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Sample records for hpge detector efficiencies

  1. An exponential model for HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-06-11

    Interest in reducing the labor-intensive requirements for calibrating HPGe detectors has resulted in various efficiency models. The present study examines a method for predicting the efficiencies over ranges of sample geometries, whereby only a few measurements are required. The method has been appraised against extensive HPGe calibrations, and has been used for a ``nondestructive`` calibration for samples from a NASA satellite.

  2. An exponential model for HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-06-11

    Interest in reducing the labor-intensive requirements for calibrating HPGe detectors has resulted in various efficiency models. The present study examines a method for predicting the efficiencies over ranges of sample geometries, whereby only a few measurements are required. The method has been appraised against extensive HPGe calibrations, and has been used for a nondestructive'' calibration for samples from a NASA satellite.

  3. Gamma-ray efficiency of a HPGe detector as a function of energy and geometry.

    PubMed

    Challan, Mohsen B

    2013-12-01

    The concept of double points detector model approach (DPDM) is developed as a procedure to find the full energy peak efficiency of the coaxial 120 cm(3) closed hyperpure germanium (HPGe) detectors. Usually in the experimental nuclear physics work, which involves using HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry, the full energy peak efficiency function must represent adequately the HPGe detector response. In the current work the gamma-ray energy in the range from 60 keV to 1332 keV and gamma-ray intensity changes by changing source to detector distance from 10mm to 800 mm. The detector was characterized using a number of point-like standard sources. The calculated efficiencies obtained by (DPDM) are in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:24007787

  4. Analytical formulae for well-type NaI (Tl) and HPGe detectors efficiency computation.

    PubMed

    Abbas, M I

    2001-08-01

    A straightforward analytical formulae for the computation of total and full-energy peak efficiencies of NaI (Tl) and HPGe well-type detectors are deduced. In addition, the attenuation of photons by the source container and the detector end cap materials is presented in a direct mathematical expression. Results are compared with previous treatments. PMID:11393766

  5. A software for simulation of efficiency of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiem, L. H.; Trong, T. D.

    2015-05-01

    Computer software named GE_EFF for calculation of detection efficiency of High Purity Ge detectors recently developed by us is presented. A Monte-Carlo method has been used for simulation. The software has been written in Visual Basic language. The calculated efficiencies for our detectors are in agreement with the measured values using a standard ?-ray sources. The software has been used at our laboratory of Institute of Physics for gamma radiation measurements.

  6. Analytical approach for radioactivity correlation of disc sources with HPGe detector efficiency.

    PubMed

    Challan, Mohsen B; El-Taher, A

    2014-02-01

    The HPGe detector efficiency is measured as a function of source to detector separation using disc sources of (131)I with diameter ranging from 10 to 400mm. Detector efficiencies are characterized using single photon point-like standard sources at different distances; the calculated efficiencies for disc sources were analyzed by utilizing the double point detector model (DPDM) and the efficiency transfer method. The developed approach provided satisfactory results. The axial variation and radial dependence for disc sources efficiency determination in gamma-ray spectrometry were described with both gamma ray standard sources and measured samples as their extended sources. PMID:24365876

  7. A Software Package Using a Mesh-grid Method for Simulating HPGe Detector Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Jackman

    2009-10-01

    Traditional ways of determining the absolute full-energy peak efficiencies of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are often time consuming, cost prohibitive, or not feasible. A software package, KMESS (Kevins Mesh Efficiency Simulator Software), was developed to assist in predicting these efficiencies. It uses a semiempirical mesh-grid method and works for arbitrary source shapes and counting geometries. The model assumes that any gamma-ray source shape can be treated as a large enough collection of point sources. The code is readily adaptable, has a web-based graphical front-end, and could easily be coupled to a 3D scanner. As will be shown, this software can estimate absolute full-energy peak efficiencies with good accuracy in reasonable computation times. It has applications to the field of gamma-ray spectroscopy because it is a quick and accurate way to assist in performing quantitative analyses using HPGe detectors.

  8. A software package using a mesh-grid method for simulating HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, Russell E; Jackman, Kevin R; Biegalski, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Traditional ways of determining the absolute full-energy peak efficiencies of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are often time consuming, cost prohibitive, or not feasible. A software package, KMESS (Kevin's Mesh Efficiency Simulator Software), was developed to assist in predicting these efficiencies. It uses a semiempirical mesh-grid method and works for arbitrary source shapes and counting geometries. The model assumes that any gamma-ray source shape can be treated as a large enough collection of point sources. The code is readily adaptable, has a web-based graphical front-end. and could easily be coupled to a 3D scanner. As will be shown. this software can estimate absolute full-energy peak efficiencies with good accuracy in reasonable computation times. It has applications to the field of gamma-ray spectroscopy because it is a quick and accurate way to assist in performing quantitative analyses using HPGe detectors.

  9. New approach for calibration the efficiency of HpGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    This work evaluates the efficiency calibrating of HpGe detector coupled with Canberra GC3018 with Genie 2000 software and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C with Gamma Vision software; available at Neutron activation analysis laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The efficiency calibration curve was constructed from measurement of an IAEA, standard gamma-point sources set composed by 214Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 152Eu, 137Cs and 60Co. The efficiency calibrations were performed for three different geometries: 5, 10 and 15 cm distances from the end cap detector. The polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points. The efficiency equation was established from the known fitted parameters which allow for the efficiency evaluation at particular energy of interest. The study shows that significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source-detector distance and photon energy.

  10. Evaluation of ANGLE(R), a code for calculating HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Victoria M

    2010-10-25

    This paper evaluates the ANGLE(reg sign) software package, an advanced efficiency calibration software for high purity germanium detectors that is distributed by ORTEC(reg sign). ANGLE(reg sign) uses a semi-empirical approach, by way of the efficiency transfer method, based on the calculated effective solid angle. This approach would have an advantage over the traditional relative and stochastic methods by decreasing the chances for systematic errors and reducing sensitivity to uncertainties in detector parameters. For experimental confirmation, a closed-end coaxial HPGe detector was used with sample geometries frequently encountered at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results obtained were sufficient for detector-source configurations which included intercepting layers of plexiglass and carbon graphite, but somewhat insufficient for bare source configurations.

  11. Experimental HPGe coaxial detector response and efficiency compared to Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Nora L; Vanin, Vito R; García-Alvarez, Juan A; Hermida-López, Marcelino; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    The peak efficiency for photons hitting the frontal surface of a medium volume n-type HPGe coaxial detector is mapped using acutely collimated beams of energies between 31 and 383keV from a (133)Ba radioactive source. Simulated values obtained with the Monte Carlo radiation transport code penelope, using a model that respected actual detector dimensions and physical constants while varying dead-layer thicknesses, allowed us to fit the experimental results in the detector bulk but not near its rim. The spectra of a (137)Cs source were measured using the detector shielded from the natural background radiation, with and without a broad angle collimator. The corresponding simulated spectra, using the fitted dead-layer thicknesses, underestimate the continuum component of the spectra and overestimate the peak efficiency, by less than ten percent in the broad angle collimator arrangement. The simulated results are sensitive to the photon attenuation coefficients. PMID:26704703

  12. A quick technique to improve the geometry characterisation of aged HPGe detectors for MC code efficiency calculation.

    PubMed

    Moser, H; Maringer, F J

    2016-03-01

    During the EMRP JRP MetroMETAL project a detector image of an aged HPGe gamma-ray detector was created for MC efficiency calculation. Using the nominal construction parameters of the detector, the simulation showed unacceptably high deviations from the assured activity values. This paper describes an optimisation of a virtual detector to obtain better results using limited resources and offers comparisons of efficiency values of point and voluminous sources calculated by LABSOCS® and PENELOPE 2011. PMID:26688355

  13. New approach for calibration the efficiency of HpGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2014-02-12

    This work evaluates the efficiency calibrating of HpGe detector coupled with Canberra GC3018 with Genie 2000 software and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C with Gamma Vision software; available at Neutron activation analysis laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The efficiency calibration curve was constructed from measurement of an IAEA, standard gamma–point sources set composed by {sup 214}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The efficiency calibrations were performed for three different geometries: 5, 10 and 15 cm distances from the end cap detector. The polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points. The efficiency equation was established from the known fitted parameters which allow for the efficiency evaluation at particular energy of interest. The study shows that significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source-detector distance and photon energy.

  14. Using lattice tools and unfolding methods for hpge detector efficiency simulation with the Monte Carlo code MCNP5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, A.; Gallardo, S.; Rdenas, J.; Verd, G.

    2015-11-01

    In environmental radioactivity measurements, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors are commonly used due to their excellent resolution. Efficiency calibration of detectors is essential to determine activity of radionuclides. The Monte Carlo method has been proved to be a powerful tool to complement efficiency calculations. In aged detectors, efficiency is partially deteriorated due to the dead layer increasing and consequently, the active volume decreasing. The characterization of the radiation transport in the dead layer is essential for a realistic HPGe simulation. In this work, the MCNP5 code is used to calculate the detector efficiency. The F4MESH tally is used to determine the photon and electron fluence in the dead layer and the active volume. The energy deposited in the Ge has been analyzed using the *F8 tally. The F8 tally is used to obtain spectra and to calculate the detector efficiency. When the photon fluence and the energy deposition in the crystal are known, some unfolding methods can be used to estimate the activity of a given source. In this way, the efficiency is obtained and serves to verify the value obtained by other methods.

  15. HPGe detector photopeak efficiency calculation including self-absorption and coincidence corrections for Marinelli beaker sources using compact analytical expressions.

    PubMed

    Abbas, M I

    2001-05-01

    Direct mathematical methods to calculate total and full-energy peak (photopeak) efficiencies, coincidence correction factors and the source self-absorption of a closed end coaxial HPGe detector for Marinelli beaker sources have been derived. The source self-absorption is determined by calculating the photon path length in the source volume. The attenuation of photons by the Marinelli beaker and the detector cap materials is also calculated. In the experiments gamma aqueous sources containing several radionuclides covering the energy range from 60 to 1836 keV were used. By comparison, the theoretical and experimental full-energy peak efficiency values are in good agreement. PMID:11258525

  16. Performance assessment by Monte Carlo simulations of a prospective assembly of up to three HPGe detectors designed for superior detection efficiency and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Jutier, Christophe; Douysset, Guilhem

    2012-09-01

    The present work reports on the results of Monte Carlo simulations performed with MCNP on an assembly of two HPGe detectors facing each other regarding detector efficiencies. Report is also made when a third detector is added to the previous configuration from below. Moreover cross talk between detectors is investigated and found of limited impact. The choice for an actual detector goes to the three detector configuration for accommodating most geometries while cost and engineering constrains remain acceptable. PMID:22440238

  17. Low background shielding of HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Trnková, L; Rulík, P

    2009-05-01

    National Radiation Protection Institute in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. Steel shielding with one of these detectors (relative efficiency 100%) was chosen to be rebuilt to decrease minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. MDA values decreased for Compton background up to 0.67 of original value. PMID:19243960

  18. A method for establishing absolute full-energy peak efficiency and its confidence interval for HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Starosta, K.; Williams, J.; Voss, P.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for establishing the absolute efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector including the confidence interval in the energy range of 79.6-3451.2 keV. The calibrations were accomplished with the 133Ba, 60Co, 56Co and 152Eu point-like radioactive sources with only the 60Co source being activity calibrated to an accuracy of 2% at the 90% confidence level. All data sets measured from activity calibrated and uncalibrated sources were fit simultaneously using the linearized least squares method. The proposed fit function accounts for scaling of the data taken with activity uncalibrated sources to the data taken with the high accuracy activity calibrated source. The confidence interval for the fit was found analytically using the covariance matrix. Accuracy of the fit was below 3.5% at the 90% confidence level in the 79.6-3451.2 keV energy range.

  19. Characterization of HPGe detectors using Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedman, A.; Bahar Gogani, J.; Granstrm, M.; Johansson, L.; Andersson, J. S.; Ramebck, H.

    2015-06-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) high-resolution imaging have been used to investigate if there is a significant change in the crystal-to-window distance, i.e. the air gap thickness, in a small n-type detector cooled to 77 K, and in a medium sized p-type HPGe detector when cooled to 100 K. The findings were compared to detector dimension data made available by the manufacturer. The air gap thickness increased by (0.380.07) mm for the n-type detector and by (0.400.15) mm for the p-type detector when the detectors were cooled to 77 resp. 100 K compared to at room temperature. Monte Carlo calculations indicate that these differences have a significant impact on the efficiency in close geometries (<5 cm). In the energy range of 40-700 keV with a source placed directly on endcap, the change in detector efficiency with temperature is 1.9-2.9% for the n-type detector and 0.3-2.1% for the p-type detector. The measured air gap thickness when cooling the detector was 1.1 mm thicker than manufacturer data for the n-type detector and 0.2 mm thicker for the p-type detector. In the energy range of 40-700 keV and with a source on endcap, this result in a change in detector efficiency of 5.2-7.1% for the n-type detector and 0.2-1.0% for the p-type detector, i.e. the detector efficiency is overestimated using data available by the manufacturer.

  20. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Fatima Padilla; Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Bernal-Castillo, Jose Luis; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D'Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar

    2010-12-01

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ((241)Am, (133)Ba, (22)Na, (60)Co, (57)Co, (137)Cs and (152)Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized. PMID:20643556

  1. Studying of characteristics of the HPGe detector for radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, D.; Ero?lu, M.; Tur?ucu, A.

    2013-10-01

    The photopeak efficiency, the peak to valley ratio, the energy resolution and the minimum detectable activity of a HPGe detector were determined experimentally for 13.81-1212.95 keV photon energy by using Am241, Ba133, Cs137 and Eu152. The photopeak efficiency was studied at the geometry with the source to detector distance of 5 cm, 10 cm, 15 cm and 20 cm. Also, it was determined theoretically. It is shown that full energy peak efficiency decreases with increases in gamma ray energy. Also, the HPGe detector offers very good resolution. This makes it a suitable detector for x- and gamma ray spectroscopy and health physics research.

  2. Development of an absolute method for efficiency calibration of a coaxial HPGe detector for large volume sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Ramrez, Pablo C.

    2015-09-01

    In this work an absolute method for the determination of the full energy peak efficiency of a gamma spectroscopy system for voluminous sources is presented. The method was tested for a high-resolution coaxial HPGe detector and cylindrical homogeneous volume source. The volume source is represented by a set of point sources filling its volume. We found that the absolute efficiency of a volume source can be determined as the average over its volume of the absolute efficiency of each point source. Experimentally, we measure the intrinsic efficiency as a function upon source-detector position. Then, considering the solid angle and the attenuations of the gamma rays emitted to the detector by each point source, considered as embedded in the source matrix, the absolute efficiency for each point source inside of the volume was determined. The factor associate with the solid angle and the self-attenuation of photons in the sample was deduced from first principles without any mathematical approximation. The method was tested by determining the specific activity of 137Cs in cylindrical homogeneous sources, using IAEA reference materials with specific activities between 14.2 Bq/kg and 9640 Bq/kg at the moment of the experimentation. The results obtained shown a good agreement with the expected values. The relative difference was less than 7% in most of the cases. The main advantage of this method is that it does not require of the use of expensive and hard to produce standard materials. In addition it does not require of matrix effect corrections, which are the main cause of error in this type of measurements, and it is easy to implement in any nuclear physics laboratory.

  3. Monte Carlo calculations of the HPGe detector efficiency for radioactivity measurement of large volume environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Azbouche, Ahmed; Belgaid, Mohamed; Mazrou, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of a High Purity Germanium detector with a (152)Eu source, packed in Marinelli beaker, was developed for routine analysis of large volume environmental samples. Then, the model parameters, in particular, the dead layer thickness were adjusted thanks to a specific irradiation configuration together with a fine-tuning procedure. Thereafter, the calculated efficiencies were compared to the measured ones for standard samples containing (152)Eu source filled in both grass and resin matrices packed in Marinelli beaker. From this comparison, a good agreement between experiment and Monte Carlo calculation results was obtained highlighting thereby the consistency of the geometrical computational model proposed in this work. Finally, the computational model was applied successfully to determine the (137)Cs distribution in soil matrix. From this application, instructive results were achieved highlighting, in particular, the erosion and accumulation zone of the studied site. PMID:25982445

  4. Accurate Characterization of the Shape of the HPGe Detector Peak Efficiency Curve for Application in PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.

    2001-06-17

    Measurements in prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) typically have errors of the order of {+-}2 to 3%. A method is described that can yield a lower limit on the uncertainty in relative efficiencies applied to PGNAA of about {+-}0.1%.

  5. Monte Carlo calculation of the efficiency calibration curve and coincidence-summing corrections in low-level gamma-ray spectrometry using well-type HPGe detectors

    PubMed

    Laborie; Le Petit G; Abt; Girard

    2000-07-01

    Well-type high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to the analysis of small amounts of environmental samples, as they can combine both low background and high detection efficiency. A low-background well-type detector is installed in the Modane underground Laboratory. In the well geometry, coincidence-summing effects are high and make the construction of the full energy peak efficiency curve a difficult task with an usual calibration standard, especially in the high energy range. Using the GEANT code and taking into account a detailed description of the detector and the source, efficiency curves have been modelled for several filling heights of the vial. With a special routine taking into account the decay schemes of the radionuclides, corrections for coincidence-summing effects that occur when measuring samples containing 238U, 232Th or 134Cs have been computed. The results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. It is shown that triple coincidences effect on counting losses accounts for 7-15% of pair coincidences effect in the case of 604 and 796 keV lines of 134Cs. PMID:10879838

  6. A trapezoid approach for the experimental total-to-peak efficiency curve used in the determination of true coincidence summing correction factors in a HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ahiner, Eren; Meri, Niyazi

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a simple method for true coincidence correction is suggested for a voluminous source measured in close detection geometry for a HPGe detector. TrueCoinc program based on Sudr's algorithm was used to determine true coincidence summing correction (TCS) factors by using full energy peak (FEP) efficiency, and total-to-peak (TTP) efficiency curves in which experimental efficiencies are obtained from almost coincident-free radionuclides such as 54Mn, 57Co, 65Zn, 109Cd, 137Cs and 241Am. In order to calculate TTP efficiency curve three different approaches were tested. One of them is new and here called trapezoid approach which was used successfully in determining total count of spectrum for the TTP efficiency curves. According to different TTP determination methods, the changes in true coincidence factors are observed. The FEP efficiency curves are also established for a cylindrical source. Then, TCS factors were determined for the particular peaks of daughters of 226Ra, 238U, and 232Th using the suggested method. Those activities measured from some certified reference materials such as IAEA RGU-1 and RGTh-1 are used to validate the present TCS correction procedure.

  7. Gamma-ray imaging with coaxial HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Schmid, G J; Beckedahl, D; Kammeraad, J; Blair, J

    2005-04-12

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of Compton imaging of gamma rays with a single coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This imaging capability is realized by two-dimensional segmentation of the outside contact in combination with digital pulse-shape analysis, which enables to image gamma rays in 4{pi} without employing a collimator. We are able to demonstrate the ability to image the 662keV gamma ray from a {sup 137}Cs source with preliminary event selection with an angular accuracy of 5 degree with an relative efficiency of 0.2%. In addition to the 4{pi} imaging capability, such a system is characterized by its excellent energy resolution and can be implemented in any size possible for Ge detectors to achieve high efficiency.

  8. HPGe virtual point detector for radioactive disk sources.

    PubMed

    Alfassi, Z B; Lavi, N; Presler, O; Pushkarski, V

    2007-02-01

    Validity of the model of a virtual point detector (implying existence of a point where all interactions virtually occur) was confirmed for measurements of radioactive disk sources with HPGe detectors. The existing correlation of the count rates with the distance between the virtual plain detector and the detector face makes it possible to inter- and extrapolate calibration curves for disk radioactive sources for use at different source-detector face distances. The dependence of the distance between the virtual plane detector and the detector face on the photon energy was studied for sources of various radii. PMID:17000113

  9. Initial Field Measurements with the Multisensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) High Purity Germanium (HPGe) Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Dorow, Kevin E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Jensen, Jeffrey L.; Morris, Scott J.; Orrell, John L.; Pitts, W. Karl; Rohrer, John S.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2010-06-29

    Abstract: The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. The system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications. This paper reports on results from initial field measurements conducted in a truck and on two different boats.

  10. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, J.; Puzovic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  11. New approach to calculate the true-coincidence effect of HpGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The corrections for true-coincidence effects in HpGe detector are important, especially at low source-to-detector distances. This work established an approach to calculate the true-coincidence effects experimentally for HpGe detectors of type Canberra GC3018 and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C, which are in operation at neutron activation analysis lab in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The correction for true-coincidence effects was performed close to detector at distances 2 and 5 cm using 57Co, 60Co, 133Ba and 137Cs as standard point sources. The correction factors were ranged between 0.93-1.10 at 2 cm and 0.97-1.00 at 5 cm for Canberra HpGe detector; whereas for Ortec HpGe detector ranged between 0.92-1.13 and 0.95-100 at 2 and 5 cm respectively. The change in efficiency calibration curve of the detector at 2 and 5 cm after correction was found to be less than 1%. Moreover, the polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points.

  12. Support of low-level instrument background for HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A. D.; Starostin, A. S.; Kuzmenko, V. I.; Rozite, A. R.

    2011-07-01

    The development results for the cryostats with the low-level of instrument background supported by special design, the reduction of mass of the materials surrounding detector and application of the materials with very low content of radiation impurities are presented. The development results for HPGe detector with ultra low-level of instrument background for gamma spectrometer under the GEMMA project for investigation of the neutrino magnetic moment are presented. (authors)

  13. Calculation of Gamma-ray Responses for HPGe Detectors with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Kang; Garg, Ruchi

    2014-06-01

    The gamma-ray response calculation of HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector is one of the most important topics of the Monte Carlo transport codes for nuclear instrumentation applications. In this study the new options of TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code for gamma-ray spectrometry were investigated. Recent improvements include the gamma-rays modeling of the electron-position annihilation, the low energy electron transport modeling, and the low energy characteristic X-ray production. The impact of these improvements on the detector efficiency of the gamma-ray spectrometry calculations was verified. Four models of HPGe detectors and sample sources were studied. The germanium crystal, the dead layer of the crystal, the central hole, the beryllium window, and the metal housing are the essential parts in detector modeling. A point source, a disc source, and a cylindrical extended source containing a liquid radioactive solution were used to study the TRIPOLI-4 calculations for the gamma-ray energy deposition and the gamma-ray self-shielding. The calculations of full-energy-peak and total detector efficiencies for different sample-detector geometries were performed. Using TRIPOLI-4 code, different gamma-ray energies were applied in order to establish the efficiency curves of the HPGe gamma-ray detectors.

  14. Development of the MCNPX model for the portable HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleska, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan

    2014-11-01

    The portable HPGe coaxial detector Canberra Big MAC is used in LVR-15 research reactor for spectrometric measurement of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is measured in the dedicated system located in the spent fuel pool situated near the reactor. For the purpose of the spectrometric system calibration, the detector was precisely modeled with the MCNPX code. This model was constructed with the data acquired from the technical specification provided by the manufacturer and from the data obtained by the radiography of the crystal. The detector model was verified on the experimental data measured with available standard radionuclide sources and on-site prepared 110mAg source.

  15. Employing thin HPGe detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, K.; Mihailescu, L.; Ziock, K.; Burks, M.; Cork, C.; Fabris, L.; Hull, E.; Madden, N.; Pehl, R.

    2002-10-01

    We have evaluated a collimator-less gamma-ray imaging system, which is based on thin layers of double-sided strip HPGe detectors. The positions of individual gamma-ray interactions will be deduced by the strip addresses and the Ge layers which fired. Therefore, high bandwidth pulse processing is not required as in thick Ge detectors. While the drawback of such a device is the increased number of electronics channels to be read out and processed, there are several advantages, which are particularly important for remote applications: the operational voltage can be greatly reduced to fully deplete the detector and no high bandwidth signal processing electronics is required to determine positions. Only a charge sensitive preamplifier, a slow pulse shaping amplifier, and a fast discriminator are required on a per channel basis in order to determine photon energy and interaction position in three dimensions. Therefore, the power consumption and circuit board real estate can be minimized. More importantly, since the high bandwidth signal shapes are not used to determine the depth position, lower energy signals can be processed. The processing of these lower energy signals increases the efficiency for the recovery of small angle scattering. Currently, we are studying systems consisting of up to ten 2mm thick Ge layers with 2mm pitch size. The required electronics of the few hundred channels can be integrated to reduce space and power. We envision applications in nuclear non-proliferation and gamma-ray astronomy where ease of operation and low power consumption, and reliability, are crucial.

  16. A repair station for HpGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearman, Robert; Lister, Christopher; Mitchell, A. J.; Copp, Patrick; Jepeal, Steven; Chowdhury, Partha

    2013-10-01

    Hyper-pure Germanium detectors (HpGe) offer the highest energy resolution for gamma-ray nuclear spectroscopy (about 1.5 keV @ 1 MeV), and are used in all the world's leading detector arrays such as GammaSphere, AGATA and GRETINA. The detector crystals are operated in cryostats at 100 K to reduce thermal noise. To maintain low leakage current and low operating temperatures, cryostat hygiene is very important. Detectors must be regularly maintained by using a high-vacuum, oil-free annealing station. At elevated temperatures above 373 K the process of pumping and baking can also anneal away neutron damage to the detector crystals. This poster will show the design and building of a new HpGe repair station at U. Mass Lowell, and make comparisons of results obtained from this new station to the Gammasphere annealing factory at Argonne. This research is funded by the DOE National Nuclear Safety Administration and the Office of Science.

  17. The DGF Pixie-4 spectrometer compact digital readout electronics for HPGe clover detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, W.; Chu, Y. X.; Tan, H.; Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Warburton, W. K.; Grzywacz, R.

    2007-10-01

    Large volume HPGe detectors are commonly used in applications that require good energy resolution and high detection efficiency, but are expensive and difficult to grow. Clover detectors consisting of four smaller crystals in a common cryostat are a possible alternative, but traditionally require complex readout electronics. In contrast, the DGF Pixie-4 is a compact, digital spectrometer providing on a single 3U CompactPCI/PXI card all the electronics required for clover detectors, including computation of addback spectra. This paper describes the DGF Pixie-4 system architecture, characterizes its energy resolution and throughput, and presents results of test measurements with a clover detector.

  18. Extrapolated HPGe efficiency estimates based on a single calibration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma spectroscopists often must analyze samples with geometries for which their detectors are not calibrated. The effort to experimentally recalibrate a detector for a new geometry can be quite time consuming, causing delay in reporting useful results. Such concerns have motivated development of a method for extrapolating HPGe efficiency estimates from an existing single measured efficiency. Overall, the method provides useful preliminary results for analyses that do not require exceptional accuracy, while reliably bracketing the credible range. The estimated efficiency {element_of} for a uniform sample in a geometry with volume V is extrapolated from the measured {element_of}{sub 0} of the base sample of volume V{sub 0}. Assuming all samples are centered atop the detector for maximum efficiency, {element_of} decreases monotonically as V increases about V{sub 0}, and vice versa. Extrapolation of high and low efficiency estimates {element_of}{sub h} and {element_of}{sub L} provides an average estimate of {element_of} = 1/2 [{element_of}{sub h} + {element_of}{sub L}] {plus_minus} 1/2 [{element_of}{sub h} {minus} {element_of}{sub L}] (general) where an uncertainty D{element_of} = 1/2 ({element_of}{sub h} {minus} {element_of}{sub L}] brackets limits for a maximum possible error. The {element_of}{sub h} and {element_of}{sub L} both diverge from {element_of}{sub 0} as V deviates from V{sub 0}, causing D{element_of} to increase accordingly. The above concepts guided development of both conservative and refined estimates for {element_of}.

  19. Efficiency transfer using the GEANT4 code of CERN for HPGe gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chagren, S; Tekaya, M Ben; Reguigui, N; Gharbi, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work we apply the GEANT4 code of CERN to calculate the peak efficiency in High Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometry using three different procedures. The first is a direct calculation. The second corresponds to the usual case of efficiency transfer between two different configurations at constant emission energy assuming a reference point detection configuration and the third, a new procedure, consists on the transfer of the peak efficiency between two detection configurations emitting the gamma ray in different energies assuming a "virtual" reference point detection configuration. No pre-optimization of the detector geometrical characteristics was performed before the transfer to test the ability of the efficiency transfer to reduce the effect of the ignorance on their real magnitude on the quality of the transferred efficiency. The obtained and measured efficiencies were found in good agreement for the two investigated methods of efficiency transfer. The obtained agreement proves that Monte Carlo method and especially the GEANT4 code constitute an efficient tool to obtain accurate detection efficiency values. The second investigated efficiency transfer procedure is useful to calibrate the HPGe gamma detector for any emission energy value for a voluminous source using one point source detection efficiency emitting in a different energy as a reference efficiency. The calculations preformed in this work were applied to the measurement exercise of the EUROMET428 project. A measurement exercise where an evaluation of the full energy peak efficiencies in the energy range 60-2000keV for a typical coaxial p-type HpGe detector and several types of source configuration: point sources located at various distances from the detector and a cylindrical box containing three matrices was performed. PMID:26623928

  20. HPGe well-type detectors for neutron activation measurements on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bertalot, L.; Damiani, M.; Esposito, B.; Lagamba, L.; Podda, S.; Batistoni, P.; De Felice, P.; Biagini, R.

    1997-01-01

    We describe an improvement of the neutron activation system in operation on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) tokamak for the measurement of the total neutron yield. A HPGe well-type detector (200 cm{sup 3} active volume) is used to detect the photoemission from neutron activated samples ({sup 115m}In336.2 keV {gamma} rays from DD neutrons on indium for FTU). Due to their high geometrical efficiency, HPGe well-type detectors are particularly suited to the FTU low-level activity measurements. A particular effort has been devoted to the calibration of the measuring system. In particular, a multi-{gamma} calibration source (59{endash}1332 keV energy range) with a density of 7.31 g/cm{sup 3} consisting of a stack of indium foils has been prepared. This assures that the shape and volume of the calibration source are the same as those of the samples used in the actual measurements. The full-energy-peak efficiency at the {sup 115m}In336.2 keV line is 0.197 with an overall uncertainty of 2{percent} (1{sigma}). For a better characterization of the detector response as a function of the sample density, a further calibration source with the same geometry has been prepared in a gel aqueous solution (density {approximately}1 g/cm{sup 3}). The calibration curves for the well-type detector at the two different density values are compared. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of an HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, E. do; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Silva, T. F.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Fernandez-Varea, J. M.

    2013-05-06

    Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy of the large Ge crystal of an HPGe detector was performed using positrons from pair production of 6.13 MeV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. Two HPGe detectors facing opposite sides of the Ge crystal acting as target provided both coincidence and singles spectra. Changes in the shape of the annihilation peak were observed when the high voltage applied to the target detector was switched on or off, amounting to somewhat less than 20% when the areas of equivalent energy intervals in the corresponding normalized spectra are compared.

  2. New analytical approach to calibrate the co-axial HPGe detectors including correction for source matrix self-attenuation.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mohamed S; Gouda, Mona M; Nafee, Sherif S; El-Khatib, Ahmed M; El-Mallah, Ekram A

    2012-12-01

    To calibrate the co-axial HPGe semiconductor detectors, we introduce a new theoretical approach based on the Direct Statistical method proposed by Selim and Abbas (1995, 1996) to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency for cylindrical detectors. The present method depends on the accurate analytical calculation of the average path length covered by the photon inside the detector active volume and the geometrical solid angle ?, to obtain a simple formula for the efficiency. In addition, the self attenuation coefficient of the source matrix (with a radius greater than the detector's radius), the attenuation factors of the source container and the detector housing materials are also treated by calculating the average path length within these materials. (152)Eu aqueous radioactive sources covering the energy range from 121 to 1408 keV were used. Remarkable agreement between the measured and the calculated efficiencies was achieved with discrepancies less than 2%. PMID:23023386

  3. New numerical algorithm method to calibrate the HPGe cylindrical detectors using non-axial extended source geometries.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Sherif S; Badawi, Mohamed S; Ahmed, Ayman H

    2010-09-01

    The knowledge of the full-energy peak efficiency for a specific source-detector arrangement is often required in various fields of research and applications, such as the analysis of nuclear waste or environmental samples, where both require modeling because it is not practical to prepare a standard that matches the physical and nuclear properties of every waste or environmental item. Therefore, a new numerical algorithm method (NAM) is proposed in the present work to calibrate the co-axial HPGe cylindrical detectors. Cylindrical sources are used in the calibration process placed perpendicularly to the detector's axis. The self-attenuation and the coincidence summing effects at low source-detector distance are also included in the algorithm. A remarkable agreement between the measured and the calculated efficiencies is achieved with discrepancies less than 3%. PMID:20395155

  4. Phenomenological Model for Predicting the Energy Resolution of Neutron-Damaged Coaxial HPGe Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    C. DeW. Van Siclen; E. H. Seabury; C. J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

    2012-10-01

    The peak energy resolution of germanium detectors deteriorates with increasing neutron fluence. This is due to hole capture at neutron-created defects in the crystal which prevents the full energy of the gamma-ray from being recorded by the detector. A phenomenological model of coaxial HPGe detectors is developed that relies on a single, dimensionless parameter that is related to the probability for immediate trapping of a mobile hole in the damaged crystal. As this trap parameter is independent of detector dimensions and type, the model is useful for predicting energy resolution as a function of neutron fluence.

  5. Monte Carlo model of HPGe detectors used in routine lung counting.

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, Jovica; Kramer, Gary H; Hogue, Mark

    2013-09-01

    An MCNP model of a pair of planar HPGe detectors (designated as: detector 3 and detector 4), that are used for routine lung counting at AECL, was developed. The model was benchmarked against experimental results, where a multi-line (152)Eu source was counted in several different geometrical arrangements. The best agreement for both detectors was achieved when side and back dead layers (of both detectors) were quadrupled, with respect to the ones quoted by their manufacturer (Canberra). In the case of detector 4, the agreement between simulated and measured spectra was within 4%, throughout the whole ?-spectrum, spanning 70-1600 keV. The same was true for detector 3 at the lower end of the ?-spectrum. However, at the high end of the ?-spectrum, the agreement was within 7% and 12% for (152)Eu ?-lines at 778.9 and 1408.01 keV. PMID:23747513

  6. Comparison of the NDA of HEU Oxide between the AWCC and the HPGe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L. G.; Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Dukes, E. E.; Akin, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper compares the performance of the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) with the performance of high resolution gamma spectrometry using an HPGe detector to nondestructively assay highly enriched (HEU) oxide. Traditionally the AWCC was considered to be the more appropriate instrument for this measurement. Although the AWCC had a high degree of precision, the HPGe provided the more accurate measurement of this material. The AWCC determines mass of U-235 from the coincident pairs of neutron detections, or doubles rate. The HPGe determines the mass of both U-235 and U238, the enrichment, and the quantity of other radioisotopes. The Tl-208 gamma rays were used to verify the amount of attenuation for the HPGe analysis. Fifty-four cans of enriched U3O8 were shipped to the Y-12 National Security Complex from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) under Scrap Declaration LANL-45. The declared values for net weight, mass of uranium, mass of U-235, and enrichment (percent mass of U-235 to total uranium) are shown in Table A-1. The masses of U-235 range from 104g to 2404g and the enrichment varies from 20% to 98%.

  7. A high-efficiency HPGe coincidence system for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Britton, R; Davies, A V; Burnett, J L; Jackson, M J

    2015-08-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is supported by a network of certified laboratories which must meet certain sensitivity requirements for CTBT relevant radionuclides. At the UK CTBT Radionuclide Laboratory (GBL15), a high-efficiency, dual-detector gamma spectroscopy system has been developed to improve the sensitivity of measurements for treaty compliance, greatly reducing the time required for each sample. Utilising list-mode acquisition, each sample can be counted once, and processed multiple times to further improve sensitivity. For the 8 key radionuclides considered, Minimum Detectable Activities (MDA's) were improved by up to 37% in standard mode (when compared to a typical CTBT detector system), with the acquisition time required to achieve the CTBT sensitivity requirements reduced from 6 days to only 3. When utilising the system in coincidence mode, the MDA for (60) Co in a high-activity source was improved by a factor of 34 when compared to a standard CTBT detector, and a factor of 17 when compared to the dual-detector system operating in standard mode. These MDA improvements will allow the accurate and timely quantification of radionuclides that decay via both singular and cascade γ emission, greatly enhancing the effectiveness of CTBT laboratories. PMID:25875083

  8. Optimized digital filtering techniques for radiation detection with HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salathe, Marco; Kihm, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes state-of-the-art digital filtering techniques that are part of GEANA, an automatic data analysis software used for the GERDA experiment. The discussed filters include a novel, nonlinear correction method for ballistic deficits, which is combined with one of three shaping filters: a pseudo-Gaussian, a modified trapezoidal, or a modified cusp filter. The performance of the filters is demonstrated with a 762 g Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, produced by Canberra, that measures γ-ray lines from radioactive sources in an energy range between 59.5 and 2614.5 keV. At 1332.5 keV, together with the ballistic deficit correction method, all filters produce a comparable energy resolution of ~1.61 keV FWHM. This value is superior to those measured by the manufacturer and those found in publications with detectors of a similar design and mass. At 59.5 keV, the modified cusp filter without a ballistic deficit correction produced the best result, with an energy resolution of 0.46 keV. It is observed that the loss in resolution by using a constant shaping time over the entire energy range is small when using the ballistic deficit correction method.

  9. Alpha Backgrounds for HPGe Detectors in Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. A.; Burritt, T. H.; Elliott, S. R.; Gehman, V. M.; Guiseppe, V.E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    The Majorana Experiment will use arrays of enriched HPGe detectors to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Such a decay, if found, would show lepton-number violation and confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Searches for such rare events are hindered by obscuring backgrounds which must be understood and mitigated as much as possible. A potentially important background contribution to this and other double-beta decay experiments could come from decays of alpha-emitting isotopes in the 232Th and 238U decay chains on or near the surfaces of the detectors. An alpha particle emitted external to an HPGe crystal can lose energy before entering the active region of the detector, either in some external-bulk material or within the dead region of the crystal. The measured energy of the event will only correspond to a partial amount of the total kinetic energy of the alpha and might obscure the signal from neutrinoless double-beta decay. A test stand was built and measurements were performed to quantitatively assess this background. We present results from these measurements and compare them to simulations using Geant4. These results are then used to measure the alpha backgrounds in an underground detector in situ. We also make estimates of surface contamination tolerances for double-beta decay experiments using solid-state detectors.

  10. Gamma-ray Full Spectrum Analysis for Environmental Radioactivity by HPGe Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Meeyoung; Lee, Kyeong Beom; Kim, Kyeong Ja; Lee, Min-Kie; Han, Ju-Bong

    2014-12-01

    Odyssey, one of the NASAs Mars exploration program and SELENE (Kaguya), a Japanese lunar orbiting spacecraft have a payload of Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) for analyzing radioactive chemical elements of the atmosphere and the surface. In these days, gamma-ray spectroscopy with a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been widely used for the activity measurements of natural radionuclides contained in the soil of the Earth. The energy spectra obtained by the HPGe detectors have been generally analyzed by means of the Window Analysis (WA) method. In this method, activity concentrations are determined by using the net counts of energy window around individual peaks. Meanwhile, an alternative method, the so-called Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) method uses count numbers not only from full-absorption peaks but from the contributions of Compton scattering due to gamma-rays. Consequently, while it takes a substantial time to obtain a statistically significant result in the WA method, the FSA method requires a much shorter time to reach the same level of the statistical significance. This study shows the validation results of FSA method. We have compared the concentration of radioactivity of 40K, 232Th and 238U in the soil measured by the WA method and the FSA method, respectively. The gamma-ray spectrum of reference materials (RGU and RGTh, KCl) and soil samples were measured by the 120% HPGe detector with cosmic muon veto detector. According to the comparison result of activity concentrations between the FSA and the WA, we could conclude that FSA method is validated against the WA method. This study implies that the FSA method can be used in a harsh measurement environment, such as the gamma-ray measurement in the Moon, in which the level of statistical significance is usually required in a much shorter data acquisition time than the WA method.

  11. Single channel beta-gamma coincidence system for radioxenon measurement using well-type HPGe and plastic scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Feng; Jiang, Wengang; Li, Xuesong; He, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jiamei; Yu, Gongshuo

    2013-11-01

    In order to improve detection sensitivity for radioxenon isotopes, a new single channel beta-gamma coincidence system has been developed. The system combines a well-type High-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector to measure gamma or X radiation and a plastic scintillator detector to obtain electron radiation. A 133Xe sample has been produced and the radioactive concentration was determined with length-compensated method based on three internal gas proportional counters. The performance of system has been checked by measuring 133Xe sample with and without coincidence. The coincidence detection efficiency of 81 keV gamma-ray from decay of 133Xe was calibrated to be 0.34 (12.4%), and the Minimum detectable activity (MDA) of the beta-gamma coincidence system for 133Xe was determined to be 1.8 mBq after one day of measurement.

  12. Search for double beta decay with HPGe detectors at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkvorets, Oleg

    2008-12-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay is practically the only way to establish the Majorana nature of the neutrino mass and its decay rate provides a probe of an effective neutrino mass. Double beta experiments are long-running underground experiments with specific challenges concerning the background reduction and the long term stability. These problems are addressed in this work for the Heidelberg-Moscow (HdM), GENIUS Test Facility (TF) and GERDA experiments. The HdM experiment collected data with enriched 76Ge high purity (HPGe) detectors from 1990 to 2003. An improved analysis of HdM data is presented, exploiting new calibration and spectral shape measurements with the HdM detectors. GENIUS-TF was a test-facility that verified the feasibility of using bare germanium detectors in liquid nitrogen. The first year results of this experiment are discussed. The GERDA experiment has been designed to further increase the sensitivity by operating bare germanium detectors in a high purity cryogenic liquid, which simultaneously serves as a shielding against background and as a cooling media. In the preparatory stage of GERDA, an external background gamma flux measurement was done at the experimental site in the Hall A of the Gran Sasso laboratory. The characterization of the enriched detectors from the HdM and IGEX experiments was performed in the underground detector laboratory for the GERDA collaboration. Long term stability measurements of a bare HPGe detector in liquid argon were carried out. Based on these measurements, the first lower limit on the half-life of neutrinoless double electron capture of 36Ar was established to be 1.85*10^18 years at 68% C.L.

  13. Fabrication and performance tests of a segmented p-type HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, George S.; Avignone, Frank T.; Cox, Christopher E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Jennings, Wayne; Reeves, James H.

    2008-10-01

    A p-type semi-coaxial HPGe detector has been segmented by cutting, with a diamond saw, and etching four circumferential grooves through the Li-diffused dead layer. The degree of segmentation was tested using a well-collimated low-energy gamma-ray source. An analysis cut that rejected events depositing energy in more than one segment was applied to an energy interval of 20385 keV, the region of interest ( Q ??) for 76Ge 0 ??? decay experiments. This segmentation cut resulted in a reduction of the Compton continuum of 59%.

  14. Position sensitivity of the TIGRESS 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, C. E.; Hackman, G.; Pearson, C. J.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cowan, N.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Martin, J. P.; Morton, A. C.; Phillips, A. A.; Roy, R.; Sarazin, F.; Starinsky, N.; Valiente-Dobn, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.

    2005-03-01

    Sensitivity to the locations of ?-ray interactions within a 32-fold segmented clover-type HPGe detector has been investigated through 90? Compton scattering of 661.6 keV ?-rays from a collimated Cs137 source. A mean position sensitivity of 0.44 mm at an energy of 373 keV is deduced by comparing the average pulse shapes for net charge collecting signals, as well as transient induced signals in neighbouring contacts, from 1007 pairs of three-dimensionally localized interaction points. The reconstruction of individual event locations based on a ?2 comparison with the measured set of basis waveforms is presented.

