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Sample records for ht-29 human colorectal

  1. Gamma Tocopherol and Lovastatin Additively Induced Apoptosis in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line (HT29)

    PubMed Central

    Zeidooni, Leila; Rezaei, Mohsen; Hashemi Tabar, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Background Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a physiological process needed to remove unwanted or damaged cells. It has been hypothesized that any failure of programmed cell death leads to the development of neoplasm. Identifying new agents which induce apoptosis in tumor cells is of great significance in treatment of neoplasms. Numerous studies suggest that exposure of tumor cells to statins and gamma tocopherol can lead to cell death. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the cell death induced by gamma tocopherol and lovastatin in human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HT29) using flow cytometry. Material and Methods HT29 cells were grown in DMEM medium, exposed to different concentrations of lovastatin (10,20,40,100μM ) and gamma tocopherol (25,50,100,200μM) for 48 and 72 hours, individually and in combination (100μM both, 48 h). Phenotype of apoptosis was determined by means of flow cytometry. Results All Concentrations of lovastatin (10, 20, 40, 100 μM) and gamma tocopherol (25, 50, 100, 200 μM) induced an apoptotic response in HT29 cells. In combination, a significant increase in apoptosis phenotype was also demonstrated (P < 0.05). Conclusions This study showed that lovastatin when combined with gamma tocopherol, could induce apoptosis in HT29 cells more potently than each agent alone, which uncovers the significance of targeting the proliferative signaling in different points of the pathway. PMID:24624174

  2. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  3. Dehydroglyasperin D Inhibits the Proliferation of HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Direct Interaction With Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Jeong, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in therapy, colorectal cancer still has a grim prognosis. Although licorice has been used in East Asian traditional medicine, the molecular properties of its constituents including dehydroglyasperin D (DHGA-D) remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the inhibitory effect of DHGA-D on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify the primary signaling molecule targeted by DHGA-D. Methods: We evaluated anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The target protein of DHGA-D was identified by Western blot analysis with a specific antibody, and direct interaction between DHGA-D and the target protein was confirmed by kinase and pull-down assays. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and further Western blot analysis was performed to identify the signaling pathway involved. Results: DHGA-D significantly suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent HT-29 colorectal cancer cell proliferation. DHGA-D directly suppressed phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and subsequent Akt phosphorylation and bound to the p110 subunit of PI3K. DHGA-D also significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest, together with the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and retinoblastoma phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions: DHGA-D has potent anticancer activity and targets PI3K in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report to detail the molecular basis of DHGA-D in suppressing colorectal cancer cell growth. PMID:27051646

  4. Effects of NVP-BEZ235 on the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Yu, Xiaofeng; Ma, Jianxia; Tong, Yili; Yao, Jianfeng

    2016-07-01

    The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays a significant role in colorectal adenocarcinoma. NVP-BEZ235 (dactolisib) is a novel dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR. The effects of NVP-BEZ235 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma are still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to explore the proliferation, migration, apoptosis and autophagy in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 3 µM) for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Cells were also treated with NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM), DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM), and NVP-BEZ235 (0.1 µM) combined with DDP (100, 300 and 1,000 µM) respectively, and cultured for 24 h after treatment. MTT assay was utilized to evaluate the effects of NVP-BEZ235 alone or NVP-BEZ235 combined with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) on proliferation of HT-29 cells. Cell wound-scratch assay was used detect cell migration. In addition, expression of microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (MAP1LC3B and LC3B) in HT-29 cells was detected by immunofluorescence at 48 h after NVP-BEZ235 (1 µM) treatment. Expression of proteins involved in cell cycle and proliferation (p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), and autophagy (cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1) were detected by western blot analysis. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. NVP-BEZ235 decreased protein expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR and cyclin D1, and increased protein expression of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved LC3B and Beclin-1 as the concentrations and the incubation time of NVP-BEZ235 increased. In addition, NVP-BEZ235 and DDP had synergic effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and migration. The expression of protein involved in apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3) was higher in drug combination group compared to the NVP-BEZ235 single treatment group. NVP-BEZ235

  5. Modified bacterial cellulose scaffolds for localized doxorubicin release in human colorectal HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Cacicedo, Maximiliano L; León, Ignacio E; Gonzalez, Jimena S; Porto, Luismar M; Alvarez, Vera A; Castro, Guillermo R

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) films modified by the in situ method with the addition of alginate (Alg) during the microbial cultivation of Gluconacetobacter hansenii under static conditions increased the loading of doxorubicin by at least three times. Biophysical analysis of BC-Alg films by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction and FTIR showed a highly homogeneous interpenetrated network scaffold without changes in the BC crystalline structure but with an increased amorphous phase. The main molecular interactions determined by FTIR between both biopolymers clearly suggest high compatibility. These results indicate that alginate plays a key role in the biophysical properties of the hybrid BC matrix. BC-Alg scaffold analysis by nitrogen adsorption isotherms revealed by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method an increase in surface area of about 84% and in pore volume of more than 200%. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model also showed an increase of about 25% in the pore size compared to the BC film. Loading BC-Alg scaffolds with different amounts of doxorubicin decreased the cell viability of HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line compared to the free Dox from around 95-53% after 24h and from 63% to 37% after 48 h. Dox kinetic release from the BC-Alg nanocomposite displayed hyperbolic curves related to the different amounts of drug payload and was stable for at least 14 days. The results of the BC-Alg nanocomposites show a promissory potential for anticancer therapies of solid tumors. PMID:26784658

  6. Inhibitory effects of tetrandrine on epidermal growth factor-induced invasion and migration in HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Chiu-Fang; Chiang, Ni-Na; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine has been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation and to inhibit metastatic effects in multiple cancer models in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of tetrandrine on the underlying mechanism of HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was focused on tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells following epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment, and Transwell, gelatin zymography, gene expression and immunoblotting assays were performed to investigate metastatic effects in vitro. Tetrandrine was observed to dose‑dependently inhibit EGF‑induced HT29 cell invasion and migration, however, no effect on cell viability occurred following exposure to tetradrine between 0.5 and 2 µM. Tetrandrine treatment inhibited the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in a concentration‑dependent manner. The present study also found a reduction in the mRNA expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 in the tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells. Tetrandrine also suppressed the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathway, including phosphoinositide‑dependent kinase 1, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase and phosphorylated AKT, suppressing the gene expression of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, tetrandrine triggered mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling through the suppressing the activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated protein kinase. These data suggested that targeting EGFR signaling and its downstream molecules contributed to the inhibition of EGF‑induced HT29 cell metastasis caused by tetrandrine, eventually leading to a reduction in the mRNA and gelatinase activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively. PMID:26648313

  7. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  8. Morusin induces apoptosis and suppresses NF-{kappa}B activity in human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.-C.; Won, S.-J.; Chao, C.-L.; Wu, F.-L.; Liu, H.-S.; Ling Pin; Lin, C.-N.; Su, C.-L.

    2008-07-18

    Morusin is a pure compound isolated from root bark of Morusaustralis (Moraceae). In this study, we demonstrated that morusin significantly inhibited the growth and clonogenicity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells. Apoptosis induced by morusin was characterized by accumulation of cells at the sub-G{sub 1} phase, fragmentation of DNA, and condensation of chromatin. Morusin also inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK-{alpha}, IKK-{beta} and I{kappa}B-{alpha}, increased expression of I{kappa}B-{alpha}, and suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B and its DNA binding activity. Dephosphorylation of NF-{kappa}B upstream regulators PI3K, Akt and PDK1 was also displayed. In addition, activation of caspase-8, change of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO, and activation of caspase-9 and -3 were observed at the early time point. Downregulation in the expression of Ku70 and XIAP was exhibited afterward. Caspase-8 or wide-ranging caspase inhibitor suppressed morusin-induced apoptosis. Therefore, the antitumor mechanism of morusin in HT-29 cells may be via activation of caspases and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B.

  9. Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid Induces Apoptosis via Reduction of COX-2 Expression in TPA-Induced HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Ju; Sung, Mi Jeong; Park, Jae Ho; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Myung Sunny; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Hwang, Jin-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) is one of the bioactive compounds found in cheonggukjang, a fast-fermented soybean paste widely utilized in Korean cooking. PGA is reported to have a number of beneficial health effects, and interestingly, it has been identified as a possible anti-cancer compound through its ability to promote apoptosis in cancer cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our findings demonstrate that PGA inhibits the pro-proliferative functions of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a known chemical carcinogen in HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells. This inhibition was accompanied by hallmark apoptotic phenotypes, including DNA fragmentation and the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. In addition, PGA treatment reduced the expression of genes known to be overexpressed in colorectal cancer cells, including cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Lastly, PGA promoted activation of 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein (AMPK) in HT-29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that PGA treatment enhances apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells, in part by modulating the activity of the COX-2 and AMPK signaling pathways. These anti-cancer functions of PGA make it a promising compound for future study. PMID:25854428

  10. Quercetin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CD133+ cancer stem cells of human colorectal HT29 cancer cell line and enhances anticancer effects of doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Atashpour, Shekoufeh; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Movahhed, Tahereh Komeili; Barzegar, Elmira; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Azizi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) with the CD133+ phenotype are a rare fraction of cancer cells with the ability of self-renewal, unlimited proliferation and resistance to treatment. Quercetin has anticancer effects with the advantage of exhibiting low side effects. Therefore, we evaluated the anticancer effects of quercetin and doxorubicin (Dox) in HT29 cancer cells and its isolated CD133+ CSCs. Materials and Methods: The CSCs from HT29 cells were isolated using CD133 antibody conjugated to magnetic beads by MACS. Anticancer effects of quercetin and Dox alone and in combination on HT29 cells and CSCs were evaluated using MTT cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry analysis of cell cycle distribution and apoptosis induction. Results: The CD133+ CSCs comprised about 10% of HT29 cells. Quercetin and Dox alone and in combination inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HT29 cells and to a lesser extent in CSCs. Quercetin enhanced cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of Dox at low concentration in both cell populations. Quercetin and Dox and their combination induced G2/M arrest in the HT29 cells and to a lesser extent in CSCs. Conclusion: The CSCs were a minor population with a significantly high level of drug resistance within the HT29 cancer cells. Quercetin alone exhibited significant cytotoxic effects on HT29 cells and also increased cytoxicity of Dox in combination therapy. Altogether, our data showed that adding quercetin to Dox chemotherapy is an effective strategy for treatment of both CSCs and bulk tumor cells. PMID:26351552

  11. Crataegus azarolus Leaves Induce Antiproliferative Activity, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis in Human HT-29 and HCT-116 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Pinon, Aline; Limami, Youness; Simon, Alain; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of CRC. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic potential of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract in HCT-116 and HT-29 human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, we attempted to investigate the signaling pathways that should be involved in its cytotoxic effect. The Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced growth inhibitory effect was associated with DNA fragmentation, sub-G1 peak, loss of mitochondrial potential, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus induced the cleavage of caspase-8. It has no effect on steady-state levels of total Bcl-2 protein. Whereas Bax levels decreased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in both tested cell lines. Taken together, these findings confirm the involvement of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The apoptotic cell death induced by ethyl acetate extract of Crataegus azarolus was accompanied by an enhancement of the p21 expression but not through p53 activation in human colorectal cancer cells. The above-mentioned data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of Crataegus azarolus ethyl acetate extract-induced apoptosis in CRC. Therefore, this compound should be a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26495895

  12. Human SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 Proteins Acting on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reduce Proliferation of Human Colorectal Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shulepko, M A; Bychkov, M L; Shenkarev, Z O; Paramonov, A S; Chugunov, A O; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2014-10-01

    Human secreted Ly-6/uPAR related proteins (SLURP-1 and SLURP-2) are produced by various cells, including the epithelium and immune system. These proteins act as autocrine/paracrine hormones regulating the growth and differentiation of keratinocytes and are also involved in the control of inflammation and malignant cell transformation. These effects are assumed to be mediated by the interactions of SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 with the α7 and α3β2 subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), respectively. Available knowledge about the molecular mechanism underling the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects is very limited. SLURP-2 remains one of the most poorly studied proteins of the Ly-6/uPAR family. In this study, we designed for the first time a bacterial system for SLURP-2 expression and a protocol for refolding of the protein from cytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-2 and its 13C-15N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant protein was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and a structural model was developed. A comparative study of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 effects on the epithelial cell growth was conducted using human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells, which express only α7-nAChRs. A pronounced antiproliferative effect of both proteins was observed. Incubation of cells with 1 μM SLURP-1 and 1 μM SLURP-2 during 48 h led to a reduction in the cell number down to ~ 54 and 63% relative to the control, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy did not reveal either apoptotic or necrotic cell death. An analysis of the dose-response curve revealed the concentration-dependent mode of the SLURP-1 and SLURP-2 action with EC50 ~ 0.1 and 0.2 nM, respectively. These findings suggest that the α7-nAChR is the main receptor responsible for the antiproliferative effect of SLURP proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:25558396

