mite species of the family Pyroglyphidae: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. D. farinae was significantly predominant and composed 82.8% of the whole pyroglyphid collection. Samples from private flats contained significantly more mites than those from hospitals and hotels: mean mites densities per 1 gram of dust were 13.07, 1.03 and 1.00, respectively. The authors suggest that only density of house dust mites in private flats may be clinically important. PMID:11426922

  11. After the PBDE Phase-Out: A Broad Suite of Flame Retardants in Repeat House Dust Samples from California

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Higher house dust levels of PBDE flame retardants (FRs) have been reported in California than other parts of the world, due to the states furniture flammability standard. However, changing levels of these and other FRs have not been evaluated following the 2004 U.S. phase-out of PentaBDE and OctaBDE. We analyzed dust collected in 16 California homes in 2006 and again in 2011 for 62 FRs and organohalogens, which represents the broadest investigation of FRs in homes. Fifty-five compounds were detected in at least one sample; 41 in at least 50% of samples. Concentrations of chlorinated OPFRs, including two (TCEP and TDCIPP) listed as carcinogens under Californias Proposition 65, were found up to 0.01% in dust, higher than previously reported in the U.S. In 75% of the homes, we detected TDBPP, or brominated Tris, which was banned in childrens sleepwear because of carcinogenicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on TDBPP in house dust. Concentrations of Firemaster 550 components (EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, and TPHP) were higher in 2011 than 2006, consistent with its use as a PentaBDE replacement. Results highlight the evolving nature of FR exposures and suggest that manufacturers continue to use hazardous chemicals and replace chemicals of concern with chemicals with uncharacterized toxicity. PMID:23185960

  12. Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lead Epidemiology Surveillance Program (ABLES) Lead in the environment Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Healthy Homes ...

  13. Comparison of Living and Bedrooms in Terms of House Dust Mites in the Province of Erzincan, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Zeytun, Erhan; Doğan, Salih; Özçiçek, Fatih; Ünver, Edhem; Dilkaraoğlu, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    The most important factors in development of symptoms such as allergic asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and dermatitis in atopic persons are the allergens of house dust mites. The objective of this study was to compare living rooms and bedrooms, and woolen and spring mattresses in terms of the number and species of mites in houses in the province of Erzincan, Turkey. In total, 74 dust samples were collected from living rooms and bedrooms of 37 randomly selected houses from various districts of the city. All examined houses were positive for house dust mites. In total, 5,210 mites were isolated, 1,058 from the living rooms and 4,152 from the bedrooms, and the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Of 4,152 mites detected in bedrooms, 1,330 (32%) were isolated from 31 spring mattresses and 2,822 (68%) from 6 woolen mattresses (P < 0.001). The study identified 14 families, 17 genera, and 16 species belonging to Astigmata, Prostigmata, and Oribatida. Of these, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart) was the dominant species: living rooms, 63.3%; bedrooms, 74.4%; woolen mattresses, 84.6%; and spring mattresses, 52.8%. This was followed by Lepidoglyphus destructor (Schrank) (9.8%), Dermatophagoides farinae Hughes (5.1%), Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank) (4.3%), and Acarus siro L. (2.5%) in living rooms; L. destructor (11.2%), Euroglyphus maynei (Cooreman) (4.2%), D. farinae (3.8%), and T. putrescentiae (1.0%) in bedrooms; L. destructor (11.8%), D. farinae (2.1%), E. maynei (0.3%), and T. putrescentiae (0.2%) in woolen mattresses; and E. maynei (12.5%), L. destructor (9.9%), D. farinae (7.5%), and T. putrescentiae (2.7%) in spring mattresses. PMID:26586534

  14. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF NEUTRAL PESTICIDES AND PAHS FROM HOUSE DUST AND SOIL (L11)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures to be used for the extraction of pesticides and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from house dust and soil. This procedure also describes the splitting of dust and soil samples for metal extractions for shipment to Emo...

  15. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION, STORAGE, AND SHIPMENT OF HOUSE DUST SAMPLES FOR METAL, PESTICIDE, AND PAH ANALYSIS (F04)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for collecting house dust samples. Dust from the floor was collected using a high-volume, small surface sampler (HVS3). Half of the sample was analyzed for metal content, and half was analyzed for pesticides and PAHs. Keywo...

  16. Hexavalent chromium in house dust — A comparison between an area with historic contamination from chromate production and background locations

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Alan H.; Yu, Chang Ho; Black, Kathleen; Lin, Lin; Lioy, Paul J.; Gochfeld, Michael; Fan, Zhi-Hua (Tina)

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to Cr+ 3, Cr+ 6 is carcinogenic and allergenic. Although Cr+ 6 can occur naturally, it is thought that most soil Cr+ 6 is anthropogenic, however, the extent of Cr+ 6 in the background environment is unknown. Cr+ 6-containing chromite ore processing residue (COPR) from chromate manufacture was deposited in numerous locations in Jersey City (JC), New Jersey. In the 1990’s, significantly elevated concentrations of total Cr (Cr+ 6+Cr+ 3) were found in house dust near COPR sites. We undertook a follow-up study to determine ongoing COPR exposure. We compared Cr+6 in house dust in JC to selected background communities with no known sources of Cr+ 6. Samples were collected from living areas, basements and window wells. Cr+6 was detected in dust from all JC and background houses. In the JC homes, the mean (±SD) Cr+ 6 concentration for all samples was 3.9±7.0 μg/g (range: non-detect–90.4 μg/g), and the mean Cr+ 6 loading was 5.8±15.7 μg/m2 (range: non-detect–196.4 μg/m2). In background homes, the mean Cr+ 6 concentrations of all samples was 4.6±7.8 μ μg/g, (range, 0.05–56.6 μg/g). The mean loading was 10.0±27.9 μg/m2 (range, 0.22–169.3 μg/m2). There was no significant difference between Cr+ 6 dust concentrations in Jersey City and background locations. Stratification by sample location within houses and sampling method gave similar results. Samples exceeding 20 μg/g were obtained only from single wood surfaces in different homes. Lower concentrations in window well samples suggests transport from outside is not the major source of indoor Cr+ 6. Landscaping and groundcover may influence indoor Cr+6. There appears to be a widespread low level background of Cr+ 6 that is not elevated in Jersey City homes despite its historic COPR contamination. It is possible that house dust, in general, is a source of Cr+ 6 exposure with potential implications for persistence of chromium allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:20692023

  17. Hexavalent chromium in house dust--a comparison between an area with historic contamination from chromate production and background locations.

    PubMed

    Stern, Alan H; Yu, Chang Ho; Black, Kathleen; Lin, Lin; Lioy, Paul J; Gochfeld, Michael; Fan, Zhi-Hua Tina

    2010-10-01

    In contrast to Cr(+3), Cr(+6) is carcinogenic and allergenic. Although Cr(+6) can occur naturally, it is thought that most soil Cr(+6) is anthropogenic, however, the extent of Cr(+6) in the background environment is unknown. Cr(+6)-containing chromite ore processing residue (COPR) from chromate manufacture was deposited in numerous locations in Jersey City (JC), New Jersey. In the 1990's, significantly elevated concentrations of total Cr (Cr(+6)+Cr(+3)) were found in house dust near COPR sites. We undertook a follow-up study to determine ongoing COPR exposure. We compared Cr(+6) in house dust in JC to selected background communities with no known sources of Cr(+6). Samples were collected from living areas, basements and window wells. Cr(+6) was detected in dust from all JC and background houses. In the JC homes, the mean (+ or - SD) Cr(+6) concentration for all samples was 3.9 + or - 7.0 microg/g (range: non-detect-90.4 microg/g), and the mean Cr(+6) loading was 5.8 + or - 15.7 microg/m(2) (range: non-detect-196.4 microg/m(2)). In background homes, the mean Cr(+6) concentrations of all samples was 4.6 + or - 7.8 microg/g, (range, 0.05-56.6 microg/g). The mean loading was 10.0 + or - 27.9 microg/m(2) (range, 0.22-169.3 microg/m(2)). There was no significant difference between Cr(+6) dust concentrations in Jersey City and background locations. Stratification by sample location within houses and sampling method gave similar results. Samples exceeding 20 microg/g were obtained only from single wood surfaces in different homes. Lower concentrations in window well samples suggests transport from outside is not the major source of indoor Cr(+6). Landscaping and groundcover may influence indoor Cr(+6). There appears to be a widespread low level background of Cr(+6) that is not elevated in Jersey City homes despite its historic COPR contamination. It is possible that house dust, in general, is a source of Cr(+6) exposure with potential implications for persistence of chromium allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:20692023

  18. Epithelial NF-?B orchestrates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and fibrotic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tully, Jane E; Hoffman, Sidra M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Nolin, James D; Anathy, Vikas; Lundblad, Lennart K A; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Black, Kendall E; Dixon, Anne E; Poynter, Matthew E; Irvin, Charles G; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W

    2013-12-15

    NF-?B activation within the epithelium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, yet the exact role of epithelial NF-?B in allergen-induced inflammation and airway remodeling remains unclear. In the current study, we used an intranasal house dust mite (HDM) extract exposure regimen time course in BALB/c mice to evaluate inflammation, NF-?B activation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and airway remodeling. We used CC10-I?B?SR transgenic mice to evaluate the functional importance of epithelial NF-?B in response to HDM. After a single exposure of HDM, mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators was significantly elevated in lung tissue of wild-type (WT) mice, in association with increases in nuclear RelA and RelB, components of the classical and alternative NF-?B pathway, respectively, in the bronchiolar epithelium. In contrast, CC10-I?B?SR mice displayed marked decreases in nuclear RelA and RelB and mRNA expression of proinflammatory mediators compared with WT mice. After 15 challenges with HDM, WT mice exhibited increases in inflammation, AHR, mucus metaplasia, and peribronchiolar fibrosis. CC10-I?B?SR transgenic mice displayed marked decreases in neutrophilic infiltration, tissue damping, and elastance parameters, in association will less peribronchiolar fibrosis and decreases in nuclear RelB in lung tissue. However, central airway resistance and mucus metaplasia remained elevated in CC10-I?B?SR transgenic mice, in association with the continued presence of lymphocytes, and partial decreases in eosinophils and IL-13. The current study demonstrates that following airway exposure with an asthma-relevant allergen, activation of classical and alternative NF-?B pathways occurs within the airway epithelium and may coordinately contribute to allergic inflammation, AHR, and fibrotic airway remodeling. PMID:24227776

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates house dust mite-induced airway epithelial apoptosis and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response participates in many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In the current study, we sought to examine the contribution of ER stress transducers in the pathogenesis of three principal facets of allergic asthma: inflammation, airway fibrosis, and airways hyperresponsiveness. Methods House Dust Mite (HDM) was used as an allergen for in vitro and in vivo challenge of primary human and murine airway epithelial cells. ER stress transducers were modulated using specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in vivo. Inflammation, airway remodeling, and hyperresponsiveness were measured by total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts, determination of collagen, and methacholine responsiveness in mice, respectively. Results Challenge of human bronchiolar and nasal epithelial cells with HDM extract induced the ER stress transducer, activating transcription factor 6 ? (ATF6?) as well as protein disulfide isomerase, ERp57, in association with activation of caspase-3. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of ATF6? and ERp57 during HDM administration in mice resulted in a decrease in components of HDM-induced ER stress, disulfide mediated oligomerization of Bak, and activation of caspase-3. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of ATF6? and ERp57 led to decreased inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and airway fibrosis. Conclusion Collectively, our work indicates that HDM induces ER stress in airway epithelial cells and that ATF6? and ERp57 play a significant role in the development of cardinal features of allergic airways disease. Inhibition of ER stress responses may provide a potential therapeutic avenue in chronic asthma and sub-epithelial fibrosis associated with loss of lung function. PMID:24364984

  20. Gene Expression in the Skin of Dogs Sensitized to the House Dust Mite Dermatophagoides farinae

    PubMed Central

    Schamber, Paz; Schwab-Richards, Rachel; Bauersachs, Stefan; Mueller, Ralf S.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a multifactorial allergic skin disease in humans and dogs. Genetic predisposition, immunologic hyperreactivity, a defective skin barrier, and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression in the skin of dogs sensitized to house dust mite antigens. Skin biopsy samples were collected from six sensitized and six nonsensitized Beagle dogs before and 6 hr and 24 hr after challenge using skin patches with allergen or saline as a negative control. Transcriptome analysis was performed by the use of DNA microarrays and expression of selected genes was validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Expression data were compared between groups (unpaired design). After 24 hr, 597 differentially expressed genes were detected, 361 with higher and 226 with lower mRNA concentrations in allergen-treated skin of sensitized dogs compared with their saline-treated skin and compared with the control specimens. Functional annotation clustering and pathway- and co-citation analysis showed that the genes with increased expression were involved in inflammation, wound healing, and immune response. In contrast, genes with decreased expression in sensitized dogs were associated with differentiation and barrier function of the skin. Because the sensitized dogs did not show differences in the untreated skin compared with controls, inflammation after allergen patch test probably led to a decrease in the expression of genes important for barrier formation. Our results further confirm the similar pathophysiology of human and canine atopic dermatitis and revealed genes previously not known to be involved in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:25098772

  1. Pim1 kinase activity preserves airway epithelial integrity upon house dust mite exposure.

    PubMed

    de Vries, M; Hesse, L; Jonker, M R; van den Berge, M; van Oosterhout, A J M; Heijink, I H; Nawijn, M C

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with allergic asthma are sensitized to house dust mite (HDM). The allergenicity of HDM largely depends on disruption of the integrity and proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. In this study, we hypothesized that Pim1 kinase activity attenuates HDM-induced asthma by preserving airway epithelial integrity. The effects of Pim1 kinase activity on barrier function and release of the proinflammatory mediators IL-1? and CCL20 were studied in vitro in 16HBE and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs). Pim1-proficient and -deficient mice were exposed to a HDM-driven model of allergic asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured upon methacholine challenge. Airway inflammation and proinflammatory mediators in lung tissue and BAL fluid were determined. We observed that inhibition of Pim1 kinase prolongs the HDM-induced loss of barrier function in 16HBE cells and sensitizes PBECs to HDM-induced barrier dysfunction. Additionally, inhibition of Pim1 kinase increased the HDM-induced proinflammatory activity of 16HBE cells as measured by IL-1? secretion. In line herewith, HDM exposure induced an enhanced production of the proinflammatory chemokines CCL17 and CCL20 in Pim1-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. While we observed a marked increase in eosinophilic and neutrophilic granulocytes as well as mucus cell metaplasia and AHR to methacholine in mice exposed to HDM, these parameters were independent of Pim1 kinase activity. In contrast, levels of the Th2-cytokines IL-5 and IL-10 were significantly augmented in HDM-treated Pim1-deficient mice. Taken together, our study shows that Pim1 kinase activity maintains airway epithelial integrity and protects against HDM-induced proinflammatory activation of the airway epithelium. PMID:26453516

  2. Vitamin E Isoform ?-Tocotrienol Downregulates House Dust Mite-Induced Asthma.

    PubMed

    Peh, Hong Yong; Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Cheng, Chang; Chan, Tze Khee; Seow, Ann Ching Genevieve; Lim, Albert Y H; Fong, Chee Wai; Seng, Kok Yong; Ong, Choon Nam; Wong, W S Fred

    2015-07-15

    Inflammation and oxidative damage contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. Although corticosteroid is the first-line treatment for asthma, a subset of patients is steroid resistant, and chronic steroid use causes side effects. Because vitamin E isoform ?-tocotrienol possesses both antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, we sought to determine protective effects of ?-tocotrienol in a house dust mite (HDM) experimental asthma model. BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with HDM. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, oxidative damage biomarkers, and cytokine levels. Lungs were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, as well as the expression of antioxidants and proinflammatory biomarkers. Sera were assayed for IgE and ?-tocotrienol levels. Airway hyperresponsiveness in response to methacholine was measured. ?-Tocotrienol displayed better free radical-neutralizing activity in vitro and inhibition of BAL fluid total, eosinophil, and neutrophil counts in HDM mouse asthma in vivo, as compared with other vitamin E isoforms, including ?-tocopherol. Besides, ?-tocotrienol abated HDM-induced elevation of BAL fluid cytokine and chemokine levels, total reactive oxygen species and oxidative damage biomarker levels, and of serum IgE levels, but it promoted lung-endogenous antioxidant activities. Mechanistically, ?-tocotrienol was found to block nuclear NF-?B level and enhance nuclear Nrf2 levels in lung lysates to greater extents than did ?-tocopherol and prednisolone. More importantly, ?-tocotrienol markedly suppressed methacholine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in experimental asthma. To our knowledge, we have shown for the first time the protective actions of vitamin E isoform ?-tocotrienol in allergic asthma. PMID:26041537

  3. Neonatal Exposure to Pneumococcal Phosphorylcholine Modulates the Development of House Dust Mite Allergy during Adult Life

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Preeyam S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, ∼20% of the global population suffers from an allergic disorder. Allergies and asthma occur at higher rates in developed and industrialized countries. It is clear that many human atopic diseases are initiated neonatally and herald more severe IgE-mediated disorders, including allergic asthma, which is driven by the priming of Th2 effector T cells. The hygiene hypothesis attempts to link the increased excessively sanitary conditions early in life to a default Th2 response and increasing allergic phenomena. Despite the substantial involvement of IgE Abs in such conditions, little attention has been paid to the effects of early microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire prior to the initiation of these diseases. In this study, we use Ab-binding assays to demonstrate that Streptococcus pneumoniae and house dust mite (HDM) bear similar phosphorylcholine (PC) epitopes. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice immunized with a PC-bearing pneumococcal vaccine expressed increased frequencies of PC-specific B cells in the lungs following sensitizing exposure to HDM as adults. Anti-PC IgM Abs in the lung decreased the interaction of HDM with pulmonary APCs and were affiliated with lowered allergy-associated cell infiltration into the lung, IgE production, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and Th2 T cell priming. Thus, exposure of neonatal mice to PC-bearing pneumococci significantly reduced the development of HDM-induced allergic disease during adult life. Our findings demonstrate that B cells generated against conserved epitopes expressed by bacteria, encountered early in life, are also protective against the development of allergic disease during adult life. PMID:25957171

  4. Intranasal exposure of mice to house dust mite elicits allergic airway inflammation via a GM-CSF-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cates, Elizabeth C; Fattouh, Ramzi; Wattie, Jennifer; Inman, Mark D; Goncharova, Susanna; Coyle, Anthony J; Gutierrez-Ramos, Jos-Carlos; Jordana, Manel

    2004-11-15

    It is now well established that passive exposure to inhaled OVA leads to a state of immunological tolerance. Therefore, to elicit allergic sensitization, researchers have been compelled to devise alternative strategies, such as the systemic delivery of OVA in the context of powerful adjuvants, which are alien to the way humans are exposed and sensitized to allergens. The objectives of these studies were to investigate immune-inflammatory responses to intranasal delivery of a purified house dust mite (HDM) extract and to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this process. HDM was delivered to BALB/c mice daily for 10 days. After the last exposure, mice were killed, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed, and samples were obtained. Expression/production of Th2-associated molecules in the lymph nodes, lung, and spleen were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA, respectively. Using this exposure protocol, exposure to HDM alone generated Th2 sensitization based on the expression/production of Th2 effector molecules and airway eosinophilic inflammation. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated expansion and activation of APCs in the lung and an influx of activated Th2 effector cells. Moreover, this inflammation was accompanied by airways hyper-responsiveness and a robust memory-driven immune response. Finally, administration of anti-GM-CSF-neutralizing Abs markedly reduced immune-inflammatory responses in both lung and spleen. Thus, intranasal delivery of HDM results in Th2 sensitization and airway eosinophilic inflammation that appear to be mediated, at least in part, by endogenous GM-CSF production. PMID:15528378

  5. Effect of the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran on allergic lung inflammation induced by repeated house dust mite administration in mice.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Johannes D; Berkhout, Lea C; de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; Yang, Jack; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Meijers, Joost C M; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-10-15

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the airways; asthma patients are hampered by recurrent symptoms of dyspnoea and wheezing caused by bronchial obstruction. Most asthma patients suffer from chronic allergic lung inflammation triggered by allergens such as house dust mite (HDM). Coagulation activation in the pulmonary compartment is currently recognized as a feature of allergic lung inflammation, and data suggest that coagulation proteases further drive inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we tested whether treatment with the oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran attenuates allergic lung inflammation in a recently developed HDM-based murine asthma model. Mice were fed dabigatran (10 mg/g) or placebo chow during a 3-wk HDM airway exposure model. Dabigatran treatment caused systemic thrombin inhibitory activity corresponding with dabigatran levels reported in human trials. Surprisingly, dabigatran did not lead to inhibition of HDM-evoked coagulation activation in the lung as measured by levels of thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer. Repeated HDM administration caused an influx of eosinophils and neutrophils into the lungs, mucus production in the airways, and a T helper 2 response, as reflected by a rise in bronchoalveolar IL-4 and IL-5 levels and a systemic rise in IgE and HDM-IgG1. Dabigatran modestly improved HDM-induced lung pathology (P < 0.05) and decreased IL-4 levels (P < 0.01), without influencing other HDM-induced responses. Considering the limited effects of dabigatran in spite of adequate plasma levels, these results argue against clinical evaluation of dabigatran in patients with asthma. PMID:26320153

  6. Dust detector using piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate with current-to-voltage converting amplifier for functional advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Miyachi, Takashi; Hattori, Maki; Sugita, Seiji; Takechi, Seiji; Okada, Nagaya

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the concept of a dust monitor using lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics with a large detection area. Its potential as a dust detector is experimentally demonstrated. The dust monitor has a small volume compared to an impact ionization detector with the same detection area, due to the PZT sensor. The PZT sensor, as a traditional device for the in-situ observation of hypervelocity dust particles, has been used for momentum measurement. The hypervelocity impact signals of PZT sensors are typically read by charge-sensitive amplifiers. Instead, we suggest a new method that a current-to-voltage converting amplifier is useful for interpreting the impact signal of a PZT sensor arising from dust particles down to 0.5 ?m in radius. We propose that datasets of dust impacts can be obtained with a higher statistical accuracy, if the new method is applied to instruments on forthcoming interplanetary-space-cruising spacecrafts.

  7. Laboratory and analytical method performance of lead measurements in paint chips, soils, and dusts.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, P C; Groff, J H; Feng, A; Song, R

    1996-11-01

    The National Lead Laboratory Accreditation Program (NLLAP) recognizes laboratories capable of analyzing lead in paints, soils, and dusts. NLLAP requires successful participation in the Environmental Lead Proficiency Analytical Testing (ELPAT) program. For paint chip analyses, laboratory-to-laboratory variability is about 10% relative standard deviation (RSD) for lead levels near 0.5%, the HUD definition of lead-based paint. For soil analyses, RSDs are about 9 to 10% near relevant federal soil standards and 16% near the lowest state bare soil standard that currently exists. For dust wipe analyses, RSDs range from 10 to 16% for lead levels near relevant HUD standards. Of participating laboratories, 92 to 93% consistently meet ELPAT performance limits. A variety of analytical methods gives similar results. No conclusive significant differences were found among most frequently used hotplate and microwave sample preparation techniques. In addition, several participating laboratories have successfully used ultrasonic extraction methods, a method suitable for use at abatement sites. The three most frequently used instrumental techniques, flame atomic absorption (FAA), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and graphite furnace atomic absorption show no statistically significant differences in ability to meet ELPAT performance limits. However, small statistically significant biases between these methods sometimes occur. The magnitude of biases is less than 5% of the corresponding laboratory mean near relevant federal standards except for lead levels near the lowest HUD lead wipe standard, where biases can be as high as 8%. Other instrumental methods that have been used successfully include ICP-mass spectroscopy, direct current plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, dithizone spectrophotometry, and anodic stripping voltametry. PMID:8931311

  8. Concentration of the genera Aspergillus, Eurotium and Penicillium in 63-μm house dust fraction as a method to predict hidden moisture damage in homes

    PubMed Central

    Baudisch, Christoph; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative measurements of mould enrichment of indoor air or house dust might be suitable surrogates to evaluate present but hidden moisture damage. Our intent was to develop a house-dust monitoring method to detect hidden moisture damage excluding the influence of outdoor air, accumulated old dust, and dust swirled up from room surfaces. Methods Based on standardized measurement of mould spores in the 63-μm fraction of house dust yielded by carpets, the background concentrations were determined and compared to simultaneously obtained colony numbers and total spore numbers of the indoor air in 80 non-mouldy living areas during summer and winter periods. Additionally, sampling with a vacuum-cleaner or manual sieve was compared to sampling with a filter holder or sieving machine, and the evaluative power of an established two-step assessment model (lower and upper limits) was compared to that of a one-step model (one limit) in order to derive concentration limits for mould load in house dust. Results Comparison with existing evaluation procedures proved the developed method to be the most reliable means of evaluating hidden moisture damage, yielding the lowest false-positive results (specificity 98.7%). Background measurements and measurements in 14 mouldy rooms show that even by evaluating just the indicator genera in summer and winter, a relatively certain assessment of mould infestation is possible. Conclusion A one-step evaluation is finally possible for house dust. The house-dust evaluation method is based on analysis of the indicator genera Aspergillus, Eurotium and Penicillium spp., which depend on the total fungal count. Inclusion of further moisture indicators currently appears questionable, because of outdoor air influence and the paucity of measurements. PMID:19615082

  9. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust in major cities in Greece in relation to the use of lead in petrol.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulou, Maria A; Day, J Philip

    2006-08-31

    Until recently, the most important source of environmental lead pollution in cities was thought to come from the combustion of leaded petrol. A simple way to monitor the extent of this phenomenon, used in a number of studies in the past, has been to measure lead levels in street dust. Nowadays, it would be expected that lead concentrations in urban dust would have decreased from earlier values, following the progressive reduction of lead in petrol over the past few years, and this hypothesis has recently been confirmed in Manchester, UK. The object of the present work is to determine levels of lead pollution in cities in Greece on 1997 and, if possible, to discover whether similar reductions in lead concentrations have occurred there also. Surveys have been conducted in Thessaloniki, Athens and Piraeus. Samples of roadside dust were collected from streets (categorised by traffic density), national gardens and school playgrounds, and lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid. Lead concentrations were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and lead isotope ratios measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Thessaloniki showed that mean lead concentrations in all categories of location are similar to present levels in Manchester. Further, lead concentrations in dust in the busiest streets in Thessaloniki have fallen by about 55% since a previous study 17 years ago. In Athens and Piraeus, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between the various types of street. In particular, it was observed that lead levels in school playgrounds in these two cities were much higher than in similar locations in Thessaloniki and Manchester, with a possible hazard to children. Isotope ratio measurements showed that Thessaloniki's lead is isotopically distinct from that found in Athens and Piraeus, which presumably reflects differences in sources of supply. PMID:16687163

  10. Hypoallergenic Der p 1/Der p 2 combination vaccines for immunotherapy of house dust mite allergy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Wei; Blatt, Katharina; Thomas, Wayne R.; Swoboda, Ines; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 50% of allergic patients have house dust mite (HDM) allergy. Group 1 and 2 allergens are the major HDM allergens. Objective We sought to produce and perform preclinical characterization of a recombinant hypoallergenic combination vaccine for specific immunotherapy of HDM allergy. Methods Synthetic genes coding for 2 hybrid proteins consisting of reassembled Der p 1 and Der p 2 fragments with (recombinant Der p 2 [rDer p 2]/1C) and without (rDer p 2/1S) cysteines were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity by means of affinity chromatography. Protein fold was determined by using circular dichroism analysis, allergenic activity was determined by testing IgE reactivity and using basophil activation assays, and the presence of T-cell epitopes was determined based on lymphoproliferation in allergic patients. Mice and rabbits were immunized to study the molecules ability to induce an allergic response and whether they induce allergen-specific IgG capable of inhibiting allergic patients IgE binding to the allergens, respectively. Results rDer p 2/1C and rDer p 2/1S were expressed in large amounts in E coli as soluble and folded proteins. Because of the lack of disulfide bonds, rDer p 2/1S did not form aggregates and was obtained as a monomeric protein, whereas rDer p 2/1C did form aggregates. Both hypoallergens lacked relevant IgE reactivity and had reduced ability to induce allergic inflammation and allergic responses but induced similar T-cell proliferation as the wild-type allergens. Immunization with the hypoallergens (rDer p 2/1S > rDer p 2/1C) induced IgG antibodies in rabbits that inhibited the IgE reactivity of patients with HDM allergy to Der p 1 and Der p 2. Conclusion The preclinical characterization indicates that particularly rDer p 2/1S can be used as a safe hypoallergenic molecule for both tolerance and vaccination approaches to treat HDM allergy. PMID:22789398

  11. Biosignature for airway inflammation in a house dust mite-challenged murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Piyadasa, Hadeesha; Altieri, Anthony; Basu, Sujata; Schwartz, Jacquie; Halayko, Andrew J; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2016-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) challenge is commonly used in murine models of allergic asthma for preclinical pathophysiological studies. However, few studies define objective readouts or biomarkers in this model. In this study we characterized immune responses and defined molecular markers that are specifically altered after HDM challenge. In this murine model, we used repeated HDM challenge for two weeks which induced hallmarks of allergic asthma seen in humans, including airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and elevated levels of circulating total and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1. Kinetic studies showed that at least 24?h after last HDM challenge results in significant AHR along with eosinophil infiltration in the lungs. Histologic assessment of lung revealed increased epithelial thickness and goblet cell hyperplasia, in the absence of airway wall collagen deposition, suggesting ongoing tissue repair concomitant with acute allergic lung inflammation. Thus, this model may be suitable to delineate airway inflammation processes that precede airway remodeling and development of fixed airway obstruction. We observed that a panel of cytokines e.g. IFN-?, IL-1?, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC, TNF-?, IL-13, IL-33, MDC and TARC were elevated in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar fluid, indicating local lung inflammation. However, levels of these cytokines remained unchanged in serum, reflecting lack of systemic inflammation in this model. Based on these findings, we further monitored the expression of 84 selected genes in lung tissues by quantitative real-time PCR array, and identified 31 mRNAs that were significantly up-regulated in lung tissue from HDM-challenged mice. These included genes associated with human asthma (e.g. clca3, ear11, il-13, il-13ra2, il-10, il-21, arg1 and chia1) and leukocyte recruitment in the lungs (e.g. ccl11, ccl12 and ccl24). This study describes a biosignature to enable broad and systematic interrogation of molecular mechanisms and intervention strategies for airway inflammation pertinent to allergic asthma that precedes and possibly potentiates airway remodeling and fibrosis. PMID:26740570

  12. Cycling of Lead Through Soil, Air, and Household Dust in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingitore, N. E.; Clague, J.; Amaya, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Elimination of leaded gasoline in the US is associated with a dramatic overall decrease in ambient lead in the environment and blood lead levels in our population. However, Pb is such a potent neurotoxin for children during the formative growth years that legislation for additional reduction of airborne lead levels is under consideration. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of a suite of samples of local (El Paso) soil, airborne particulate matter, and household dust reveals that lead humate is the dominant Pb species in these diverse environmental materials. Lead humate is a stable complex of Pb with the humus component of soil, a product of interaction between the humus and such introduced contaminant lead species as lead oxide, lead sulfate, etc. Because lead humate forms only in soil, we conclude that the source of the majority of the lead in El Paso's airborne particulate matter and household dust is local soils. Analysis of lead isotopes in selected samples is consistent with this conclusion. Re-entrainment of low-density (relative to most Pb species) humus soil particles is the apparent pathway from soil to air. Deposition of airborne particulate matter and pedal traction are the presumed mechanisms for transfer to household interiors. Reduction of airborne lead in El Paso by reducing input from its dominant local source may require extensive soil remediation, a tedious and expensive prospect. X-Ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were conducted at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory on beam lines 7-3, 10-2, and 11-2. Spectra were collected at the Pb L-III absorption edge in fluorescence mode using a 13-element or a 30-element Ge solid-state detector. This publication was made possible by grant numbers 1RO1-ES11367 and 1 S11 ES013339-04 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIEHS, NIH. Partial travel support provided by SSRL-DOE- UTEP Gateway Program.