  15. Half-life measurements of lutetium-176 using underground HPGe-detectors.

    PubMed

    Hult, Mikael; Vidmar, Tim; Rosengrd, Ulf; Marissens, Gerd; Lutter, Guillaume; Sahin, Namik

    2014-05-01

    The half-life of (176)Lu was determined by measuring the (176)Lu activity in metallic lutetium foils. Three different HPGe-detectors located 225 m underground were employed for the study. Measurements using the sum-peak method were performed and resulted in an average massic activity of (52.610.36) Bq g(-1). The foils were of natural isotopic abundance so using the massic activity and the value of the natural isotopic abundance of (2.590.01)%, a half-life of (3.7220.029)10(10)a could be calculated. PMID:24360858

  16. True coincidence summing corrections for an extended energy range HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venegas-Argumedo, Y.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-01

    True coincidence summing (TCS) effect for natural radioactive families of U-238 and Th-232 represents a problem when an environmental sample with a close source-detector geometry measurement is performed. By using a certified multi-nuclide standard source to calibrate an energy extended range (XtRa) HPGe detector, it is possible to obtain an intensity spectrum slightly affected by the TCS effect with energies from 46 to 1836 keV. In this work, the equations and some other considerations required to calculate the TCS correction factor for isotopes of natural radioactive chains are described. It is projected a validation of the calibration, performed with the IAEA-CU-2006-03 samples (soil and water).

  17. Operation of bare HPGe detectors in LAr/LN2 for the GERDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnab Heider, M.; Cattadori, C.; Chkvorets, O.; di Vacri, A.; Gusev, K.; Schnert, S.; Shirchenko, M.

    2008-11-01

    GERDA is designed to search for 0???-decay of 76Ge using high purity germanium detectors (HPGe), enriched (~ 85%) in 76Ge, directly immersed in LAr which acts both as shield against ? radiation and as cooling medium. The cryostat is located in a stainless steel water tank providing an additional shield against external background. The GERDA experiment aims at a background (b) lessapprox10-3 cts/(kg-y-keV) and energy resolution (FWHM) <= 4 keV at Q?? = 2039 keV. GERDA experiment is foreseen to proceed in two phases. For Phase I, eight reprocessed enriched HPGe detectors from the past HdM [C Balysh et al., Phys. Rev. D 66 (1997) 54] and IGEX [C E Aalseth et al., Phys. of Atomic Nuclei 63 (2000) 1225] experiments (~ 18 kg) and six reprocessed natural HPGe detectors (~ 15 kg) from the Genius Test-Facility [H V Klapdor et al., HIM A 481 (2002) 149] will be deployed in strings. GERDA aims at b lessapprox 10-2 cts/(kgkeVy). With an exposure of ~ 15 kgy of 76Ge and resolution ~ 3.6 keV, the sensitivity on the half-life will be T0?1/2 3 1025 y (90 % C.L.) corresponding to mee < 270 meV [V A Rodin et al., Nucl. Phys. A 766 (2006) 107]. In Phase II, new diodes, able to discriminate between single- and multi-site events, will be added (~ 20 kg of 76Ge with intrinsic b ~ 10-2 cts/(kgkeVy). With an exposure of ~ 120 kgy, it is expected T0?1/2 > 1.5 1026 y (90% C.L.) corresponding to mee < 110 meV [V A Rodin et al., Nucl. Phys. A 766 (2006) 107]. Three natural p-type HPGe prototypes (different passivation layer designs) are available in the GERDA underground facility at LNGS to investigate the effect of the detector assembly (low-mass low-activity holder), of the handling procedure and of the refurbishment technology on long term stability and spectroscopy performance. The study started on prototype 1 (fully passivated on the borehole side). 60Co ?-irradiation of the detector in LAr resulted in an increase of the leakage current (LC), depending on the rate of LAr ionization which however is reversible. The radiation induced LC is believed to produce pairs of Ar+/e- that are drifted towards the passivation layer by the diode bias electric field (E) dispersed in LAr. In fact, E, numerically calculated by the Maxwell 2D code, resulted strong enough to drift charges before recombination, in the volume surrounding the passivation layer. Charges collected and trapped at the passivation layer cause a decrease of the its resistivity, i.e. an increase of the surface LC. The increase rate depends on the charge collection rate, on the density of trapped charge and on the starting value of the passivation layer resistivity. To study this mechanism two other detector configurations were tested. They have been irradiated in LAr to investigate the influence of both geometry and extension of the passivation layer and measurements with prototype 1 have been also repeated in LN2: prototype 2 (passivation layer only in the groove) shows a ~30 times lower LC increase rate than the case of prototype 1; prototype 3 (no passivation layer) does not show any increase of LC and prototype 1 operated in LN2 does not show any increase. The observed LC is cured by irradiation without HV, explained either by ? ionization of the passivation layer or by effect of the UV LAr scintillation light.

  18. Field analyses of (238)U and (226)Ra in two uranium mill tailings piles from Niger using portable HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Déjeant, Adrien; Bourva, Ludovic; Sia, Radia; Galoisy, Laurence; Calas, Georges; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The radioactivities of (238)U and (226)Ra in mill tailings from the U mines of COMINAK and SOMAÏR in Niger were measured and quantified using a portable High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The (238)U and (226)Ra activities were measured under field conditions on drilling cores with 600s measurements and without any sample preparation. Field results were compared with those obtained by Inductive Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and emanometry techniques. This comparison indicates that gamma-ray absorption by such geological samples does not cause significant deviations. This work shows the feasibility of using portable HPGe detector in the field as a preliminary method to observe variations of radionuclides concentration with the aim of identifying samples of interest. The HPGe is particularly useful for samples with strong secular disequilibrium such as mill tailings. PMID:25036918

  19. Estimation of background spectrum in a shielded HPGe detector using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Medhat, M E; Wang, Yifang

    2014-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are powerful tools used to estimate the background ?-radiation detected by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry systems with a HPGe (high purity germanium) detector contained inside a lead shield. The purpose of this work was to examine the applicability of Monte Carlo simulations to predict the optimal lead thickness necessary to reduce the background effect in spectrometer measurements. GEANT4 code was applied to simulate the background radiation spectrum at different thicknesses of lead. The simulated results were compared with experimental measurements of background radiation taken at the same shielding thickness. The results show that the background radiation detected depends on the thickness, size and lining of the shield. Simulation showed that 12 cm lead thick is the optimal shielding thickness. PMID:24292007

  20. Double β experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Dossovitskiyj, A. E.; Galashov, E. N.; Grinyov, B. V.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Laubenstein, M.; Mikhlin, A. L.; Nagornaya, L. L.; Nagorny, S. S.; Nagornyi, P. G.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Prosperi, D.; Polischuk, O. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Shlegel, V. N.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Stenin, Y. G.; Suhonen, J.; Tolmachev, A. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Vasiliev, Y. V.; Virich, V. D.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yavetskiy, R. P.; Yurchenko, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    A search for double beta decay of 64,70Zn, 180,186W was carried out by using low background ZnWO4 crystal scintillators, while a CeCl3 scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2β processes in 136,138,142Ce. A search for 2β decay of 96,104Ru, 156,158Dy, 190,198Pt and study of 2ν2β decay of 100Mo to the first excited 0+ level of 100Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe γ spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO4 crystal scintillators from enriched 106Cd and 116Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2β decay of 106Cd and 116Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate 96,104Ru and 116Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2β processes in 106Cd is in preparation.

  1. Resolution enhancement of gamma-spectroscopy data from neutron-damaged coaxial n-type HPGe-detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenauer, M.; Wirowski, R.; Marcus, D.; von Brentano, P.

    1994-02-01

    A new method has been developed to correct gamma-spectroscopy data for effects of charge carrier trapping in neutron-damaged coaxial n-type HPGe-detectors. In addition to the pulse height, the risetime of each signal is measured with standard nuclear spectroscopy electronics and both data are recorded on tape. From this data the amount of the pulse height deficit, which is due to the neutron damage, can be calculated for each event. The correction of the pulse height is done by software during the normal analysis of the listmode data. For the determination of the correction coefficients a calibration of the detector with a standard gamma-calibration source is performed. With this new technique the energy resolution of neutron-damaged coaxial n-type HPGe-detectors can be improved significantly.

  2. Evaluation of radioactive background rejection in 76Ge neutrino-lessdouble-beta decay experiments using a highly segmented HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Yuen-Dat; Campbell, D.B.; Vetter, K.; Henning, R.; Lesko, K.; Chan, Y.D.; Poon, A.W.P.; Perry, M.; Hurley, D.; Smith, A.R.

    2007-02-05

    A highly segmented coaxial HPGe detector was operated in a low background counting facility for over 1 year to experimentally evaluate possible segmentation strategies for the proposed Majorana neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment. Segmentation schemes were evaluated on their ability to reject multi-segment events while retaining single-segment events. To quantify a segmentation scheme's acceptance efficiency the percentage of peak area due to single segment events was calculated for peaks located in the energy region 911-2614 keV. Single interaction site events were represented by the double-escape peak from the 2614 keV decay in {sup 208}Tl located at 1592 keV. In spite of its prototypical nature, the detector performed well under realistic operating conditions and required only minimal human interaction. Though the energy resolution for events with interactions in multiple segments was impacted by inter-segment cross-talk, the implementation of a cross-talk correlation matrix restored acceptable resolution. Additionally, simulations utilizing the MaGe simulation package were performed and found to be in good agreement with experimental observations verifying the external nature of the background radiation.

  3. A Monte Carlo simulation of background characteristics of low-level HPGe detectors

    PubMed

    Vojtyla; Povinec

    2000-07-01

    The radionuclide levels observed at present in the marine environment are very low, therefore high sensitive spectrometric systems are required for carrying out oceanographic investigations. The present-state-of-the-art carefully designed low-level HPGe gamma-spectrometers, which do not operate underground, have a dominating background component induced by cosmic rays, mostly by cosmic muons. High energy cosmic rays can initiate a large number of physical processes leading to background induction. Analytic solutions for describing these processes are not available and therefore, a Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. The development of a simulation code for background induction is useful for the optimisation of a counting system in respect to its background characteristics. It enables to assert the background before the system is built and also to perform systematic investigation of the influence of various parameters on the background of the detector. The GEANT code has been selected from the codes systems facilitating the simulation of the passage of particles through matter, as it best meets the requirements for simulations with high-energy muons. The obtained results show that the background depends most significantly on the thickness, the size and lining of the shield. Lead shielding of 15 cm thick has been found to be the optimum shielding for most applications. It is not advisable to build an unnecessarily large shield. A shield with removable lining would be the best as the lining can be removed from applications where the lead X-rays are not a disturbing influence. PMID:10879859

  4. Measurements of radionuclides in Pond C with an underwater HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1995-08-01

    This study on Pond C is part of a broader effort to appraise Savannah River Site (SRS) waterways impacted by the Par Pond Dam remediation program that commenced 1991. In addition, the results were sought to provide a more complete appraisal of the status of historical radioactive releases that remain in the Lower Three Runs system. Gamma emitting radionuclide concentrations in Pond C sediment were measured with an underwater HPGe detector. The predominant radionuclide was Cs-137 and the only other radionuclide detected was Co-60, which was only 1% as intense as the Cs-137. At the time of the measurements (November 1992), the total Pond C inventory of {sup 137}Cs was 4.5 {plus_minus} 0.8 Ci of which 0.30 {plus_minus} 0.09 Ci was exposed during a 6-ft drawdown for Par Pond Dam repairs. The Pond C inventory of Cs-137 is only 10% of that of Par Pond, primarily because of the much larger area of Par Pond. However, Pond C has a larger average sediment concentration of 8.1 {mu}Ci/m{sup 2} compared to 4.5 {mu}Ci/m{sup 2} for Par Pond, which is consistent with Pond C being closer to the origins of the earlier SRS reactor releases. The maximum Cs-137 concentration observed for Pond C was 55 {mu}Ci/m{sup 2}, which is about 10% higher than the maximum observed for Par Pond.

  5. Double {beta} experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, A.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Belli, P.; D'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yurchenko, S. S.; Brudanin, V. B.; and others

    2011-12-16

    A search for double beta decay of {sup 64,70}Zn, {sup 180,186}W was carried out by using low background ZnWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators, while a CeCl{sub 3} scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2{beta} processes in {sup 136,138,142}Ce. A search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 96,104}Ru, {sup 156,158}Dy, {sup 190,198}Pt and study of 2{nu}2{beta} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the first excited 0{sup +} level of {sup 100}Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe {gamma} spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate {sup 96,104}Ru and {sup 116}Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2{beta} processes in {sup 106}Cd is in preparation.

  6. X-ray fluorescence analysis in environmental radiological surveillance using HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Peraza, E.; Renteria Villalobos, M.; Montero Cabrera, M. E.; Muoz Romero, A.

    2004-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been proven to be a valuable tool for determining trace quantities of heavy metals, such as uranium and lead, in different types of samples. The present paper demonstrates the applicability of XRF spectrometry to measure the concentrations of these heavy metals in samples from natural ore and soil. The values of uranium concentrations in rock from the Pea Blanca uranium ore, in Chihuahua, Mxico, were calculated for the purpose of precertifying the rock powders samples. The comparison with other techniques, such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and electron microscopy, was used to complete the precertification process, so that the sample powders may be used as secondary standards. The source-sample-detector geometry and the incident angle are the most important factors for obtaining low detection limits. The selected system uses a 57Co source of about 0.1 mCi to excite the K X-rays from uranium and lead. X-rays were recorded on a CANBERRA HPGe coaxial detector. The comparative results for two incident angles (90 and 180) performed previously by other authors show that the best geometry is the backscattering geometry. In the present paper, using EGS4 code system with Monte Carlo simulation, it was possible to determine the location and distribution of background produced by the Compton edge in the optimized geometry. This procedure allowed to find the minimum detectable concentration of uranium and lead, which was experimentally calculated using standards. The possibility of performing in vivo measurements rapidly and easily, as well as the factors affecting accuracy and the minimum detectable concentration in several samples are also discussed.

  7. Low background HPGe spectrometer in investigations of 2β decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; TGV Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer called OBELIX is briefly described. The calibration measurements using {sup 152}Eu, {sup 133}Ba and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources in different geometries, the obtained efficiency curves for OBELIX HPGe detector, the results of measurements of radioactivity of the NEMO-3 sources ({sup 100}Mo, {sup 150}Nd) as well as future plans for OBELIX detector (e.g. 0νEC/EC decay of {sup 106}Cd) are presented.

  8. An investigation of the performance of a coaxial HPGe detector operating in a magnetic resonance imaging field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, L. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cole, P.; Cresswell, J. R.; Filmer, F.; Jones, M.; Judson, D. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Sampson, J. A.; Scraggs, D. P.; Slee, M. J.; Bimson, W. E.; Kemp, G. J.; Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.; Cooper, R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear medical imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography are used to probe physiological functions of the body by detecting gamma rays emitted from biologically targeted radiopharmaceuticals. A system which is capable of simultaneous data acquisition for nuclear medical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging is highly sought after by the medical imaging community. Such a device could provide a more complete medical insight into the functions of the body within a well-defined structural context. However, acquiring simultaneous nuclear/MRI sequences are technically challenging due to the conventional photomultiplier tube readout employed by most existing scintillator detector systems. A promising solution is a nuclear imaging device composed of semiconductor detectors that can be operated with a standard MRI scanner. However, the influence of placing a semiconductor detector such as high purity germanium (HPGe) within or close to the bore of an MRI scanner, where high magnetic fields are present, is not well understood. In this paper, the performance of a HPGe detector operating in a high strength static ( BS) MRI field along with fast switching gradient fields and radiofrequency from the MRI system has been assessed. The influence of the BS field on the energy resolution of the detector has been investigated for various positions and orientations of the detector within the magnetic field. The results have then been interpreted in terms of the influence of the BS field on the charge collection properties. MRI images have been acquired with the detector situated at the entrance of the MRI bore to investigate the effects of simultaneous data acquisition on detector performance and MRI imaging.

  9. Determination of LaBr3(Ce) internal background using a HPGe detector and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Camp, Anna; Vargas, Arturo; Fernández-Varea, José M

    2016-03-01

    The presence of (138)La and (227)Ac impurities in LaBr3(Ce) scintillator crystals is a drawback for their use in environmental radiation monitoring. A method is presented to evaluate the internal (138)La activity. Firstly, an experimental set-up is prepared with the LaBr3(Ce) crystal acting as the radiation source and an HPGe detector that acquires the photon spectrum. Then, the internal background spectrum is simulated with a modified version of the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code. The simulated spectra agree with measurements conducted at ultra-low-background facilities. PMID:26688364

  10. Characterization of different surface passivation routes applied to a planar HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Eberth, J.; Gelain, M.; Carturan, S.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Tat, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of different passivation methods applied to the same planar high-purity germanium gamma radiation detector have been studied. By means of the scanning with a low-energy collimated gamma source, it has been found that the surface passivation gives rise to a dead layer below the intrinsic Ge surface, whose thickness and distribution are strongly dependent on the passivation type. Measured bulk detector properties like the peak-to-Compton ratio and efficiency have shown a dependence on the passivation and an influence of the passivation type on the depletion voltage, whilst the optimal energy resolution has been the same for all the passivations.

  11. Uncertainty analysis of in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements of air cleaning filter cartridges and 200 L drums by a HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Slaninka, Alojz; Slvik, Ondrej; Necas, Vladimr

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with most significant sources of uncertainty in determination of radionuclides massic activity in 200 L drums with radioactive waste (RAW) from decommissioning of nuclear power plant (NPP) A1 and operational air cleaning filters coming from different parts of NPP's ventilation system. It turned out that the most significant source of uncertainty is determination of photo peak detection efficiency, in particular measurement geometry. The detection efficiency of HPGe detector has been determined by calculation using ISOCS software (In Situ Object Counting System) and detector characteristics delivered by the manufacturer (LABSOCS). The detector efficiency is influenced by various factors like measurement geometry, deviation from standard geometry, environmental characteristics, sample properties (density, material composition), used collimator etc. Mentioned factors and their contributions to the uncertainty of detection efficiency and thus to the total uncertainty of massic activity determination have been individually evaluated in the paper. The main part of the work consists of evaluation of maximum uncertainty factor due to presence of hypothetical point source in measurement volume for both types of measurement geometry. PMID:19945884

  12. Monte-Carlo optimisation of a Compton suppression system for use with a broad-energy HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, R.; Burnett, J. L.; Davies, A. V.; Regan, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    Monte-Carlo simulations are used to evaluate and optimise multiple components of a Compton Suppression System based upon a Broad-energy HPGe primary detector. Several materials for the secondary crystal are evaluated, including NaI(Tl), BGO and LaBr3(Ce). BGO was found to be the most effective across the required energy range, with the sizes of the proposed veto detector then optimised to extract the maximum performance for a given volume of material. Suppression factors are calculated for a range of nuclides (both single and cascade emitters) with improvements of 2 for the Compton Suppression Factors, and 10 for the continuum reduction when compared to the Compton suppression system currently in use. This equates to a reduction in the continuum by up to a factor of ~240 for radionuclides such as 60Co, which is crucial for the detection of low-energy, low-activity ? emitters typically swamped by such a continuum.

  13. Distribution of lake-bottom radionuclides measured with an underwater HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Dunn, D.L.; Bresnahan, P.J.

    1996-07-01

    This study at Savannah River was done to assist decisions on the future of L Lake, an artificial reservoir made in 1983-5 for additional cooling for L Reactor discharges. EG&G overflight NaI mappings prior to filling indicated that most of the man-made radionuclides were {sup 60}Co and (predominantly) {sup 137}Cs in the earlier stream beds lying beneath the lake. An underwater HPGe was used in 1995 to rapidly scope the present radiation levels at 96 locations in the lake. The present levels are in reasonable agreement with the earlier overflight mappings. 1 fig, 4 figs.

  14. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  15. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  16. Multi-element readout of structured HPGe-detectors for high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy using CUBE-preamplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Spillmann, U.; Proti?, D.; Ro, C.; Sthlker, Th.; Weber, G.; Bombelli, L.; Alberti, R.; Frizzi, T.

    2015-02-01

    Very recently we have shown that CUBE-preamplifiers developed by XGLab s.r.l. can be used for the readout of single elements of thick structured planar HPGe- and Si(Li)-detectors produced by SEMIKON [1]. In this paper we will present the results of a simultaneous multi-element readout of structured detectors using the same preamplifiers for measuring high-energy x-rays (more than 100 keV) with a comparable energy resolution as for the single-element readout. Several high-purity germanium detectors (HPGe-detectors) with different position sensitive structures on one detector contact have been used for the first tests. In addition to that we have modified an existing 16-pixel HPGe-polarimeter from GSI-Darmstadt with the new readout. The detector elements (7 mm 7 mm each, arranged in a 4 4 matrix) are connected to CUBE-preamplifiers used in pulse-reset mode. The technological progress achieved with this detector system resulting in a significant improved energy resolution will contribute a lot to much more precise polarization measurements of x-rays emitted from atom-ion collisions which are part of the physics program of the SPARC collaboration (Stored Particles Atomic Physics Research Collaboration) at GSI and the future FAIR accelerator facility (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research).

  17. An approach to evaluate the efficiency of ?-ray detectors to determine the radioactivity in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed., S. Badawi; Ahmed., M. El-Khatib; Samah., M. Diab; Sherif., S. Nafee; Ekram., A. El-Mallah

    2014-06-01

    This work provides an approach to determine the efficiency of ?-ray detectors with a good accuracy in order to determine the concentrations of either naturally occurring or artificially prepared radionuclides. This approach is based on the efficiency transfer formula (ET), the effective solid angles, the self- absorptions of the source matrix, the attenuation by the source container and the detector housing materials on the detector efficiency. The experimental calibration process was done using radioactive (Cylindrical & Marinelli) sources, in different dimensions, that contain aqueous 152Eu radionuclide. The comparison point to a fine agreement between the experimental measured and calculated efficiencies for the (NaI & HPGe) detectors using volumetric radioactive sources.

  18. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  19. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry, which underwent several iterations before an optimal electrode configuration was found. The model was tested and validated against real-world measurements with existing germanium detectors. Extensive modeling of electronic noise was conducted using established formulae, and real-world measurements were performed on candidate front-end electronic components. This initial work proved the feasibility of the design with respect to expected high count rate and energy resolution performance. Phase I also delivered the mechanical design of the detector housing and vacuum cryostat to be built in Phase II. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation was created to show the response of the complete design to a Cs-137 source. This development presents a significant advance for nuclear safeguards instrumentation with increased speed and accuracy of detection and identification of special nuclear materials. Other significant applications are foreseen for a gamma-ray detector that delivers high energy resolution (1keV FWHM noise) at high count rate (1 Mcps), especially in the areas of physics research and materials analysis.

  20. Uranium Isotopic and Quantitative Analysis Using a Mechanically-Cooled HPGe Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Solodov, Alexander A

    2008-01-01

    A new, portable high-resolution spectroscopy system based on a high-purity germanium detector cooled with a miniature Stirling-cycle cooler, ORTEC trans-SPEC, has recently become commercially available. The use of a long-life mechanical cooling system eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of this new instrument for isotopic and quantitative analyses of uranium samples. The results of the performance of the trans-SPEC with the combination of PC-FRAM and ISOTOPIC software packages are described in this paper. An optimal set of analysis parameters for uranium measurements is proposed.

  1. Gamma-ray multiplicity measurement of the spontaneous fission decay of 252Cf in a segmented HPGe/BGO detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A; Burke, J T; Gibelin, J; Heffner, M D; Mintz, J; Norman, E B; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D; Sheets, S A; Snyderman, N J; Stoyer, M A; Wiedeking, M

    2008-04-23

    Coincident {gamma} rays from a {sup 252}Cf source were measured using an array of six segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) Clover detectors each enclosed by 16 bismuth-germanate (BGO) detectors. The detectors were arranged in a cubic pattern around a 1 {micro}Ci {sup 252}Cf source to cover a large solid angle for {gamma}-ray measurement with a reasonable reconstruction of the multiplicity. Neutron multiplicity was determined in certain cases by identifying the prompt {gamma} rays from individual fission fragment pairs. Multiplicity distributions from previous experiments and theoretical models were convolved with the response function of the array and compared to the present results. These results suggest a {gamma}-ray multiplicity spectrum broader than previous measurements and models, and provide no evidence of correlation with neutron multiplicity.

  2. High-efficiency photoionization detector

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-05-12

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 +- 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20/sup 0/C.

  3. The gender-specific chest wall thickness prediction equations for routine measurements of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am within the lungs using HPGE detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, L.R.

    1996-03-01

    The current chest wall thickness prediction equation is not applicable to use in routine lung counting measurements for detection of low energy photons (17-60 keV) within the lungs of male and female subjects. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation was derived for the NaI-CsI {open_quotes}phoswich{close_quotes} detection system, which is not the routine detection system in use; the subject position was supine, which is not the routine position; the equation did not account for the intercostal tissue thicknesses of muscle and adipose which significantly attenuate low energy photons (17-60 keV); it was derived from male subjects only and is used to predict the chest wall thickness of female subjects for whom it is not applicable. The current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors in the HPGe detection efficiency calibration for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (17- and 59.5-keV photons, respectively) relative to the gender-specific HPGe chest wall thickness prediction equations of this paper (+284% to -73% for {sup 239}Pu; +42% to -39% for {sup 241}Am). As a result, use of the current chest wall thickness prediction equation yields unacceptable percent errors (proportional in magnitude to the percent errors in the detection efficiency calibration) in the calculation of the minimum detectable activity (Bq) or in an initial assessment of a radioactive contamination exposure detected by a routine lung count measurement. 17 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Applying a low energy HPGe detector gamma ray spectrometric technique for the evaluation of Pu/Am ratio in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, I S; Mishra, Lokpati; Yadav, J R; Nadar, M Y; Rao, D D; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological samples is an important input for the assessment of internal dose received by the workers. The radiochemical separation of Pu isotopes and (241)Am in a sample followed by alpha spectrometry is a widely used technique for the determination of Pu/(241)Am ratio. However, this method is time consuming and many times quick estimation is required. In this work, Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological sample was estimated with HPGe detector based measurements using gamma/X-rays emitted by these radionuclides. These results were compared with those obtained from alpha spectroscopy of sample after radiochemical analysis and found to be in good agreement. PMID:26141295

  5. Study of the real part (f') of anomalous scattering factors for the elements of atomic number from Z = 64 to 73 using HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Savita B.; Naik, L. R.; Badiger, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The real part ( f') of the anomalous scattering factors for the targets of atomic number ranging from Z = 64 to 73 (Gd, Dy, Yb, Hf and Ta) are determined using low-energy external bremsstrahlung (EB) radiations. In this method, the EB photons are produced by beta particles from a weak beta source of 90Sr - 90Y in a nickel foil. The emitted EB photons are incident on the elemental targets of our study and the transmitted spectrum of the emerging photons from the target is measured using an ORTEC-made High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector coupled to an 8 K multichannel analyzer. The transmitted spectra show a sharp decrease in intensity at the K shell binding energies of the target atoms. The regions around the decreased portion have been used to determine the real part of the anomalous scattering factors. The experimentally measured values are found to be in good agreement with the available theoretical values.

  6. Metrological tests of a 200 L calibration source for HPGE detector systems for assay of radioactive waste drums.

    PubMed

    Boshkova, T; Mitev, K

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present test procedures, approval criteria and results from two metrological inspections of a certified large volume (152)Eu source (drum about 200L) intended for calibration of HPGe gamma assay systems used for activity measurement of radioactive waste drums. The aim of the inspections was to prove the stability of the calibration source during its working life. The large volume source was designed and produced in 2007. It consists of 448 identical sealed radioactive sources (modules) apportioned in 32 transparent plastic tubes which were placed in a wooden matrix which filled the drum. During the inspections the modules were subjected to tests for verification of their certified characteristics. The results show a perfect compliance with the NIST basic guidelines for the properties of a radioactive certified reference material (CRM) and demonstrate the stability of the large volume CRM-drum after 7 years of operation. PMID:26640236

  7. Experimentally determined vs. Monte Carlo simulated peak-to-valley ratios for a well-characterised n-type HPGe detector.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Karl; Samuelsson, Christer; Rf, Christopher L

    2014-10-23

    Measurements and simulations to investigate the contributing factors to the peak-to-valley (PTV) ratio have been both experimentally determined as well as Monte Carlo simulated for a well-characterised HPGe n-type detector together with a Cs-137 gamma source encapsulated in thin polystyrene. Measurements were carried out in a low-background gamma counting facility at Lund University. The results of the PTV ratio have been compared to distinguish what components or variables in the setup that significantly influence the ratio. In addition to manufacture specifications, the detector components have been examined using planar X-ray, source scanning and computer tomography in order to determine and verify component dimensions when necessary. In spite of these efforts a discrepancy of approximately 25% for thin absorbers in the PTV ratio between measurements and calculations is observed. However, this discrepancy becomes less significant for larger absorbing layers of copper (>1mm). This indicates that it would be difficult to achieve a field calibration for in-situ gamma spectrometry using the PTV ratio that could position a Cs-137 source in soil depth shallower than corresponding 1mm layer of copper. The results also showed that when building a detector in simulations part by part, the inner dead layer, and the contact pin are of great importance for the accuracy of the PTV ratio simulations. PMID:25464184

  8. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a 6Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m2, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  9. Simulation of background reduction and Compton suppression in a low-background HPGe spectrometer at a surface laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Shun-Li; Cai, Xiao; Wu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Yi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Fang, Jian; Sun, Xi-Lei; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Ying-Biao; Gao, Long; Zhang, Xuan; Zhao, Hang; Zhou, Li; L, Jun-Guang; Hu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are well suited to analyse the radioactivity of samples. In order to reduce the environmental background for an ultra-low background HPGe spectrometer, low-activity lead and oxygen free copper are installed outside the probe to shield from gamma radiation, with an outer plastic scintillator to veto cosmic rays, and an anti-Compton detector to improve the peak-to-Compton ratio. Using Geant4 tools and taking into account a detailed description of the detector, we optimize the sizes of these detectors to reach the design requirements. A set of experimental data from an existing HPGe spectrometer was used to compare with the simulation. For the future low-background HPGe detector simulation, considering different thicknesses of BGO crystals and anti-coincidence efficiency, the simulation results show that the optimal BGO thickness is 5.5 cm, and the peak-to-Compton ratio of 40K is raised to 1000 when the anti-coincidence efficiency is 0.85. In the background simulation, 15 cm oxygen-free copper plus 10 cm lead can reduce the environmental gamma rays to 0.0024 cps/100 cm3 Ge (50 keV-2.8 MeV), which is about 10-5 of the environmental background.

  10. DETEFF: An improved Monte Carlo computer program for evaluating the efficiency in coaxial gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daz, N. Cornejo; Vargas, M. Jurado

    2008-02-01

    We present the new improved version of our Monte Carlo program DETEFF for detector efficiency calibration in gamma-ray spectrometry. It can be applied to a wide range of sample geometries commonly used for measurements with coaxial gamma-ray detectors: point, rectangular, disk, cylindrical, and Marinelli sources (the last being newly included in this version). The program is a dedicated code, designed specifically for computation of gamma-ray detector efficiency. Therefore, it is more user-friendly and less time consuming than most multi-purpose programs that are intended for a wide range of applications. The comparison of efficiency values obtained with DETEFF and MCNP4C for a typical HpGe detector and for energies between 40 and 1800 keV for point, cylindrical, and Marinelli geometries gave acceptable results, with relative deviations <2% for most energies. The validity of the program was also tested by comparing the DETEFF-calculated efficiency values with those obtained experimentally using a coaxial HpGe detector for different sources (point, disk, and 250 mL Marinelli beaker) which contain 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 139Ce, 85Sr, 137Cs, 88Y, and 60Co. The calculated values were in good agreement with the experimental efficiencies for the three geometries considered, with the relative deviations generally being below 3.0%. These results and those obtained during the application of the previous versions indicate the program's suitability as a tool for the efficiency calibration of coaxial gamma-ray detectors, especially in routine measurements such as environmental monitoring.

  11. Heterodyne mixing efficiency for detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J H

    1987-09-01

    Monostatic radar equations are reported for laser-transceiver sensors that employ coherent optical detection over a linear-array photodetector. Explicit results are presented illustrating the impact of transmitter and receiver antenna patterns on the heterodyne mixing efficiency achieved by each detector element. PMID:20490110

  12. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  13. Determination of Barium and selected rare-earth elements in geological materials employing a HpGe detector by radioisotope excited x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Preiss, I.L.

    1984-01-01

    The laterite material (geological) from Cerro Impacto was first studied by air radiometric techniques in the 1970's and was found to have an abnormally high radioactive background. Further studies showed this deposit to be rich in thorium, columbium, barium and rare-earth elements (mostly La, Ce, Pr and Nd). A similar work has been reported for the analysis of Brazil's lateritic material from Morro do Ferro to determine elemental compositions (including barium and rare-earth elements) and its relationship to the mobilization of thorium from the deposit using a Co-57 radioisotope source. The objective of this work was to develop an analytical method to determine barium and rare-earth element present in Venezuelan lateritic material from Cerro Impacto. We have employed a method before, employing a Si(Li) detector, but due to the low detection efficiencies in the rare-earth K-lines region (about 30 KeV - 40 KeV), we have decided to study the improvement in sensitivities and detection limits using an hyperpure germanium detector.

  14. Measurement of radionuclide activities induced in target components of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 by gamma-ray spectrometry with HPGe and LaBr3: Ce detectors.

    PubMed

    Tomarchio, Elio

    2014-08-01

    Cyclotrons are used worldwide to produce radiopharmaceuticals by proton irradiation of a suitable target. The intense secondary neutron beam generated by proton interactions with the target induce high radionuclide activities in the target assembly parts that may result in an exposure to high dose levels of the operators during maintenance. The main goal of this work is to evaluate gamma-emitting radionuclide activities induced in Havar foils and titanium windows of a target assembly and carousel stripper forks of an IBA CYCLONE 18/9 cyclotron. The knowledge of radionuclide inventory for each component is required by many companies to assess risk for operators before waste handling and disposal. Gamma-ray spectrometric analyses were carried out with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors. HPGe is the most used detector for its high energy resolution although it is more suitable for use in a laboratory. The use of LaBr3:Ce can be considered a viable option, particularly in realizing a portable spectrometric system to perform "on-site" measurements and a fast dose rate evaluation before the disposal of activated parts. Due to a high activity of target assembly components replaced after a typical irradiation cycle (about 5000 ?Ah integrated beam current), gamma-ray spectrometric measurements were performed at a large distance from the detector, even more than 100 cm, or by using a purposely realized Lead-walled collimator. The identification of some key-radionuclides allows to evaluate through simple formulations the dose rate behavior for each component as function of decay time from the last irradiation. The knowledge of the dose rate behavior is a significant piece of information to health physicists for waste handling with safety at work. For an Havar foil, the dose rate will be reduced to about 1/1,000 of the starting value after a decay period of approximately 4 y (about 1,500 d), with a relatively safety at product disposal work. For a longer time, only long-lived radionuclides (57)Co, (60)Co, and (54)Mn contribute to dose rate. PMID:24949919

  15. Evaluation of the neutron background in an HPGe target for WIMP direct detection when using a reactor neutrino detector as a neutron veto system

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiangpan; Xu, Ye Lin, Junsong; Feng, Yulong; Li, Haolin

    2013-11-15

    A direct WIMP (weakly interacting massive particle) detector with a neutron veto system is designed to better reject neutrons. The experimental configuration is studied in this paper involves 984 Ge modules placed inside a reactor-neutrino detector. The neutrino detector is used as a neutron veto device. The neutron background for the experimental design is estimated using the Geant4 simulation. The results show that the neutron background can decrease to O(0.01) events per year per tonne of high-purity germanium and it can be ignored in comparison with electron recoils.

  16. High-efficiency single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiat, P.G.; Steinberg, A.M.; Chiao, R.Y. ); Eberhard, P.H. ); Petroff, M.D. )

    1993-08-01

    Using correlated photon pairs produced via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, we have measured the absolute single-photon detection efficiencies and time responses of four detectors: two solid-state photomultipliers (SSPM's) manufactured by Rockwell International Corp., and two custom-modified single-photon counting modules (SSPM's) manufactured by EG G, Canada. The highest observed efficiencies were 70.9[plus minus]1.9% (with an SSPM, at a wavelength of 632 nm) and 76.4[plus minus]2.3% (with an SPCM, at 702 nm). We believe these to be the highest reported single-photon detection efficiencies in the visible spectrum; they are important for quantum cryptography and loophole-free tests of Bell's inequalities, as well as more prosaic applications such as photon correlation spectroscopy and velocimetry. We found that the time profile for coincidences between the SSPM and the SPCM consisted of a main peak with a 3.5-ns full width at half maximum (FWHM) preceded by a smaller peak by 11 ns. A similar time profile between two SPCM's displayed only one peak, with a 300-ps FWHM. Afterpulses were detected in the SPCM's at a level of less than 10[sup [minus]4] of the counting rate, with an exponential decay time constant of 4.5 [mu]s.

  17. Obelix, a new low-background HPGe at Modane Underground Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, P.; Brudanin, V.; Piquemal, F.; Rukhadze, E.; Rukhadze, N.; Stekl, I.; Warot, G.; Zampaolo, M.

    2015-08-01

    An ultra-low background coaxial HPGe detector for gamma-ray spectrometry with a relative efficiency of 160%, corresponding to a 600 cm3 Ge crystal, was installed at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France (4800 m.w.e). To reduce the instrinsic detector background, all parts involved in the detector cryostat were selected for their low radioactivity contamination. A shielding, composed of an inner layer of roman lead and an external layer of regular lead was installed, together with a system to reduce the Rn level inside the sample chamber. The shielding was designed to allow the measurement of Marinelli-shaped samples. We present the constructional details which lead to a remarkable low detector background of 73 cts/kg.d in [40, 3000] keV. Measured samples showed that sensitivities about 100 ?Bq/kg in 226Ra and 228Th are reached for samples of some kg and 30 days of lifetime.

  18. Development of compact high efficiency microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, D. S.; Bellinger, S. L.; Fronk, R. G.; Henson, L.; Huddleston, D.; Ochs, T.; Shultis, J. K.; Sobering, T. J.; Taylor, R. D.

    2015-11-01

    Semiconductor diode detectors coated with neutron reactive materials are generally fashioned as planar diodes coated with 10B, 6LiF, or Gd. Planar detectors coated with 10B or 6LiF are limited to less than 5% intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency. Detectors coated with Gd can achieve higher efficiencies, but the low-energy signatures are problematic in the presence of background radiations. Microstructured semiconductor neutron detectors (MSNDs) can now achieve a tenfold increase in neutron detection efficiency over the planar diode designs. These semiconductor neutron detectors are fashioned with a matrix of microstructured patterns etched deeply into the semiconductor substrate and, subsequently, backfilled with neutron reactive materials. Intrinsic thermal-neutron detection efficiencies exceeding 35% have been achieved with devices no thicker than 1 mm while operating on less than 5 V, now allowing for instrumentation to be realized with similar performance as 3He gas-filled detectors.

  19. Quantum Efficient Detectors for Use in Absolute Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, Jessica; Eastwood, Michael; Pavri, Betina; Raney, James

    1998-01-01

    The trap or quantum efficient detector has a quantum efficiency of greater than 0.98 for the region from 450 to 900 nm. The region of flattest response is from 600 to 900 nm. The QED consists of three windowless Hamamatsu silicon detectors. The QED was mounted below AVIRIS to monitor the Spectralon panel for changes in radiance during radiometric calibration. The next step is to permanently mount the detector to AVIRIS and monitor the overall radiance of scenes along with calibration.

  20. Simulation and detector response for the High Efficiency Multimode Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Michelle; Zoglauer, Andreas; Amman, Mark; Boggs, Steven E.; Luke, Paul N.

    2011-10-01

    The High Efficiency Multimode Imager (HEMI) is a gamma-ray detection system consisting of two planes of CdZnTe detector elements to allow for both coded aperture and Compton imaging of radioactive sources. The HEMI detector is being developed to detect, characterize, and locate gamma-ray sources within the energy range of tens of keV to a few MeV. This paper details the methods used to make accurate simulations and performance predictions and provides an overview of the data analysis pipeline for imaging sources. Compton mode reconstruction and detector response results of simulations and measurements are shown for a 24-detector HEMI array.

  1. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  2. Efficiency and Gamma Sensitivity of a Lithium Glass Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Adam; Rees, Lawrence; Czirr, Bart; Hoggan, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Neutron detectors are used in national security applications for detecting potential radioactive material entering the country. Due to the shortage of Helium-3 for neutron detectors, Lithium-6 glass scintillators could be a good material for a replacement detector. Lithium-6 has a large neutron capture cross section, which gives high neutron detection rates. Our detector is based on the fact that neutrons are captured by Lithium-6 which rapidly decays into an alpha particle and triton. Those particles induce scintillation in the glass scintillator and are detected in a photomultiplier tube. The orientation of the plastic and Lithium-6 glass changes the efficiency of the detector. Monte Carlo for Neutral Particles (MCNP) calculations have shown that increasing amounts of plastic provide more efficient neutron detection and that placing a layer of glass in the front of the detector is the ideal configuration. Homeland Security requires that a replacement for Helium-3 detectors must have low gamma sensitivity and high neutron detection efficiency. We are measuring the absolute gamma sensitivity of various arrangements of glass and plastic scintillator. Our goal is to meet the Department of Homeland Security requirement for gamma sensitivity of one part in 10,000.

  3. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  4. Environmental measurements at the Savannah River Site with Underwater gamma detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1994-12-31

    Underwater NAI(Tl) and HPGe detectors are used in the environmental measurements programs at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A 22.9 cm {times} 10.2 cm NAI(Tl) detector on the Savannah River continuously monitors effluent releases from both SRS (DOE) and Plant Vogtle (Georgia Power). Correlations with known releases indicate a sensitivity of 4 mBq/l for {sup 58}Co with 1500 min spectra; such levels are well below those of hazardous or legal concern. A 30%-efficient HPGE detector has appraised radionuclides in SRS cooling pond sediments; the dominant gamma-emitting radionuclide detected was {sup 137}Cs, at levels ranging up to 2.0 MBq/m{sup 2}. The pond activities were adequately quantified by 1 min counts with the HPGE detector; resulting contour maps of sediment {sup 137}Cs provided guidance for partially draining the ponds for dam repairs.

  5. Existing NaI detectors; an efficient alternative to He-3 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, Walid A.

    2014-11-01

    Neutron detectors are important in various fields of research, safeguards, security, medicine, and industry. The most common methods for detecting neutrons involve utilization of the 10B(n,α), 6Li(n,α), or 3He(n,p) reactions; with the He-3 filled proportional counters being the most widely used because of their high detection efficiency and good gamma ray discrimination. However these counters have severe drawbacks in terms of detector size and scarcity of He-3. The aim of this work is to investigate an alternative neutron detection method by using a boron lining with existing NaI detectors and compare the results with those obtained from a He-3 detector. The results show a good sensitivity of the boron-lined NaI detector to neutrons at different source locations and a considerable improvement in efficiency compared to He-3 detectors. On top of this the NaI detectors are used to detect the gamma rays from the surrounding source and interacting media.