  13. Human colon cancer HT-29 cell death responses to doxorubicin and Morus Alba leaves flavonoid extract.

    PubMed

    Fallah, S; Karimi, A; Panahi, G; Gerayesh Nejad, S; Fadaei, R; Seifi, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic basis for the biological properties of Morus alba flavonoid extract (MFE) and chemotherapy drug of doxorubicin on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line death are unknown. The effect of doxorubicin and flavonoid extract on colon cancer HT-29 cell line death and identification of APC gene expression and PARP concentration of HT-29 cell line were investigated. The results showed that flavonoid extract and doxorubicin induce a dose dependent cell death in HT-29 cell line. MFE and doxorubicin exert a cytotoxic effect on human colon cancer HT-29 cell line by probably promoting or induction of apoptosis. PMID:27064876

  14. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline; Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  15. Effects of cellular redox balance on induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and rat colon in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Latham, P; Lund, E; Brown, J; Johnson, I

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Epidemiological evidence suggests n-3 polyunsaturated lipids may protect against colorectal neoplasia. Consumption of fish oil modulates crypt cytokinetics in humans, and crypt apoptosis in animal models. To explore these effects, we investigated involvement of caspase enzymes and cellular redox balance in the induction of apoptosis by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in HT29 cells, and in rat colon in vivo.
METHODS—Survival of HT29 cells grown with EPA in the presence of caspase inhibitors, antioxidants, or buthionine sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione neosynthesis, was determined. The effects of EPA enriched fish oil and glutathione depletion on apoptosis in rat colon were assessed using microdissected crypts.
RESULTS—Treatment of HT29 cells with EPA reduced viable cell number and activated caspase 3, prior to cell detachment. Antioxidants and caspase inhibitors blocked HT29 cell death whereas glutathione depletion increased it. Rats fed fish oil had higher crypt cell apoptosis than those fed corn oil, and glutathione depletion enhanced this effect.
CONCLUSIONS—Incorporation of EPA into colonic epithelial cell lipids increases apoptosis. The results of this study, using both an animal and cell line model, support the hypothesis that this effect is mediated via cellular redox tone, and is sensitive to glutathione metabolism. The data suggest a mechanism whereby polyunsaturated fatty acids may influence the susceptibility of colorectal crypt cells to induction or progression of neoplasia.


Keywords: eicosapentaenoic acid; apoptosis; glutathione; caspase; redox; colorectal cancer; rat PMID:11413117

  16. Sensitizing human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells to cisplatin by cyclopentenylcytosine, in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Szekeres, T; Yalowitz, J A; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Pommier, Y G; Jayaram, H N

    2000-11-24

    Cyclopentenylcytosine (CPEC) is cytotoxic to HT-29 cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with CPEC resulted in sensitizing HT-29 cells to cisplatin (CDDP), as evidenced by synergistic cytotoxicity. CPEC exhibits potent cytotoxicity to HT-29 cells in vitro, 2 and 24 h exposure providing an LC50 of 2.4 and 0.46 microM, respectively. Exposure of HT-29 cells to CDDP for 2 h resulted in an LC50 of 26 microM. Treatment of HT-29 cells with 1.0 or 1.25 microM CPEC and then incubating with CDDP showed synergistic cytotoxicity. Lesser synergy at very high concentrations of CPEC was demonstrated when HT-29 cells were first exposed to CDDP and then incubated with CPEC. Combination index calculations showed synergistic cytotoxicity in HT-29 cells when CPEC was combined with CDDP. Synergistic antitumor activity was demonstrable in vivo in mice transplanted with HT-29 tumor when treated with a combination of CPEC and CDDP without undue toxicity, since no excessive loss in mouse body weight or overt pathology was observed. CPEC had no influence on the total DNA adduct formation and CDDP did not affect the intracellular levels of CPEC or its metabolites, suggesting that enhanced CDDP cytotoxicity resulted from a step subsequent to excision of platinum-cross-linked DNA. These studies support a new approach for augmenting cytotoxic effect of CPEC with CDDP in treating human colon carcinoma. PMID:11132239

  17. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  18. Effect of eicosapentaenoic acid on the proliferation and incidence of apoptosis in the colorectal cell line HT29.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R G; Lund, E K; Latham, P; Pinder, A C; Johnson, I T

    1999-12-01

    Fish oil has been shown to reduce the induction of colorectal cancer in animal models by a mechanism which may involve suppression of mitosis, increased apoptosis, or both. We used the human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 to explore the effects of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on cell proliferation and death in vitro. Cells were cultured in media containing EPA at 5, 10, and 15 microg/mL. Cell number and thymidine incorporation were used to quantify proliferation, and cell cycle effects were studied using flow cytometry. Gel electrophoresis, annexin-V binding, and morphological criteria were used to characterize apoptosis. Adherent cells and freely floating detached cells were treated as two distinct populations. In the presence of EPA at 10 and 15 microg/mL there was a marked reduction in the growth rate of adherent HT29 colonies, owing to an increased detachment of adherent cells. After treatment with 10 or 15 microg/mL EPA the proportion of adherent cells in S-phase increased, indicating either a block in late S-phase or early G2. Floating cells showed evidence of extensive DNA cleavage, but the proportion of floating cells with sub GO DNA content declined on treatment with 10 or 15 microg/mL EPA even though the number of floating cells increased. We conclude that EPA does not inhibit mitosis of adherent cells, but increases the rate at which they become detached from the substrate, probably at an early stage in the initiation of apoptosis. This mechanism may be analogous to "anoikis," or induction of apoptosis in response to loss of cell contact, and may contribute to the anticarcinogenic effects of fish oil in vivo. PMID:10652988

  19. Targeting miR-21 enhances the sensitivity of human colon cancer HT-29 cells to chemoradiotherapy in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Jun; Lei, Wan; Fu, Jian-Chun; Zhang, Ling; Li, Jun-He; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-17

    Highlight: •MiR-21 plays a significant role in 5-FU resistance. •This role might be attributed to targeting of hMSH2 as well as TP and DPD via miR-21 targeted hMSH2. •Indirectly targeted TP and DPD to influence 5-FU chemotherapy sensitivity. -- Abstract: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a classic chemotherapeutic drug that has been widely used for colorectal cancer treatment, but colorectal cancer cells are often resistant to primary or acquired 5-FU therapy. Several studies have shown that miR-21 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer. This suggests that this miRNA might play a role in this resistance. In this study, we investigated this possibility and the possible mechanism underlying this role. We showed that forced expression of miR-21 significantly inhibited apoptosis, enhanced cell proliferation, invasion, and colony formation ability, promoted G1/S cell cycle transition and increased the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU and X radiation in HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of miR-21 reversed these effects on HT-29 cells and increased the sensitivity of HT-29/5-FU to 5-FU chemotherapy. Finally, we showed that miR-21 targeted the human mutS homolog2 (hMSH2), and indirectly regulated the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD). These results demonstrate that miR-21 may play an important role in the 5-FU resistance of colon cancer cells.

  20. The cytotoxic effect of Bowman-Birk isoinhibitors, IBB1 and IBBD2, from soybean (Glycine max) on HT29 human colorectal cancer cells is related to their intrinsic ability to inhibit serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Moreno, Francisco Javier; Marín-Manzano, Maria del Carmen; Jiménez, Elisabeth; Domoney, Claire

    2010-03-01

    Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) from soybean and related proteins are naturally occurring protease inhibitors with potential health-promoting properties within the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, we have investigated the effects of soybean BBI proteins on HT29 colon adenocarcinoma cells, compared with non-malignant colonic fibroblast CCD-18Co cells. Two major soybean isoinhibitors, IBB1 and IBBD2, showing considerable amino acid sequence divergence within their inhibitory domains, were purified in order to examine their functional properties, including their individual effects on the proliferation of HT29 colon cancer cells. IBB1 inhibited both trypsin and chymotrypsin whereas IBBD2 inhibited trypsin only. Despite showing significant differences in their enzyme inhibitory properties, the median inhibitory concentration values determined for IBB1 and IBBD2 on HT29 cell growth were not significantly different (39.9+/-2.3 and 48.3+/-3.5 microM, respectively). The cell cycle distribution pattern of HT29 colon cancer cells was affected by BBI treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with cells becoming blocked in the G0-G1 phase. Chemically inactive soybean BBI had a weak but non-significant effect on the proliferation of HT29 cells. The anti-proliferative properties of BBI isoinhibitors from soybean reveal that both trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteases involved in carcinogenesis should be considered as potential targets of BBI-like proteins. PMID:19885848

  1. Curcumin inhibits anchorage-independent growth of HT29 human colon cancer cells by targeting epigenetic restoration of the tumor suppressor gene DLEC1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue; Shu, Limin; Zhang, Chengyue; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains the most prevalent malignancy in humans. The impact of epigenetic alterations on the development of this complex disease is now being recognized. The dynamic and reversible nature of epigenetic modifications makes them a promising target in colorectal cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Curcumin (CUR), the major component in Curcuma longa, has been shown as a potent chemopreventive phytochemical that modulates various signaling pathways. Deleted in lung and esophageal cancer 1 (DLEC1) is a tumor suppressor gene with reduced transcriptional activity and promoter hypermethylation in various cancers, including colorectal cancer. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the inhibitory role of DLEC1 in anchorage-independent growth of the human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT29 cells and epigenetic regulation by CUR. Specifically, we found that CUR treatment inhibited colony formation of HT29 cells, whereas stable knockdown of DLEC1 using lentiviral short hairpin RNA vector increased cell proliferation and colony formation. Knockdown of DLEC1 in HT29 cells attenuated the ability of CUR to inhibit anchorage-independent growth. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), bisulfite genomic sequencing, and methylated DNA immunoprecipitation revealed that CUR decreased CpG methylation of the DLEC1 promoter in HT29 cells after 5 days of treatment, corresponding to increased mRNA expression of DLEC1. Furthermore, CUR decreased the protein expression of DNA methyltransferases and subtypes of histone deacetylases (HDAC4, 5, 6, and 8). Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CUR on anchorage-independent growth of HT29 cells could, at least in part, involve the epigenetic demethylation and up-regulation of DLEC1. PMID:25640947

  2. Interleukin-8 production by the human colon epithelial cell line HT-29: modulation by interleukin-13.

    PubMed Central

    Kolios, G.; Robertson, D. A.; Jordan, N. J.; Minty, A.; Caput, D.; Ferrara, P.; Westwick, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have determined which cytokines induce and modulate the production of the chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by the human colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. 2. Growth arrested cell cultures were stimulated with the human recombinant cytokines interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-13 (IL-13), interleukin-10 (IL-10) or vehicle added alone or in combination. The production of IL-8 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IL-8 messenger RNA expression by Northern blot analysis. 3. The production of IL-8 in unstimulated cells was undetectable by both ELISA and Northern blot analysis. 4. HT-29 cells produced IL-8 following stimulation with IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha in a time- and a concentration-dependent manner, while IFN-gamma, IL-10 and IL-13 did not induce IL-8 production by HT-29 cells. 5. IL-13 was found to up-regulate significantly (P < 0.01) the IL-1 alpha but not the TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 generation by HT-29 cells. In contrast, IL-10 had no effect on either IL-1 alpha or TNF-alpha-induced IL-8 production. 6. Experiments using cycloheximide demonstrated that this synergistic effect of IL-13 and IL-1 alpha on IL-8 secretion was not through de novo protein synthesis. Using actinomycin-D, we demonstrated that the IL-13 up-regulation was at the level of transcription rather than messenger RNA stability. 7. These findings suggest that colonic epithelial cells have a functional IL-13 receptor, which is coupled to an up-regulation of IL-1 alpha, but not TNF-alpha induced IL-8 generation. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8886420

  3. Enhanced sensitivity to irinotecan by Cdk1 inhibition in the p53-deficient HT29 human colon cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Abal, Miguel; Bras-Goncalves, Rui; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Fsihi, Hafida; De Cremoux, Patricia; Louvard, Daniel; Magdelenat, Henri; Robine, Sylvie; Poupon, Marie-France