  13. Simultaneous determination of thirteen organophosphate esters in settled indoor house dust and a comparison between two sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinghua; Kubwabo, Cariton; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2014-09-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of 13 organophosphate esters (OPEs) in house dust was developed. The method is based on solvent extraction by sonication, sample cleanup by solid phase extraction (SPE), and analysis by gas chromatography-positive chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/PCI-MS/MS). Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 0.03 to 0.43 ?g/g and recoveries from 60% to 118%. The inter- and intra-day variations ranged from 3% to 23%. The method was applied to dust samples collected using two vacuum sampling techniques from 134 urban Canadian homes: a sample of fresh or "active" dust (FD) collected by technicians and a composite sample taken from the household vacuum cleaner (HD). Results show that the two sampling methods (i.e., FD vs HD) provided comparable results. Tributoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP), triphenyl phosphate (TPhP), tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP), tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tricresyl phosphate (TCrP), and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TnBP) were detected in the majority of samples. The most predominant OPE was TBEP, with median concentrations of 31.9 ?g/g and 22.8 ?g/g in FD and HD samples, respectively, 1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher than other OPEs. The method was also applied to the analysis of OPEs in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standard reference material (NIST SRM 2585, organic contaminants in house dust). The results from SRM 2585 may contribute to the certification of OPE concentration values in this SRM. PMID:24462133

  14. Supercritical fluid extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from house dust with supercritical 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a).

    PubMed

    Calvosa, Frank C; Lagalante, Anthony F

    2010-01-15

    The extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) from SRM 2585 (Organic Contaminants in House Dust) was investigated using supercritical fluid R134a as an extraction solvent. Three methods of dust extraction were studied: (1) extraction of dry dust, (2) extraction of dry dust dispersed on Ottawa sand and (3) extraction of dust wet with dichloromethane. For each of the three sample preparation methods, extracts at three temperatures (110, 150, and 200 degrees C) above the critical temperature of R134a were performed. Eight PBDE congeners (BDE-28, -47, -99, 100, -153, -154, -183, and -209) in the SFE extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography negative-ion atmospheric pressure photoionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/NI-APPI/MS/MS). The optimum extraction of PBDEs from house dust using supercritical R134a is obtained when the dust is pre-wet with dichloromethane prior to extraction to swell the dust. For all sample preparation methods, higher temperatures afforded higher percent recoveries of the eight PBDE congeners. Only a combination of high-temperature (200 degrees C) and pre-wetting the dust with dichloromethane produced high recovery of the environmentally important, fully brominated PBDE congener, BDE-209. PMID:20006061

  15. Determination of synthetic musk compounds in indoor house dust by gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, Cariton; Fan, Xinghua; Rasmussen, Pat E; Wu, Fang

    2012-08-01

    A new method for the simultaneous determination of 11 synthetic musks and one fragrance compound in house dust was developed. The nitro musks included musk ketone (MK, 4-tert-butyl-3,5-dinitro-2,6-dimethylacetophenone), musk xylene (MX, 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), musk ambrette (1-tert-butyl-2-methoxy-4-methyl-3,5-dinitrobenzene) and musk moskene (1,1,3,3,5-pentamethyl-4,6-dinitroindane). The polycyclic musk compounds were 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-(?)-2-benzopyran (HHCB), 7-acetyl-1,1,3,4,4,6-hexamethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene (AHTN), 4-acetyl-1,1-dimethyl-6-tert-butylindane, 6-acetyl-1,1,2,3,3,5-hexamethylindane, 5-acetyl-1,1,2,6-tetramethyl-3-isopropylindane, 6,7-dihydro-1,1,2,3,3-pentamethyl-4(5H)-indanon. The one macrocyclic musk was 1,4-dioxacycloheptadecane-5,17-dione. The bicyclic hydrocarbon fragrance compound (1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydro-2,3,8,8-tetramethylnaphthalen-2yl)ethan-1-one (OTNE) and HHCB-lactone (4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1H,3H,4H,6H,7H, 8H-indeno[5,6-c]pyran-1-one), a degradation product of HHCB, were also analysed. NIST SRM 2781 (domestic sludge) and SRM 2585 (organic contaminants in house dust) were analysed for these target compounds. The method was applied for the analysis of 49 paired samples collected using two vacuum sampling methods: a sample of fresh or "active" dust (FD) collected using a Pullman-Holt vacuum sampler, and a household dust (HD) sample taken from the participants' vacuum cleaners. Method detection limits and recoveries ranged from 12 to 48ng/g and 54 to 117%, respectively. AHTN, HHCB, OTNE and HHCB-lactone were detected in all samples, with median concentrations of 552, 676, 252 and 453ng/g for FD samples, respectively; and 405, 992, 212 and 492ng/g for HD samples, respectively. MX and MK were detected with high frequencies but with much lower concentrations. The two sampling methods produced comparable results for the target analytes. Widely scattered concentration levels were observed for target analytes from this set of 49 house dust samples, suggesting a wide variability in Canadian household exposure to synthetic musks. PMID:22684881

  16. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark Patrick Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-15

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m{sup 2}) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m{sup 2}) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m{sup 2}) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust.

  17. Spatiotemporal analysis and human exposure assessment on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor air, settled house dust, and diet: A review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuning; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    This review summarizes the published literature on the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in indoor air, settled house dust, and food, and highlights geographical and temporal trends in indoor PAH contamination. In both indoor air and dust, ΣPAH concentrations in North America have decreased over the past 30 years with a halving time of 6.7±1.9years in indoor air and 5.0±2.3 years in indoor dust. In contrast, indoor PAH concentrations in Asia have remained steady. Concentrations of ΣPAH in indoor air are significantly (p<0.01) higher in Asia than North America. In studies recording both vapor and particulate phases, the global average concentration in indoor air of ΣPAH excluding naphthalene is between 7 and 14,300 ng/m(3). Over a similar period, the average ΣPAH concentration in house dust ranges between 127 to 115,817ng/g. Indoor/outdoor ratios of atmospheric concentrations of ΣPAH have declined globally with a half-life of 6.3±2.3 years. While indoor/outdoor ratios for benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalents (BaPeq) declined in North America with a half-life of 12.2±3.2 years, no significant decline was observed when data from all regions were considered. Comparison of the global database, revealed that I/O ratios for ΣPAH (average=4.3±1.3), exceeded significantly those of BaPeq (average=1.7±0.4) in the same samples. The significant decline in global I/O ratios suggests that indoor sources of PAH have been controlled more effectively than outdoor sources. Moreover, the significantly higher I/O ratios for ΣPAH compared to BaPeq, imply that indoor sources of PAH emit proportionally more of the less carcinogenic PAH than outdoor sources. Dietary exposure to PAH ranges from 137 to 55,000 ng/day. Definitive spatiotemporal trends in dietary exposure were precluded due to relatively small number of relevant studies. However, although reported in only one study, PAH concentrations in Chinese diets exceeded those in diet from other parts of the world, a pattern consistent with the spatial trends observed for concentrations of PAH in indoor air. Evaluation of human exposure to ΣPAH via inhalation, dust and diet ingestion, suggests that while intake via diet and inhalation exceeds that via dust ingestion; all three pathways contribute and merit continued assessment. PMID:26197059

  18. Metals and metalloids in atmospheric dust: Use of lead isotopic analysis for source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix Villar, Omar I.

    Mining activities generate aerosol in a wide range of sizes. Smelting activities produce mainly fine particles (<1 microm). On the other hand, milling, crushing and refining processes, as well tailings management, are significant sources of coarse particles (> 1 microm). The adverse effects of aerosols on human health depend mainly on two key characteristics: size and chemical composition. One of the main objectives of this research is to analyze the size distribution of contaminants in aerosol produced by mining operations. For this purpose, a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) was utilized. Results from the MOUDI samples show higher concentrations of the toxic elements like lead and arsenic in the fine fraction (<1 microm). Fine particles are more likely to be deposited in the deeper zones of the respiratory system; therefore, they are more dangerous than coarse particles that can be filtered out in the upper respiratory system. Unfortunately, knowing the total concentration of contaminants does not give us enough information to identify the source of contamination. For this reason, lead isotopes have been introduced as fingerprints for source apportionment. Each source of lead has specific isotopic ratios; by knowing these ratios sources can be identified. During this research, lead isotopic ratios were analyzed at different sites and for different aerosol sizes. From these analyses it can be concluded that lead isotopes are a powerful tool to identify sources of lead. Mitigation strategies could be developed if the source of contamination is well defined. Environmental conditions as wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity and precipitation have an important role in the concentration of atmospheric dust. Dry environments with low relative humidity are ideal for the transport of aerosols. Results obtained from this research show the relationship between dust concentrations and meteorological parameters. Dust concentrations are highly correlated with relative humidity and wind speed. With all the data collected on site and the analysis of the meteorological parameters, models can be develop to predict the transport of particles as well as the concentration of contaminants at a specific point. These models were developed and are part of the results shown in this dissertation.

  19. Chamber studies on mass-transfer of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and di- n-butylphthalate (DnBP) from emission sources into house dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schripp, Tobias; Fauck, Christian; Salthammer, Tunga

    2010-08-01

    For a number of phthalates and especially for di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), surprisingly high house dust concentrations are reported in the literature. Therefore, the uptake of the most prominent compounds DEHP and di- n-butylphthalate (DnBP) from plasticized indoor materials into house dust samples of different organic content has been experimentally determined. The experiments have been performed within 45 days which is sufficient for the more volatile phthalate (DnBP) to reach equilibrium conditions. DnBP reaches considerably higher concentrations in the chamber air compared to real room measurements and, thus, also elevated dust concentrations. In contrast, the mass transfer of DEHP in the dust via the gas phase was significantly lower. However, small chamber experiments showed elevated mass transfer of DEHP in case of direct contact between emission source and sink. This aspect is experimentally determined using an plasticized PVC polymer with and without direct contact to house dust. A transfer into the dust could be observed in dependence of the initial concentration in the material. However, the results do not allow the differentiation between the two uptake mechanisms via capillary forces and contact to the material's boundary layer. The results illustrate that the reasons for elevated DEHP concentrations in dust indoors can be traced back to direct contact of source and sink, abrasion from the source, and transport via airborne particles.

  20. A new exposure metric for traffic-related air pollution? An analysis of determinants of hopanes in settled indoor house dust

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) can adversely impact health but epidemiologic studies are limited in their abilities to assess long-term exposures and incorporate variability in indoor pollutant infiltration. Methods In order to examine settled house dust levels of hopanes, engine lubricating oil byproducts found in vehicle exhaust, as a novel TRAP exposure measure, dust samples were collected from 171 homes in five Canadian cities and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. To evaluate source contributions, the relative abundance of the highest concentration hopane monomer in house dust was compared to that in outdoor air. Geographic variables related to TRAP emissions and outdoor NO2 concentrations from city-specific TRAP land use regression (LUR) models were calculated at each georeferenced residence location and assessed as predictors of variability in dust hopanes. Results Hopanes relative abundance in house dust and ambient air were significantly correlated (Pearson’s r=0.48, p<0.05), suggesting that dust hopanes likely result from traffic emissions. The proportion of variance in dust hopanes concentrations explained by LUR NO2 was less than 10% in Vancouver, Winnipeg and Toronto while the correlations in Edmonton and Windsor explained 20 to 40% of the variance. Modeling with household factors such as air conditioning and shoe removal along with geographic predictors related to TRAP generally increased the proportion of explained variability (10-80%) in measured indoor hopanes dust levels. Conclusions Hopanes can consistently be detected in house dust and may be a useful tracer of TRAP exposure if determinants of their spatiotemporal variability are well-characterized, and when home-specific factors are considered. PMID:23782977

  1. Diversity of House Dust Mite Species in Xishuangbanna Dai, a Tropical Rainforest Region in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing-Miao; Luo, Qing-Hua; Sun, Jin-Lu; Shi, Cun-Lian; Yin, Jia; Zhou, Yu-Ling; Tang, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Zhang; Chen, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the species diversity of home dust mites (HDM) in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China. Methods. From August 2010 to January 2011, mite-allergic patients and healthy controls were invited to participate. Dust samples from the patients' homes were collected, and mites in the samples were isolated. Permanent slides were prepared for morphologically based species determination. Results. In total, 6316 mite specimens of morphologically identifiable species were found in 233 dust samples taken from 41 homes. The result shows that the mite family of Pyroglyphidae occupied the highest percentage of the total amount of mites collected, followed by Cheyletidae family. The most common adult Pyroglyphidae mites were Dermatophagoides (D.) farinae, D. pteronyssinus, and D. siboney. The most common mites found from other families were Blomia tropicalis, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and Aleuroglyphus ovatus. Four main allergenic dust mite species D. farinae, D. pteronyssinus, D. siboney, and Blomia tropicalis were found to be coinhabiting in 6/41 homes. Conclusion. The HDM population in homes in Xishuangbanna, a tropical rainforest region in Southwest China, has its own characteristics. It has rich dust mite species and the dust mite densities do not show significant variation across seasons. PMID:26064909

  2. Organophosphorous pesticide breakdown products in house dust and childrens urine

    PubMed Central

    Quirs-Alcal, Lesliam; Bradman, Asa; Smith, Kimberly; Weerasekera, Gayanga; Odetokun, Martins; Barr, Dana Boyd; Nishioka, Marcia; Castorina, Rosemary; Hubbard, Alan E.; Nicas, Mark; Hammond, S. Katharine; McKone, Thomas E.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to preformed dialkylphosphates (DAPs) in food or the environment may affect the reliability of DAP urinary metabolites as biomarkers of organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure. We conducted a study to investigate the presence of DAPs in indoor residential environments and their association with childrens urinary DAP levels. We collected dust samples from homes in farmworker and urban communities (40 homes total, n = 79 samples) and up to two urine samples from resident children ages 36 years. We measured six DAPs in all samples and eight DAP-devolving OP pesticides in a subset of dust samples (n = 54). DAPs were detected in dust with diethylphosphate (DEP) being the most frequently detected (?60%); detection frequencies for other DAPs were ?50%. DEP dust concentrations did not significantly differ between communities, nor were concentrations significantly correlated with concentrations of chlorpyrifos and diazinon, the most frequently detected diethyl-OP pesticides (Spearman ? = ?0.41 to 0.38, P>0.05). Detection of DEP, chlorpyrifos, or diazinon, was not associated with DEP and/or DEP + diethylthiophosphate detection in urine (Kappa coefficients = ?0.33 to 0.16). Finally, estimated non-dietary ingestion intake from DEP in dust was found to be ?5% of the dose calculated from DEP levels in urine, suggesting that ingestion of dust is not a significant source of DAPs in urine if they are excreted unchanged. PMID:22781438

  3. 77 FR 70179 - Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties and Housing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties... paint hazard in federally-owned residential properties and housing receiving Federal assistance, as...: Requirements for Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Federally Owned Residential Properties and Housing...

  4. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick; Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-01

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 ?g/dL in children aged 1-4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 ?g/m(2)) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 ?g/m(2)) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 ?g/m(2)) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ((206)Pb/(207)Pb, (208)Pb/(207)Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. PMID:25462679

  5. Studies on the Occurrence, Identification and Control of House Dust Mites at Rural Houses of Shebin El-Kom Locality, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Heikal, H M

    2015-04-01

    The present study was conducted at Elkom Elakhdar village, Shebin El-Kom, Menoufia Governorate along 2012 year seasons, to calculate and identify the species composition and the occurrence frequency of the extracted dust mites collected from three building ages at rural houses, as well as to determine the toxicity limits of different concentrations of three plant essential oils against two species of the family Pyroglyphidae the main causal of allergy to humans. The obtained results revealed that there were eleven mite species belong to five families (Pyroglyphidae, Chortoglyphidae, Glycyphagidae, Acaridae and Cheyletidae). Of the total collected mites (5276) the highest dominant percentage species was the dust mites: Dermatophagoides farinae (66.1%), followed by D. pteronyssinus (23.3%), while the percentages of the rest species: Chortoglyphus arcuatus, Lepidoglyphus destructor, Glycyphagus domesticus, Gohieria fusca, Tyrophagusputrescentiae, Caloglyphus sp, Cheyletus malaccensis, Blomia sp. and Acarus siro were ranged between 0.16-2.0%. Regarding to the effect of temperature degrees on mite population, high degrees more than 25 degrees C at summer season, decreased the numbers of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus. Toxicological tests of the three plant essential oils against adult stages of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus showed that lemon grass oil gave the highest toxicity effect, in comparison with geranium and thyme oils, where mortality percentages were approximately around 100% at 800 ppm concentration on both species. The LC50 of lemon grass were 228.992 and 293.615 ppm against the two species, respectively. From the results of the research, it could be recommend that it is preferable to apply control operation during summer season where the mite population density is the least, moreover, the botanical oil extracts effectively controlled the parasitic dust mites, D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus and can be used in the biological control programs, as well as, it can play effective role in the integrated management programs. PMID:26506648

  6. Levels of non-polybrominated diphenyl ether brominated flame retardants in residential house dust samples and fire station dust samples in California.

    PubMed

    Brown, F Reber; Whitehead, Todd P; Park, June-Soo; Metayer, Catherine; Petreas, Myrto X

    2014-11-01

    Eleven novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were analyzed in dust samples from California homes as a part of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) and from the living quarters of California fire stations as a part of the Firefighter Occupational Exposure (FOX) study using high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The eleven NBFRs were ?- and ?-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (?- and ?-DBE-DBCH), 2-bromoallyl 2,3,6-tribromophenylether (BATE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE). Six of the seven NBFRs that are produced in relatively small quantities (i.e., ?-, ?-DBE-DBCH, BATE, PBEB, PBT, TBP-DBPE) were measured close to or below the limit of quantitation (0.64 ng/g) in both the NCCLS and FOX samples, and the seventh, HBB, was measured at median concentrations of 1.85 ng/g and 9.40 ng/g in the NCCLS and FOX samples, respectively. The remaining four NBFRs, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE, and DBDPE, are produced in higher quantities, and were detected at median concentrations of 337 ng/g, 186 ng/g, 22.3 ng/g, and 82.8 ng/g, respectively in the NCCLS samples, and at median concentrations of 2687 ng/g, 2076 ng/g, 28.4 ng/g, and 161 ng/g, respectively, in the FOX samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were several times lower than concentrations of PBDEs previously measured in the same samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were generally comparable to concentrations of NBFRs in other studies of house dust from the US and Canada. PMID:25261858

  7. Levels of Non-Polybrominated Diphenyl Ether Brominated Flame Retardants in Residential House Dust Samples and Fire Station Dust Samples in California

    PubMed Central

    Brown, F Reber; Whitehead, Todd P; Park, June-Soo; Metayer, Catherine; Petreas, Myrto X

    2014-01-01

    Eleven novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) were analyzed in dust samples from California homes as a part of the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study (NCCLS) and from the living quarters of California fire stations as a part of the Firefighter Occupational Exposure (FOX) study using high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The eleven NBFRs, were: α- and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (α- and β-DBE-DBCH), 2-bromoallyl 2,3,6-tribromophenylether (BATE), pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), 2,3-dibromopropyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (TBP-DBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP), and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE). Six of the seven NBFRs that are produced in relatively small quantities (i.e., α−, β−DBE-DBCH, BATE, PBEB, PBT, TBP-DBPE) were measured close to or below the limit of quantitation (0.64 ng/g) in both the NCCLS and FOX samples, and the seventh, HBB, was measured at median concentrations of 1.85 ng/g and 9.40 ng/g in the NCCLS and FOX samples, respectively. The remaining four NBFRs, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP, BTBPE, and DBDPE, are produced in higher quantities, and were detected at median concentrations of 337 ng/g, 186 ng/g, 22.3, ng/g, and 82.8 ng/g, respectively in the NCCLS samples, and at median concentrations of 2687 ng/g, 2076 ng/g, 28.4 ng/g, and 161 ng/g, respectively, in the FOX samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were several times lower than concentrations of PBDEs previously measured in the same samples. Concentrations of NBFRs in the NCCLS and FOX dust samples were generally comparable to concentrations of NBFRs in other studies of house dust from the US and Canada. PMID:25261858

  8. Product screening for sources of halogenated flame retardants in Canadian house and office dust.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Golnoush; Saini, Amandeep; Goosey, Emma; Diamond, Miriam L

    2016-03-01

    Human exposure to halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their replacements, can be related to exposure to indoor dust and direct contact with HFR-containing products. This study aimed to identify electronic products that contributed to HFRs measured in indoor dust and to develop a screening method for identifying HFRs in hard polymer products. Concentrations of 10 PBDEs and 12 halogenated replacements in dust and surface wipe samples of hard polymer casings of electronic products plus Br in the surfaces of those casing measured using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) were analyzed from 35 homes and 10 offices in Toronto (ON, Canada). HFR concentrations in dust and product wipes were positively correlated. Thus, we hypothesize that electronic products with the highest HFR concentrations contribute the most to concentrations in dust, regardless of the volatility of the HFR. Abundant HFRs in dust and product wipes were PBDEs (BDE-47, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 209), TDCPP, DBDPE, EH-TBB and BEHTBP. Older CRT TVs had the highest concentration of BDE-209 of all products tested. This was followed by higher concentrations of HFRs in PCs, Audio/Video (A/V) devices, small household appliances (HHAs) and flat screen TVs. The removal of HFRs from polymer surfaces using wipes supports concerns that HFRs could be transferred from these surfaces to hands as a result of direct contact with HFR-containing products. Surface wipe testing shows promise for screening additive HFRs. In comparison, the Br-content obtained using a handheld XRF analyzer did not correspond to concentrations obtained from surface wipe testing. PMID:26747994

  9. Evaluation of errors and limits of the 63-?m house-dust-fraction method, a surrogate to predict hidden moisture damage

    PubMed Central

    Baudisch, Christoph; Assadian, Ojan; Kramer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to analyze possible random and systematic measurement errors and to detect methodological limits of the previously established method. Findings To examine the distribution of random errors (repeatability standard deviation) of the detection procedure, collective samples were taken from two uncontaminated rooms using a sampling vacuum cleaner, and 10 sub-samples each were examined with 3 parallel cultivation plates (DG18). In this two collective samples of new dust, the total counts of Aspergillus spp. varied moderately by 25 and 29% (both 9 cfu per plate). At an average of 28 cfu/plate, the total number varied only by 13%. For the evaluation of the influence of old dust, old and fresh dust samples were examined. In both cases with old dust, the old dust influenced the results indicating false positive results, where hidden moist was indicated but was not present. To quantify the influence of sand and sieving, 13 sites were sampled in parallel using the 63-?m- and total dust collection approaches. Sieving to 63-?m resulted in a more then 10-fold enrichment, due to the different quantity of inert sand in each total dust sample. Conclusion The major errors during the quantitative evaluation from house dust samples for mould fungi as reference values for assessment resulted from missing filtration, contamination with old dust and the massive influence of soil. If the assessment is guided by indicator genera, the percentage standard deviation lies in a moderate range. PMID:19852825

  10. Relationship between chicken cellular immunity and endotoxin levels in dust from chicken housing environments

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Katharine; Shin, Kyung-Min; Jo, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hyoung-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous biochemical agents in animal husbandry indoor environments are known to promote the occurrence of various illnesses among workers and animals. The relationship between endotoxin levels in dust collected from chicken farms and various immunological markers was investigated. Peripheral blood was obtained from 20 broiler chickens and 20 laying hens from four different chicken farms in Korea. Concentrations of total or respirable dust in the inside the chicken farm buildings were measured using a polyvinyl chloride membrane filter and mini volume sampler. Endotoxin levels in the dust were determined by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate Kinetic method. Interferon-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with concanavalin A was significantly lower in broilers or layers from the farms with higher endotoxin concentrations than the chickens from the farms with lower endotoxin levels. An opposite pattern was observed for plasma cortisol concentrations with higher cortisol levels found in chickens from the farms with higher endotoxin levels. When peripheral lymphocytes were examined, the percentage of CD3-Ia+ B cells was lower in layers from farms with higher endotoxin levels than those from locations with lower endotoxin levels. Overall, these results suggest a probable negative association between dust endotoxin levels and cell-mediated immunity in chickens. PMID:25549222

  11. Exposure to herbicides in house dust and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Metayer, Catherine; Colt, Joanne S; Buffler, Patricia A; Reed, Helen D; Selvin, Steve; Crouse, Vonda; Ward, Mary H

    2013-07-01

    We examine the association between exposure to herbicides and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Dust samples were collected from homes of 269 ALL cases and 333 healthy controls (<8 years of age at diagnosis/reference date and residing in same home since diagnosis/reference date) in California, using a high-volume surface sampler or household vacuum bags. Amounts of agricultural or professional herbicides (alachlor, metolachlor, bromoxynil, bromoxynil octanoate, pebulate, butylate, prometryn, simazine, ethalfluralin, and pendimethalin) and residential herbicides (cyanazine, trifluralin, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), mecoprop, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), chlorthal, and dicamba) were measured. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Models included the herbicide of interest, age, sex, race/ethnicity, household income, year and season of dust sampling, neighborhood type, and residence type. The risk of childhood ALL was associated with dust levels of chlorthal; compared to homes with no detections, ORs for the first, second, and third tertiles were 1.49 (95% CI: 0.82-2.72), 1.49 (95% CI: 0.83-2.67), and 1.57 (95% CI: 0.90-2.73), respectively (P-value for linear trend=0.05). The magnitude of this association appeared to be higher in the presence of alachlor. No other herbicides were identified as risk factors of childhood ALL. The data suggest that home dust levels of chlorthal, and possibly alachlor, are associated with increased risks of childhood ALL. PMID:23321862

  12. QUANTITATIVE PCR ANALYSIS OF HOUSE DUST CAN REVEAL ABNORMAL MOLD CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor mold populations were measured in the dust of homes in Cleveland and Cincinnati, OH, by quantitative PCR (QPCR) and, in Cincinnati, also by culturing. QPCR assays for 82 species (or groups of species) were used to identify and quantify indoor mold populations in moldy home...

  13. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section 745... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target...

  14. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section 745... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target...

  15. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section 745... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target...

  16. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces isolated from house dust samples collected around the world

    PubMed Central

    Visagie, C.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Tanney, J.B.; Whitfield, E.; Mwange, K.; Meijer, M.; Amend, A.S.; Seifert, K.A.; Samson, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a worldwide survey of the indoor mycobiota, dust was collected from nine countries. Analyses of dust samples included the culture-dependent dilution-to-extinction method and the culture-independent 454-pyrosequencing. Of the 7 904 isolates, 2 717 isolates were identified as belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces. The aim of this study was to identify isolates to species level and describe the new species found. Secondly, we wanted to create a reliable reference sequence database to be used for next-generation sequencing projects. Isolates represented 59 Aspergillus species, including eight undescribed species, 49 Penicillium species of which seven were undescribed and 18 Talaromyces species including three described here as new. In total, 568 ITS barcodes were generated, and 391 β-tubulin and 507 calmodulin sequences, which serve as alternative identification markers. PMID:25492981

  17. Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces isolated from house dust samples collected around the world.

    PubMed

    Visagie, C M; Hirooka, Y; Tanney, J B; Whitfield, E; Mwange, K; Meijer, M; Amend, A S; Seifert, K A; Samson, R A

    2014-06-01

    As part of a worldwide survey of the indoor mycobiota, dust was collected from nine countries. Analyses of dust samples included the culture-dependent dilution-to-extinction method and the culture-independent 454-pyrosequencing. Of the 7?904 isolates, 2?717 isolates were identified as belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Talaromyces. The aim of this study was to identify isolates to species level and describe the new species found. Secondly, we wanted to create a reliable reference sequence database to be used for next-generation sequencing projects. Isolates represented 59 Aspergillus species, including eight undescribed species, 49 Penicillium species of which seven were undescribed and 18 Talaromyces species including three described here as new. In total, 568 ITS barcodes were generated, and 391 ?-tubulin and 507 calmodulin sequences, which serve as alternative identification markers. PMID:25492981

  18. Treatment of Patients with Refractory Atopic Dermatitis Sensitized to House Dust Mites by Using Sublingual Allergen Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Ryu, Ha-Ryeong; Yoon, Cheol-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Baek, Jin-Ok; Roh, Joo-Young

    2015-01-01

    Even though atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin diseases, its treatment remains a challenge in clinical practice, with most approaches limited to symptomatic, unspecific anti-inflammatory, or immunosuppressive treatments. Many studies have shown AD to have multiple causes that activate complex immunological and inflammatory pathways. However, aeroallergens, and especially the house dust mite (HDM), play a relevant role in the elicitation or exacerbation of eczematous lesions in many AD patients. Accordingly, allergen-specific immunotherapy has been used in AD patients with the aim of redirecting inappropriate immune responses. Here, we report three cases of refractory AD sensitized to HDM who were treated with sublingual immunotherapy. PMID:25673938

  19. SQ house dust mite (HDM) SLIT-tablet provides clinical improvement in HDM-induced allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Ludger; Mosbech, Holger; Zieglmayer, Petra; Rehm, Dorte; Stage, Brian Sonne; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergy represents a highly prevalent inhalant allergy, and exposure to HDM allergens results in allergic rhinitis with persistent symptoms that may not be adequately controlled with available allergy pharmacotherapy. Allergy immunotherapy constitutes a complementary treatment option targeting the underlying immunological mechanisms of allergic disease and represents the only treatment with a potential for disease modification and long-term efficacy. As traditional allergy immunotherapy delivered by subcutaneous injection of specific HDM allergens involves a time-consuming treatment regimen and a risk of systemic adverse reactions, sublingually administered allergy immunotherapy (SLIT) has been investigated as a more convenient treatment option with similar levels of efficacy and an improved safety profile that allows for at-home daily administration. In this Drug Profile, we provide a review of the clinical data behind the SQ HDM SLIT-tablet, which was recently approved for the treatment of HDM-induced allergic rhinitis by regulatory authorities in Europe and Japan. PMID:26788764

  20. Three-Year Follow-up Results of Sublingual Immunotherapy in Patients With Allergic Rhinitis Sensitized to House Dust Mites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Hye; Mun, Sue Jean; Han, Doo Hee; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Kim, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the long-term efficacy, safety, and compliance associated with sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in Korean patients with allergic rhinitis sensitized to house dust mites. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study. A total of 164 patients who were sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae and who received SLIT were enrolled between November 2007 and January 2010. Each patient was followed up using a diary card, on which a symptom score, rescue medication score, and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Results All allergic rhinitis symptoms improved after 3 years of SLIT (P<0.05), and the rescue medication score decreased with time (P<0.05). The incidence of AEs associated with SLIT was 31% (51 of 164 patients) during the first month of therapy, and there were no severe AEs. The dropout rate was 19.5% (32 of 164 patients) during the first month, 34% (56 of 164 patients) after 6 months, and 41% (68 of 164 patients) after 1 year of SLIT. The 3-year compliance rate was approximately 40% (65 of 164 patients). The most common causes of dropout during the first month of SLIT were high cost and inconvenience. The improvement in allergic symptoms was the most common cause of dropout after 6 months. Conclusions Allergic symptoms significantly decreased after 1 year of SLIT treatment, and this effect was sustained after 2 or 3 years of treatment. By increasing compliance through patient education, the 3-year use of SLIT for house dust mite allergies may be effective in the management of allergic rhinitis. PMID:25729618

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    CHARACTERIZATION OF IMMEDIATE AND LATE PHASE AIRWAY RESPONSES TO HOUSE DUST MITE CHALLENGE IN BROWN NORWAY RATS AND CORRELATIONS AMONG PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL MEDIATORS (P.
    SinghI, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2, J. Richards2, K. Crissman2, D.L. Doerfler2 and M.I. Gilmour2, 1NCSU, Ra...