  6. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  7. MaMP and FeMP: computational mesh phantoms applied for studying the variation of WBC efficiency using a NaI(Tl) detector.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Fonseca, T C; Bogaerts, R; Lebacq, A L; Ribeiro, R M; Vanhavere, F

    2014-09-01

    In a previous study, the counting efficiency calibration was calculated for 36 computational mesh phantoms called MaMP and FeMP-Male and Female Mesh Phantoms, which span variations in height, weight and gender. They were created to be used in a sitting configuration WBC set-up using an HPGe detector. Now this work is extended to investigate the influence of body sizes and the position of the detector on the counting efficiency (CE) for a different counting geometry. This was done by creating a new set of MaMP and FeMP mesh phantoms lying on a reclining chair and by studying the variation of the counting efficiency using a NaI(Tl) detector for the WBC set-up of SCK-CEN. The deviation of the CE due to the detector's position with respect to the phantom was investigated. Correlations were also studied for CE as a function of trunk volume, waist-hips ratio (WHR) and waist-chest ratio (WCR) for different mesh phantoms. PMID:24938683

  8. Resonant infrared detector with substantially unit quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor); Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A resonant infrared detector includes an infrared-active layer which has first and second parallel faces and which absorbs radiation of a given wavelength. The detector also includes a first tuned reflective layer, disposed opposite the first face of the infrared-active layer, which reflects a specific portion of the radiation incident thereon and allows a specific portion of the incident radiation at the given wavelength to reach the infrared-active layer. A second reflective layer, disposed opposite the second face of the infrared-active layer, reflects back into the infrared-active layer substantially all of the radiation at the given wavelength which passes through the infrared-active layer. The reflective layers have the effect of increasing the quantum efficiency of the infrared detector relative to the quantum efficiency of the infrared-active layer alone.

  9. Determination of the Quantum Efficiency of a Light Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2008-01-01

    The "quantum efficiency" (QE) is an important property of a light detector. This quantity can be determined in the undergraduate physics laboratory. The experimentally determined QE of a silicon photodiode appeared to be in reasonable agreement with expected values. The experiment confirms the quantum properties of light and seems to be a useful…

  10. Determination of the Quantum Efficiency of a Light Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2008-01-01

    The "quantum efficiency" (QE) is an important property of a light detector. This quantity can be determined in the undergraduate physics laboratory. The experimentally determined QE of a silicon photodiode appeared to be in reasonable agreement with expected values. The experiment confirms the quantum properties of light and seems to be a useful

  11. Testing the Ge detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, W.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; et al

    2015-03-24

    High purity germanium (HPGe) crystals will be used for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, where they serve as both the source and the detector for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is crucial for the experiment to understand the performance of the HPGe crystals. A variety of crystal properties are being investigated, including basic properties such as energy resolution, efficiency, uniformity, capacitance, leakage current and crystal axis orientation, as well as more sophisticated properties, e.g. pulse shapes and dead layer and transition layer distributions. In this talk, we will present our measurements that characterize the HPGe crystals. We will also discuss the ourmore » simulation package for the detector characterization setup, and show that additional information can be extracted from data-simulation comparisons.« less

  12. Testing the Ge detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M. P.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W.P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G.H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C. -H.; Yumatov, V.

    2015-03-24

    High purity germanium (HPGe) crystals will be used for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, where they serve as both the source and the detector for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is crucial for the experiment to understand the performance of the HPGe crystals. A variety of crystal properties are being investigated, including basic properties such as energy resolution, efficiency, uniformity, capacitance, leakage current and crystal axis orientation, as well as more sophisticated properties, e.g. pulse shapes and dead layer and transition layer distributions. In this talk, we will present our measurements that characterize the HPGe crystals. We will also discuss the our simulation package for the detector characterization setup, and show that additional information can be extracted from data-simulation comparisons.

  13. Isotopic Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel with an Ultra-High Rate HPGe Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Glasgow, Brian D.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2014-06-06

    A longstanding challenge is the assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Determining the isotopic content of SNF requires gamma-ray spectroscopy. PNNL has developed new digital filtering and analysis techniques to produce an ultra high-rate gamma-ray spectrometer from a standard coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystal. This ~40% efficient detector has been operated for SNF measurements at a throughput of about 400k gamma-ray counts per second (kcps) at an input rate of 1.3 Mcps. Optimized filtering algorithms preserve the spectroscopic capability of the system even at these high rates. This talk will present the results of a SNF measurement with aged SNF pellets at PNNL’s Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, first results with a FPGA front end processor capable of processing the data in real time, and the development path toward a multi-element system to assay fuel assemblies.

  14. Investigations of 2β decay of 106Cd and 58Ni with HPGe spectrometer OBELIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukhadze, E.; Brudanin, V.; Fajt, L.; Hodák, R.; Klimenko, A.; Kochetov, O.; Loaiza, P.; Piquemal, F.; Rozov, S.; Rukhadze, N.; Shitov, Yu.; Špavorová, M.; Štekl, I.; Yakushev, E.; Zampaolo, M.

    2015-08-01

    Investigations of double beta decay processes to excited states of daughter nuclei were performed at the Modane underground laboratory (LSM, France, 4800 m w.e.) using the high sensitivity spectrometer OBELIX [1], which is a common activity of JINR Dubna, IEAP CTU in Prague and LSM. The spectrometer is based on the HPGe detector with the sensitive volume of 600 cm3 and relative efficiency of 160%. Investigation of resonant neutrino-less double electron capture of 106Cd was performed with ˜23.2 g of 106Cd (enrichment of 99.57%) during ˜17 days. The experiment with natural Ni (˜21.7 kg of mass) was also carried out during ˜47 days. The preliminary experimental limits for 0νEC/EC resonant decay to the excited states of 106Pd and different modes of β β decay 58Ni are presented.

  15. GRABGAM: A Gamma Analysis Code for Ultra-Low-Level HPGe SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been developed for analysis of ultra-low-level HPGe gamma spectra. The code employs three different size filters for the peak search, where the largest filter provides best sensitivity for identifying low-level peaks and the smallest filter has the best resolution for distinguishing peaks within a multiplet. GRABGAM basically generates an integral probability F-function for each singlet or multiplet peak analysis, bypassing the usual peak fitting analysis for a differential f-function probability model. Because F is defined by the peak data, statistical limitations for peak fitting are avoided; however, the F-function does provide generic values for peak centroid, full width at half maximum, and tail that are consistent with a Gaussian formalism. GRABGAM has successfully analyzed over 10,000 customer samples, and it interfaces with a variety of supplementary codes for deriving detector efficiencies, backgrounds, and quality checks.

  16. High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

    2007-01-16

    Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

  17. Charge collection efficiency simulations of irradiated silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, T.

    2014-12-01

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face a more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to the required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulation studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects on the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on the Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed before and after irradiation for fluences up to 1.5 1015 neqcm-2 for n-on-p sensors. A two level defect model and non-uniform three level defect model were applied for the proton irradiation simulations, and a two level model for neutrons. The results are presented together with the measurements of strip detectors irradiated by different particles and fluences and show considerable agreement for both CCE and its position dependency.

  18. Investigation of the quantum efficiency of optical heterodyne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency response and quantum efficiency of optical photodetectors for heterodyne receivers is investigated. The measurements utilized two spectral lines from the output of two lasers as input to the photodetectors. These lines are easily measurable in power and frequency and hence serve as known inputs. By measuring the output current of the photodetector the quantum efficiency is determined as a function of frequency separation between the two input signals. An investigation of the theoretical basis and accuracy of this type of measurement relative to similar measurements utilizing risetime is undertaken. A theoretical study of the heterodyne process in photodetectors based on semiconductor physics is included so that higher bandwidth detectors may be designed. All measurements are made on commercially available detectors and manufacturers' specifications for normal photodetector operation are compared to the measured heterodyne characteristics.

  19. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Wang, Xinkang

    2016-04-01

    The average minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the number of bits used by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  20. Germanium detectors in homeland security at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, S.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADES HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.

  1. Germanium detectors in homeland security at PNNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stave, S.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADESmore » HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.« less

  2. Germanium Detectors in Homeland Security at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Stave, Sean C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray detection is used for non-proliferation and national security applications. While lower energy resolution detectors such as NaI(Tl) have their place, high purity germanium (HPGe) also has a role to play. A detection with HPGe is often a characterization due to the very high energy resolution. However, HPGe crystals remain small and expensive leaving arrays of smaller crystals as an excellent solution. PNNL has developed two similar HPGe arrays for two very different applications. One array, the Multisensor Aerial Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a fieldable array that has been tested on trucks, boats, and helicopters. The CASCADES HPGe array is an array designed to assay samples in a low background environment. The history of HPGe arrays at PNNL and the development of MARS and CASCADES will be detailed in this paper along with some of the other applications of HPGe at PNNL.

  3. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on optimizing the detection efficiency of visible light photon counters (VLPCs), a single-photon detection technology that is also capable of resolving photon number states. We report a record-breaking quantum efficiency of 91 +/- 3% observed with our detection system. Both sources and detectors are independently interesting physical systems worthy of study, but together they promise to enable entire new classes and applications of information based on quantum mechanics.

  4. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  5. Development of a stochastic detection efficiency calibration procedure for studying collimation effects on a broad energy germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Massimo; Remetti, Romolo

    2013-06-01

    ISPRA, the Italian nuclear safety regulatory body, has started a measurement campaign for validating the performances of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry based on BEGe detectors and ISOCS software. The goal of the validation program is to verify if the mathematical algorithms used by Canberra to account for collimation effects of HpGe detectors continue to work well also for BEGe detectors. This has required the development of a calibration methodology, based on MCNPX code, which, by avoiding any mathematical algorithm utilization, is purely stochastic.Experimental results obtained by such a new procedure, were generally found to be 5% of the reference values. While, in the case of gamma-ray energies greater than 400 keV and small angles collimation, results given by ISOCS software produced larger deviations, around 20%. This work presents a detailed description of the simulation procedure and of the first experimental results.

  6. LEGe detector intrinsic efficiency calibration for parallel incident photons.

    PubMed

    Haoran, Liu; Jinjie, Wu; Juncheng, Liang; Fajun, Chen; Zeshu, Li

    2016-03-01

    A low energy germanium (LEGe) detector was calibrated by Monte Carlo simulation and experiment with radionuclides. At first, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for calibrating the detector for parallel incident photons in the 1.5-180keV energy range. Then, a set of radionuclides emitting low-energy X- or γ-rays was used to calibrate the detector for quasi-parallel incident photons, which provided experimental values to compare with the simulated ones. The results show good agreement with a largest relative discrepancy of -1.8%. PMID:26782703

  7. Development of A Self Biased High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara; Jian-Qiang Lu, James

    2013-09-03

    Neutron detection is an important aspect of materials protection, accounting, and control for transmutation (MPACT). Currently He-3 filled thermal neutron detectors are utilized in many applications; these detectors require high-voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when multiple detectors are used. In addition, due to recent increase in homeland security activity and the nuclear renaissance, there is a shortage of He-3, and these detectors become more expensive. Instead, cheap solid-state detectors that can be mass produced like any other computer chips will be developed. The new detector does not require a bias for operation, has low gamma sensitivity, and a fast response. The detection system is based on a honeycomb-like silicon device, which is filled with B-10 as the neutron converter; while a silicon p-n diode (i.e., solar cell type device) formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic charged particles emitted from the B-10 conversion layer. Such a detector has ~40% calculated thermal neutron detection efficiency with an overall detector thickness of about 200 ?m. Stacking of these devices allows over 90% thermal neutron detection efficiency. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a high-efficiency, low-noise, self-powered solid-state neutron detector system based on the promising results of the existing research program. A prototype of this solid-state neutron detector system with sufficient detector size (up to 8-inch diam., but still portable and inexpensive) and integrated with interface electronics (e.g., preamplifier) will be designed, fabricated, and tested as a coincidence counter for MPACT applications. All fabrications proposed are based on silicon-compatible processing; thus, an extremely cheap detector system could be massively produced like any other silicon chips. Such detectors will revolutionize current neutron detection systems by providing a solid-state alternative to traditional gas-based neutron detectors.

  8. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  9. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S. (Riley, KS); Shultis, John K. (Manhattan, KS); Rice, Blake B. (Manhattan, KS); McNeil, Walter J. (Winnfield, KS); Solomon, Clell J. (Wichita, KS); Patterson, Eric L. (Manhattan, KS); Bellinger, Steven L. (Manhattan, KS)

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  10. Investigations of 2? decay measured by low background HPGe spectrometer OBELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2013-12-30

    A low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer OBELIX was installed at the Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM, France, 4800 m w.e.). The detector was designed to measure a contamination of enriched isotopes and radio-impurities in construction materials, to investigate rare nuclear processes such as resonance neutrinoless double electron capture and two-neutrino double beta decay to excited states of daughter nuclei. Spectrometer sensitivity, contamination of NEMO-3 sources and results of 2?2?{sup ?} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the 0{sup +} (1130 keV) and 2{sup +} (540 keV) excited states as well as future plans for OBELIX detector are given.

  11. MCNP Comparison With Point Source Measurements From a Portable HPGe System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2006-01-01

    The Ortec trans-SPEC is a portable gamma ray spectrometer which is approximately 10.4 kg in total weight and 37 cm 16 cm 32 cm in overall size It utilizes a P-type 50 mm diameter and 30 mm height coaxial HPGe detector and has more than 3 hours of battery life when fully charged. This paper details the experimental agreement found for one of these detector units and that of MCNP5 [1] calculations. The purpose of carrying out this work is to evaluate the potential utility of the spectrometer for emergency response (consequence management) applications.

  12. DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

    2012-11-26

    ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

  13. True coincidence summing correction and mathematical efficiency modeling of a well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäderström, H.; Mueller, W. F.; Atrashkevich, V.; Adekola, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    True coincidence summing (TCS) occurs when two or more photons are emitted from the same decay of a radioactive nuclide and are detected within the resolving time of the gamma ray detector. TCS changes the net peak areas of the affected full energy peaks in the spectrum and the nuclide activity is rendered inaccurate if no correction is performed. TCS is independent of the count rate, but it is strongly dependent on the peak and total efficiency, as well as the characteristics of a given nuclear decay. The TCS effects are very prominent for well detectors because of the high efficiencies, and make accounting for TCS a necessity. For CANBERRA's recently released Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) well detector, an extension to CANBERRA's mathematical efficiency calibration method (In Situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory SOurceless Calibration Software or LabSOCS) has been developed that allows for calculation of peak and total efficiencies for SAGe well detectors. The extension also makes it possible to calculate TCS corrections for well detectors using the standard algorithm provided with CANBERRAS's Spectroscopy software Genie 2000. The peak and total efficiencies from ISOCS/LabSOCS have been compared to MCNP with agreements within 3% for peak efficiencies and 10% for total efficiencies for energies above 30 keV. A sample containing Ra-226 daughters has been measured within the well and analyzed with and without TCS correction and applying the correction factor shows significant improvement of the activity determination for the energy range 46-2447 keV. The implementation of ISOCS/LabSOCS for well detectors offers a powerful tool for efficiency calibration for these detectors. The automated algorithm to correct for TCS effects in well detectors makes nuclide specific calibration unnecessary and offers flexibility in carrying out gamma spectral analysis.

  14. 222Rn detection efficiency and sensitivity coefficient of the LR 115-II nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Planini?, J

    1992-04-01

    Radon activity concentrations in air were measured by the Kodak-Path LR 115-II nuclear track detector. Using the calibrated sensitivity coefficient of the detector (k = 0.0285 Bq-1 m3 tr cm-2 d-1 = 0.33 cm), the critical detection angle was calculated. In the alpha-particle energy region of 1-3.7 MeV, the detector efficiency for 241Am was near 32% but the 222Rn detector efficiency was 23%. The permeability constant of the detector paper filter was measured in a standard radon atmosphere and a value of 9.08 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 was obtained. PMID:1597388

  15. An empirical formula to calculate the full energy peak efficiency of scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mohamed S; Abd-Elzaher, Mohamed; Thabet, Abouzeid A; El-khatib, Ahmed M

    2013-04-01

    This work provides an empirical formula to calculate the FEPE for different detectors using the effective solid angle ratio derived from experimental measurements. The full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) curves of the (2?(*)2?) NaI(Tl) detector at different seven axial distances from the detector were depicted in a wide energy range from 59.53 to 1408keV using standard point sources. The distinction was based on the effects of the source energy and the source-to-detector distance. A good agreement was noticed between the measured and calculated efficiency values for the source-to-detector distances at 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50cm. PMID:23353091

  16. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-10-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled {sup 3}He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source.

  17. Efficient Soft-Input Soft-Output MIMO Chase Detectors for Arbitrary Number of Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Ahmad; Jalloul, Louay M.-A.

    2015-08-01

    We present novel soft-input soft-output (SISO) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) detectors based on the Chase detection principle [1] in the context of iterative and decoding (IDD). The proposed detector complexity is linear in the signal modulation constellation size and the number of spatial streams. Two variants of the SISO detector are developed, referred to as SISO B-Chase and SISO L-Chase. An efficient method is presented that uses the decoder output to modulate the signal constellation decision boundaries inside the detector leading to the SISO detector architecture. The performance of these detectors significantly improves with just a few number of IDD iterations. The effect of transmit and receive antenna correlation is simulated. For the high-correlation case, the superiority of SISO B-Chase over the SISO L-Chase is demonstrated.

  18. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.

    2015-03-15

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  19. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, S.

    2015-03-01

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  20. Performance of SEM scintillation detector evaluated by modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency function.

    PubMed

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In the paper, the SEM detector is evaluated by the modulation transfer function (MTF) which expresses the detector's influence on the SEM image contrast. This is a novel approach, since the MTF was used previously to describe only the area imaging detectors, or whole imaging systems. The measurement technique and calculation of the MTF for the SEM detector are presented. In addition, the measurement and calculation of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as a function of the spatial frequency for the SEM detector are described. In this technique, the time modulated e-beam is used in order to create well-defined input signal for the detector. The MTF and DQE measurements are demonstrated on the Everhart-Thornley scintillation detector. This detector was alternated using the YAG:Ce, YAP:Ce, and CRY18 single-crystal scintillators. The presented MTF and DQE characteristics show good imaging properties of the detectors with the YAP:Ce or CRY18 scintillator, especially for a specific type of the e-beam scan. The results demonstrate the great benefit of the description of SEM detectors using the MTF and DQE. In addition, point-by-point and continual-sweep e-beam scans in SEM were discussed and their influence on the image quality was revealed using the MTF. PMID:24323770

  1. Note: fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, S

    2015-03-01

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed. PMID:25832287

  2. Quantum efficiency test set up performances for NIR detector characterization at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; De Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.; Viale, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Payload Technology Validation Section (Future mission preparation Office) at ESTEC is in charge of specific mission oriented validation activities, for science and robotic exploration missions, aiming at reducing development risks in the implementation phase. These activities take place during the early mission phases or during the implementation itself. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near infrared detectors has been developed. The first detector to be tested will an HAWAII-2RG detector with a 2.5?m cut off, it will be used as commissioning device in preparation to the tests of prototypes European detectors developed under ESA funding. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers will be a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication presents the performances of the quantum efficiency test bench to prepare measurements on the HAWAII-2RG detector. A SOFRADIR Saturn detector has been used as a preliminary test vehicle for the bench. A test set up with a lamp, chopper, monochromator, pinhole and off axis mirrors allows to create a spot of 1mm diameter between 700nm and 2.5?m.The shape of the beam has been measured to match the rms voltage read by the Merlin Lock -in amplifier and the amplitude of the incoming signal. The reference detectors have been inter-calibrated with an uncertainty up to 3 %. For the measurement with HAWAII-2RG detector, the existing cryostat [1] has been modified to adapt cold black baffling, a cold filter wheel and a sapphire window. An statistic uncertainty of +/-2.6% on the quantum efficiency on the detector under test measurement is expected.

  3. Efficient data transmission from silicon wafer strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Lackner, K.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sharp, D.H.; Winter, L.; Ziock, H.J.

    1991-12-31

    An architecture for on-wafer processing is proposed for central silicon-strip tracker systems as they are currently designed for high energy physics experiments at the SSC, and for heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The data compression achievable with on-wafer processing would make it possible to transmit all data generated to the outside of the detector system. A set of data which completely describes the state of the wafer for low occupancy events and which contains important statistical information for more complex events can be transmitted immediately. This information could be used in early trigger decisions. Additional data packages which complete the description of the state of the wafer vary in size and are sent through a second channel. By buffering this channel the required bandwidth can be kept far below the peak data rates which occur in rate but interesting events. 18 refs.

  4. Efficiency of TTAC's ORTEC IDM

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, Jake; Combs, Jason C; Margrave, Timothy E; Miller, Ian J

    2012-08-01

    ORNL's Technical Testing and Analysis Center (TTAC) acquired a High Purity Germanium Detector (HPGe) from ORTEC - a variant called an Interchangeable Detection Module (IDM). This detector has excellent energy resolution as well as high intrinsic efficiency. The purpose of this report is to detail the determination of the efficiency curve of the IDM, so future measurements can quantify the (otherwise unknown) activity of sources. Without such a curve, the activity cannot be directly reported by use of the IDM alone - a separate device such as an ion chamber would be required. This builds upon the capability of TTAC. The method for determining the energy-dependent intrinsic efficiency is laid-out in this report. It's noteworthy that this basic technique can be applied to any spectroscopic radiation detector, independent of the specific type (e.g. NaI, CzT, ClYC).

  5. Bell inequalities violated using detectors of low efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pl, Kroly F.; Vrtesi, Tams

    2015-11-01

    We define a family of binary-outcome n -party m ?n settings per party Bell inequalities whose members require the least detection efficiency for their violation among all known inequalities of the same type. This gives upper bounds for the minimum value of the critical efficiencybelow which no violation is possibleachievable for such inequalities. For m =2 , our family reduces to the one given by Larsson and Semitecolos in 2001 [Phys. Rev. A 63, 022117 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.63.022117]. For m >2 , a gap remains between these bounds and the best lower bounds. The violating state near the threshold efficiency always approaches a product state of n qubits.

  6. Evaluation of efficiency calibration parameters of the LR-115 radon detector.

    PubMed

    Mireles, F; Dvila, J I; Garca, M L; Pinedo, J L; Lpez, H

    2010-05-01

    Measurement of 222Rn is an important research concern because of the high-energy alpha emission of its 218Po and 214Po progeny. The LR-115 passive detector is the basis of a solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) whose use for radon measurements has been well established. The usage of the SSNTD technique requires calibration by comparison. The aim of this work is to evaluate the efficiency calibration parameters for the radon measurement system that three steps: (1) irradiation conditions, (2) etching conditions, and (3) track counting. The following parameters were evaluated: breakdown and counting voltages for the spark counter, detector thickness, etching time, temperature and NaOH concentration as etching conditions for the LR-115 detector. Calibrating factors of 0.035 and 0.028 tracks cm-2 Bq-1 m3 d-1 for the open- and closed-chamber radon monitors, respectively, were determined considering the best efficiency calibration parameter values. PMID:20386194

  7. Quantum efficiency performances of the NIR European Large Format Array detectors tested at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; de Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.

    2015-10-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 10/12/2015, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 10/23/2015. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. The Payload Technology Validation Section (SRE-FV) at ESTEC has the goal to validate new technology for future or on-going mission. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near-infrared (NIR) detectors has been created. In the context of the NIR European Large Format Array ("LFA"), 3 deliverables detectors coming from SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side were characterized. The quantum efficiency of an HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne was as well measured. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers is a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication will present the quantum efficiency results of a HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne with a 2.5um cut off compared to the LFA European detectors prototypes developed independently by SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side.

  8. Determination of the energy limits and efficiency of track detectors for the formation of etched through tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.

    1994-04-01

    The energy limits for the formation of etched through tracks in plastic track detectors are calculated using track development kinetics for varying track etch rates. Using Monte Carlo calculations, it is shown that the energy limits and the efficiency of the detector are strongly dependent on the removed layer from the detector surface as well as on the thickness of the detector concerned. General empirical equations are given that relate the energy limits and the efficiency of LR-115 detectors to the removed thickness. The obtained results have important applications when track detectors are used in radon and neutron dosimetry, elemental mapping, charged particle activation analysis, and nuclear track microfilters.

  9. Efficient nanoplasmonic antennas for fabricating single protein molecule detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sharmistha; Dantham, Venkata Ramanaiah; Hussain, Sahid

    2015-06-01

    Real time (label-free) detection and sizing of single protein molecule at its natural state is "holy grail" in biosensing field. This non-destructive technique is useful for predicting the dangerous diseases at very early-stage. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of efficient nanoplasmonic antennas, which could be useful to fabricate an ultrasensitive nanoplasmonic-whispering gallery mode hybrid microresonator for the real time detection and sizing of single protein molecule. This hybrid microresonator could be easily converted as an ultrasensitive single molecule biosensor by anchoring suitable anti-bodies on the surface of the plasmonic nanoantenna.

  10. Quantum Efficiency for Electron-Hole Pair Generation by Infrared Irradiation in Germanium Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domange, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Olivieri, E.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L.

    2009-12-01

    A study is made of the quantum efficiency of a coplanar grid ionization/heat Ge detector operated at cryogenic temperatures for dark matter search. Carrier generation is performed with infra-red LEDs of different wavelengths (1.30, 1.45, and 1.65 ?m) near the optical bandgap of germanium. The corresponding quantum efficiency is obtained from an analysis of the Joule (Luke-Neganov) effect. This investigation is part of a program to optimize the reset procedure of the detectors in the Edelweiss-II dark matter search experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory.

  11. Evaluation of HPGe spectrometric devices in monitoring the level of radioactive contamination in metallurgical industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrucci, A.; Arnold, D.; Burda, O.; De Felice, P.; Garcia-Toraño, E.; Mejuto, M.; Peyres, V.; Šolc, J.; Vodenik, B.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the results of the tests of High Purity Germanium (HPGe) based gamma spectrometers employed for radioactivity control carried out on a daily basis in steel factories. This new application of this type of detector is part of the Joint Research Project (JRP) MetroMETAL supported by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The final purpose of the project was the improvement and standardisation of the measurement methods and systems for the control of radioactivity of recycled metal scraps at the beginning of the working process and for the certification of the absence of any radioactive contamination above the clearance levels (IAEA-TECDOC-8S5) in final steel products, Clearance levels for radionuclides in solid materials: application of exemption principles). Two prototypes based on HPGe detectors were designed and assembled to suit the needs of steel mills which had been examined previously. The evaluation of the two prototypes, carried out at three steel factories with standard sources of 60Co, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra and 241Am in three different matrices (slag, fume dust and cast steel) and with samples provided on-site by the factories, was successful. The measurements proved the superiority of the prototypes over the scintillation detectors now commonly used regarding energy resolution and multi-nuclide identification capability. The detection limits were assessed and are presented as well.

  12. Development of an underground HPGe array facility for ultra low radioactivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, E.; Hahn, I. S.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, M. H.; Leonard, D. S.; Park, S. Y.

    2015-08-01

    Low Level Counting techniques using low background facilities are continuously under development to increase the possible sensitivity needed for rare physics events experiments. The CUP (Center for Underground Physics) group of IBS is developing, in collaboration with Canberra, a ultra low background instrument composed of two arrays facing each other with 7 HPGe detectors each. The low radioactive background of each detector has been evaluated and improved by the material selection of the detector components. Samples of all the building materials have been provided by the manufacturer and the contaminations had been measured using an optimized low background 100% HPGe with a dedicated shielding. The evaluation of the intrinsic background has been performed using MonteCarlo simulations and considering the contribution of each material with the measured contamination. To further reduce the background, the instrument will be placed in the new underground laboratory at YangYang exploiting the 700m mountain coverage and radon-free air supplying system. The array has been designed to perform various Ultra Low background measurements; the sensitivity we are expecting will allow not only low level measurements of Ra and Th contaminations in Copper or other usually pure materials, but also the search for rare decays. In particular some possible candidates and configurations to detect the 0?ECEC (for example 106Cd and 156Dy) and rare ? decays (96Zr, 180mTa , etc ) are under study.

  13. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  14. Investigation of the Charge Collection Efficiency of CdMnTe Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov A.; Rafiei, R.; Boardman, D.; Sarbutt, A.; Prokopovich, A.; Kim, K.; Reinhard, M.I.; James, R.B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. The 10 x 10 x 1.9 mm{sup 3} samples have been fabricated, and the charge collection properties of the CdMnTe detectors have been measured. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100%. Ion beam induced charge (IBIC) measurements have been performed by raster scanning focused 5.5 MeV {sup 4}He beams onto the detectors. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of Te inclusions within the detector bulk, and the reduction in charge collection efficiency in their locality has been quantified. It has been shown that the role of Te inclusions in degrading charge collection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. IBIC measurements for a range of low biases have highlighted the evolution of the charge collection uniformity across the detectors.

  15. Soft x-ray quantum efficiency of silicon hybrid CMOS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary R.; Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Burrows, David N.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Griffith, Christopher V.; Nikoleyczik, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Si Hybrid CMOS detectors (HCDs) are sensitive to X-rays between approximately 0.2 - 20 keV. HCDs can provide superior performance to traditional CCDs in multiple areas: faster read out time, windowed read out mode, less susceptible to radiation & micrometeoroid damage, and lower power consumption. X-ray detectors designed for use in astronomical observatories must have an optical blocking filter to prevent the detectors from being saturated by optical light. We have previously reported on the successful deposition of an Al optical blocking layer directly onto the surface of HCDs. These blocking filters were deposited with multiple thicknesses from 180 - 1000 Å and successfully block optical light at all thicknesses, with minimal impact expected on quantum efficiency at the energies of interest for these detectors. The thin Al layer is not expected to impact quantum efficiency at the energies of interest for these detectors. We report energy dependent soft X-ray quantum efficiency measurements for multiple HCDs with different optical blocking filter thicknesses.

  16. Development of a low-mass and high-efficiency charged-particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, D.; Maeda, Y.; Kawasaki, N.; Masuda, T.; Nanjo, H.; Nomura, T.; Sasaki, M.; Sasao, N.; Seki, S.; Shiomi, K.; Tajima, Y.

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a low-mass and high-efficiency charged-particle detector for an experimental study of the rare decay K_L rArr π ^0 ν bar {ν }. The detector is important for suppressing the background with charged particles to the level below the signal branching ratio predicted by the Standard Model (O(10^{-11})). The detector consists of two layers of 3 mm thick plastic scintillators with embedded wavelength-shifting fibers and multi-pixel photon counters for the readout. We manufactured the counter and evaluated the performance in terms of light yield, timing resolution, and efficiency. With this design, we achieved an inefficiency per layer against penetrating charged particles of less than 1.5 × 10^{-5}, which satisfies the requirement of the KOTO experiment determined from simulation studies.

  17. Efficiency estimation for detecting U alpha particles in solid-state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Uda, T; Iba, H

    1985-09-01

    The detection efficiencies of solid-state nuclear track detectors, made with cellulose nitrate materials (LR-115 II) or allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) were investigated. Detection efficiency for a surface alpha source was experimentally obtained by changing the dimensions between the detector and the source, while alpha-particle incident efficiency was calculated. The ratio of the detection efficiency to the incident efficiency was then determined. It was confirmed that the ratio for LR-115 II was dependent on energy, but for CR-39 the ratio showed almost no dependency. Considering the relationship between solid absorber thickness and detection efficiency of the surface alpha source, detection efficiencies of U in various metals were estimated. The efficiency for U contained in Al and Fe was proposed as 16% for LR-115 II and 22% for CR-39. Using these efficiencies, amounts of U in some Al and Fe ingots were determined. These agreed with concentrations obtained by neutron-activation analysis with deviations of less than 15%. PMID:4030336

  18. Coincidence summing corrections for a clover detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chhavi; Danu, L. S.; Gathibandhe, M.; Goswami, A.; Biswas, D. C.

    2014-11-01

    The true coincidence summing effect on the full energy peak efficiency calibration of a clover HPGe detector for point sources has been determined as a function of sample-to-detector distance using mono-energetic and multi-energetic gamma ray sources. The coincidence summing effect has been observed to increase at closer distances with the correction factors as high as 1.25 at closest distance studied. The correction factors for the total and the photopeak efficiencies have been obtained using the analytical method. The clover detector response has been simulated using MCNP code, taking care of the bevels and the flat surfaces of the clover detector. The geometry of the clover detector has been optimized to match the experimental and the theoretical efficiencies. The true coincidence summing correction factors (kTCS) have also been experimentally obtained by taking the ratio of corresponding mono-energetic extrapolated efficiencies to multi-energetic efficiencies. The kTCS obtained from analytical method has been found to match with the experimental kTCS with the simulated values within 1-5%.

  19. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10(-19) W/Hz(-1/2) range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  20. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550?nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10-19?W/Hz-1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35?ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms.

  1. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  2. Charge collection efficiency of irradiated silicon detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Collins, P.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Loureno, C.; Sonderegger, P.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Pirollo, S.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Chapuy, S.; Dimcovski, Z.; Grigoriev, E.; Bell, W.; Devine, S. R. H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.; Berglund, P.; de Boer, W.; Hauler, F.; Heising, S.; Jungermann, L.; Casagrande, L.; Cindro, V.; Miku, M.; Zavartanik, M.; da Vi, C.; Esposito, A.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Buontempo, S.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Pagano, S.; Ruggiero, G.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; RD39 Collaboration

    2000-01-01

    The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of heavily irradiated silicon diode detectors was investigated at temperatures between 77 and 200 K. The CCE was found to depend on the radiation dose, bias voltage value and history, temperature, and bias current generated by light. The detector irradiated to the highest fluence 210 15 n/cm 2 yields a MIP signal of at least 15000 e - both at 250 V forward bias voltage, and at 250 V reverse bias voltage in the presence of a light-generated current. The "Lazarus effect" was thus shown to extend to fluences at least ten times higher than was previously studied.

  3. A convenient technique for determining the relative quantum efficiency of a monochromator and detector system.

    PubMed

    Kohl, J L; Curtis, L J; Chojnacki, D A; Schectman, R M

    1971-01-01

    A technique is described for determining the relative efficiency with wavelength of a monochromator and detector system using single photon detection. The method described utilizes a commercially available standard of spectral irradiance and provides a convenient, straightforward, and accurate technique for making the calibration, which is applicable over large ranges of wavelength and detector sensitivity. The calibration procedure has been designed to fill a need in atomic spectroscopy for a convenient method of determining the relative intensities of spectral lines in measurements which require single photon detection. PMID:20094386

  4. High optical efficiency and photon noise limited sensitivity of microwave kinetic inductance detectors using phase readout

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, R. M. J. Endo, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen ; Klapwijk, T. M.; Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate photon noise limited performance in both phase and amplitude readout in microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) consisting of NbTiN and Al, down to 100 fW of optical power. We simulate the far field beam pattern of the lens-antenna system used to couple radiation into the MKID and derive an aperture efficiency of 75%. This is close to the theoretical maximum of 80% for a single-moded detector. The beam patterns are verified by a detailed analysis of the optical coupling within our measurement setup.

  5. Fabrication process development for high-purity germanium radiation detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looker, Quinn

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors are well established as a valuable tool in nuclear science, astrophysics, and nuclear security applications. HPGe detectors excel in gamma-ray spectroscopy, offering excellent energy resolution with large detector sizes for high radiation detection efficiency. Although a robust fabrication process has been developed, improvement is needed, especially in developing electrical contact and surface passivation technology for position-sensitive detectors. A systematic study is needed to understand how the detector fabrication process impacts detector performance and reliability. In order to provide position sensitivity, the electrical contacts are segmented to form multiple electrodes. This segmentation creates new challenges in the fabrication process and warrants consideration of additional detector effects related to the segmentation. A key area of development is the creation of the electrical contacts in a way that enables reliable operation, provides low electronic noise, and allows fine segmentation of electrodes, giving position sensitivity for radiation interactions in the detector. Amorphous semiconductor contacts have great potential to facilitate new HPGe detector designs by providing a thin, high-resistivity surface coating that is the basis for electrical contacts that block both electrons and holes and can easily be finely segmented. Additionally, amorphous semiconductor coatings form a suitable passivation layer to protect the HPGe crystal surface from contamination. This versatility allows a simple fabrication process for fully passivated, finely segmented detectors. However, the fabrication process for detectors with amorphous semiconductors is not as highly developed as for conventional technologies. The amorphous semiconductor layer properties can vary widely based on how they are created and these can translate into varying performance of HPGe detectors with these contacts. Some key challenges include minimizing charge injection leakage current, increasing the long-term stability of the contacts, and achieving good charge collection properties in segmented detectors. A systematic study of contact characteristics is presented where amorphous germanium (a-Ge) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) contacts are sputtered with varying sputter gas hydrogen content, sputter gas pressure, and amorphous film thickness. A set of about 45 detectors fabricated from 11 different crystal samples were analyzed for electron barrier height and effective Richardson constant. Most of these detectors were subjected to as many as 10 temperature cycles over a period of up to several months in order to assess their long-term stability. Additionally, 6 double-sided strip detectors were fabricated with a-Ge and a-Si contacts in order to study their inter-electrode charge collection properties. An attempt is made to relate fabrication process parameters such as hydrogen content, sputter pressure, and film thickness to changes observed in detector performance and assess the level of reproducibility using the current methods. Several important results and conclusions were found that enable more reliable and highly performing detectors with amorphous semiconductor contacts. Utilizing the new information should enable consistent production of finely segmented detectors with excellent energy resolution that can be operated reliably for a long period of time. The passivation process could impact planar detectors as well as other designs, such as the p-type point contact detector. It is demonstrated that the long-term stability of amorphous semiconductor contacts is primarily dependent on the time the detector is at room temperature rather than the number of temperature cycles. For a-Ge contacts, higher sputter pressure yields a more stable process that changes little with time, giving a reliable hole-blocking contact. The a-Si contacts form a good electron-blocking contact with decreasing leakage current over time. Both materials, when 7% hydrogen is included in the argon sputter gas, show acceptab

  6. Geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe rectangular parallelepiped detector using arbitrary positioned point, plane, and volumetric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzawy, A.; Badawi, Mohamed S.; Thabet, Abouzeid A.; Gouda, Mona M.; El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Abbas, Mahmoud I.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray detectors are widely used in many fields like environmental measurements, medicine, space science, and industry, where the detector geometrical, total, photopeak efficiencies and peak-to-total ratio could be required. The calculation of the detector efficiency depends mainly on the value of the geometrical efficiency, which depends on the solid angle subtended by the source-detector system. The present work introduces a direct analytical method to calculate the geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe gamma-ray detector using off-axis isotropic radiating γ-ray [point, disk, and cylindrical] sources. To test the validity of the present work, the results are compared with some published data and also to prove how much it is important to determine the efficiency of difficult gamma-ray detection arrangement.

  7. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  8. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: optimisation of imaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Pennycook, Timothy J; Nellist, Peter D

    2015-04-01

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 1616 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. PMID:25481091

  9. Novel Approach to Surface Processing for Improving the Efficiency of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Jones, D.; Hall, J.; Kim, K. H.; Mwathi, J.; Tong, X.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2014-08-01

    We emphasize an improvement of the surface processing procedures for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, which is one of the principal problems limiting the technology. A rough surface enhances the leakage current into the medium, creating additional trapping centers and thereby degrading the detector's performance. Mechanical polishing followed by chemical treatment yields smoother surfaces as required, but chemical treatment, especially with bromine-based solutions, induces unwanted surface features, increases the surface conductivity, and generates chemical species that alter the material's surface and interfacial properties. It is essential to avoid such adverse consequences of surface etching in the manufacturing of highly efficient radiation detectors. We approached the problem of processing the crystals' surfaces by using two different solutions (a low-concentration bromine-based etchant mixture in conjunction with a surface-passivation reagent and a non-bromine-based etchant). The chemomechanical treatment yielded smooth nonconductive surfaces with fewer detrimental features, therefore allowing us to fabricate better devices. We determined the surface roughness using atomic force microscopy and optical profilometry (OP). We analyzed the surface structure, orientations of the crystals, and formation of chemical species by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques and delineated their effects on the devices' electrical properties and performance. Our experimental data revealed that our new chemical etching process produced nonconductive surfaces with fewer surface defects and so improved the detectors' charge transport and efficiency. We detail the results of our new etchants and compare them with those for conventional Br-methanol etchants.

  10. Loophole-free test of quantum nonlocality using high-efficiency homodyne detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Patron, Raul; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2005-02-01

    We provide a detailed analysis of the recently proposed setup for a loophole-free test of Bell inequality violation using conditionally generated non-Gaussian states of light and balanced homodyning. In the proposed scheme, a two-mode squeezed vacuum state is de-Gaussified by subtracting a single photon from each mode with the use of an unbalanced beam splitter and a standard low-efficiency single-photon detector. We thoroughly discuss the tolerance of the achievable Bell violation in the various experimentally relevant parameters such as the detector efficiencies, the electronic noise, the mixedness of the initial Gaussian state, and the probability of false triggers. We also consider several alternative schemes involving squeezed states, linear optical elements, conditional photon subtraction, and homodyne detection.

  11. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments

    SciTech Connect

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Hahn, Robert von; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan

    2015-02-15

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ∼10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK’s Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  12. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments.

    PubMed

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; von Hahn, Robert; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Novotn, Old?ich; Schippers, Stefan; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude

    2015-02-01

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut fr Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ?10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK's Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency. PMID:25725832

  13. A biomimetic olfactory-based biosensor with high efficiency immobilization of molecular detectors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Wang, Di; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-15

    The immobilization efficiency of molecular detectors is of great importance with regard to the performances of biosensors such as the sensitivity, stability, and reproducibility. This paper presents a biomimetic olfactory receptor-based biosensor with better performances by improving the immobilization efficiency of molecular detectors for odorant sensing. A mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized with specific olfactory receptors (ODR-10) was constructed on the sensitive area of surface acoustic wave (SAW) chip. The immobilization of ODR-10 was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The responses of this biosensor to various odorants were recorded by monitoring the resonance frequency shifts of SAW, which is correlated to the mass loading on its sensitive area. All the results demonstrate this biosensor can specifically respond to the natural ligand of ODR-10, diacetyl, with high sensitivity and stability. The sensitivity is 4 kHz/ng, which is 2 higher than that of previous work. The detection limit is 1.210(-11) mM. The major advances on immobilization efficiency of molecular detectors presented in this work could substantially promote and accelerate the researches and applications of olfactory receptor-based biosensors with different transducers, such as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), surface plasma resonance (SPR), and field effect transistors (FET). PMID:22040748

  14. Note: Determining the detection efficiency of excited neutral atoms by a microchannel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ben; Zohrabi, M.; Hayes, D.; Ablikim, U.; Jochim, Bethany; Severt, T.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-04-15

    We present a method for determining the detection efficiency of neutral atoms relative to keV ions. Excited D* atoms are produced by D{sub 2} fragmentation in a strong laser field. The fragments are detected by a micro-channel plate detector either directly as neutrals or as keV ions following field ionization and acceleration by a static electric field. Moreover, we propose a new mechanism by which neutrals are detected. We show that the ratio of the yield of neutrals and ions can be related to the relative detection efficiency of these species.

  15. A comparison of empirical and semiempirical efficiency calculations for Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Empirical and semiempirical formulations for calculating the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of Ge detectors are reviewed. By comparing the predictions of these formulae with experimental data obtained from an 86 cm 3 Ge(HP) crystal, it is found that the most precise predictions, over the largest possible energy range, are obtained using the semiempirical formula of Hajnal and Klusek [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 122 (1974) 559]. Mean deviations of 1.8% were recorded over the energy range 59.6-3253.6 keV. The calculated efficiency curve was found to be in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. High-efficiency WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors operating at 2.5 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V. B.; Korzh, B.; Bussires, F.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Marsili, F.; Shaw, M. D.; Zbinden, H.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the operation of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at 2.5 K, a temperature which is 70% of the superconducting transition temperature (TC) of 3.4 K. We demonstrate saturation of the system detection efficiency at 78 2% at a wavelength of 1310 nm, with a jitter of 191 ps. We find that the jitter at 2.5 K is limited by the noise of the readout and can be improved through the use of cryogenic amplifiers. Operation of SNSPDs with high efficiency at temperatures very close to TC appears to be a unique property of amorphous WSi.