    2004-03-01

    Mutations in the tumor-suppressor gene p53 have been associated with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). Irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase 1 inhibitor, has been recently incorporated to the adjuvant therapy. Since the DNA-damage checkpoint depends on p53 activation, the status of p53 might critically influence the response to CPT-11. We analysed the sensitivity to CPT-11 in the human colon cancer cell line HT29 (mut p53) and its wild-type (wt)-p53 stably transfected subclone HT29-A4. Cell-cycle analysis in synchronised cells demonstrated the activation of transfected wt-p53 and a p21(WAF1/CIP1)-dependent cell-cycle blockage in the S phase. Activated wt-p53 increased apoptosis and enhanced sensitivity to CPT-11. In p53-deficient cells, cDNA-macroarray analysis and western blotting showed an accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)1/cyclin B complex. Subsequent p53-independent activation of the cdk-inhibitor (cdk-I) p21(WAF1/CIP1) prevented cell-cycle progression. Cdk1 induction was exploited in vivo to improve the sensitivity to CPT-11 by additional treatment with the cdk-I CYC-202. We demonstrate a gain of sensitivity to CPT-11 in a p53-mutated colon cancer model either by restoring wild-type p53 function or by sequential treatment with cdk-Is. Considering that mutations in p53 are among the most common genetic alterations in CRC, a therapeutic approach specifically targeting p53-deficient tumors could greatly improve the treatment outcomes. PMID:15001986

  4. HSP90 Inhibition Suppresses PGE2 Production via Modulating COX-2 and 15-PGDH Expression in HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Yaghoobi, M M; Gholamhoseinian Najar, A; Kalantari-Khandani, B; Sharifi, H; Saravani, M

    2016-06-01

    The existence of multiple-interactive roles between several signaling pathways in tumorigenesis shows the significance of pharmacological factors like heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors which control several signaling pathways simultaneously. HSP90 as a molecular chaperone supports the active conformational structure and function of several oncogenic signal proteins, termed "client" proteins, some of them act as a link between cancer and inflammation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is one of the major mediators of inflammation in colorectal cancer development and progress. However, the relationship between chaperone activity of HSP90 and PGE2 levels remains unclear. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of 17-demethoxy-17-allylamino geldanamycin (1 7-AAG), an HSP90 inhibitor, on PGE2 levels in HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. For the first time, we showed inhibitory effects of 17-AAG, on PGE2 levels in HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. 17-AAG inhibited PMA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression and protein level. We showed 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) expression induced by 17-AAG treatment at both mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, we found that inhibitory effects of 17-AAG on PGE2 levels in HT-29 colorectal cancer cells were mediated through modulating COX-2 and 15-PGDH expression. PMID:27075590

  5. Geoditin A Induces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis on Human Colon HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Florence W. K.; Li, Chunman; Che, Chun-Tao; Liu, Bonnie P. L.; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Wing-Keung

    2010-01-01

    Geoditin A, an isomalabaricane triterpene isolated from the marine sponge Geodia japonica, has been demonstrated to dissipate mitochondrial membrane potential, activate caspase 3, decrease cytoplasmic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and induce apoptosis of leukemia cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear [1]. In this study, we found fragmentation of Golgi structure, suppression of transferrin receptor expression, production of oxidants, and DNA fragmentation in human colon cancer HT29 cells after treatment with geoditin A for 24 h. This apoptosis was not abrogated by chelation of intracellular iron with salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH), but suppressed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a thiol antioxidant and GSH precursor, indicating that the cytotoxic effect of geoditin A is likely mediated by a NAC-inhibitable oxidative stress. Our results provide a better understanding of the apoptotic properties and chemotherapeutical potential of this marine triterpene. PMID:20161972

  6. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 expression suppresses the invasive properties of colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT-116 and HT-29.

    PubMed

    Cimen, Ismail; Tunçay, Seda; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2009-12-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is often lethal when invasion and/or metastasis occur. 15-Lipoxygenase-1 (15-LO-1), a member of the inflammatory eicosanoid pathway, oxidatively metabolizes linoleic acid and its expression is repressed in CRC. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that the lack of 15-LO-1 expression in CRC cells might contribute to tumorigenesis. Therefore we introduced 15-LO-1 into HCT-116 and HT-29 cells that do not have detectable levels of 15-LO-1. Our data indicate that expression of 15-LO-1 significantly decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. In addition, we observed a reduction in adhesion to fibronectin, anchorage-independent growth on soft agar, cellular motility and ability to heal a scratch wound, and migratory and invasive capacity across Matrigel. 15-LO-1 expression also reduced the expression of metastasis associated protein-1, a part of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase silencing complex. We propose that 15-LO-1 expression in CRC might contribute to the inhibition of metastatic capacity in vitro and can be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:19775287

  7. A mannose-specific adherence mechanism in Lactobacillus plantarum conferring binding to the human colonic cell line HT-29.

    PubMed Central

    Adlerberth, I; Ahrne, S; Johansson, M L; Molin, G; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1996-01-01

    Two Lactobacillus plantarum strains of human intestinal origin, strains 299 (= DSM 6595) and 299v (= DSM 9843), have proved to be efficient colonizers of the human intestine under experimental conditions. These strains and 17 other L. plantarum strains were tested for the ability to adhere to cells of the human colonic cell line HT-29.L.plantarum 299 and 299v and nine other L. plantarum strains, including all six strains that belong to the same genetic subgroup as L. plantarum 299 and 299v, adhered to HT-29 cells in a manner that could be inhibited by methyl-alpha-D-mannoside. The ability to adhere to HT-29 cells correlated with an ability to agglutinate cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and erythrocytes in a mannose-sensitive manner and with adherence to D-mannose-coated agarose beads. L. plantarum 299 and 299v adhered to freshly isolated human colonic and ileal enterocytes, but the binding was not significantly inhibited by methyl-alpha-D-mannoside. Periodate treatment of HT-29 cells abolished mannose-sensitive adherence, confirming that the cell-bound receptor was of carbohydrate nature. Proteinase K treatment of the bacteria also abolished adherence, indicating that the binding involved protein structures on the bacterial cell surface. Thus, a mannose-specific adhesin has been identified in L. plantarum; this adhesin could be involved in the ability to colonize the intestine. PMID:8779562

  8. Effect of oligosaccharides on the adhesion of gut bacteria to human HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Altamimi, M; Abdelhay, O; Rastall, R A

    2016-06-01

    The influence of five oligosaccharides (cellobiose, stachyose, raffinose, lactulose and chito-oligosaccharides) on the adhesion of eight gut bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ATCC 29148D-5, Clostridium leptum ATCC 29065, Blautia coccoides ATCC 29236, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27766, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 23745, Clostridium difficile ATCC 43255 and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393) to mucous secreting and non-mucous secreting HT-29 human epithelial cells, was investigated. In pure culture, the bacteria showed variations in their ability to adhere to epithelial cells. The effect of oligosaccharides diminished adhesion and the presence of mucus played a major factor in adhesion, likely due to high adhesiveness to mucins present in the native human mucus layer covering the whole cell surface. However, clostridia displayed almost the same level of adhesion either with or without mucus being present. Bl. coccoides adhesion was decreased by stachyose and cellobiose in non-mucus-secreting cells in pure culture, while in mixed faecal culture cellobiose displayed the highest antiadhesive activity with an overall average of 65% inhibition amongst tested oligomers and lactulose displayed the lowest with an average of 47.4%. Bifidobacteria, Bacteroides, lactobacilli and clostridia were inhibited within the following ranges 47-78%, 32-65%, 11.7-58% and 64-85% respectively. This means that clostridia were the most strongly influenced members of the microflora amongst the bacterial groups tested in mixed culture. In conclusion, introducing oligosaccharides which are candidate prebiotics into pure or mixed cultures has affected bacterial adhesion. PMID:27018325

  9. Primula auriculata Extracts Exert Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effects against HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Behzad, Sahar; Ebrahim, Karim; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primula auriculata (Tootia) is one of the most important local medicinal plants in Hamedan district, Iran. To investigate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of crude methanolic extract and different fraction of it, we compared several methods on HT-29 human colon Adenocarcinoma cells. Cancer cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4, 5‑dimethylthiazolyl)2, 5‑diphenyl‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis induction was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (acridin orange/ethidium bromide, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, TUNEL assay and Caspase-3 activity assay). Crude methanolic extract (CM) inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among solvent fractions, the dichloromethane fraction (CF) was found to be the most toxic compared to other fractions. With double staining methods, high percentage of 40 µg/mL of (CM) and (CF) treated cells exhibited typical characteristics of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis induction was also revealed by apoptotic fragmentation of nuclear DNA and activation of caspas-3 in treated cells. These findings indicate that crude methanolic extract and dichloromethan fraction of P.auriculata induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in colon cancer cells and could be used as a source for new lead structures in drug design to combat colon cancer. PMID:27610172

  10. Primula auriculata Extracts Exert Cytotoxic and Apoptotic Effects against HT-29 Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Behzad, Sahar; Ebrahim, Karim; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Haeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primula auriculata (Tootia) is one of the most important local medicinal plants in Hamedan district, Iran. To investigate cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction of crude methanolic extract and different fraction of it, we compared several methods on HT-29 human colon Adenocarcinoma cells. Cancer cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4, 5‑dimethylthiazolyl)2, 5‑diphenyl‑tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis induction was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy (acridin orange/ethidium bromide, annexin V/propidium iodide staining, TUNEL assay and Caspase-3 activity assay). Crude methanolic extract (CM) inhibited the growth of malignant cells in a dose-dependent manner. Among solvent fractions, the dichloromethane fraction (CF) was found to be the most toxic compared to other fractions. With double staining methods, high percentage of 40 µg/mL of (CM) and (CF) treated cells exhibited typical characteristics of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis induction was also revealed by apoptotic fragmentation of nuclear DNA and activation of caspas-3 in treated cells. These findings indicate that crude methanolic extract and dichloromethan fraction of P.auriculata induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in colon cancer cells and could be used as a source for new lead structures in drug design to combat colon cancer. PMID:27610172

  11. Mechanisms Underlying Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Kaempferol in HT-29 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Cho, Han Jin; Yu, Rina; Lee, Ki Won; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2014-01-01

    We previously noted that kaempferol, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, reduced cell cycle progression of HT-29 cells. To examine whether kaempferol induces apoptosis of HT-29 cells and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, cells were treated with various concentrations (0–60 μmol/L) of kaempferol and analyzed by Hoechst staining, Annexin V staining, JC-1 labeling of the mitochondria, immunoprecipitation, in vitro kinase assays, Western blot analyses, and caspase-8 assays. Kaempferol increased chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation and the number of early apoptotic cells in HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, kaempferol increased the levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3 and caspase-7 as well as those of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Moreover, it increased mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytosolic cytochrome c concentrations. Further, kaempferol decreased the levels of Bcl-xL proteins, but increased those of Bik. It also induced a reduction in Akt activation and Akt activity and an increase in mitochondrial Bad. Additionally, kaempferol increased the levels of membrane-bound FAS ligand, decreased those of uncleaved caspase-8 and intact Bid and increased caspase-8 activity. These results indicate that kaempferol induces the apoptosis of HT-29 cells via events associated with the activation of cell surface death receptors and the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:24549175

  12. Ethanol extract of Innotus obliquus (Chaga mushroom) induces G1 cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Inonotus obliquus (I. obliquus, Chaga mushroom) has long been used as a folk medicine to treat cancer. In the present study, we examined whether or not ethanol extract of I. obliquus (EEIO) inhibits cell cycle progression in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, in addition to its mechanism of action. MATERIALS/METHODS To examine the effects of Inonotus obliquus on the cell cycle progression and the molecular mechanism in colon cancer cells, HT-29 human colon cancer cells were cultured in the presence of 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO, and analyzed the cell cycle arrest by flow cytometry and the cell cycle controlling protein expression by Western blotting. RESULTS Treatment cells with 2.5 - 10 µg/mL of EEIO reduced viable HT-29 cell numbers and DNA synthesis, increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, decreased protein expression of CDK2, CDK4, and cyclin D1, increased expression of p21, p27, and p53, and inhibited phosphorylation of Rb and E2F1 expression. Among I. obliquus fractions, fraction 2 (fractionated by dichloromethane from EEIO) showed the same effect as EEIO treatment on cell proliferation and cell cycle-related protein levels. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that fraction 2 is the major fraction that induces G1 arrest and inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting I. obliquus could be used as a natural anti-cancer ingredient in the food and/or pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25861415

  13. Antitumor activity of water extract of a mushroom, Inonotus obliquus, against HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hak; Hwang, Hee Sun; Yun, Jong Won