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF HOUSE DUST FOR ARSENIC (RTI/ACS-AP-209-121)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this protocol is to provide guidelines for the analysis of wipes that were used in Lioy-Wainman-Weisel (LWW) surface samplers to collect house dust for arsenic (As). This method involves the extraction of the analyte from wipe samples using 50% ultra-pure nitric ac...

  3. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR ANALYSIS OF SOIL OR HOUSE DUST SAMPLES USING CHLORPYRIFOS ELISA SAMPLES (BCO-L-1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract is included for completeness of documentation, but this SOP was not used in the study.

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for analyzing both Stage II and Stage III soil and vacuum-cleaner collected house dust samples, and Stage III air samples u...

  4. A post-remediation assessment in Jersey City of the association of hexavalent chromium in house dust and urinary chromium in children.

    PubMed

    Black, Kathleen; Gochfeld, Michael; Lioy, Paul J; Fan, Zhi-Hua Tina; Yu, Chang Ho; Jeitner, Chris; Hernandez, Marta; Einstein, Stephanie A; Stern, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Although all chromite ore processing residue (COPR) sites near residential neighborhoods in Jersey City, New Jersey have undergone remediation, recent studies found widespread, but low levels of hexavalent chromium (Cr(+6)) in house dust both in Jersey City and in communities with no known sources of Cr(+6). This study was designed as a follow-up to determine whether there is an association between current Cr(+6) levels in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations in young children. Dust samples (N=369) were collected from 123 homes. The median Cr(+6) concentration was 3.3 μg/g (mean±SD 5.2±7.5) and the median Cr(+6) loading was 1.1 μg/m(2) (1.9±3.1). These levels were not elevated compared with previously reported levels in background communities (median concentration=3.5 μg/g; median loading=2.8 μg/m(2)). Urinary chromium concentrations were measured in spot urine samples collected from 150 children, ages 3 months to 6 years. The median uncorrected urinary chromium concentration was 0.19 μg/l (0.22±0.16). Current urinary chromium concentrations were significantly lower than those previously reported before and during remediation (t-test; P<0.001). Urinary chromium concentrations were not significantly higher in homes with high (75th or 90th percentile) Cr(+6) dust levels (concentration or loading) compared with other homes. Multiple linear regression was used to examine the relationship between Cr(+6) levels (concentration and loading) in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations (uncorrected and specific gravity corrected). Contrary to pre-remediation studies, we did not find a positive association between Cr(+6) levels in house dust and urinary chromium concentrations. The findings indicate that current Cr(+6) levels in house dust are not positively associated with children's chromium exposure as measured by urinary chromium, and the children's exposure to Cr(+6) in house dust is below the level that could be identified by urine sampling. PMID:26329141

  5. Risk assessment of non-dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via house PM2.5, TSP and dust and the implications from human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Min-juan; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the cancer risk due to non-dietary PAHs exposure in home environment (inhalation and ingestion), exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of PM2.5, total suspend particles (TSP) and dust in homes at two urban centers of Pearl River Delta were assessed. House PM2.5 bound PAHs in Guangzhou (GZ) ranged from 10.0 to 61.9 ng m-3 and 0.72 to 8.15 ng m-3 in Hong Kong (HK). PAH profiles found in PM2.5, TSP and dust were different than that in hair (dominated by Nap and Phe). Pyr and Flu in house dust significantly correlated with that in hair (r = 0.69; 0.55, p < 0.05) but no correlation was found between PAHs in hair and PM2.5. High correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.97/0.95, p < 0.01) were noted between dibenzo(a,h)anthracene (DBA) and Toxicity Equivalent Concentrations (TEQs) of dust and PM2.5. The lung cancer risks based on PM2.5 bound PAHs exposure in houses of GZ (10-5-10-4) were significantly higher than those of HK (10-6-10-5), which were also significantly higher than the cancer risks associated with house dust intake (10-7-10-5) in GZ. PAHs exposure via non-dietary route (PM2.5 and dust) was found to be 1-3 times higher than fish consumption for children and contributed to 52-76% of total PAHs intake for children and 24-50% for adults in GZ.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD TEST METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF LEAD IN PAINT, AND PAINT-CONTAMINATED DUST AND SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid, simple, inexpensive, and relatively accurate field test method for the determination of lead (Pb) in paints, dusts, and soils has been developed. The method involves the ultrasonic leaching of 0.19 - 0.5g of the sample in 5 mL of 25% (v/v) nitric acid for 30 minutes foll...

  7. Quantitative PCR analysis of house dust can reveal abnormal mold conditions.

    PubMed

    Meklin, Teija; Haugland, Richard A; Reponen, Tiina; Varma, Manju; Lummus, Zana; Bernstein, David; Wymer, Larry J; Vesper, Stephen J

    2004-07-01

    Indoor mold concentrations were measured in the dust of moldy homes (MH) and reference homes (RH) by quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays for 82 species or related groups of species (assay groups). About 70% of the species and groups were never or only rarely detected. The ratios (MH geometric mean : RH geometric mean) for 6 commonly detected species (Aspergillus ochraceus, A. penicillioides, A. unguis, A. versicolor, Eurotium group, and Cladosporium sphaerospermum) were >1 (Group I). Logistic regression analysis of the sum of the logs of the concentrations of Group I species resulted in a 95% probability for separating MH from RH. These results suggest that it may be possible to evaluate whether a home has an abnormal mold condition by quantifying a limited number of mold species in a dust sample. Also, four common species of Aspergillus were quantified by standard culturing procedures and their concentrations compared to QPCR results. Culturing underestimated the concentrations of these four species by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to QPCR. PMID:15237292

  8. Quantitative PCR analysis of house dust can reveal abnormal mold conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meklin, Teija; Haugland, Richard A.; Reponen, Tiina; Varma, Manju; Lummus, Zana; Bernstein, David; Wymer, Larry J.; Vesper, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Indoor mold concentrations were measured in the dust of moldy homes (MH) and reference homes (RH) by quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays for 82 species or related groups of species (assay groups). About 70% of the species and groups were never or only rarely detected. The ratios (MH geometric mean : RH geometric mean) for 6 commonly detected species (Aspergillus ochraceus, A. penicillioides, A. unguis, A. versicolor, Eurotium group, and Cladosporium sphaerospermum) were > 1 (Group I). Logistic regression analysis of the sum of the logs of the concentrations of Group I species resulted in a 95% probability for separating MH from RH. These results suggest that it may be possible to evaluate whether a home has an abnormal mold condition by quantifying a limited number of mold species in a dust sample. Also, four common species of Aspergillus were quantified by standard culturing procedures and their concentrations compared to QPCR results. Culturing underestimated the concentrations of these four species by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to QPCR. PMID:15237292

  9. Genetically Engineered Lactococcus lactis Protect against House Dust Mite Allergy in a BALB/c Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chunqing; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Ren, Chengcheng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucosal vaccine based on lactic acid bacteria is an attractive concept for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, but their mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate how recombinant major dust mite allergen Der p2-expressing Lactococcus lactis as a mucosal vaccine induced the immune tolerance against house dust mite allergy in a mouse model. Methods Three strains of recombinant L. lactis producing Der p2 in different cell components (extracellular, intracellular and cell wall) were firstly constructed. Their prophylactic potential was evaluated in a Der p2-sensitised mouse model, and immunomodulation properties at the cellular level were determined by measuring cytokine production in vitro. Results Der p2 expressed in the different recombinant L. lactis strains was recognized by a polyclonal anti-Der p2 antibody. Oral treatment with the recombinant L. lactis prior sensitization significantly prevented the development of airway inflammation in the Der p2-sensitized mice, as determined by the attenuation of inflammatory cells infiltration in the lung tissues and decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the serum allergen-specific IgE levels were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-4 in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes cell cultures were also markedly decreased upon allergen stimulation in the mice fed with the recombinant L. lactis strains. These protective effects correlated with a significant up-regulation of regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Conclusion Oral pretreatment with live recombinant L. lactis prevented the development of allergen-induced airway inflammation primarily by the induction of specific mucosal immune tolerance. PMID:25290938

  10. Duration of exposure--histological effects on broiler lungs, performance, and house environment with Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash dust

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, M.C.; Nakaue, H.S.; Goeger, M.P.; Helfer, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen hundred broilers were exposed to Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash (VA) dust (D) from 28 to 49 days of age to correlate the duration of exposure time to histological effect on lungs and to determine the effects on broiler performance and house environment. Histological examinations of the lungs from birds exposed each day for 4 days to either VAD for 60 min (VAD 60) in the morning and afternoon (3276 g VA/day), or VAD after one direct application (DiAp) (20 kg/m2) on wood shaving litter revealed mild lymphoid hyperplasia and granuloma formation accompanied by phagocytized crystalline material seen in some alveolar macrophages; however, no effect was observed in lung tissues from broilers exposed each day for 4 days to VAD for 15 min (VAD 15) in the morning and afternoon (82 g VAD/day). Birds exposed to all VAD treatments and examined after 7 days had histological changes in the lungs, including giant cell granuloma formation, similar to those seen at 4 days. No significant histopathological changes were found in the turbinates with any VAD treatments. Levels of mean body weight, ammonia concentration, mortality, and respiratory dust (particles ranging in size from .5 to 10 micron) levels were not significantly different among the treatments. Significantly poorer mean feed conversion was observed with broilers exposed to VAD 60 than the VA DiAp exposure. No difference in feed conversion was observed between the control and either VAD 15 or VAD 60 treatments. From this experiment, the observed histological changes in the lungs occurred with 4 days or less exposure to VAD 60 (3276 g/day).

  11. 157?The Post-Treatment Efficacy of House Dust Mite Sublingual Allergen Immunotherapy Tablets in Adults With Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Demoly, Pascal; Worm, Margitta; Fokkens, Wystke; Anna, Tabar; Helene, Nguyen; de Beaumont, Olivier; Melac, Michel; Frereux, Marine; Zeldin, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy and safety of 2 doses of sublingual allergen immunotherapy house dust mite (HDM) tablets administered for 12 months were demonstrated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of adults suffering from HDM-related allergic rhinitis. Here we report the efficacy during the 12-month, treatment-free, follow-up period. Methods Of the 509 patients randomized, 412 were included in the year 2 full analysis set (500 IR = 132, 300 IR = 134, Placebo = 146). The primary efficacy variable was the Average Adjusted Symptom Score (AAdSS, scale 012) an average of the daily score based on the severity of 4 rhinitis symptoms (sneezing, rhinorrhea, nasal pruritus and nasal congestion) and adjusted for rescue medication usage. The AAdSS was analyzed, at the end of the post-treatment period, using an ANCOVA and at 3, 6, 8 and 12 months after treatment cessation in a secondary analysis, using repeated measures ANCOVA. Results At the end of the post-treatment period, the 500 IR group showed a significant improvement in AAdSS vs. placebo (P = 0.021) with a LS Means difference of 0.70 (95% CI [1.29, 0.11]), corresponding to 19.1%. The LS Means difference of 0.62 (95% CI [1.20, 0.05]) between the 300 IR and placebo groups was also significant (P = 0.034), corresponding to 17.0%. The difference between the active treatment groups was not statistically significant. Eight months after treatment cessation, which corresponds to the autumn peak in HDM, the relative LS mean difference was 20.9% (P = 0.0079) for the 500 IR and was 25.5% (P = 0.0011) for the 300 IR group. Conclusions During the 12-month post-treatment period, house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy tablets at doses of 500 IR and 300 IR provided sustained symptom relief, demonstrating their efficacy after treatment cessation.

  12. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  13. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  14. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  15. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.227 Section 745.227 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN...

  16. 40 CFR 745.227 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: target housing and child...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT LEAD-BASED... for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing; the EPA Guidance on Residential... control procedures; and/or (ii) All collected paint chip samples shall be analyzed according to...

  17. House dust mite extract induces growth factor expression in nasal mucosa by activating the PI3K/Akt/HIF-1? pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Wei-Ming; Zhou, Han

    2016-01-22

    Growing evidence suggests that hypoxia-inducible factor-? (HIF-1?) plays an important role in the progression of allergic airway inflammation and remodeling. However, the biochemical mechanisms leading to the activation of HIF-1? and the effects of HIF-1? on the expression of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1), and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), in allergic nasal inflammation are not clear. We examined the relationship between HIF-1? activation and production of VEGF, TGF-?1, and FGF-2 in primary cultured nasal epithelial cells (NECs) after stimulation with house dust mite (HDM) extract. Moreover, we evaluated the importance of phosphoinositide3-kinase(PI3K)/Akt signaling in HDM-induced production of these growth factors invitro and in the nasal mucosa of a murine model of allergic rhinitis (AR). Our results indicate HDM extract induced the expression of VEGF, TGF-?1, and FGF-2 by activating the PI3K/Akt/HIF-1? pathway in human primary cultured NECs and in the nasal mucosa of a murine model. HIF-1? regulated the expression of VEGF, TGF-?1, and FGF-2 in the nasal mucosa through direct and indirect pathways, which suggested that targeting the HIF-1? pathway could be a novel therapeutic approach for reducing nasal airway inflammation and remodeling in AR. PMID:26740176

  18. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... General Departmental Enforcement Center Office of Strategic Planning & Management Equal Employment Opportunity Policy Development and Research Fair Housing / Equal Opportunity Public Affairs Field Policy and Management Public and Indian Housing General Counsel Small / Disadvantaged ...

  19. Relationship between the level of lead absorption in children and the age, type, and condition of housing

    SciTech Connect

    Chisolm, J.J. Jr.; Mellits, E.D.; Quaskey, S.A.

    1985-10-01

    A group of 184 preschool-aged children with pretreatment blood lead concentrations (PbB) greater than or equal to 50 g/dl, who received in-patient chelation therapy, were followed prospectively as out-patients for 12 months after discharge. Of these, 160 were followed for 24-30 months. Serial PbB data were analyzed according to the type of housing to which each child was discharged. Following therapy, PbB stabilized by 3 months. Thereafter, highly significant differences existed between those living in or visiting old houses in which lead-in-paint hazards had been abated according to local ordinances (anti m PbB = 38.5 g/dl) and those discharged to lead-free public housing (anti m PbB = 28.8 g/dl) or to recently, totally gutted and renovated old housing (anti m PbB = 28.7 g/dl). During the period of study (1978-1982), no downward trend in PbB within housing groups was found during the first 12 months of follow-up. Of the 152 children discharged to old housing, 75 had 127 recurrences of PbB greater than or equal to 50 g/dl. This emphasizes the need for close and prolonged follow-up in all cases. These data indicate that substantially improved methods of detection, classification, and abatement of lead hazards must replace traditional methods if lead exposure for young children in old housing is to be reduced to an acceptable level.

  20. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatory therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy. PMID:26387548

  1. Long-term Effects of Specific Allergen Immunotherapy Against House Dust Mites in Polysensitized Patients With Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kun Hee; Kim, Sung Wan; Cho, Joong Saeng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only currently available treatment to modify the natural history of allergic rhinitis (AR). If patients are polysensitized, it is difficult to identify the allergen causing the allergic symptoms. We evaluated the effectiveness of immunotherapy against house dust mites (HDMs) in AR patients polysensitized to both HDMs and seasonal allergens. Methods Thirty AR patients polysensitized to both HDMs and seasonal allergens (group A) and 30 patients sensitized to HDMs only (group B) were enrolled in this study. All subjects who received immunotherapy against HDMs for more than 2 years were evaluated by the multiple allergen simultaneous test (MAST) to determine the specific IgE level in luminescence units, total eosinophil counts in peripheral blood, serum total IgE, total nasal symptom scores, and the rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire (RQLQ) before and after immunotherapy. Results There were no statistical differences in levels of total and specific IgE, or total eosinophil count between the two groups. The total nasal symptom scores, RQLQ and medication scores significantly decreased after immunotherapy in both groups, however no significant differences were noted between the two groups. Conclusions We determined that the primary causative allergen of AR in Seoul, Korea is perennial allergens, such as HDMs, rather than seasonal allergens. This study provides a reference for the selection of allergens to use in immunotherapy for polysensitized AR patients living in an urban environment. PMID:25374753

  2. Xerotolerant fungi in house dust: taxonomy of Spiromastix, Pseudospiromastix and Sigleria gen. nov. in Spiromastigaceae (Onygenales, Eurotiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yuuri; Tanney, Joey B; Nguyen, Hai D T; Seifert, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    During a global investigation of fungi in house dust, we isolated six novel arthroconidial fungi. Phylogenies from combined analysis of nuc rDNA 18S, 28S and internal transcribed spacers sequences demonstrated that these fungi and two species preserved in culture collections represent undescribed species of Spiromastigaceae, Onygenales. Seven of the eight species lacked sexual states and only characters of asexual states and growth rates on different media could be used to characterize them. The eighth species produced ascomata only on water agar. We introduce six new species and one new combination in Spiromastix and validate the recently proposed family Spiromastigaceae, genus Pseudospiromastix and combination Ps. tentaculata. The new genus Sigleria is proposed for two new species that differ from Spiromastix by conidiophore branching patterns, slower growth and a limited ability to utilize nitrate as a sole N source. A key to the three genera of Spiromastigaceae, Spiromastix, Pseudospiromastix and Sigleria, is provided. Phylogenetic analyses support the placement of Spiromastigaceae within Onygenales. PMID:26577613

  3. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-09-21

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatorymore » therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy.« less

  4. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Der f 2, a Potent Allergen Derived from the House Dust Mite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Takai, Toshiro; Okumura, Yasushi; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Although a number of allergens have been identified and isolated, the underlying molecular basis for the potent immune response is poorly understood. House dust mites (Dermatophugoides sp.) are particularly ubiquitous contributors to atopy in developed countries. The rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma associated with allergic reactions to these arthropods are often caused by relatively small (125-129 amino acids) mite proteins of unclear biological function. Der f 2, a major allergen from the mite Dermatophagoides farinae, has been recombinantly expressed and characterized. The Der f 2 protein has been crystallized in our laboratory and a native data set collected at a synchrotron source. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I422 with unit cell parameters of a = 95.2 Angstroms, b = 95.2 Angstroms, and c = 103.3 Angstroms. An essentially complete (97.2%) data set has been collected to 2.4 Angstroms. Attempts to solve the crystal structure of Der f 2 by molecular replacement using the available NMR coordinates for either Der f 2 or Der p 2 (the homologous protein from D. pterovssinus) failed to reveal a creditable solution.

  5. Next-generation DNA sequencing reveals that low fungal diversity in house dust is associated with childhood asthma development

    PubMed Central

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Mendell, Mark J.; Macher, Janet M.; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Bradman, Asa; Holland, Nina; Harley, Kim; Eskenazi, Brenda; Peccia, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Dampness and visible mold in homes are associated with asthma development, but causal mechanisms remain unclear. The goal of this research was to explore associations among measured dampness, fungal exposure, and childhood asthma development without the bias of culture-based microbial analysis. In the low-income, Latino CHAMACOS birth cohort, house dust was collected at age 12 months, and asthma status was determined at age 7 years. The current analysis included 13 asthma cases and 28 controls. Next-generation DNA sequencing methods quantified fungal taxa and diversity. Lower fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was significantly associated with increased risk of asthma development: unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 4.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–22.1). Control for potential confounders strengthened this relationship. Decreased diversity within the genus Cryptococcus was significantly associated with increased asthma risk (OR 21.0, 95% CI 2.16–204). No fungal taxon (species, genus, class) was significantly positively associated with asthma development, and one was significantly negatively associated. Elevated moisture was associated with increased fungal diversity, and moisture/mold indicators were associated with four fungal taxa. Next-generation DNA sequencing provided comprehensive estimates of fungal identity and diversity, demonstrating significant associations between low fungal diversity and childhood asthma development in this community. PMID:24883433

  6. Diesel Exhaust Particles Induce Cysteine Oxidation and S-Glutathionylation in House Dust Mite Induced Murine Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gerald B.; Brandt, Eric B.; Xiao, Chang; Gibson, Aaron M.; Le Cras, Timothy D.; Brown, Lou Ann S.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust particle (DEP) exposure enhances allergic inflammation and has been linked to the incidence of asthma. Oxidative stress on the thiol molecules cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) can promote inflammatory host responses. The effect of DEP on the thiol oxidation/reduction (redox) state in the asthmatic lung is unknown. Objective To determine if DEP exposure alters the Cys or GSH redox state in the asthmatic airway. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from a house dust mite (HDM) induced murine asthma model exposed to DEP. GSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG), Cys, cystine (CySS), and s-glutathionylated cysteine (CySSG) were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography. Results DEP co-administered with HDM, but not DEP or HDM alone, decreased total Cys, increased CySS, and increased CySSG without significantly altering GSH or GSSG. Conclusions DEP exposure promotes oxidation and S-glutathionylation of cysteine amino acids in the asthmatic airway, suggesting a novel mechanism by which DEP may enhance allergic inflammatory responses. PMID:23555996

  7. Vaccination against IL-33 Inhibits Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Inflammation in a House Dust Mite Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ying; Adner, Mikael; Hellman, Lars; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    In several clinical and experimental studies IL-33 and its receptor have been found to play important roles in the development of asthma and allergic airway inflammation. We evaluated the effects of vaccination against IL-33 in a mouse model of airway inflammation induced by house dust mite (HDM) allergen. Balb/c mice received the IL-33 vaccine subcutaneously, followed by intranasal administration of HDM for up to six weeks. Vaccination against IL-33 induced high titers of specific anti-IL-33 IgG antibodies that inhibited HDM-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in the conducting airways and tissue damping. The vaccination also attenuated the HDM-induced elevation in the numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airways. Furthermore, the levels of IL-17A, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP in lung tissue homogenates were reduced by vaccination against IL-33. These observations demonstrate that vaccination against IL-33 inhibits HDM-induced development of AHR, airway inflammation and production of inflammatory cytokines. The results also indicate an important role of IL-33 in the regulation of AHR of the distal lung compartments. Thus, administration of such a vaccine is potentially an effective therapeutic tool for treating allergic asthma. PMID:26214807

  8. House-dust mite allergen and ozone exposure decreases histamine H3 receptors in the brainstem respiratory nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Sekizawa, Shin-ichi; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tham, Rick C.; Kott, Kayleen S.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Joad, Jesse P.; Bonham, Ann C.

    2010-09-15

    Allergic airway diseases in children are a common and a growing health problem. Changes in the central nervous system (CNS) have been implicated in contributing to some of the symptoms. We hypothesized that airway allergic diseases are associated with altered histamine H3 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus, where lung/airway and nasal sensory afferents terminate, respectively. Immunohistochemistry for histamine H3 receptors was performed on brainstem sections containing the NTS and the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus from 6- and 12-month-old rhesus monkeys who had been exposed for 5 months to house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + O{sub 3} or to filtered air (FA). While histamine H3 receptors were found exclusively in astrocytes in the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus, they were localized to both neuronal terminals and processes in the NTS. HDMA + O{sub 3} exposure significantly decreased histamine H3 receptor immunoreactivity in the NTS at 6 months and in the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus at 12 months of age. In conclusion, exposing young primates to HDMA + O{sub 3} changed histamine H3 receptor expression in CNS pathways involving lung and nasal afferent nerves in an age-related manner. Histamine H3 receptors may be a therapeutic target for allergic asthma and rhinitis in children.

  9. Der p 11 Is a Major Allergen for House Dust Mite-Allergic Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Srinita; Resch, Yvonne; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Swoboda, Ines; Focke-Tejkl, Margit; Blatt, Katharina; Novak, Natalija; Wickman, Magnus; van Hage, Marianne; Ferrara, Rosetta; Mari, Adriano; Purohit, Ashok; Pauli, Gabrielle; Sibanda, Elopy N.; Ndlovu, Portia; Thomas, Wayne R.; Krzyzanek, Vladislav; Tacke, Sebastian; Malkus, Ursula; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Vrtala, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    House dust mites (HDMs) belong to the most potent indoor allergen sources worldwide and are associated with allergic manifestations in the respiratory tract and the skin. Here we studied the importance of the high-molecular-weight group 11 allergen from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 11) in HDM allergy. Sequence analysis showed that Der p 11 has high homology to paramyosins from mites, ticks, and other invertebrates. A synthetic gene coding for Der p 11 was expressed in Escherichia coli and rDer p 11 purified to homogeneity as folded, alpha-helical protein as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Using antibodies raised against rDer p 11 and immunogold electron microscopy, the allergen was localized in the muscle beneath the skin of mite bodies but not in feces. IgE reactivity of rDer p 11 was tested with sera from HDM-allergic patients from Europe and Africa in radioallergosorbent test–based dot-blot assays. Interestingly, we found that Der p 11 is a major allergen for patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD), whereas it is only a minor allergen for patients suffering from respiratory forms of HDM allergy. Thus, rDer p 11 might be a useful serological marker allergen for the identification of a subgroup of HDM-allergic patients suffering from HDM-associated AD. PMID:24999597

  10. Nanoparticle conjugation enhances the immunomodulatory effects of intranasally delivered CpG in house dust mite-allergic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester, Marie; Jeanbart, Laura; de Titta, Alexandre; Nembrini, Chiara; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-09-21

    An emerging strategy in preventing and treating airway allergy consists of modulating the immune response induced against allergens in the lungs. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides have been investigated in airway allergy studies, but even if promising, efficacy requires further substantiation. We investigated the effect of pulmonary delivery of nanoparticle (NP)-conjugated CpG on lung immunity and found that NP-CpG led to enhanced recruitment of activated dendritic cells and to Th1 immunity compared to free CpG. We then evaluated if pulmonary delivery of NP-CpG could prevent and treat house dust mite-induced allergy by modulating immunity directly in lungs. When CpG was administered as immunomodulatory therapy prior to allergen sensitization, we found that NP-CpG significantly reduced eosinophilia, IgE levels, mucus production and Th2 cytokines, while free CpG had only a moderate effect on these parameters. In a therapeutic setting where CpG was administered after allergen sensitization, we found that although both free CpG and NP-CpG reduced eosinophilia and IgE levels to the same extent, NP conjugation of CpG significantly enhanced reduction of Th2 cytokines in lungs of allergic mice. Taken together, these data highlight benefits of NP conjugation and the relevance of NP-CpG as allergen-free therapy to modulate lung immunity and treat airway allergy.

  11. High-level expression and purification of the major house dust mite allergen Der p 2 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tuo; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Zhi-Gao; Dou, Xia; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Bo; Yu, Zhen-Dong; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Der p 2, a major allergen derived from the house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, is one of the most clinically relevant allergens worldwide. Recombinant Der p 2 (rDer p 2) is useful in clinical diagnosis and disease-specific immunotherapy. However, previous studies showed that Der p 2 can only be expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells as inclusion bodies, thus protein refolding is required to obtain functional products. Here we report a new method to produce biologically active Der p 2 protein in E. coli. N-terminal hexahistidine- and trigger factor (TF)-tagged Der p 2 was expressed in soluble form in E. coli and purified using a combination of chromatography processes. This procedure produced milligram-level high purity Der p 2 per liter of bacterial culture. Moreover, far-UV region circular dichroism (CD) analysis and serum specific IgE reactivity test demonstrated that the secondary structure and IgE reactivity properties of rDer p 2 produced in our study were almost identical to those of natural Der p 2 (nDer p 2). In conclusion, the method developed in this work provides a useful tool for the production of immunologically active recombinant Der p 2 for clinical applications. PMID:26812600

  12. A GM-CSF/IL-33 Pathway Facilitates Allergic Airway Responses to Sub-Threshold House Dust Mite Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Guevara, Alba; Chu, Derek K.; Walker, Tina D.; Goncharova, Susanna; Fattouh, Ramzi; Silver, Jonathan S.; Moore, Cheryl Lynn; Xie, Juliana L.; O’Byrne, Paul M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Kolbeck, Roland; Humbles, Alison A.; Stämpfli, Martin R.; Jordana, Manel

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic immune-inflammatory disease of the airways. Despite aeroallergen exposure being universal, allergic asthma affects only a fraction of individuals. This is likely related, at least in part, to the extent of allergen exposure. Regarding house dust mite (HDM), we previously identified the threshold required to elicit allergic responses in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the impact of an initial immune perturbation on the response to sub-threshold HDM exposure. We show that transient GM-CSF expression in the lung facilitated robust eosinophilic inflammation, long-lasting antigen-specific Th2 responses, mucus production and airway hyperresponsiveness. This was associated with increased IL-33 levels and activated CD11b+ DCs expressing OX40L. GM-CSF-driven allergic responses were significantly blunted in IL-33-deficient mice. IL-33 was localized on alveolar type II cells and in vitro stimulation of human epithelial cells with GM-CSF enhanced intracellular IL-33 independently of IL-1α. Likewise, GM-CSF administration in vivo resulted in increased levels of IL-33 but not IL-1α. These findings suggest that exposures to environmental agents associated with GM-CSF production, including airway infections and pollutants, may decrease the threshold of allergen responsiveness and, hence, increase the susceptibility to develop allergic asthma through a GM-CSF/IL-33/OX40L pathway. PMID:24551140

  13. Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) from house-dust mites may cause covariation of sensitization to allergens from other invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Inam, Muhammad; Ismail, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz

    2012-01-01

    Group 10 allergens (tropomyosins) have been assumed to be a major cause of cross-reactivity between house-dust mites (HDMs) and other invertebrates. Despite all of the published data regarding the epidemiology, percent IgE binding and level of sensitization in the population, the role of tropomyosin as a cross-reactive allergen in patients with multiple allergy syndrome still remains to be elucidated. Homology between amino acid sequences reported in allergen databases of selected invertebrate tropomyosins was determined with Der f 10 as the reference allergen. The 66.9 and 54.4% identities were found with selected crustacean and insect species, respectively, whereas only 20.4% identity was seen with mollusks. A similar analysis was performed using reported B-cell IgE-binding epitopes from Met e1 (shrimp allergen) and Bla g7 (cockroach allergen) with other invertebrate tropomyosins. The percent identity in linear sequences was higher than 35% in mites, crustaceans, and cockroaches. The polar and hydrophobic regions in these groups were highly conserved. These findings suggest that tropomyosin may be a major cause of covariation of sensitization between HDMs, crustaceans, and some species of insects and mollusks. PMID:23342293

  14. Dendritic cells induce Th2-mediated airway inflammatory responses to house dust mite via DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amarjit; Brown, Alexandra L.; Yao, Xianglan; Yang, Shutong; Park, Sung-Jun; Liu, Chengyu; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Jeffries, Kenneth R.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Levine, Stewart J.; Chung, Jay H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) mediates double stranded DNA break repair, V(D)J recombination, and immunoglobulin class switch recombination, as well as innate immune and pro-inflammatory responses. However, there is limited information regarding the role of DNA-PK in adaptive immunity mediated by dendritic cells (DCs), which are the primary antigen-presenting cells in allergic asthma. Here we show that house dust mite induces DNA-PK phosphorylation, which is a marker of DNA-PK activation, in DCs via the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK, as well as the specific deletion of DNA-PK in DCs, attenuates the induction of allergic sensitization and Th2 immunity via a mechanism that involves the impaired presentation of mite antigens. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK following antigen priming similarly reduces the manifestations of mite-induced airway disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that DNA-PK may be a potential target for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25692509

  15. Interference in foraging behaviour of European and American house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) by catmint, Nepeta cataria (Lamiaceae).