  17. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  18. Quantum efficiency of Si Hybrid CMOS detectors in the soft X-ray band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Bongiorno, Stephen; Burrows, David; Falcone, Abraham; Griffith, Christopher; Nikoleyczik, Jonathan; Wells, Mark; PSU X-ray Instrumentation Group Team

    2015-04-01

    X-ray sensitive Si Hybrid CMOS detectors (HCDs) will potentially replace X-ray CCDs in the focal planes of future X-ray observatories. HCDs improve on the performance of CCDs in numerous areas: faster read out time, windowed read out mode, less susceptibility to radiation & micrometeoroid damage, and lower power consumption. Understanding the detector quantum efficiency (QE) is critical for estimating the sensitivity of an X-ray instrument. We report on the QE for multiple energies in the soft X-ray band of four HCDs based on the Teledyne Imaging Sensors HyViSITM detectors. These detectors have Al optical blocking filters deposited directly on the Si substrate; these filters vary in thickness from 180 - 1000 Å. We estimate the QE with a 1D slab absorption model and find good agreement between the model and our results across an energy range from 0.677 - 8.05 keV. This work was supported by NASA Grants NNG05WC10G, NNX08AI64G, and NNX11AF98G.

  19. A 3-dimensional interdigitated electrode geometry for the enhancement of charge collection efficiency in diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forneris, J.; Lo Giudice, A.; Olivero, P.; Picollo, F.; Re, A.; Marinelli, Marco; Pompili, F.; Verona, C.; Verona Rinati, G.; Benetti, M.; Cannata, D.; Di Pietrantonio, F.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, a single crystal CVD diamond film with a novel three-dimensional (3D) interdigitated electrode geometry has been fabricated with the reactive ion etching (RIE) technique in order to increase the charge collection efficiency (CCE) with respect to that obtained by standard superficial electrodes. The geometrical arrangement of the electric field lines due to the 3D patterning of the electrodes results in a shorter travel path for the excess charge carriers, thus contributing to a more efficient charge collection mechanism. The CCE of the device was mapped by means of the ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique. A 1 MeV proton micro-beam was raster-scanned over the active area of the diamond detector under different bias voltage conditions, enabling to probe the charge transport properties of the detector up to a depth of 8 ? \\text{m} below the sample surface. The experimental results, supported by the numerical simulations, show a significant improvement in the 3D detector performance (i.e. CCE, energy resolution, extension of the active area) if compared with the results obtained by standard surface metallic electrodes.

  20. Design of a polarization-insensitive superconducting nanowire single photon detector with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Xu, Ruiying; Zhu, Guanghao; Jin, Biaobing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) deliver superior performance over their competitors in the near-infrared regime. However, these detectors have an intrinsic polarization dependence on the incident wave because of their one-dimensional meander structure. In this paper, we propose an approach to eliminate the polarization sensitivity of SNSPDs by using near-field optics to increase the absorption of SNSPDs under transverse magnetic (TM) illumination. In addition, an optical cavity is added to our SNSPD to obtain nearly perfect absorption of the incident wave. Numerical simulations show that the maximum absorption of a designed SNSPD can reach 96% at 1550 nm, and indicate that the absorption difference between transverse electric (TE) and TM polarization is less than 0.5% across a wavelength window of 300 nm. Our work provides the first demonstration of the possibility of designing a polarization-insensitive and highly efficient SNSPD without performing device symmetry improvements. PMID:26948672

  1. Heterodyne detection at 300 GHz using glow discharge detectors with efficient quasi-optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon Akram, Avihai; Rozban, Daniel; Levanon, Assaf; Abramovich, A.; Kopeika, N. S.

    2013-05-01

    A miniature neon indicator lamp, also known as a Glow Discharge Detector (GDD), costing about 50 cents, was found to be an excellent room temperature THz radiation detector. A proof of concept of 300 GHz heterodyne detection using GDD is demonstrated in this paper. Furthermore, a comparison to direct detection was carried-out and polarization effects on heterodyne detection were investigated. Preliminary results at 300 GHz showed better sensitivity by a factor of 20 with only 56 microwatt local oscillator power using heterodyne compared to direct detection. Further improvement of the detection sensitivity can be achieved if the Local Oscillator (LO) power (Plo) is increased. Effects of orthogonal polarizations of signal and local oscillator powers on heterodyne sensitivity were found to be surprisingly weak. More efficient quasi optical design for heterodyne detection is presented in this study, experimental results showed above 50% better performance compared to conventional ones.

  2. Design of a polarization-insensitive superconducting nanowire single photon detector with high detection efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Xu, Ruiying; Zhu, Guanghao; Jin, Biaobing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) deliver superior performance over their competitors in the near-infrared regime. However, these detectors have an intrinsic polarization dependence on the incident wave because of their one-dimensional meander structure. In this paper, we propose an approach to eliminate the polarization sensitivity of SNSPDs by using near-field optics to increase the absorption of SNSPDs under transverse magnetic (TM) illumination. In addition, an optical cavity is added to our SNSPD to obtain nearly perfect absorption of the incident wave. Numerical simulations show that the maximum absorption of a designed SNSPD can reach 96% at 1550 nm, and indicate that the absorption difference between transverse electric (TE) and TM polarization is less than 0.5% across a wavelength window of 300 nm. Our work provides the first demonstration of the possibility of designing a polarization-insensitive and highly efficient SNSPD without performing device symmetry improvements. PMID:26948672

  3. Evaluation of the relative TL efficiency of the thermoluminescent detectors to heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    S?del, M; Bilski, P; Swako?, J; Weber, A

    2016-01-01

    The relative thermoluminescence efficiency, ?, is in general not constant but depends on ionisation density. Evaluation of the ? is therefore important especially for correct interpretation of measurements of densely ionising radiation doses in proton radiotherapy or in space dosimetry. The correct determination of the ? is not always straightforward especially when more strongly ionising radiation is to be measured. In the present work, the process of calculation of the ? based on two kinds of heavy charged particles was studied. Several factors which may influence the value of the ? and their significance for the final result were discussed. These include for example non-uniform deposition of the dose within the detector volume, self-attenuation of thermoluminescent light, choice of the reference radiation, etc. The presented approach was applied to the experimental results of ? of LiF:Mg,Ti detectors irradiated with two kinds of heavy charged particles, protons and alpha particles. PMID:25656042

  4. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Pernice, W H P; Schuck, C; Minaeva, O; Li, M; Goltsman, G N; Sergienko, A V; Tang, H X

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  5. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  6. The trigger system of the Pierre Auger Surface Detector: operation, efficiency and stablility

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, D.; Armengaud, E.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Bertou, Xavier; Billoir, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dorofeev, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gorgi, A.; Hamilton, J.C.; Harton, J.

    2005-08-01

    The trigger system of the Surface Detector (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory is described, from the identification of candidate showers (E > 1 EeV) at the level of a single station, among a huge background (mainly single muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences at a higher central trigger level (including the reconstruction accuracy). Efficiency of a single station trigger is evaluated using real data, and the high performance of event selection hierarchy will be demonstrated.

  7. The efficiency and angular sensitivity of the LR-115 nuclear track detector to alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planini?, J.

    1992-07-01

    The LR-115 detector sensitivity coefficient was calibrated ( k = 0.0343 tr cm -2 d -1 per Bq m -3 = 0.40 cm) and detection threshold energies were determined ( E1 = 0.7 MeV, Eu = 3.86 MeV). Measurements of the alpha particle diameter ( d) showed a parabolic dependence on the incident particle energy ( E). Relationship between the detection efficiency, critical detection angle, k, d and E were derived. The emperical effective value of the critical angle was 59.

  8. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  9. Comparison of two HPGe counting system used in activation studies for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Szücs, T.; Kiss, G. G.; Fülöp, Zs.

    2014-05-09

    The activation method is a widely used technique to measure charged-particle induced cross sections for astrophys-ical applications. This two step technique is used for example to measure alpha-induced cross sections in γ-process related studies. The first step – in which a target is irradiated with a proton/alpha beam – is followed by the determination of the produced activity. Especially in p-process related studies in the heavier mass range, the produced radioactive nuclei decays mainly with electron-capture, resulting intense x-rays. The activity of the reaction products hence can be determine via the counting of these x-rays, and not only by counting the usually much weaker γ-rays. In this paper we compare the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of two High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors used for x- and γ-ray counting in activation experiments.

  10. Validation of Pulse Shape Simulation for Ge detectors in the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, Benjamin; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR expects to begin searching for neutrinoless double beta decay using 76 Ge-enriched detectors in 2015. The DEMONSTRATOR high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are built in the p-type point contact (PPC) geometry. The electrode of a PPC detector is small and shallow, resulting in low intrinsic capacitance and bulk field strengths compared to the traditional coaxial HPGe configuration. These characteristics allow for discrimination of signal event candidates from background using pulse shape analysis (PSA). In order to fully understand the systematics and efficiencies of PSA cuts, the MAJORANA collaboration has developed a software package to simulate signal generation in PPC detectors. This code has been validated by comparing simulated pulses to the pulse shapes generated for given detectors using an external source. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  12. Minimum length Pb/SCIN detector for efficient cosmic ray identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. David

    1989-01-01

    A study was made of the performance of a minimal length cosmic ray shower detector that would be light enough for space flight and would provide efficient identification of positions and protons. Cosmic ray positions are mainly produced in the decay chain of: Pion yields Muon yields Positron and they provide a measure of the matter density traversed by primary protons. Present positron flux measurements are consistent with the Leaky Box and Halo models for sources of cosmic rays. Abundant protons in the space environment are a significant source of background that would wash out the positron signal. Protons and positrons produced very distictive showers of particles when they enter matter; many studies have been published on their behavior on large calorimeter detectors. The challenge is to determine the minimal material necessary (minimal calorimeter depth) for positive particles identification. The primary instrument for the investigation is the Monte Carlo code GEANT, a library of programs from CERN that can be used to model experimental geometry, detector responses and particle interaction processes. The use of the Monte Carlo approach is crucial since statistical fluctuations in shower shape are significant. Studies conducted during the 1988 summer program showed that straightforward approaches to the problem achieved 85 to 90 percent correct identification, but left a residue of 10 to 15 percent misidentified particles. This percentage improved to a few percent when multiple shower-cut criteria were applied to the data. This summer, the same study was extended to employ several physical and statistical methods of identifying response of the calorimeter and the efficiency of the optimal shower cuts to off-normal incidence particle was determined.

  13. ELENA MCP detector: absolute detection efficiency for low-energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J. A.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-09-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission of ESA to Mercury to be launched in 2015. ELENA is a Time of Flight (TOF) sensor, based on a novel concept using an ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section), which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop detector. The scientific objective of ELENA is to detect energetic neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 76 FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the plasma environment and the planets surface, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles released from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (< 1eV - < 100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E < 30 eV) is a crucial point for this investigation. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of the University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different types of MCP (with and without coating) have been performed providing the detection efficiencies in the energy range 10eV - 1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are discussed here.

  14. A Mechanically-Cooled, Highly-Portable, HPGe-Based, Coded-Aperture Gamma-Ray Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Hayward, Jason P; Raffo-Caiado, Ana Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Coded-aperture gamma-ray imaging is a mature technology that is capable of providing accurate and quantitative images of nuclear materials. Although it is potentially of high value to the safeguards and arms-control communities, it has yet to be fully embraced by those communities. One reason for this is the limited choice, high-cost, and low efficiency of commercial instruments; while instruments made by research organizations are frequently large and / or unsuitable for field work. In this paper we present the results of a project that mates the coded-aperture imaging approach with the latest in commercially-available, position-sensitive, High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detec-tors. The instrument replaces a laboratory prototype that, was unsuitable for other than demonstra-tions. The original instrument, and the cart on which it is mounted to provide mobility and pointing capabilities, has a footprint of ~ 2/3 m x 2 m, weighs ~ 100 Kg, and requires cryogen refills every few days. In contrast, the new instrument is tripod mounted, weighs of order 25 Kg, operates with a laptop computer, and is mechanically cooled. The instrument is being used in a program that is ex-ploring the use of combined radiation and laser scanner imaging. The former provides information on the presence, location, and type of nuclear materials while the latter provides design verification information. To align the gamma-ray images with the laser scanner data, the Ge imager is fitted and aligned to a visible-light stereo imaging unit. This unit generates a locus of 3D points that can be matched to the precise laser scanner data. With this approach, the two instruments can be used completely independently at a facility, and yet the data can be accurately overlaid based on the very structures that are being measured.

  15. Maximizing the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate detectors - The collection of photoelectrons from the interchannel web using an electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. C.; Hettrick, M. C.; Malina, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    High quantum efficiency and two-dimensional imaging capabilities make the microchannel plate (MCP) a suitable detector for a sky survey instrument. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite, to be launched in 1987, will use MCP detectors. A feature which limits MCP efficiency is related to the walls of individual channels. The walls are of finite thickness and thus form an interchannel web. Under normal circumstances, this web does not contribute to the detector's quantum efficiency. Panitz and Foesch (1976) have found that in the case of a bombardment with ions, electrons were ejected from the electrode material coating the web. By applying a small electric field, the electrons were returned to the MCP surface where they were detected. The present investigation is concerned with the enhancement of quantum efficiencies in the case of extreme UV wavelengths. Attention is given to a model and a computer simulation which quantitatively reproduce the experimental results.

  16. Reducing the Read Noise of H2RG Detector Arrays by more Efficient use of Reference Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixen, D. J.; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a process for characterizing the correlation properties of the noise in large two-dimensional detector arrays, and describe an efficient process for its removal. In the case of the 2k x 2k HAWAII-2RG detectors (H2RG) detectors from Teledyne which are being used on the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we find that we can reduce the read noise by thirty percent. Noise on large spatial scales is dramatically reduced. With this relatively simple process, we provide a performance improvement that is equivalent to a significant increase in telescope collecting area for high resolution spectroscopy with NIRSpec.

  17. A high efficiency, low background neutron and gamma detector for cold fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, B.; Celani, F.; Corradi, M.; Ferrarotto, F.; Iucci, N.; Milone, V.; Spallone, A.; Villoresi, G.

    1995-02-01

    The present apparatus (named by the acrostic "FERMI" also to celebrate the 60 yr of the discovery, by Enrico Fermi and collaborators at Rome University, of the effects of moderation of neutrons) is mainly a moderated neutron detector developed for the search of cold fusion events. It is based on 7 BF 3 and 2 3He proportional counters with detection efficiency for neutrons 40%-8% in the range 1 keV-20 MeV, pulse shape acquisition and good time resolution for neutron bursts; it also allows us to perform a good reconstruction of the average original neutron energy. The neutron background measured in the Gran Sasso INFN underground laboratory is about 0.09 Hz. Gamma rays are revealed mostly by a complementary low background NaI detector with 26% solid angle coverage. The performances are controlled by a full MC simulation, experimentally tested. A high multiplicity (up to 100) neutrons' event has been detected during background runs. The system is being upgraded by the detection and identification of charged hadrons.

  18. Optimization of the Efficiency of a Neutron Detector to Measure (α, n) Reaction Cross-Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perello, Jesus; Montes, Fernando; Ahn, Tony; Meisel, Zach; Joint InstituteNuclear Astrophysics Team

    2015-04-01

    Nucleosynthesis, the origin of elements, is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. A recent particular nucleosynthesis process of interest is the charge-particle process (cpp). In the cpp, elements form by nuclear fusion reactions during supernovae. This process of nuclear fusion, (α,n), will be studied by colliding beam elements produced and accelerated at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to a helium-filled cell target. The elements will fuse with α (helium nuclei) and emit neutrons during the reaction. The neutrons will be detected for a count of fused-elements, thus providing us the probability of such reactions. The neutrons will be detected using the Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO). Currently, NERO's efficiency varies for neutrons at the expected energy range (0-12 MeV). To study (α,n), NERO's efficiency must be near-constant at these energies. Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP6), a software package that simulates nuclear processes, was used to optimize NERO configuration for the experiment. MCNP6 was used to simulate neutron interaction with different NERO configurations at the expected neutron energies. By adding additional 3He detectors and polyethylene, a near-constant efficiency at these energies was obtained in the simulations. With the new NERO configuration, study of the (α,n) reactions can begin, which may explain how elements are formed in the cpp. SROP MSU, NSF, JINA, McNair Society.

  19. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  20. 4D STEM: High efficiency phase contrast imaging using a fast pixelated detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jones, L.; Ryll, H.; Simson, M.; Soltau, H.; Kondo, Y.; Sagawa, R.; Banba, H.; MacLaren, I.; Nellist, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Phase contrast imaging is widely used for imaging beam sensitive and weak phase objects in electron microscopy. In this work we demonstrate the achievement of high efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using the pnCCD, a fast direct electron pixelated detector, which records the diffraction patterns at every probe position with a speed of 1000 to 4000 frames per second, forming a 4D STEM dataset simultaneously with the incoherent Z-contrast imaging. Ptychographic phase reconstruction has been applied and the obtained complex transmission function reveals the phase of the specimen. The results using GaN and Ti, Nd- doped BiFeO3 show that this imaging mode is especially powerful for imaging light elements in the presence of much heavier elements.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  2. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performances of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes are compared. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300 A and 1800 A. It is demonstrated that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40 percent at 1216 A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CsI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution of less than 70 microns FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 50,000/sec. Background rates of 0.55 events sq cm per sec have been achieved and low distortion (less than 1 percent) imaging has been demonstrated.

  3. Measurement of the Charge Collection Efficiency After Heavy Non-Uniform Irradiation in BABAR Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Calderini, G.; Forti, F.; Marchiori, G.; Rizzo, G.; Giorgi, M.A.; Bosisio, L.; Dittongo, S.; Campagnari, C.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the depletion voltage changes, leakage current increase and charge collection efficiency of a silicon microstrip detector identical to those used in the inner layers of the BABAR Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) after heavy nonuniform irradiation. A full SVT module with the front-end electronics connected has been irradiated with a 0.9 GeV electron beam up to a peak fluence of 3.5 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 2}, well beyond the level causing substrate type inversion. We have irradiated the silicon with a nonuniform profile having {sigma} = 1.4 mm that simulates the conditions encountered in the BABAR experiment by the modules intersecting the horizontal machine plane. The position dependence of the charge collection properties and the depletion voltage have been investigated in detail using a 1060 nm LED and an innovative measuring technique based only on the digital output of the chip.

  4. Three-dimensional diamond detectors: Charge collection efficiency of graphitic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S. Parrini, G.; Sciortino, S.; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino ; Bellini, M.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Istituto Nazionale di Ottica , Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Firenze ; Corsi, C.

    2013-12-02

    Implementation of 3D-architectures in diamond detectors promises to achieve unreached performances in the radiation-harsh environment of future high-energy physics experiments. This work reports on the collection efficiency under ?-irradiation of graphitic 3D-electrodes, created by laser pulses in the domains of nanoseconds (ns-made-sensors) and femtoseconds (fs-made-sensors). Full collection is achieved with the fs-made-sensors, while a loss of 25%30% is found for the ns-made-sensors. The peculiar behaviour of ns-made sensors has been explained by the presence of a nano-structured sp{sup 3}-carbon layer around the graphitic electrodes, evidenced by micro-Raman imaging, by means of a numerical model of the charge transport near the electrodes.

  5. Three-dimensional diamond detectors: Charge collection efficiency of graphitic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, S.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Gorelli, F.; Parrini, G.; Santoro, M.; Sciortino, S.

    2013-12-01

    Implementation of 3D-architectures in diamond detectors promises to achieve unreached performances in the radiation-harsh environment of future high-energy physics experiments. This work reports on the collection efficiency under ?-irradiation of graphitic 3D-electrodes, created by laser pulses in the domains of nanoseconds (ns-made-sensors) and femtoseconds (fs-made-sensors). Full collection is achieved with the fs-made-sensors, while a loss of 25%-30% is found for the ns-made-sensors. The peculiar behaviour of ns-made sensors has been explained by the presence of a nano-structured sp3-carbon layer around the graphitic electrodes, evidenced by micro-Raman imaging, by means of a numerical model of the charge transport near the electrodes.

  6. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodrguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-21

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement. PMID:26682623

  7. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  8. ELENA MCP detector: absolute efficiency measurement for low energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-04-01

    MicroChannel plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission to Mercury to be launched in 2014. ELENA is a TOF sensor, based on a novel concept ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section)which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop section. It is aimed to detect neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 70 FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (<1eV and >100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E< 30eV) is a crucial point not yet investigated. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different type of MCPs coating have been performed providing the behaviors of MCP detection efficiency in the range 10eV-1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are here discussed.

  9. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  10. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.; Amman, M.; Martin, R.; Vetter, K.

    2016-03-01

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  11. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-06-29

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 ?m. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps. PMID:26191739

  12. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  13. Development of high quantum efficiency flat panel detectors for portal imaging: intrinsic spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Pang, G; Rowlands, J A

    2002-10-01

    Recently developed flat panel detectors have been proven to have a much better image quality than conventional electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). They are, however, not yet the ideal systems for portal imaging application due to the low x-ray absorption, i.e., low quantum efficiency (QE), which is typically on the order of 2-4% as compared to the theoretical limit of 100%. The QE of current flat panel systems can be improved by significantly increasing the thickness of the energy conversion layer (i.e., amorphous selenium or phosphor screen). This, however, will be at the expense of a decrease in spatial resolution mainly due to x-ray scatter in the conversion layer (and also the spread of optical photons in the case of phosphor screen). In this paper, we investigate theoretically the intrinsic spatial resolution of a high QE flat panel detector with a new energy conversion layer that is much denser and thicker than that of current flat panel systems. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system is calculated based on a theoretical model using a novel approach, which uses an analytical expression for absorbed dose. It is found that if appropriate materials are used for the conversion layer, then the intrinsic MTF of the high QE flat panel is better than that of current EPIDs, and in addition they have a high QE (e.g., approximately 60%). Some general rules for the design of the conversion layer to achieve both high QE and high resolution as well as high DQE are also discussed. PMID:12408302

  14. High efficiency microfluidic beta detector for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convert, Laurence; Girard-Baril, Frdrique; Renaudin, Alan; Grondin, tienne; Jaouad, Abdelatif; Aimez, Vincent; Charette, Paul; Lecomte, Roger

    2011-10-01

    New radiotracers are continuously being developed to improve diagnostic efficiency using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) or Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The characterization of their pharmacokinetics requires blood radioactivity monitoring over time during the scan and is very challenging in small animals because of the low volume of blood available. In this work, a prototype microfluidic blood counter made of a microchannel atop a silicon substrate containing PIN photodiodes is proposed to improve beta detection efficiency in a small volume by eliminating unnecessary interfaces between fluid and detector. A flat rectangular-shaped epoxy channel, 36 ?m1.26 mm cross section and 31.5 mm in length, was microfabricated over a die containing an array of 22 mm 2 PIN photodiodes, leaving only a few micrometers of epoxy floor layer between the fluid and the photodiode sensitive surface. This geometry leads to a quasi 2D source, optimizing geometrical detection efficiency that was estimated at 41% using solid angle calculation. CV- IV measurements were made at each fabrication step to confirm that the microchannel components had no significant effects on the diodes' electrical characteristics. The chip was wire-bonded to a PCB and connected to charge sensitive preamplifier and amplifier modules for pulse shaping. Energy spectra recorded for different isotopes showed continuous beta distribution for PET isotopes and monoenergetic conversion electron peaks for 99mTc. Absolute sensitivity was determined for the most popular PET and SPECT radioisotopes and ranged from 26% to 33% for PET tracers ( 18F, 13N, 11C, 68Ga) and more than 2% for 99mTc. Input functions were successfully simulated with 18F, confirming the setup's suitability for pharmacokinetic modeling of PET and SPECT radiotracers in animal experiments. By using standard materials and procedures, the fabrication process is well suited to on-chip microfluidic functionality, allowing full characterization of new radiotracers.

  15. GRABGAM Analysis of Ultra-Low-Level HPGe Gamma Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1999-07-28

    The GRABGAM code has been used successfully for ultra-low level HPGe gamma spectrometry analysis since its development in 1985 at Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Although numerous gamma analysis codes existed at that time, reviews of institutional and commercial codes indicated that none addressed all features that were desired by SRTC. Furthermore, it was recognized that development of an in-house code would better facilitate future evolution of the code to address SRTC needs based on experience with low-level spectra. GRABGAM derives its name from Gamma Ray Analysis BASIC Generated At MCA/PC.

  16. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  17. Activity determination of (41)Ar using efficiency extrapolation method and 4??(PS)-4??(NaI) coincidence system.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Li, Xuesong; Dai, Yihua; Jiang, Wengang; He, Xiaobing; Yu, Gongshuo; Ni, Jianzhong

    2015-03-01

    Noble gas (41)Ar was measured with a 4??-4?? coincidence system, in which gamma- and beta-rays were respectively detected with a well-type NaI(Tl) and plastic scintillator (PS) detector. The activity of (41)Ar was determined from an efficiency extrapolation method, in which the beta detector efficiency was varied by electronic discrimination using the software developed under Visual basic. In addition, high resolution gamma spectroscopy with HPGe detector was also used for activity determination of (41)Ar, and the result was satisfactory in agreement with that obtain by the efficiency extrapolation method. This work demonstrated that the activity of (41)Ar can be accurately measured by efficiency extrapolation method. PMID:25527895

  18. HST/WFC3 UVIS Detector: Dark, Charge Transfer Efficiency, and Point Spread Function Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia; Bowers, Ariel; MacKenty, John W.; Sahu, Kailash C.

    2015-08-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. As one of two channels available on WFC3, the UVIS detector is comprised of two e2v CCDs and is sensitive to ultraviolet and visible light. Here we provide updates to the characterization and monitoring of the UVIS performance and stability. We present the long-term growth of the dark current and the hot pixel population, as well as the evolution of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE). We also discuss updates to the UVIS dark calibration products, which are used to correct for dark current in science images. We examine the impacts of CTE losses and outline some techniques to mitigate CTE effects during and after observation by use of post-flash and pixel-based CTE corrections. Finally, we summarize an investigation of WFC3/UVIS Point Spread Functions (PSFs) and their potential use for characterizing the focus of the instrument.

  19. Charge collection efficiency and resolution of an irradiated double-sided silicon microstrip detector operated at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borer, K.; Janos, S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Buytaert, J.; Chabaud, V.; Chochula, P.; Collins, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Loureno, C.; Parkes, C.; Saladino, S.; Ruf, T.; Granata, V.; Pagano, S.; Vitobello, F.; Bell, W.; Bartalini, P.; Dormond, O.; Frei, R.; Casagrande, L.; Bowcock, T.; Barnett, I. B. M.; Da Via, C.; Konorov, I.; Paul, S.; Schmitt, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Stavitski, I.; Esposito, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents results on the measurement of the cluster shapes, resolution and charge collection efficiency of a double-sided silicon microstrip detector after irradiation with 24 GeV protons to a fluence of 3.510 14 p/cm 2 and operated at cryogenic temperatures. An empirical model is presented which describes the expected cluster shapes as a function of depletion depth, and is shown to agree with the data. It is observed that the clusters on the p-side broaden if the detector is under-depleted, leading to a degradation of resolution and efficiency. The model is used to make predictions for detector types envisaged for the LHC experiments. The results also show that at cryogenic temperature the charge collection efficiency varies depending on the operating conditions of the detector and can reach values of 100% at unexpectedly low bias voltage. By analysing the cluster shapes it is shown that these variations are due to changes in depletion depth. This phenomenon, known as the "Lazarus effect", can be related to similar recent observations on diode behaviour.

  20. Comparison of calculation results of neutron detection efficiency for models with silicon semiconductor detector and plastic scintillator for GAMMA-400 telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedenko, G.; Zin, Thant; Kadilin, V.; Gavrikov, I.; Tyurin, E.; Isakov, S.

    2013-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for two models of neutron detector. The first model of the neutron detector includes the layer of polyethylene as a moderator, boron as a target for (n, α) reaction and silicon as a detector of α-particles. The second model consists of polyethylene layers alternating with layers of plastic-boron scintillators. Calculations were performed for parallel neutron flux with evaporation spectrum. The calculation results of neutron detection efficiency for two proposed models were analyzed and compared. The high neutron detection efficiency is attained by using a plastic-boron scintillator. Using natural boron the 10% of detection efficiency is attained and in the case of enriched boron more than 15% of detection efficiency is attained when the detector thickness is 4 cm. The model using silicon detectors provides the detection efficiency about 4%.

  1. Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

  2. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Gamma scanning of large-volume CdZnTe detectors to map their efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenthoner, S.; Arlt, R.; Hartley, I.; Unterweger, R.

    2001-02-01

    An automated, computer-controlled scanning device to map the sensitivity of large-volume CdZnTe gamma detectors is described. It is of modular design and fully based on moderately priced commercial components. The collimated radiation source is moved in X- Y direction over the radiation detector under test using stepping motors. Synchronously, gamma spectra are taken for each X- Y position. Different regions of interest in a spectrum can be evaluated or re-evaluated and the measured gamma countrate (peak area) is displayed and documented in contour maps as a function of the X- Y coordinate. The system is meant for evaluation of new, large-volume room temperature semiconductor detectors and for quality-control measurements on detectors which are used in the Department of Safeguards for the verification of nuclear material.

  4. Comparison of MCNP and Experimental Measurements for an HPGe-based Spectroscopy Portal Monitor.

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, Ronald M.; Hensley, Walter K.; Twomey, Timothy R.; UPP, Daniel L.

    2008-05-15

    The necessity to monitor international commercial transportation for illicit nuclear materials resulted in the installation of many nuclear radiation detection systems in Portal Monitors. These were mainly gross counters which alarmed at any indication of high radioactivity in the shipment, the vehicle or even the driver. The innocent alarm rate, due to legal shipments of sources and NORM, or medical isotopes in patients, caused interruptions and delays in commerce while the legality of the shipment was verified. To overcome this difficulty, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) supported the writing of the ANSI N42.38 standard (Performance Criteria for Spectroscopy-Based Portal Monitors used for Homeland Security) to define the performance of a Portal Monitor with nuclide identification capabilities, called a Spectroscopy Portal Monitor. This standard defines detection levels and response characteristics for the system for energies from 25 keV to3. MeV. To accomplish the necessary performance, several different HPGe detector configurations were modeled using MCNP for the horizontal field of view (FOV) and vertical linearity of response over the detection zone of 5 meters by 4.5 meters for 661 keV as representative of the expected nuclides of interest. The configuration with the best result was built and tested. The results for the FOV as a function of energy and the linearity show good agreement with the model and performance exceeding the requirements of N42.38.

  5. Performance of a HPGe System for Surface and Container Measurements - 13582

    SciTech Connect

    Twomey, Timothy R.; Keyser, Ronald M.

    2013-07-01

    The decommissioning of a nuclear facility or post-accident cleanup is an immense engineering effort requiring an array of specialist tools and techniques. The decommissioning and cleanup activities generate large quantities of low activity waste. For economic disposal, it is desirable to certify the waste as suitable for free release. Every container must be assayed to a sufficient degree of accuracy and sensitivity so that it may be certified to be or not to be suitable for 'free release'. In a previous work, the performance of a highly-automated system for free release of large numbers of containers was presented in which the spectroscopy hardware comprised four ORTEC Interchangeable Detector Module (IDM) mechanically cooled HPGe spectrometers in conjunction with ORTEC ISOPlus waste assay software. It was shown that the system was capable of assaying large containers to free release levels in reasonable measurement times. Not all operations have enough waste to justify an automated system or rapid assay results may be required, perhaps in a remote location. To meet this need, a new mobile system has been developed for the assay of smaller objects (drums, boxes, and surfaces) In-Situ. The system incorporates the latest generation IDM-200 and ISOPlus software and a new variant of the ISOCart hardware. This paper will describe the system and performance. (authors)

  6. High efficiency and rapid response superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector based on asymmetric split ring metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanhai; Wang, Shao-Wei; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    With asymmetric split ring metamaterial periodically placed on top of the niobium nitride (NbN) nanowire meander, we theoretically propose a kind of metal-insulator-metallic metamaterial nanocavity to enhance absorbing efficiency and shorten response time of the superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) operating at wavelength of 1550 nm. Up to 99.6% of the energy is absorbed and 96.5% dissipated in the nanowire. Meanwhile, taking advantage of this high efficiency absorbing cavity, we implement a more sparse arrangement of the NbN nanowire of the filling factor 0.2, which significantly lessens the nanowire and crucially boosts the response time to be only 40% of reset time in previous evenly spaced meander design. Together with trapped mode resonance, a standing wave oscillation mechanism is presented to explain the high efficiency and broad bandwidth properties. To further demonstrate the advantages of the nanocavity, a four-pixel SNSPD on 10 ?m 10 ?m area is designed to further reduce 75% reset time while maintaining 70% absorbing efficiency. Utilizing the asymmetric split ring metamaterial, we show a higher efficiency and more rapid response SNSPD configuration to contribute to the development of single photon detectors.

  7. High efficiency and rapid response superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector based on asymmetric split ring metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guanhai; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Shao-Wei Lu, Wei

    2014-06-09

    With asymmetric split ring metamaterial periodically placed on top of the niobium nitride (NbN) nanowire meander, we theoretically propose a kind of metal-insulator-metallic metamaterial nanocavity to enhance absorbing efficiency and shorten response time of the superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) operating at wavelength of 1550 nm. Up to 99.6% of the energy is absorbed and 96.5% dissipated in the nanowire. Meanwhile, taking advantage of this high efficiency absorbing cavity, we implement a more sparse arrangement of the NbN nanowire of the filling factor 0.2, which significantly lessens the nanowire and crucially boosts the response time to be only 40% of reset time in previous evenly spaced meander design. Together with trapped mode resonance, a standing wave oscillation mechanism is presented to explain the high efficiency and broad bandwidth properties. To further demonstrate the advantages of the nanocavity, a four-pixel SNSPD on 10 μm × 10 μm area is designed to further reduce 75% reset time while maintaining 70% absorbing efficiency. Utilizing the asymmetric split ring metamaterial, we show a higher efficiency and more rapid response SNSPD configuration to contribute to the development of single photon detectors.

  8. High-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors fabricated from MoSi thin-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, V. B.; Korzh, B.; Bussires, F.; Horansky, R. D.; Dyer, S. D.; Lita, A. E.; Vayshenker, I.; Marsili, F.; Shaw, M. D.; Zbinden, H.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) fabricated from MoSi thin-films. We measure a maximum system detection efficiency (SDE) of 87 +- 0.5 % at 1542 nm at a temperature of 0.7 K, with a jitter of 76 ps, maximum count rate approaching 10 MHz, and polarization dependence as low as 3.4 +- 0.7 % The SDE curves show saturation of the internal efficiency similar to WSi-based SNSPDs at temperatures as high as 2.3 K. We show that at similar cryogenic temperatures, MoSi SNSPDs achieve efficiencies comparable to WSi-based SNSPDs with nearly a factor of two reduction in jitter.

  9. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Erb, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Ferreiro, N.; Gorla, P.; Gtlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Mnster, A.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Prbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Schffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Scholl, S.; Schnert, S.; Seidel, W.; von Sivers, M.; Stanger, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Tanzke, A.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wstrich, M.; Zller, A.

    2015-08-01

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESST-II aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of keV and a resolution of keV (at 2.60 keV). With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3 GeV/c. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail.

  10. Improvements in the Low Energy Collection Efficiency of Si(Li) X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox,C.; Fischer, D.; Schwartz, W.; Song, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray beam-line applications are of fundamental importance to material research, and commonly employ high-resolution Si(Li) detectors for energy dispersive spectroscopy. However, the measurement of X-rays below 1 keV is compromised by absorption in the material layers in front of the active crystal and a dead layer at the crystal surface. Various Schottky barrier type contacts were investigated resulting in a 40% reduction of the dead-layer thickness and a factor of two increased sensitivity at carbon K{sub {alpha}} compared to the standard Si(Li) detector. Si(Li) detectors were tested on the U7A soft X-ray beam-line at the National Synchrotron Light Source and on a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  11. Time-resolved singlet-oxygen luminescence detection with an efficient and practical semiconductor single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Boso, Gianluca; Ke, Damei; Korzh, Boris; Bouilloux, Jordan; Lange, Norbert; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    In clinical applications, such as PhotoDynamic Therapy, direct singlet-oxygen detection through its luminescence in the near-infrared range (1270 nm) has been a challenging task due to its low emission probability and the lack of suitable single-photon detectors. Here, we propose a practical setup based on a negative-feedback avalanche diode detector that is a viable alternative to the current state-of-the art for different clinical scenarios, especially where geometric collection efficiency is limited (e.g. fiber-based systems, confocal microscopy, scanning systems etc.). The proposed setup is characterized with Rose Bengal as a standard photosensitizer and it is used to measure the singlet-oxygen quantum yield of a new set of photosensitizers for site-selective photodynamic therapy. PMID:26819830

  12. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Korzh, B. Walenta, N.; Lunghi, T.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H.

    2014-02-24

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1 cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20 μs of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of −110 °C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625 MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in the presence of 30 dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350 bps.

  13. Time-resolved singlet-oxygen luminescence detection with an efficient and practical semiconductor single-photon detector

    PubMed Central

    Boso, Gianluca; Ke, Damei; Korzh, Boris; Bouilloux, Jordan; Lange, Norbert; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In clinical applications, such as PhotoDynamic Therapy, direct singlet-oxygen detection through its luminescence in the near-infrared range (1270 nm) has been a challenging task due to its low emission probability and the lack of suitable single-photon detectors. Here, we propose a practical setup based on a negative-feedback avalanche diode detector that is a viable alternative to the current state-of-the art for different clinical scenarios, especially where geometric collection efficiency is limited (e.g. fiber-based systems, confocal microscopy, scanning systems etc.). The proposed setup is characterized with Rose Bengal as a standard photosensitizer and it is used to measure the singlet-oxygen quantum yield of a new set of photosensitizers for site-selective photodynamic therapy. PMID:26819830

  14. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzh, B.; Walenta, N.; Lunghi, T.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H.

    2014-02-01

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1 cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20 ?s of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of -110 C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625 MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in the presence of 30 dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350 bps.

  15. Calibration of the RLS HPGe spectral gamma ray logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, C.J.; Brodeur, J.R.; Ulbricht, W.H.; Price, R.K.

    1991-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectral data have been recorded with the Radionuclide Logging System (RLS) high purity germanium (HPGe) system at (1) the American Petroleum Institute (API) spectral gamma-ray calibration center in Houston, Texas; (2) the US Department of Energy (DOE) spectral gamma-ray field calibration facility in Spokane, Washington; and (3) the DOE spectral gamma-ray primary calibration center in Grand Junction, Colorado. Analyses of the Grand Junction data yielded: calibration constants for the natural gamma-ray sources (potassium, uranium and thorium), energy-dependent borehole diameter corrections for the aid-filled borehole, energy-dependent borehole casing corrections for steel casing over a range of thicknesses from 0 to 79 cm (5/16 in.), a casing index function that varies with casing thickness and provides a method for verifying that the correct casing correction is applied, and an energy-dependent inverse function that is the basis for assessment of subsurface concentrations of man-made gamma-ray emitters such as cesium-137 and cobalt-60.

  16. The feasibility of using a photoelectric cigarette smoke detector for energy-efficient air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.M.; Alevantis, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a smoke sensor to monitor and control cigarette smoke levels in occupied spaces and also to determine whether the use of such a detector could result in energy savings. A smoke detector was built and tested. The experimental results show that the smoke sensor output is a function of cigarette smoke concentration and that the smoke sensor gives a rapid and continuous response. In addition, a computer program that simulates the transient mass and energy interactions in buildings was modified so that the impact of ventilation strategies on indoor air quality and energy consumption could be studied when smokers are present. The results of the numerical modeling for an arbitrary test case show that the use of a smoke sensor to detect cigarette smoke particulates and to control ventilation can allow indoor air quality to be continuously maintained at acceptable levels while minimizing energy consumption.

  17. Status and Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, A. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Slee, M.; Lazarus, I. H.; Simpson, J.

    2009-03-31

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (AGATA)[1] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA)[2] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array) asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  18. First demonstration of plasmonic GaN quantum cascade detectors with enhanced efficiency at normal incidence.

    PubMed

    Pesach, Asaf; Sakr, Salam; Giraud, Etienne; Sorias, Ofir; Gal, Lior; Tchernycheva, Maria; Orenstein, Meir; Grandjean, Nicolas; Julien, Francois H; Bahir, Gad

    2014-08-25

    We have designed, fabricated and measured the first plasmon-assisted normal incidence GaN/AlN quantum cascade detector (QCD) making use of the surface plasmon resonance of a two-dimensional nanohole Au array integrated on top of the detector absorption region. The spectral response of the detector at room temperature is peaked at the plasmon resonance of 1.82 ?m. We show that the presence of the nanohole array induces an absolute enhancement of the responsivity by a factor of ~30 over that of the bare device at normal incidence and by a factor of 3 with respect to illumination by the 45 polished side facet. We show that this significant improvement arises from two phenomena, namely, the polarization rotation of the impinging light from tangential to normal induced by the plasmonic structure and from the enhancement of the absorption cross-section per quantum well due to the near-field optical intensity of the plasmonic wave. PMID:25321307

  19. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  20. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M. (Knoxville, TN); Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Blakeman, Edward D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  1. Security loophole in free-space quantum key distribution due to spatial-mode detector-efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Chaiwongkhot, Poompong; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Jennewein, Thomas; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Makarov, Vadim

    2015-06-01

    In free-space quantum key distribution (QKD), the sensitivity of the receiver's detector channels may depend differently on the spatial mode of incoming photons. Consequently, an attacker can control the spatial mode to break security. We experimentally investigate a standard polarization QKD receiver and identify sources of efficiency mismatch in its optical scheme. We model a practical intercept-and-resend attack and show that it would break security in most situations. We show experimentally that adding an appropriately chosen spatial filter at the receiver's entrance may be an effective countermeasure.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of the BEGe detector response function for in vivo measurements of 241Am in the skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantínová, K.; Fojtík, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure of the BEGe detector characterization for the Monte Carlo calibrations. A project is under way to improve the counting and operating capabilities of the Whole Body Counter (WBC) installed in SÚRO, v.v.i. (NRPI) Prague, Czech Republic. Possible emergency monitoring should mainly benefit from the rapid, safe and flexible operation of the WBC. The system of the WBC for the detection of low energy X and gamma radiation comprises four HPGe detectors intended for the routine, emergency, and research measurements of persons internally contaminated with low-energy photon emitters, mainly actinides. Among them, 241Am is the main subject of interest. A precise detection efficiency calibration of the detector is required for the measurement of activity in individual organs and tissues. The use of physical phantoms in the calibrations is often supplemented with the application of voxel phantoms and a Monte Carlo technique that are used for the calculation of the detector response function and the full energy peak efficiency. Both experimental and computational approaches have been used for the calibration of the BEGe (Broad Energy Germanium) detector. In this paper, the process of the Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response function and the peak efficiency calculation is described. Results of the simulations are provided in the paper and discussed.

  3. Signal and charge collection efficiency of n-in-p strip detectors after mixed irradiation to HL-LHC fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Susanne; Barber, Thomas; Casse, Gianluigi; Dervan, Paul; Driewer, Adrian; Forshaw, Dean; Huse, Torkjell; Jakobs, Karl; Parzefall, Ulrich

    2013-12-01

    For the year 2020, an upgrade of the LHC with a factor ten increase in luminosity is planned. The resulting severe radiation doses for the ATLAS tracker demand extremely radiation tolerant detectors. In this study six planar n-in-p strip sensors produced by Hamamatsu Photonics were irradiated in consecutive irradiation steps with pions of 280 Mev/c, protons of 25 Mev/c and reactor neutrons resulting in a combined fluence of up to 3×1015 1 MeV neutron equivalent particles per square centimeter (neq /cm2). This particle composition and fluence corresponds to the qualification limit specified by the ATLAS experiment for the outer pixel layers (assuming an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1). The 320 μm thick devices are investigated using electrons from a 90Sr source. After each irradiation step both charge collection efficiency and noise measurements have been performed using the ALIBAVA readout system, which is based on analogue Beetle ASICs clocked at 40 MHz. Measurements of the signal and signal-to-noise ratio of detectors will be given after the sensors were exposed to radiation that both in fluence and composition are corresponding to the expectations for the HL-LHC trackers. Conclusions will be drawn on their operation in the ATLAS inner detector upgrade.