    2009-12-01

    In the current study, it was demonstrated that the hot water extract of I. obliquus (IOWE) exerts inhibitory activity against the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (HT-29). The inhibitory effect of IOWE on the growth of HT-29 cancer cells was evaluated by treating cells with IOWE at concentrations of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL for 24 or 48 h. The IOWE inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, and this inhibition was accompanied by apoptotic cell death. The maximum inhibitory effect (56%) was observed when IOWE was treated at a concentration of 1.0 mg/mL for 48 h. The apoptotic effect of IOWE on HT-29 cells was also confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. In addition, the apoptotic cell percentage was closely associated with down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax and caspase-3. The results suggest that IOWE would be useful as an antitumor agent via the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of the growth of cancer cells through up-regulation of the expression of proapoptotic proteins and down-regulation of antiapoptotic proteins. PMID:19367670

  14. Permeability of human HT-29/B6 colonic epithelium as a function of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bojarski, C; Gitter, A H; Bendfeldt, K; Mankertz, J; Schmitz, H; Wagner, S; Fromm, M; Schulzke, J D

    2001-01-01

    The barrier function of colonic epithelia is challenged by apoptotic loss of enterocytes. In monolayers of human colonic HT-29/B6 cells, apoptosis induced by camptothecin was assessed by poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP) cleavage, histone ELISA and DNA-specific fluorochrome staining (with 4′,6′-diamidino-2′-phenylindoladihydrochloride (DAPI)). Epithelial barrier function was studied in Ussing chambers by measuring transepithelial conductivity and unidirectional tracer fluxes. The ion permeability associated with single cell apoptoses was investigated with the conductance scanning technique. The spontaneous rate of apoptotic cells was 3.5 ± 0.3 % with an overall epithelial conductivity of 3.2 ± 0.1 mS cm−2. Camptothecin induced a time- and dose-dependent increase of apoptosis and permeability. With 20 μg ml−1 of camptothecin for 48 h, apoptosis increased 4.1-fold to 14.3 ± 1.5 % and the conductivity doubled to 6.4 ± 1.0 mS cm−2. While 3H-mannitol flux increased 3.8-fold and 3H-lactulose flux increased 2.6-fold, the flux of 3H-polyethylene glycol 4000 remained unchanged. Hence, the higher permeability was limited to molecules < 4000 Da. The local epithelial conductivity was higher at the sites of apoptosis than in non-apoptotic areas. With camptothecin the leaks associated with apoptosis became more numerous and more conductive, while in non-apoptotic areas the conductivity remained at control level. Hence, the camptothecin-induced increase in epithelial conductivity reflected the opening of apoptotic leaks and thus the results described, for the first time, epithelial permeability as a function of apoptosis only. The conductivity of apoptotic leaks contributed 5.5 % to the epithelial conductivity of controls and 60 % to the conductivity of monolayers treated with 20 μg ml−1 of camptothecin. Thus apoptosis increased the contribution of paracellular pathways to the overall epithelial permeability. Under control conditions the paracellular

  15. Novel irreversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor 324674 sensitizes human colon carcinoma HT29 and SW480 cells to apoptosis by blocking the EGFR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiwei; Cui, Binbin; Jin, Yinghu; Chen, Haipeng; Wang, Xishan

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This article described the effects of the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor on the cell proliferation and the apoptosis induction of the colon carcinoma cell lines. {yields} Demonstrated that 326474 is a more potent EGFR inhibitor on colon cancer cells than other three TKIs. {yields} It can be important when considering chemotherapy for colonic cancer patients. -- Abstract: Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is widely expressed in multiple solid tumors including colorectal cancer by promoting cancer cell growth and proliferation. Therefore, the inhibition of EGFR activity may establish a clinical strategy of cancer therapy. Methods: In this study, using human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 and SW480 cells as research models, we compared the efficacy of four EGFR inhibitors in of EGFR-mediated pathways, including the novel irreversible inhibitor 324674, conventional reversible inhibitor AG1478, dual EGFR/HER2 inhibitor GW583340 and the pan-EGFR/ErbB2/ErbB4 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT analysis, and apoptosis was evaluated by the Annexin-V binding assay. EGFR and its downstream signaling effectors were examined by western blotting analysis. Results: Among the four inhibitors, the irreversible EGFR inhibitor 324674 was more potent at inhibiting HT29 and SW480 cell proliferation and was able to efficiently induce apoptosis at lower concentrations. Western blotting analysis revealed that AG1478, GW583340 and pan-EGFR/ErbB2/ErbB4 inhibitors failed to suppress EGFR activation as well as the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT/mTOR (AKT) pathways. In contrast, 324674 inhibited EGFR activation and the downstream AKT signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: Our studies indicated that the novel irreversible EGFR inhibitor 324674 may have a therapeutic application in colon cancer therapy.

  16. A New HPLC-MS Method for Measuring Maslinic Acid and Oleanolic Acid in HT29 and HepG2 Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peragón, Juan; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; Muñoz-Espada, Irene; Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) and oleanolic acid (OA), the main triterpenic acids present in olive, have important properties for health and disease prevention. MA selectively inhibits cell proliferation of the HT29 human colon-cancer cell line by inducing selective apoptosis. For measuring the MA and OA concentration inside the cell and in the culture medium, a new HPLC-MS procedure has been developed. With this method, a determination of the amount of MA and OA incorporated into HT29 and HepG2 human cancer-cell lines incubated with different concentrations of MA corresponding to 50% growth inhibitory concentration (IC50), IC50/2, IC50/4, and IC50/8 has been made. The results demonstrate that this method is appropriate for determining the MA and OA concentration in different types of cultured cells and reveals the specific dynamics of entry of MA into HT29 and HepG2 cells. PMID:26370984

  17. Inhibition of enteropathogens adhesion to human enterocyte-like HT-29 cells by a dairy strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Zárate, G; Palacios, J M; Villena, J; Zúñiga-Hansen, M E

    2016-06-01

    Adhesion to the host intestinal mucosa is considered relevant for orally delivered probiotics as it prolongs their persistence in the gut and their health promoting effects. Classical propionibacteria are microorganisms of interest due to their role as dairy starters as well as for their functions as probiotics. Propionibacterium acidipropionici Q4, is a dairy strain isolated from a Swiss-type cheese made in Argentina that displays probiotic potential. In the present work we assessed the ability of this strain to adhere to the human enterocyte-like HT-29 cell line and to counteract the adhesion of two common human enteropathogens, such as Escherichia coli C3 and Salmonella Enteritidis 90/390. The results were compared with those obtained with the well-known probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. P. acidipropionici Q4 showed a high adhesion capacity, even higher than the reference strain L. rhamnosus GG (42.3±4.4% and 36.2±2.3%, respectively), whereas adhesion of enteropathogens was significantly lower (25.2±2.2% for E. coli and 21.0±3.4% for S. Enteritidis). Propionibacteria as well as lactobacilli were able to inhibit by exclusion and competition the adherence of E. coli C3 and S. Enteritidis 90/390 whereas only L. rhamnosus GG displaced S. Enteritidis from HT-29 intestinal cells. Inhibition of pathogens by propionibacteria was not exerted by antimicrobials or coaggregation but was mainly due to exclusion by cell surface components, such as proteins and carbohydrates. The relevance of cell surface proteins (CSP) for preventing pathogens infection was confirmed by their concentration dependent effect observed for both pathogens: 100 µg/ml of CSP inhibited E. coli attachment almost as untreated propionibacteria, whereas it partially inhibited the attachment of S. Enteritidis. Results suggest that P. acidipropionici Q4 could be considered for the development of propionibacteria containing functional foods helpful in counteracting enteropathogen infection. PMID

  18. Fucoidan inhibits the migration and proliferation of HT-29 human colon cancer cells via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin pathways

    PubMed Central

    HAN, YONG-SEOK; LEE, JUN HEE; LEE, SANG HUN

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, has a variety of biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of fucoidan as an anti-cancer agent remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the anti-cancer effect of fucoidan on HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The cell growth of HT29 cells was significantly decreased following treatment with fucoidan (200 μg/ml). In addition, fucoidan inhibited the migration of HT-29 cells by decreasing the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in a dose-dependent manner (0–200 μg/ml). The underlying mechanism of these inhibitory effects included the downregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by treatment with fucoidan. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and decreased cancer sphere formation. The present study suggested that fucoidan exerts an anti-cancer effect on HT-29 human colon cancer cells by downregulating the PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, fucoidan may be a potential therapeutic reagent against the growth of human colon cancer cells. PMID:25998232

  19. Studies on the antitumor activity and biochemical actions of cyclopentenyl cytosine against human colon carcinoma HT-29 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Zhen, W; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Szekeres, T; Jayaram, H N

    1999-01-01

    Cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) is cytotoxic to several tumor cell lines. CPEC inhibits CTP synthesis resulting in depletion of cytidylate pools. The aim of this study was to examine CPEC's cytotoxic and antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo against human colon carcinoma HT-29, and to relate its action on CTP synthesis. CPEC exhibits potent cytotoxicity in vitro to HT-29 cells with an LC50 (concentration that is lethal to the survival of 50% cell colonies) of 2.4 microM and 0.46 microM following 2 h and 24 h exposure, respectively. Incubation of cells with CPEC for 2 h resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cytidylate pools. The in vivo antitumor activity of CPEC in athymic mice transplanted subcutaneously (s.c.) with 3 million HT-29 cells was examined. Antitumor activity of CPEC was elucidated in early-staged tumor, wherein CPEC (1.5 mg/kg, QD x 9 or 3 mg/kg, QOD x 9) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 24 h after tumor implantation and it resulted in a significant reduction in tumor weight to 48% of control. The effect of CPEC on established solid tumors in vivo was examined in athymic mice transplanted s.c. 14 days earlier with HT-29 cells and treated i.p. with 1.5 mg/kg CPEC, QD x 5 for 4 courses, with a 10 day-interval between courses. This treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumor weight (72%) in the treated group. HPLC analysis of HT-29 tumor obtained from mice after treatment with CPEC showed a depletion of the CTP concentration reaching a nadir at 8 h. In conclusion, the present studies demonstrate potent antitumor activity of CPEC against freshly transplanted and established human colon carcinoma which can be corroborated with the drug's biochemical actions. PMID:10069488

  20. Induction of apoptosis and the regulation of ErbB signaling by laminarin in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    PARK, HEE-KYOUNG; KIM, IN-HYE; KIM, JOONGKYUN; NAM, TAEK-JEONG

    2013-01-01

    Laminarin, found in marine brown algae, is used as a carbohydrate reserve for phytoplankton; however, it is also used in traditional Chinese medicine, and has been shown to have several biological activities, including anticancer activities. In this study, we examined the mechanisms through which laminarin from Laminaria digitata induces apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells, as well as the involvement of the ErbB signaling pathway. Cell viability assay revealed that laminarin induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis revealed that laminarin increased the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 and G2-M phase. Western blot analysis demonstrated that laminarin inhibited the heregulin-stimulated phosphorylation of ErbB2. A decrease in cellular proliferation was also observed; this was found to be dependent on ErbB, which activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These findings demonstrate the important role of the epidermal growth factor receptor in colon cancer tumorigenesis, and suggest the potential of laminarin as a bio-functional food with anticancer effects on human colon cancer. PMID:23739740

  1. Aspirin induces cell death and caspase-dependent phosphatidylserine externalization in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, E; Dalmau, M; Barragán, M; Pueyo, G; Bartrons, R; Gil, J

    1999-01-01

    The induction of cell death by aspirin was analysed in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. Aspirin induced two hallmarks of apoptosis: nuclear chromatin condensation and increase in phosphatidylserine externalization. However, aspirin did not induce either oligonucleosomal fragmentation of DNA, decrease in DNA content or nuclear fragmentation. The effect of aspirin on Annexin V binding was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk, indicating the involvement of caspases in the apoptotic action of aspirin. However, aspirin did not induce proteolysis of PARP, suggesting that aspirin does not increase nuclear caspase 3-like activity in HT-29 cells. This finding may be related with the ‘atypical’ features of aspirin-induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496355

  2. Hyperoside and rutin of Nelumbo nucifera induce mitochondrial apoptosis through a caspase-dependent mechanism in HT-29 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    GUON, TAE EUN; CHUNG, HA SOOK

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the mechanism of 2 flavonol glycosides, hyperoside and rutin, in the induction of apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells through the bioactivity-guided fractionation and isolation method. The chemical structure of hyperoside and rutin, isolated from the roots of Nelumbo nucifera, were established using extensive 1- and 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and absolute high resolution fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectral analytical methods. The treatment of HT-29 colon cancer cells with hyperoside and rutin significantly decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The concomitant activation of the mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway of hyperoside and rutin occurred via modulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein and B-cell lymphoma 2 expression, resulting in the activation of cleaved caspases-3, −8 and −9 and cleaved poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The findings of the present study indicate that hyperoside and rutin induce apoptosis in HT-29 human colon cancer cells, and that this phenomenon is mediated via the death receptor-mediated and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathways. These results suggest that hyperoside and rutin may be useful in the development of a colon cancer therapy protocol. PMID:27073499

  3. Daucus carota Pentane-Based Fractions Suppress Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma HT-29 Cells by Inhibiting the MAPK and PI3K Pathways.