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Jones, I; Loza-Reyes, E; Cameron, M M; Pickett, J A; Birkett, M A

    2012-05-01

    The European and American house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae, have a huge impact upon human health worldwide due to being the most important indoor trigger of atopic diseases such as asthma, rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. Preceding studies have shown that the behavioural response of house dust mites towards volatile chemicals from food sources can be assessed using a Y-tube olfactometer assay. In the current study, we used this assay to investigate, for the first time, the ability of the essential oil of the catmint plant, Nepeta cataria (Lamiaceae), known to repel other ectoparasites affecting human and animal health, to interfere with the attraction of D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae towards a standard food source (fish flakes). Two distinct chemotypes (A and B), enriched in the iridoid compounds (4aS,7S,7aR)-nepetalactone and (4aS,7S,7aS)-nepetalactone, and the sesquiterpene (E)-(1R,9S)-caryophyllene, were used. Initial assays with a hexane extract of fish flakes (FF extract) confirmed attraction of mites to this positive control (P<0.001 and P<0.05 for D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae respectively), but when presented in combination with either N. cataria chemotype, tested across a range of doses (10, 1, 0.1 and 0.01?g), decreasing attraction of mites to their food source was observed as the dose augmented. Our study shows that N. cataria, enriched in iridoid nepetalactones and (E)-(1R,9S)-caryophyllene, exhibits potent repellent activity for house dust mites, and has the potential for deployment in control programmes based on interference with normal house dust mite behaviour. PMID:22382713

  16. House dust (13)-?-D-glucan and wheezing in infants

    PubMed Central

    Iossifova, Y. Y.; Reponen, T.; Bernstein, D. I.; Levin, L.; Kalra, H.; Campo, P.; Villareal, M.; Lockey, J.; Hershey, G. K. K.; LeMasters, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background (13)-?-D-glucan is a fungal cell wall component, suspected to cause respiratory symptoms in adults. However, very little is known on the possible health effects of (13)-?-D-glucan during infancy. We examined the association between (13)-?-D-glucan exposure and the prevalence of allergen sensitization and wheezing during the first year of life in a birth cohort of 574 infants born to atopic parents. Endotoxin exposure was included as a possible confounder. Methods (13)-?-D-glucan and endotoxin exposures were measured in settled dust collected from infants primary activity rooms. The primary outcomes at approximately age one included parental reports of recurrent wheezing and allergen sensitization evaluated by skin prick testing to a panel of 15 aeroallergens as well as milk and egg white. Results Exposure to high (13)-?-D-glucan concentration (within fourth quartile) was associated with reduced likelihood of both recurrent wheezing [adjusted OR (aOR) = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.160.93] and recurrent wheezing combined with allergen sensitization (aOR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.030.61). Similar trends were found between (13)-?-D-glucan concentrations and allergen sensitization (aOR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.301.10). In contrast, recurrent wheezing with or without allergen sensitization was positively associated with low (13)-?-D-glucan exposure within the first quartile (aOR = 3.04, 95% CI = 1.257.38; aOR = 4.89, 95% CI = 1.0223.57). There were no significant associations between endotoxin exposure and the studied health outcomes. Conclusions This is the first study to report that indoor exposure to high levels of (13)-?-D-glucan (concentration >60 ?g/g) is associated with decreased risk for recurrent wheezing among infants born to atopic parents. This effect was more pronounced in the subgroup of allergen-sensitized infants. PMID:17441791

  17. 75 FR 13127 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... Exposure Reduction. In the Federal Register dated April 22, 2008 (73 FR 21692), EPA promulgated final TSCA... AGENCY Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied... for a renovation, repair and painting program in accordance with section 402(c)(3) of TSCA, 15...

  18. 75 FR 51808 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... April 22, 2008, (73 FR 21692), EPA promulgated final TSCA section 402(c)(3) regulations governing... AGENCY Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied... for renovation, repair and painting programs in accordance with section 402(c)(3) of TSCA, 15...

  19. 76 FR 12106 - Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    .... In the Federal Register dated April 22, 2008 (73 FR 21692), EPA promulgated final TSCA section 402(c... AGENCY Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting Activities in Target Housing and Child Occupied..., repair and painting program in accordance with section 402(c)(3) of TSCA. This notice also announces...

  20. High Degree of Overlap between Responses to a Virus and to the House Dust Mite Allergen in Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Golebski, Korneliusz; Luiten, Silvia; van Egmond, Danielle; de Groot, Esther; Rschmann, Kristina Irene Lisolette; Fokkens, Wytske Johanna; van Drunen, Cornelis Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Airway epithelium is widely considered to play an active role in immune responses through its ability to detect changes in the environment and to generate a microenvironment for immune competent cells. Therefore, besides its role as a physical barrier, epithelium affects the outcome of the immune response by the production of various pro-inflammatory mediators. Methods We stimulated airway epithelial cells with viral double stranded RNA analogue poly(I:C) or with house dust mite in a time course of 24 hours. In order to determine cytokines production by stimulated cells, we performed multiplex enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results We demonstrate that the temporal pattern of the genes that respond to virus exposure in airway epithelium resembles to a significant degree their pattern of response to HDM. The gene expression pattern of EGR1, DUSP1, FOSL1, JUN, MYC, and IL6 is rather similar after viral (poly(I:C)) and HDM exposure. However, both triggers also induce a specific response (e.g. ATF3, FOS, and NFKB1). We confirmed these data by showing that epithelial cells produce a variety of similar mediators in response to both poly(I:C) and HDM challenge (IL1-RA, IL-17, IFN-? and MIP1-?), sometimes with a quantitative difference in response (IL2-R, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, MIG, and HGF). Interestingly, only four mediators (IL-12, IP-10, RANTES and VEGF) where up-regulated specifically by poly(I:C) and not by HDM. Additionally, we report that pre-exposure to HDM deregulates production of cytokines and mediators in response to poly(I:C). Conclusions Epithelial cells responses to the HDM-allergen and a virus strongly resemble both in gene expression and in protein level explaining why these two responses may affect each other. PMID:24498371

  1. Morus alba L. suppresses the development of atopic dermatitis induced by the house dust mite in NC/Nga mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Morus alba, a medicinal plant in Asia, has been used traditionally to treat diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia. However, the effects of M. alba extract (MAE) on atopic dermatitis have not been verified scientifically. We investigated the effects of MAE on atopic dermatitis through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We evaluated the effects of MAE on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7, as well as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) in HaCaT cells. In an in vivo experiment, atopic dermatitis was induced by topical application of house dust mites for four weeks, and the protective effects of MAE were investigated by measuring the severity of the skin reaction on the back and ears, the plasma levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) and histamine, and histopathological changes in the skin on the back and ears. Results MAE suppressed the production of NO and PGE2 in RAW 264.7 cells, as well as TARC in HaCaT cells, in a dose-dependent manner. MAE treatment of NC/Nga mice reduced the severity of dermatitis and the plasma levels of IgE and histamine. MAE also reduced the histological manifestations of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the skin on the back and ears. Conclusion Our results suggest that MAE has potent inhibitory effects on atopic dermatitis-like lesion and may be a beneficial natural resource for the treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:24755250

  2. Retrospective Analysis on the Effects of House Dust Mite Specific Immunotherapy for More Than 3 Years in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Hemin; Noh, Seongmin; Bae, Byung Gi; Shin, Jung U; Park, Chang Ook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In extrinsic atopic dermatitis (AD), house dust mites (HDM) play a role in eliciting or aggravating allergic lesions. The nature of skin inflammation in AD has raised a growing interest in allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). Thus, we assessed clinical improvement and laboratory parameters for evaluation of the benefit of long-term SIT. Materials and Methods A total of 217 AD patients who were treated with SIT for at least 3 years were retrospectively assessed, by using their investigator global assessment, pruritus scores, loss of sleep (LOS), total serum IgE, and eosinophil counts collected. Patients were additionally classified into subgroups according to age, initial AD severity and mono- or multi-sensitization to include different individual factors in the evaluation of SIT efficacy. Lastly, we compared laboratory data of good responders to SIT with that of poor responders to SIT. Results Improvement after SIT therapy was observed in 192 out of 217 patients (88.4%). Among these patients, 138 (63.5%) achieved excellent, near-complete or complete clinical remission. Significant reduction of pruritus, LOS, and the mean value of total serum IgE were observed (p<0.01). Better outcome was found in patients younger than 12 years of age (p=0.024). Patients with moderate to severe AD showed better treatment outcomes (p=0.036). Patients sensitized only to HDM had the better response to treatment, but SIT was also effective in multi-sensitized groups (p=1.051). No significant differences in baseline laboratory results were observed between good and poor responders (p>0.05). Conclusion We emphasize the usefulness of long-term HDM SIT as a disease-modifying therapy for AD. PMID:26847292

  3. Effect of high-dose sublingual immunotherapy on respiratory infections in children allergic to house dust mite

    PubMed Central

    Barberi, Salvatore; Verduci, Elvira; D'Auria, Enza; Poli, Piercarlo; Pietra, Benedetta; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Buttafava, Serena; Frati, Franco; Riva, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is characterized by eosinophil inflammation. Allergic inflammation may induce susceptibility to respiratory infections (RI). House dust mite (HDM) sensitization is very frequent in childhood. Allergen immunotherapy may cure allergy as it restores a physiologic immune and clinical tolerance to allergen and exerts anti-inflammatory activity. Objective This study investigated whether six-month high-dose, such as 300 IR (index of reactivity), HDM-sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) could affect RI in allergic children. Methods Globally, 40 HDM allergic children (18 males; mean age, 9.3 years) were subdivided in 2 groups: 20 treated by symptomatic drugs (group 1) and 20 by high-dose HDM-SLIT (group 2), since September 2012 to April 2013. The daily maintenance dose of HDM-SLIT was 4 pressures corresponding to 24, 4.8, and 60 µg, respectively of the major allergens Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 1, Der p 2, and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) 1. RI was diagnosed when at least 2 symptoms or signs, and fever were present for at least 48 hours. A family pediatrician provided diagnosis on a clinical ground. Results SLIT-treated children had significantly (p = 0.01) less RI episodes (3.5) than control group (5.45). About secondary outcomes, SLIT-treated children had less episodes of pharyngo-tonsillitis (p < 0.05) and bronchitis (p < 0.005), and snoring (p < 0.05) than control group. In addition, SLIT-treated children had less fever (p < 0.01) and took fewer medications, such as antibiotics (p < 0.05) and fever-reducers (p < 0.01), than control group. Conclusion This preliminary study might suggest that also a short course (6 months) of high-dose SLIT, titrated in µg of major allergens, could reduce RI in allergic children. PMID:26240793

  4. PARP is activated in human asthma and its inhibition by olaparib blocks house dust mite-induced disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghonim, Mohamed A.; Pyakurel, Kusma; Ibba, Salome V.; Wang, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Paulo; Al-Khami, Amir A.; Lammi, Matthew R.; Kim, Hogyoung; Zea, Arnold H.; Davis, Christian; Okpechi, Samuel; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Al-Ghareeb, Kamel; Mansy, Moselhy S.; Ochoa, Augusto; Naura, Amarjit S.

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory established a role for poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in asthma. To increase the clinical significance of our studies, it is imperative to demonstrate that PARP is actually activated in human asthma, to examine whether a PARP inhibitor approved for human testing such as olaparib blocks already-established chronic asthma traits in response to house dust mite (HDM), a true human allergen, in mice and to examine whether the drug modulates human cluster of differentiation type 4 (CD4+) T-cell function. To conduct the study, human lung specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a HDM-based mouse asthma model were used. Our results show that PARP is activated in PBMCs and lung tissues of asthmatics. PARP inhibition by olaparib or gene knockout blocked established asthma-like traits in mice chronically exposed to HDM including airway eosinophilia and hyper-responsiveness. These effects were linked to a marked reduction in T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine production without a prominent effect on interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-10. PARP inhibition prevented HDM-induced increase in overall cellularity, weight and CD4+ T-cell population in spleens of treated mice whereas it increased the T-regulatory cell population. In CD3/CD28-stimulated human CD4 +T-cells, olaparib treatment reduced Th2 cytokine production potentially by modulating GATA binding protein-3 (gata-3)/IL-4 expression while moderately affecting T-cell proliferation. PARP inhibition inconsistently increased IL-17 in HDM-exposed mice and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD4+ T cells without a concomitant increase in factors that can be influenced by IL-17. In the present study, we provide evidence for the first time that PARP-1 is activated in human asthma and that its inhibition is effective in blocking established asthma in mice. PMID:26205779

  5. PARP is activated in human asthma and its inhibition by olaparib blocks house dust mite-induced disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghonim, Mohamed A; Pyakurel, Kusma; Ibba, Salome V; Wang, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Paulo; Al-Khami, Amir A; Lammi, Matthew R; Kim, Hogyoung; Zea, Arnold H; Davis, Christian; Okpechi, Samuel; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Al-Ghareeb, Kamel; Mansy, Moselhy S; Ochoa, Augusto; Naura, Amarjit S; Boulares, A Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Our laboratory established a role for poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in asthma. To increase the clinical significance of our studies, it is imperative to demonstrate that PARP is actually activated in human asthma, to examine whether a PARP inhibitor approved for human testing such as olaparib blocks already-established chronic asthma traits in response to house dust mite (HDM), a true human allergen, in mice and to examine whether the drug modulates human cluster of differentiation type 4 (CD4(+)) T-cell function. To conduct the study, human lung specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a HDM-based mouse asthma model were used. Our results show that PARP is activated in PBMCs and lung tissues of asthmatics. PARP inhibition by olaparib or gene knockout blocked established asthma-like traits in mice chronically exposed to HDM including airway eosinophilia and hyper-responsiveness. These effects were linked to a marked reduction in T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine production without a prominent effect on interferon (IFN)-? or interleukin (IL)-10. PARP inhibition prevented HDM-induced increase in overall cellularity, weight and CD4(+) T-cell population in spleens of treated mice whereas it increased the T-regulatory cell population. In CD3/CD28-stimulated human CD4 (+)T-cells, olaparib treatment reduced Th2 cytokine production potentially by modulating GATA binding protein-3 (gata-3)/IL-4 expression while moderately affecting T-cell proliferation. PARP inhibition inconsistently increased IL-17 in HDM-exposed mice and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD4(+) T cells without a concomitant increase in factors that can be influenced by IL-17. In the present study, we provide evidence for the first time that PARP-1 is activated in human asthma and that its inhibition is effective in blocking established asthma in mice. PMID:26205779

  6. Immunomodulation of Airway Epithelium Cell Activation by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ameliorates House Dust Mite-Induced Airway Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1? and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  7. Evaluating the Bioaccessibility of Flame Retardants in House Dust Using an In Vitro Tenax Bead-Assisted Sorptive Physiologically Based Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to house dust is a significant source of exposure to flame retardant chemicals (FRs), particularly in the US. Given the high exposure there is a need to understand the bioaccessibility of FRs from dust. In this study, Tenax beads (TA) encapsulated within a stainless steel insert were used as an adsorption sink to estimate the dynamic absorption of a suite of FRs commonly detected in indoor dust samples (n = 17), and from a few polyurethane foam samples for comparison. Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) had the highest estimated bioaccessibility (?80%) compared to brominated compounds (e.g., PBDEs), and values generally decreased with increasing Log Kow, with <30% bioaccessibility measured for BDE209. These measurements were in very close agreement with reported PBDE bioavailability measures from an in vivo rat exposure study using indoor dust. The bioaccessibility of very hydrophobic FRs (Log Kow > 6) in foam was much less than that in house dust, and increasing bioaccessibility was observed with decreasing particle size. In addition, we examined the stability of more labile FRs containing ester groups (e.g., OPFRs and 2-ethylhexyl-tetrabromo-benzoate (EH-TBB)) in a mock-digestive fluid matrix. No significant changes in the OPFR concentrations were observed in this fluid; however, EH-TBB was found to readily hydrolyze to tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) in the intestinal fluid in the presence of lipases. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the bioaccessibility and stability of FRs following ingestion varies by chemical and sample matrix and thus should be considered in exposure assessments. PMID:25330458

  8. Evaluating the bioaccessibility of flame retardants in house dust using an in vitro Tenax bead-assisted sorptive physiologically based method.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-11-18

    Exposure to house dust is a significant source of exposure to flame retardant chemicals (FRs), particularly in the US. Given the high exposure there is a need to understand the bioaccessibility of FRs from dust. In this study, Tenax beads (TA) encapsulated within a stainless steel insert were used as an adsorption sink to estimate the dynamic absorption of a suite of FRs commonly detected in indoor dust samples (n = 17), and from a few polyurethane foam samples for comparison. Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) had the highest estimated bioaccessibility (? 80%) compared to brominated compounds (e.g., PBDEs), and values generally decreased with increasing Log K(ow), with <30% bioaccessibility measured for BDE209. These measurements were in very close agreement with reported PBDE bioavailability measures from an in vivo rat exposure study using indoor dust. The bioaccessibility of very hydrophobic FRs (Log K(ow) > 6) in foam was much less than that in house dust, and increasing bioaccessibility was observed with decreasing particle size. In addition, we examined the stability of more labile FRs containing ester groups (e.g., OPFRs and 2-ethylhexyl-tetrabromo-benzoate (EH-TBB)) in a mock-digestive fluid matrix. No significant changes in the OPFR concentrations were observed in this fluid; however, EH-TBB was found to readily hydrolyze to tetrabromobenzoic acid (TBBA) in the intestinal fluid in the presence of lipases. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the bioaccessibility and stability of FRs following ingestion varies by chemical and sample matrix and thus should be considered in exposure assessments. PMID:25330458

  9. Blood lead levels in preprimary school-age children in Nicosia, Cyprus, and their relationship with leaded soil dust exposure.

    PubMed

    Demoliou, Catherine D; Charalambous, Andreas

    2004-09-01

    The authors conducted a cross-sectional study to determine blood lead levels in children who attended kindergarten schools and nurseries in Nicosia, Cyprus, and to correlate their findings with (a) home and school environments, (b) behavior of the children, and (c) socioeconomic characteristics. Capillary blood for lead assay was collected from March 2001 to September 2001 from children who lived and attended school in Nicosia. Children who lived and attended school in a rural setting served as controls. Parental questionnaires and interviews yielded information about socioeconomic background, environment, and children's habits and health. Overall findings indicated that children in Nicosia had mean blood lead levels similar to controls (i.e., <10 microg/dl)--the level of concern defined by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The findings of our study likely represent high standards of hygiene adopted by parents and teachers, rather than knowledge embraced by parents and teachers about risks associated with lead exposure and sources of lead exposure. PMID:16381486

  10. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Detectors SAVE LIVES HUD's Office of Housing releases Bed Bug Notice - May 2012 EPA/HUD Model Renovator Course ... Homes Calendar of Events Asthma Intervention and Workshops Bed Bugs! Guidelines, Announcements, and other IPM information Advancing Healthy ...

  11. Determinants of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in house dust samples from four areas of the United States.

    PubMed

    Deziel, N C; Nuckols, J R; Colt, J S; De Roos, A J; Pronk, A; Gourley, C; Severson, R K; Cozen, W; Cerhan, J R; Hartge, P; Ward, M H

    2012-09-01

    Determinants of levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in dust in U.S. homes are not well characterized. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the relationship between concentrations of PCDD/F in house dust and residential proximity to known sources, including industrial facilities and traffic. Samples from vacuum bag dust from homes of 40 residents of Detroit, Los Angeles, Seattle, or Iowa who participated in a population-based case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma conducted in 1998-2000 were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry for 7 PCDD and 10 PCDF congeners considered toxic by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Locations of 10 types of PCDD/F-emitting facilities were obtained from the EPA; however only 4 types were located near study homes (non-hazardous waste cement kilns, coal-fired power plants, sewage sludge incinerators, and medical waste incinerators). Relationships between concentrations of each PCDD/F and proximity to industrial facilities, freight routes, and major roads were evaluated using separate multivariate regression models for each congener. The median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) toxic equivalence (TEQ) concentration of these congeners in the house dust was 20.3 pg/g (IQR=14.3, 32.7). Homes within 3 or 5 km of a cement kiln had 2 to 9-fold higher concentrations of 5 PCDD and 5 PCDF (p<0.1 in each model). Proximity to freight routes and major roads was associated with elevated concentrations of 1 PCDD and 8 PCDF. Higher concentrations of certain PCDD/F in homes near cement kilns, freight routes, and major roads suggest that these outdoor sources are contributing to indoor environmental exposures. Further study of the contribution of these sources and other facility types to total PCDD/F exposure in a larger number of homes is warranted. PMID:22832089

  12. Determinants of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans in house dust samples from four areas of the United States

    PubMed Central

    NC, Deziel; Nuckols; JS, Colt; AJ, De Roos; A, Pronk; C, Gourley; RK, Severson; W, Cozen; Cerhan; P, Hartge; MH, Ward

    2012-01-01

    Determinants of levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) in dust in U.S. homes are not well characterized. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the relationship between concentrations of PCDD/F in house dust and residential proximity to known sources, including industrial facilities and traffic. Samples from vacuum bag dust from homes of 40 residents of Detroit, Los Angeles, Seattle, or Iowa who participated in a population-based case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma conducted in 1998–2000 were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry for 7 PCDD and 10 PCDF congeners considered toxic by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Locations of 10 types of PCDD/F-emitting facilities were obtained from the EPA; however only 4 types were located near study homes (non-hazardous waste cement kilns, coal-fired power plants, sewage sludge incinerators, and medical waste incinerators). Relationships between concentrations of each PCDD/F and proximity to industrial facilities, freight routes, and major roads were evaluated using separate multivariate regression models for each congener. The median (inter-quartile range [IQR]) toxic equivalence (TEQ) concentration of these congeners in the house dust was 20.3 pg/g (IQR=14.3, 32.7). Homes within 3 or 5 km of a cement kiln had 2 to 9-fold higher concentrations of 5 PCDD and 5 PCDF (p<0.1 in each model). Proximity to freight routes and major roads was associated with elevated concentrations of 1 PCDD and 8 PCDF. Higher concentrations of certain PCDD/F in homes near cement kilns, freight routes, and major roads suggest these outdoor sources are contributing to indoor environmental exposures. Further study of the contribution of these sources and other facility types to total PCDD/F exposure in a larger number of homes is warranted. PMID:22832089

  13. Effect of heat treatments on the house-dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae (Acari: Pyroglyphidae) in a mattress-like polyurethane foam block.

    PubMed

    de Boer, R

    1990-08-01

    The behaviour and survival of the house-dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae were studied under laboratory conditions in a mattress-like polyurethane foam block that was heated by an electric blanket. Mites obtained from a laboratory culture were introduced into the foam block which was sliced into seven horizontal layers and covered with an electric blanket. Measurements of temperature and relative humidity were taken between the layers and the number of living mites was established using the heat-escape method. PMID:2226071

  14. Removal of lead by using Raschig rings manufactured with mixture of cement kiln dust, zeolite and bentonite.

    PubMed

    Salem, A; Afshin, H; Behsaz, H

    2012-07-15

    The present investigation is a follow-up of study on manufacturing Raschig ring for removal of lead from aqueous solution. The mixtures were formulated using cement kiln dust, zeolite, and bentonite, normally used as natural adsorbents in the industrial scale, according to mixture design algorithm and response surface method. The pastes were prepared by addition of 28.0wt.% de-ionized water, containing 0.1wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose, with mixed powders. The adsorbents were fabricated by extrusion of the pastes in Raschig ring form and calcination at 500C after drying in oven. The effects of starting materials on the mechanical behavior of rings were studied from view point of mixture design algorithm to optimize the adsorbent composition. This method demonstrated to yield valuable information on the effects of used materials on mechanical characteristics. The study concluded that the strength, reliability and sorption capacity of ring can be simultaneously optimized by the addition of 47.5wt.% cement kiln dust, 32.5wt.% zeolite, and 20.0wt.% bentonite. In the next part of work, the sorption kinetics was investigated. The kinetic study indicated that the modified model can successfully correlate the sorption data. The equilibrium result showed the possibility of lead immobilization by fabricated rings. PMID:22608209

  15. Development, application, and results of routine monitoring of Marek's disease virus in broiler house dust using real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Walkden-Brown, Stephen W; Islam, A F Aminul; Groves, Peter J; Rubite, Ambrosio; Sharpe, Sue M; Burgess, Susan K

    2013-06-01

    Results are presented from four studies between 2002 and 2011 into the feasibility of routinely monitoring Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1) in broiler house dust using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) measurement. Study 1 on two farms showed that detection of MDV-1 occurred earlier on average in dust samples tested using qPCR than standard PCR and in spleen samples from five birds per shed assayed for MDV-1 by qPCR or standard PCR. DNA quality following extraction from dust had no effect on detection of MDV-1. Study 2 demonstrated that herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) and MDV serotype 2 (MDV-2) in addition to MDV-1 could be readily amplified from commercial farm dust samples, often in mixtures. MDV-2 was detected in 11 of 20 samples despite the absence of vaccination with this serotype. Study 3 investigated the reproducibility and sensitivity of the qPCR test and the presence of inhibitors in the samples. Samples extracted and amplified in triplicate showed a high level of reproducibility except at very low levels of virus near the limit of detection. Mixing of samples prior to extraction provided results consistent with the proportions in the mixture. Tests for inhibition showed that if the template contained DNA in the range 0.5-20 ng/microl no inhibition of the reaction was detectable. The sensitivity of the tests in terms of viral copy number (VCN) per milligram of dust was calculated to be in the range 24-600 VCN/mg for MDV-1, 48-1200 VCN/mg for MDV-2, and 182-4560 VCN/mg for HVT. In study 4 the results of 1976 commercial tests carried out for one company were analyzed. Overall 23.1% of samples were positive for MDV-1, 26.1% in unvaccinated and 16.4% in vaccinated chickens. There was marked regional and temporal variation in the proportion of positive samples and the MDV-1 load. The tests were useful in formulating Marek's disease vaccination strategies. The number of samples submitted has increased recently, as has the incidence of positive samples. These studies provide strong evidence that detection and quantitation of MDV-1, HVT, and MDV-2 in poultry house dust using qPCR is robust, sensitive, reproducible, and meaningful, both biologically and commercially. Tactical vaccination based on monitoring of MDV-1 rather than routine vaccination may reduce selection pressure for increased virulence in MDV-1. PMID:23901774

  16. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Instructor Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.

    This document is the instructor's manual for a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) training course that reflects the requirements of HUD's Lead Safe Housing Rule and is designed to provide training contractors with information regarding containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb…

  17. Sources of halogenated brominated retardants in house dust in an industrial city in southern China and associated human exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, She-Jun; Ding, Nan; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-11-01

    Halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) are a class of ubiquitous pollutants in the environment and attract increasing attention. In the present study, HFR concentrations were measured in indoor and outdoor dust in an important industrial city (Dongguan) in southern China, in which their presence and associated human exposure are unknown. The HFRs were dominated by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), with mean concentrations of 2365 and 2441 ng/g in the indoor dust, respectively, which were 2-3 order of magnitude higher the concentrations of other HFRs. However elevated tri- to hepta-BDE concentrations (869 ng/g) were found in Houjie Town, a furniture manufacturing center. The mean indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios of HFR concentrations in the dust were all larger than one (1.55-16.4), suggesting the importance of indoors sources for HFRs in indoor dust in this industrial city. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the correlations among the HFRs in the indoor dust probably revealed differences in their commercial applications, while most HFRs in the outdoor dust have similar sources except for phased-out BDE47 and 99. The compositions of lower brominated PBDEs varied among the towns, probably due to their different sources or influence of photo-degradation. Nevertheless, the similar composition of highly brominated congeners indicated little photo-degradation encountered in the ambient environment. The non-cancer risk associated with indoor dust ingestion is low for the general population in Dongguan, but some children in the furniture manufacturing center have significantly high risk of exposure to banned PBDEs. PMID:25282276

  18. The prevalence of indoor allergens in the Baltimore area: house dust-mite and animal-dander antigens measured by immunochemical techniques.

    PubMed

    Lind, P; Norman, P S; Newton, M; Lwenstein, H; Schwartz, B

    1987-10-01

    Mattress dust samples from 42 homes in Baltimore, Md., were analyzed by ELISA and rocket immunoelectrophoresis (RIE) for major excrement allergens (P1 [equal to Dp 42], Df 6, and Dm 6) of house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, and D. microceras, by RIE for cat major epithelial allergen (cat Ag 1) and horse major epithelial antigen (horse Ag 11), and by counter-current immunoelectrophoresis (CCIE) for cat and dog antigens. Dp 42 was detected by ELISA in 24 samples (57%) and Df 6 in 39 samples (92%). All samples were negative to Dm 6. Recorded levels varied from 50 ng of allergen per gram of dust (detection limit) to 15,000 ng/gm. A combined content of Dp 42 and Df 6 greater than 700 ng/gm was associated with a positive reaction in RIE. Concentrations of Dp 42 and Df 6 did not correlate (rS = 0.21; p greater than 0.05). Cat and dog antigens were frequently detected by CCIE (77% and 63%, respectively). CCIE titer to cat correlated well with quantitation of cat Ag 1 by RIE (p less than 0.01). Horse antigen was detected in few homes (5%). None of the specific allergen determinations correlated with levels of human serum albumin determined by RIE. PMID:3668118

  19. Environmental isolation of Cryptococcus gattii VGII from indoor dust from typical wooden houses in the deep Amazonas of the Rio Negro basin.