  4. High efficiency plastic scintillator detector with wavelength-shifting fiber readout for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Deering, P. L.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Nebel, T. R.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the design and performance studies of the scintillator tile detectors for the anti-coincidence detector (ACD) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in early 2008. The scintillator tile detectors utilize wavelength-shifting fibers and have dual-photomultiplier-tube readout. The design requires highly efficient and uniform detection of singly charged relativistic particles over the tile area and must meet all requirements for a launch, as well as operation in a space environment. We present here the design of three basic types of tiles used in the ACD, ranging in size from 450 to 2500 cm2, all 1 cm thick, with different shapes, and with photoelectron yield of 20 photoelectrons per minimum ionizing particle at normal tile incidence, uniform over the tile area. Some tiles require flexible clear fiber cables up to 1.5 m long to deliver scintillator light to remotely located photomultiplier tubes.

  5. High-efficiency WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors operating at 2.5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Korzh, B.; Bussières, F.; Zbinden, H.; Marsili, F.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-09-22

    We investigate the operation of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at 2.5 K, a temperature which is ∼70% of the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub C}) of 3.4 K. We demonstrate saturation of the system detection efficiency at 78 ± 2% at a wavelength of 1310 nm, with a jitter of 191 ps. We find that the jitter at 2.5 K is limited by the noise of the readout and can be improved through the use of cryogenic amplifiers. Operation of SNSPDs with high efficiency at temperatures very close to T{sub C} appears to be a unique property of amorphous WSi.

  6. beta. sup + decays of sup 37 Ca: Implications for the efficiency of the sup 37 Cl solar. nu. detector

    SciTech Connect

    Garcriaaa, A.; Adelberger, E.G.; Magnus, P.V.; Swanson, H.E. ); Tengblad, O.; ISOLDE Collaboration ); Molz, D.M. )

    1991-12-23

    We studied {sup 37}Ca {beta}{sup +} decays using a mass separated {sup 37}Ca beam and a proton telescope with 16-keV resolution. Delayed {ital p}'s were detected in coincidence with {gamma}'s to identify {ital p} decays of {sup 37}K daughter levels to excited states of {sup 36}Ar. We observed 43 previously undetected proton groups, yielding an integrated {ital B}({ital GT}) twice as large as that observed previously. Although our result increases the efficiency of the {sup 37}Cl detector for counting solar {nu}'s by 6%, its main effect is to reduce uncertainties in this efficiency arising from discrepancies between previous {sup 37}Ca {beta} decay and {sup 37}Cl({ital p},{ital n}) results.

  7. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 (deg)C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  8. A DC-coupling area-efficiency readout circuit for CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Su, L.; Wei, X.; Zheng, R.; Hu, Y.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a DC-coupling readout circuit is presented in order to readout the signal from CdZnTe detectors. A differential stage is added in CSA to compensate the leakage current introduced by the CdZnTe crystal. A compact shaper is designed to achieve low area with wide range of adjustable peaking time from 3 ? s to 10 ? s. The area of proposed circuit is about 130 ? m 1100 ? m. The experimental results show that the ENC is 70 e- + 14 e-/pF and the gain is about 152 mV/fC at the peaking time of 4 ? s.

  9. Comparison of two methods for high purity germanium detector efficiency calibration for charcoal canister radon measurement.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, J; Pantelic, G; Zivanovic, M; Rajacic, M; Todorovic, D

    2014-11-01

    The charcoal canister method of radon measurement according to US Environment Protection Agency protocol 520/5-87-005 is widely used for screening. This method is based on radon adsorption on coal and measurement of gamma radiation of radon daughters. For the purpose of gamma spectrometry, appropriate efficiency calibration of the measuring system must be performed. The most usual method of calibration is using standard canister, a sealed canister with the same matrix and geometry as the canisters used for measurements, but with the known activity of radon. In the absence of standard canister, a different method of efficiency calibration has to be implemented. This study presents the results of efficiency calibration using the EFFTRAN efficiency transfer software. Efficiency was calculated using a soil matrix cylindrical secondary reference material as a starting point. Calculated efficiency is then compared with the one obtained using standard canister and applied to a realistic measurement in order to evaluate the results of the efficiency transfer. PMID:25377751

  10. Calibration Analyses and Efficiency Studies for the Anti Coincidence Detector on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kachulis, Chris; /Yale U. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope provides charged particle rejection for the Large Area Telescope (LAT). We use two calibrations used by the ACD to conduct three studies on the performance of the ACD. We examine the trending of the calibrations to search for damage and find a timescale over which the calibrations can be considered reliable. We also calculated the number of photoelectrons counted by a PMT on the ACD from a normal proton. Third, we calculated the veto efficiencies of the ACD for two different veto settings. The trends of the calibrations exhibited no signs of damage, and indicated timescales of reliability for the calibrations of one to two years. The number of photoelectrons calculated ranged from 5 to 25. Large errors in the effect of the energy spectrum of the charged particles caused these values to have very large errors of around 60 percent. Finally, the veto efficiencies were found to be very high at both veto values, both for charged particles and for the lower energy backsplash spectrum. The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope is a detector system built around the silicon strip tracker on the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The purpose of the ACD is to provide charged particle rejection for the LAT. To do this, the ACD must be calibrated correctly in flight, and must be able to efficiently veto charged particle events while minimizing false vetoes due to 'backsplash' from photons in the calorimeter. There are eleven calibrations used by the ACD. In this paper, we discuss the use of two of these calibrations to preform three studies on the performance of the ACD. The first study examines trending of the calibrations to check for possible hardware degradation. The second study uses the calibrations to explore the efficiency of an on-board hardware veto. The third study uses the calibrations to calculate the number of photoelectrons seen by each PMT when a minimum ionizing particle is detected, which is a useful value for performing simulations.

  11. Spatial resolution and efficiency of microchannel plate detectors with neutron converter films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazalas, Edward; Trivelpiece, Cory; Jovanovic, Igor

    2014-12-01

    An investigation into the potential neutron detection efficiency gains that could be made to microchannel plates (MCPs) has been conducted by a GEANT4 simulation. Thin-film neutron converters are coupled to the upstream-side of the MCP. MCPs with and without pre-existing neutron sensitivity were examined. A study into potential film materials favors a Gd2O3 converter film utilized in thin-film and pillar geometries for straight-channel MCPs. The objective was to increase thermal neutron detection efficiency without sacrificing the spatial resolution of the system by studying (1) the balance between capture efficiency and charged particle product production and range to optimize detection efficiency, and (2) the extent of radial straggling that the reaction products undergo as they are transmitted through the neutron converter and MCP, which affects spatial resolution. Our investigation reveals that an increase in efficiency of 9.9% can be achieved for an MCP without preexisting neutron sensitivity using a film geometry neutron converter of 4-?m thickness. An increase in efficiency of 4.3% can be achieved for a neutron-sensitive MCP using a pillar-type converter of 4-?m thickness. Degradation of spatial resolution is not significant for either film or pillar geometries with thicknesses in the range 0.5-10 ?m.

  12. TECHNICAL DESIGN NOTE: Monte Carlo calculation for the geometrical efficiency of a multi-detector system for heavy ion reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savovi?, Svetislav; Djordjevich, Alexandar; Joki?, Stevan

    2010-08-01

    The Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the geometrical efficiency of a multi-detector system for fragments produced in heavy ion reactions. This efficiency is defined as a quotient of the number of fragments intercepted by the system and the total number of fragments emitted by the fissioning nucleus in all directions. The multi-detector system consists of six parallel-plate avalanche counters in a hexagonal configuration around the target. Its geometrical efficiency was calculated with respect to the 36Ar + 238U reaction at a 7 MeV/u projectile energy.

  13. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a 1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a ?5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  14. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140?keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5?mm-thick CZT and 10?mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140?keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a 1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  15. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  16. Improving photon detector efficiency using a high-fidelity optical controlled-not gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Katherine L.; Singh, Robinjeet; Plaskus, Joshua H. Mendez; Broadus, Hanna E.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2015-02-01

    A significant problem for optical quantum computing is inefficient or inaccurate photodetectors. It is possible to use controlled-not (cnot) gates to improve a detector by making a large cat state, then measuring every qubit in that state. In this paper we develop a code that compares five different schemes for making multiple measurements, some of which are capable of detecting loss and some of which are not. We explore how each of these schemes performs in the presence of different errors, and derive a formula to find at what probability of qubit loss it is worth detecting loss, and at what probability does this just lead to further errors than the loss introduces.

  17. Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Efficiency with a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris; Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We first review the state-of-the-art coherent on-off-keying (OOK) with a photoncounting measurement, illustrating its asymptotic inefficiency relative to the Holevo limit. We show that a commonly made Poisson approximation in thermal noise leads to unbounded photon information efficiencies, violating the conjectured Holevo limit. We analyze two binary-modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with conventional OOK. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  18. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ? 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible. PMID:26406688

  19. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  20. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  1. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  2. Polar-azimuthal angle dependent efficiency of different infrared superconducting nanowire single-photon detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csete, Mria; Sipos, ron; Najafi, Faraz; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-10-01

    The illumination-angle-dependent absorptance was determined for three types of superconducting-nanowire singlephoton detector (SNSPD) designs: 1. periodic bare niobium-nitride (NbN) stripes with dimensions of conventional SNSPDs, 2. the same NbN patterns integrated with ~quarter-wavelength hydrogensilsesquioxane-filled nano- cavity, 3. similar cavity-integrated structures covered by a thin gold reflector. A three-dimensional finite-element method was applied to determine the optical response and near-field distribution as a function of p-polarized light illumination orientations specified by polar-angle, ?, and azimuthal-angle, ?. The numerical results proved that the NbN absorptance might be maximized via simultaneous optimization of the polar and azimuthal illumination angles. Complementary transfer-matrix-method calculations were performed on analogous film-stacks to uncover the phenomena contributing to the appearance of extrema on the optical response of NbN-patterns in P-structure-configuration. This comparative study showed that the absorptance of bare NbN patterns is zero at the angle corresponding to total internal reflection (TIR). In cavity-integrated structures the NbN absorptance curve indicates a maximum at the same orientation due to the phase shift introduced by the quarter-wavelength HSQ layer. The reflector promotes the NbN absorptance at small polar angles, but the available absorptance is limited by attenuated TIR in polar angle-intervals, where surface modes are excited on the gold film.

  3. High quantum efficiency and low dark count rate in multi-layer superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari Salim, A. Eftekharian, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-02-07

    In this paper, we theoretically show that a multi-layer superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD) is capable of approaching characteristics of an ideal SNSPD in terms of the quantum efficiency, dark count, and band-width. A multi-layer structure improves the performance in two ways. First, the potential barrier for thermally activated vortex crossing, which is the major source of dark counts and the reduction of the critical current in SNSPDs is elevated. In a multi-layer SNSPD, a vortex is made of 2D-pancake vortices that form a stack. It will be shown that the stack of pancake vortices effectively experiences a larger potential barrier compared to a vortex in a single-layer SNSPD. This leads to an increase in the experimental critical current as well as significant decrease in the dark count rate. In consequence, an increase in the quantum efficiency for photons of the same energy or an increase in the sensitivity to photons of lower energy is achieved. Second, a multi-layer structure improves the efficiency of single-photon absorption by increasing the effective optical thickness without compromising the single-photon sensitivity.

  4. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Winkler, Mark; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the 'ring' artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset. PMID:26086713

  5. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Winkler, Mark; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the ‘ring’ artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset.

  6. Search for rare nuclear decays with HPGe detectors at the STELLA facility of the LNGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; d'Angelo, A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kovtun, N. G.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Suhonen, J.; Tolmachev, A. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Yavetskiy, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Results on the search for rare nuclear decays with the ultra low background facility STELLA at the LNGS using gamma ray spectrometry are presented. In particular, the best T1/2 limits were obtained for double beta processes in 96Ru and 104Ru. Several isotopes, which potentially decay through different 2β channels, including also possible resonant double electron captures, were investigated for the first time (156Dy, 158Dy, 184Os, 192Os, 190Pt, 198Pt). Search for resonant absorption of solar 7Li axions in a LiF crystal gave the best limit for the mass of 7Li axions (< 8.6 keV). Rare alpha decay of 190Pt to the first excited level of 186Os(Eexc = 137.2keV) was observed for the first time.

  7. Search for rare nuclear decays with HPGe detectors at the STELLA facility of the LNGS

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, P.; Di Marco, A.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Cerulli, R.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kovtun, N. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Polischuk, O. G.; and others

    2013-12-30

    Results on the search for rare nuclear decays with the ultra low background facility STELLA at the LNGS using gamma ray spectrometry are presented. In particular, the best T{sub 1/2} limits were obtained for double beta processes in {sup 96}Ru and {sup 104}Ru. Several isotopes, which potentially decay through different 2β channels, including also possible resonant double electron captures, were investigated for the first time ({sup 156}Dy, {sup 158}Dy, {sup 184}Os, {sup 192}Os, {sup 190}Pt, {sup 198}Pt). Search for resonant absorption of solar {sup 7}Li axions in a LiF crystal gave the best limit for the mass of {sup 7}Li axions (< 8.6 keV). Rare alpha decay of {sup 190}Pt to the first excited level of {sup 186}Os(E{sub exc} = 137.2keV) was observed for the first time.

  8. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Detector with High Efficiency, Broad Bandwidth, and Highly Symmetric Coupling to Transition Edge Sensor Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Denis, K.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Schneider, G.; Stevenson, T.; Travers, D.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Four probe antennas transfer signals from waveguide to microstrip lines. The probes not only provide broadband impedance matching, but also thermally isolate waveguide and detector. In addition, we developed a new photonic waveguide choke joint design, with four-fold symmetry, to suppress power leakage at the interface. We have developed facilities to test superconducting circuit elements using a cryogenic microwave probe station, and more complete systems in waveguide. We used the ring resonator shown below to measure a dielectric loss tangent < 7x10(exp -4) over 10 - 45 GHz. We have combined component simulations to predict the overall coupling from waveguide modes to bolometers. The result below shows the planar circuit and waveguide interface can utilize the high beam symmetry of HE11 circular feedhorns with > 99% coupling efficiency over 30% fractional bandwidth.

  9. The effect of the displacement damage on the Charge Collection Efficiency in Silicon Drift Detectors for the LOFT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Bozzo, E.; Cadoux, F.; Rachevski, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Feroci, M.; Pohl, M.; Vacchi, A.

    2015-05-01

    The technology of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) has been selected for the two instruments aboard the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) space mission. LOFT underwent a three year long assessment phase as candidate for the M3 launch opportunity within the ``Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025'' long-term science plan of the European Space Agency. During the LOFT assessment phase, we studied the displacement damage produced in the SDDs by the protons trapped in the Earth's magnetosphere. In a previous paper we discussed the effects of the Non Ionising Energy Losses from protons on the SDD leakage current. In this paper we report the measurement of the variation of Charge Collection Efficiency produced by displacement damage caused by protons and the comparison with the expected damage in orbit.

  10. Characterization measurement of a thick CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT - detection efficiency and energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Nakamura, Soichiro; Manabe, Masanobu; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itsuro

    2014-06-01

    Author?s group is carrying out development of BNCT-SPECT with CdTe device, which monitors the therapy effect of BNCT in real-time. From the design calculations, the dimensions were fixed to 1.5230mm(3). For the collimator it was confirmed that it would have a good spatial resolution and simultaneously the number of counts would be acceptably large. After producing the CdTe crystal, the characterization measurement was carried out. For the detection efficiency an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement was obtained. Also, the detector has a very good energy resolution so that gamma-rays of 478keV and 511keV could be distinguished in the spectrum. PMID:24581600

  11. High-efficiency moderating neutron detectors and low-level neutron measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takashi )

    1991-01-01

    Moderating-type neutron spectrometers to measure the energy spectrum in the wide energy region from the thermal to mega-electron-volts and neutron dosimeters to obtain dose equivalents have been developed for use in the radiation environment surrounding nuclear facilities. Two types of multimoderator neutron spectrometers have been developed: one is a gamma-ray-insensitive type, and the other is a high-efficiency type. The response functions of these spectrometers were measured by thermal and monoenergetic neutron standard fields at the Electrotechnical Laboratory (ETL) and were also calculated by the one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code ANISN. The authors also developed two types of high-efficiency dose equivalent counters (rem counters) to measure the dose equivalent directly for low-level environmental neutron monitoring.

  12. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  13. Quantitative analysis and efficiency study of PSD methods for a LaBr3:Ce detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Cang, Jirong; Zeng, Zhi; Yue, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Jianping; Liu, Yinong; Ma, Hao; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    The LaBr3:Ce scintillator has been widely studied for nuclear spectroscopy because of its optimal energy resolution (<3%@ 662 keV) and time resolution (~300 ps). Despite these promising properties, the intrinsic radiation background of LaBr3:Ce is a critical issue, and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been shown to be an efficient potential method to suppress the alpha background from the 227Ac. In this paper, the charge comparison method (CCM) for alpha and gamma discrimination in LaBr3:Ce is quantitatively analysed and compared with two other typical PSD methods using digital pulse processing. The algorithm parameters and discrimination efficiency are calculated for each method. Moreover, for the CCM, the correlation between the CCM feature value distribution and the total charge (energy) is studied, and a fitting equation for the correlation is inferred and experimentally verified. Using the equations, an energy-dependent threshold can be chosen to optimize the discrimination efficiency. Additionally, the experimental results show a potential application in low-activity high-energy γ measurement by suppressing the alpha background.

  14. An efficient procedure for tomotherapy treatment plan verification using the on-board detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaturo, O.; Miéville, F.; Tercier, P.-A.; Allal, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a fast and simple procedure for tomotherapy treatment plan verification using the on-board detector (OBD) has been developed. This procedure allows verification of plans with static and dynamic jaws (TomoEDGE). A convolution-based calculation model has been derived in order to link the leaf control sinogram from the treatment planning system to the data acquired by the OBD during a static couch procedure. The convolution kernel has been optimized using simple plans calculated in the Tomotherapy Cheese phantom. The optimal kernel has been found to be a lorentzian function, whose parameter Γ is 0.186 for the 1 cm jaw opening, 0.232 for the 2.5 cm jaw opening and 0.373 for the 5 cm jaw opening. The evaluation has been performed with a γ-index analysis. The dose criterion was 3% of the 95th percentile of the dose distribution and the distance-to-agreement criterion is 2 mm. In order to validate the procedure, it has been applied to around 50 clinical treatment plans, which had already been validated by the Delta4 phantom (Scandidos, Sweden). 96% of the tested plans have passed the criteria. Concerning the other 4%, significant discrepancies between the leaf pattern in the leaf control sinogram and the OBD data have been shown, which might be due to differences in the leaf open time. This corresponds also to a higher sensitivity of this method over the Delta4, adding the possibility of better monitoring the treatment delivery.

  15. Jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against high-orbit IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gui-qing; Li, Yong-xiang

    2011-08-01

    In order to lower the orientating capability of the DSP satellite, at first the paper analyzes early warning missile satellite detective system, introduces the jamming mechanism of infrared smoke screen, and a model of jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against early warning satellite was built from three sides of absorbency of smoke screen to infrared radiation, dispersion ability and infrared radiation from smoke screen self. At last the correlative conclusion was got based on the brief depiction of Early-warning Satellite.

  16. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

  17. The optical design of highly efficient cold shield in IR detector based on ASAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianjing; Bai, Jian; Yin, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    In order to obtain higher stray radiation suppression of a cold shield and enhance the cold shield efficiency of cooled infrared system, different configurations of the vanes inside cold shield are proposed. The effects of these configurations of vanes on stray radiation suppression are simulated and analysed by Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP software), which not only trace ray by Monte Carlo method but also simulate the scattering of each surface. According to the analysis of results, vane plays an important role in the improvement of cold shield efficiency and the suppression of stray radiation. The cold shield with 6 vanes characterized by rounded-square hole, whose configuration is calculated based on the principle of laying out a set of vanes, suppresses 99.5% more stray radiation comparing to the original one without any vanes. However, considering that the cold shield with 6 vanes is complicated and difficult to fabricate, the cold shield with 3 vanes owing rounded-square hole is selected, since its stray radiation suppression level is acceptable.

  18. Large-area NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detectors with saturated detection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan P.; Grein, Matthew E.; Gudmundsen, Theodore J.; McCaughan, Adam; Najafi, Faraz; Berggren, Karl K.; Marsili, Francesco; Dauler, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    Superconducting circuits comprising SNSPDs placed in parallelsuperconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors, or SNAPshave previously been demonstrated to improve the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by increasing the critical current. In this work, we employ a 2-SNAP superconducting circuit with narrow (40 nm) niobium nitride (NbN) nanowires to improve the system detection efficiency to near-IR photons while maintaining high SNR. Additionally, while previous 2-SNAP demonstrations have added external choke inductance to stabilize the avalanching photocurrent, we show that the external inductance can be entirely folded into the active area by cascading 2-SNAP devices in series to produce a greatly increased active area. We fabricated series-2-SNAP (s2-SNAP) circuits with a nanowire length of 20 ?m with cascades of 2-SNAPs providing the choke inductance necessary for SNAP operation. We observed that (1) the detection efficiency saturated at high bias currents, and (2) the 40 nm 2-SNAP circuit critical current was approximately twice that for a 40 nm non-SNAP configuration.

  19. Study on the novel neutron-to-proton convertor for improving the detection efficiency of a triple GEM based fast neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, He-Run; Ren, Zhong-Guo; Zhang, Jun-We; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Ha, Ri-Ba-La; An, L-Xing; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2015-02-01

    A high-efficiency fast neutron detector prototype based on a triple Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, which, coupled with a novel multi-layered high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a neutron-to-proton converter for improving the neutron detection efficiency, is introduced and tested with the Am-Be neutron source in the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) at Lanzhou in the present work. First, the developed triple GEM detector is tested by measuring its effective gain and energy resolution with 55Fe X-ray source to ensure that it has a good performance. The effective gain and obtained energy resolution is 5.0104 and around 19.2%, respectively. Secondly, the novel multi-layered HDPE converter is coupled with the cathode of the triple GEM detector making it a high-efficiency fast neutron detector. Its effective neutron response is four times higher than that of the traditional single-layered conversion technique when the converter layer number is 38. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11305232, 11175076)

  20. Performance Modeling of Orbital Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Asteroids: Monte-Carlo Modeling of the HPGe Mars Odyssey GRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, R. D.; Lim, L. F.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2014-12-01

    Orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiments with high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors have successfully measured elemental abundances in the top ~50 cm of the surfaces of Mars and Mercury. GRS is sensitive to bulk concentrations of H, C, O, S, Fe, and Si among other elements. As these elements are also diagnostic of major carbonaceous and ordinary chondritic meteorite classes, we have simulated the science performance of a HPGe experiment in orbit around asteroids with model compositions corresponding to those of volatile-rich CI and CO carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. A circular orbit around a spherical asteroid was considered, with the altitude of the orbit equal to the radius of the asteroid (similar to the Dawn low-altitude mapping orbit "LAMO"). We simulated the gamma-ray and neutron emission from CI-like (~17 wt%structural H2O) and CO-like (<2 wt% structural H2O) asteroids usingthe MCNPX Monte-Carlo radiation transport code. The spacecraftbackground (based on a Dawn-like spacecraft model) was also modeledusing MCNPX: this included background due to direct GCR/spacecraftinteractions and also background due to asteroidal neutron flux on thespacecraft. The detector model was based on the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer ("MOGRS"; Boynton et al. 2004, 2007), the largest HPGe detector flown to date. The spectra from the MCNPX output were broadened to a resolution based on the in-flight performance of MOGRS, FWHM = 4.1 keV at 1332 keV (Evans et al. 2006). Doppler broadening was also modeled where applicable. Line fluxes were then extracted from the combined background + asteroid spectrum and statistical uncertainties evaluated. Our simulations show that asteroids can be identified as havingCI-like vs. CO-like compositions in H/Si, O/Si, S/Si, and C/Si withMOGRS within 4.5 months in a Dawn LAMO-like orbit. In addition, theFe/Si and S/Si sensitivity are sufficient to distinguish CO and otherlow-hydrogen carbonaceous chondritic compositions from achondriticcarbon-rich (ureilitic) compositions.

  1. Neutron Damage in Mechanically-Cooled High-Purity Germanium Detectors for Field-Portable Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey; J.B. McCabe; C. DeW. Van Siclen

    2013-10-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNAA) systems require the use of a gamma-ray spectrometer to record the gamma-ray spectrum of an object under test and allow the determination of the object’s composition. Field-portable systems, such as Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS system, have used standard liquid-nitrogen-cooled high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to perform this function. These detectors have performed very well in the past, but the requirement of liquid-nitrogen cooling limits their use to areas where liquid nitrogen is readily available or produced on-site. Also, having a relatively large volume of liquid nitrogen close to the detector can impact some assessments, possibly leading to a false detection of explosives or other nitrogen-containing chemical. Use of a mechanically-cooled HPGe detector is therefore very attractive for PGNAA applications where nitrogen detection is critical or where liquid-nitrogen logistics are problematic. Mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors constructed from p-type germanium, such as Ortec’s trans-SPEC, have been commercially available for several years. In order to assess whether these detectors would be suitable for use in a fielded PGNAA system, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been performing a number of tests of the resistance of mechanically-cooled HPGe detectors to neutron damage. These detectors have been standard commercially-available p-type HPGe detectors as well as prototype n-type HPGe detectors. These tests compare the performance of these different detector types as a function of crystal temperature and incident neutron fluence on the crystal.

  2. Gigahertz-gated InGaAs/InP single-photon detector with detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Fröhlich, B.; Dynes, J. F.; Sharpe, A. W.; Lucamarini, M.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2015-02-28

    We report on a gated single-photon detector based on InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with a single-photon detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm. Our detector is gated at 1 GHz and employs the self-differencing technique for gate transient suppression. It can operate nearly dead time free, except for the one clock cycle dead time intrinsic to self-differencing, and we demonstrate a count rate of 500 Mcps. We present a careful analysis of the optimal driving conditions of the APD measured with a dead time free detector characterization setup. It is found that a shortened gate width of 360 ps together with an increased driving signal amplitude and operation at higher temperatures leads to improved performance of the detector. We achieve an afterpulse probability of 7% at 50% detection efficiency with dead time free measurement and a record efficiency for InGaAs/InP APDs of 55% at an afterpulse probability of only 10.2% with a moderate dead time of 10 ns.

  3. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  4. Performance of an AGATA asymmetric detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, A. J.; Dimmock, M. R.; Unsworth, C.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Grint, A. N.; Harkness, L. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Simpson, J.; Slee, M.; Agata Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray detectors based on high-purity germanium crystals (HPGe) are one of the key workhorses of experimental nuclear science. The technical development of such detector technology has been dramatic in recent years. Large volume, high-granularity, electrically segmented HPGe detectors have been realised and a methodology to improve position sensitivity using pulse-shape analysis coupled with the novel technique of gamma-ray tracking has been developed. Collaborations have been established in Europe (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA)) [J. Simpson, Acta Phys. Pol. B 36 (2005) 1383] and the USA (GRETA/GRETINA) [C.W. Beausang, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 204 (2003)] to build gamma-ray tracking spectrometers. This paper discusses the performance of the first AGATA asymmetric detector that has been tested at the University of Liverpool. The use of a fully digital data acquisition system has allowed detector charge pulse shapes from a selection of well-defined photon interaction positions to be analysed, yielding important information on the position sensitivity of the detector.

  5. Development of a CZT drift ring detector for X and ? ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alruhaili, A.; Sellin, P. J.; Lohstroh, A.; Boothman, V.; Veeramani, P.; Veale, M. C.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Kachkanov, V.

    2015-04-01

    CdTe and CZT detectors are considered better choices for high energy ? and X-ray spectroscopy in comparison to Si and HPGe detectors due to their good quantum efficiency and room temperature operation. The performance limitations in CdTe and CZT detectors are mainly associated with poor hole transport and trapping phenomena. Among many techniques that can be used to eliminate the effect of the poor charge transport properties of holes in CdTe and CZT material, the drift ring technique shows promising results. In this work, the performance of a 2.3 mm thick CZT drift ring detector is investigated. Spatially resolved measurements were carried out with an X-ray microbeam (25 and 75 keV) at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron to study the response uniformity and extent of the active area. Higher energy photon irradiation was also carried out at up to 662 keV using different radioisotopes to complement the microbeam data. Different biasing schemes were investigated in terms of biasing the cathode rear electrode (bulk field) and the ring electrodes (lateral fields). The results show that increasing the bulk field with fixed-ratio ring biases and lateral fields with fixed bulk fields increase the active area of the device significantly, which contrasts with previous studies in CdTe, where only an increasing lateral field resulted in an improvement of device performance. This difference is attributed to the larger thickness of the CZT device reported here.

  6. Development of high quantum efficiency, flat panel, thick detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging: An experimental study of a single-pixel prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, X.; Pang, G.

    2005-11-15

    Our overall goal is to develop a new generation of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) with a quantum efficiency (QE) more than an order of magnitude higher and a spatial resolution equivalent to that of EPIDs currently used for portal imaging. A novel design of such a high QE flat-panel based EPID was introduced recently and its feasibility was investigated theoretically [see Pang and Rowlands, Med. Phys. 31, 3004 (2004)]. In this work, we constructed a prototype single-pixel detector based on the novel design. Some fundamental imaging properties including the QE, spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the prototype detector were measured with a 6 MV beam. It has been shown that the experimental results agree well with theoretical predictions and further development based on the novel design including the construction of a prototype area detector is warranted.

  7. High detection efficiency micro-structured solid-state neutron detector with extremely low leakage current fabricated with continuous p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kuan-Chih; Lu, James J.-Q.; Bhat, Ishwara B.; Dahal, Rajendra; Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3522 ; Danon, Yaron

    2013-04-15

    We report the continuous p-n junction formation in honeycomb structured Si diode by in situ boron deposition and diffusion process using low pressure chemical vapor deposition for solid-state thermal neutron detection applications. Optimized diffusion temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C was obtained by current density-voltage characteristics for fabricated p{sup +}-n diodes. A very low leakage current density of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} at -1 V was measured for enriched boron filled honeycomb structured neutron detector with a continuous p{sup +}-n junction. The neutron detection efficiency for a Maxwellian spectrum incident on the face of the detector was measured under zero bias voltage to be {approx}26%. These results are very encouraging for fabrication of large area solid-state neutron detector that could be a viable alternative to {sup 3}He tube based technology.

  8. Cascaded-systems analyses and the detective quantum efficiency of single-Z x-ray detectors including photoelectric, coherent and incoherent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Seungman; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A.; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Theoretical models of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of x-ray detectors are an important step in new detector development by providing an understanding of performance limitations and benchmarks. Previous cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) models accounted for photoelectric interactions only. This paper describes an extension of the CSA approach to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions, important for low-Z detectors such as silicon and selenium. Methods: A parallel-cascade approach is used to describe the three types of x-ray interactions. The description of incoherent scatter required developing expressions for signal and noise transfer through an 'energy-labeled reabsorption' process where the parameters describing reabsorption are random functions of the scatter photon energy. The description of coherent scatter requires the use of scatter form factors that may not be accurate for some crystalline detector materials. The model includes the effects of scatter reabsorption and escape, charge collection, secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, and additive noise. Model results are validated by Monte Carlo calculations for Si and Se detectors assuming free-atom atomic form factors. Results: The new signal and noise transfer expressions were validated by showing agreement with Monte Carlo results. Coherent and incoherent scatter can degrade the DQE of Si and sometimes Se detectors depending on detector thickness and incident-photon energy. Incoherent scatter can produce a substantial low-frequency drop in the modulation transfer function and DQE. Conclusions: A generally useful CSA model of the DQE is described that is believed valid for any single-Z material up to 10 cycles/mm at both mammographic and radiographic energies within the limitations of Fourier-based linear-systems models and the use of coherent-scatter form factors. The model describes a substantial low-frequency drop in the DQE of Si systems due to incoherent scatter above 20-40 keV.

  9. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector from an axially symmetric cylindrical shell. Subsequent to publication of 1, the theoretical treatment of the cylindrical shell and disk source acquisition sources was recognized by the Los Alamos National Laboratory as suitable for including in the Safeguards Training Program.8 Therefore, we felt it was important to accurately demonstrate the calculus describing the cylindrical shell configuration for the HpGe detector and to theoretically account for the observed bare-detector efficiencies measured in references (3-6). In this paper we demonstrate the applicability of the cylindrical shell derivation to a flexible planar sheet of known Am-241, Eu-152, and Cs-137 activity that we rolled into a symmetrical cylindrical shell of radioactivity. Using the geometry correction equation of reference 1, we calculate geometry correction values using the known detector and source dimensions combined with source to detector distances. We then compare measured detection efficiencies from a cylindrical shell of activity for the 185.7-keV photon (U-235) and for the 414.3-keV photon (Pu-239) with those determined for a 12-inch point source(2,7) to demonstrate agreement between experiment and the theoretically calculated values derived by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) authors of reference 1. We demonstrate this geometry correction first for the 185.7- and 414.3-keV {gamma}-rays. But because the detector was point source calibrated at 12 inches for the energy range (60 -1700) keV (using two distinct sources) to map its intrinsic efficiency, the geometry correction for any acquisition configuration holds for all photon energies.2 We demonstrate that for ten photon energies in the range 121 keV to 967 keV. The good agreement between experiment and calculation is demonstrated at five source to detector distances using the identical shielded HpGe detector of references 4-7 as well as with a separate HpGe detector. We then extend the measurement to include a single acquisition where the flexible source is wrapped around the bare detector in a symmetrical cylinder tha

  10. An investigation of HPGe gamma efficiency calibration software (ANGLE V.3) for applications in nuclear decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Bell, S J; Judge, S M; Regan, P H

    2012-12-01

    High resolution gamma spectrometry offers a rapid method to characterise waste materials on a decommissioning nuclear site. To meet regulatory requirements, measurements must be traceable to national standards, meaning that the spectrometers must be calibrated for a wide range of materials. Semi-empirical modelling software (such as ANGLE) offers a convenient method to carry out such calibrations. This paper describes an assessment of the modelling software for use by a small laboratory based on a nuclear site. The results confirmed the need for accurate information on the detection construction if the calibration were to be accurate to within 10%. PMID:23041778

  11. Neutrino Detectors: Challenges and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, F. J. P.

    2011-10-06

    This paper covers possible detector options suitable at future neutrino facilities, such as Neutrino Factories, Super Beams and Beta Beams. The Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND), which is the baseline detector at a Neutrino Factory, will be described and a new analysis which improves the efficiency of this detector at low energies will be shown. Other detectors covered include the Totally Active Scintillating Detectors (TASD), particularly relevant for a low energy Neutrino Factory, emulsion detectors for tau detection, liquid argon detectors and megaton scale water Cherenkov detectors. Finally the requirements of near detectors for long-baseline neutrino experiments will be demonstrated.

  12. Enhanced detection efficiency of direct conversion X-ray detector using polyimide as hole-blocking layer.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Scott, Christopher C; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate the performance of a direct conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) X-ray detector using biphenyldisnhydride/1,4 phenylenediamine (BPDA/PPD) polyimide (PI) as a hole-blocking layer. The use of a PI layer with a-Se allows detector operation at high electric fields (?10 V/?m) while maintaining low dark current, without deterioration of transient performance. The hole mobility of the PI/a-Se device is measured by the time-of-flight method at different electric fields to investigate the effect of the PI layer on detector performance. It was found that hole mobility as high as 0.75 cm(2)/Vs is achievable by increasing the electric field in the PI/a-Se device structure. Avalanche multiplication is also shown to be achievable when using PI as a blocking layer. Increasing the electric field within a-Se reduces the X-ray ionization energy, increases hole mobility, and improves the dynamic range and sensitivity of the detector. PMID:24285255

  13. Enhanced Detection Efficiency of Direct Conversion X-ray Detector Using Polyimide as Hole-Blocking Layer

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Scott, Christopher C.; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate the performance of a direct conversion amorphous selenium (a-Se) X-ray detector using biphenyldisnhydride/1,4 phenylenediamine (BPDA/PPD) polyimide (PI) as a hole-blocking layer. The use of a PI layer with a-Se allows detector operation at high electric fields (?10?V/?m) while maintaining low dark current, without deterioration of transient performance. The hole mobility of the PI/a-Se device is measured by the time-of-flight method at different electric fields to investigate the effect of the PI layer on detector performance. It was found that hole mobility as high as 0.75?cm2/Vs is achievable by increasing the electric field in the PI/a-Se device structure. Avalanche multiplication is also shown to be achievable when using PI as a blocking layer. Increasing the electric field within a-Se reduces the X-ray ionization energy, increases hole mobility, and improves the dynamic range and sensitivity of the detector. PMID:24285255

  14. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  15. Efficiency of the cross-correlation statistic for gravitational wave stochastic background signals with non-Gaussian noise and heterogeneous detector sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellini, Lionel; Regimbau, Tania

    2015-11-01

    Under standard assumptions including stationary and serially uncorrelated Gaussian gravitational wave stochastic background signal and noise distributions, as well as homogenous detector sensitivities, the standard cross-correlation detection statistic is known to be optimal in the sense of minimizing the probability of a false dismissal at a fixed value of the probability of a false alarm. The focus of this paper is to analyze the comparative efficiency of this statistic, vs a simple alternative statistic obtained by cross-correlating the squared measurements, in situations that deviate from such standard assumptions. We find that differences in detector sensitivities have a large impact on the comparative efficiency of the cross-correlation detection statistic, which is dominated by the alternative statistic when these differences reach 1 order of magnitude. This effect holds even when both the signal and noise distributions are Gaussian. While the presence of non-Gaussian signals has no material impact for reasonable parameter values, the relative inefficiency of the cross-correlation statistic is less prominent for fat-tailed noise distributions, but it is magnified in case noise distributions have skewness parameters of opposite signs. Our results suggest that introducing an alternative detection statistic can lead to noticeable sensitivity gains when noise distributions are possibly non-Gaussian and/or when detector sensitivities exhibit substantial differences, a situation that is expected to hold in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, in particular in the early phases of development of the detectors, or in joint detections from Advanced LIGO and the Einstein Telescope.

  16. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Terasawa, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2007-03-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%{+-}0.71% and 0.21%{+-}0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  17. Strategy of HPGe screening measurements in the SuperNEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Perrot, Frdric [Universit de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nuclaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan, France and CNRS Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    SuperNEMO is a double beta decay experiment that will use a tracko-calorimeter technique. The goal is to reach a sensitivity of T{sub 1/2}(0?)>10{sup 26} y corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.04-0.11 eV with 100 kg of {sup 82}Se. The general strategy of the HPGe screening measurements is described for the materials of the SuperNEMO demonstrator, regarding their radiopurity and their location. The two platforms, PRISNA and LSM, used for this screening are also briefly described.

  18. Impact of detector efficiency and energy resolution on gamma-ray background rejection in mobile spectroscopy and imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucott, Timothy J.; Bandstra, Mark S.; Negut, Victor; Curtis, Joseph C.; Meyer, Ross E.; Chivers, Daniel H.; Vetter, Kai

    2015-07-01

    The presence of gamma-ray background significantly reduces detection sensitivity when searching for radioactive sources in the field, and the systematic variability in the background will limit the size and energy resolution of systems that can be used effectively. An extensive survey of the background was performed using both sodium iodide and high-purity germanium. By using a bivariate negative binomial model for the measured counts, these measurements can be resampled to simulate the performance of a detector array of arbitrary size and resolution. The response of the system as it moved past a stationary source was modeled for spectroscopic and coded aperture imaging algorithms and used for source injection into the background. The performance of both techniques is shown for various sizes and resolutions, as well as the relative performance for sodium iodide and germanium. It was found that at smaller detector sizes or better energy resolution, spectroscopy has higher detection sensitivity than imaging, while imaging is better suited to larger or poorer resolution detectors.

  19. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  20. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Sguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ?0.58 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80?C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.74.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3??10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ?50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  1. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  2. Investigation of quantum efficiency in mid-wave infrared (MWIR) InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice (T2SL) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Lilian; Klein, Brianna; Tian, Zhao-Bing; Frantz, Eric; Myers, Stephen; Gautam, Nutan; Schuler-Sandy, Ted; Plis, Elena; Krishna, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to optimize the absorption in the active region of InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors for the realization of high-performance MWIR devices. Two sets of MWIR (?100% cut-off ~ 5.5?m at 77K) T2SL detectors were realized; one set with varied detector absorber thickness, the other set with varied T2SL period. The T2SL material quality was evaluated on the basis of room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) and the high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) data. Then the device performance was compared using spectral response, dark current and responsivity measurements. Finally, quantum efficiency was calculated and employed as a metric for the definition of the optimal T2SL period and active region thickness. For the first part of the study, a homojunction pin architecture based on 8 monolayers (MLs) InAs/8MLs GaSb T2SL was used. The thickness of the non-intentionally doped absorber layers were 1.5?m, 2.5?m, and 3.5?m. For the second part of the study, unipolar barrier (pBiBn) devices were grown. The thickness of the absorber region and the T2SL constituent InAs layer thicknesses were kept the same (1.5 ?m and 8 MLs, respectively) whereas the T2SL constituent GaSb thickness was varied as 6 MLs, 8 MLs, and 10 MLs. We have found that the pin detector with 2.5 ?m thick absorber and the pBiBn detector with 8 ML InAs/ 8 ML GaSb T2SL composition are, within the scope of this study, optimal for the realization of MWIR single-element devices and FPAs with corresponding architectures.

  3. Shaped detector

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-09-29

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier.

  4. Legri Operations. Detectors and Detector Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reglero, V.; Ballesteros, F.; Blay, P.; Porras, E.; Snchez, F.; Suso, J.

    2001-03-01

    Two years after launch (04.21.97), LEGRI is operating on Minisat-01 in a LEO orbit. The LEGRI detector plane is formed by two type of gamma-ray solid state detectors: HgI_2 and CdZnTe. Detectors are embedded in a box containing the FEE and DFE electronics. This box provides an effective detector passive shielding. Detector plane is multiplexed by a Coded Aperture System located at 54 cm and a Ta Collimator with a FCFOV of 22 and 2 angular resolution. The aim of this paper is to summarize the detector behaviour in three different time scales: before launch, during the in-orbit check-out period (IOC), and after two years of routine operation in space. Main results can be summarized as follows: A large fraction of the HgI_2 detectors presented during LEGRI IOC very high count ratios from their first switch-on (May 1997). Therefore, they induced saturation in the on-board mass memory. After some unsuccessful attempts to reduce the count ratios by setting up different thresholds during LEGRI IOC, all of them were switched off except nine detectors in column 4, with a higher degree of stability. Oppositely, the 17 CdZnTe detectors present a remarkable stability in both their count-ratios and spectral shapes. Details about CdZnTe ground energy calibration, in-flight calibration (using the Crab) and detector stability are discussed hereafter. Detector efficiency function has been computed with the fixed flight threshold used within the calibrated energy range (20-80 KeV). It presents a maximum at 60 KeV, and decreasing efficiencies in the lower and upper energy range ends. Both, non-linear threshold cutting and the drop in the detector efficiency explain the CdZnTe computed operational efficiency response.

  5. Spatio-temporal Monte Carlo modeling of a-Se detectors for breast imaging: energy-weighted Swank noise and detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yuan; Badal, Andreu; Karim, Karim S.; Badano, Aldo

    2012-03-01

    We study the effect of energy weighting in Swank noise and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) at zero spatial frequency with a detailed Monte Carlo (MC) transport code that includes the three-dimensional spatial and temporal transport of electron-hole pairs in semiconductor x-ray detectors. The transport model takes into account recombination and trapping of carriers including effects of Coulomb forces and external applied electric field. We report pulse-height spectra (PHS) for mono-energetic x rays from 6 to 28 keV photon energy with 0.5 keV step size, and for clinical mammography spectra. A first-approximation electronic noise model is included in the simulations. The Swank calculations take into account the entire PHS distribution while the DQE(0) is calculated from the simulated Swank factor, and quantum efficiency values from the PENELOPE database of attenuation coefficients. The simulated DQE(0) is based on the entire clinical x-ray spectrum and takes into account the energy distribution following Tapiovaara and Wagner's (Phys. Med. Biol. 30, 1985) description for the weighting of carrier transport processes. Swank and DQE simulations for semiconductor detectors can provide insight into the fundamental limitations and possible optimization of breast imaging systems.