    PubMed

    Shebaby, Wassim N; Bodman-Smith, K B; Mansour, Anthony; Mroueh, Mohamad; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Daher, Costantine F

    2015-07-01

    Daucus carota L. ssp. carota (Apiacea, wild carrot, Queen Anne's lace) has been used in folk medicine throughout the world and recently was shown to possess anticancer and antioxidant activities. This study aims to determine the anticancer activity of the pentane fraction (F1) and the 1:1 pentane:diethyl ether fraction (F2) of the Daucus Carota oil extract (DCOE) against human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and Caco-2). Treatment of cells with various concentrations of F1 or F2 fractions produced a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that both fractions induced sub-G1 phase accumulation and increased apoptotic cell death. Western blot revealed the activation of caspase-3, PARP cleavage, and a considerable increase in Bax and p53 levels, and a decrease in Bcl-2 level. Treatment of HT-29 cells with either fraction markedly decreased the levels of both phosphorylated Erk and Akt. Furthermore, the combined treatment of F1 or F2 with wortmannin showed no added inhibition of cell survival suggesting an effect of F1 or F2 through the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. This study proposes that DCOE fractions (F1 and F2) inhibit cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HT-29 cells through the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways. PMID:25599142

  4. Fisetin inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases leading to cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianghua; Jung, Jae in; Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chun, Hyang Sook; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2005-12-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits, and wine, was reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of fisetin on the cell cycle progression of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. HT-29 cells were cultured in serum-free medium with 0, 20, 40, or 60 micromol/L fisetin. Fisetin dose dependently inhibited both cell growth and DNA synthesis (P < 0.05), with a 79 +/- 1% decrease in cell number observed 72 h after the addition of 60 micromol/L fisetin. Perturbed cell cycle progression from the G(1) to S phase was observed at 8 h with 60 micromol/L fisetin treatment, whereas a G(2)/M phase arrest was observed after 24 h (P < 0.05). The phosphorylation state of the retinoblastoma proteins shifted from hyperphosphorylated to hypophosphorylated in cells treated with 40 micromol/L fisetin. (P < 0.05). Fisetin decreased the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and CDK4; these effects were likely attributable to decreases in the levels of cyclin E and D1 and an increase in p21(CIP1/WAF1) levels (P < 0.05). However, fisetin also inhibited CDk4 activity in a cell-free system (P < 0.05), indicating that it may directly inhibit CDk4 activity. The protein levels of cell division cycles (CDC)2 and CDC25C and the activity of CDC2 were also decreased in fisetin-treated cells (P < 0.05). These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells after treatment with fisetin can be explained, at least in part, by modification of CDK activities. PMID:16317137

  5. Antiproliferative activity of Humulus lupulus extracts on human hepatoma (Hep3B), colon (HT-29) cancer cells and proteases, tyrosinase, β-lactamase enzyme inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Cömert Önder, Ferah; Ay, Mehmet; Aydoğan Türkoğlu, Sümeyye; Tura Köçkar, Feray; Çelik, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the antiproliferation of Humulus lupulus extracts on human hepatoma carcinoma (Hep3B) and human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cell lines along with enzyme inhibitory effects of the crude extracts. Potential cell cytotoxicity of six different H. lupulus extracts were assayed on various cancer cells using MTT assay at 24, 48 and 72 h intervals. Methanol-1 extract has inhibited the cell proliferation with doses of 0.6-1 mg/mL in a time dependent (48 and 72 hours) manner in Hep3B cells with 70% inhibition, while inhibitory effect was not seen in colon cancer cells. Acetone extract has increased the cell proliferation at low doses of 0.1 mg/mL for 72 h in Hep3B cells and 0.1-0.2 mg/mL for 48 and 72 h in HT29 cells. The inhibitory effects of the extracts were compared by relative maximum activity values (V(max)) using proteases such as α-chymotrypsin, trypsin and papain, tyrosinase and β-lactamase (penicillinase). PMID:25683080

  6. Dichloromethane-methanol extract from Borassus aethiopumn mart. (Arecaceae) induces apoptosis of human colon cancer HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Sakandé, J; Rouet-benzineb, P; Devaud, H; Nikiema, J B; Lompo, M; Nacoulma, O G; Guissou, I P; Bado, A

    2011-05-15

    Borassus aetihiopum MART (Arecaceae) is a plant used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of various diseases (bronchitis, laryngitis, antiseptic). In particular, their male inflorcscences were reported to exhibit cicatrizing, antiseptic and fungicidal properties. In the present study, the biological activity of E2F2, an apolar extract from Borassus aethiopum male inflorescence was investigated on colon cancer HT29 cells. Phytochemical screening was carried according to methodology for chemical analysis for vegetable drugs. Cells proliferation was determined by the MTT assay and cells cycle distribution was analysed by using laser flow cytometer (Beckman coulter). The cytoskeleton organisation was examined under a laser scanning confocal microscope (Zess). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of E2F2 extract revealed the presence of sterols, triterpenes and saponosids. E2F2 extract (1 microg and 100 microg mL(-1)) significantly inhibited cell proliferation by blocking cell population in G0/G1 phase. Flow Cytometric analysis of E2F2-treated HT29 cells showed that hypoploïd cell population (sub G1 phase) increased with processing time exposures. Immunofluorescence confocal analysis revealed a disrupt actin microfilaments network in E2F2 treated-cells with a significant reduction in actin stress fibres and appearance of a random, non-oriented distribution of focal adhesion sites. These data indicate that E2F2 extract has anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. Further studies are required to unravel the mechanisms of action of E2F2 extract. PMID:22097093

  7. Reduced tumour growth of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 and HT-29 in vivo by dietary n-3 lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M.; Rowley, S.; Kane, N.; Imray, C.; Davies, A.; Jones, C.; Newbold, M.; Keighley, M. R.; Baker, P.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    Seventy-five nude mice received subcutaneous inoculation with 1 X 10(7) cells of the human colonic cancer cell lines COLO-320 or HT-29. Tumour growth was assessed over 4 weeks in animals given one of three iso-caloric diets; standard diet, high saturated fat (20% coconut) diet and high n-3 fat (20% Maxepa fish oil) diet. The n-3 diet produced significant tumour growth reduction compared to the other diets for COLO-320 at 3 to 4 weeks (P less than 0.05 at least) and similarly for HT-29 at 4 weeks (P less than 0.05). Significant incorporation of n-3 fatty acids occurred in red cell membranes, adipose tissue and both neutral lipid and phospholipid fractions of tumour lipids in animals fed Maxepa (P less than 0.01 at least). This was accompanied by reduction of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid in these tissues (P less than 0.01 at least) but was most marked in the metabolically labile phospholipid fraction. There was high mitotic activity in the tumours from all the groups but there was no difference according to diet. PMID:2245166

  8. l-carnosine dipeptide overcomes acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in HT29 human colon cancer cells via downregulation of HIF1-alpha and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Guardia, Francesca; Irace, Carlo; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α) protein is over-expressed in many human cancers and is a major cause of resistance to drugs. HIF-1α up-regulation decreases the effectiveness of several anticancer agents, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), because it induces the expression of drug efflux transporters, alters DNA repair mechanisms and modifies the balance between pro- and antiapoptotic factors. These findings suggest that inhibition of HIF-1α activity may sensitize cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. We previously reported that l-carnosine reduces HIF-1α expression by inhibiting the proliferation of colon cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the effect of l-carnosine on HT29 colon cancer cells with acquired resistance to 5-FU. We found that l-carnosine reduces colon cancer cell viability, decreases HIF-1α and multi-drug resistant protein MDR1-pg expression, and induces apoptosis. Moreover, the l-carnosine/5-FU combination lowers the expression of some chemoresistance markers. The combination index evaluated in vitro on the HT29-5FU cell line by median drug effect analysis reveals a significant synergistic effect. PMID:27234614

  9. Induction of apoptosis by laminarin, regulating the insulin-like growth factor-IR signaling pathways in HT-29 human colon cells

    PubMed Central

    PARK, HEE-KYOUNG; KIM, IN-HYE; KIM, JOONGKYUN; NAM, TAEK-JEONG

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, algae have been highlighted as potential sources of anticancer agents. Laminarin is a molecule found in marine brown algae that has potentially beneficial biological activities. However, these activities have not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of laminarin on HT-29 cells and analyzed its effect on the insulin-like growth factor (IGF-IR) signaling pathway. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assays revealed that laminarin induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting showed that laminarin decreased mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and ERK phosphorylation. Decreased proliferation depended on IGF-IR, which was associated with the downregulation of MAPK/ERK. These results are important for understanding the roles of IGF-IR in colon cancer cell tumorigenesis, and suggest that laminarin shows activity against human colon cancer. PMID:22859258

  10. Lidamycin induces marked G2 cell cycle arrest in human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells through activation of p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Bian, Chunjing; Ren, Kaihuan; Jin, Haixia; Li, Baowei; Shao, Rong-Guang

    2007-03-01

    Lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family, is presently undergoing phase I clinical trials in P.R. China. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of LDM-induced cell cycle arrest in order to support its use in clinical cancer therapy. Using human colon carcinoma HT-29 cells, we observed that LDM induced G2 cell cycle arrest in a time- and dose-dependent manner. LDM-induced G2 arrest was associated with increasing phosphorylation of Chk1, Chk2, Cdc25C, Cdc2 and expression of Cdc2 and cyclin B1. In addition, cytoplasmic localization of cyclin B1 was also involved in LDM-induced G2 arrest. Moreover, we found that p38 MAPK pathway contributed to LDM-induced G2 arrest. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by its inhibitor SB203580 not only attenuated LDM-induced G2 arrest but also potentiated LDM-induced apoptosis, which was accompanied by decreasing phosphorylation of Cdc2 and increasing expression of FasL and phosphorylation of JNK. Finally, we demonstrated that cells at G1 phase were more sensitive to LDM. Together, our findings suggest that p38 MAPK signaling pathway is involved in LDM-induced G2 arrest, at least partly, and a combination of LDM with p38 MAPK inhibitor may represent a new strategy for human colon cancer therapy. PMID:17273739

  11. Phloroglucinol induces apoptosis through the regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling pathways in human colon cancer HT-29 cells

    PubMed Central

    KANG, MI-HYE; KIM, IN-HYE; NAM, TAEK-JEONG

    2014-01-01

    Phloroglucinol is a polyphenol compound with free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of phloroglucinol on insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Apoptosis was evaluated using 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, which clearly demonstrated cell shrinkage and condensed nuclei. Treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor reduced the expression of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, which could induce apoptosis through IGF-1R signaling pathways. Treatment with phloroglucinol significantly inhibited the expression of Ras, Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK), extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, PI3K and Akt. Phloroglucinol also decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and expression of its downstream effectors p70S6 kinase and translation initiation factors elF4B and RPS6. These results demonstrate that IGF-1R activates PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Ras/ERK-MAPK downstream signaling pathways, which has important implications for understanding the roles of cell growth pathways in colon cancer cell tumorigenesis. PMID:24970012

  12. Silencing of CD59 enhanced the sensitivity of HT29 cells to 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haipeng; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Shaoyu; Guo, Qiang; Ren, Xia; Jiang, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Complement regulatory proteins (CD55 and CD59) were known to be expressed in many tumors and tumor cell lines including colorectal carcinoma, and were proposed as immunotherapy targets, however whether knocking down of CD55 and CD59 will affect the sensitivity of HT-29 cells to chemotherapy drugs for example, 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin and their possible mechanisms haven't been studied. To address this question, SiRNAs targeting CD55 and CD59 were chemically synthesized and transfected into HT-29 cells by lipofectamine. HT-29 growth curves of CD55 and CD59 knockdown cells were detected by MTT assay, HT29 inhibition curves to chemotherapy drugs (5-Fu and Oxaliplatin) were also assayed, in addition, chemotherapy sensitivity changes of HT29 affected by CD55 and CD59 knockdown were equally detected. Complement mediated lysis was examined by calcein-AM. We found that silencing CD59 in HT-29 cells could significantly enhance their sensitivity to 5-FU (P < 0.05) and Oxaliplatin (P < 0.05), and significantly reduced their IC50 concentration. On the contrary, knocking down of CD55 could inhibit HT-29 growth (P < 0.05). Mechanisms included increasing apoptosis rate of HT-29 by CD59 knocking down and G1/G0 blocking by silencing CD55. Our results thus shed light on the novel mechanism of chemotherapy resistance and provide an alternative strategy to overcome the resistance problem. PMID:25444672