    PubMed

    Brito-Santos, Fábio; Barbosa, Gláucia Gonçalves; Trilles, Luciana; Nishikawa, Marília Martins; Wanke, Bodo; Meyer, Wieland; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a human fungal infection of significant mortality and morbidity, especially in the meningoencephalitis form. Cryptococcosis is distributed worldwide and its agents, C. neoformans and C. gattii, present eight major molecular types-VNI-VNIV and VGI-VGIV respectively. The primary cryptococcosis caused by molecular type VGII (serotype B, MAT alpha) prevails in immunocompetent patients in the North and Northeast of Brazil, revealing an endemic regional pattern to this molecular type. Since 1999, C. gattii VGII has been involved in an ongoing outbreak in Canada, and is expanding to the Northwest of the United States, two temperate regions. Exposure to propagules dispersed in the environment, related to various organic substrates, mainly decomposing wood in and around dwellings, initiates the infection process. The present study investigated the presence of the agents of cryptococcosis in dust from dwellings in the upper Rio Negro, municipality of Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in Amazonas state. Indoor dust was collected from 51 houses, diluted and plated on bird seed agar. Dark brown colonies were identified phenotypically, and genotypically by URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The mating type was identified using pheromone-specific primers. Three of the 51 houses were positive for C. gattii molecular type VGII, MATα and MATa, showing a high prevalence of this agent. MLST studies identified eight subtypes, VGIIb (ST7), VGIIa (ST20), (ST5) and 5 new subtypes unique to the region. For the first time in the state of Amazonas, C. gattii VGII MATα and MATa were isolated from the environment and correlates with endemic cryptococcosis in this state. This is the first description of MLST subtypes on environmental isolates in the Brazilian Amazon, indicating domiciliary dust as a potential source for human infection with different subtypes of C. gattii VGII MATα and MATa. PMID:25688971

  20. Environmental Isolation of Cryptococcus gattii VGII from Indoor Dust from Typical Wooden Houses in the Deep Amazonas of the Rio Negro Basin

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Santos, Fbio; Barbosa, Glucia Gonalves; Trilles, Luciana; Nishikawa, Marlia Martins; Wanke, Bodo; Meyer, Wieland; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe Anibal; Lazra, Mrcia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a human fungal infection of significant mortality and morbidity, especially in the meningoencephalitis form. Cryptococcosis is distributed worldwide and its agents, C. neoformans and C. gattii, present eight major molecular typesVNI-VNIV and VGI-VGIV respectively. The primary cryptococcosis caused by molecular type VGII (serotype B, MAT alpha) prevails in immunocompetent patients in the North and Northeast of Brazil, revealing an endemic regional pattern to this molecular type. Since 1999, C. gattii VGII has been involved in an ongoing outbreak in Canada, and is expanding to the Northwest of the United States, two temperate regions. Exposure to propagules dispersed in the environment, related to various organic substrates, mainly decomposing wood in and around dwellings, initiates the infection process. The present study investigated the presence of the agents of cryptococcosis in dust from dwellings in the upper Rio Negro, municipality of Santa Isabel do Rio Negro in Amazonas state. Indoor dust was collected from 51 houses, diluted and plated on bird seed agar. Dark brown colonies were identified phenotypically, and genotypically by URA5 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The mating type was identified using pheromone-specific primers. Three of the 51 houses were positive for C. gattii molecular type VGII, MAT? and MATa, showing a high prevalence of this agent. MLST studies identified eight subtypes, VGIIb (ST7), VGIIa (ST20), (ST5) and 5 new subtypes unique to the region. For the first time in the state of Amazonas, C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa were isolated from the environment and correlates with endemic cryptococcosis in this state. This is the first description of MLST subtypes on environmental isolates in the Brazilian Amazon, indicating domiciliary dust as a potential source for human infection with different subtypes of C. gattii VGII MAT? and MATa. PMID:25688971

  1. Spatial distribution, health risk assessment, and isotopic composition of lead contamination of street dusts in different functional areas of Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Wei, Xin; Xu, Dongyu; Gao, Li

    2016-02-01

    Street dusts from heavy density traffic area (HDTA), tourism area (TA), residential area (RA), and educational area (EA) in Beijing were collected to explore the distribution, health risk assessment, and source of lead (Pb). The average concentration of Pb in TA was the highest among the four areas. Compared with other cities, Pb concentrations in Beijing were generally at moderate or low levels. The average value (14.05) of ecological risk index (RI) indicated that Pb was at "low pollution risk" status. According to the calculation on hazard index (HI), the ingestion of dust particles of children and adults was the major route of exposure to street dusts in four studied areas, followed by dermal contact. The lower values of HI than 1 further suggested that non-carcinogenic risks of Pb in the street dusts were in the low range. Comparing (206)Pb/(207)Pb and (208)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of street dusts with other environmental samples, it was found that atmospheric deposition of coal combustion dust might be the main pathway for anthropogenic Pb input to the street dusts in four functional areas. PMID:26490894

  2. Decreased Mitochondrial DNA Content in Association with Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in House Dust during Wintertime: From a Population Enquiry to Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 M) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (SD) 0.950.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25th75th percentile: 390.7767.3) and 1385ng/g dust (25th75th percentile: 10001980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: ?15.16 to ?4.2; p?=?0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was ?7.3% (95% CI: ?13.71 to ?0.42; p?=?0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 M to 500 M) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans. PMID:23658810

  3. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in association with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust during wintertime: from a population enquiry to cell culture.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (± SD) 0.95 ± 0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 390.7-767.3) and 1385 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 1000-1980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: -15.16 to -4.2; p = 0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was -7.3% (95% CI: -13.71 to -0.42; p = 0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans. PMID:23658810

  4. The Discovery of Potent, Selective, and Reversible Inhibitors of the House Dust Mite Peptidase Allergen Der p 1: An Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the bioactivity of allergens is conceptually attractive as a small-molecule therapy for allergic diseases but has not been attempted previously. Group 1 allergens of house dust mites (HDM) are meaningful targets in this quest because they are globally prevalent and clinically important triggers of allergic asthma. Group 1 HDM allergens are cysteine peptidases whose proteolytic activity triggers essential steps in the allergy cascade. Using the HDM allergen Der p 1 as an archetype for structure-based drug discovery, we have identified a series of novel, reversible inhibitors. Potency and selectivity were manipulated by optimizing drug interactions with enzyme binding pockets, while variation of terminal groups conferred the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic attributes required for inhaled delivery. Studies in animals challenged with the gamut of HDM allergens showed an attenuation of allergic responses by targeting just a single component, namely, Der p 1. Our findings suggest that these inhibitors may be used as novel therapies for allergic asthma. PMID:25365789

  5. OUTREACH TO MANUFACTURERS OF LEAD TEST KITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lead test kits offer a potentially rapid, inexpensive, and simple to use technique for the analysis of low levels of lead in paint, soil, and house dust. n order to assess the feasibility of homeowners and contractors using test kits as an indicator of the need for or success of ...

  6. Retrofit wall system for insulation and lead encasement in older multi-family housing.

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, R. L.

    1998-08-11

    This paper presents an approach to modernization or rehabilitation of buildings with uninsulated masonry walls that have lead-based paint hazards or deteriorated plaster walls. The approach provides a solution to lead contamination on the walls, increased energy efficiency and comfort improvements associated with better insulated building envelopes. The system sheaths or replaces damaged or contaminated walls with a tight, well-insulated, durable interior surface. The costs of this system are estimated to be less than those of other insulated wall systems. Modeling of the impact of this system shows significant improvement in energy performance. The energy savings over the life of this durable system contribute to significantly offset the often-times sizeable cost of lead hazard remediation.

  7. PREPARATION OF LEAD-CONTAINING PAINT AND DUST METHOD EVALUATION MATERIALS AND VERIFICATION OF THE PREPARATION PROTOCOL BY ROUND-ROBIN ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols for preparing method evaluation materials from real-world lead-containing paints and dusts were developed. he materials were evaluated in a round-robin using five combinations of extraction methods/quantitation techniques (hot-plate and microwave extractions/atomic abso...

  8. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE FIELD ANALYSIS OF LEAD IN PAINT, BULK DUST, AND SOIL BY ULTRASONIC, ACID DIGESTION AND COLORIMETRIC MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative field method was developed for the analysis of lead (Pb) in paint, bulk dust, and soil. 5% (v/v) HNO3 ultrasonic digestion was followed by colorimetric measurement of the digest using a commercially available water Pb test kit. or paints, the range of the method is...

  9. The lead isotopic composition of dust in the vicinity of a uranium mine in northern Australia and its use for radiation dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Bollhfer, Andreas; Honeybun, Russell; Rosman, Kevin; Martin, Paul

    2006-08-01

    Airborne lead isotope ratios were measured via Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry in samples from the vicinity of Ranger uranium mine in northern Australia. Dust deposited on leaves of Acacia spp. was washed off and analysed to gain a geographical snapshot of lead isotope ratios in the region. Aerosols were also collected on Teflon filters that were changed monthly over one seasonal cycle using a low volume diaphragm pump. Lead isotope ratios in dust deposited on leaves overestimate the relative amount of mine origin airborne lead, most likely due to a difference of the size distribution of particles collected on leaves and true aerosol size distribution. Seasonal measurements show that the annual average mine contribution to airborne lead concentrations in Jabiru East, approximately 2.5 km northwest of the mine, amounted to 13%, with distinct differences between the wet and dry season. The relative contribution of mine origin lead deposited on leaves in the dry season drops to less than 1% at a distance of 12.5 km from the mine along the major wind direction. An approach is outlined, in which lead isotope ratios are used to estimate the effective radiation dose received from the inhalation of mine origin radioactivity trapped in or on dust. Using the data from our study, this dose has been calculated to be approximately 2 microSv year(-1) for people living and working in the area. PMID:16388836

  10. Life in cellulose houses: Symbiotic bacterial biosynthesis of ascidian drugs and drug leads

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Donia, Mohamed S.

    2010-01-01

    Ascidians (tunicates; sea squirts) are sources of diverse, bioactive natural products, one of which is an approved drug and many of which are potent drug leads. It has been shown that symbiotic bacteria living with ascidians produce some of the bioactive compounds isolated from whole animals, and indirect evidence strongly implicates symbiotic bacteria in the synthesis of many others. However, for the majority the producing organism has not been identified. In cases where a symbiotic origin has been definitively assigned, the resulting data lead to improved paths to drug discovery and development from marine animals. This review traces evidence for symbiotic production where such evidence exists and describes the strengths and limitations of that evidence. PMID:21050742

  11. Reconsideration of methods and standards: Digestion of diaper wipes and use of matrix-matched calibration standards for dust lead analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, A.O.; Losh, L.N.; Bannon, D.I.; Lees, P.S.J.; Chisolm, J.J. Jr.; Farfel, M.R.

    1999-12-15

    Diaper wipes are widely used for sampling residential dust for lead analysis. A thicker type of diaper wipe was incompletely digested and had low recoveries of lead on stock solution spikes using existing protocols. A modified protocol was applied to various quality control samples prepared with thicker diaper wipes in 134 batches of field samples. Modifications included a larger reagent volume, more concentrated acid, 3 h on the hot plate, and squeezing wipe residues during filtration. Seventeen batches were reanalyzed using matrix-matched standards. Acceptable lead recoveries were obtained for stock solution spikes (88%) and spikes prepared with leaded dust-SRM 2582 (88%), SRM 2589 (96%), and CRMO 14-050 (99%). Matrix-matched calibration standards increased mean lead recoveries by an additional 8%. Their protocol may provide a basis for a standard operational procedure for wipe digestion and analysis. Differences in estimates of dust lead loadings attributable to the type of wipe and to sample preparation and calibration procedures have implications for risk assessment, clearance testing, and comparability of laboratory data. Reconsideration of current protocols for wipe materials, wipe digestion, and judging laboratory performance is warranted.

  12. Encasing lead hazards and adding energy efficiency in low-income housing

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, J.D.; Wendt, R.

    1997-03-01

    Field research has confirmed that the lower the incremental (marginal) cost of producing an outcome, the more likely that production will occur. In residential building rehabilitation the economic truth suggests that energy efficiency is likely to become part of the scope of work of a project when the additional cost of conservation measures are relatively small, i.e., comparing gut rehab to moderate rehab, replacement of a furnace with an energy efficient model, and low-cost solutions to address lead poisoning hazards. Energy efficiency must fit into the overall needs and opportunities of a building retrofit. If little is being done to the building, then few measures can be expected to be justified. If much must be done, however, the opportunities for conservation are likely to be great. An example of this is the composite wall system described, therein, that was developed to address the problem of lead poisoning hazards on wall surfaces while adding a tight, well-insulated, and strong interior surface to perimeter walls at the lowest possible cost.

  13. Boltless Seal for Electronic Housings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawe, R. H.; Evans, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Spring clips seal housings for electronic circuitry, preventing electromagnetic interference from entering or leaving housings. Clips also keep dust out of housing. Since no bolts are used, housing can be opened quickly; unlike bolts, clips can be used on thin-walled housing. Seal was developed for an X-band array amplifier.

  14. Wheeze in Infancy: Protection Associated with Yeasts in House Dust Contrasts with Increased Risk Associated with Yeasts in Indoor Air and Other Fungal Taxa

    PubMed Central

    Behbod, Behrooz; Sordillo, Joanne E.; Hoffman, Elaine B.; Datta, Soma; Muilenberg, Michael L.; Scott, James A.; Chew, Ginger L.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Schwartz, Joel; Burge, Harriet; Gold, Diane R.

    2016-01-01

    Background While fungal exposures are assumed to provoke wheeze through irritant or allergenic mechanisms, little is known about the differential effects of indoor and outdoor fungi on early-life wheeze. Methods In a Boston prospective birth-cohort of 499 at-risk infants, culturable fungi in bedroom air and dust and outdoor air were measured at age 23 months. Wheeze was determined using bimonthly telephone-questionnaires. Odds ratios were estimated for an interquartile increase in fungal natural log-transformed concentrations, adjusting for predictors of wheeze and potential confounders. Results Increased odds of any wheeze (?1 versus 0 episodes) by age one were positively associated with indoor dust Alternaria [odds ratio (OR)=1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.073.14], Penicillium [OR=1.18; (0.981.43)] and Cladosporium [OR=1.47; (1.161.85)], indoor air Penicillium [OR=1.26; (0.921.74)], and outdoor air Cladosporium [OR=1.68; (1.042.72)]. In contrast, indoor dust yeasts were protective [OR=0.78; (0.660.93)]. Frequent wheeze (?2 versus <2 episodes) by age one was borderline associated with dust yeasts [OR=0.86; (0.701.04)] and indoor air yeasts [OR=1.53; (0.932.53)]. Alternaria concentration was associated with any wheeze for children with maternal mold sensitization [OR=9.16; (1.3761.22)], but not for those without maternal mold sensitization [OR=1.32; (0.792.20)]. Conclusions While wheeze rates were higher with exposures to fungal taxa considered to be irritant or allergenic in sensitive subjects, yeasts in the home had a strong protective association with wheeze in infancy. Molecular microbiologic studies may elucidate specific components of innate microbiologic stimulants that lead to contrasting effects on wheeze development. PMID:24118031

  15. Prevention of childhood lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Campbell, C; Osterhoudt, K C

    2000-10-01

    Although past national public health efforts have reduced lead exposure significantly, lead poisoning remains the most common environmental health problem affecting American children. Currently, lead exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of lead-contaminated household dust and soil in older housing containing lead-based paint; exposure can be increased with housing deterioration or renovation. Environmental prevention efforts focus on improvement in risk assessment, development of housing-based standards for lead-based paint hazards, and safe and cost-effective lead hazard remediation techniques. Educational efforts address parental awareness of lead exposure pathways, hygiene, and housekeeping measures to prevent ingestion of dust and soil. Blood lead screening is recommended either universally at ages 1 and 2 years or in a targeted manner where local health departments can document a low prevalence of elevated blood lead levels. Nutritional interventions involve provision of regular meals containing adequate amounts of calcium and iron and supplementation for iron deficiency. Lead chelation should complement environmental, nutritional, and educational interventions, when indicated. Collaboration of multiple federal agencies in a new strategy to eliminate childhood lead poisoning should further prevention efforts. PMID:11021406

  16. Can Serum-Specific IgE/Total IgE Ratio Predict Clinical Response to Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Children Monosensitized to House Dust Mite?

    PubMed

    Karakoc, Gulbin Bingol; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Alt?nta?, Derya Ufuk; Kendirli, Seval Gne?er

    2012-01-01

    Background. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the important regimens for the treatment of allergic diseases. Predictive tests for the clinical response to SIT are limited. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether specific IgE/total IgE levels can predict clinical improvement in monosensitized patients to house dust mite treated with immunotherapy. Patients and Methods. We analyzed 32 patients who had undergone 2 years of SIT. Serum t-IgE and s-IgE levels, and serum s-IgE/t-IgE ratios were calculated and tested for correlation with clinical response to SIT. Asthma symptom score (ASS), rhinitis symptom score (RSS), pulmonary functions and visual analogue scales (VAS) were evaluated at the beginning and after 2 years. Results. There were 17 boys and 15 girls with the mean age of 10.78 3.03 years. The mean serum house dust mite s-IgE level was 128.62 142.61?kU/L, t-IgE 608.90 529.98?IU/mL, and s-IgE/t-IgE ratio 33.83 53.18. Before immunotherapy, ASS was 6.23 1.63, RSS; 8.20 1.88, VAS; 7.38 2.01, FEV1 (%); 89.14 8.48, PEF (%); 88.93 13.57, and after 2 years, these values were determined as 1.90 1.10, 3.05 1.39, 1.35 1.24, 97.6 11.26, and 97.0 11.55, respectively. s-IgE/t-IgE ratio was correlated with change in RSS (r = -0.392, P = 0.08) and VAS (r = -0.367, P = 0.05). Conclusion. Although SIT is very effective treatment, all patients do not benefit from treatment. We assumed that s-IgE/t-IgE ratio would be useful to predict the clinical response to SIT. PMID:22536274

  17. Can Serum-Specific IgE/Total IgE Ratio Predict Clinical Response to Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Children Monosensitized to House Dust Mite?

    PubMed Central

    Karakoc, Gulbin Bingol; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Alt?nta?, Derya Ufuk; Kendirli, Seval Gne?er

    2012-01-01

    Background. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the important regimens for the treatment of allergic diseases. Predictive tests for the clinical response to SIT are limited. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether specific IgE/total IgE levels can predict clinical improvement in monosensitized patients to house dust mite treated with immunotherapy. Patients and Methods. We analyzed 32 patients who had undergone 2 years of SIT. Serum t-IgE and s-IgE levels, and serum s-IgE/t-IgE ratios were calculated and tested for correlation with clinical response to SIT. Asthma symptom score (ASS), rhinitis symptom score (RSS), pulmonary functions and visual analogue scales (VAS) were evaluated at the beginning and after 2 years. Results. There were 17 boys and 15 girls with the mean age of 10.78 3.03 years. The mean serum house dust mite s-IgE level was 128.62 142.61?kU/L, t-IgE 608.90 529.98?IU/mL, and s-IgE/t-IgE ratio 33.83 53.18. Before immunotherapy, ASS was 6.23 1.63, RSS; 8.20 1.88, VAS; 7.38 2.01, FEV1 (%); 89.14 8.48, PEF (%); 88.93 13.57, and after 2 years, these values were determined as 1.90 1.10, 3.05 1.39, 1.35 1.24, 97.6 11.26, and 97.0 11.55, respectively. s-IgE/t-IgE ratio was correlated with change in RSS (r = ?0.392, P = 0.08) and VAS (r = ?0.367, P = 0.05). Conclusion. Although SIT is very effective treatment, all patients do not benefit from treatment. We assumed that s-IgE/t-IgE ratio would be useful to predict the clinical response to SIT. PMID:22536274

  18. Retagging identifies dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM3)-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) protein as a novel receptor for a major allergen from house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mohamed; Royer, Pierre-Joseph; Mahdavi, Jafar; Shakib, Farouk; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2012-02-17

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of immune responses to microbial pathogens as well as to allergens, but the exact mechanisms of their involvement in allergic responses and Th2 cell differentiation have remained elusive. Using retagging, we identified DC-SIGN as a novel receptor involved in the initial recognition and uptake of the major house dust mite and dog allergens Der p 1 and Can f 1, respectively. To confirm this, we used gene silencing to specifically inhibit DC-SIGN expression by DCs followed by allergen uptake studies. Binding and uptake of Der p 1 and Can f 1 allergens was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. Intriguingly, our data showed that silencing DC-SIGN on DCs promotes a Th2 phenotype in DC/T cell co-cultures. These findings should lead to better understanding of the molecular basis of allergen-induced Th2 cell polarization and in doing so paves the way for the rational design of novel intervention strategies by targeting allergen receptors on innate immune cells or their carbohydrate counterstructures on allergens. PMID:22205703

  19. Lead poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lead is still found in some modern faucets. Soil contaminated by decades of car exhaust or years ... house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil near highways and houses. Hobbies involving soldering, stained ...

  20. Antigenic analysis of group I house dust mite allergens using random fragments of Der p I expressed by recombinant DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Greene, W K; Chua, K Y; Stewart, G A; Thomas, W R

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic regions of a major house dust mite allergen, Der p I, were identified by a recombinant DNA strategy employing the technique of random fragmentation. Fragments of cDNA coding for Der p I were produced by sonication and used to construct lambda gt 11 expression libraries. Analyses of recombinant fragments reactive with a rabbit anti-Der p I antiserum showed that the B cell determinants expressed in Escherichia coli were limited, with the majority (86%) of antigenic clones isolated mapping to the region comprising amino acid sequence position 60-80. To define antigenic regions of Der p I more precisely, selected overlapping fragments were subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1. Dot blot immunoassay and immunoabsorption studies using individual fusion proteins revealed five regions - 34-47, 60-72, 82-99, 112-140, and 166-194 - to contain B cell determinants responsible for the antigenicity of recombinant Der p I. Absorption of the antiserum with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extract removed reactivity to all fragments, whereas absorption with an extract from the related mite Dermatophagoides farinae removed reactivity to peptides containing residues 34-47, 60-72, and 166-194, but not 82-99 and 112-140. Similarly, rabbit anti-D.farinae reacted strongly with peptides containing residues 34-47, 60-72, and 166-194, but not residues 82-99 and 112-140 which again showed antigenic differences in these residues between the group I allergens. PMID:2246073

  1. Application of the Phylogenetic Species Concept to Wallemia sebi from House Dust and Indoor Air Revealed by Multi-Locus Genealogical Concordance

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai D. T.; Jančič, Sašo; Meijer, Martin; Tanney, Joey B.; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Seifert, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide survey of Wallemia occurring in house dust and indoor air was conducted. The isolated strains were identified as W. sebi and W. muriae. Previous studies suggested that the W. sebi phylogenetic clade contained cryptic species but conclusive evidence was lacking because only the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) marker was analyzed. The ITS and four protein-coding genes (MCM7, RPB1, RPB2, and TSR1) were sequenced for 85 isolates. Based on an initial neighbor joining analysis of the concatenated genes, W. muriae remained monophyletic but four clades were found in W. sebi, which we designated as W. sebi clades 1, 2, 3, and 4. We hypothesized that these clades represent distinct phylogenetic species within the Wallemia sebi species complex (WSSC). We then conducted multiple phylogenetic analyses and demonstrated genealogical concordance, which supports the existence of four phylogenetic species within the WSSC. Geographically, W. muriae was only found in Europe, W. sebi clade 3 was only found in Canada, W. sebi clade 4 was found in subtropical regions, while W. sebi clade 1 and 2 were found worldwide. Haplotype analysis showed that W. sebi clades 1 and 2 had multiple haplotypes while W. sebi clades 3 and 4 had one haplotype and may have been under sampled. We describe W. sebi clades 2, 3, and 4 as new species in a companion study. PMID:25799362

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Der f 2, a potent allergen derived from the house dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Takai, Toshiro; Okumura, Yasushi; Scott, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Although a number of allergens have been identified and isolated, the underlying molecular basis for the potent immune response is poorly understood. House dust mites (Dermatophagoides sp.) are ubiquitous contributors to atopy in developed countries. The rhinitis, dermatitis and asthma associated with allergic reactions to these arthropods are frequently caused by relatively small (125-129 amino acids) mite proteins of unknown biological function. Der f 2, a major allergen from the mite D. farinae, has been recombinantly expressed, characterized and crystallized. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group I4(1)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.2, c = 103.3 A. An essentially complete (97.2%) data set has been collected to 2.4 A at a synchrotron source. Attempts to solve the crystal structure of Der f 2 by molecular replacement using the NMR coordinates for either Der f 2 or Der p 2 (the homologous protein from D. pteronyssinus) failed, but preliminary searches using the crystalline Der p 2 atomic coordinates appear to be promising.

  3. Saussurea lappa alleviates inflammatory chemokine production in HaCaT cells and house dust mite-induced atopic-like dermatitis in Nc/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hye-Sun; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Mee-Young; Jin, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Jeon, Woo-Young; Shin, Na-Ra; Sok, Dai-Eun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    Saussurea lappa is a traditional herbal medicine used for to treat various inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of S. lappa against atopic dermatitis using human keratinocyte HaCaT cells, murine mast cell line MC/9 cells, and a house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis model of Nc/Nga mice. Treatment with the S. lappa caused a significant reduction in the mRNA levels and production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokine, including thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in tumor necrosis factor-?/interferone-?-stimulated HaCaT cells. S. lappa exhibited the significant reduction in histamine production in MC/9 cells. In the atopic dermatitis model, S. lappa significantly reduced the dermatitis score and serum IgE and TARC levels. In addition, the back skin and ears of S. lappa-treated Nc/Nga mice exhibited reduced histological manifestations of atopic skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration. In conclusion, an extract of S. lappa effectively suppressed the development of atopic dermatitis, which was closely related to the reduction of chemokines and cytokine. Our study suggests that S. lappa may be a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis. PMID:24216625

  4. Sensitization by subcutaneous route is superior to intraperitoneal route in induction of asthma by house dust mite in a murine mode.

    PubMed

    Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Almeida, Francine Maria de; Brggemann, Thayse Regina; Kalil, Jorge; Martins, Milton de Arruda; Arantes-Costa, Fernanda Magalhes; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Objective To develop a new experimental model of chronic allergic pulmonary disease induced by house dust mite, with marked production of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate in the airways and remodeling, comparing two different routes of sensitization. Methods The protocol lasted 30 days. BALB/c mice were divided into six groups and were sensitized subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with saline (negative control), Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 50 or 500mcg in three injections. Subsequently they underwent intranasal challenge with Der p or saline for 7 days and were sacrificed 24 hours after the last challenge. We evaluated the titration of specific IgE anti-Der p, eosinophilic density in peribronchovascular space and airway remodeling. Results Both animals sensitized intraperitoneally and subcutaneously produced specific IgE anti-Der p. Peribronchovascular eosinophilia increased only in mice receiving lower doses of Der p. However, only the group sensitized with Der p 50mcg through subcutaneously route showed significant airway remodeling. Conclusion In this murine model of asthma, both pathways of sensitization led to the production of specific IgE and eosinophilia in the airways. However, only the subcutaneously route was able to induce remodeling. Furthermore, lower doses of Der p used in sensitization were better than higher ones, suggesting immune tolerance. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this model in the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, but it can already be replicated in experiments to create new therapeutic drugs or immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26761554

  5. Application of the phylogenetic species concept to Wallemia sebi from house dust and indoor air revealed by multi-locus genealogical concordance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai D T; Jan?i?, Sao; Meijer, Martin; Tanney, Joey B; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Seifert, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide survey of Wallemia occurring in house dust and indoor air was conducted. The isolated strains were identified as W. sebi and W. muriae. Previous studies suggested that the W. sebi phylogenetic clade contained cryptic species but conclusive evidence was lacking because only the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) marker was analyzed. The ITS and four protein-coding genes (MCM7, RPB1, RPB2, and TSR1) were sequenced for 85 isolates. Based on an initial neighbor joining analysis of the concatenated genes, W. muriae remained monophyletic but four clades were found in W. sebi, which we designated as W. sebi clades 1, 2, 3, and 4. We hypothesized that these clades represent distinct phylogenetic species within the Wallemia sebi species complex (WSSC). We then conducted multiple phylogenetic analyses and demonstrated genealogical concordance, which supports the existence of four phylogenetic species within the WSSC. Geographically, W. muriae was only found in Europe, W. sebi clade 3 was only found in Canada, W. sebi clade 4 was found in subtropical regions, while W. sebi clade 1 and 2 were found worldwide. Haplotype analysis showed that W. sebi clades 1 and 2 had multiple haplotypes while W. sebi clades 3 and 4 had one haplotype and may have been under sampled. We describe W. sebi clades 2, 3, and 4 as new species in a companion study. PMID:25799362

  6. Enhanced Cysteinyl-Leukotriene Type 1 Receptor Expression in T Cells from House Dust Mite-Allergic Individuals following Stimulation with Der p

    PubMed Central

    Thivierge, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the potential for allergen to modulate T cell expression of the CysLT1 receptor and responsiveness to leukotrienes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from house dust mite-allergic or nonallergic individuals were incubated with D. pteronyssinus allergen (Der p). Baseline CysLT1 expression was similar in both groups of donors, but Der p significantly enhanced CysLT1 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of only allergic individuals and induced enhanced responsiveness of CD4+ T cells to LTD4 in terms of calcium mobilisation. This effect was prevented by the CysLT1 antagonist MK571. Der p also induced IL-4 and IL-10 production, and neutralizing antibody to IL-4 prevented both the enhanced CysLT1 expression and the enhanced responsiveness of T cells to LTD4 induced by Der p. In allergic individuals, Der p also induced T cell proliferation and a Th2-biased phenotype. Our data suggest that, in allergen-sensitized individuals, exposure to allergen can enhance T cell expression of CysLT1 receptors through a mechanism involving IL-4 production. This, in turn, would induce CD4+ T cell responsiveness to cysteinyl-leukotrienes and Th2 cell activation. PMID:25918735

  7. Pruni cortex ameliorates skin inflammation possibly through HMGB1-NFκB pathway in house dust mite induced atopic dermatitis NC/Nga transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.; Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Sreedhar, Remya; Afrin, Rejina; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Takashi; Nomoto, Mayumi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Fukumoto, Kyoko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Pruni cortex, the bark of Prunus jamasakura Siebold ex Koidzumi, has been used in the Japanese systems of medicine for many years for its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitussive properties. In this study, we investigated the effect of pruni cortex on atopic dermatitis NC/Nga mouse model. Atopic dermatitis-like lesion was induced by the application of house dust mite extract to the dorsal skin. After induction of atopic dermatitis, pruni cortex aqueous extract (1 g/kg, p.o.) was administered daily for 2 weeks. We evaluated dermatitis severity, histopathological changes and cellular protein expression by Western blotting for nuclear and cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear factor κB, apoptosis and inflammatory markers in the skin of atopic dermatitis mice. The clinical observation confirmed that the dermatitis score was significantly lower when treated with pruni cortex than in the atopic dermatitis group. Similarly pruni cortex inhibited hypertrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells as identified by histopathology. In addition, pruni cortex significantly inhibited the protein expression of cytoplasmic high mobility group box 1, receptor for advanced glycation end products, nuclear p-nuclear factor kappa B, apoptosis and inflammatory markers. These results indicate that pruni cortex may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by attenuating high mobility group box 1 and inflammation possibly through the nuclear factor κB pathway. PMID:26060348

  8. In vitro bioaccessibility of lead in surface dust and implications for human exposure: A comparative study between industrial area and urban district.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiangyang; Li, Zhonggen; Sun, Guangyi; Liu, Jinling; Han, Zhixuan

    2015-10-30

    In this study, ground surface dust samples from two contrasting areas, a former zinc smelting area in Guizhou Province and a common urban district in Wuhan city, Hubei Province, China, were assessed for in vitro Pb bioaccessibility using a physiologically based extraction test (PBET). Extremely elevated concentrations of Pb (220-6348 mg/kg) and other trace metals were observed in the zinc smelting area. While moderate high metal concentrations (79-1544 mg/kg of Pb) in the urban dusts were attributed to various urban activities, coal combustion and traffic emissions. Lead bioaccessibility in the stomach-phase varied from 17.6 to 76.1% and no significant difference was found between industrial and urban dust samples. Compared with the stomach-phase, Pb bioaccessibility in the more alkaline intestinal-phase was considerably lower (1.2-21.8%). A significantly negative correlation was found between dust Ca concentrations and Pb bioaccessibility in the intestinal-phase, suggesting that Ca plays an important role in reducing the bioaccessible Pb in the intestinal-phase. The estimated Pb exposure based on gastric bioaccessible Pb was 13.9 and 1.8 μg/kg day for children living in the industrial and urban areas, respectively, accounting for 85% and 41% of their corresponding total Pb exposure. PMID:25958267

  9. Soil is an important pathway of human lead exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Reagan, P L

    1998-01-01

    This review shows the equal or greater importance of leaded gasoline-contaminated dust compared to lead-based paint to the child lead problem, and that soil lead, resulting from leaded gasoline and pulverized lead-based paint, is at least or more important than lead-based paint (intact and not pulverized) as a pathway of human lead exposure. Because lead-based paint is a high-dose source, the biologically relevant dosage is similar to lead in soil. Both lead-based paint and soil lead are associated with severe lead poisoning. Leaded gasoline and lead in food, but not lead-based paint, are strongly associated with population blood lead levels in both young children and adults. Soil lead and house dust, but not lead-based paint, are associated with population blood lead levels in children. Most soil lead and house dust are associated with leaded gasoline. Lead-based paint dust is associated with cases of renovation of either exterior or interior environments in which the paint was pulverized. Based upon the limited data to date, abatement of soil lead is more effective than abatement of lead-based paint in reducing blood lead levels of young children. About equal numbers of children under 7 years of age are exposed to soil lead and lead-based paint. Seasonality studies point to soil lead as the main source of population blood lead levels. Soil lead is a greater risk factor than lead-based paint to children engaged in hand-to-mouth and pica behavior. In summary, soil lead is important for addressing the population of children at risk of lead poisoning. When soil lead is acknowledged by regulators and the public health community as an important pathway of human lead exposure, then more effective opportunities for improving primary lead prevention can become a reality. Images Figure 1 PMID:9539015

  10. Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... serious about making sure companies that break the law are held accountable In the past year, EPA ... health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ...