  6. Study of the material photon and electron background and the liquid argon detector veto efficiency of the CDEX-10 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jian; Zeng, Zhi; Ma, Hao; Yue, Qian; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Chang, Jian-Ping; Chen, Nan; Chen, Ning; Chen, Qing-Hao; Chen, Yun-Hua; Chuang, Yo-Chun; Deng, Zhi; Du, Qiang; Gong, Hui; Hao, Xi-Qing; He, Qing-Ju; Huang, Han-Xiong; Huang, Teng-Rui; Jiang, Hao; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Hau-Bin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Li, Xia; Li, Xin-Ying; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Li, Yuan-Jing; Liao, Heng-Yi; Lin, Fong-Kay; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; L, Lan-Chun; Mao, Shao-Ji; Qin, Jian-Qiang; Ren, Jie; Ren, Jing; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Shen, Man-Bin; Lakhwinder, Singh; Manoj, Kumar Singh; Arun, Kumar Soma; Tang, Chang-Jian; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Wang, Ji-Min; Wang, Li; Wang, Qing; Wong Tsz-King, Henry; Wu, Shi-Yong; Wu, Yu-Cheng; Xing, Hao-Yang; Xu, Yin; Xue, Tao; Yang, Li-Tao; Yang, Song-Wei; Yi, Nan; Yu, Chun-Xu; Yu, Hao; Yu, Xun-Zhen; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Yun-Hua; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Zhu, Jing-Jun; Zhu, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Xue-Zhou; Zhu, Zhong-Hua; CDEX Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The China Dark Matter Experiment (CDEX) is located at the China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL) and aims to directly detect the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) flux with high sensitivity in the low mass region. Here we present a study of the predicted photon and electron backgrounds including the background contribution of the structure materials of the germanium detector, the passive shielding materials, and the intrinsic radioactivity of the liquid argon that serves as an anti-Compton active shielding detector. A detailed geometry is modeled and the background contribution has been simulated based on the measured radioactivities of all possible components within the GEANT4 program. Then the photon and electron background level in the energy region of interest (<10-2eventskg1day-1keV-1 (cpkkd)) is predicted based on Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated result is consistent with the design goal of the CDEX-10 experiment, 0.1cpkkd, which shows that the active and passive shield design of CDEX-10 is effective and feasible. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175099, 10935005, 10945002, 11275107, 11105076) and State Key Development Program of Basic Research of China (2010CB833006)

  7. Analytical modeling of relative luminescence efficiency of Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors exposed to high-energy heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Yukihara, Eduardo G.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to test analytical models to calculate the luminescence efficiency of Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) exposed to heavy charged particles with energies relevant to space dosimetry and particle therapy. We used the track structure model to obtain an analytical expression for the relative luminescence efficiency based on the average radial dose distribution produced by the heavy charged particle. We compared the relative luminescence efficiency calculated using seven different radial dose distribution models, including a modified model introduced in this work, with experimental data. The results obtained using the modified radial dose distribution function agreed within 20% with experimental data from Al2O3:C OSLDs relative luminescence efficiency for particles with atomic number ranging from 1 to 54 and linear energy transfer in water from 0.2 up to 1368 keV m-1. In spite of the significant improvement over other radial dose distribution models, understanding of the underlying physical processes associated with these radial dose distribution models remain elusive and may represent a limitation of the track structure model.

  8. Advanced UV Detectors and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pankove, Jacques I.; Torvik, John

    1998-01-01

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) with its wide energy bandgap of 3.4 eV holds excellent promise for solar blind UV detectors. We have successfully designed, fabricated and tested GaN p-i-n detectors and detector arrays. The detectors have a peak responsivity of 0.14A/W at 363 nm (3.42 eV) at room temperature. This corresponds to an internal quantum efficiency of 56%. The responsivity decreases by several orders of magnitude to 0.008 A/W at 400 nm (3.10 eV) giving the excellent visible rejection ratio needed for solar-blind applications.

  9. Effect of the wire width on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lusche, R. Semenov, A.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.; Korneeva, Y.; Trifonov, A.; Korneev, A.; Goltsman, G.; Vodolazov, D.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2014-07-28

    A thorough spectral study of the intrinsic single-photon detection efficiency in superconducting TaN and NbN nanowires with different widths has been performed. The experiment shows that the cut-off of the intrinsic detection efficiency at near-infrared wavelengths is most likely controlled by the local suppression of the barrier for vortex nucleation around the absorption site. Beyond the cut-off quasi-particle diffusion in combination with spontaneous, thermally activated vortex crossing explains the detection process. For both materials, the reciprocal cut-off wavelength scales linearly with the wire width where the scaling factor agrees with the hot-spot detection model.

  10. Development of high quantum efficiency, flat panel, thick detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging: A novel direct-conversion design and its feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, G.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2004-11-01

    Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed to date, including recently developed flat panel systems, have low x-ray absorption, i.e., low quantum efficiency (QE) of 2%-4% as compared to the theoretical limit of 100%. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as a megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCT) and megavoltage fluoroscopy. However, the spatial resolution of an imaging system usually decreases significantly with an increase of QE. The key to the success in the design of a high QE detector is therefore to maintain the spatial resolution. Recently, we demonstrated theoretically that it is possible to design a portal imaging detector with both high QE and high resolution [see Pang and Rowlands, Med. Phys. 29, 2274 (2002)]. In this paper, we introduce such a novel design consisting of a large number of microstructured plates (made by, e.g., photolithographic patterning of evaporated or electroplated layers) packed together and aligned with the incident x rays. On each plate, microstrip charge collectors are focused toward the x-ray source to collect charges generated in the ionization medium (e.g., air or gas) surrounded by high-density materials that act as x-ray converters. The collected charges represent the x-ray image and can be read out by various means, including a two-dimensional (2-D) active readout matrix. The QE, spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the detector have been calculated. It has been shown that the new design will have a QE of more than an order of magnitude higher and a spatial resolution equivalent to that of flat panel systems currently used for portal imaging. The new design is also quantum noise limited down to very low doses ({approx}1-2 radiation pulses of the linear accelerator)

  11. Controlling the Leakage-Current of Low Temperature Germanium Detectors Using XeF $_{2}$ 2 Dry Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marnieros, S.; Bergé, L.; Broniatowski, A.; Drillien, A. A.; Dumoulin, L.; Holtzer, N.; Olivieri, E.; Piro, M. C.; Rigaut, O.

    2014-08-01

    Ionization detectors, based on the drift and collection of charges in high purity Germanium crystals (HP-Ge), are commonly used for gamma and particle detection. In the field of very low temperature detectors, several major experiments, like EDELWEISS or CDMS, are using such devices combined with a simultaneous measurement of the detector heat pulses, to search for dark matter in the universe. The leakage current between the charge collecting electrodes of the detectors must be kept as low as possible to preserve performance in terms of high resolution and low threshold. We present results concerning the surface treatment of EDELWEISS HP-Ge crystals, aiming at the reduction of their leakage currents at temperatures below 4 K. Among the explored solutions, a post-process dry-etching using XeF (xenon difluoride) gives very promising and reproducible results. The modification of the Ge surface by this treatment and its effect on the low temperature leakage currents are discussed.

  12. Measurement and calculation of the efficiency of fission detectors designed to monitor the time dependence of the neutron production of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, M.T.; Jarvis, O.N.

    1985-05-01

    Three pairs of fission counters (each pair one /sup 235/U and one /sup 238/U) are used at the Joint European Torus to determine the time dependence of the neutron production. In order to determine the absolute value of the neutron flux at the detector location it is necessary to know the neutron detection efficiency of the counter assemblies. This was measured using monoenergetic neutrons (at 2.5 and 14 MeV) and Cf and Am/Be sources. The fraction of fissions detected was determined by extrapolation of the pulse-height spectrum to zero pulse height. The calculation of efficiency was made with the Monte-Carlo neutron transport code MORSE. It was found that the detailed structure of the counter significantly affected the calculated efficiency and that the thermal cross-section values of the DLC37F nuclear data library had to be replaced with room-temperature values. The mean difference between calculation and experiment is (5.5 +- 6.3)%.

  13. Measurement and calculation of the efficiency of fission detectors designed to monitor the time dependence of the neutron production of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinhoe, M. T.; Jarvis, O. N.

    1985-05-01

    Three pairs of fission counters (each pair one 235U and one 238U) are used at the Joint European Torus to determine the time dependence of the neutron production. In order to determine the absolute value of the neutron flux at the detector location it is necessary to know the neutron detection efficiency of the counter assemblies. This was measured using monoenergetic neutrons (at 2.5 and 14 MeV) and Cf and Am/Be sources. The fraction of fissions detected was determined by extrapolation of the pulse-height spectrum to zero pulse height. The calculation of efficiency was made with the Monte-Carlo neutron transport code MORSE. It was found that the detailed structure of the counter significantly affected the calculated efficiency and that the thermal cross-section values of the DLC37F nuclear data library had to be replaced with room-temperature values. The mean difference between calculation and experiment is (5.56.3)%.

  14. Charge carrier localization effects on the quantum efficiency and operating temperature range of InAsxP1-x/InP quantum well detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashisht, Geetanjali; Dixit, V. K.; Porwal, S.; Kumar, R.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of charge carrier localization resulting in "S-shaped" temperature dependence of the photoluminescence peak energy of InAsxP1-x/InP quantum wells (QWs) is distinctly revealed by the temperature dependent surface photo voltage (SPV) and photoconductivity (PC) processes. It is observed that the escape efficiency of carriers from QWs depends on the localization energy, where the carriers are unable to contribute in SPV/PC signal below a critical temperature. Below the critical temperature, carriers are strongly trapped in the localized states and are therefore unable to escape from the QW. Further, the critical temperature increases with the magnitude of localization energy of carriers. Carrier localization thus plays a pivotal role in defining the operating temperature range of InAsxP1-x/InP QW detectors.

  15. Method for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>1.0E4)

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Heineck, Daniel; Voss, Lars F.; Wang, Tzu Fang; Shao, Qinghui

    2013-10-15

    Methods for manufacturing solid-state thermal neutron detectors with simultaneous high thermal neutron detection efficiency (>50%) and neutron to gamma discrimination (>10.sup.4) are provided. A structure is provided that includes a p+ region on a first side of an intrinsic region and an n+ region on a second side of the intrinsic region. The thickness of the intrinsic region is minimized to achieve a desired gamma discrimination factor of at least 1.0E+04. Material is removed from one of the p+ region or the n+ region and into the intrinsic layer to produce pillars with open space between each pillar. The open space is filed with a neutron sensitive material. An electrode is placed in contact with the pillars and another electrode is placed in contact with the side that is opposite of the intrinsic layer with respect to the first electrode.

  16. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C. (Knoxville, TN); Jardret; Vincent D. (Powell, TN)

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  17. Large Area and High Efficiency Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with High Time and Spatial Resolution for Night Time Sensing and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2012-09-01

    The development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors with high performance has significance for applications in astronomy (such as our sensor on the SAAO SALT 10m telescope), night time remote reconnaissance, airborne/space situational awareness, and high-speed adaptive optics. Sealed tube configurations for optical/IR sensing also have applications in detection of Cherenkov light (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and neutron imaging applications. In open faced configurations these devices are important for UV and particle detection in space astrophysics, mass spectroscopy and many time-of flight applications. Currently available devices are limited to sizes of about 5 cm and use either conventional microchannel plates, or dynode multipliers for amplification, coupled coarse pad array readouts. Extension of these schemes to devices as large as 20 cm with high spatial resolution presents significant problems and potentially considerable cost. A collaboration (Large Area Picosecond Photon Detector) of the U. Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, U.C. Berkeley, U. Hawaii and a number of other institutions has developed novel technologies to realize 20 cm format detectors in open face or sealed tube configurations. One critical component of this development is novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays. The microchannel plates are based on a novel concept where the substrate is constructed from a borosilicate micro-capillary array that is made to function as a microchannel plate by deposition of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition. The process is relatively inexpensive compared with conventional microchannel plates and allows very large microchannel plates to be produced with pore sizes as small as 10 microns. These provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional microchannel plates, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have low intrinsic background (<0.1 events/sq-cm/sec) and high stability with no observed gain degradation behavior over at least 5 Coul/sq-cm of charge extraction. Initial tests in a 20 cm detector with a cross strip electronic readout have achieved 4k x 4k pixel imaging with single photon sub-ns timing and MHz event rates. In concert with this effort we have made stable, uniform 20 cm bialkali photocathodes with >20% quantum efficiency on borosilicate windows compatible with a large sealed tube device. Other related efforts have also produced small sealed tubes with 30% quantum efficiency GaAs sealed tubes with high resolution imaging and timing that are immediately applicable to current applications, and opaque GaN UV photocathodes directly deposited onto these novel microchannel plates. We will discuss the details and implications of these novel microchannel plates with respect to the realization of novel detectors up to 20 cm format with reasonable cost and performance, robust construction, high flexibility of format and readout, reduction of fabrication effort, dramatically increased lifetime and stability, and their potential applications.

  18. The measurement of gamma-emitting radionuclides in beach sand cores of coastal regions of Ramsar, Iran using HPGe detectors.

    PubMed

    Tari, Marziyeh; Moussavi Zarandi, Sayyed Ali; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Zare, Mohammad Reza

    2013-09-15

    Radionuclides which present in different beach sands are sources of external exposure that contribute to the total radiation exposure of human. (226)Ra, (235)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs analysis has been carried out in sand samples collected at six depth levels, from eight locations of the northern coast of Iran, Ramsar, using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The average Specific activities of natural radionuclides viz., (226)Ra, (235)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, in the 0-36 cm depth sand were found as: 19.20.04, 2.670.17, 17.90.06, 337.50.61 and 3.350.12 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The effects of organic matter content and pH value of sand samples on the natural radionuclide levels were also investigated. Finally, the measured radionuclide concentrations in the Ramsar beach were compared with the world average values, as reported by UNSCEAR (2000). None of the studied beaches were considered as a radiological risk. PMID:23850123

  19. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    As the complexity and resolution of imaging detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing the detectors requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system.

  20. Efficient implementation of multiple scattering Monte Carlo estimates in time-of-flight neutron spectrometry exploiting wide-area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Francesco, Alessio; Bafile, Ubaldo; Formisano, Ferdinando; Guarini, Eleonora

    2012-02-01

    The substantial upgrade in new-generation reactor-based time-of-flight spectrometers lies in their hugely increased detection area ensuring high neutron-collection power and remarkably good count statistics in relatively short times. Dealing with thousands of time channels and several tens of thousands of detection pixels is, however, quite punishing for data handling and correction. Real-geometry multiple scattering evaluation, even in an approximate way, is often the most demanding step in the treatment of inelastic neutron data, and becomes a very hard task in widely-extended detection geometries, as those of spectrometers like BRISP, IN4 or IN5 at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble. We refreshed our approach to multiple scattering calculations, in order to obtain reasonably accurate real-geometry results in nearly real-time conditions. Our new code, originating from a long standing experience in the application of Monte Carlo (MC) integration techniques to multiple scattering calculations, is now made particularly efficient in computing time both by a careful application of the MC importance sampling method, and by the use of programming languages allowing for an efficient use of matrix algebra to avoid the far slower nested-loop logic of more traditional languages. The concepts at the basis of the algorithm and several implementation details are presented, together with the application to a real experimental test case.

  1. Detector or System? Extending the Concept of Detective Quantum Efficiency to Characterize the Performance of Digital Radiographic Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; MacKenzie, Alistair; Honey, Ian D.; Dobbins, James T.; Ravin, Carl E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an experimental method for measuring the effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) of digital radiographic imaging systems and evaluate its use in select imaging systems. Materials and Methods: A geometric phantom emulating the attenuation and scatter properties of the adult human thorax was employed to assess eight imaging systems in a total of nine configurations. The noise power spectrum (NPS) was derived from images of the phantom acquired at three exposure levels spanning the operating range of the system. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured by using an edge device positioned at the anterior surface of the phantom. Scatter measurements were made by using a beam-stop technique. All measurements, including those of phantom attenuation and estimates of x-ray flux, were used to compute the eDQE. Results: The MTF results showed notable degradation owing to focal spot blur. Scatter fractions ranged between 11% and 56%, depending on the system. The eDQE(0) results ranged from 1%17%, indicating a reduction of up to one order of magnitude and different rank ordering and performance among systems, compared with that implied in reported conventional detective quantum efficiency results from the same systems. Conclusion: The eDQE method was easy to implement, yielded reproducible results, and provided a meaningful reflection of system performance by quantifying image quality in a clinically relevant context. The difference in the magnitude of the measured eDQE and the ideal eDQE of 100% provides a great opportunity for improving the image quality of radiographic and mammographic systems while reducing patient dose. RSNA, 2008 PMID:19011189

  2. The effects of Doppler broadening and detector resolution on the performance of three-stage Compton cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Dennis; Polf, Jerimy; Peterson, Steve; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated how the characteristics of the detectors used in a three-stage Compton camera (CC) affect the CC's ability to accurately measure the emission distribution and energy spectrum of prompt gammas (PG) emitted by nuclear de-excitations during proton therapy. The detector characteristics they studied included the material (high-purity germanium [HPGe] and cadmium zinc telluride [CZT]), Doppler broadening (DB), and resolution (lateral, depth, and energy). Methods: The authors simulated three-stage HPGe and CZT CCs of various configurations, detecting gammas from point sources with energies ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. They also simulated a proton pencil beam irradiating a tissue target to study how the detector characteristics affect the PG data measured by CCs in a clinical proton therapy setting. They used three figures of merit: the distance of closest approach (DCA) and the point of closest approach (PCA) between the measured and actual position of the PG emission origin, and the calculated energy resolution. Results: For CCs with HPGe detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 14% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 20% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. For CCs with CZT detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 18% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 25% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the PCA in the z-caret direction for HPGe and CZT detectors ranged from 1.3 to 0.4 mm for gammas with incident energy ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of HPGe detectors, the resolution of incident gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 6% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of CZT detectors, the resolution of gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 10% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For HPGe and CZT CCs in which all detector effect were included, the DCA was less than 3 mm for 75% and 68% of the detected gammas, respectively, and restricting gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV increased these percentages to 83% and 77% for HPGe and CZT, respectively. Distributions of the true gamma origins and the PCA after detector characteristics had been included showed good agreement on beam range and some loss of resolution for the lateral profile of the PG emission. Characteristic energy lines were evident in the calculated gamma energy spectrum. Conclusions: The authors found the following: (1) DB is the dominant source of spatial and energy resolution loss in the CCs at all energy levels; (2) the largest difference in the spatial resolution of HPGe and CZT CCs is that the spatial resolution distributions of CZT have broader tails. The differences in the FWHM of these distributions are small; (3) the energy resolution of both HPGe and CZT three-stage CCs is adequate for PG spectroscopy; and (4) restricting the gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV can improve the achievable image resolution.

  3. The effects of Doppler broadening and detector resolution on the performance of three-stage Compton cameras

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Dennis; Polf, Jerimy; Peterson, Steve; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how the characteristics of the detectors used in a three-stage Compton camera (CC) affect the CC's ability to accurately measure the emission distribution and energy spectrum of prompt gammas (PG) emitted by nuclear de-excitations during proton therapy. The detector characteristics they studied included the material (high-purity germanium [HPGe] and cadmium zinc telluride [CZT]), Doppler broadening (DB), and resolution (lateral, depth, and energy). Methods: The authors simulated three-stage HPGe and CZT CCs of various configurations, detecting gammas from point sources with energies ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. They also simulated a proton pencil beam irradiating a tissue target to study how the detector characteristics affect the PG data measured by CCs in a clinical proton therapy setting. They used three figures of merit: the distance of closest approach (DCA) and the point of closest approach (PCA) between the measured and actual position of the PG emission origin, and the calculated energy resolution. Results: For CCs with HPGe detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 14% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 20% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. For CCs with CZT detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 18% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 25% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the PCA in the \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\hat z\\end{equation*} \\end{document}z^ direction for HPGe and CZT detectors ranged from 1.3 to 0.4 mm for gammas with incident energy ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of HPGe detectors, the resolution of incident gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 6% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of CZT detectors, the resolution of gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 10% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For HPGe and CZT CCs in which all detector effect were included, the DCA was less than 3 mm for 75% and 68% of the detected gammas, respectively, and restricting gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV increased these percentages to 83% and 77% for HPGe and CZT, respectively. Distributions of the true gamma origins and the PCA after detector characteristics had been included showed good agreement on beam range and some loss of resolution for the lateral profile of the PG emission. Characteristic energy lines were evident in the calculated gamma energy spectrum. Conclusions: The authors found the following: (1) DB is the dominant source of spatial and energy resolution loss in the CCs at all energy levels; (2) the largest difference in the spatial resolution of HPGe and CZT CCs is that the spatial resolution distributions of CZT have broader tails. The differences in the FWHM of these distributions are small; (3) the energy resolution of both HPGe and CZT three-stage CCs is adequate for PG spectroscopy; and (4) restricting the gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV can improve the achievable image resolution. PMID:23298111

  4. Modelling of a Single-Channel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Phoswich Detector Using Geant4 for the Conversion Electron Energy Peak Resolution and Beta-Gamma Coincidence Efficiency Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weihua; Mekarski, Pawel; Bean, Marc; Yi, Jing; Ungar, Kurt

    2014-03-01

    In this study, an optimized single-channel phoswich well detector design has been proposed and assessed in order to improve beta-gamma coincidence measurement sensitivity of xenon radioisotopes. This newly designed phoswich well detector consists of a plastic beta counting cell (BC404) embedded in a CsI (Tl) crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The BC404 is configured in a cylindrical pipe shape to minimise light collection deterioration. The CsI (Tl) crystal consists of a rectangular part and a semi-cylinder scintillation part as a light reflector to increase light gathering. Compared with a PhosWatch detector, the final optimized detector geometry showed 15 % improvement in the energy resolution of a 131mXe 129.4 keV conversion electron peak. The predicted beta-gamma coincidence efficiencies of xenon radioisotopes have also been improved accordingly.

  5. The ZEUS microvertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Tobias

    2005-09-01

    The ZEUS microvertex detector (MVD) was installed in 2001 and commissioned in 2002/03. Doses of up to 1.2 kGy were observed from synchrotron radiation and beam-gas interactions. Detector operation is stable. Hit efficiencies are around 98%. Alignment accuracies of around 40-60 ?m have been reached.

  6. The ZEUS microvertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlin, Roberto; ZEUS MVD Group

    2003-09-01

    The ZEUS silicon microstrip vertex detector was installed in 2001, during the shutdown for the HERA upgrade. In this report, we briefly summarize the structure of the MVD, and then present the first results on noise, efficiency and alignment. The detector has already integrated a non-negligible radiation dose; the effects and the prospect are discussed.

  7. Investigations of quantum efficiency in type-II InAs/GaSb very long wavelength infrared superlattice detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaochao; Jiang, Dongwei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Wang, Dongbo; Yu, Qingjiang; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the quantum efficiency (QE) of InAs/GaSb T2SL very long wavelength Infrared (VLWIR) photodetectors with 50% cutoff of 12.7 μm. Due to the small depletion width and similar absorption coefficient in the T2SL material system, the minority-carrier diffusion length was determined as the key element to improve the QE of VLWIR T2SL photodetectors. The minority-carrier diffusion length was estimated by a comparison of the experimental data with the Hovel model. Our result suggest that the short hole diffusion length (Lh ∼ 520 nm) and the large its ratio to the width of this region (xn/Lh) are considered against the photo-excited carrier collection in the T2SL photodetectors. In addition, the influence of surface recombination velocity (Sh) on the QE of the T2SL photodetectors is also studied. The change of QE with Sh is not so significant due to the relatively low absorption coefficient and short hole diffusion length in our photodetector.

  8. Detective quantum efficiency for photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors in the tender X-ray domain: application to Medipix3RX.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Jean; Magalhes, Debora; Wagner, Franz; Meneau, Florian; Cesar Vicentin, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray imaging techniques using tender X-rays are facing a growing demand, in particular to probe the K absorption edges of low-Z elements. Here, a mathematical model has been developed for estimating the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero spatial frequency in the tender X-ray energy range for photon-counting detectors by taking into account the influence of electronic noise. The experiments were carried out with a Medipix3RX ASIC bump-bonded to a 300?m silicon sensor at the Soft X-ray Spectroscopy beamline (D04A-SXS) of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS, Campinas, Brazil). The results show that Medipix3RX can be used to develop new imaging modalities in the tender X-ray range for energies down to 2?keV. The efficiency and optimal DQE depend on the energy and flux of the photons. The optimal DQE values were found in the 7.9-8.6?keV photon energy range. The DQE deterioration for higher energies due to the lower absorption efficiency of the sensor and for lower energies due to the electronic noise has been quantified. The DQE for 3?keV photons and 1 10(4)?photons pixel(-1) s(-1) is similar to that obtained with 19?keV photons. Based on our model, the use of Medipix3RX could be extended down to 2?keV which is crucial for coming applications in imaging techniques at modern synchrotron sources. PMID:26698065

  9. New electronically black neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, D.M.; Feldman, W.C.; Hurlbut, C.

    1986-03-01

    Two neutron detectors are described that can function in a continuous radiation background. Both detectors identify neutrons by recording a proton recoil pulse followed by a characteristic capture pulse. This peculiar signature indicates that the neutron has lost all its energy in the scintillator. Resolutions and efficiencies have been measured for both detectors.

  10. A simultaneous measurement of the $b$-tagging efficiency scale factor and the $t\\bar{t}$ Production Cross Section at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Nazim; /McGill U.

    2011-07-01

    The ability to compare results between Monte Carlo and data is imperative in modern experimental high-energy physics analyses. The b-tagging efficiency Scale Factor (SF) allows for an accurate comparison of b quark identification in data samples and Monte Carlo. This thesis presents a simultaneous measurement of the SF for the SecVtx algorithm and the t{bar t} production cross section using 5.6 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. The t{bar t} cross section was measured to be 7.26 {+-} 0.47 pb, consistent with prior CDF analyses. The tight SF value was measured to be 0.925 {+-} 0.032 and the loose SF value was measured at 0.967 {+-} 0.033. These are the most precise SF SecVtx measurements to be performed at CDF to date.

  11. Multiple detectors "Influence Method".

    PubMed

    Rios, I J; Mayer, R E

    2016-05-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency and without the need to register coincidences of any kind. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector in the count rate of another detector, when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency (Rios and Mayer, 2015a). Its detailed mathematical description was recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015b) and its practical implementation in the measurement of a moderated neutron flux arising from an isotopic neutron source was exemplified in (Rios and Mayer, 2016). With the objective of further reducing the measurement uncertainties, in this article we extend the method for the case of multiple detectors placed one behind the other. The new estimators for the number of particles and the detection efficiency are herein derived. PMID:26943904

  12. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Because the liquid hydrogen which NASA stores for the space shuttle engines is easily ignited, a hand held ultraviolet fire detector was developed by detector electronics under NASA contract. The system was commercialized by Detector Electronics for use in other hydrogen handling facilities. The detector sensors spot a hydrogen flame at 100 feet, show radiation levels and provide an aural fire alert.

  13. GLAS 532nm Optical Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaRue, Ross A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents fabrication and testing of 532nm optical detectors. Testing procedures included 532nm quantum efficiency, detector gain, and photon counting performance, in particular, photon counting efficiency. 532nm quantum efficiency was measured to be 36% to 39% for the detectors fabricated. Detectors with a GaAs APD anode had measured gains of 12,000 to 15,000 maximum. Photon counting efficiency for the detector with an APD anode was measured to be approximately 80% with a detector gain of 11,000. Measurements made on an identical detector, not fabricated under this contract, had a photon counting efficiency exceeding 90% with a gain of 13,000. A formula is derived in which the photon counting efficiency is determined by the system preamp noise and the peak single photon pulse height which is proportional to detector gain. This formula agrees well with the measured results and indicates that a detector gain of 15,000 is sufficient to provide a counting efficiency of 99.6%.

  14. Microtomography using a tube source of X-rays, a low-energy-resolution HPGe detector system and an array of detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, R.; Rao, D. V.; Appoloni, C. R.; Brunetti, A.

    1995-02-01

    A new microtomographic system has been assembled with a geometrical resolution of about 25-50 mm. This system is employed directly using the bremsstrahlung radiation and filtering the primary radiation with absorbers composed by an element. A reconstruction programme, written in PASCAL is able to give the reconstruction matrix of linear attenuation coefficients, simulates the matrix and the related tomography. Microtomography was studied thoroughly with different samples like acrylic cylinders containing internal W-wires of about 10 ?m diameter, acrylic cylinders with holes of known diameters, small pencils with internal graphite, acrylic cylinders containing grains of soil and so on.

  15. The ZEUS Microvertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrucci, Maria Carmela

    A new silicon microvertex detector (MVD) will be installed in the ZEUS experiment during the 2000 HERA luminosity upgrade. Such a high precision detector will improve the global tracking system and allow to identity events with secondary vertices originating from the decays of long-lived states. It will be placed in the proximity to the beam pipe to surround the interaction region. The barrel part is a 60 cm long cylinder consisting of three double layers of single-sided silicon detectors, the forward part is made of four double shaped layers, called wheels, extending 42 cm along the beam. A test beam has been setup in order to characterize the performance of the detector modules and readout electronics (i.e. track position resolution, signal to noise ratio, detection efficiency). The detector layout and some selected test beam results are presented.

  16. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2008-03-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resum; Appendixes; Index.

  17. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  18. LEDs for Efficient Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, David A.

    1978-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are described and three classroom experiments are given, one to prove the, low power requirements and efficiency of LEDs, an LED on-off detector circuit, and the third an LED photoelectric smoke detector. (BB)

  19. Capabilities of germanium detectors. [gamma ray spectoscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. B.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The gamma ray detection efficiency and energy resolution of germanium detectors is reviewed. A general sensitivity equation for gamma-ray detectors is presented and calculated sensitvity curves are shown for a large volume balloon-borne spectrometer using germanium detectors. Improvement anticipated from a planned satellite experiment using germanium detectors is discussed.

  20. Gallium arsenide pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, R.; Campbell, M.; Cantatore, E.; D'Auria, S.; da Vi, C.; del Papa, C.; Heijne, E. M.; Middelkamp, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Ropotar, I.; Scharfetter, L.; Smith, K.; Snoeys, W.

    1998-02-01

    GaAs detectors can be fabricated with bidimensional single-sided electrode segmentation. They have been successfully bonded using flip-chip technology to the Omega-3 silicon read-out chip. We present here the design features of the GaAs pixel detectors and results from a test performed at the CERN SpS with a 120 GeV ?- beam. The detection efficiency was 99.2% with a nominal threshold of 5000 e -.

  1. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  2. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  3. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many – you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability we’d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDD’s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detector’s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  4. Calibration drift in a laboratory high purity germanium detector spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Dewey, S C; Kearfott, K J

    2008-02-01

    For unknown radionuclide identification, it is important that a high purity germanium (HPGe) spectrometry system be calibrated correctly for energy. The energy calibration of an HPGe spectrometry system will drift over time due to a variety of factors including the ambient temperature, the line voltage applied to the system, variation in the electronics, and other possible influences. In order to better understand the nature of this energy calibration drift, calibration spectra were collected over a period of several months from a laboratory HPGe spectrometry system. System parameters, including detector voltage, amplifier gain, and preamplifier gain, were not deliberately modified during the course of the experiment. The system was calibrated routinely over the 90 days, and the results of the calibrations were compared in order to assess the drift in the energy calibration of the detector over time. The analysis of a 36% high purity germanium system demonstrated the energy calibration drifted an average of 0.014 keV d(-1) to 0.041 keV d(-1) depending upon energy. At 1,332 keV, one day after calibration, it was shown that up to half of the total error in energy calibration was as a result of calibration drift. PMID:18192795

  5. TU-F-18A-08: Effect of Quantum Detection Efficiency and Energy Bin Selection On Contrast-To-Noise-Ratio for Energy-Resolved Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam Ng, A; Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors have the capability to discriminate photons according to their energies. By using optimal energy weighting factors, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) of the reconstructed image can be improved. In this work, we investigate how quantum detection efficiency (QDE) affects the determination of the optimal energy threshold bins, and therefore the CNR improvement of photon-counting detectors. Methods: In this simulation study a photon-counting detector, based on Silicon (Si), was investigated. A task-oriented algorithm was used to determine the optimal energy bin setting in order to maximize CNR. Projection-based and Image-based energy weighting techniques were implemented. A 13 mm PMMA phantom with two contrast materials, hydroxyapatite (HA) and iodine (I), at different concentrations (100, 200, and 300 mg/mL for HA and 2, 4, and 8 mg/mL for I) was used. TASMIP algorithm was used to generate the spectrum with 2.7 mm Al filter. Different tube voltages, number of energy bins, and bin widths were investigated. Different thicknesses of Si were also investigated to determine the QDE effect on CNR. Results: CNR increased as the detector material thickness increased until it reached 30 mm for Si thickness such that the CNR value was near to the value predicted by an ideal detector. Also, the results indicated that the improvement of CNR due to the QDE is task-dependent when comparing weighted images to photon-counting images. For hydroxyapatite the improvement is approximately 20%, whereas for iodine it is less than 10%. Conclusion: The results showed that the improvement of CNR for an energy-resolved photon-counting detector is highly task-dependent when QDE is taken into account.

  6. Measurement of the detective quantum efficiency in digital detectors consistent with the IEC 62220-1 standard: Practical considerations regarding the choice of filter material

    SciTech Connect

    Ranger, Nicole T.; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T. III; Ravin, Carl E.

    2005-07-15

    As part of a larger evaluation we attempted to measure the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector using the method described in the International Electrotechnical Commission standard 62220-1 published in October 2003. To achieve the radiographic beam conditions specified in the standard, we purchased scientific-grade ultrahigh purity aluminum (99.999% purity, type-11999 alloy) filters in thicknesses ranging from 0.1 through 10.0 mm from a well-known, specialty metals supplier. Qualitative evaluation of flat field images acquired at 71 kV (RQA5 beam quality) with 21 mm of ultrahigh purity aluminum filtration demonstrated a low frequency mottle that was reproducible and was not observed when the measurement was repeated at 74 kV (RQA5 beam quality) with 21 mm of lower-purity aluminum (99.0% purity, type-1100 alloy) filtration. This finding was ultimately attributed to the larger grain size (approximately 1-2 mm) of high purity aluminum metal, which is a well-known characteristic, particularly in thicknesses greater than 1 mm. The impact of this low frequency mottle is to significantly overestimate the noise power spectrum (NPS) at spatial frequencies {<=}0.2 mm{sup -1}, which in turn would cause an underestimation of the DQE in this range. A subsequent evaluation of ultrahigh purity aluminum, purchased from a second source, suggests, that reduced grain size can be achieved by the process of annealing. Images acquired with this sample demonstrated vertical striated nonuniformities that are attributed to the manufacturing method and which do not appear to appreciably impact the NPS at spatial frequencies {>=}0.5 mm{sup -1}, but do result in an asymmetry in the x- and y-NPS at spatial frequencies {<=}0.2 mm{sup -1}. Our observations of markedly visible nonuniformities in images acquired with high purity aluminum filtration suggest that the uniformity of filter materials should be carefully evaluated and taken into consideration when measuring the DQE.

  7. Study of the counting efficiency of a WBC setup by using a computational 3D human body library in sitting position based on polygonal mesh surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, T C Ferreira; Bogaerts, R; Lebacq, A L; Mihailescu, C L; Vanhavere, F

    2014-04-01

    A realistic computational 3D human body library, called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms), based on polygonal mesh surface geometry, has been created to be used for numerical calibration of the whole body counter (WBC) system of the nuclear power plant (NPP) in Doel, Belgium. The main objective was to create flexible computational models varying in gender, body height, and mass for studying the morphology-induced variation of the detector counting efficiency (CE) and reducing the measurement uncertainties. First, the counting room and an HPGe detector were modeled using MCNPX (Monte Carlo radiation transport code). The validation of the model was carried out for different sample-detector geometries with point sources and a physical phantom. Second, CE values were calculated for a total of 36 different mesh phantoms in a seated position using the validated Monte Carlo model. This paper reports on the validation process of the in vivo whole body system and the CE calculated for different body heights and weights. The results reveal that the CE is strongly dependent on the individual body shape, size, and gender and may vary by a factor of 1.5 to 3 depending on the morphology aspects of the individual to be measured. PMID:24562069

  8. Characterisation of the SmartPET planar Germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boston, H. C.; Boston, A. J.; Cooper, R. J.; Cresswell, J.; Grint, A. N.; Mather, A. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Scraggs, D. P.; Turk, G.; Hall, C. J.; Lazarus, I.; Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R.

    2007-08-01

    Small Animal Reconstruction PET (SmartPET) is a project funded by the UK medical research council (MRC) to demonstrate proof of principle that Germanium can be utilised in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The SmartPET demonstrator consists of two orthogonal strip High Purity Germanium (HPGe) planar detectors manufactured by ORTEC. The aim of the project is to produce images of an internal source with sub mm 3 spatial resolution. Before this image can be achieved the detectors have to be fully characterised to understand the response at any given location to a ?-ray interaction. This has been achieved by probing the two detectors at a number of specified points with collimated sources of various energies and strengths. A 1 mm diameter collimated beam of photons was raster scanned in 1 mm steps across the detector. Digital pulse shape data were recorded from all the detector channels and the performance of the detector for energy and position determination has been assessed. Data will be presented for the first SmartPET detector.

  9. GEM Detectors for Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Frank; Friedrich, Jan; Grube, Boris; Konorov, Igor; Paul, Stephan; Altunbas, Cem; Kappler, Steffen; Ketzer, Bernhard; Placci, Alfredo; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio

    2002-11-01

    For the small-area tracking of the COMPASS experiment, GEM detectors with an active area of 31 31 cm2 are employed. These detectors use three cascaded GEM foils with asymmetric voltage sharing and Ar:CO2 (70/30) as detector gas. The GEMs have a non-uniformity in gain of less than 15% and achieve an efficiency of 99.0 0.1% and a spatial resolution of 46 3 ?m for minimum-ionizing particles at nominal gain of ~ 8000. The narrow charge correlation (?rat< 0.1) between the orthogonal coordinates of the 2D projective readout improves the reconstruction capability for multiple hits. High rate tolerance and low discharge probability make the GEM detectors well suited for operation in intense muon and hadron beams.

  10. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  11. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevremovi?, Milutin; Miloevi?, Bratislav; Lazarevi?, Nataa

    This article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of a metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems, which are used for the painting of military equipment. During the evaluation of the efficiency of decontamination, the impact of contaminants on the coating was not examined but the amount of contaminants residual after decontamination was, and was determined by activity measurements of the surface. The samples for testing were painted aluminum plates contaminated by liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60Co, 133Ba, 152Eu and 241Am (A=12297.91 Bq/ml). Decontamination of contaminated samples was performed with 0.5% detergent solution on the basis of synthetic surfactants. The activity measurements of samples were conducted using gamma spectroscopy system with a high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of relative efficiency of 50% at 60Co (1.33 MeV). The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. A comparison of the results is presented in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the efficiency of decontamination. The samples with an alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin were superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. The difference in the efficiency of decontamination for the examined coatings increases almost linearly in relation to the retention time of the contaminants in the coating.

  12. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  13. An experimental approach to efficiency calibration for gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of large air particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarchio, Elio

    2013-04-01

    A full-energy-peak efficiency (FEPE) calibration procedure for gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of air particulate samples collected on large filters is described herein. The experimental results are obtained for an unconventional measurement geometry, termed a "packet-sample". The sample is obtained from a large cellulose filter (45 cm45 cm) used to collect air particulate samples that is resized to dimensions suitable for spectrometric measurements (6 cm6 cm0.7 cm). To determine the FEPEs, many standards were created, i.e., some filters containing a small amount of ThO2 and others containing a known amount of KCl. Efficiency curves obtained through best fits to experimental data for three high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, one of them for X-ray measurement, cover the energy range from 40 keV to 2600 keV. To validate the efficiency calibration procedure two experimental tests with the use of calibrated sources were conducted and, as application example, airborne concentrations of 131I (particulate matter), 134Cs and 137Cs at Palermo (Italy) in the days following the Fukushima accident in Japan were evaluated.

  14. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  15. Vapor Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  16. PET detector modules based on novel detector technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    A successful PET detector module must identify 511 keV photons with: high efficiency (>85%), high spatial resolution (<5 mm fwhm), low cost (<$600 / in{sup 2}), low dead time (<4 {mu}s in{sup 2}), good timing resolution (<5 ns fwhm for conventional PET, <200 ps fwhm for time of flight), and good energy resolution (<100 keV fwhm), where these requirements are listed in decreasing order of importance. The ``high efficiency`` requirement also implies that the detector modules must pack together without inactive gaps. Several novel and emerging radiation detector technologies could improve the performance of PET detectors. Avalanche photodiodes, PIN photodiodes, metal channel dynode photomultiplier tubes, and new scintillators all have the potential to improve PET detectors significantly.

  17. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  18. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  19. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  20. Performance of A Compact Multi-crystal High-purity Germanium Detector Array for Measuring Coincident Gamma-ray Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Art; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-02-18

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,γ)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center of mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the segmented nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within the uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance will be presented.

  1. Response of a LaBr3(Ce) Detector to 2-11 MeV Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    The development of lanthanum halide scintillation detectors has great potential application in field-portable prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis systems. Because the low-energy response of these detectors has already been well-characterized [1[-[2], we have measured their response to higher energy gamma rays in the region between 2 and 11 MeV. We have measured the response of a 2-inch (5.08 cm) by 2-inch long LaBr3(Ce) detector to high energy gamma rays produced by neutron interactions on chlorine, hydrogen, iron, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur. The response of the LaBr3(Ce) detector is compared to that of HPGe and NaI(Tl) detectors.

  2. Performance of a compact multi-crystal high-purity germanium detector array for measuring coincident gamma-ray emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Chris; Daigle, Stephen; Buckner, Matt; Erikson, Luke E.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stave, Sean C.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Cooper, Andrew; Downen, Lori; Glasgow, Brian D.; Kelly, Keegan; Sallaska, Anne

    2015-05-01

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) detector is a 14-crystal array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors housed in a single cryostat. The array was used to measure the astrophysical S-factor for the 14N(p,?)15O* reaction for several transition energies at an effective center-of-mass energy of 163 keV. Owing to the granular nature of the MARS detector, the effect of gamma-ray summing was greatly reduced in comparison to past experiments which utilized large, single-crystal detectors. The new S-factor values agree within their uncertainties with the past measurements. Details of the analysis and detector performance are presented.

  3. Lanthanum Bromide Detectors for Safeguards Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.

    2011-05-25

    Lanthanum bromide has advantages over other popular inorganic scintillator detectors. Lanthanum bromide offers superior resolution, and good efficiency when compared to sodium iodide and lanthanum chloride. It is a good alternative to high purity germanium detectors for some safeguards applications. This paper offers an initial look at lanthanum bromide detectors. Resolution of lanthanum bromide will be compared lanthanum chloride and sodium-iodide detectors through check source measurements. Relative efficiency and angular dependence will be looked at. Nuclear material spectra, to include plutonium and highly enriched uranium, will be compared between detector types.