  13. Role of hesperetin (a natural flavonoid) and its analogue on apoptosis in HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sivagami, Gunasekaran; Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Bernini, Roberta; Preethy, Christo Paul; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader; Menon, Venugopal Padmanaban; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2012-03-01

    Colon cancer is one of the serious health problems in most developed countries and its incidence rate is increasing in India. Hesperetin (HN) (3',5,7-trihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavonone) and hesperetin analogue (HA) were tested for their apoptosis inducing ability. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay revealed a dose as well as duration-dependent reduction of HT-29 (colon adenocarcinoma) cellular growth in response to HN and HA treatment. At 24 h 70 μM of HN and 32 μM of HA showed 50% reduction of HT-29 cellular growth. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining showed apoptotic features of cell death induced by HN and HA. Rhodamine 123 staining showed significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by HN and HA. HN and HA induced DNA damage was confirmed by comet tail formation. Lipid peroxidation markers (TBARS) and protein oxidation marker (PCC) were significantly elevated in HN and HA treated groups. Enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were slightly decreased in their activities compared to control (untreated HT-29 cells). Results of Western blot analysis of apoptosis associated genes revealed an increase in cytochrome C, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 expression and a decrease in Bcl-2 expression. These findings indicate that HN and HA induce apoptosis on HT-29 via Bax dependent mitochondrial pathway involving oxidant/antioxidant imbalance. PMID:22142698

  14. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  15. Nicotine promotes cell proliferation via {alpha}7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes-mediated pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Helen Pui Shan; Yu Le; Lam, Emily Kai Yee; Tai, Emily Kin Ki; Wu, William Ka Kei; Cho, Chi Hin . E-mail: chcho@cuhk.edu.hk

    2007-06-15

    Cigarette smoking has been implicated in colon cancer. Nicotine is a major alkaloid in cigarette smoke. In the present study, we showed that nicotine stimulated HT-29 cell proliferation and adrenaline production in a dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory action of nicotine was reversed by atenolol and ICI 118,551, a {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-selective antagonist, respectively, suggesting the role of {beta}-adrenoceptors in mediating the action. Nicotine also significantly upregulated the expression of the catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes [tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-{beta}-hydroxylase (D{beta}H) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase]. Inhibitor of TH, a rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine-biosynthesis pathway, reduced the actions of nicotine on cell proliferation and adrenaline production. Expression of {alpha}7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7-nAChR) was demonstrated in HT-29 cells. Methyllycaconitine, an {alpha}7-nAChR antagonist, reversed the stimulatory actions of nicotine on cell proliferation, TH and D{beta}H expression as well as adrenaline production. Taken together, through the action on {alpha}7-nAChR nicotine stimulates HT-29 cell proliferation via the upregulation of the catecholamine-synthesis pathway and ultimately adrenaline production and {beta}-adrenergic activation. These data reveal the contributory role {alpha}7-nAChR and {beta}-adrenoceptors in the tumorigenesis of colon cancer cells and partly elucidate the carcinogenic action of cigarette smoke on colon cancer.

  16. Proteasome inhibitors MG-132 and bortezomib induce AKR1C1, AKR1C3, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in human colon cancer cell lines SW-480 and HT-29.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Wsól, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play central roles in the reductive metabolism of endogenous signaling molecules and in the detoxification of xenobiotics. AKRC1-1C3, AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 have been shown to be regulated via nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that is activated upon oxidative stress. Proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and MG-132 produce mild oxidative stress that activates Nrf2-mediated gene expression that in turn may have cytoprotective effects. Bortezomib is clinically approved to treat haematological malignancies and it has also proven activity in solid tumors such as colon cancer. The present study investigated the effect of bortezomib and MG-132 on the expression of AKR1C1-1C4, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and SW-480. Human cancer cell lines derived from different organs (lung, colon, pancreas, skin, liver, ovary) were initially assayed for the expression of the AKRs, showing a very unequal distribution. Even among the colon cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, HCT116 and SW-480, the AKRs were expressed quite non-uniformly. HT-29 cells expressed all AKRs on the mRNA level including liver-specific AKR1C4, but AKR1B1 was almost undetectable. In SW-480 cells, treatment with bortezomib (50 nM, 48 h) dramatically increased mRNA levels of AKR1B10 (32-fold), AKR1B1 (5.5-fold), and, to a lesser extent, AKR1C1 and AKR1C3. Drug-efflux transporter MRP2 (ABCC2) and Cox-2 were induced as well. AKR1C2 mRNA was down-regulated in SW-480 but induced in HT-29 cells. MG-132 increased mRNA amounts of AKR1C1, 1C3, 1B1, and 1B10 in a concentration-dependent manner. AKR1B10 and AKR1B1 protein expression was inducible by bortezomib in HT-29 cells, but not detectable in SW-480 cells. In conclusion, treatment with proteasome inhibitors increased the expression of several AKRs as well as of MRP2. It remains to be investigated whether this enzyme induction may contribute to enhanced cell survival and thereby supporting the

  17. Ponicidin suppresses HT29 cell growth via the induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie; Chen, Chunyou; Sun, Yiqun; Zheng, Lin; Wang, Wanchen

    2015-10-01

    Ponicidin is a diterpenoid extracted from the Chinese herb Isodon adenolomus, which has been reported as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug that may be used to treat various types of human cancer. The present study aimed to determine the antitumor effects of ponicidin, and to investigate its underlying mechanisms in colorectal cancer. The HT29 colorectal cancer cell line was used to detect the cytotoxicity of various doses of ponicidin. Cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting kit‑8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses were performed using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins following treatment with ponicidin. Treatment with ponicidin significantly suppressed HT29 cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The AKT and MEK signaling pathways were also suppressed by ponicidin; however, the p38 signaling pathway was significantly activated. The expression levels of caspase 3 and Bax protein were markedly upregulated following treatment with ponicidin. These results suggest that ponicidin exerts significant antitumor effects via the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cells. In conclusion, ponicidin acted as an inducer of apoptosis, and may be used as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug to treat human cancer, including colorectal cancer. PMID:26239027

  18. Ponicidin suppresses HT29 cell growth via the induction of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    DU, JIE; CHEN, CHUNYOU; SUN, YIQUN; ZHENG, LIN; WANG, WANCHEN

    2015-01-01

    Ponicidin is a diterpenoid extracted from the Chinese herb Isodon adenolomus, which has been reported as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug that may be used to treat various types of human cancer. The present study aimed to determine the antitumor effects of ponicidin, and to investigate its underlying mechanisms in colorectal cancer. The HT29 colorectal cancer cell line was used to detect the cytotoxicity of various doses of ponicidin. Cell proliferation was measured using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis analyses were performed using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression levels of apoptosis-associated proteins following treatment with ponicidin. Treatment with ponicidin significantly suppressed HT29 cell growth by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The AKT and MEK signaling pathways were also suppressed by ponicidin; however, the p38 signaling pathway was significantly activated. The expression levels of caspase 3 and Bax protein were markedly upregulated following treatment with ponicidin. These results suggest that ponicidin exerts significant antitumor effects via the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cells. In conclusion, ponicidin acted as an inducer of apoptosis, and may be used as a therapeutic cytotoxic drug to treat human cancer, including colorectal cancer. PMID:26239027

  19. Induction of apoptosis by the tropical seaweed Pylaiella littoralis in HT-29 cells via the mitochondrial and MAPK pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Bo-Ram; Kim, Junseong; Kim, Min-Sun; Jang, Jiyi; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Jung, Won-Kyo; Choi, Il-Whan; Heo, Soo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrated that an extract from Pylaiella littoralis, collected from the Federate States of Micronesia (FSM), could inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells. P. littoralis extract (PLE) showed anti-proliferative activities in the tumorigenic cells tested, ranging from 20.2% to 67.9%. The highest inhibitory activity, in HT-29 cells, was selected for further experiments. PLE showed no cytotoxic effect in normal cells and inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells depending on concentration and incubation time. PLE-treated HT-29 cells showed the typical morphological characteristics of apoptosis, such as apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. PLE also induced mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and resulted in increased mitochondrial membrane permeability, compared with untreated cells. PLE decreased Bcl-2 protein and increased Bax protein expression, activating caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) expression via the caspase pathway. PLE also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and it reduced cell viability in treatment cells with specific inhibitors such as PD98059 (a specific inhibitor of ERK), SP600125 (a specific inbibitor of JNK), and SB 203580 (a specific inbibitor of p38 MAPK). via the the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway. These results suggest that PLE inhibits the proliferation of HT-29 cells by affecting the caspase and MAPK pathways involved in the induction of apoptosis. Thus, we suggest that P. littoralis extract might be potential candidate agents for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  20. Hedyotis diffusa Willd extract inhibits HT-29 cell proliferation via cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minghe; Lin, Jiumao; Wei, Lihui; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Cai, Qiaoyan; Peng, Jun; Zhu, Dezeng

    2012-08-01

    Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW) has long been used as an important component in several Chinese medicine formulae to clinically treat various types of cancer, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Previously, we reported that HDW inhibits CRC growth via the induction of cancer cell apoptosis and the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, to further elucidate the mechanism of HDW-mediated antitumor activity, we investigated the effect of HDW ethanol extract (EEHDW) on the proliferation of HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells. We found that EEHDW reduced HT-29 cell viability and survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that EEHDW treatment blocked the cell cycle, preventing G1 to S progression, and reduced mRNA expression of pro-proliferative PCNA, Cyclin D1 and CDK4, but increased that of anti-proliferative p21. Our findings suggest that Hedyotis diffusa Willd may be an effective treatment for CRC via the suppression of cancer cell proliferation. PMID:23139718

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of patchouli alcohol in RAW264.7 and HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Shin, Yong Kyu; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA) is a chemical compound extracted from patchouli which belongs to the genus Pogostemon, herb of mint family. Recently, it has been reported that PA inhibits the production of inflammatory mediators. However, the biological mechanisms of PA for anti-inflammatory activities have not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether PA decreases the production of inflammatory mediators through downregulation of the NF-κB and ERK pathway. Our data indicated that PA inhibits the over-expression of iNOS and IL-6 in protein and mRNA levels in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and TNF-α stimulated HT-29 cells. PA inhibited IκB-α degradation and p65 nuclear translocation, and subsequently suppressed transcriptional activity of NF-κB in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and TNF-α-stimulated HT-29 cells. In addition, PA inhibited LPS- or TNF-α-stimulated ERK1/2 activation by decreasing phosphorylation of ERK1/2. These findings suggest that PA shows anti-inflammatory activities through suppressing ERK-mediated NF-κB pathway in mouse macrophage and human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:23348408

  2. Micropropagation effect on the anti-carcinogenic activitiy of polyphenolics from Mexican oregano (Poliomintha glabrescens Gray) in human colon cancer cells HT-29.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Enrique; Noratto, Giuliana D; García-Lara, Silverio; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2013-06-01

    Phenolic extracts obtained from spices are known to have anti-carcinogenic activities but little is known about the effect of micropropagation on these beneficial effects. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic activity of flavonoid-enriched extracts (FEE) from the leaves of wild (WT), in vitro (IN), and ex vitro (EX) grown oregano plants in colon cancer cells HT-29 and the non-cancer cells CCD-18Co. Cell proliferation of HT-29 cells was reduced to 50 % by WT, IN, and EX at concentrations of 4.01, 1.32, and 4.84 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/L, respectively. In contrast, in CCD-18Co cells, higher concentrations were required for the same cytotoxic effect. At 6 mg GAE/L, WT and IN reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-stimulated control cells to 59.89 and 59.43 %, respectively, and EX to 73.89 %. The mRNA of Caspase-3 was increased 1.53-fold when cells were treated with 4 mg GAE/L of IN extract, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 6 (FAS), and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) mRNA increased 2.55 and 1.53 fold, respectively. Results on protein expression corroborated the apoptotic effects with a significant decrease of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression for all treatments but more remarkable for EX that also showed the most intense signal of BAX. Overall, FEE extracts derived from micropropagation had increased pro-apoptotic effects, however extracts from the in vitro plants produced more efficacy at the transcriptional level while extracts from the ex vitro plant were superior at the traductional level. PMID:23435631

  3. Morphologic differentiation of colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and HT-29KM in rotating-wall vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Jessup, J. M.; Wolf, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    A new low shear stress microcarrier culture system has been developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center that permits three-dimensional tissue culture. Two established human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines, HT-29, an undifferentiated, and HT-29KM, a stable, moderately differentiated subline of HT-29, were grown in new tissue culture bioreactors called Rotating-Wall Vessels (RWVs). RWVs are used in conjunction with multicellular cocultivation to develop a unique in vitro tissue modeling system. Cells were cultivated on Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads, with and without mixed normal human colonic fibroblasts, which served as the mesenchymal layer. Culture of the tumor lines in the absence of fibroblasts produced spheroidlike growth and minimal differentiation. In contrast, when tumor lines were co-cultivated with normal colonic fibroblasts, initial growth was confined to the fibroblast population until the microcarriers were covered. The tumor cells then commenced proliferation at an accelerated rate, organizing themselves into three-dimensional tissue masses that achieved 1.0- to 1.5-cm diameters. The masses displayed glandular structures, apical and internal glandular microvilli, tight intercellular junctions, desmosomes, cellular polarity, sinusoid development, internalized mucin, and structural organization akin to normal colon crypt development. Differentiated samples were subjected to transmission and scanning electron microscopy and histologic analysis, revealing embryoniclike mesenchymal cells lining the areas around the growth matrices. Necrosis was minimal throughout the tissue masses. These data suggest that the RWV affords a new model for investigation and isolation of growth, regulatory, and structural processes within neoplastic and normal tissue.