  11. Lead Sampling Technician Training Course. Trainer Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ICF, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document presents a model curriculum for use by trainers presenting training course in assessing and reporting dust and debris from deteriorated lead-based paint. The course, which was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, is intended for use with housing quality standard inspectors, rehabilitation specialists, home…

  12. Identification of lead sources in residential environments: Sydney Australia.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, M A S; Zahran, S; Pingitore, N; Clague, J; Devlin, G; Taylor, M P

    2014-01-01

    Interior and exterior dust, soil and paint were analysed at five brick urban Sydney homes over 15 months to evaluate temporal variations and discriminate sources of lead (Pb) exposure. Exterior dust gauge Pb loading rates (?g/m(2)/28 days), interior vacuum dust Pb concentrations (mg/kg) and interior petri-dish Pb loading rates (?g/m(2)/28 days), were correlated positively with soil Pb concentrations. Exterior dust gauge Pb loading rates and interior vacuum dust Pb concentrations peaked in the summer. Lead isotope and Pb speciation (XAS) were analysed in soil and vacuum dust samples from three of the five houses that had elevated Pb concentrations. Results show that the source of interior dust lead was primarily from soil in two of the three houses and from soil and Pb paint in the third home. IEUBK child blood Pb modelling predicts that children's blood Pb levels could exceed 5?g/dL in two of the five houses. PMID:24071634

  13. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  14. The Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Attenuates House Dust Mite-induced Airway Inflammation by Suppressing Dendritic Cell-mediated Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Karin; Mishra, Amarjit; Lam, Jonathan K.; Mushaben, Elizabeth M.; Cuento, Rosemarie A.; Meyer, Katharine S.; Yao, Xianglan; Keeran, Karen J.; Nugent, Gayle Z.; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Yang, Yanqin; Raghavachari, Nalini; Dagur, Pradeep K.; McCoy, J. Philip; Levine, Stewart J.

    2014-01-01

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family that binds multiple ligands and plays a key role in brain development. Although the VLDLR mediates pleiotropic biological processes, only a limited amount of information is available regarding its role in adaptive immunity. Here, we identify an important role for the VLDLR in attenuating house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway inflammation in experimental murine asthma. We show that HDM-challenged Vldlr?/? mice have augmented eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation with increases in Th2 cytokines, C-C chemokines, IgE production and mucous cell metaplasia. A genome-wide analysis of the lung transcriptome identified that mRNA levels of CD209e (DC-SIGNR4), a murine homologue of DC-SIGN, were increased in the lungs of HDM-challenged Vldlr?/? mice, which suggested that the VLDLR might modify dendritic cell (DC) function. Consistent with this, VLDLR expression by human monocyte-derived DCs was increased by HDM stimulation. In addition, 55% of peripheral blood CD11c+ DCs from individuals with allergy expressed VLDLR under basal conditions. Lastly, the adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed, CD11c+ bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from Vldlr?/? mice to the airways of wild type (WT) recipient mice induced augmented eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation upon HDM challenge with increases in Th2 cytokines, C-C chemokines, IgE production and mucous cell metaplasia, as compared to the adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed, CD11c+ BMDCs from WT mice. Collectively, these results identify a novel role for the VLDLR as a negative regulator of DC-mediated adaptive immune responses in HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. PMID:24733846

  15. The very low density lipoprotein receptor attenuates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation by suppressing dendritic cell-mediated adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Karin; Mishra, Amarjit; Lam, Jonathan K; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Cuento, Rosemarie A; Meyer, Katharine S; Yao, Xianglan; Keeran, Karen J; Nugent, Gayle Z; Qu, Xuan; Yu, Zu-Xi; Yang, Yanqin; Raghavachari, Nalini; Dagur, Pradeep K; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J

    2014-05-15

    The very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family that binds multiple ligands and plays a key role in brain development. Although the VLDLR mediates pleiotropic biological processes, only a limited amount of information is available regarding its role in adaptive immunity. In this study, we identify an important role for the VLDLR in attenuating house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway inflammation in experimental murine asthma. We show that HDM-challenged Vldlr(-/-) mice have augmented eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation with increases in Th2 cytokines, C-C chemokines, IgE production, and mucous cell metaplasia. A genome-wide analysis of the lung transcriptome identified that mRNA levels of CD209e (DC-SIGNR4), a murine homolog of DC-SIGN, were increased in the lungs of HDM-challenged Vldlr(-/-) mice, which suggested that the VLDLR might modify dendritic cell (DC) function. Consistent with this, VLDLR expression by human monocyte-derived DCs was increased by HDM stimulation. In addition, 55% of peripheral blood CD11c(+) DCs from individuals with allergy expressed VLDLR under basal conditions. Lastly, the adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed, CD11c(+) bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from Vldlr(-/-) mice to the airways of wild type recipient mice induced augmented eosinophilic and lymphocytic airway inflammation upon HDM challenge with increases in Th2 cytokines, C-C chemokines, IgE production, and mucous cell metaplasia, as compared with the adoptive transfer of HDM-pulsed, CD11c(+) BMDCs from wild type mice. Collectively, these results identify a novel role for the VLDLR as a negative regulator of DC-mediated adaptive immune responses in HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. PMID:24733846

  16. Worst-case aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle (''worst case'') size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method.

  17. "Worst-case" aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle ("worst case") size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method. PMID:2543198

  18. Quantities of lead producing health effects in humans: sources and bioavailability.

    PubMed Central

    Mahaffey, K R

    1977-01-01

    Levels of lead ingestion and inhalation producing increased body burden of lead and clinical toxicity in adults and children are compared with usual levels of exposure. The magnitude of lead exposure from air, water, and food is estimated. Sources of high level exposure to lead are described; urban street dirt, house dust, and paint are particularly common sources of high concentrations of lead. The bioavailability of different lead compounds is reviewed as well as factors affecting susceptibility to lead. PMID:908307

  19. Children and lead: new findings and concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Fu, J.S.

    1982-09-02

    An editorial dealing with lead in the environment and its health risks to children is presented. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure. Through hand-to-mouth activities, such as thumb sucking, nail biting, or eating with dirty hands, lead in house dust and garden soil readily enters their bodies. Children with pica are exposed to more lead because they eat such items as paint chips, broken plaster, and dirt. Moreover, intestinal lead absorption is greater in children than in adults. The author recommends a concerted effort to reduce undue lead absorption in children. (JMT)

  20. Group 1 Allergen Genes in Two Species of House Dust Mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae): Direct Sequencing, Characterization and Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Klimov, Pavel B; Inam, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz; OConnor, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Group 1 allergens of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) and D. pteronyssinus (Der p 1) dominate overall allergic responses in house dust mite allergy patients. The need for accurate identification and characterization of representative variants of group 1 allergens in any given geographic locality has been emphasized for development of appropriate allergen extracts. Regional amino acid sequence polymorphism has been described but the extent of this polymorphism is not well understood. Such data are completely absent for the USA and many other countries. Most previous studies used cDNA libraries generated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and/or primers amplifying shorter fragments of this gene. Using novel species-specific primers and direct PCR, we document group 1 allergen gene sequence polymorphism in populations of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus from the USA and Pakistan. We report two novel introns (nt pos 87 and 291) in both species, and the absence of intron 3 in Der p 1. Thirteen silent and one novel non-synonymous mutation (Tryptophan W197 to Arginine R197) were detected in D. farinae. The potential medical significance of the latter mutation is discussed. Two haplotypes of the Der f 1 gene were identified, haplotype 1 (63%) was more frequent than haplotype 2 (18%). Polymorphism in Der f 1 displayed geographical localization, since both haplotypes were present in mite populations from Pakistan whereas haplotype 1 was observed only in the USA. In Der p 1, a silent mutation at nt (aa) position 1011(149) and four non-synonymous mutations at positions 589(50), 935(124), 971(136), 1268(215) were observed. These mutations were reported from many other geographic regions, suggesting that polymorphism in the Der p 1 gene is panmictic. The extent of polymorphism in both genes is substantially lower than that reported previously (0.10-0.16% vs 0.31-0.49%), indicating the need for careful evaluation of potential polymerase errors in studies utilizing RT-PCR. PMID:25494056

  1. Block Copolymer/DNA Vaccination Induces a Strong Allergen-Specific Local Response in a Mouse Model of House Dust Mite Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Roussey-Bihoue, Tiphaine; Hassoun, Dorian; Evrard, Justine; Cheminant, Marie-Aude; Chesn, Julie; Braza, Faouzi; Mahay, Guillaume; Portero, Vincent; Sagan, Christine; Pitard, Bruno; Magnan, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is caused by abnormal immunoreactivity against allergens such as house dust mites among which Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f) is a common species. Currently, immunotherapy is based on allergen administration, which has variable effect from patient to patient and may cause serious side effects, principally the sustained risk of anaphylaxis. DNA vaccination is a promising approach by triggering a specific immune response with reduced allergenicity. Objective The aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of DNA immunization with Der f1 allergen specific DNA on allergic sensitization, inflammation and respiratory function in mice. Methods Mice were vaccinated 28 and 7 days before allergen exposure with a Der f1-encoding plasmid formulated with a block copolymer. Asthma was induced by skin sensitization followed by intra-nasal challenges with Der f extract. Total lung, broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) and spleen cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for their surface antigen and cytokine expression. Splenocytes and lung cell IFN-? production by CD8+ cells in response to Der f CMH1-restricted peptides was assessed by ELISPOT. IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a were measured in serum by ELISA. Specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness was assessed by direct resistance measurements. Results Compared to animals vaccinated with an irrelevant plasmid, pVAX-Der f1 vaccination induced an increase of B cells in BAL, and an elevation of IL-10 and IFN-? but also of IL-4, IL-13 and IL-17 producing CD4+ lymphocytes in lungs and of IL-4 and IL-5 in spleen. In response to CD8-restricted peptides an increase of IFN-? was observed among lung cells. IgG2a levels non-specifically increased following block copolymer/DNA vaccination although IgE, IgG1 levels and airways resistances were not impacted. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance DNA vaccination using a plasmid coding for Der f1 formulated with the block copolymer 704 induces a specific immune response in the model of asthma used herein. PMID:24497934

  2. Group 1 Allergen Genes in Two Species of House Dust Mites, Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae): Direct Sequencing, Characterization and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Klimov, Pavel B.; Inam, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Farhana Riaz; OConnor, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    Group 1 allergens of Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1) and D. pteronyssinus (Der p 1) dominate overall allergic responses in house dust mite allergy patients. The need for accurate identification and characterization of representative variants of group 1 allergens in any given geographic locality has been emphasized for development of appropriate allergen extracts. Regional amino acid sequence polymorphism has been described but the extent of this polymorphism is not well understood. Such data are completely absent for the USA and many other countries. Most previous studies used cDNA libraries generated by reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR) and/or primers amplifying shorter fragments of this gene. Using novel species-specific primers and direct PCR, we document group 1 allergen gene sequence polymorphism in populations of D. farinae and D. pteronyssinus from the USA and Pakistan. We report two novel introns (nt pos 87 and 291) in both species, and the absence of intron 3 in Der p 1. Thirteen silent and one novel non-synonymous mutation (Tryptophan W197 to Arginine R197) were detected in D. farinae. The potential medical significance of the latter mutation is discussed. Two haplotypes of the Der f 1 gene were identified, haplotype 1 (63%) was more frequent than haplotype 2 (18%). Polymorphism in Der f 1 displayed geographical localization, since both haplotypes were present in mite populations from Pakistan whereas haplotype 1 was observed only in the USA. In Der p 1, a silent mutation at nt (aa) position 1011(149) and four non-synonymous mutations at positions 589(50), 935(124), 971(136), 1268(215) were observed. These mutations were reported from many other geographic regions, suggesting that polymorphism in the Der p 1 gene is panmictic. The extent of polymorphism in both genes is substantially lower than that reported previously (0.10–0.16% vs 0.31–0.49%), indicating the need for careful evaluation of potential polymerase errors in studies utilizing RT-PCR. PMID:25494056

  3. [EVALUATION OF THE CARCINOGENIC RISK OF LEAD IN THE COHORT STUDY OF MALE WORKERS OCCUPATIONALLY EXPOSED TO INORGANIC LEAD IN 27 MOSCOW PRINTING-HOUSES].

    PubMed

    Ilychova, S A; Zaridze, D G

    2015-01-01

    As millions of people worldwide are expoed to inorganic lead, both in the workplace and in general environment, its potential carcinogenicity is an important health problem. Although lead has been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals, epidemiological studies have been inconclusive, and the relationship between lead and human cancer is still unclear. There were several limitations that complicated the analysis and evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of lead compounds. In particular, many of the cohort studies of lead and cancer, mostly among heavily lead-exposed workers, have been limited by a failure to identify and control for covariates, especially co-exposures to other metals such as arsenic, cadmium, and chromium, which have been shown to be carcinogenic. Most of the epidemiological studies unfortunately do not have data on dose-response. The scientific merit of our study is the virtual absence of confounding by other known carcinogens. Another advantage of our study is the presence of three occupational sub-cohorts with different levels and routes of lead exposure. Most previous studies have data on dose-response provided only by comparisons of exposed to unexposed persons. In summary, the results of this cohort study suggest that occupational exposure to lead may increase the risk of cancers of the pancreas, kidney and rectum. In conclusion, despite several limitations, the results of our study add to the evidence that carcinogenicity to humans may be an additional adverse health effect of lead. PMID:26625623

  4. Peeling Lead Paint Turns into Poisonous Dust. Guess Where It Ends Up? A Media Campaign to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P.; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to

  5. Peeling Lead Paint Turns into Poisonous Dust. Guess Where It Ends Up? A Media Campaign to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P.; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to…

  6. Increased lead absorption in inner city children: where does the lead come from?

    PubMed

    Charney, E; Sayre, J; Coulter, M

    1980-02-01

    Pica for lead-containing paint has been questioned as the principal mechanism for the widespread moderately elevated blood lead levels (30 to 80 microgram/100 ml) in inner city children. This study explored the hypothesis that lead-contaminated household dust is a major source of lead for these children; hand contamination and repetitive mouthing is the proposed mechanism of ingestion. Forty-nine inner city children with blood lead 40 to 70 microgram/100 ml were matched with 50 children with blood lead less than or equal to 29 microgram/100 ml from the same inner city environment. House dust lead and lead on hands were found in significantly greater quantity among experimental subjects. Other factors differed between groups; lead content of peeling paint, soil lead, and pica affected more experimental than control children, but did not account for more than 50% of experimental cases. The cause of moderate blood lead elevation is multifactoral: no single source accounted for all children with elevated levels. However, lead contamination of house dust and hands appears to be a major factor in this condition. PMID:7354967

  7. Peeling lead paint turns into poisonous dust. Guess where it ends up? A media campaign to prevent childhood lead poisoning in New York City.

    PubMed

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-06-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to increase parents' awareness of childhood lead poisoning, ways to protect their children, and property owners' legal responsibility to fix peeling lead paint safely, and increase awareness of regulatory changes and encourage enforcement of New York City's Local Law 1 of 2004. Campaign materials were focus group tested and the campaign was refined annually. The campaign ran city-wide and in targeted high-risk neighborhoods. Neighborhoods and media venue (bus, train, kiosk, and store) changed annually, based on population risk factors and venue availability. Exposure to the campaign, campaign-related knowledge, and behavior were assessed using pre- and postcampaign street intercept surveys. Results showed that campaign reached the targeted population, and had an impact on knowledge of lead poisoning prevention measures as evidenced by increased knowledge of lead paint exposures sources in one year and increased knowledge of preventive behaviors in another year; these improvements were observed for both genders and most ethnic, primary language, educational attainment, and age groups in each year. Lessons learned indicate that well-targeted media campaigns, designed with audience participation, can reach parents through various venues, and improve key knowledge areas. Evaluation challenges faced include high levels of knowledge at baseline, competing media messages, and balancing between program needs and evaluation design. PMID:25558876

  8. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about 38 million homes in the US still contain some lead paint. While lead paint that is ... the nation's housing stock—some 24 million homes— contains significant lead-based paint hazards, i.e. deteriorating ...

  9. Lead Poisoning

    MedlinePLUS

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  10. EVALUATION OF PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETER FOR MEASUREMENT OF LEAD IN PAINT, SOIL AND DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three widely used commercially available portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometers were evaluated for precision and accuracy of measurement of lead in paint. ncluded were two direct reading instruments and one spectrum analyzer. est materials were prepared by spiking oil-based an...

  11. Development and field trial of a household surface lead loading rate sampling device in a lead-contaminated community of southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Untimanon, Orrapan; Geater, Alan; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Thoumsang, Somkiat; Verkasalo, Pia K; Saetia, Wiyada

    2010-05-01

    A new dust-collecting device was developed to assess surface lead loading rates in houses in communities contaminated with lead oxide dust used for caulking in nearby boat-repair yards. The device consists of two small glass sheets with total area of 1,200 cm(2) placed in two plastic trays suspended from the ceiling in the house for 3 months before wiping and sending the dust specimen for determination of lead content using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After a pilot trial in four households, further data were collected from 43 matched pairs of boat-caulkers' and neighboring control households. All devices were retained in the house for 3 months without any complaint. Static measurements of lead dust levels were also assessed in all households. The values significantly discriminated high from low lead exposure households (p = 0.015) and provided good correlations with floor lead loading (Spearman rank correlation coefficient, r = 0.39 to 0.62) and dust lead content (r = 0.53 to 0.64). This sampling method is an alternative to others which consume more household space or require a longer collection period. PMID:19415518

  12. Effect of inhaled dust mite allergen on regional particle deposition and mucociliary clearance in allergic asthmatics**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background Acute exacerbations in allergic asthmatics may lead to impaired ability to clear mucus from the airways, a key factor in asthma morbidity. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inhaled house dust mite challenge on the regional deposition of...

  13. Nurse Case Management and Housing Interventions Reduce Allergen Exposures: The Milwaukee Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Breysse, Jill; Wendt, Jean; Dixon, Sherry; Murphy, Amy; Wilson, Jonathan; Meurer, John; Cohn, Jennifer; Jacobs, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We examined the impact of a combination of home environmental interventions and nurse case management services on total settled dust loadings and on allergen concentrations in the homes of asthmatic children. Methods Using a randomized longitudinal controlled trial study design, we randomly assigned homes of asthmatic children in Milwaukee to either a control (n=64) or an intervention (n=57) group. Control group homes received a visual assessment, education, bed/pillow dust mite encasings, and treatment of lead-based paint hazards. The intervention group received these same services plus nurse case management that included tailored, individual asthma action plans, provision of minor home repairs, home cleaning using special vacuuming and wet washing, and integrated pest management. Dust vacuum samples were collected from measured surface areas of floors in the TV room, kitchen, and child's bedroom at baseline and at three-, six-, and 12-month follow-up visits. Dust loading (mass per surface area) is a means of measuring total dust and the total amount of allergen present. Results For the intervention group, geometric mean dust loadings declined significantly from baseline (39 milligrams per square foot [mg/ft2]) to post-intervention (11 mg/ft2) (p<0.001). Baseline dust loading, treatment group, visit, and season were significant predictors of follow-up dust loadings. Mean post-intervention dust loadings were 72% higher in the control group. The total amount of allergen in settled house dust declined significantly following the intervention because total dust loading declined; the concentration of allergens in settled dust did not change significantly. Conclusion The combination of nurse case management and home environmental interventions promotes collaboration between health and housing professionals and is effective in reducing exposures to allergens in settled dust. PMID:21563716

  14. Learn about Lead

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their hands and other objects that can have lead from dust or soil on them into their mouths. Children may also ... dishes or glasses that contain lead, inhaling lead dust from lead-based paint or lead-contaminated soil or from playing with toys with lead paint. ...

  15. Identification of sources of lead in children in a primary zinc-lead smelter environment.

    PubMed Central

    Gulson, Brian L; Mizon, Karen J; Davis, Jeff D; Palmer, Jacqueline M; Vimpani, Graham

    2004-01-01

    We compared high-precision lead isotopic ratios in deciduous teeth and environmental samples to evaluate sources of lead in 10 children from six houses in a primary zinc-lead smelter community at North Lake Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia. Teeth were sectioned to allow identification of lead exposure in utero and in early childhood. Blood lead levels in the children ranged from 10 to 42 micro g/dL and remained elevated for a number of years. For most children, only a small contribution to tooth lead can be attributed to gasoline and paint sources. In one child with a blood lead concentration of 19.7 microg/dL, paint could account for about 45% of lead in her blood. Comparison of isotopic ratios of tooth lead levels with those from vacuum cleaner dust, dust-fall accumulation, surface wipes, ceiling (attic) dust, and an estimation of the smelter emissions indicates that from approximately 55 to 100% of lead could be derived from the smelter. For a blood sample from another child, > 90% of lead could be derived from the smelter. We found varying amounts of in utero-derived lead in the teeth. Despite the contaminated environment and high blood lead concentrations in the children, the levels of lead in the teeth are surprisingly low compared with those measured in children from other lead mining and smelting communities. PMID:14698931

  16. Roadside dusts and soils contamination in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Susanna T. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Roadside dusts and soils were collected from various nonindustrial districts in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, and analyzed for lead and copper contents. Results showed that the recent lead phase-down action has reduced the level of lead, but the concentrations of both metals are still higher than the background levels for normal soil. Elevated concentrations of copper in heavily traveled highways were noted, suggesting that much of the copper pollutants is probably of automotive origin. The concentration of lead was found to vary with housing age, and higher levels of contamination in the older neighborhoods were observed. This result is probably ascribable to the accumulation of residues from leaded gasoline and lead-based paint in the past and the use of coal fire for space heating in older houses.

  17. Comparison of a Wipe Method With and Without a Rinse to Recover Wall Losses in Closed Face 37-mm Cassettes used for Sampling Lead Dust Particulates.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-mm polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for three consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8-54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13-33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16-22%). Similarly, we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4-19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4-39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  18. Comparison of a wipe method with and without a rinse to recover wall losses in closed face 37-mm cassettes used for sampling lead dust particulates

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos, Diana; King, Bradley; Beaucham, Catherine; Brueck, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Closed-face 37-millimeter (mm) polystyrene cassettes are often used for exposure monitoring of metal particulates. Several methods have been proposed to account for the wall loss in air sampling cassettes, including rinsing, wiping, within-cassette dissolution, and an internal capsule fused to the filter that could be digested with the filter. Until internal capsules replace filters, other methods for assessing wall losses may be considered. To determine if rinsing and wiping or wiping alone is adequate to determine wall losses on cassettes, we collected 54 full-shift area air samples at a battery recycling facility. We collected six replicate samples at three locations within the facility for 3 consecutive days. The wall losses of three replicate cassettes from each day-location were analyzed following a rinse and two consecutive wipes. The wall losses of the other three replicates from each day-location were analyzed following two consecutive wipes only. Mixed-cellulose ester membrane filter, rinse, and wipes were analyzed separately following NIOSH Method 7303. We found an average of 29% (range: 8%54%) recovered lead from the cassette walls for all samples. We also found that rinsing prior to wiping the interior cassette walls did not substantially improve recovery of wall losses compared to wiping alone. A rinse plus one wipe recovered on average 23% (range: 13%33%) of the lead, while one wipe alone recovered on average 21% (range: 16%22%). Similarly we determined that a second wipe did not provide substantial additional recovery of lead (average: 4%, range: 0.4%19%) compared to the first wipe disregarding the rinse (average: 18%, range: 4%39%). We concluded that when an internal capsule is not used, wall losses of lead dust in air sampling cassettes can be adequately recovered by wiping the internal wall surfaces of the cassette with a single wipe. PMID:26125330

  19. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOSIN AIR, CARPETING, AND DUST AND ITS REEMISSION FROM CARPETING FOLLOWING THE USE OF TOTAL RELEASE AEROSOLS IN AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of experiments to explore the relationships between the insecticide chlorpyrifos and its distribution into carpet., carpet dust, and reemission into air. Two total release aerosols containing 0.5% chlorpyrifos were applied in the living room and den of EP...

  20. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are exposed through lead-contaminated household dust or soil that gets into their mouths. • Homes that were ... out of areas in the yard with bare soil. o Wash children’s hands and toys with soap ...

  1. The relationship of environmental lead to blood-lead levels in children

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.D.; Quah, R.; Meigs, J.W.; DeLouise, E.R.

    1982-04-01

    An in-depth study of the distribution of lead sources in the residential environment of 377 children in New Haven, Connecticut, was carried out. Substantial amounts of lead were present in soil, paint, and house dust throughout New Haven, but not in air or water. Multiple regression modeling indicated that the most important contributors to variation in children's blood-lead levels were soil lead and exterior house paint lead. Using the best five-variable model only 11.7% of the variation in the children's blood-lead levels could be explained. This led to the conclusion that availability of lead in the residential environment did not account for most of the variation observed in the population.

  2. Immediate and one-year post-intervention effectiveness of Maryland's lead law treatments.

    PubMed

    Breysse, Jill; Anderson, Jack; Dixon, Sherry; Galke, Warren; Wilson, Jonathan

    2007-10-01

    A 1994 Maryland law prescribes a lead-based paint risk reduction standard for pre-1950, privately owned rental housing. This standard, applied at each tenancy change, can be met by sampling to verify that dust lead loadings are within acceptable limits or by performing specific lead hazard reduction treatments, followed by an independent visual inspection without dust sampling. We evaluated the ability of visual inspection to predict treatment completion and dust lead loadings. Fifty-two Baltimore housing units were enrolled and received the law-specified treatments. Before treatment, study risk assessors conducted visual assessments and dust lead wipe sampling in each unit. After treatment, Maryland-certified visual inspectors conducted the law's required visual inspection, followed by the study risk assessors, who performed a separate visual assessment and collected dust wipe samples. One year later, study risk assessors performed another visual assessment and dust wipe sampling (n=34). Dust lead loadings declined significantly immediately after prescribed lead treatments were implemented. Fifty-three percent, 20%, and 47% of units had at least one sample that exceeded 1995 EPA/HUD floor, window sill and window trough clearance guidance of 100, 500 and 800 microg/ft2, respectively. Overall, 73% of units had one or more immediate post-intervention single surface sample results exceeding the 1995 clearance values that were in effect at the time of the study. One-year post-intervention loadings remained significantly below pre-intervention levels for floors but not window sills or troughs. Visual assessments alone, without dust lead testing, did not ensure that prescribed treatments were completed or that dust lead loadings were below clearance values. PMID:17559831

  3. Lead in drinking water and human blood lead levels in the United States.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mary Jean; Margolis, Stephen

    2012-08-10

    Lead is a pervasive environmental contaminant. The adverse health effects of lead exposure in children and adults are well documented, and no safe blood lead threshold in children has been identified. Lead can be ingested from various sources, including lead paint and house dust contaminated by lead paint, as well as soil, drinking water, and food. The concentration of lead, total amount of lead consumed, and duration of lead exposure influence the severity of health effects. Because lead accumulates in the body, all sources of lead should be controlled or eliminated to prevent childhood lead poisoning. Beginning in the 1970s, lead concentrations in air, tap water, food, dust, and soil began to be substantially reduced, resulting in significantly reduced blood lead levels (BLLs) in children throughout the United States. However, children are still being exposed to lead, and many of these children live in housing built before the 1978 ban on lead-based residential paint. These homes might contain lead paint hazards, as well as drinking water service lines made from lead, lead solder, or plumbing materials that contain lead. Adequate corrosion control reduces the leaching of lead plumbing components or solder into drinking water. The majority of public water utilities are in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) of 1991. However, some children are still exposed to lead in drinking water. EPA is reviewing LCR, and additional changes to the rule are expected that will further protect public health. Childhood lead poisoning prevention programs should be made aware of the results of local public water system lead monitoring measurement under LCR and consider drinking water as a potential cause of increased BLLs, especially when other sources of lead exposure are not identified. PMID:22874873

  4. Lead intake and blood lead in two-year-old U.K. urban children.

    PubMed

    Davies, D J; Thornton, I; Watt, J M; Culbard, E B; Harvey, P G; Delves, H T; Sherlock, J C; Smart, G A; Thomas, J F; Quinn, M J

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive study of a group of 2-year-old urban children (n = 97), designed to provide quantitative information simultaneously for lead intakes via all identified pathways, has been carried out in Birmingham (U.K.). Results showed that for children whose blood levels and exposure to environmental lead were within the normal range for the U.K., blood lead concentration was significantly related to a combination of house dust lead loading and an overall rate of touching objects, to water lead concentration and to the parents' smoking habits. On the basis of assumptions used by the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution (RCEP), the estimated average total uptake of lead was 36 micrograms day-1; of this, 97% was from ingestion from dust, food and water and only 3% from inhalation. PMID:2305239

  5. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungroul Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2008-11-15

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure.