  4. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  5. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  6. Characterization of naturally occurring radioactive materials in Libyan oil pipe scale using a germanium detector and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, A. S.; Shutt, A. L.; Regan, P. H.; Matthews, M. C.; Alsulaiti, H.; Bradley, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    Radioactive scale formation in various oil production facilities is acknowledged to pose a potential significant health and environmental issue. The presence of such an issue in Libyan oil fields was recognized as early as 1998. The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) involved in this matter are radium isotopes (226Ra and 228Ra) and their decay products, precipitating into scales formed on the surfaces of production equipment. A field trip to a number of onshore Libyan oil fields has indicated the existence of elevated levels of specific activity in a number of locations in some of the more mature oil fields. In this study, oil scale samples collected from different parts of Libya have been characterized using gamma spectroscopy through use of a well shielded HPGe spectrometer. To avoid potential alpha-bearing dust inhalation and in accord with safe working practices at this University, the samples, contained in plastic bags and existing in different geometries, are not permitted to be opened. MCNP, a Monte Carlo simulation code, is being used to simulate the spectrometer and the scale samples in order to obtain the system absolute efficiency and then to calculate sample specific activities. The samples are assumed to have uniform densities and homogeneously distributed activity. Present results are compared to two extreme situations that were assumed in a previous study: (i) with the entire activity concentrated at a point on the sample surface proximal to the detector, simulating the sample lowest activity, and; (ii) with the entire activity concentrated at a point on the sample surface distal to the detector, simulating the sample highest activity.

  7. Tracking Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Manfred; Mitaroff, Winfried

    Tracking detectors are devices to measure and reconstruct the trajectories of charged particles. They are developed for and used by physics experiments in the fields of nuclear physics, particle physics, and astro-particle physics. To understand and analyze the physics processes under study at these experiments the reconstruction and precise determination of the particles flight path is important. From these particle tracks, parameters such as the particle momentum, the particle type, its origin, etc., can be deduced. Several detector technologies have been invented and are being constantly improved. The most important ones are the various types of gas detectors, detectors based on semiconductor material, and scintillating detectors. In a realistic experiment, several tracking (and other) devices are arranged to a complex set-up. Charged particle tracks are reconstructed by making use of all available information from all tracking detectors. The actual reconstruction of events from raw measurements is a nontrivial task involving pattern recognition, track and vertex fitting. The performance of both hardware and software must be optimized for the benefit of follow-on physics analyses.

  8. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-10-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible.

  9. Continuum Background in Space-Borne Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Larry G.; Trombka, Jacob I; Starr, Richard; Boyton, William V.; Bailey, S.

    1997-01-01

    The background measured with space-borne gamma-ray spectrometers (GRS) in the 100 keV-10 MeV energy region consists of both discrete lines and continuum. The discrete lines originate in the decay of radioactive species. The continuum originates from a number of different processes and can be an important factor in the detection, for example, of weak gamma-ray lines from a planetary surface. Measurements of the gamma-ray background have been made during the cruise portion of a number of planetary missions. The three missions described here are the Apollo 15 and 16 missions each of which carried a 7 cm x 7 cm NaI scintillation detector, the Mars Observer (MO) mission which used a 5.5 cm X 5.5 cm high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and the Near Earth Rendezvous Asteroid (NEAR) mission that has a 2.54 cm x 7.6 cm NaI detector. A comparison of the intensity and spectral shape of these background spectra can be useful to help understand how these backgrounds vary with spacecraft size, detector position, and detector size. The use of shields to reduce the background components on these three missions is a test of the effectiveness of different shield designs.

  10. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  11. Development of ?-ray detectors for 16O(p,p'?) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Ou, I.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2012-11-01

    The ? ray production in neutral-current (NC) neutrino-oxygen interaction is very important to the detection of neutrinos from supernova explosion in a neutrino experiment, since those ? rays can become extra signals or unexpected background in the energy region from 5 MeV to 30 MeV. We propose the experiment to measure ? rays in 16O(p,p') reaction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka) to provide good information on the ?-ray emission spectra in neutrino-oxygen reactions. We present the design of ?-ray detectors (NaI, CsI, HPGe), which will be used in proposed experiment.

  12. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  13. Optimization of high purity germanium (HPGe) crystals growth rate through the simulation and modeling of growth system geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govani, Jayesh; Mei, Dongming; Wang, Guojian; Yang, Gang

    2012-02-01

    The growth rate and quality of high-purity germanium (HPGe) single crystals depend largely on the control of the thermal field such as the temperature profile and heat transfer. The control parameters of the thermal field can only be regulated externally through the growth system geometry, hydrogen and argon gas pressure, flow rate, pulling rate, and power and frequency of a RF heater. Since quantitative determination of the control parameters is exceptionally challenging and expensive, computer modeling and simulation of CZ growth processes play an imperative role in the advances of innovative pulling procedures and augmentation of Ge crystal quality. We present a detailed modeling and simulation study of radial and vertical temperature gradient, radial and vertical heat flux, temperature profile, thermo-elastic stresses, and defect density analysis for different crystal positions and diverse growth system geometry. We also virtually studied the consequences of targeted growth rate on temperature gradient and induction heating. A comparative analysis of simulated and available experimental results is also presented. In this effort, we have demonstrated the importance of simulation and modeling as it helps reducing the number of growth experiments significantly for the optimization of crystal quality and targeted growth rate.

  14. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi (Mito, JP); Ikemoto, Ichiro (Mito, JP)

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  15. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W. (Moss Beach, CA); Cusson, Ronald Y. (Chapel Hill, NC); Johnson, Ray M. (San Ramon, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  16. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  17. Pulse shape analysis of a two fold clover detector with empirical mode decomposition based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Mandal, S.; Palit, R.; Schaffner, H.; Adamczewski, J.; Kurz, N.; Naidu, B. S.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2014-08-01

    A study of Second-Generation HPGe detectors, which aim at high resolution gamma spectroscopy are underway. The study will utilize the concept of Compton imaging in semiconductors, which will be probed by the Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) and Gamma-Ray Tracking (GRT) algorithms. The ?-ray track vertices inside the detector volume can be found by analyzing the core and mirror signals which result from different kinds of couplings among the electrodes. The energy accuracy of the reconstructed tracks will depend on the accuracy of the co-ordinate reconstruction. In the present investigation such co-ordinate reconstruction has been done under Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) based algorithm. The implications of EMD on pulse shapes of signals from a two fold clover detector has been studied.

  18. PHAROS: A pluri-detector, high-resolution, analyser of radiometric properties of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigollet, C.; de Meijer, R. J.

    2002-08-01

    PHAROS is a new type of core logger, designed to measure activity concentrations of 40K, 238U, 232Th and 137Cs in sediment and rock cores with a spatial resolution of a few centimetres along the core. PHAROS has been developed as a non-destructive alternative to the traditional slicing of cores into sub-samples and their analysis on an HPGe detector. The core is scanned at fixed increments by three BGO scintillation detectors and the spectra analysed by the full spectrum analysis method. The core logger is also equipped with a collimated lead castle and a 137Cs source for transmission measurements. In this paper, we report on the properties of the core logger and its detectors, and on the analysis techniques used for the determination of the radionuclides activity concentrations. Results from initial measurements are presented and discussed.

  19. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  20. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  1. The micro void neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsis, Menyhért

    2004-08-01

    The Gas-filled Micro Void Particle Detector is based on gas-filled micro voids placed in an external electric field. This detector presents common features of solid state and gas filled devices as internal amplification, unlimited size and shape, dense, high efficiency parallax reducing structure. The gas filling in the void and/or the wall of the micro void serves as radiation detector. The working principle was tested on syntactic foam composed of glass micro bubbles embedded in an epoxy matrix.

  2. Spatial resolution attainable in germanium detectors by pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J., Bechtel, NV; Beckedahl, D.; Kammeraad, J.; Schmid, G., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    There are several applications for which it is desirable to calculate the locations and energies of individual gamma-ray interactions within a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector. These include gamma-ray imaging and Compton suppression. With a segmented detector this can be accomplished by analyzing the pulse shapes of the signals from the various segments. We examine the fundamental limits to the spatial resolution attainable with this approach. The primary source of error is the series noise of the field effect transistors (FETs) at the inputs of the charge amplifiers. We show how to calculate the noise spectral density at the output of the charge amplifiers due to an optimally selected FET. This calculation is based only on the detector capacitance and a noise constant for the FET technology. We show how to use this spectral density to calculate the uncertainties in parameters, such as interaction locations and energies, that are derived from pulse shape analysis using maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) applied to filtered and digitized recordings of the charge signals. Example calculations are given to illustrate our approach. Experimental results are given that demonstrate that one can construct complete systems, from detector through data analysis, that come near the theoretical limits.

  3. Characteristics of Signals Originating Near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, Juan; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, Matthew P.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, Mark; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, Mary; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Ron L.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila K.; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, D.; Poon, Alan; Radford, Davis; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2013-02-11

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  4. Characteristics of Signals Originating near the Lithium-Diffused N+ Contact of High Purity Germanium P-Type Point Contact Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, E.; Amman, M.; Avignone, F. T.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, James R; Bertrand Jr, Fred E; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C. D.; Collar, Juan I.; Combs, D. C.; Detwiler, J.A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, J.; Fast, J.E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Gehman, V. M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E.W.; Horton, M.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.J.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S.I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.N.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R.D.; Merriman, J. H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, L.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, N. R.; Perumpilly, G.; Phillips II, D. G.; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A study of signals originating near the lithium-diffused n+ contact of p-type point contact (PPC) high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) is presented. The transition region between the active germanium and the fully dead layer of the n+ contact is examined. Energy depositions in this transition region are shown to result in partial charge collection. This provides a mechanism for events with a well defined energy to contribute to the continuum of the energy spectrum at lower energies. A novel technique to quantify the contribution from this source of background is introduced. Experiments that operate germanium detectors with a very low energy threshold may benefit from the methods presented herein.

  5. Detection efficiency characteristics of free-running InGaAs/InP single photon detector using passive quenching active reset IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng; Chao, Wang; Zhi-Bin, Sun; Guang-Jie, Zhai

    2016-01-01

    InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APD) are rarely used in a free-running regime for near-infrared single photon detection. In order to overcome the detrimental afterpulsing, we demonstrate a passive quenching active reset integrated circuit. Taking advantage of the inherent fast passive quenching process and active reset to reduce reset time, the integrated circuit is useful for reducing afterpulses and is also area-efficient. We investigate the free-running single photon detector’s afterpulsing effect, de-trapping time, dark count rate, and photon detection efficiency, and also compare with gated regime operation. After correction for deadtime and afterpulse, we find that the passive quenching active reset free-running single photon detector’s performance is consistent with gated operation. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122902), the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274024 and 61474123).

  6. The Watchman Detector Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazeley, Steven

    2014-03-01

    The Watchman collaboration is proposing a kiloton scale antineutrino detector of reactor-based antineutrinos for non-proliferation purposes. As an added bonus the detector will also have the capability to search for evidence of sterile neutrino oscillation, super-nova antineutrinos and, in a second phase, measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. Despite that fact that KamLAND demonstrated the feasibility of kiloton scale, long distance antineutrino detection with liquid scintillator, similar detectors at the megaton scale remain problematic for environmental, cost and light attenuation reasons. Water, with gadolinium added for neutron sensitivity, may be the detection medium of choice if its efficiency can be shown to be competitive with scintillator. The goal of the Watchman project, therefore, is to demonstrate medium distance reactor antineutrino detection, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of moving to water-based megaton scale antineutrino detectors in the future. In this talk I will describe the scope of the experiment, the physics and engineering challenges involved, the proposed design and the predicted performance of the experimental non-proliferation and high-energy physics program. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-648381.

  7. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  8. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Cme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water ?erenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  9. Terahertz sources and detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.; Porterfield, David W.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Bishop, William L.; Kurtz, David S.; Hui, Kai

    2005-05-01

    Through the support of the US Army Research Office we are developing terahertz sources and detectors suitable for use in the spectroscopy of chemical and biological materials as well as for use in imaging systems to detect concealed weapons. Our technology relies on nonlinear diodes to translate the functionality achieved at microwave frequencies to the terahertz band. Basic building blocks that have been developed for this application include low-noise mixers, frequency multipliers, sideband generators and direct detectors. These components rely on planar Schottky diodes and integrated diode circuits and are therefore easy to assemble and robust. They require no mechanical tuners to achieve high efficiency and broad bandwidth. This paper will review the range of performance that has been achieved with these terahertz components and briefly discuss preliminary results achieved with a spectroscopy system and the development of sources for imaging systems.

  10. Physics and Detector Response Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.; McCormick, Jeremy

    As the complexity and resolution of modern detectors increases, the need for detailed simulation of the experimental setup also becomes more important. Designing detector systems composed of many disparate subsystems requires efficient tools to simulate the detector response and reconstruct the events. Comparisons of different technology options, or geometric layouts, are facilitated if the results can be obtained with a common simulation and reconstruction framework. We have developed efficient and flexible tools for detailed physics and detector response simulation as well as event reconstruction and analysis. The primary goal has been to develop a software toolkit and computing infrastructure to allow physicists from universities and labs to quickly and easily conduct physics analyses and contribute to detector research and development with a minimal investment of time and effort. The application harnesses the full power of the Geant4 toolkit without requiring the end user to have any experience with either Geant4 or C++, thereby allowing the user to concentrate on the physics of the detector system. The reconstruction software and analysis environment are written in Java, providing a modern, object-oriented platform which is independent of the computing operating system.

  11. Analytical response function for planar Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alvarez, Juan A.; Maidana, Nora L.; Vanin, Vito R.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2016-04-01

    We model the response function (RF) of planar HPGe x-ray spectrometers for photon energies between around 10 keV and 100 keV. The RF is based on the proposal of Seltzer [1981. Nucl. Instrum. Methods 188, 133-151] and takes into account the full-energy absorption in the Ge active volume, the escape of Ge Kα and Kβ x-rays and the escape of photons after one Compton interaction. The relativistic impulse approximation is employed instead of the Klein-Nishina formula to describe incoherent photon scattering in the Ge crystal. We also incorporate a simple model for the continuous component of the spectrum produced by the escape of photo-electrons from the active volume. In our calculations we include external interaction contributions to the RF: (i) the incoherent scattering effects caused by the detector's Be window and (ii) the spectrum produced by photo-electrons emitted in the Ge dead layer that reach the active volume. The analytical RF model is compared with pulse-height spectra simulated using the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code.

  12. New preshower detector for the DIRAC experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentia, M.; Aogaki, S.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gugiu, M.; Yazkov, V.

    2015-09-01

    The Preshower (PSh) detector [1] is a component of the DIRAC setup [2]. It is designed to identify and reject the huge e-e+ pairs background in the ?? and K? pairs measurement produced in a hadronic atom ionization process. In the high energy region used for kaon detection, the small Nitrogen Cherenkov detector has low electron rejection efficiency. To increase the overall efficiency, a new two-layer scintillator Preshower detector has been developed and built. The new Preshower-Cherenkov combination ensures an electron rejection efficiency better than 99% in the momentum range 1-7 GeV/c.

  13. How noise affects quantum detector tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Renema, J. J.; Gaggero, A.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; van Exter, M. P.; de Dood, M. J. A.

    2015-10-01

    We determine the full photon number response of a NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detector via quantum detector tomography, and the results show the separation of linear, effective absorption efficiency from the internal detection efficiencies. In addition, we demonstrate an error budget for the complete quantum characterization of the detector. We find that for short times, the dominant noise source is shot noise, while laser power fluctuations limit the accuracy for longer timescales. The combined standard uncertainty of the internal detection efficiency derived from our measurements is about 2%.

  14. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  15. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM); Wrobleski, Debra A. (Los Alamos, NM); Orler, Edward B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  16. The ROSAT WFC imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Sansom, A. E.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the calibration program performed on flight and flight-spare detectors for the Rosat Wide Field Camera (WFC) are presented. The result of an accelerated life test on a development model detector assembled to flight standard are summarized. Imaging tests demonstrate that the lookup table technique for removing distortion works efficiency with low differential nonlinearity. No undesirable 'chicken wire' effects are seen in the images, and the detector resolution matches the on-axis performance of the telescope and is constant across the field of view. Peaks in efficiency occur at 10.2, 20, and 100 eV and mimima at 13 and 45 eV. The secondary 13 eV minimum is correlated with the onset of two-electron photoemission. The mean change in gain as a function of photon energy in the EUV band is much less rapid than in the soft X-ray band.

  17. Corner detector using invariant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengfei; Li, Shuxiao; Song, Yi; Chang, Hongxing

    2013-07-01

    Corner detection has been shown to be very useful in many computer vision applications. Some valid approaches have been proposed, but few of them are accurate, efficient and suitable for complex applications (such as DSP). In this paper, a corner detector using invariant analysis is proposed. The new detector assumes an ideal corner of a gray level image should have a good corner structure which has an annulus mask. An invariant function was put forward, and the value of which for the ideal corner is a constant value. Then, we could verify the candidate corners by compare their invariant function value with the constant value. Experiments have shown that the new corner detector is accurate and efficient and could be used in some complex applications because of its simple calculation.

  18. A multiple-detector Radioactive Material Detection Spectroscopic (RMDS) portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaar, Ilan; Peysakhov, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes an optimization process for a Radioactive Material Detection Spectroscopic (RMDS) portal, designed to detect and identify radioactive materials concealed inside cargo containers. The system is based on a combination of conventional 3 in. NaI(Tl) gamma detectors and 3He neutron detection tubes. The basic concept and the advantages of the new segmented spectroscopic detector approach are presented with several algorithms that were developed to enhance the detection capability of the portal and improve the signal to noise ratio. The results of field tests performed in several locations in Israel are also presented. The RMDS portal fully meets the demands of new ANSI Standard 42.38 for spectroscopic portals. In addition, the portal has some unique features, such as the ability to find the exact location of a point source inside the cargo and the ability to differentiate between a point source and Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) radiation. During the tests, the RMDS portal was compared to other detection systems, such as a PVT-based portal and a handheld spectroscopic HPGe detector. In these tests, the RMDS system was found to have a unique technique for background subtraction, which results in a higher detection sensitivity.

  19. Advanced Thermal Neutron Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham; Fried, Jack; de Geronimo, Gianluigi; Mahler, George; Makowiecki, Don; Mead, Joe; Radeka, Veljko; Schaknowski, Neil; Vernon, Emerson; Yu, Bo

    2012-02-01

    With the advent of new high intensity spallation sources, there is a vital need for development of advanced position sensitive detectors. Using neutron conversion in helium 3, which yields a large signal with excellent background rejection capability, our research program focuses on improving the rate capability, resolution, efficiency and long term stability of detectors for neutron scattering studies. We have developed a suite of detectors using proportional chambers, the latest being an array of curved, multi-wire segments with interpolating cathode strip electrodes operating simultaneously and seamlessly in a single gas volume. With rate capability of nearly 1 million per sec, this instrument has significantly advanced the state-of-the-art for protein crystallography. To attain even higher count rates, a new concept based on operation in the ionization mode is being explored, in which direct ionization from a neutron conversion is collected with unity gain on one of many pads that form the anode plane. Each pad is implemented with charge sensitive electronics, using purpose-designed application specific integrated circuits. A prototype device with 48 by 48 pads has been successfully developed. Examples of measurements at major neutron user facilities will be presented.

  20. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  1. Efficiency corrections in determining the (137)Cs inventory of environmental soil samples by using relative measurement method and GEANT4 simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Liang, Yongfei; Xu, Jiayun; Bai, Lixin

    2015-08-01

    The determination of (137)Cs inventory is widely used to estimate the soil erosion or deposition rate. The generally used method to determine the activity of volumetric samples is the relative measurement method, which employs a calibration standard sample with accurately known activity. This method has great advantages in accuracy and operation only when there is a small difference in elemental composition, sample density and geometry between measuring samples and the calibration standard. Otherwise it needs additional efficiency corrections in the calculating process. The Monte Carlo simulations can handle these correction problems easily with lower financial cost and higher accuracy. This work presents a detailed description to the simulation and calibration procedure for a conventionally used commercial P-type coaxial HPGe detector with cylindrical sample geometry. The effects of sample elemental composition, density and geometry were discussed in detail and calculated in terms of efficiency correction factors. The effect of sample placement was also analyzed, the results indicate that the radioactive nuclides and sample density are not absolutely uniform distributed along the axial direction. At last, a unified binary quadratic functional relationship of efficiency correction factors as a function of sample density and height was obtained by the least square fitting method. This function covers the sample density and height range of 0.8-1.8g/cm(3) and 3.0-7.25cm, respectively. The efficiency correction factors calculated by the fitted function are in good agreement with those obtained by the GEANT4 simulations with the determination coefficient value greater than 0.9999. The results obtained in this paper make the above-mentioned relative measurements more accurate and efficient in the routine radioactive analysis of environmental cylindrical soil samples. PMID:25973538

  2. Pillar Structured Thermal Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Graff, R; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C

    2008-06-10

    This work describes an innovative solid state device structure that leverages advanced semiconductor fabrication technology to produce an efficient device for thermal neutron detection which we have coined the 'Pillar Detector'. State-of-the-art thermal neutron detectors have shortcomings in simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low operating voltage while maintaining adequate fieldability performance. By using a three dimensional silicon PIN diode pillar array filled with isotopic {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B), a high efficiency device is theoretically possible. Here we review the design considerations for going from a 2-D to 3-D device and discuss the materials trade-offs. The relationship between the geometrical features and efficiency within our 3-D device is investigated by Monte Carlo radiation transport method coupled with finite element drift-diffusion carrier transport simulations. To benchmark our simulations and validate the predicted efficiency scaling, experimental results of a prototype device are illustrated. The fabricated pillar structures reported in this work are composed of 2 {micro}m diameter silicon pillars with a 2 {micro}m spacing and pillar height of 12 {micro}m. The pillar detector with a 12 {micro}m height achieved a thermal neutron detection efficiency of 7.3% at a reverse bias of -2 V.

  3. Measuring partial fluorescence yield using filtered detectors.

    PubMed

    Boyko, T D; Green, R J; Moewes, A; Regier, T Z

    2014-07-01

    Typically, X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements aim to probe the linear attenuation coefficient. These measurements are often carried out using partial fluorescence yield techniques that rely on detectors having photon energy discrimination improving the sensitivity and the signal-to-background ratio of the measured spectra. However, measuring the partial fluorescence yield in the soft X-ray regime with reasonable efficiency requires solid-state detectors, which have limitations due to the inherent dead-time while measuring. Alternatively, many of the available detectors that are not energy dispersive do not suffer from photon count rate limitations. A filter placed in front of one of these detectors will make the energy-dependent efficiency non-linear, thereby changing the responsivity of the detector. It is shown that using an array of filtered X-ray detectors is a viable method for measuring soft X-ray partial fluorescence yield spectra without dead-time. The feasibility of this technique is further demonstrated using α-Fe2O3 as an example and it is shown that this detector technology could vastly improve the photon collection efficiency at synchrotrons and that these detectors will allow experiments to be completed with a much lower photon flux reducing X-ray-induced damage. PMID:24971965

  4. Fundamental properties of semiconductor materials, and material performance in detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for determining fundamental properties of semiconductor materials, their performance as radiation detectors, and their service life as such detectors are given. Relationships were established between the minority carrier lifetime in the bulk of the material and the charge collection efficiency of the detector.

  5. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a clinical setting.

  6. Southwest Research Institute intensified detector development capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Erik; Vincent, Michael; Kofoed, Christopher; Andrews, John; Brownsberger, Judith; Siegmund, Oswald

    2012-09-01

    Imaging detectors for wavelengths between 10 nm and 105 nm generally rely on microchannel plates (MCPs) to provide photon detection (via the photo-electric effect) and charge amplification. This is because silicon-based detectors (CCD or APS) have near zero quantum detection efficiency (QDE) over this wavelength regime. Combining a MCP based intensifier tube with a silicon detector creates a detector system that can be tuned to the wavelength regime of interest for a variety of applications. Intensified detectors are used in a variety of scientific (e.g. Solar Physics) and commercial applications (spectroscopic test instrumentation, night vision goggles, low intensity cameras, etc.). Building an intensified detector requires the mastery of a variety of technologies involved in integrating and testing of these detector systems. We report on an internally funded development program within the Southwest Research Institute to architect, design, integrate, and test intensified imaging detectors for space-based applications. Through a rigorous hardware program the effort is developing and maturing the technologies necessary to build and test a large format (2k 2k) UV intensified CCD detector. The intensified CCD is designed around a commercially available CCD that is optically coupled to a UV Intensifier Tube from Sensor Sciences, LLC. The program aims to demonstrate, through hardware validation, the ability to architect and execute the integration steps necessary to produce detector systems suitable for space-based applications.

  7. Future of Semiconductor Based Thermal Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R J; Cheung, C L; Reinhardt, C E; Wang, T F

    2006-02-22

    Thermal neutron detectors have seen only incremental improvements over the last decades. In this paper we overview the current technology of choice for thermal neutron detection--{sup 3}He tubes, which suffer from, moderate to poor fieldability, and low absolute efficiency. The need for improved neutron detection is evident due to this technology gap and the fact that neutrons are a highly specific indicator of fissile material. Recognizing this need, we propose to exploit recent advances in microfabrication technology for building the next generation of semiconductor thermal neutron detectors for national security requirements, for applications requiring excellent fieldability of small devices. We have developed an innovative pathway taking advantage of advanced processing and fabrication technology to produce the proposed device. The crucial advantage of our Pillar Detector is that it can simultaneously meet the requirements of high efficiency and fieldability in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 70%.

  8. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Detector developments at DESY.

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Cornelia B; Allahgholi, Aschkan; Bayer, Matthias; Bianco, Laura; Correa, Jonathan; Delfs, Annette; Gttlicher, Peter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Jack, Stefanie; Klyuev, Alexander; Lange, Sabine; Marras, Alessandro; Niemann, Magdalena; Pithan, Florian; Reza, Salim; Sheviakov, Igor; Smoljanin, Sergej; Tennert, Maximilian; Trunk, Ulrich; Xia, Qingqing; Zhang, Jiaguo; Zimmer, Manfred; Das, Dipayan; Guerrini, Nicola; Marsh, Ben; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Menk, Ralf; Khromova, Anastasiya; Pinaroli, Giovanni; Stebel, Luigi; Marchal, Julien; Pedersen, Ulrik; Rees, Nick; Steadman, Paul; Sussmuth, Mark; Tartoni, Nicola; Yousef, Hazem; Hyun, HyoJung; Kim, KyungSook; Rah, Seungyu; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Mezza, Davide; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Krueger, Hans; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joem; Graafsma, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs) enabling revolutionary science with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon sensitivity with low probability of false positives and (multi)-megapixels. At DESY, one ongoing development project - in collaboration with RAL/STFC, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond, and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory - is the CMOS-based soft X-ray imager PERCIVAL. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active-pixel sensor back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250?eV to 1?keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to preliminary specifications, the roughly 10?cm 10?cm, 3.5k 3.7k monolithic sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120?Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within 27?m pixels to measure 1 to ?100000 (500?eV) simultaneously arriving photons. DESY is also leading the development of the AGIPD, a high-speed detector based on hybrid pixel technology intended for use at the European XFEL. This system is being developed in collaboration with PSI, University of Hamburg, and University of Bonn. The AGIPD allows single-pulse imaging at 4.5?MHz frame rate into a 352-frame buffer, with a dynamic range allowing single-photon detection and detection of more than 10000 photons at 12.4?keV in the same image. Modules of 65k pixels each are configured to make up (multi)megapixel cameras. This review describes the AGIPD and the PERCIVAL concepts and systems, including some recent results and a summary of their current status. It also gives a short overview over other FEL-relevant developments where the Photon Science Detector Group at DESY is involved. PMID:26698052

  10. PAU camera: detectors characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, Ricard; Ballester, Otger; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castilla, Javier; Jimnez, Jorge; Maiorino, Marino; Po, Cristbal; Sevilla, Ignacio; de Vicente, Juan

    2012-07-01

    The PAU Camera (PAUCam) [1,2] is a wide field camera that will be mounted at the corrected prime focus of the William Herschel Telescope (Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, Canary Islands, Spain) in the next months. The focal plane of PAUCam is composed by a mosaic of 18 CCD detectors of 2,048 x 4,176 pixels each one with a pixel size of 15 microns, manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. This mosaic covers a field of view (FoV) of 60 arcmin (minutes of arc), 40 of them are unvignetted. The behaviour of these 18 devices, plus four spares, and their electronic response should be characterized and optimized for the use in PAUCam. This job is being carried out in the laboratories of the ICE/IFAE and the CIEMAT. The electronic optimization of the CCD detectors is being carried out by means of an OG (Output Gate) scan and maximizing it CTE (Charge Transfer Efficiency) while the read-out noise is minimized. The device characterization itself is obtained with different tests. The photon transfer curve (PTC) that allows to obtain the electronic gain, the linearity vs. light stimulus, the full-well capacity and the cosmetic defects. The read-out noise, the dark current, the stability vs. temperature and the light remanence.

  11. Apfel's superheated drop detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Francesco

    2001-05-01

    The introduction of new approaches for radiation dosimetry is rare. A similar breakthrough occurred in 1979, when Robert Apfel invented the superheated drop detector, a miniature relative of the bubble chamber. A fundamental in high-energy particle physics, the bubble chamber utilizes a liquid briefly brought to a transient, radiation-sensitive superheated state by reducing its pressure. Mass boiling of the liquid is prevented by cyclic pressurization, drastically limiting the detection efficiency. In Apfel's detector, the liquid is kept in a steady superheated state by fractionating it into droplets and dispersing them in an immiscible host fluid, a perfectly smooth and clean container. The approach extends the lifetime of the metastable droplets to the point that practical application in radiation dosimetry is possible. Bubble formation is measured from the volume of vapor or by detecting individual vaporizations acoustically. Various halocarbons are employed and this permits a wide range of applications. Moderately superheated halocarbons are used for neutron measurements, since they are only nucleated by energetic neutron recoil particles. Highly superheated halocarbons nucleate with much smaller energy deposition and are used to detect photons and electrons. This paper reviews the radiation physics of superheated emulsions and their manifold applications.

  12. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  13. Detector Simulations for the COREA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwon; Kang, Hyesung

    2006-12-01

    The COREA (COsmic ray Research and Education Array in Korea) project aims to build a ground array of particle detectors distributed over the Korean Peninsular, through collaborations of high school students, educators, and university researchers, in order to study the origin of ultra high energy cosmic rays. COREA array will consist of about 2000 detector stations covering several hundreds of km2 area at its final configuration and detect electrons and muons in extensive air-showers triggered by high energy particles. During the initial pase COREA array will start with a small number of detector stations in Seoul area schools. In this paper, we have studied by Monte Carlo simulations how to select detector sites for optimal detection efficiency for proton triggered air-showers. We considered several model clusters with up to 30 detector stations and calculated the effective number of air-shower events that can be detected per year for each cluster. The greatest detection efficiency is achieved when the mean distance between detector stations of a cluster is comparable to the effective radius of the air-shower of a given proton energy. We find the detection efficiency of a cluster with randomly selected detector sites is comparable to that of clusters with uniform detector spacing. We also considered a hybrid cluster with 60 detector stations that combines a small cluster with Δl ≈ 100 m and a large cluster with Δl ≈ 1 km. We suggest that it can be an ideal configuration for the initial phase study of the COREA project, since it can measure the cosmic rays with a wide energy range, i.e., 1016eV ≤E ≤ 1019eV, with a reasonable detection rate.

  14. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory; Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J.; Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan

    2013-04-01

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  15. Large area liquid argon detectors for interrogation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, Charles; Kane, Steve; Firestone, Murray I.; Smith, Gregory; Gozani, Tsahi; Brown, Craig; Kwong, John; King, Michael J.; Nikkel, James A.; McKinsey, Dan

    2013-04-19

    Measurements of the efficiency, pulse shape, and energy and time resolution of liquid argon (LAr) detectors are presented. Liquefied noble gas-based (LNbG) detectors have been developed for the detection of dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, the same qualities that make LNbG detectors ideal for these applications, namely their size, cost, efficiency, pulse shape discrimination and resolution, make them promising for portal screening and the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Two 18-liter prototype detectors were designed, fabricated, and tested, one with pure LAr and the other doped with liquid Xe (LArXe). The LArXe detector presented the better time and energy resolution of 3.3 ns and 20% at 662 KeV, respectively. The total efficiency of the detector was measured to be 35% with 4.5% of the total photons detected in the photopeak.

  16. The ANTARES detector: background sources and effects on detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escoffier, S.

    The ANTARES Collaboration is deploying a large neutrino detector at a depth of 2500 m in the Mediterranean Sea, 40 km off shore from La Seyne-sur-Mer in South France. The construction of this 12-line detector with 75 phototubes per line will be completed by the end of 2007. Data taking has begun since April 2005 with an instrumentation line also equipped with optical modules. The first 5 detector lines are operational since January 2007. The telescope is aimed to observe high energy cosmic neutrinos through the detection of the Cerenkov light produced by up-going induced muons. Background sources are due to atmospheric neutrinos as well as misreconstructed atmospheric muons. Additional backgrounds inherent to the sea water environment come from 40K decay and marine organisms luminescence. While the contribution of the former is expected to be constant at a level of about 45 kHz, the bioluminescence has shown large time variations, with periods of very high activity, up to several hundred kHz. Description of these background sources will be reported, and effects on detector performance will be described. Methods recently developed to improve the detection efficiency in high background periods will be described, together with some of the results obtained.

  17. Energy resolution enhancement of mercuric iodide detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, M.; Prince, T.A.

    1984-02-01

    A pulse processing technique has been developed which improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of mercuric iodide detectors. The technique employs a fast (100 ns) and a slow (6.4 ..mu..s) pulse height analysis to correct for signal variations due to variations in charge trapping. The capabilities of the technique for energy resolution enhancement are discussed as well as the utility of the technique for examining the trapping characteristics of individual detectors. We have achieved an energy resolution of 2.6% FWHM at 662 keV with an acceptance efficiency of 100% from a mercuric iodide detector which gives 8.3% FWHM using standard techniques.

  18. Energy resolution enhancement of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.; Padgett, L.; Prickett, B.; Schnepple, W.

    1984-01-01

    A pulse processing technique has been developed which improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of mercuric iodide detectors. The technique employs a fast (100 ns) and a slow (6.4 microsec) pulse height analysis to correct for signal variations due to variations in charge trapping. The capabilities of the technique for energy resolution enhancement are discussed as well as the utility of the technique for examining the trapping characteristics of individual detectors. An energy resolution of 2.6 percent FWHM at 662 keV was achieved with an acceptance efficiency of 100 percent from a mercuric iodide detector which gives 8.3 percent FWHM using standard techniques.

  19. Panoramic photon-counting detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, D.; Hardy, E.; Couture, J.

    1987-07-01

    The characteristics and implementation of the Laval Image Photon-Counting System (LIPS) are described. LIPS is a flexible, compact, and transportable two-dimensional detector system which is currently in use in the spectroscopic mode on the 1.6 m telescope at the Mont Megantic Observatory. The detector is described, including the quantum efficiency, resolution, linearity, noise characteristics, and distortions. The data acquisition and display module is considered, including the computer, image display unit, Direct Memory Access Board which controls the detector, and control and data-acquisition program. Spectroscopy using LIPS is briefly addressed. The present assessment of the system and its future use are discussed. 5 references.

  20. Silicon Detectors Applied to Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2003-07-01

    In this laboratory we will see some to those characteristics of silicon detectors which make them very useful in the fields of Medical Physics. One of the application of these devices that we will work with is in detecting low energy X-ray radiation (from 6 to 30KeV). In this laboratory we will learn something of the aquisition system (LabVIEW), the readout system (PCI-1200 card, buffer, RX64 chip and the silicon detector on the printed circuit board) and the measurements of the X rays (coming from a radiation source) for different positions of the detector, in searching for improving the efficiency of detection.

  1. Single photon detector with high polarization sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qi; Li, Hao; You, LiXing; Zhang, WeiJun; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, XiaoMing; Qi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Polarization is one of the key parameters of light. Most optical detectors are intensity detectors that are insensitive to the polarization of light. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) is naturally sensitive to polarization due to its nanowire structure. Previous studies focused on producing a polarization-insensitive SNSPD. In this study, by adjusting the width and pitch of the nanowire, we systematically investigate the preparation of an SNSPD with high polarization sensitivity. Subsequently, an SNSPD with a system detection efficiency of 12% and a polarization extinction ratio of 22 was successfully prepared. PMID:25875225

  2. Operation and performance of new NIR detectors from SELEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D.; Bezawada, N.; Hipwood, L. G.; Shorrocks, N.; Milne, H.

    2012-07-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has funded SELEX Galileo, Southampton, UK to develop large format near infrared (NIR) detectors for its future space and ground based programmes. The UKATC has worked in collaboration with SELEX Galileo to test and characterise the new detectors produced during phase-1 of the development. In order to demonstrate the detector material performance, the HgCdTe (MCT) detector diodes (grown on GaAs substrate through MOVPE process in small 320256, 24?m pixel format) are hybridised to the existing SELEX Galileo SWALLOW CMOS readout chip. The substrate removed and MCT thinned detector arrays were then tested and evaluated at the UKATC following screening tests at SELEX. This paper briefly describes the test setup, the operational aspects of the readout multiplexer and presents the performance parameters of the detector arrays including: conversion gain, detector dark current, read noise, linearity, quantum efficiency and persistence for various detector temperatures between 80K and 140K.

  3. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  4. Development of {gamma}-ray detectors for {sup 16}O(p,p'{gamma}) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, T.; Izumi, T.; Ou, I.; Yano, T.; Sakuda, M.; Tamii, A.; Suzuki, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2012-11-12

    The {gamma} ray production in neutral-current (NC) neutrino-oxygen interaction is very important to the detection of neutrinos from supernova explosion in a neutrino experiment, since those {gamma} rays can become extra signals or unexpected background in the energy region from 5 MeV to 30 MeV. We propose the experiment to measure {gamma} rays in {sup 16}O(p,p') reaction at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP, Osaka) to provide good information on the {gamma}-ray emission spectra in neutrino-oxygen reactions. We present the design of {gamma}-ray detectors (NaI, CsI, HPGe), which will be used in proposed experiment.

  5. Segmented pyroelector detector

    DOEpatents

    Stotlar, S.C.; McLellan, E.J.

    1981-01-21

    A pyroelectric detector is described which has increased voltage output and improved responsivity over equivalent size detectors. The device comprises a plurality of edge-type pyroelectric detectors which have a length which is much greater than the width of the segments between the edge-type electrodes. External circuitry connects the pyroelectric detector segments in parallel to provide a single output which maintains 50 ohm impedance characteristics.

  6. Tevatron detector upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The D0 and CDF experiments are in the process of upgrading their detectors to cope with the high luminosities projected for the remainder of Tevatron Run II. They discuss the expected Tevatron environment through 2009, the detector challenges due to increasing luminosity in this period, and the solutions undertaken by the two experiments to mitigate detector problems and maximize physics results.

  7. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  8. Noise performance of the D0 layer 0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    A new inner detector called Layer 0 has been added to the existing silicon detector for the DZero colliding beams experiment. This detector has an all carbon fiber support structure that employs thin copper clad Kapton sheets embedded in the surface of the carbon fiber structure to improve the grounding of the structure and a readout system that fully isolates the local detector ground from the rest of the detector. Initial measurements show efficiencies greater than 90% and 0.3 ADC count common mode contribution to the signal noise.

  9. BGO suppressed gamma detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, S. L.

    1987-04-01

    Arrays of a number of high-resolution γ detectors are needed to investigate the excited states of nuclei in detail, especially in coincidence experiments. The best elements currently available for such arrays use a high-resolution Ge diode detector surrounded by a high-efficiency Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator. The BGO scintillator serves to veto those events in which the incoming γ-ray undergoes Compton scattering leading to escape of the scattered photon from the Ge crystal. The first elements of a detector array at the FSU tandem-linac laboratory have been assembled with Ortec high-purity n-type Ge crystals and single crystal BGO scintillators from Harshaw. Each Ge crystal is placed inside a 127 cm diameter by 152 cm long BGO annulus. A smaller 61 mm diameter by 81 mm long BGO split annulus is placed around the cold finger behind the Ge crystal. The performance of the array elements and repair techniques on the Ge detectors are discussed.

  10. Performance characterization of edge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Visvanathan; Haralick, Robert M.

    1992-03-01

    Edge detection is the most fundamental step in vision algorithms. A number of edge detectors have been discussed in the computer vision literature. Examples of classic edge detectors include the Marr-Hildreth edge operator, facet edge operator, and the Canny edge operator. Edge detection using morphological techniques are attractive because they can be efficiently implemented in near real time machine vision systems that have special hardware support. However, little performance characterization of edge detectors has been done. In general, performance characterization of edge detectors has been done mainly by plotting empirical curves of performance. Quantitative performance evaluation of edge detectors was first performed by Abdou and Pratt. It is the goal of this paper to perform a theoretical comparison of gradient based edge detectors and morphological edge detectors. By assuming that an ideal edge is corrupted with additive noise we derive theoretical expressions for the probability of misdetection (the probability of labeling of a true edge pixel as a nonedge pixel in the output). Further, we derive theoretical expressions for the probability of false alarm (the probability of labeling of a nonedge pixel as an output edge pixel) by assuming that the input to the operator is a region of flat graytone intensity corrupted with additive Gaussian noise of zero mean and variance (sigma) 2. Even though the blurring step in the morphological operator introduces correlation in the additive noise, we make an approximation that the output samples after blurring are i.i.d. Gaussian random variables with zero mean and variance (sigma) 2/M where M is the window size of the blurring kernel. The false alarm probabilities obtained by using this approximation can be shown to be upperbounds of the false alarm probabilities computed without the approximation. The theory indicates that the blur- min operator is clearly superior when a 3 X 3 window size is used. Since we only have an upperbound for the false alarm probability the theory is inadequate to confirm the superiority of the blur-min operator. Empirical evaluation of the performance indicates that the blur-min operator is superior to the gradient based operator. Evaluation of the edge detectors on real images also indicate superiority of the blur-min operator. Application of hysteresis linking, after edge detection, significantly reduces the misdetection rate, but increases the false alarm rate.

  11. Microstructured silicon neutron detectors for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, S.; Fleta, C.; Guardiola, C.; Jumilla, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Lozano, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present the design and performance of a perforated thermal neutron silicon detector with a 6LiF neutron converter. This device was manufactured within the REWARD project workplace whose aim is to develop and enhance technologies for the detection of nuclear and radiological materials. The sensor perforated structure results in a higher efficiency than that obtained with an equivalent planar sensor. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity were obtained. The Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the experimental conditions, i.e. thermal neutron beam and the whole detector geometry. An intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency of 8.6%±0.4% with a discrimination setting of 450 keV was measured.

  12. Trustworthiness of detectors in quantum key distribution with untrusted detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol has been demonstrated as a viable solution to detector side-channel attacks. Recently, to bridge the strong security of MDI-QKD with the high efficiency of conventional QKD, the detector-device-independent (DDI) QKD has been proposed. One crucial assumption made in DDI-QKD is that the untrusted Bell state measurement (BSM) located inside the receiver's laboratory cannot send any unwanted information to the outside. Here, we show that if the BSM is completely untrusted, a simple scheme would allow the BSM to send information to the outside. Combined with Trojan horse attacks, this scheme could allow an eavesdropper to gain information of the quantum key without being detected. To prevent the above attack, either countermeasures to Trojan horse attacks or some trustworthiness to the "untrusted" BSM device is required.

  13. CALIFA Barrel prototype detector characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietras, B.; Gascn, M.; lvarez-Pol, H.; Bendel, M.; Bloch, T.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Durn, I.; Fiori, E.; Gernhuser, R.; Gonzlez, D.; Krll, T.; Le Bleis, T.; Montes, N.; Ncher, E.; Robles, M.; Perea, A.; Viln, J. A.; Winkel, M.