  4. Phloroglucinol induces apoptosis via apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    KANG, MI-HYE; KIM, IN-HYE; NAM, TAEK-JEO NG

    2014-01-01

    Phloroglucinol is a polyphenolic compound that is used to treat and prevent several human diseases, as it exerts beneficial biological activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of phloroglucinol on apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that phloroglucinol suppressed cell viability and induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Phloroglucinol treatment of HT-29 cells resulted in characteristic apoptosis-related changes: altered Bcl-2 family proteins, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8. This study also showed that proteins involved in apoptosis were stimulated by treatment with phloroglucinol. These findings demonstrated that phloroglucinol exerts anticancer activity in HT-29 colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. PMID:25070748

  5. Cell Free DNA of Tumor Origin Induces a ‘Metastatic’ Expression Profile in HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Schöller, Andrea; Barták, Barbara; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial cells in malignant conditions release DNA into the extracellular compartment. Cell free DNA of tumor origin may act as a ligand of DNA sensing mechanisms and mediate changes in epithelial-stromal interactions. Aims To evaluate and compare the potential autocrine and paracrine regulatory effect of normal and malignant epithelial cell-related DNA on TLR9 and STING mediated pathways in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Materials and Methods DNA isolated from normal and tumorous colonic epithelia of fresh frozen surgically removed tissue samples was used for 24 and 6 hour treatment of HT-29 colon carcinoma and HDF-α fibroblast cells. Whole genome mRNA expression analysis and qRT-PCR was performed for the elements/members of TLR9 signaling pathway. Immunocytochemistry was performed for epithelial markers (i.e. CK20 and E-cadherin), DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) and NFκB (for treated HDFα cells). Results Administration of tumor derived DNA on HT29 cells resulted in significant (p<0.05) mRNA level alteration in 118 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including overexpression of metallothionein genes (i.e. MT1H, MT1X, MT1P2, MT2A), metastasis-associated genes (i.e. TACSTD2, MACC1, MALAT1), tumor biomarker (CEACAM5), metabolic genes (i.e. INSIG1, LIPG), messenger molecule genes (i.e. DAPP, CREB3L2). Increased protein levels of CK20, E-cadherin, and DNMT3a was observed after tumor DNA treatment in HT-29 cells. Healthy DNA treatment affected mRNA expression of 613 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including increased expression of key adaptor molecules of TLR9 pathway (e.g. MYD88, IRAK2, NFκB, IL8, IL-1β), STING pathway (ADAR, IRF7, CXCL10, CASP1) and the FGF2 gene. Conclusions DNA from tumorous colon epithelium, but not from the normal epithelial cells acts as a pro-metastatic factor to HT-29 cells through the overexpression of pro-metastatic genes through TLR9/MYD88 independent pathway. In contrast, DNA derived from

  6. Different responses of Fe transporters in Caco2/HT29-MTX cocultures than in independent Caco-2 cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human intestinal epithelium is composed of several cell types; mainly enterocytes and globet (mucin-secreting) cells. This study compares the cellular response for Fe transporters in Caco-2, HT29-MTX, and Caco-2/HT29-MTX coculture models for Fe bioavailability studies. Under culture, Caco-2 cell...

  7. 1-(2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) Ethanone-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in G1/G0 in HT-29 Cells Human Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2014-01-01

    1-(2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) ethanone (DMHE) was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl fruits and the structure confirmed by GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) analysis. This compound was tested on the HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cell line using MTT (method of transcriptional and translational) cell proliferation assay. The results of MTT assay showed that DMHE exhibited good cytotoxic effect on HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner but no cytotoxic effect on the MRC-5 cell line after 72 h incubation. Morphological features of apoptotic cells upon treatment by DMHE, e.g., cell shrinkage and membrane blebbing, were examined by an inverted and phase microscope. Other features, such as chromatin condension and nuclear fragmentation were studied using acridine orange and propidium iodide staining under the fluorescence microscope. Future evidence of apoptosis/necrosis was provided by result fromannexin V-FITC/PI (fluorescein-isothiocyanate/propidium iodide) staining revealed the percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, necrotic and live cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner using flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis showed G0/G1 arrest in a time-dependent manner. A western blot analysis indicated that cell death might be associated with the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax PUMA. However, the anit-apotptic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 were also found to increase in a time-dependent manner. The expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bak was not observed. PMID:24451128

  8. Cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of aerial parts of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum on Hela, HT29 and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, A.; Ghannadi, A.; Mohebi, B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that some species of Cuscuta possess anticancer activity on various cell lines. Due to the lack of detailed researches on the cytotoxic effects of Cuscuta chinensis and Cuscuta epithymum, the aim of the present study was to evaluate cytotoxic effects of chloroform and hydroalcoholic extracts of these plants on the human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-468), human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) and human uterine cervical carcinoma (Hela). Using maceration method, different extracts of aerial parts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were prepared. Extraction was performed using chloroform and ethanol/water (70/30). Total phenolic contents of the extracts were determined according to the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Using MTT assay, the cytotoxic activity of the extracts against HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells was evaluated. Extracts were considered cytotoxic when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. The poly-phenolic content of the hydroalcoholic and chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithymum were 56.08 ± 4.11, 21.49 ± 2.00, 10.64 ± 0.86 and 4.81 ± 0.38, respectively. Our findings showed that the chloroform extracts of C. chinensis and C. epithyum significantly reduced the viability of Hela, HT-29 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Also, hydroalcoholic extracts of C. chinensis significantly decreased the viability of HT29, Hela and MDA-MB-468 cells. However, in the case of hydroalcoholic extracts of C. epithymum only significant decrease in the viability of MDA-MB-468 cells was observed (IC50 = 340 μg/ml). From these findings it can be concluded that C. chinensis and C. epithymum are good candidates for further study to find new possible cytotoxic agents. PMID:25657780

  9. Inhibition of Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells and HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells by Rice-Produced Recombinant Human Insulin-Like Growth Binding Protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lizhong; Liu, Qiaoquan; Lan, Linlin; Tong, Peter C. Y.; Sun, Samuel S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional molecule which is closely related to cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metabolism and senescence. It combines with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to form a complex (IGF-I/IGFBP-3) that can treat growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS) and reduce insulin requirement in patients with diabetes. IGFBP-3 alone has been shown to have anti-proliferation effect on numerous cancer cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We reported here an expression method to produce functional recombinant human IGFBP-3 (rhIGFBP-3) in transgenic rice grains. Protein sorting sequences, signal peptide and endoplasmic reticulum retention tetrapeptide (KDEL) were included in constructs for enhancing rhIGFBP-3 expression. Western blot analysis showed that only the constructs with signal peptide were successfully expressed in transgenic rice grains. Both rhIGFBP-3 proteins, with or without KDEL sorting sequence inhibited the growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells (65.76 ± 1.72% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.05; 50.84 ± 1.97% vs 45.00 ± 0.86%, p < 0.01 respectively) and HT-29 colon cancer cells (65.14 ±3.84% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 and 54.7 ± 9.44% vs 18.01 ± 13.81%, p < 0.05 respectively) when compared with wild type rice. Conclusion/Significance These findings demonstrated the feasibility of producing biological active rhIGFBP-3 in rice using a transgenic approach, which will definitely encourage more research on the therapeutic use of hIGFBP-3 in future. PMID:24143239

  10. Cell line-dependent cytotoxicity of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles coated with chitosan and thiolated chitosan: Insights from cultured human epithelial HeLa, Caco2/TC7 and HT-29/MTX cells.

    PubMed

    Pradines, Bénédicte; Lievin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Vauthier, Christine; Ponchel, Gilles; Loiseau, Philippe M; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles composed of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) core coated with a mixture of chitosan and thiolated chitosan have already shown promising results in terms of mucoadhesion and permeation enhancement properties of pharmaceutical active drugs delivered via mucosal routes. In the present work, the cytotoxicity of these nanoparticles was first investigated using direct contact assay on undifferentiated human cervix epithelial HeLa cells. The results showed strong toxicity in HeLa cells for the two investigated concentrations 25 and 50 μg/mL. The cytotoxic effect was mainly attributed to the poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) core since no significant differences in nanoparticle cytotoxicity were reported when nanoparticle shell composition was modified by adding chitosan or thiolated chitosan. In contrast, lower nanoparticle toxicity was reported using human fully-differentiated enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7, and fully-differentiated mucus-secreting HT-29/MTX cells forming monolayer in culture mimicking an intestinal epithelial barrier. This study demonstrated that the toxicity of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles is highly cell line-dependent. PMID:26051544

  11. New tungstenocenes containing 3-hydroxy-4-pyrone ligands: antiproliferative activity on HT-29 and MCF-7 cell lines and binding to human serum albumin studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-García, Moralba; Ortega-Zúñiga, Carlos; Meléndez, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Three new water-soluble tungstenocene derivatives were synthesized and characterized using 3-hydroxy-4-pyrone ligands, which provide aqueous stability to the complexes. The antiproliferative activities of the complexes on HT-29 colon cancer and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and showed the new tungstenocene derivatives have higher antiproliferative action than tungstenocene dichloride (Cp2WCl2, where Cp is cyclopentadienyl). The binding interactions of the tungstenocenes with human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling methods. Analysis of the fluorescence quenching spectra indicates that the tungstenocene complexes bind HSA by hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding at fatty acid binding site 6 and drug binding site II. Docking studies provided a description of the hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding by which the tungstenocenes become engaged with HSA. It was determined that the binding affinity of the tungstenoecenes for HSA is in the order Cp2WCl2 < [Cp2W(ethyl maltolato)]Cl < [Cp2W (maltolato)]Cl < [Cp2W(kojato)]Cl, consistent with the hydrophobic interactions and the number of hydrogen bonds involved. PMID:23212785

  12. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) from human breast milk activates PAR-2 receptors, of the intestinal epithelial cells HT-29, regulating cytokines and defensins.