  6. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  7. Exposure to Beta-(1,3)-D-Glucan in House Dust at Age 7–10 Is Associated with Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Atopic Asthma by Age 11–14

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, Dharini; Zeng, Yiye; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Scott, James; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Becker, Allan B.; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mould exposure has been linked to childhood asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Few studies have assessed beta-(1,3)-d-glucan (beta-glucan), a significant fungal cell wall constituent, in relation to asthma in adolescence. Objective To determine whether house dust-derived beta-glucan exposure at age 7–10 is associated with the development and persistence of atopic and non-atopic asthma, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) by age 11–14. Methods Dust samples were collected from the 1995 Study of Asthma, Genes, and Environment (SAGE) birth cohort. This cohort was derived from Manitoba provincial healthcare administrative records of children high and low risk for asthma. Samples were collected from the homes of 422 children at age 7–10 and analyzed using beta-glucan and endotoxin-specific Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate assays. Asthma, atopy, and BHR status of each child were also assessed at ages 7–10 and 11–14. Results At age 7–10, beta-glucan dust levels in the home were associated with persistent atopic asthma at age 11–14 (OR 1.79 for each unit increase in levels, 95% CI 1.14–2.81), independent of endotoxin exposure, and Alternaria or Cladosporium sensitization. The likelihood of BHR almost doubled with unit increases in dust beta-glucan in asthmatic children. In children without asthma, exposure to high beta-glucan levels at age 7–10 also elevated risk for BHR in adolescence (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.05–2.89). New-onset atopic asthma was twice more likely following high beta-glucan exposure in children without asthma but the association did not reach statistical significance. No associations were evident with concurrent asthma phenotype at age 7–10 or non-atopic asthma at age 11–14. Conclusion These findings implicate home beta-glucan exposure at school-age as a risk factor for persistent atopic asthma and new-onset BHR. The higher prevalence of BHR in urban adolescents may be propagated by this home exposure. PMID:24905346

  8. Galaxy formation by dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, Goerge B.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known since the early 1940's that radiation can cause an instability in the interstellar medium. Absorbing dust particles in an isotropic radiation field shadow each other by a solid angle which is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two particles, leading to an inverse-square attractive force - mock gravity. The effect is largest in an optically thin medium. Recently Hogan and White (HW, hereafter) proposed that if the pre-galactic universe contained suitable sources of radiation and dust, instability in the dust distribution caused by mock gravity may have led to the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In their picture of a well-coupled dust-gas medium, HW show that mock gravity begins to dominate gravitational instability when the perturbation becomes optically thin, provided that the radiation field at the time is strong enough. The recent rocket observation of the microwave background at submillimeter wavelengths by Matsumoto et al. might be from pre-galactic stars, the consequence of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by dust, and infrared reemission which is subsequently redshifted. HW's analysis omits radiative drag, incomplete collisional coupling of gas and dust, finite dust albedo, and finite matter pressure. These effects could be important. In a preliminary calculation including them, the authors have confirmed that mock gravitational instability is effective if there is a strong ultraviolet radiation at the time, but any galaxies that form would be substantially enriched in heavy elements because the contraction of the dust is more rapid than that of the gas. Moreover, since the dust moves with supersonic velocity through the gas soon after the perturbation becomes optically thin, the sputtering of dust particles by gas is significant, so the dust could disappear before the instability develops significantly. They conclude that the mock gravity by dust is not important in galaxy formations.

  9. The effect of house dust mite sensitization on lung size and airway caliber in symptomatic and nonsymptomatic preadolescent children: a community-based study in Poland.

    PubMed Central

    Jedrychowski, Wieslaw; Maugeri, Umberto; Jedrychowska-Bianchi, Iwona; Mrz, Elzbieta

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports on the effects of atopy on lung function. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of house mite (HM) atopy on lung function in subsamples of 12-year-old symptomatic and nonsymptomatic preadolescent children taken from the community sample. An additional objective of this study was to identify possible environmental determinants of HM skin reaction. We obtained questionnaire data on respiratory symptoms and skin-prick tests and performed spirometry on a subsample of 311 children of a birth cohort of children who have been followed over 3 years. Multivariate regression analysis showed progressive decrement of lung function indices (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, and forced expiratory flow, midexpiratory phase) with increasing degree of HM atopy reflected by the skin reaction to HM allergens. The apparent association between the level of HM atopy and the lung function indices was highly significant in symptomatic individuals but insignificant in nonsymptomatic subjects. HM sensitization was significantly associated with mother's atopy. It occurred predominantly in boys and was related to the use of coal or gas for house heating. The effect of allergen sensitization on lung size and airway caliber confined to symptomatic subjects may reflect the inflammatory status of bronchial airways in the symptomatic subjects. PMID:12055047

  10. Friction and impact surfaces: are they lead-based paint hazards?

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry; Wilson, Jonathan; Galke, Warren

    2007-11-01

    Professionals who identify residential lead-based paint hazards and develop lead hazard control plans are instructed to assess painted friction and impact surfaces in homes as potentially active sources of dust lead, a known exposure vector for young children. However, empirical tests of the importance of these surfaces had not been conducted. Using data collected as part of a 1998 three-community study of the Housing and Urban Development Lead Risk Assessment protocols, this article explores how much rubbing or binding on friction and impact surfaces on windows and doors influence dust lead levels on windowsills and floors, while taking into account paint condition on these surfaces and other sources of lead. The analyses included windowsill dust wipe samples from 611 rooms in 182 homes and 782 floor dust wipe samples collected in 209 rooms from 104 homes. The study found that when the paint on windows is intact but the window is rubbing or binding, the dust lead levels on the windowsills are significantly higher than on windows with intact paint without rubbing or binding, after controlling for other lead sources. Windowsill dust lead on a window with intact lead-based paint at 1 mg/cm(2) and no rubbing/binding would be 27% lower than on a window with nonintact paint, rubbing/binding surfaces, or both of these conditions. An independent effect of rubbing/binding of doors on floor dust lead loadings was not observed. These findings support federal regulations calling for lead risk assessors to check the friction/impact surfaces at windows when dust lead samples taken below them are elevated, but these analyses did not offer support for taking extra observations of friction/impact surfaces around doors. PMID:17885913

  11. Lead poisoning among household members exposed to lead-acid battery repair shops in Kingston, Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Ostrowski, S; Burr, G; Jackson-Hunt, L; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-12-01

    To investigate the risk of lead poisoning among household members exposed to 'backyard' battery repair shops (BBRS) in Kingston, Jamaica, environmental and blood lead (PbB) were measured at 24 households (112 individuals) with a BBRS worker or located at a BBRS premises and at 18 neighbourhood control households (74 individuals). Elevated PbB (greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per decilitre [micrograms/dl]) was common among subjects of all ages living at BBRS premises, especially among children less than age 12, 43% of whom had PbB greater than 70 micrograms/dl. Potentially hazardous soil and house dust lead levels were also common at BBRS premises, where 84% of yards had soil lead levels above 500 parts per million (geometric mean 3388 parts per million [ppm] at BBRS premises households with a BBRS worker). Geometric mean blood and environmental lead levels were significantly lower at control households, where less than 10% of subjects in all age groups had elevated PbB (maximum 33 micrograms/dl). Sharing a premises with a BBRS was a stronger determinant of household blood lead and environmental contamination than was the presence of a BBRS worker in a household. Blood lead levels were associated with soil and house dust lead levels in all age groups. We conclude that small battery repair shops, which have also been described in other developing countries, create a high lead poisoning risk for nearby residents. PMID:2621024

  12. A coordinated relocation strategy for enhancing case management of lead poisoned children: outcomes and costs.

    PubMed

    McLaine, Pat; Shields, Wendy; Farfel, Mark; Chisolm, J Julian; Dixon, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    Controlling residential lead hazards is critical for case management of lead poisoned children. To attain this goal, permanent relocation of the family is sometimes necessary or advisable for many reasons, including poor housing conditions; extensive lead hazards; lack of abatement resources, landlord compliance and local enforcement capacity; and family eviction. During 1996-1998, the Kennedy Krieger Institute implemented a unique capitated program for case management of Baltimore City children with blood lead concentrations (PbB) >19 microg/dL. The Program provided financial, housing, and social work assistance to facilitate relocation as a means of providing safer housing. Nearly half of the Program families relocated with direct assistance, and 28% relocated on their own. The Program evaluation examined the costs and benefits of relocation. Average relocation cost per child was relatively inexpensive (<1,500 dollars). Average relocation time of 5 months (range <2 months to >12 months) was less than the 8-month average time to complete lead hazard control work in 14 city and state programs funded by U.S. HUD. Relocation was associated with (1) a statistically significant decrease in dust lead loadings on floors, windowsills and window troughs that persisted for one year, and (2) statistically significantly greater decreases in children's PbB compared to children who did not relocate from untreated homes. Children relocated to housing that met current Federal residential dust lead standards had statistically significant decreases in blood lead levels. Visual inspection did not consistently identify relocation houses with dust lead levels below current Federal standards, indicating that dust testing should be an essential component of future programs. This will require additional resources for dust testing and possibly cleaning and repairs but is expected to yield additional benefits for children. The findings support recent U.S. CDC case management recommendations suggesting that permanent relocation to safer housing is a viable means to reduce children's lead exposure. The benefits of relocation notwithstanding, 40% of families moved at least twice. Research is needed to better understand how to expedite relocation and encourage families to remain in safe housing. Relocation does not negate owners' and health authorities' responsibilities to address lead hazards in the child's original house in order to protect future occupants. PMID:16736359

  13. A Coordinated Relocation Strategy for Enhancing Case Management of Lead Poisoned Children: Outcomes and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Wendy; Farfel, Mark; Chisolm, J. Julian; Dixon, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    Controlling residential lead hazards is critical for case management of lead poisoned children. To attain this goal, permanent relocation of the family is sometimes necessary or advisable for many reasons, including poor housing conditions; extensive lead hazards; lack of abatement resources, landlord compliance and local enforcement capacity; and family eviction. During 19961998, the Kennedy Krieger Institute implemented a unique capitated program for case management of Baltimore City children with blood lead concentrations (PbB) >19?g/dL. The Program provided financial, housing, and social work assistance to facilitate relocation as a means of providing safer housing. Nearly half of the Program families relocated with direct assistance, and 28% relocated on their own. The Program evaluation examined the costs and benefits of relocation. Average relocation cost per child was relatively inexpensive (<$1,500). Average relocation time of 5 months (range <2 months to >12 months) was less than the 8-month average time to complete lead hazard control work in 14 city and state programs funded by U.S. HUD. Relocation was associated with (1) a statistically significant decrease in dust lead loadings on floors, windowsills and window troughs that persisted for one year, and (2) statistically significantly greater decreases in childrens PbB compared to children who did not relocate from untreated homes. Children relocated to housing that met current Federal residential dust lead standards had statistically significant decreases in blood lead levels. Visual inspection did not consistently identify relocation houses with dust lead levels below current Federal standards, indicating that dust testing should be an essential component of future programs. This will require additional resources for dust testing and possibly cleaning and repairs but is expected to yield additional benefits for children. The findings support recent U.S. CDC case management recommendations suggesting that permanent relocation to safer housing is a viable means to reduce childrens lead exposure. The benefits of relocation notwithstanding, 40% of families moved at least twice. Research is needed to better understand how to expedite relocation and encourage families to remain in safe housing. Relocation does not negate owners and health authorities' responsibilities to address lead hazards in the child's original house in order to protect future occupants. PMID:16736359

  14. Fatal pediatric lead poisoning--New Hamphshire, 2000.

    PubMed

    2001-06-01

    Fatal pediatric lead poisoning is rare in the United States because of multiple public health measures that have reduced blood lead levels (BLLs) in the population. However, the risk for elevated BLLs among children remains high in some neighborhoods and populations, including children living in older housing with deteriorated leaded paint. This report describes the investigation of the first reported death of a child from lead poisoning since 1990 (1). The investigation implicated leaded paint and dust in a home environment as the most likely source of the poisoning. Lead poisoning can be prevented by correcting lead hazards, especially in older housing, and by screening children at risk according to established guidelines (2). PMID:11414596

  15. Multiple metal contamination from house paints: consequences of power sanding and paint scraping in New Orleans.

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, H W; Powell, E T; Shah, A; Gonzales, C R; Mielke, P W

    2001-01-01

    Power sanding exterior paint is a common practice during repainting of old houses in New Orleans, Louisiana, that triggers lead poisoning and releases more than Pb. In this study we quantified the Pb, zinc, cadmium, manganese, nickel, copper, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium in exterior paint samples collected from New Orleans homes (n = 31). We used interior dust wipes to compare two exterior house-painting projects. House 1 was measured in response to the plight of a family after a paint contractor power sanded all exterior paint from the weatherboards. The Pb content (approximately 130,000 microg Pb/g) was first realized when the family pet died; the children were hospitalized, the family was displaced, and cleanup costs were high. To determine the quantity of dust generated by power sanding and the benefits of reducing Pb-contaminated dust, we tested a case study house (house 2) for Pb (approximately 90,000 microg/g) before the project was started; the house was then dry scraped and the paint chips were collected. Although the hazards of Pb-based paints are well known, there are other problems as well, because other toxic metals exist in old paints. If house 2 had been power sanded to bare wood like house 1, the repainting project would have released as dust about 7.4 kg Pb, 3.5 kg Zn, 9.7 g Cd, 14.8 g Cu, 8.8 g Mn, 1.5 g Ni, 5.4 g Co, 2.4 g Cr, and 0.3 g V. The total tolerable daily intake (TTDI) for a child under 6 years of age is 6 microg Pb from all sources. Converting 7.4 kg Pb to this scale is vexing--more than 1 billion (10(9)) times the TTDI. Also for perspective, the one-time release of 7.4 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust from sanding compares to 50 x 10(9) microg of Pb dust emitted annually per 0.1 mile (0.16 km) from street traffic during the peak use of leaded gasoline. In this paper, we broaden the discussion to include an array of metals in paint and underscore the need and possibilities for curtailing the release of metal dust. PMID:11673129

  16. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a particular concern because it can introduce lead dust into the home. water that flows through old lead pipes or faucets, if the pipes begin to break down food stored in bowls glazed or painted with lead, or imported from ...

  17. Dust control for draglines

    SciTech Connect

    Grad, P.

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

  18. Influence of nutrient intake on blood lead levels of young children at risk for lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Scherer, Roberta W; Sexton, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Although removal of lead paint hazards from at-risk houses remains the primary means of preventing elevated blood lead among young children, reduction of risk through nutritional factors has also been of interest. In this study we evaluated the effect of nutrient intake on blood lead levels by analyzing whether the intakes of certain dietary components a) were associated with blood lead levels independent of lead exposure or b) modified the effect of lead exposure on blood lead. Subjects were 205 children from low-income families who were approximately 1 year of age and living in old, urban houses. The data collected for each child included blood lead level, nutritional status, and amount of lead exposure, which was assessed from samples of household dust. Multiple linear regression analyses showed a statistically significant positive association between lead exposure and blood lead. Statistically significant positive associations were found between blood lead and total fat as well as blood lead and saturated fat, independent of lead exposure and age of the child. Regression modeling and stratified analysis showed that mean blood lead increased with increasing lead exposure as well as with increasing caloric intake, suggesting that caloric intake modifies the association between lead exposure and blood lead. The findings from this study, if replicated in other studies, support a dietary intervention to reduce the amount of total calories, total fat, and saturated fat among children 1 year of age at risk for lead exposure, while maintaining adequate intake of these dietary components. Our results also reinforce recommendations that removal of lead paint hazards from at-risk houses should be the primary means of preventing lead exposure. PMID:12460816

  19. Cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, Donald E.; Sandford, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    Dust is a ubiquitous component of our galaxy and the solar system. The collection and analysis of extraterrestrial dust particles is important to exobiology because it provides information about the sources of biogenically significant elements and compounds that accumulated in distant regions of the solar nebula and that were later accreted on the planets. The topics discussed include the following: general properties of interplanetary dust; the carbonaceous component of interplanetary dust particles; and the presence of an interstellar component.

  20. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE--ANALYSIS OF DUST AND SOIL FOR LEAD, CADMIUM, AND CHROMIUM (RTI/ACS-AP-209-120)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This protocol describes methodology and quality control measures used in the analysis of dust wipes, wet wipes, soil, and the rug/mat for metals. The samples were extracted with a 10% or greater concentration of ultra-pure nitric acid and diluted to a final concentration of 2% or...

  1. Lead intoxication in infancy.

    PubMed

    Shannon, M W; Graef, J W

    1992-01-01

    Four years of experience in the evaluation and management of lead intoxication in the first year of life were reviewed. This study was conducted in a lead referral program within the state of Massachusetts, whose comprehensive lead laws include extensive (and now mandatory) lead screening of all children. Over the period of study, 50 (14%) of 370 new patients enrolled in the program were infants aged 12 months or younger. Median age of these infants was 11 months (range 1 through 12 months). Mean peak lead level was 39.0 micrograms/dL while the mean peak erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentration was 111.9 micrograms/dL of whole blood. Thirty-two percent of infants were ambulatory at the time lead intoxication was diagnosed; only 24% had a history of pica. Twenty-six percent of parents were welfare dependent. Apparent sources of plumbism included house-hold renovation (n = 20), direct ingestion of paint chips (n = 10), formula preparation with lead-contaminated water (n = 9), lead dust importation (n = 1), and congenital exposure to elevated maternal lead level (n = 1). In 9 cases the source was not found. When this profile was compared with that of a randomly selected group of 47 children aged 18 through 30 months, who were seen in the lead program during the same interval, apparent sources of intoxication in the older group were paint chip ingestion (n = 41), household renovation (n = 2), and unknown (n = 4) (P less than .0001). On the basis of these data, it is concluded that lead intoxication in infants is common and has significantly different origins from that in toddlers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1728028

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR SIEVING AND DIVISION OF DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES (L05)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedure for sieving samples of house dust and soil. The procedure is applicable to house dust samples taken using the HVS3 dust sampler, and to soil samples. Keywords: dust; soil.

    The National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHE...

  3. Environmental Lead after Hurricane Katrina: Implications for Future Populations

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahed; Perry, Sara; Arroyave, Whitney; Rice, Janet C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As a result of Hurricane Katrina, > 100,000 homes were destroyed or damaged and a significant amount of sediment was deposited throughout the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. Researchers have identified the potential for increased lead hazards from environmental lead contamination of soils. Objectives: We assessed the distribution of residential soil and dust lead 2 years poststorm and compared soil lead before and after the storm. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in New Orleans in which households were selected by stratified random sampling. A standard residential questionnaire was administered, and lead testing was performed for both the interior and exterior of homes. Logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors of interior and exterior lead levels in excess of allowable levels. Results: One hundred nine households were enrolled; 61% had at least one lead measurement above federal standards. Of homes with bare soil, 47% had elevated lead and 27% had levels exceeding 1,200 ppm. Housing age was associated with soil lead, and housing age and soil lead were associated with interior lead. Race, income, and ownership status were not significantly associated with either interior or exterior lead levels. The median soil lead level of 560 ppm was significantly higher than the median level of samples collected before Hurricane Katrina. Conclusions: The high prevalence (61%) of lead above recommended levels in soil and dust samples in and around residences raises concern about potential health risks to the New Orleans population, most notably children. Steps should be taken to mitigate the risk of exposure to lead-contaminated soil and dust. Further research is needed to quantify the possible contribution of reconstruction activities to environmental lead levels. PMID:22052045

  4. Dust Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 May 2004 From time to time, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) catches--in action-an afternoon dust storm, dust devil, or other dust-raising event. The dust-raising event shown here, probably the result of a sudden strong gust of wind, occurred in November 2003 in a crater located near 57.5oS, 60.6oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left, so the dark area below the dust plume is its shadow. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  5. Lead exposure assessment from study near a lead-acid battery factory in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laiguo; Xu, Zhencheng; Liu, Ming; Huang, Yumei; Fan, Ruifang; Su, Yanhua; Hu, Guocheng; Peng, Xiaowu; Peng, Xiaochun

    2012-07-01

    The production of lead-acid battery in China covered about one-third of the world total output and there are more than 2000 lead-acid battery factories. They may cause the major environment lead pollution. Blood lead levels of several hundreds of residents were over 100 ?g/L due to the waste discharges from a lead-acid battery factory in Heyuan, Guangdong province. This study aimed to find out the environmental lead sources, the human lead exposure pathways, and the amplitudes from a lead-acid battery factory. The study results showed that lead levels in soil, dust, tree leaves and human blood declined with the distances increased from the production site. Twenty nine of 32 participants had blood lead levels of over 100 ?g/L with an exceptional high value of 639 ?g/L for one child. This result suggested that the lead-acid battery production from this factory has caused the elevated lead levels in its neighboring environment and residents. Dust intake was the dominant exposure pathway for humans (over 90%). The lead levels found in adult and toddler (6.19 and 50.1 ?g/kg/d, respectively) in the polluted area were far higher than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) of 25 ?g/kg body weight (translated into 3.5 ?g/kg/d), which was established by the joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee. Blood lead levels within the family members were strongly correlated with the house dust lead levels. Our results in this study suggested that further studies in this area should be performed to assess human exposure and relevant human health risks from living close to lead-acid battery factories. PMID:22578522

  6. Lunar Dust Mitigation Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Shawn; Holloway, Nancy

    With plans for the United States to return to the moon, and establish a sustainable human presence on the lunar surface many issues must be successfully overcome. Lunar dust is one of a number of issues with the potential to create a myriad of problems if not adequately addressed. Samples of dust brought back from Apollo missions show it to be soft, yet sharp and abrasive. The dust consists of a variety of morphologies including spherical, angular blocks, shards, and a number of irregular shapes. One of the main issues with lunar dust is its attraction to stick to anything it comes in contact with (i.e. astronauts, equipment, habitats, etc.). Ionized radiation from the sun strikes the moon's surface and creates an electrostatic charge on the dust. Further, the dust harbors van der Waals forces making it especially difficult to separate once it sticks to a surface. During the Apollo missions, it was discovered that trying to brush the lunar dust from spacesuits was not effective, and rubbing it caused degradation of the suit material. Further, when entering the lunar module after moonwalks, the astronauts noted that the dust was so prolific inside the cabin that they inhaled and ingested it, causing at least one of them, Harrison "Jack" Schmidt, to report irritation of the throat and lungs. It is speculated that the dust could also harm an astronaut's nervous and cardiovascular systems, especially during an extended stay. In addition to health issues, the dust can also cause problems by scouring reflective coatings off of thermal blankets, and roughening surfaces of windows and optics. Further, panels on solar cells and photovoltaics can also be compromised due to dust sticking on the surfaces. Lunar dust has the capacity to penetrate seals, interfere with connectors, as well as mechanisms on digging machines, all of which can lead to problems and failure. To address lunar dust issues, development of electrostatic screens to mitigate dust on sur-faces is currently being developed in a collaborative effort between Langley Research Center and Kennedy Space Center. The screens typically consist of spiral shaped conductive traces patterned on high dielectric substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, polyimide film, etc.). Two broad categories of substrate materials are being investigated for the screens. One category consists of transparent substrates (i.e. glass, quartz, sapphire, etc.), and the other non-transparent sub-strates (Kapton, polyimide films, metals, etc.). The transparent screens utilize patterns made from indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive material, on clear substrates while the non-transparent screens use copper patterns on a transluscent or opaque substrates. Further, the screen is coated with a high dielectric polyimide cover layer to protect the screen pattern. One promising cover layer material that is currently being investigated is Langley Research Center-Soluble Imide (LaRC-SI), a NASA LaRC developed polyimide. Lastly, a top-coat of hard, inorganic material is evaporated onto the cover layer for protection from scratches due to abrasive nature of the dust. Of note, several top-coat materials are under investigation and include: aluminum oxide, silicon dioxide, titanium oxide, yttrium oxide, zirconium oxide, and zinc sulfide. The electrostatic dust mitigation screens function when a high voltage (700V or greater) is applied to the screen electrodes, thus creating an electromagnetic wave across the surface of the screen that repels the dust. Lunar dust typically contains a high positive charge; therefore, the screens are charged with a higher positive charge that effectively repels dust from the surface (i.e. like charges repel, unlike charges attract). It is anticipated that full development and maturation of this technology will enable humans to sustain a long term presence on the moon, and other planets where dust may have negative implications.

  7. Multimedia exposures to arsenic and lead for children near an inactive mine tailings and smelter site.

    PubMed

    Loh, Miranda M; Sugeng, Anastasia; Lothrop, Nathan; Klimecki, Walter; Cox, Melissa; Wilkinson, Sarah T; Lu, Zhenqiang; Beamer, Paloma I

    2016-04-01

    Children living near contaminated mining waste areas may have high exposures to metals from the environment. This study investigates whether exposure to arsenic and lead is higher in children in a community near a legacy mine and smelter site in Arizona compared to children in other parts of the United States and the relationship of that exposure to the site. Arsenic and lead were measured in residential soil, house dust, tap water, urine, and toenail samples from 70 children in 34 households up to 7 miles from the site. Soil and house dust were sieved, digested, and analyzed via ICP-MS. Tap water and urine were analyzed without digestion, while toenails were washed, digested and analyzed. Blood lead was analyzed by an independent, certified laboratory. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between each environmental media and urine and toenails for arsenic and lead. Geometric mean arsenic (standard deviation) concentrations for each matrix were: 22.1 (2.59) ppm and 12.4 (2.27)ppm for soil and house dust (<63μm), 5.71 (6.55)ppb for tap water, 14.0 (2.01)μg/L for specific gravity-corrected total urinary arsenic, 0.543 (3.22)ppm for toenails. Soil and vacuumed dust lead concentrations were 16.9 (2.03)ppm and 21.6 (1.90) ppm. The majority of blood lead levels were below the limit of quantification. Arsenic and lead concentrations in soil and house dust decreased with distance from the site. Concentrations in soil, house dust, tap water, along with floor dust loading were significantly associated with toenail and urinary arsenic but not lead. Mixed models showed that soil and tap water best predicted urinary arsenic. In our study, despite being present in mine tailings at similar levels, internal lead exposure was not high, but arsenic exposure was of concern, particularly from soil and tap water. Naturally occurring sources may be an additional important contributor to exposures in certain legacy mining areas. PMID:26803211

  8. Photoelectric charging of dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2009-08-15

    Photoemission from the surface of a dust grain in vacuum is considered. It is shown that the cutoff in the energy spectrum of emitted electrons leads to the formation of a steady-state electron cloud. The equation describing the distribution of the electric potential in the vicinity of a dust grain is solved numerically. The dust grain charge is found as a function of the grain size.

  9. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  10. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  11. Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The birth of a solar system is enshrouded in gas and dust. A collapsing rotating cloud increases in density until a critical point is reached and a YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT begins its rapid accretion at the center, still surrounded by a disk of gas and dust (figure 1). As stars evolve through a T-Tauri phase, much of this primordial dust cloud is removed by strong stellar winds and radiation forces...

  12. Intergalactic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, A.

    2002-12-01

    We study the composition and sizes of intergalactic dust based on the expulsion of interstellar dust from the galactic disk. Interstellar grains in the Galactic disk are modelled as a mixture of amorphous silicate dust and carbonaceous dust consisting of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and larger graphitic grains (Li & Draine 2001) with size distributions like those of the Milky Way dust (Weingartner & Draine 2001). We model their dynamic evolution in terms of the collective effects caused by (1) radiative acceleration, (2) gravitational attraction, (3) gas drag, (4) thermal sputtering, and (5) Lorenz force from the galactic magnetic field (Ferrara et al. 1991). Radiation pressure from the stellar disk exerts an upward force on dust grains and may ultimately expel them out of the entire galaxy. Gravitational force from the stellar, dust and gas disk as well as the dark matter halo exerts a downward force. Thermal sputtering erodes all grains to some degree but more efficiently destroys small grains. This, together with the fact that (1) very small grains (with small radiation pressure efficiencies) are not well coupled to starlight; (2) for large grains the radiative force to the gravitational force is approximately inversely proportional to grain size, acts as a size ``filter'' for dust leaking into the intergalactic space. Since the radiation pressure efficiency and the grain destruction rate are sensitive to dust composition, the relative importance of carbon dust compared to silicate dust expelled into the intergalactic space differs from that in the galactic plane. We derive the size distributions of both silicate and carbonaceous dust finally getting into the intergalactic space and obtain an intergalactic extinction curve. The predicted intergalactic infrared emission spectrum is calculated. References: Ferrara, A., Ferrini, F., Franco, J., & Barsella, B. 1991, ApJ, 381, 137 Li, A., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 554, 778 Weingartner, J.C., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 548, 296

  13. Implications of different residential lead standards on children's blood lead levels in France: predictions based on a national cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Oulhote, Youssef; LeTertre, Alain; Etchevers, Anne; Le Bot, Barbara; Lucas, Jean-Paul; Mandin, Corinne; Le Strat, Yann; Lanphear, Bruce; Glorennec, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Despite the dramatic reductions in children's blood lead levels (BLLs), there is considerable evidence that low-level lead exposure is associated with intellectual deficits and behavioral problems, without apparent threshold. There are limited data, however, about the contribution of residential sources of lead to contemporary children's blood lead levels. The aim of this study is to calculate the contributions of residential sources of lead to assess the potential impact of setting new standards for lead levels in residential dust, soil and water. We enrolled 484 French children aged from 6 months to 6 years, and collected data on social, housing and individual characteristics. Lead concentrations in blood and environmental samples (water, soils, and dusts) were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Data were analyzed using a multivariate generalized additive model accounting for the sampling design and the sampling weights. We found that exceedingly low concentrations of lead in dust, soil and water were significant predictors of children's BLLs, after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Lead-contaminated floor dust was the main source of lead in blood. BLLs (GM: 14?g/L) increased by 65%, 13%, 25%, and 5% when lead content in floor dust, loose soil, hard soil and water increased from their 25th percentile to their 95th percentile, respectively. We also observed that the steepest increase in BLLs occurred at the lowest levels of lead-contaminated floor dust, which indicates that lead contamination should be kept as low as possible. Impact of different possible standards on children's BLLs was also tabulated and indicated that unless standards are set low, they will only benefit a small proportion of children who have the highest exposures. PMID:23528234

  14. An evaluation of the effectiveness of lead paint hazard reduction when conducted by homeowners and landlords

    SciTech Connect

    Etre, L.A.; Reynolds, S.J.; Burmeister, L.F.; Whitten, P.S.; Gergely, R.

    1999-08-01

    This research project was conducted in collaboration with the Iowa Department of Public Health to evaluate whether property owners who follow recommended procedures for lead-based paint removal/repair can do the work safely and effectively. This study included 29 homes where a lead-based paint hazard had been identified and lead-based paint was removed or repaired (hazard reduction). Exposure evaluation included pre-project surface dust wipe sampling, air monitoring during lead-based paint removal, post-project surface dust wipe sampling, and pre- and post-project blood samples from adult study participants. The comparison of surface dust wipe samples taken before and after lead paint hazard reduction was used to evaluate the effectiveness of lead paint hazard reduction. The lead loadings on window sill surfaces in the work area were significantly lower after completion of the project, and the lead-based paint removal did not contaminate the adjoining living area. The proportion of homes with surface dust lead loading exceeding Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance standard was 73% pre-project and 38% post-project. Personal airborne exposures during lead removal activities reinforce the need to respiratory protection and good hygiene. There was no difference in adult pre-/post-blood levels, indicating that participants die remove lead in a safe manner with respect to their own exposures. The results indicate that hazard reduction can be done effectively when recommended procedures for the removal of lead-based paint are followed.

  15. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title: Massive Dust Storm over Australia View ... winds and dry conditions caused a massive blanket of dust from Australia's Outback to spread eastward across Queensland and New ... data were obtained from the NASA Langley Research Center Atmospheric Science Data Center in Hampton, VA. Image credit: ...