    2013-11-01

    Well established in the field of scintillator detection, Caesium Iodide remains at the forefront of scintillators for use in modern calorimeters. Recent developments in photosensor technology have lead to the production of Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs), a huge advancement on traditional photosensors in terms of high internal gain, dynamic range, magnetic field insensitivity, high quantum efficiency and fast recovery time. The R3B physics programme has a number of requirements for its calorimeter, one of the most challenging being the dual functionality as both a calorimeter and a spectrometer. This involves the simultaneous detection of ?300 MeV protons and gamma rays ranging from 0.1 to 20 MeV. This scintillator - photosensor coupling provides an excellent solution in this capacity, in part due to the near perfect match of the LAAPD quantum efficiency peak to the light output wavelength of CsI(Tl). Modern detector development is guided by use of Monte Carlo simulations to predict detector performance, nonetheless it is essential to benchmark these simulations against real data taken with prototype detector arrays. Here follows an account of the performance of two such prototypes representing different polar regions of the Barrel section of the forthcoming CALIFA calorimeter. Measurements were taken for gamma-ray energies up to 15.1 MeV (Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Garching, Germany) and for direct irradiation with a 180 MeV proton beam (The Svedberg Laboratoriet, Uppsala, Sweden). Results are discussed in light of complementary GEANT4 simulations.

  14. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  15. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  16. Cosmic muon detector using proportional chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dezs?; Gl, Zoltn; Hamar, Gerg?; Sra Molnr, Janka; Olh, va; Pzmndi, Pter

    2015-11-01

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers was designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  17. Plastic neutron detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Tiffany M.S; King, Michael J.; Doty, F. Patrick

    2008-12-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting {pi}-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor {pi}-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in photoresponse with increasing stretch ratio. Other additives examined, including small molecules and cosolvents, did not cause any significant increase in photoresponse. Finally, we discovered an inverse-geometric particle track effect wherein increased track lengths created by tilting the detector off normal incidence resulted in decreased signal collection. This is interpreted as a trap-filling effect, leading to increased carrier mobility along the particle track direction. Estimated collection efficiency along the track direction was near 20 electrons/micron of track length, sufficient for particle counting in 50 micron thick films.

  18. Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

  19. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantzsch, K.; Arfaoui, S.; Franz, S.; Gutzwiller, O.; Schlenker, S.; Tsarouchas, C. A.; Mindur, B.; Hartert, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Talyshev, A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Poblaguev, A.; Braun, H.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Kersten, S.; Martin, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Caforio, D.; Sbarra, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Nemecek, S.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Wynne, B.; Banas, E.; Hajduk, Z.; Olszowska, J.; Stanecka, E.; Bindi, M.; Polini, A.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Mandic, I.; Ertel, E.; Marques Vinagre, F.; Ribeiro, G.; Santos, H. F.; Barillari, T.; Habring, J.; Huber, J.; Arabidze, G.; Boterenbrood, H.; Hart, R.; Iakovidis, G.; Karakostas, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Mountricha, E.; Ntekas, K.; Filimonov, V.; Khomutnikov, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Grassi, V.; Mitrevski, J.; Phillips, P.; Chekulaev, S.; D'Auria, S.; Nagai, K.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Aielli, G.; Marchese, F.; Lafarguette, P.; Brenner, R.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are controlled and monitored by the Detector Control System (DCS) using a highly distributed system of 140 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC controls, and provide a synchronization mechanism with the ATLAS data acquisition system. Different databases are used to store the online parameters of the experiment, replicate a subset used for physics reconstruction, and store the configuration parameters of the systems. This contribution describes the computing architecture and software tools to handle this complex and highly interconnected control system.

  20. Superconducting nano-strip particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors. Particle detectors based on superconducting nano-strips stem from the parent devices developed for single photon detection (SSPD) and share with them ultra-fast response times (sub-nanosecond) and the ability to operate at a relatively high temperature (25 K) compared with other cryogenic detectors. SSPDs have been used in the detection of electrons, neutral and charged ions, and biological macromolecules; nevertheless, the development of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors has mainly been driven by their use in time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) where the goal of 100% efficiency at large mass values can be achieved. Special emphasis will be given to this case, reporting on the great progress which has been achieved and which permits us to overcome the limitations of existing mass spectrometers represented by low detection efficiency at large masses and charge/mass ambiguity. Furthermore, such progress could represent a breakthrough in the field. In this review article we will introduce the device concept and detection principle, stressing the peculiarities of the nano-strip particle detector as well as its similarities with photon detectors. The development of parallel strip configuration is introduced and extensively discussed, since it has contributed to the significant progress of TOF-MS applications.

  1. Monolithic short wave infrared (SWIR) detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A monolithic self-scanned linear detector array was developed for remote sensing in the 1.1- 2.4-micron spectral region. A high-density IRCCD test chip was fabricated to verify new design approaches required for the detector array. The driving factors in the Schottky barrier IRCCD (Pdsub2Si) process development are the attainment of detector yield, uniformity, adequate quantum efficiency, and lowest possible dark current consistent with radiometric accuracy. A dual-band module was designed that consists of two linear detector arrays. The sensor architecture places the floating diffusion output structure in the middle of the chip, away from the butt edges. A focal plane package was conceptualized and includes a polycrystalline silicon substrate carrying a two-layer, thick-film interconnecting conductor pattern and five epoxy-mounted modules. A polycrystalline silicon cover encloses the modules and bond wires, and serves as a radiation and EMI shield, thermal conductor, and contamination seal.

  2. A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhehui; Hoffbauer, M. A.; Morris, C. L.; Callahan, N. B.; Adamek, E. R.; Bacon, J. D.; Blatnik, M.; Brandt, A. E.; Broussard, L. J.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Gao, J.; Gray, F. E.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Ramsey, J. C.; Pattie, R. W.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Schmidt, D. W.; Schulze, R. K.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sprow, A.; Tang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Zeck, B. A.

    2015-10-01

    A multilayer surface detector for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) is described. The top 10B layer is exposed to vacuum and directly captures UCNs. The ZnS:Ag layer beneath the 10B layer is a few microns thick, which is sufficient to detect the charged particles from the 10B(n,α)7Li neutron-capture reaction, while thin enough that ample light due to α and 7Li escapes for detection by photomultiplier tubes. A 100-nm thick 10B layer gives high UCN detection efficiency, as determined by the mean UCN kinetic energy, detector materials, and other parameters. Low background, including negligible sensitivity to ambient neutrons, has also been verified through pulse-shape analysis and comparison with other existing 3He and 10B detectors. This type of detector has been configured in different ways for UCN flux monitoring, development of UCN guides and neutron lifetime research.

  3. Antenna Enhanced Graphene THz Emitter and Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jiayue; Muthee, Martin; Chen, Shao-Yu; Yngvesson, Sigfrid K.; Yan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Recent intense electrical and optical studies of graphene have pushed the material to the forefront of optoelectronic research. Of particular interest is the few terahertz (THz) frequency regime where efficient light sources and highly sensitive detectors are very challenging to make. Here we present THz sources and detectors made with graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) enhanced by a double-patch antenna and an on-chip silicon lens. We report the first experimental observation of 1-3 THz radiation from graphene, as well as four orders of magnitude performance improvements in a GFET thermoelectric detector operating at ~2 THz. The quantitative analysis of the emitting power and its unusual charge density dependence indicate significant non-thermal contribution from the GFET. The polarization resolved detection measurements with different illumination geometries allow for detailed and quantitative analysis of various factors that contribute to the overall detector performance. Our experimental results represent a significant advance towards practically useful graphene THz devices.

  4. A microstrip decay detector for beauty physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, M.; Angelini, C.; Barney, D.; Cardini, A.; French, B. R.; Hurst, R. B.; Lazzeroni, C.; Martinengo, P.; Menetrey, A.; Roda, C.; Rossi, L.

    1993-05-01

    The Decay Detector is a compact array of 10 ?m pitch silicon microstrip detectors designed to give charged track data which is sufficient, both in quantity and in precision, to allow reconstruction of beauty particle decays. It has been built for Beatrice, a fixed-target hadroproduction experiment at CERN. This "electronic bubble chamber" consists of sixteen 5 mm 5 mm microstrip planes comprising more than 8000 detector channels packed into a volume of less than 0.8 cm 3. The pulse heights of all channels are read by analogue front-end electronics and are then compared with individually set thresholds and pedestals. The performance of the Decay Detector has been studied in a test beam and data are presented on its spatial precision, efficiency, and other characteristics.

  5. Simulation of signal induction in the Caliste-SO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barylak, A.; Barylak, J.; Mrozek, T.; Podgrski, P.; Ste?licki, M.; ?cis?owski, D.

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents a two methods for simulation of signal induction in the detector. First method base on carriers tracks calculation while second method include simplification of accelerating calculations. Calculation has been performed for Caliste-SO detector, which is cadmium telluride X-ray detector. This detector will be used in the Solar Orbiter/STIX instrument. Solar Orbiter is M-class mission of the ESA's programme Cosmic Vision 2015-2025, which is conducted in collaboration with NASA. It will be launched in October 2018. STIX (Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-Rays) is X-ray telescope and spectrometer and will observe solar X-ray emission from 4 to 150 keV using Fourier-imaging technique. Deep space condition can influence significantly the detector parameters. Tools for detectors behaviour analysis are needed to understand how this harsh radiation environment can influence detector quantum efficiency.

  6. GaAs detectors irradiated by low doses of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    agtov, A.; Zat'ko, B.; Pavlovi?, M.; Sedla?kov, K.; Hybler, P.; Dubeck, F.; Ne?as, V.

    2014-04-01

    Semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detectors were irradiated by 5 MeV electrons up to a dose of 69 kGy, in order to test their radiation hardness. The electric and spectrometric stability of detectors was examined as a function of the absorbed dose. Investigated detectors showed a very good detector radiation resistance within a dose up to 40 kGy followed by deterioration of some spectrometric and electric properties. However, the reverse current and the detector charge collection efficiency showed minimum changes with the overall applied doses. The obtained results will be used as a preliminary study for further radiation-hardness investigations of GaAs detectors against high energy electrons. This will complete our previous studies of GaAs detector radiation hardness against fast neutrons and ?-rays.

  7. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity {eta} distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  8. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity {eta} distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  9. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of high-speed, single photon detectors using superconducting NbN nanowires at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A 15 by 15 micron detector with a detector efficiency of 40% has been measured. Due to kinetic inductance, the recovery time of such large area detectors is longer than that of smaller or single wire detectors. The recovery time of our detectors (50 ns) has been characterized by measuring the inter-arrival time statistics of our detector.

  11. Detectors (4/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  12. History of infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogalski, A.

    2012-09-01

    This paper overviews the history of infrared detector materials starting with Herschel's experiment with thermometer on February 11th, 1800. Infrared detectors are in general used to detect, image, and measure patterns of the thermal heat radiation which all objects emit. At the beginning, their development was connected with thermal detectors, such as thermocouples and bolometers, which are still used today and which are generally sensitive to all infrared wavelengths and operate at room temperature. The second kind of detectors, called the photon detectors, was mainly developed during the 20th Century to improve sensitivity and response time. These detectors have been extensively developed since the 1940's. Lead sulphide (PbS) was the first practical IR detector with sensitivity to infrared wavelengths up to ˜3 μm. After World War II infrared detector technology development was and continues to be primarily driven by military applications. Discovery of variable band gap HgCdTe ternary alloy by Lawson and co-workers in 1959 opened a new area in IR detector technology and has provided an unprecedented degree of freedom in infrared detector design. Many of these advances were transferred to IR astronomy from Departments of Defence research. Later on civilian applications of infrared technology are frequently called "dual-use technology applications." One should point out the growing utilisation of IR technologies in the civilian sphere based on the use of new materials and technologies, as well as the noticeable price decrease in these high cost technologies. In the last four decades different types of detectors are combined with electronic readouts to make detector focal plane arrays (FPAs). Development in FPA technology has revolutionized infrared imaging. Progress in integrated circuit design and fabrication techniques has resulted in continued rapid growth in the size and performance of these solid state arrays.

  13. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  14. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  15. Detectors (5/5)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    This lecture will serve as an introduction to particle detectors and detection techniques. In the first lecture, a historic overview of particle detector development will be given. In the second lecture, some basic techniques and concepts for particle detection will be discussed. In the third lecture, the interaction of particles with matter, the basis of particle detection, will be presented. The fourth and fifth lectures will discuss different detector types used for particle tracking, energy measurement and particle identification.

  16. Thinned Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. G.

    Silicon sensors used in tracking or vertexing detectors in particle physics are usually made with silicon wafers of 280 ? m to 500 ? m thickness. In order to reduce multiple scattering much thinner detectors would be desirable. Another motivation for thin detectors might arise from the need to operate detectors after severe radiation damage when charge carrier drift is limited by trapping. Since thin silicon wafers are difficult to handle fabrication of such sensors is challenging. This article describes a method to produce thin sensors using SOI wafers.

  17. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  18. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  19. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  20. Photocapacitive MIS infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Lu, S. S.-M.; Moriarty, J. A.; Crouch, R. K.; Miller, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A new class of room-temperature infrared detectors has been developed through use of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) or metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal (MISIM) slabs. The detectors, which have been fabricated from Si, Ge and GaAs, rely for operation on the electrical capacitance variations induced by modulated incident radiation. The peak detectivity for a 1000-A Si MISIM detector is comparable to that of a conventional Si detector functioning in the photovoltaic mode. Optimization of the photocapacitive-mode detection sensitivity is discussed.

  1. Design and Performance of Neutron Detector N*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelczak, Iwona; Toke, Jan; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Udo Schrder, W.

    2008-04-01

    The design of the N* Detector (``Neutron Sandwich Transmuter/Activation-? Radiator'') and its response to neutrons are described. The N* is a high efficiency plastic-scintillation detector with sensitivity to neutrons in a wide energy range and multi-hit information. The device consists of a stack of plastic scintillator slabs (Saint Gobain BC-408) alternating with thin radiator films (PDMS), which are loaded with 0.5% (by weight) of Gd. The stack is coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The scintillator plays the dual role of a neutron moderator and a ?-radiation detector. Scintillation light is produced in response to both, the prompt moderation process and the delayed emission of Gd-capture ?-rays. The design and experimental results with respect to light response, energy and time resolution, and detection efficiency will be discussed, along with comparison to Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Explosives (and other threats) detection using pulsed neutron interrogation and optimized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, Dan A.; Elsalim, Mashal; Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported results from a human-portable system using neutron interrogation to detect contraband and explosives. We summarized our methodology for distinguishing threat materials such as narcotics, C4, and mustard gas in the myriad of backgrounds present in the maritime environment. We are expanding our mission for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) through the detection of multiple fission signatures without compromising the conventional threat detection performance. This paper covers our initial investigations into using neutrons from compact pulsed neutron generators via the d(D,n)3He or d(T,n)α reactions with energies of ~2.5 and 14 MeV, respectively, for explosives (and other threats) detection along with a variety of gamma-ray detectors. Fast neutrons and thermal neutrons (after successive collisions) can stimulate the emission of various threat detection signatures. For explosives detection, element-specific gamma-ray signatures via the (n,n'γ) inelastic scattering reaction and the (n,'γ) thermal capture reaction are detected. For SNM, delayed gamma-rays following fission can be measured with the same detector. Our initial trade-off investigations of several gamma-ray detectors types (NaI, CsI, LaBr3, HPGe) for measuring gamma-ray signatures in a pulsed neutron environment for potential application in a human-portable active interrogation system are covered in this paper.

  3. Can scintillation detectors with low spectral resolution accurately determine radionuclides content of building materials?

    PubMed

    Kovler, K; Prilutskiy, Z; Antropov, S; Antropova, N; Bozhko, V; Alfassi, Z B; Lavi, N

    2013-07-01

    The current paper makes an attempt to check whether the scintillation NaI(Tl) detectors, in spite of their poor energy resolution, can determine accurately the content of NORM in building materials. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides were measured using two types of detectors: (a) NaI(Tl) spectrometer equipped with the special software based on the matrix method of least squares, and (b) high-purity germanium spectrometer. Synthetic compositions with activity concentrations varying in a wide range, from 1/5 to 5 times median activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides available in the earth crust and the samples of popular building materials, such as concrete, pumice and gypsum, were tested, while the density of the tested samples changed in a wide range (from 860 up to 2,410 kg/m(3)). The results obtained in the NaI(Tl) system were similar to those obtained with the HPGe spectrometer, mostly within the uncertainty range. This comparison shows that scintillation spectrometers equipped with a special software aimed to compensate for the lower spectral resolution of NaI(Tl) detectors can be successfully used for the radiation control of mass construction products. PMID:23542118

  4. Special Nuclear Material Detection with a Water Cherenkov based Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, M; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Dazeley, S; Svoboda, R

    2008-11-10

    Fission events from Special Nuclear Material (SNM), such as highly enriched uranium or plutonium, produce a number of neutrons and high energy gamma-rays. Assuming the neutron multiplicity is approximately Poissonian with an average of 2 to 3, the observation of time correlations between these particles from a cargo container would constitute a robust signature of the presence of SNM inside. However, in order to be sensitive to the multiplicity, one would require a high total efficiency. There are two approaches to maximize the total efficiency; maximizing the detector efficiency or maximizing the detector solid angle coverage. The advanced detector group at LLNL is investigating one way to maximize the detector size. We are designing and building a water Cerenkov based gamma and neutron detector for the purpose of developing an efficient and cost effective way to deploy a large solid angle car wash style detector. We report on our progress in constructing a larger detector and also present preliminary results from our prototype detector that indicates detection of neutrons.

  5. Detectors, sampling, shielding, and electronics for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1981-08-01

    A brief discussion of the important design elements for positron emission tomographs is presented. The conclusions are that the instrumentation can be improved by the use of larger numbers of small, efficient detectors closely packed in many rings, the development of new detector materials, and novel electronic designs to reduce the deadtime and increase maximum event rates. (ACR)

  6. Lumped Element Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, S.; Mauskopf, P.; Naylon, J.; Porch, A.; Duncombe, C.

    2008-04-01

    Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) provide a promising solution to the problem of producing large format arrays of ultra sensitive detectors for astronomy. Traditionally KIDs have been constructed from superconducting quarter-wave resonant elements capacitively coupled to a co-planar feed line [1]. Photon detection is achieved by measuring the change in quasi-particle density caused by the splitting of Cooper pairs in the superconducting resonant element. This change in quasi-particle density alters the kinetic inductance, and hence the resonant frequency of the resonant element. This arrangement requires the quasi-particles generated by photon absorption to be concentrated at positions of high current density in the resonator. This is usually achieved through antenna coupling or quasi-particle trapping. For these detectors to work at wavelengths shorter than around 500 ?m where antenna coupling can introduce a significant loss of efficiency, then a direct absorption method needs to be considered. One solution to this problem is the Lumped Element KID (LEKID), which shows no current variation along its length and can be arranged into a photon absorbing area coupled to free space and therefore requiring no antennas or quasi-particle trapping. This paper outlines the relevant microwave theory of a LEKID, along with theoretical and measured performance for these devices.

  7. 3D silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Part Of This Work Is Performed Within The Framework Of Rd50; Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kühn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola; Part of this work is performed within the framework of RD50

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 1015 Neq/cm2, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 1015 Neq/cm2. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5 μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  8. Radiation Effect On Gas Electron Multiplier Detector Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kwang June; Baldeloma, Edwin; Park, Seongtae; White, Andrew P.; Yu, Jaehoon

    2011-06-01

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is a gas device with high gain and high efficiency. These detectors use chemically perforated 65 {mu}m thick copper clad Kapton polyimide foils. Given its potential for detecting X-rays and other radiations, GEM detectors may be used in an environment with high radioactivity. The Kapton foils manufacturer, Du Pont Inc., claims that the foils are radioactive resistant. To verify whether the GEM detector performance is affected by the exposure to radiation, several GEM foils were irradiated to a {sup 60}Co source at the gamma-ray irradiation facility at Sterigenics, Tustin, CA. Four sets of GEM foils were exposed to the level of 10 kGy, 100 kGy, 1,000 kGy and 10,000 kGy. The output signal from the GEM detectors with irradiated GEM foils were measured and compared to the detector with no irradiation. We observed that the shapes of the peaks from 5.9 KeV {sup 55}Fe X-ray were distorted and that the detector gain increased compared to that of the un-irradiated detector. In particular, the detector with 10,000 kGy irradiation appeared to have the biggest peak distortion and increased gain. It was also found from that additional electrons from radiation-induced free radicals in the Kapton film contribute to output signal of the irradiated GEM detectors. Further studies are needed to explain the mechanism of these detector performance changes.

  9. New detector perspectives for high angular resolution astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe

    2001-05-01

    Some new types of detector have just appear in the last decade pushing the limits in term of very low light level detection. High Angular Resolution astronomy usually uses 2 types of detectors: "conventional" detectors and photon counting detectors. Among the photon counting detectors, a very promising solution could be Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (STJ) detectors. They are able to count optical photons from the UV (200 nm) to the near infrared (2000 nm), with a good quantum efficiency (about 70%), a good temporal response (about 10 kHz/detector) and an energy resolution that does not exist in semiconductor-based devices. STJ first applications could be: fringe sensor for interferometry, or a visible and near-IR wavefront sensor. A radically new CCD development by Marconi Applied Technologies, available very soon, has enabled substantial internal gain within the CCD before the signal reaches the output amplifier. With reasonably high gain, sub-electron readout noise levels are achieved even at MHz pixel rates. This technology may have the conjugate advantages of the CCD's and of the photon counting detectors. Among the conventional detectors, I will present a recent CCD application: the wavefront sensor for the NAOS adaptive optic system for the VLT (ESO). New type of CMOS visible detectors are also fabricated by the Rockwell Science Center. The "multiple readouts" technique used by the IR CMOS detectors can be used in the visible and may decrease the readout noise down to about 1 e-, but the frame rate also decreases.

  10. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  11. Scanning Seismic Intrusion Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Scanning seismic intrusion detector employs array of automatically or manually scanned sensors to determine approximate location of intruder. Automatic-scanning feature enables one operator to tend system of many sensors. Typical sensors used with new system are moving-coil seismic pickups. Detector finds uses in industrial security systems.

  12. The CLAS Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    G. Adams; V. Burkert; R. Carl; T. Carstens; V. Frolov; L. Houghtlin; G. Jacobs; M. Kossov; M. Klusman; B. Kross; M. Onuk; J. Napolitano; J. W. Price; C. Riggs; Y. Sharabian; A. Stavinsky; L. C. Smith; W. A. Stephens; P. Stoler; W. Tuzel; K. Ullrich; A. Vlassovc; A. Weisenberger; M. Witkowski; B. Wojtekhowski; P. F. Yergin; C. Zorn

    2001-06-01

    The design, construction, and performance of the CLAS Cerenkov threshold gas detector at Jefferson Lab is described. The detector consists of 216 optical modules. Each module consists of 3 adjustable mirrors, of lightweight composite construction, a Winston light collecting cone, a 5-inch photomultiplier tube, and specially designed magnetic shielding.

  13. Borner Ball Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector measures neutron radiation. Neutrons are uncharged atomic particles that have the ability to penetrate living tissues, harming human beings in space. The Bonner Ball Neutron Detector is one of three radiation experiments during Expedition Two. The others are the Phantom Torso and Dosimetric Mapping.

  14. Cable-splice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.; Iufer, E. J.; Giovannetti, A.

    1980-01-01

    Detector has possible uses in aerial cable-car systems, equipment handling in mines, boreholes, and undersea operations, and other applications where moving steel cable must be measured, monitored, or controlled. Detector consists of Hall-effect magnetic sensor located close to cable. Magnetic markings on cable are converted to electrical signals. Signals are filtered, amplified, and can actuate alarm.

  15. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  16. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  17. Smoke Detectors and Legislation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Prevention and Control Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This manual, one of a series for use in public education, provides an in-depth review of the current status of state and local smoke detector legislation. First, for the community considering a smoke detector law or ordinance, six decision points are discussed: which residential occupancy sub-classes will be affected; what the time factors are for

  18. SNM Detection with a Large Water Cerenkov Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dazeley, S; Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Ouedraogo, S; Svoboda, R; Sweeny, M

    2009-06-04

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission, or be induced to do so. Either case results in neutron emission. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could, potentially, be detected escaping even a well shielded cargo container. Obviously, if the shielding is sophisticated, detecting it would require a highly efficient detector with close to 4{pi} solid angle coverage. Water Cerenkov detectors may be a cost effective way to achieve that goal if it can be shown that the neutron capture signature is large enough and if sufficient background rejection can be employed as detectors get larger. In 2008 the LLNL Advanced Detector Group reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 1/4 ton gadolinium doped water Cerenkov prototype. We have now built a 4 ton version. This detector is not only bigger, it was designed with photon detection efficiency in mind from the beginning. We are employing increased photocathode coverage and more reflective walls, coated with PTFE. The increased efficiency should allow better energy resolution. We expect that the better diffusive wall reflectivity will reduce the overall dependence of the detector response on particle direction, again producing a more consistent response. We also believe that as detectors get larger, both uncorrelated and correlated backgrounds due to gamma-rays and cosmic ray interactions near the detector will increase. To prove the effectiveness of the technology we must develop new ways to reject these backgrounds while maintaining our sensitivity to SNM neutrons. Better energy resolution will enable us to reject more of the low energy gamma-ray backgrounds on this basis. Overcoming cosmic ray induced neutrons is perhaps an even larger concern as detectors get larger. Our detector is designed so that we can test various segmentation schemes - effectively dividing the detector up into smaller ones. In this presentation, we will describe our detector in detail.

  19. Multi-layer boron thin-film detectors for neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic efficiencies of the multilayer boron detectors have been examined both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that due to the charge loss in the boron layers, the practical efficiencies of most multi-layer {sup 10}B detectors are limited up to about 42%, much less than 77% of the 2 bar 2-inch diameter {sup 3}He detectors. It is suggested that the same charge loss mechanism will prevent essentially all substrate-based boron detectors from ever reaching the efficiencies of high-pressure {sup 3}He tubes, independent of the substrate geometry and material composition (including silicon). Meanwhile, the experimental data indicate that the multi-layer approach can increase the efficiencies up to the theoretical limit. Good n/{gamma} discrimination has also achieved using the ionization charnber technique.

  20. Pyroelectric detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Robertson, J. B.; Breckenridge, R. A. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A pryoelectric detector array and the method for making it are described. A series of holes formed through a silicon dioxide layer on the surface of a silicon substrate forms the mounting fixture for the pyroelectric detector array. A series of nontouching strips of indium are formed around the holes to make contact with the backside electrodes and form the output terminals for individual detectors. A pyroelectric detector strip with front and back electrodes, respectively, is mounted over the strip. Biasing resistors are formed on the surface of the silicon dioxide layer and connected to the strips. A metallized pad formed on the surface of the layer is connected to each of the biasing resistors and to the film to provide the ground for the pyroelectric detector array.

  1. Pyroelectric detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Robertson, J. B.; Breckenridge, R. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A pyroelectric detector array and the method for using it are described. A series of holes formed through a silicon dioxide layer on the surface of a silicon substrate forms the mounting fixture for the pyroelectric detector array. A series of nontouching strips of indium are formed around the holes to make contact with the backside electrodes and form the output terminals for individual detectors. A pyroelectric detector strip with front and back electrodes, respectively, is mounted over the strips. Biasing resistors are formed on the surface of the silicon dioxide layer and connected to the strips. A metallized pad formed on the surface of layer is connected to each of the biasing resistors and to the film to provide the ground for the pyroelectric detector array.

  2. Nanomechanical resonance detector

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Jeffrey C; Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-10-29

    An embodiment of a nanomechanical frequency detector includes a support structure and a plurality of elongated nanostructures coupled to the support structure. Each of the elongated nanostructures has a particular resonant frequency. The plurality of elongated nanostructures has a range of resonant frequencies. An embodiment of a method of identifying an object includes introducing the object to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the object. An embodiment of a method of identifying a molecular species of the present invention includes introducing the molecular species to the nanomechanical resonance detector. A resonant response by at least one of the elongated nanostructures of the nanomechanical resonance detector indicates a vibrational mode of the molecular species.

  3. Advanced far infrared detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent advances in photoconductive and bolometric semiconductor detectors for wavelength 1 mm > {lambda} > 50 {mu}m are reviewed. Progress in detector performance in this photon energy range has been stimulated by new and stringent requirements for ground based, high altitude and space-borne telescopes for astronomical and astrophysical observations. The paper consists of chapters dealing with the various types of detectors: Be and Ga doped Ge photoconductors, stressed Ge:Ga devices and neutron transmutation doped Ge thermistors. Advances in the understanding of basic detector physics and the introduction of modern semiconductor device technology have led to predictable and reliable fabrication techniques. Integration of detectors into functional arrays has become feasible and is vigorously pursued by groups worldwide.

  4. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, G.; Croci, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Cavenago, M.; Claps, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2015-04-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m2) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards the realization of new neutron beam monitors for fusion experiments and spallation sources.

  5. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrer, Andreas; Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  6. Scintillation detectors in gamma spectral logging; geometry, absorption and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schimschal, Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    The theory for the evaluation of the effects of geometry in gamma ray absorption is developed for cylindrical scintillation detectors as applicable to borehole gamma spectrometry. The results of a laboratory experiment are shown for comparison. A calibration procedure to determine detector efficiency is given for application to borehole probes. It is shown that the response of a crystal can be separated in terms of geometric effects and instrumentation effects. It is also shown that approximating crystal detectors with point detectors in mathematical theory is grossly oversimplified. (USGS)

  7. Status of the D0 fiber tracker and preshower detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Dmitri; ,

    2009-01-01

    In this report we focus on the performance of the D0 central fiber tracker and preshower detectors during the high luminosity p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 GeV delivered by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab (Run IIb). Both fiber tracker and preshower detectors utilize a similar readout system based on high quantum efficiency solid state photo-detectors capable of converting light into electrical signals. We also give a brief description of the D0 detector and the central track trigger, and conclude with a summary on the central tracker performance.

  8. Assessing CZT detector performance for environmental radioactivity investigations.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubina; Plater, A J; Nolan, P J; Appleby, P G

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is the leading semiconductor detector for gamma spectroscopy at room temperature. In the present study, a coplanar-grid CZT detector was used for gamma-ray measurements of environmental radioactivity on a contaminated saltmarsh sediment core in comparison with results from a coaxial high-purity germanium detector to assess their comparative performance. The findings reveal that the CZT performs well for both (241)Am and (137)Cs measurements over a broad range of activities, despite limited detector efficiency, and can be used to good effect in the study of environmental radioactivity in contaminated estuarine settings. PMID:23060429

  9. Plasmonic lens enhanced mid-infrared quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, Andreas Schwarz, Benedikt; Gansch, Roman; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2014-10-27

    We demonstrate monolithic integrated quantum cascade detectors enhanced by plasmonic lenses. Surface normal incident mid-infrared radiation is coupled to surface plasmon polaritons guided to and detected by the active region of the detector. The lens extends the optical effective active area of the device up to a 5 times larger area than for standard mesa detectors or pixel devices while the electrical active region stays the same. The extended optical area increases the absorption efficiency of the presented device as well as the room temperature performance while it offers a flexible platform for various detector geometries. A photocurrent response increase at room temperature up to a factor of 6 was observed.

  10. Tracking Performance of the ATLAS Inner Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauren, Tompkins; Heinemann, Beate

    2009-05-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the large scale experiments designed to explore high energy collisions at the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton accelerator with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. Tracking of the individual particle trajectories in the ATLAS experiment is provided by the Inner Detector. It consists of three layers of silicon pixel detectors, four layers of silicon strip detectors, and a transition radiation tracker comprised of straw proportional tubes, which provides both tracking and transition radiation detection. In preparation for collision data the ATLAS experiment has taken large amounts of cosmic ray data that have been used to calibrate and align the tracking detectors. In this presentation we will show the observed tracking performance of the Inner Detector in cosmic ray data and compare it to the expected performance for collisions using simulated data. We will examine resolutions, efficiencies and mis-identification rates to paint a picture of the tracking performance in both early data and at the detector's design luminosity.

  11. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  12. The next generation of crystal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ren-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Crystal detectors have been used widely in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, medical instruments and homeland security applications. Novel crystal detectors are continuously being discovered and developed in academia and in industry. In high energy and nuclear physics experiments, total absorption electromagnetic calorimeters (ECAL) made of inorganic crystals are known for their superb energy resolution and detection efficiency for photon and electron measurements. A crystal ECAL is thus the choice for those experiments where precision measurements of photons and electrons are crucial for their physics missions. For future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers, however, the crystal detectors used in the above mentioned ECALs are either not bright and fast enough, or not radiation hard enough. Crystal detectors have also been proposed to build a Homogeneous Hadron Calorimeter (HHCAL) to achieve unprecedented jet mass resolution by duel readout of both Cherenkov and scintillation light, where development of cost-effective crystal detectors is a crucial issue because of the huge crystal volume required. This paper discusses several R&D directions for the next generation of crystal detectors for future HEP experiments.

  13. Amperometric detector designs for capillary electrophoresis microchips.

    PubMed

    Castao-Alvarez, Mario; Fernndez-Abedul, M Teresa; Costa-Garca, Agustn

    2006-03-24

    Electrochemical (EC) detection is a sensitive and miniaturisable detection mode for capillary electrophoresis (CE) microchips. Detection cell design is very important in order to ensure electrical isolation from the high separation voltage. Amperometric detectors with different designs have been developed for coupling EC detection to CE-microchips. Different working electrode alignment: in-channel or end-channel has been tested in conjunction with several materials: gold, platinum or carbon. The end-channel detector was based on a platinum or gold wire manually aligned at the exit of the separation channel. Thick- (screen-printed carbon electrode) and thin-film (sputtered gold film) electrodes have also been employed with this configuration, but with a different design that allowed the rapid replacement of the electrode. The in-channel detector was based on a gold film within the separation channel. A gold-based dual electrode detector, which combined for the first time in- and end-channel detection, has been also tested. These amperometric detectors have been evaluated in combination to poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and Topas (thermoplastic olefin polymer of amorphous structure) CE-microchips. Topas is a new and promising cyclic olefin copolymer with high chemical resistance. Relevant parameters of the polymer microchip separation such as precision, efficiency or resolution and amperometric detection were studied with the different detector designs using p-aminophenol and L-ascorbic acid as model analytes in Tris-based buffer pH 9.0. PMID:16472530

  14. Development of a Neutron Detector for A1 at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Zoe; A1 MAMI Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The Mainz A1 spectrometers perform high precision measurements to investigate the structure of the nucleus and its constituents. Previous knowledge of the neutron form factor (FF) is limited due to poor detection efficiencies. Our goal is to create a neutron detector with an efficiency better than 80%, leading to the improvement of the measurements of the neutron electric FF and reducing systematic uncertainties. This new detector would also open up the possibility to study non-mesonic two-body weak decays. The neutron detector should have a large active detector volume, a high detection efficiency (>80%), a good resolution (<.5 ns), and must be low in cost. The proposed design of the detector follows a modular concept with an active detector volume of approximately one cubic meter. In order to allow high beam currents and their resulting high rates, this detector will be highly segmented using 32 crossed layers consisting of 64 bars, utilizing solid and liquid organic scintillators, with dimensions (15 x 30 x 960) mm3. In total 4096 channels have to be read out via WLS fibers using silicon multi pixel photon counters (MPPC). The Mainz A1 spectrometers perform high precision measurements to investigate the structure of the nucleus and its constituents. Previous knowledge of the neutron form factor (FF) is limited due to poor detection efficiencies. Our goal is to create a neutron detector with an efficiency better than 80%, leading to the improvement of the measurements of the neutron electric FF and reducing systematic uncertainties. This new detector would also open up the possibility to study non-mesonic two-body weak decays. The neutron detector should have a large active detector volume, a high detection efficiency (>80%), a good resolution (<.5 ns), and must be low in cost. The proposed design of the detector follows a modular concept with an active detector volume of approximately one cubic meter. In order to allow high beam currents and their resulting high rates, this detector will be highly segmented using 32 crossed layers consisting of 64 bars, utilizing solid and liquid organic scintillators, with dimensions (15 x 30 x 960) mm3. In total 4096 channels have to be read out via WLS fibers using silicon multi pixel photon counters (MPPC). Funded by NSF IRES Award IIA-1358175 MAMI A1 Collaboration.

  15. Redesigned Beta-Gamma Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carman, April J.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; Hubbard, Charles W.; Lidey, Lance S.; Litke, Kevin E.; Morris, Scott J.; Ripplinger, Michael D.; Suarez, Reynold; Thompson, Robert C.

    2007-08-21

    The Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), can collect and detect several radioxenon isotopes and is used to monitor underground nuclear explosions. The ARSA is very sensitive to 133Xe, 131mXe, 133mXe, and 135Xe (< 1 mBq/SCM) due to the compact high efficiency beta-gamma coincidence detector it uses. For this reason, it is an excellent treaty monitoring system and it can be used as an environmental sampling device as well. Field testing of the system has shown it to be both robust and reliable, but the nuclear detector requires a detailed photomultiplier tube (PMT) gain matching regime that is difficult to implement in a field environment. This complexity is a problem from a maintenance and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) standpoint and efforts to reduce these issues have led to development of a simplified beta-gamma coincident detector. The new design reduces the number of PMT’s and, therefore, the complexity of the calibration needed in comparison to the old design. New scintillation materials were investigated and a comparison of three different gamma sensitive well detectors has been completed. In addition, a new plastic-scintillator gas cell was designed that utilized a cell was constructed as well as a new method of forming the scintillator gas cell. The new simplified detector system has compared favorably with the original ARSA design in spectral resolution and efficiency and is significantly easier to set up and calibrate. The new materials and configuration allow the resulting beta-gamma coincendence detector to maintain the overall performance of the ARSA type beta-gamma detector, while simplifying the design.

  16. Arc detector uses fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.; Leech, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Arc detector for protecting high-power microwave klystron oscillators uses fiber optics connected to remote solid-state light-sensing circuits. Detector is more reliable, smaller, and sensitive than other systems that locate detector in waveguide.

  17. Background studies for NaI(Tl) detectors in the ANAIS dark matter project

    SciTech Connect

    Amaré, J.; Borjabad, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; Fortuño, D.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Gómez, H.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Solórzano, A. Ortiz de; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2013-08-08

    Several large NaI(Tl) detectors, produced by different companies, have been operated in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in the frame of the ANAIS (Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators) project devoted to the direct detection of dark matter. A complete background model has been developed for a 9.6 kg detector (referred as ANAIS-0 prototype) after a long data taking at LSC. Activities from the natural chains of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K in the NaI(Tl) crystal were evaluated applying different methods: discrimination of alpha particles vs beta/gamma background by Pulse Shape Analysis for quantifying the content of the natural chains and coincidence techniques for {sup 40}K. Radioactive contaminations in the detector and shielding components were also determined by HPGe spectrometry. Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 package were carried out to evaluate their contribution. At high energies, most of the measured background is nicely reproduced; at low energy some non-explained components are still present, although some plausible background sources have been analyzed. The {sup 40}K content of the NaI(Tl) crystal has been confirmed to be the dominant contributor to the measured background with this detector. In addition, preliminary results of the background characterization, presently underway at the LSC, of two recently produced NaI(Tl) detectors, with 12.5 kg mass each, will be presented: cosmogenic induced activity has been clearly observed and is being quantified, and {sup 40}K activity at a level ten times lower than in ANAIS-0 has been determined.

  18. Background studies for NaI(Tl) detectors in the ANAIS dark matter project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaré, J.; Borjabad, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cuesta, C.; Fortuño, D.; García, E.; Ginestra, C.; Gómez, H.; Martínez, M.; Oliván, M. A.; Ortigoza, Y.; Ortiz de Solórzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedón, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.; Villar, P.

    2013-08-01

    Several large NaI(Tl) detectors, produced by different companies, have been operated in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) in the frame of the ANAIS (Annual modulation with NaI Scintillators) project devoted to the direct detection of dark matter. A complete background model has been developed for a 9.6 kg detector (referred as ANAIS-0 prototype) after a long data taking at LSC. Activities from the natural chains of 238U and 232Th, and 40K in the NaI(Tl) crystal were evaluated applying different methods: discrimination of alpha particles vs beta/gamma background by Pulse Shape Analysis for quantifying the content of the natural chains and coincidence techniques for 40K. Radioactive contaminations in the detector and shielding components were also determined by HPGe spectrometry. Monte Carlo simulations using Geant4 package were carried out to evaluate their contribution. At high energies, most of the measured background is nicely reproduced; at low energy some non-explained components are still present, although some plausible background sources have been analyzed. The 40K content of the NaI(Tl) crystal has been confirmed to be the dominant contributor to the measured background with this detector. In addition, preliminary results of the background characterization, presently underway at the LSC, of two recently produced NaI(Tl) detectors, with 12.5 kg mass each, will be presented: cosmogenic induced activity has been clearly observed and is being quantified, and 40K activity at a level ten times lower than in ANAIS-0 has been determined.

  19. TM Failed Detectors Data Replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco, L.; Trevese, D.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the LANDSAT 4 Thematic Mapper detectors (band 2 detector 4 and band 5 detector 3) have inadequate performances. The operational system correction processing will disregard the data sensed by the failed detectors and replace them by data coming from the neighbor detectors of the same spectra band. The analysis performed by ESA Earthnet and attempts to suggest an operational failed detector replacement algorithm are described.

  20. The detector system of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Bai, J. Z.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beavis, D.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Brown, R. L.; Butorov, I.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Carr, R.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, W. T.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M. J.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X. C.; Chen, X. H.; Chen, X. S.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chidzik, S.; Chow, K.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dong, L.; Dove, J.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fang, S. D.; Fu, J. Y.; Fu, Z. W.; Ge, L. Q.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gill, R.; Goett, J.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gornushkin, Y. A.; Grassi, M.; Greenler, L. S.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Hahn, R. L.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; He, Q.; He, W. S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hinrichs, P.; Ho, T. H.; Hoff, M.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, P. W.; Huang, X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiang, W. Q.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joseph, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, C. Y.; Lai, W. C.; Lai, W. H.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, M. K. P.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, B.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, J.; Li, N. Y.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. F.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. B.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, J.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. X.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, A.; Luk, K. B.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Ma, L. H.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Mayes, B.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Mohapatra, D.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Morgan, J. E.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Newsom, C.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ngai, W. K.; Nie, Y. B.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pagac, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Patton, S.; Pearson, C.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Sands, W. R.; Seilhan, B.; Shao, B. B.; Shih, K.; Song, W. Y.; Steiner, H.; Stoler, P.; Stuart, M.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tagg, N.; Tam, Y. H.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tang, W.; Tang, X.; Taychenachev, D.; Themann, H.; Torun, Y.; Trentalange, S.; Tsai, O.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Virostek, S.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, L. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X. T.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Wenman, D. L.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Whitten, C. A.; Wilhelmi, J.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. C.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, J.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, F. F.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xiang, S. T.; Xiao, Q.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, G.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Yip, K.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zeng, S.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q. X.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zimmerman, S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Daya Bay experiment was the first to report simultaneous measurements of reactor antineutrinos at multiple baselines leading to the discovery of νbare oscillations over km-baselines. Subsequent data has provided the world's most precise measurement of sin2 2θ13 and the effective mass splitting Δ mee2. The experiment is located in Daya Bay, China where the cluster of six nuclear reactors is among the world's most prolific sources of electron antineutrinos. Multiple antineutrino detectors are deployed in three underground water pools at different distances from the reactor cores to search for deviations in the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum due to neutrino mixing. Instrumented with photomultiplier tubes, the water pools serve as shielding against natural radioactivity from the surrounding rock and provide efficient muon tagging. Arrays of resistive plate chambers over the top of each pool provide additional muon detection. The antineutrino detectors were specifically designed for measurements of the antineutrino flux with minimal systematic uncertainty. Relative detector efficiencies between the near and far detectors are known to better than 0.2%. With the unblinding of the final two detectors' baselines and target masses, a complete description and comparison of the eight antineutrino detectors can now be presented. This paper describes the Daya Bay detector systems, consisting of eight antineutrino detectors in three instrumented water pools in three underground halls, and their operation through the first year of eight detector data-taking.