  16. Andromeda's dust

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  17. Andromeda's Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ? 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M d = 5.4 107 M ?, the global dust/H mass ratio is M d/M H = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is langq PAHrang = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ? 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M d/M H ? 0.026 at the center to ~0.0027 at R ? 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ~10, from Z/Z ? ? 3 at R = 0 to ~0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter langUrang peaks at the center, with langUrang ? 35, declining to langUrang ? 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q PAH ? 0.045 at R ? 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q PAH for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q PAH in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 ?m emission at R ? 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with ? ? 2.3 between 200 and 600 ?m) than in the model.

  18. Dust control

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, B.R.; Roe, W.J.

    1983-11-29

    Dust is controlled on roads, in mines, on mineral and tailings piles, surfaces of pulverized coal and mineral piles contained within open transit cars such as coal cars or trucks, and other surfaces containing coal particles, rock dust, clay, soil particles and other finely divided particles subject to dusting by applying thereto a dust inhibiting amount of a liquid dispersion of watery consistency of highly branched water swellable polymer of acrylamide or an acrylamide-acrylic acid copolymer, branched and/or cross-linked with a multifunctional unsaturated monomer containing more than one ethylenically unsaturated group, said cross-linked polyer or copolymer having a three-dimensional structure and being in the form of microgelatinous particles having a particle size not exceeding approximately one micron in an oil containing emulsion form, and having the properties of swelling dramatically in water and binding dust particles upon adsorption from solution.

  19. Particulate emission abatement for Krakow boiler houses

    SciTech Connect

    Wysk, R.

    1995-12-31

    Among the many strategies for improving air quality in Krakow, one possible method is to adapt new and improved emission control technology. This project focuses on such a strategy. In order to reduce dust emissions from coal-fueled boilers, a new device called a Core Separator has been introduced in several boiler house applications. This advanced technology has been successfully demonstrated in Poland and several commercial units are now in operation. Particulate emissions from the Core Separator are typically 3 to 5 times lower than those from the best cyclone collectors. It can easily meet the new standard for dust emissions which will be in effect in Poland after 1997. The Core Separator is a completely inertial collector and is based on a unique recirculation method. It can effectively remove dust particles below 10 microns in diameter, the so-called PM-10 emissions. Its performance approaches that of fabric filters, but without the attendant cost and maintenance. It is well-suited to the industrial size boilers located in Krakow. Core Separators are now being marketed and sold by EcoInstal, one of the leading environmental firms in Poland, through a cooperative agreement with LSR Technologies.

  20. Aeolian Dust and Dust Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognon, Pierre

    In Earth science history, numerous subjects, such as pollen and freshwater diatoms have been studied from first a geological point of view, then in relation to the presentday environment. This is the case for dust; loess deposit studies began as far back as 1880 and included many international publications on the subject, but scientific works concerning the eolian dust only started toward the middle of the 20th century. Nevertheless, investigators of eolian dust have made great strides, as it is pointed out in the interesting book by Kenneth Pye, which puts together the present studies on dust and its history since the Quaternary and Cenozoic epochs. In addition to loess, the studies also cover the contribution of dust to deep-ocean sediments, ice, and soils.

  1. Streptomycetes in house dust: associations with housing characteristics and endotoxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to mold, indoor bioaerosols also contain bacterial components that may have implications for human health. Endotoxin is a cell wall component in Gram-negative bacteria present at varying levels indoors that has been found to have respiratory health implications. Stre...

  2. Blood lead levels in children and environmental lead contamination in Miami inner city, Florida.

    PubMed

    Gasana, Janvier; Hlaing, WayWay M; Siegel, Kristy A; Chamorro, Armando; Niyonsenga, Theophile

    2006-09-01

    Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL) as low as 10 microg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 microg/dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 microg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05). However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami. PMID:16968968

  3. PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK FACTORS SIGNIFICANTLY ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAI CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya; Kavinum, Suporn; Papwijitsil, Ratchadaporn; Tontiwattanasap, Worawit; Khunyotying, Wanlee; Umpan, Jiraporn; BoonthuM, Ratchaneekorn; Kaewnate, Yingyot; Boonmee, Sasis; Thongchub, Winai; Rodsung, Thassanee

    2014-11-01

    A community-based study was conducted to determine personal risk factors and environmental sources of lead exposure for elevated blood lead levels (? 10 g/dl, EBLLs) among rural children living at the Thailand-Myanmar border in Tak Province, northwestern Thailand. Six hundred ninety-five children aged 1-14 years old were screened for BLLs. Environmental specimens for lead measurements included samples of water from the streams, taps, and household containers, house floor dust, and foods. Possible lead release from the cooking ware was determined using the leaching method with acetic acid. The overall prevalence of EBLLs was 47.1% and the geometric mean level of blood lead was 9.16 g/dl. Personal risk factors significantly associated with EBLLs included being male, younger age, anemia, and low weight-for-age. Significant environmental risk factors were exposure to a lead-acid battery of solar energy system and use of a non-certified metal cooking pot. Some families whose children had high BLLs reported production of lead bullets from the used batteries at home. About one-third of the house dust samples taken near batteries contained lead content above the recommended value, compared with none of those taken from other areas and from the houses with no batteries. The metal pots were safe for cooking rice but might be unsafe for acidic food preparation. Both nutritional intervention and lead exposure prevention programs are essential to reduce EBLLs in this population. PMID:26466436

  4. Ceiling (attic) dust: a "museum" of contamination and potential hazard.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jeffrey J; Gulson, Brian L

    2005-10-01

    Ceiling or attic dusts provide an indirect measure of air pollution integrated over varying time periods. We undertook an investigation into the particle-size distributions and sources and exposure pathways of metals in ceiling dusts from 38 houses in the city of Sydney, Australia. The houses ranged in age from 4 to 106 years and were grouped into three settings: industrial, semi-industrial, and non-industrial. The main roof types were terracotta tile (n=23), cement tile (n=8), and corrugated iron (n=4), with two slate and one asbestos. Soils and rocks from the Sydney area were also analyzed to provide "background" values and allow the estimation of enrichment factors. The bulk of the dusts contained particles derived from soil of crustal origin and organic plant material, with an anthropogenic component estimated at up to 25%. Particle sizes from selected dust samples showed a bimodal distribution, and the volumes of fine dusts were 50% <63 microm, 30%<38 microm, and 7%<10 microm; the highest metal concentrations were in the finest fractions. The geometric mean concentrations of important anthropogenic-derived metals from the industrial setting were 17294 microg/g Zn, 1660 microg/g Pb, 111 microg/g Cr, 261 microg/g Cu, and 26 microg/g As. The metals Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn were consistently higher in the industrial settings than in the other settings. Median regression analyses showed that there were significant differences in the urban setting for the metals Cd, Co, Ni, Pb, and Zn. Enrichment factors for metals in the dust from the industrial site houses compared with background soils and rocks from the Sydney area were As, x 5; Cr, x2; Co, x3; Cu, x 12; Pb, x10; Sb, x 26; and Zn, 596. For the three roof types of terracotta tile, cement, and iron, median regression analyses showed that there were no significant effects with respect to age. Median regression analyses for terracotta tile, cement tile, and corrugated iron roofs showed a "roof" effect for Cu and V. Significant correlations (P0.03) were observed between most of the metals As-Cd-Cu-Pb-Sb-Zn, especially from the industrial settings. Pathways of dust exposure in this study are classified as being passive or active based upon the probable route of dust infiltration. Ceiling dusts pose a probable health hazard if the dust is disturbed and allowed to plume within the living areas of a dwelling, thereby exposing the occupants, especially children, to elevated levels of metals and fine particulates. Modeling shows that exposure to the elevated levels of Pb in dust could give rise to blood lead concentrations exceeding current guidelines for the industrial and semi-industrial areas. PMID:16194668

  5. Size-resolved dust and aerosol contaminants associated with copper and lead smelting emissions: implications for emission management and human health.

    PubMed

    Csavina, Janae; Taylor, Mark P; Félix, Omar; Rine, Kyle P; Eduardo Sáez, A; Betterton, Eric A

    2014-09-15

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (<1 μm) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (<1 μm) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emission management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. PMID:24995641

  6. Size-Resolved Dust and Aerosol Contaminants Associated with Copper and Lead Smelting Emissions: Implications for Emissions Management and Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Csavina, Janae; Taylor, Mark P.; Félix, Omar; Rine, Kyle P.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations, including crushing, grinding, smelting, refining, and tailings management, are a significant source of airborne metal and metalloid contaminants such as As, Pb and other potentially toxic elements. In this work, we show that size-resolved concentrations of As and Pb generally follow a bimodal distribution with the majority of contaminants in the fine size fraction (< 1 μm) around mining activities that include smelting operations at various sites in Australia and Arizona. This evidence suggests that contaminated fine particles (< 1 μm) are the result of vapor condensation and coagulation from smelting operations while coarse particles are most likely the result of windblown dust from contaminated mine tailings and fugitive emissions from crushing and grinding activities. These results on the size distribution of contaminants around mining operations are reported to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of this phenomenon so that more effective emissions management and practices that minimize health risks associated with metal extraction and processing can be developed. PMID:24995641

  7. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-08-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  8. Lead poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, P J; Todd, A C

    1994-01-01

    Lead poisoning is the most common disease of environmental origin in the United States today. Adult lead poisoning results primarily from exposure by inhalation in the workplace. Pediatric lead poisoning results principally from the ingestion of lead from environmental media, including paint chips, dust, soil, drinking water, ceramics, and medications. Lead is toxic to many organ systems, among them developing erythrocytes, the kidneys, and the nervous system. Lead-induced toxicity to the central nervous system causes delayed development, diminished intelligence, and altered behavior. In young children, this effect has been demonstrated convincingly to occur at blood lead levels between 10 and 20 micrograms per dl. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended that a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dl or higher be considered evidence of increased lead absorption, and the National Academy of Sciences has concurred in that recommendation. Unresolved issues in need of further study include the frequency of screening young children for lead, the question of whether women should be offered screening for lead before conceiving a pregnancy, the role of x-ray fluorescence analysis in assessing lead in bone, and the appropriate legislative response of the United States government to lead-based paint abatement. PMID:7941534

  9. Lead isotopes as a supplementary tool in the routine evaluation of household lead hazards.

    PubMed

    Gwiazda, R H; Smith, D R

    2000-11-01

    The advent of magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows rapid, accurate, and precise measurement of lead isotopes in environmental and biological samples at a lower cost than traditional methods. This may increase the feasibility of including lead isotope measurements as a routine tool to identify household sources of lead exposure to children. Here, we present three household case studies to illustrate how lead hazard evaluations by an environmental specialist could be supplemented with routine lead isotope analyses of potential lead sources and blood. Sampling for lead isotopes was undertaken following the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulatory guidelines for the evaluation of lead hazards in housing, and with the consideration of minimizing the additional costs associated with lead isotope measurements. The range of isotopic ratios within a single residence was large enough to allow the characterization of different lead sources, particularly when both major (e.g., (207)Pb/(206)Pb) and minor (e.g., (206)Pb/(204)Pb) isotope ratios were considered. These cases illustrate the utility of the lead isotope method to identify main source(s) of lead exposure to the child; discard unlikely sources of exposure to the child; point to sources of lead to dust; and substantiate or refine the environmental assessment based exclusively on lead concentrations and loadings. Thus, a more effective evaluation of household lead hazards would likely benefit from considering a) lead concentrations and loadings in and around the household environment; b) all isotopic ratios of potential lead sources within that environment; and c) information about behavioral habits, as well as an evaluation of viable pathways of exposure to the child. PMID:11102302

  10. Lead isotopes as a supplementary tool in the routine evaluation of household lead hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Gwiazda, R H; Smith, D R

    2000-01-01

    The advent of magnetic sector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows rapid, accurate, and precise measurement of lead isotopes in environmental and biological samples at a lower cost than traditional methods. This may increase the feasibility of including lead isotope measurements as a routine tool to identify household sources of lead exposure to children. Here, we present three household case studies to illustrate how lead hazard evaluations by an environmental specialist could be supplemented with routine lead isotope analyses of potential lead sources and blood. Sampling for lead isotopes was undertaken following the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulatory guidelines for the evaluation of lead hazards in housing, and with the consideration of minimizing the additional costs associated with lead isotope measurements. The range of isotopic ratios within a single residence was large enough to allow the characterization of different lead sources, particularly when both major (e.g., (207)Pb/(206)Pb) and minor (e.g., (206)Pb/(204)Pb) isotope ratios were considered. These cases illustrate the utility of the lead isotope method to identify main source(s) of lead exposure to the child; discard unlikely sources of exposure to the child; point to sources of lead to dust; and substantiate or refine the environmental assessment based exclusively on lead concentrations and loadings. Thus, a more effective evaluation of household lead hazards would likely benefit from considering a) lead concentrations and loadings in and around the household environment; b) all isotopic ratios of potential lead sources within that environment; and c) information about behavioral habits, as well as an evaluation of viable pathways of exposure to the child. PMID:11102302

  11. Historic Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Reviews some of the efforts of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (SPNEA) to preserve, conserve, and interpret historic houses to the public. Examines the history and some of the specific preservation problems concerning the Beauport Cottage, the Sayward-Wheeler House, and the Gropius House. (MJP)

  12. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 m) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 1710-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use of the CLOUDY code, we have showed that a high-density gas region can effectively stop most of the UV flux from the white dwarf and provide the observed dust shielding.

  13. Dust-Tolerant Intelligent Electrical Connection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Mark; Dokos, Adam; Perotti, Jose; Calle, Carlos; Mueller, Robert; Bastin, Gary; Carlson, Jeffrey; Townsend, Ivan, III; Immer, Chirstopher; Medelius, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Faults in wiring systems are a serious concern for the aerospace and aeronautic (commercial, military, and civilian) industries. Circuit failures and vehicle accidents have occurred and have been attributed to faulty wiring created by open and/or short circuits. Often, such circuit failures occur due to vibration during vehicle launch or operation. Therefore, developing non-intrusive fault-tolerant techniques is necessary to detect circuit faults and automatically route signals through alternate recovery paths while the vehicle or lunar surface systems equipment is in operation. Electrical connector concepts combining dust mitigation strategies and cable diagnostic technologies have significant application for lunar and Martian surface systems, as well as for dusty terrestrial applications. The dust-tolerant intelligent electrical connection system has several novel concepts and unique features. It combines intelligent cable diagnostics (health monitoring) and automatic circuit routing capabilities into a dust-tolerant electrical umbilical. It retrofits a clamshell protective dust cover to an existing connector for reduced gravity operation, and features a universal connector housing with three styles of dust protection: inverted cap, rotating cap, and clamshell. It uses a self-healing membrane as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required, while also combining lotus leaf technology for applications where a dust-resistant coating providing low surface tension is needed to mitigate Van der Waals forces, thereby disallowing dust particle adhesion to connector surfaces. It also permits using a ruggedized iris mechanism with an embedded electrodynamic dust shield as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required.

  14. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Doma?ska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mo?ocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis. PMID:8231799

  15. Housing and child health.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Michael; Baten, Ahmareen; Rosenthal, David G; Hoshino, Risa; Tohn, Ellen; Jacobs, David E

    2013-09-01

    The connection between housing and health is well established. Physical, chemical, and biological aspects of the child's home, such as cleanliness, moisture, pests, noise, accessibility, injury risks, and other forms of housing environmental quality, all have the potential to influence multiple aspects of the health and development of children. Basic sanitation, reduced household crowding, other improvements in housing and expanded, and improved housing regulations have led to advances in children's health. For example, lead poisoning prevention policies have profoundly reduced childhood lead exposure in the United States. This and many other successes highlight the health benefits for families, particularly children, by targeting interventions that reduce or eliminate harmful exposures in the home. Additionally, parental mental health problems, food insecurity, domestic violence, and the presence of guns in children's homes all are largely experienced by children in their homes, which are not as yet considered part of the Healthy Homes agenda. There is a large movement and now a regulatory structure being put in place for healthy housing, which is becoming closely wedded with environmental health, public health, and the practice of pediatrics. The importance of homes in children's lives, history of healthy homes, asthma, and exposures to lead, carbon monoxide, secondhand/thirdhand smoke, radon, allergy triggers is discussed, as well as how changes in ambient temperature, increased humidity, poor ventilation, water quality, infectious diseases, housing structure, guns, electronic media, family structure, and domestic violence all affect children's health. PMID:23953987

  16. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    MedlinePLUS

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  17. Addressing Lead-Based Paint Hazards During Renovation, Remodeling, and Rehabilitation in Federally Owned and Assisted Housing. Student Manual for Use in HUD-Sponsored Lead-Safe Work Practices Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Housing and Urban Development, Washington, DC.

    This student manual comprises the United States Environmental Protection Agency's model renovation training course designed for renovation, remodeling, and painting contractors. It provides information regarding the containment, minimization, and cleanup of lead hazards during activities that disturb lead painted surfaces. Introductory material…

  18. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  19. Determination of numbers of lead-exposed American children as a function of lead source: Integrated summary of a report to the US Congress on childhood lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mushak, P.; Crocetti, A.F. )

    1989-12-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Congress (Section 118(f), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA)) directed the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to provide to it a quantitative assessment of the contributions of various sources of lead to childhood exposure. We provided both a quantitative response to the mandate and a critique of low-level lead sources for U.S. population segments. We also present here an integrated assessment of major and low-level lead sources. Significant sources of lead in childhood exposure include lead in paint, dust, soil, and drinking water. Approximately 6 million U.S. children less than 7 years old reside in the oldest housing, with highest exposure risk due to leaded paint. About 2 million in deteriorated units are at particularly high risk for exposure with ca. 1.2 million children in oldest, deteriorated housing estimated to have blood lead (PbB) levels above 15 micrograms/dl. Soil and dust lead are potential sources of exposure for 6-12 million children. Residential tap water lead is a measurable source for ca. 3.8 million children, of whom the U.S. EPA estimates ca. 240,000 have water-specific exposures at toxic levels. Leaded gasoline combustion mainly in past years has produced, and will continue to produce into the 1990s, significant numbers of exposed children with toxicologically elevated PbBs. For 1990, 1.25 million children will have their PbBs fall below 15 micrograms/dl. Food lead can cause significant exposure in certain cases.36 references.

  20. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    ... shift in the position of the clouds is due to geometric parallax between the nine view angles (rather than true motion), whereas the ... meters per second. Note that there is much less geometric parallax for the cloud shadows owing to the relatively low altitude of the dust ...

  1. 40 CFR 63.545 - Standards for fugitive dust sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for fugitive dust sources. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Secondary Lead Smelting § 63.545 Standards for fugitive dust... in place to control fugitive dust emission sources within the areas of the secondary lead...

  2. Litter use by laying hens in a commercial aviary: dust bathing and piling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L M; Makagon, M M; Swanson, J C; Siegford, J M

    2016-01-01

    The laying hen industry, including in the United States, is responding to social concerns about hen welfare by implementing alternative housing systems such as the aviary, to provide more space and resources to large groups of hens. Data detailing the behavior of hens in commercial aviaries is needed to determine hens' use of the resources in order to understand their impact on hen welfare. The open litter area of aviaries provides additional space for hens during the day. Litter is also a substrate for dust bathing which is a strongly motivated natural behavior. Hens are often synchronous in their performance of dust bathing, which may lead to overcrowding in the litter area. Additionally, the open litter area can facilitate expression of unusual behavior such as flock piling (defined as the occurrence of densely grouped clusters of hens, resulting from no obvious cause and occurring randomly throughout the day and flock cycle) which may be a welfare concern. Therefore, we conducted observations of hen occupancy of the open litter area and the performance of dust bathing and flock piling across 3 production points (peak lay, mid lay and end of lay) for two flocks of Lohmann White laying hens housed in a commercial aviary. All areas of the open litter area were occupied to the same degree. Hens performed dust bathing throughout the day but showed peak dust bathing activity in the afternoon for Flock 1 (all P < 0.001) and in the late morning for Flock 2 (all P < 0.001). Overall, 174 incidents of piling behavior were observed between the 2 flocks, with piles varying in size, duration, and time of occurrence; however, no smothering was detected. Crowding on the open litter area sometimes occurred during peak periods of synchronous dust bathing and when hens piled. Further research is needed to understand the welfare implications of individual hen use of the open litter area and the causes and welfare implications of hen piling. PMID:26354762

  3. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D L; West, W P; Groth, M; Yu, J H; Boedo, J A; Bray, B D; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Hollmann, E M; Hyatt, A W; Krasheninnikov, S I; Lasnier, C J; Moyer, R A; Pigarov, A Y; Smirnov, R; Solomon, W M; Wong, C C

    2008-04-15

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  4. Dust Studies in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D. L.; Yu, J. H.; Boedo, J. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Moyer, R. A.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Smirnov, R.; West, W. P.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Hyatt, A. W.; Wong, C. P. C.; Groth, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Solomon, W. M.

    2008-09-07

    Studies of submicron dust using Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers and video data of micron to sub-millimeter sized dust on DIII-D tokamak have provided the first data of dust sources and transport during tokamak discharges. During normal operation on DIII-D dust observation rates are low, a few events per discharge or less. The net carbon content of the dust corresponds to a carbon atom density a few orders of magnitude below the core impurity density. Statistical analysis of Mie data collected over months of operation reveal correlation of increased dust rate with increased heating power and impulsive wall loading due to edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions. Generation of significant amounts of dust by disruptions is confirmed by the camera data. However, dust production by disruptions alone is insufficient to account for estimated in-vessel dust inventory in DIII-D. After an extended entry vent, thousands of dust particles are observed by cameras in the first 2-3 plasma discharges. Individual particles moving at velocities up to {approx}300 m/s, breakup of larger particles into pieces, and collisions of particles with walls are observed. After {approx}70 discharges, dust levels are reduced to a few events per discharge. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark modeling, milligram amounts of micron-sized carbon dust have been injected into DIII-D discharges, leading to the core carbon density increase by a factor of 2-3. Following injection, dust trajectories in the divertor are mostly in the toroidal direction, consistent with the ion drag force. Dust from the injection is observed in the outboard midplane by a fast framing camera. The observed trajectories and velocities of the dust particles are in qualitative agreement with modeling by the 3D DustT code.

  5. Effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation on dust acoustic waves: generation of dust acoustic shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M R; Sarkar, S; Ghosh, S; Debnath, M; Khan, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation arising due to small nonzero values of tau(ch)/tau(d) has been studied where tau(ch) and tau(d) are the dust charging and dust hydrodynamical time scales on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves. Analytical investigation shows that the propagation of a small amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation. Notwithstanding the soliton decay, the "soliton mass" is conserved, but the dissipative term leads to the development of a noise tail. Nonadiabaticity generated dissipative effect causes the generation of a dust acoustic shock wave having oscillatory behavior on the downstream side. Numerical investigations reveal that the propagation of a large amplitude dust acoustic shock wave with dust density enhancement may occur only for Mach numbers lying between a minimum and a maximum value whose dependence on the dusty plasma parameters is presented. PMID:11308955

  6. Comet Gas and Dust Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul A.; Lee, Seungwon

    2010-01-01

    This software models the gas and dust dynamics of comet coma (the head region of a comet) in order to support the Microwave Instrument for Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO) project. MIRO will study the evolution of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's coma system. The instrument will measure surface temperature, gas-production rates and relative abundances, and velocity and excitation temperatures of each species along with their spatial temporal variability. This software will use these measurements to improve the understanding of coma dynamics. The modeling tool solves the equation of motion of a dust particle, the energy balance equation of the dust particle, the continuity equation for the dust and gas flow, and the dust and gas mixture energy equation. By solving these equations numerically, the software calculates the temperature and velocity of gas and dust as a function of time for a given initial gas and dust production rate, and a dust characteristic parameter that measures the ability of a dust particle to adjust its velocity to the local gas velocity. The software is written in a modular manner, thereby allowing the addition of more dynamics equations as needed. All of the numerical algorithms are added in-house and no third-party libraries are used.

  7. Potential for atmospheric-driven lead paint degradation in the South Coast Air Basin of California.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Alexander J; Edwards, Rufus D; Kleinman, Michael T; Dabdub, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to lead in paint or lead residues in house dust and soil is one of the leading environmental risks to the health of children in the United States. Components of photochemical smog can increase the degradation of binders in lead paint, leading to increased release of lead pigment granules to hands in surface contact or for deposition in house dust and soil. This study uses photochemical air quality modeling to map areas susceptible to increased lead paint degradation as a result of photochemical atmospheric pollutants to prioritize areas of concern. Typical air quality episodes in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) are modeled for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Results indicate that large areas of the SoCAB were susceptible to atmospheric-driven accelerated lead paint degradation. Inner city urban areas from central Los Angeles to Azusa and most of Orange County had the highest susceptibility to accelerated lead paint degradation, followed by inland locations near the San Bernardino Mountains. This study identifies photochemical oxidant gases as contributors to greater lead release from indoor painted surfaces in urban areas. PMID:19943661

  8. Impact of a More Stringent Blood Lead Level Recommendation for Children (Ages 1-5): Vulnerabilities Related to Housing, Food Security, Vitamins, and Environmental Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse health effects of lead (Pb) exposure in young children are well known. Non-Hispanic black children historically have higher blood Pb levels (BLL) compared to Mexican-Americans and non- Hispanic white children (CDC-MMWR). In the past, BLL tests below 10 µg/dL m...

  9. Impact of a More Stringent Blood Lead Level Recommendation for Children (Ages 1-5): Vulnerabilities Related to Housing, Food Security, Vitamins, and Environmental Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse health effects of lead (Pb) exposure in young children are well known. Non-Hispanic black children historically have higher blood Pb levels (BLL) compared to Mexican-Americans and non- Hispanic white children (CDC-MMWR). In the past, BLL tests below 10 g/dL m...

  10. A multivariate linear regression model for predicting children's blood lead levels based on soil lead levels: A study at four Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.D.; Sarasua, S.; Jones, P.A. . Div. of Health Studies)

    1999-07-01

    For the purpose of examining the association between blood lead levels and household-specific soil lead levels, the authors used a multivariate linear regression model to find a slope factor relating soil lead levels to blood lead levels. They used previously collected data from the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's (ATSDR's) multisite lead and cadmium study. The data included in the blood lead measurements of 1,015 children aged 6--71 months, and corresponding household-specific environmental samples. The environmental samples included lead in soil, house dust, interior paint, and tap water. After adjusting for income, education or the parents, presence of a smoker in the household, sex, and dust lead, and using a double log transformation, they found a slope factor of 0.1388 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09--0.19 for the dose-response relationship between the natural log of the soil lead level and the natural log of the blood lead level. The predicted blood lead level corresponding to a soil lead level of 500 mg/kg was 5.99 [micro]g/kg with a 95% prediction interval of 2.08--17.29. Predicted values and their corresponding prediction intervals varied by covariate level. The model shows that increased soil lead level is associated with elevated blood leads in children, but that predictions based on this regression model are subject to high levels of uncertainty and variability.

  11. Dust cyclone technology for gins A literature review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust cyclone research leading to more efficient designs has helped the cotton ginning industry to comply with increasingly stringent air quality regulations governing fine particulate emissions. Future changes in regulations may require additional improvements in dust cyclone efficacy. This inter-...

  12. Rental Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Retired Persons, Washington, DC. Consumer Housing Information Service for Seniors.

    This is one of a series of booklets prepared as a resource for trained Housing Information Volunteers to provide impartial information to older people who have questions of concern about how to find safe, comfortable, affordable housing; how to cut household expenses or use their homes to earn extra income; home maintenance and home improvement;

  13. Halfway Houses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Harry E.; And Others

    This program model focuses on adult residential inmate aftercare programs. Critical issues in halfway house operations, a model for evaluation, and innovative variations are discussed. The facilities discussed include public and private halfway houses that provide residential services to adult offenders as a transitional step between their release

  14. Clay Houses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  15. Environmental Health Disparities in Housing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The physical infrastructure and housing make human interaction possible and provide shelter. How well that infrastructure performs and which groups it serves have important implications for social equity and health. Populations in inadequate housing are more likely to have environmental diseases and injuries. Substantial disparities in housing have remained largely unchanged. Approximately 2.6 million (7.5%) non-Hispanic Blacks and 5.9 million Whites (2.8%) live in substandard housing. Segregation, lack of housing mobility, and homelessness are all associated with adverse health outcomes. Yet the experience with childhood lead poisoning in the United States has shown that housing-related disparities can be reduced. Effective interventions should be implemented to reduce environmental health disparities related to housing. PMID:21551378

  16. AMERICAN HOUSING SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The American Housing Survey (AHS) collects data on the Nation's housing, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, vacant housing units, household characteristics, income, housing and neighborhood quality, housing costs, equipment and fuels, size of housing unit, a...

  17. Star dust.

    PubMed

    Ney, E P

    1977-02-11

    Infrared astronomy has shown that certain classes of stars are abundant producers of refractory grains, which condense in their atmospheres and are blown into interstellar space by the radiation pressure of these stars. Metallic silicates of the kind that produce terrestrial planets are injected by the oxygen-rich stars and carbon and its refractories by carbon stars. Much of the interstellar dust may be produced by this mechanism. A number of "infrared stars" are completely surrounded by their own dust, and a few of these exhibit a unique morphology that suggests the formation of a planetary system or a stage in the evolution of a planetary nebula. Certain novae also condense grains, which are blown out in their shells. In our own solar system, comets are found to contain the same silicates that are present elsewhere in the galaxy, suggesting that these constituents were present in the primeval solar nebula. PMID:17732279

  18. Asteroidal Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Durda, D. D.; Grogan, K.; Kehoe, T. J. J.

    There is good evidence that the high-speed, porous, anhydrous chondritic interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in Earth's stratosphere originated from short-period comets. However, by considering the structure of the solar-system dust bands discovered by IRAS, we are able to show that asteroidal collisions are probably the dominant source of particles in the zodiacal cloud. It follows that a significant and probably the dominant fraction of the IDPs collected in Earth's stratosphere also originated from asteroids. IDPs are the most primitive particles in the inner solar system and represent a class of material quite different from that in our meteorite collections. The structure, mineralogy, and high C content of IDPs dictate that they cannot have originated from the grinding down of known meteorite types. We argue that the asteroidal IDPs were probably formed as a result of prolonged mechanical mixing in the deep regoliths of asteroidal rubble piles in the outer main belt.

  19. The Cosmic Odyssey of Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We will present models for the evolution of dust in high redshift galaxies and in galaxies in the local universe. Galaxies at very high redshift, when the universe was less than one billion years old, contain massive quantities of dust that could only have fornedin the explosion of core-collapse supernovae. These same objects are also the main source of grain destruction during the later, remnant phase of their evolution. These galaxies offer therefore a unique opportunity for examining the effect of massive stars on the formation and destruction of interstellar dust, and the lecture will present a model for the evolution of dust in these very young galaxies. Spectral and photometric observations of nearby galaxies show a correlation between the strength of their mid-IR aromatic features, attributed to PAH molecules, and their metal abundance, leading to a deficiency of these features in low-metallicity galaxies. We show the observed correlation represents a trend of PAH abundance with galactic age, reflecting the delayed injection of carbon dust into the ISM by AGB stars in the final post-AGB phase of their evolution. We also show that larger dust particles giving rise to the far-IR emission follow a distinct evolutionary trend closely related to the injection of dust by massive stars into the ISM.