    PubMed

    Barrera, G J; Tortolero, G Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. Each one improves healing of the gastrointestinal tract. Trefoil factors may be grouped into three classes: the gastric peptides (TFF1), spasmolytic peptide (TFF2) and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3). Significant amounts of TFF3 are present in human breast milk. Previously, we have reported that trefoil factor 3 isolated from human breast milk produces down regulation of cytokines and promotes human beta defensins expression in intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to determine the molecular mechanism involved. Here we showed that the presence of TFF3 strongly correlated with protease activated receptors 2 (PAR-2) activation in human intestinal cells. Intracellular calcium ((Ca2+)i)mobilization was induced by the treatment with: 1) TFF3, 2) synthetic PAR-2 agonist peptide. The co-treatment with a synthetic PAR-2 antagonist peptide and TFF3 eliminates the latter's effect. Additionally, we demonstrated the existence of interactions among TFF3 and PAR-2 receptors through far Western blot and co-precipitation. Finally, down regulation of PAR-2 by siRNA resulted in a decrease of TFF3 induced intracellular (Ca2+)i mobilization, cytokine regulation and defensins expression. These findings suggest that TFF3 activates intestinal cells through PAR-2 (Fig. 4, Ref. 19). PMID:27546365

  13. Impairement of HT29 Cancer Cells Cohesion by the Soluble Form of Neurotensin Receptor-3

    PubMed Central

    Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Béraud-Dufour, Sophie; Coppola, Thierry; Mazella, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The neurotensin (NT) receptor-3 (NTSR3), also called sortilin is a multifunctional protein localized at the intracellular and plasma membrane level. The extracellular domain of NTSR3 (sNTSR3) is released by shedding from several cell lines including colonic cancer cells. This soluble protein acts as an active ligand through its ability to bind, to be internalized in the human adenocarcinoma epithelial HT29 cells and to stimulate the PI3 kinase pathway. The aim of this study was to investigate cellular responses induced by sNTSR3 in HT29 cells. The cellular functions of sNTSR3 were monitored by immunofluocytochemistry, electron microscopy and quantitative PCR in order to characterize the cell shape and the expression of adhesion proteins. We evidenced that sNTSR3 significantly regulates the cellular morphology as well as the cell-cell and the cell-matrix adherens properties by decreasing the expession of several integrins and by modifying the structure of desmosomes. Altogether, these properties lead to an increase of cell detachment upon sNTSR3 treatment on HT29, HCT116 and SW620 cancer cells. Our results indicate that sNTSR3 may induce the first phase of a process which weaken HT29 epithelial properties including desmosome architecture, cell spreading, and initiation of cell separation, all events which could be responsible for cancer metastasis. PMID:25221642

  14. Induction of Apoptosis of 2,4′,6-Trihydroxybenzophenone in HT-29 Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Ma Ma; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2014-01-01

    2,4′,6-Trihydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl. fruits. It was found to inhibit cell proliferation in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line but caused little damage to WRL-68 normal human liver and MRC-5 normal human fibroblast lung cell lines. The compound was found to sharply affect the viability of HT-29 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. HT-29 cells treated with the compound showed morphological changes under microscopic examination such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, DNA fragmentation, and the occurrence of apoptotic nuclei. The percentage of early apoptotic, late apoptotic, and dead or necrotic cells was determined by flow cytometry using annexin V-FTIC/PI staining. In addition, flow cytometry showed that, when the HT-29 cells were treated with 115 µM of the compound, it resulted in G0/G1 phase arrest in a time-dependent manner. Western blot revealed an upregulation of PUMA, Bak, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 proteins suggesting that the compound induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells by regulating these proteins. PMID:24579081

  15. Alisertib Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, Autophagy and Suppresses EMT in HT29 and Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Bao-Jun; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Da-Jian; Ju, Yong-Le; Wu, Jin-Hao; Ouyang, Man-Zhao; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with substantial mortality and morbidity. Alisertib (ALS) is a selective Aurora kinase A (AURKA) inhibitor with unclear effect and molecular interactome on CRC. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular interactome and anticancer effect of ALS and explore the underlying mechanisms in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. ALS markedly arrested cells in G2/M phase in both cell lines, accompanied by remarkable alterations in the expression level of key cell cycle regulators. ALS induced apoptosis in HT29 and Caco-2 cells through mitochondrial and death receptor pathways. ALS also induced autophagy in HT29 and Caco-2 cells, with the suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), but activation of 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways. There was a differential modulating effect of ALS on p38 MAPK signaling pathway in both cell lines. Moreover, induction or inhibition of autophagy modulated basal and ALS-induced apoptosis in both cell lines. ALS potently suppressed epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HT29 and Caco-2 cells. Collectively, it suggests that induction of cell cycle arrest, promotion of apoptosis and autophagy, and suppression of EMT involving mitochondrial, death receptor, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, p38 MAPK, and AMPK signaling pathways contribute to the cancer cell killing effect of ALS on CRC cells. PMID:26729093

  16. Response to Multiple Radiation Doses of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells Infected With Recombinant Adenovirus Containing Dominant-Negative Ku70 Fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Muneyasu; He Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Ling, C. Clifton; Li, Gloria C.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment on the response of tumor cells to multiple small radiation doses. Our ultimate goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of using this virus in gene-radiotherapy to enhance the radiation response of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human colorectal HCT8 and HT29 carcinoma cells were plated in glass tubes, infected with virus (25 multiplicity of infection), and irradiated with a single dose or zero to five doses of 3 Gy each at 6-h intervals. Hypoxia was induced by flushing with 100% nitrogen gas. The cells were trypsinized 0 or 6 h after the final irradiation, and cell survival was determined by colony formation. The survival data were fitted to linear-quadratic model or exponential line. Results: Virus infection enhanced the radiation response of the HCT8 and HT29 cells. The virus enhancement ratio for single-dose irradiation at a surviving fraction of 0.1 was {approx}1.3 for oxic and hypoxic HCT8 and 1.4 and 1.1 for oxic and hypoxic HT29, respectively. A similar virus enhancement ratio of 1.2-1.3 was observed for both oxic and hypoxic cells irradiated with multiple doses; however, these values were smaller than the values found for dominant-negative Ku70-transfected Rat-1 cells. This difference has been discussed. The oxygen enhancement ratio for HCT8 and HT29 receiving fractionated doses was 1.2 and 2.0, respectively, and virus infection altered them slightly. Conclusion: Infection of recombinant replication-defective adenovirus containing dominant-negative Ku70 fragment enhanced the response of human colorectal cancer cells to single and multiple radiation doses.

  17. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits human colorectal cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Swanson, X; Mhashilkar, A M; Oida, Y; Schrock, R; Branch, C D; Chada, S; Zumstein, L; Ramesh, R

    2003-11-01

    The tumor-suppressor gene PTEN encodes a multifunctional phosphatase that is mutated in a variety of human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and downstream functions, including activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), cell survival, and cell proliferation in tumor cells carrying mutant- or deletion-type PTEN. In such tumor cells, enforced expression of PTEN decreases cell proliferation through cell-cycle arrest at G1 phase accompanied, in some cases, by induction of apoptosis. More recently, the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN has been reported in ovarian and thyroid tumors that are wild type for PTEN. In the present study, we examined the tumor-suppressive effect of PTEN in human colorectal cancer cells that are wild type for PTEN. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of PTEN (Ad-PTEN) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis significantly in colorectal cancer cells (DLD-1, HT29, and SW480) carrying wtPTEN than in normal colon fibroblast cells (CCD-18Co) carrying wtPTEN. This suppression was induced through downregulation of the Akt/PKB pathway, dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, but not the G1 phase. Furthermore, treatment of human colorectal tumor xenografts (HT-29, and SW480) with Ad-PTEN resulted in significant (P=0.01) suppression of tumor growth. These results indicate that Ad-PTEN exerts its tumor-suppressive effect on colorectal cancer cells through inhibition of cell-cycle progression and induction of cell death. Thus Ad-PTEN may be a potential therapeutic for treatment of colorectal cancers. PMID:14528320

  18. Expression of adrenomedullin in human colorectal tumors and its role in cell growth and invasion in vitro and in xenograft growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nouguerède, Emilie; Berenguer, Caroline; Garcia, Stéphane; Bennani, Bahia; Delfino, Christine; Nanni, Isabelle; Dahan, Laetitia; Gasmi, Mohamed; Seitz, Jean-François; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a multifunctional peptide vasodilator that transduces its effects through calcitonin receptor-like receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein-2 and -3 (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3). In this study, real-time quantitative reverse transcription demonstrated a significant expression of AM mRNA in tumor samples from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in clinical stage II, III, and IV when compared with normal colorectal tissue. AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 proteins were immunohistochemically localized in the carcinomatous epithelial compartment of CRC tissue. Tissue microarray analysis revealed a clear increase of AM, CLR, RAMP2, and RAMP3 staining in lymph node and distant metastasis when compared with primary tumors. The human colon carcinoma cells HT-29 expressed and secreted AM into the culture medium with a significant increase under hypoxia. Treatment of HT-29 cells with synthetic AM stimulated cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. Incubation with anti-AM antibody (αAM), anti-AM receptors antibodies (αAMR), or AM antagonist AM22–52 inhibited significantly basal levels of proliferation of HT-29 cells, suggesting that AM may function as an autocrine growth factor for CRC cells. Treatment with αAM significantly suppressed the growth of HT-29 tumor xenografts in vivo. Histological examination of αAM-treated tumors showed evidence of disruption of tumor vascularity with decreased microvessel density, depletion of endothelial cells and pericytes, and increased tumor cell apoptosis. These findings highlight the potential importance of AM and its receptors in the progression of CRC and support the conclusion that αAM treatment inhibits tumor growth by suppression of angiogenesis and tumor growth, suggesting that AM may be a useful therapeutic target. PMID:23634287

  19. Moguntinones--new selective inhibitors for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Maderer, Annett; Plutizki, Stanislav; Kramb, Jan-Peter; Göpfert, Katrin; Linnig, Monika; Khillimberger, Katrin; Ganser, Christopher; Lauermann, Eva; Dannhardt, Gerd; Galle, Peter R; Moehler, Markus

    2014-06-01

    3-Indolyl and 3-azaindolyl-4-aryl maleimide derivatives, called moguntinones (MOG), have been selected for their ability to inhibit protein kinases associated with angiogenesis and induce apoptosis. Here, we characterize their mode of action and their potential clinical value in human colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo. MOG-19 and MOG-13 were characterized in vitro using kinase, viability, and apoptosis assays in different human colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-116, Caco-2, and SW480) and normal colon cell lines (CCD-18Co, FHC, and HCoEpiC) alone or in combination with topoisomerase I inhibitors. Intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blotting. To determine their potential to inhibit tumor growth in vivo, the human HT-29 tumor xenograft model was used. Moguntinones prominently inhibit several protein kinases associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Specific signaling pathways such as GSK3β and mTOR downstream targets were inhibited with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. GSK3β signaling inhibition was independent of KRAS, BRAF, and PI3KCA mutation status. While moguntinones alone induced apoptosis only in concentrations >10 μmol/L, MOG-19 in combination with topoisomerase I inhibitors induced apoptosis synergistically at lower concentrations. Consistent with in vitro data, MOG-19 significantly reduced tumor volume and weight in combination with a topoisomerase I inhibitor in vivo. Our in vitro and in vivo data present significant proapoptotic, antiangiogenic, and antiproliferative effects of MOG-19 in different human colon cancer cells. Combination with clinically relevant topoisomerase I inhibitors in vitro and xenograft mouse model demonstrate a high potency of moguntinones to complement and improve standard chemotherapy options in human colorectal cancer. PMID:24743703

  20. The effects of Bifidobacterium breve on immune mediators and proteome of HT29 cells monolayers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Arboleya, Silvia; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The use of beneficial microorganisms, the so-called probiotics, to improve human health is gaining popularity. However, not all of the probiotic strains trigger the same responses and they differ in their interaction with the host. In spite of the limited knowledge on mechanisms of action some of the probiotic effects seem to be exerted through maintenance of the gastrointestinal barrier function and modulation of the immune system. In the present work, we have addressed in vitro the response of the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 to the strain Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004. In the array of 84 genes involved in inflammation tested, the expression of 12 was modified by the bifidobacteria. The genes of chemokine CXCL6, the chemokine receptor CCR7, and, specially, the complement component C3 were upregulated. Indeed, HT29 cells cocultivated with B. breve produced significantly higher levels of protein C3a. The proteome of HT29 cells showed increased levels of cytokeratin-8 in the presence of B. breve. Altogether, it seems that B. breve IPLA20004 could favor the recruitment of innate immune cells to the mucosa reinforcing, as well as the physical barrier of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25793196

  1. The Effects of Bifidobacterium breve on Immune Mediators and Proteome of HT29 Cells Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Borja; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Arboleya, Silvia; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The use of beneficial microorganisms, the so-called probiotics, to improve human health is gaining popularity. However, not all of the probiotic strains trigger the same responses and they differ in their interaction with the host. In spite of the limited knowledge on mechanisms of action some of the probiotic effects seem to be exerted through maintenance of the gastrointestinal barrier function and modulation of the immune system. In the present work, we have addressed in vitro the response of the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29 to the strain Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004. In the array of 84 genes involved in inflammation tested, the expression of 12 was modified by the bifidobacteria. The genes of chemokine CXCL6, the chemokine receptor CCR7, and, specially, the complement component C3 were upregulated. Indeed, HT29 cells cocultivated with B. breve produced significantly higher levels of protein C3a. The proteome of HT29 cells showed increased levels of cytokeratin-8 in the presence of B. breve. Altogether, it seems that B. breve IPLA20004 could favor the recruitment of innate immune cells to the mucosa reinforcing, as well as the physical barrier of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25793196

  2. Potential chemoprevention activity of pterostilbene by enhancing the detoxifying enzymes in the HT-29 cell line.

    PubMed

    Harun, Zaliha; Ghazali, Ahmad Rohi

    2012-01-01

    Detoxifying enzymes are present in most epithelial cells of the human gastrointestinal tract where they protect against xenobiotics which may cause cancer. Induction of examples such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and its thiol conjugate, glutathione (GSH) as well as NAD(P)H: quinoneoxidoreductase (NQO1) facilitate the excretion of carcinogens and thus preventing colon carcinogenesis. Pterostilbene, an analogue of resveratrol, has demonstrated numerous pharmacological activities linked with chemoprevention. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of pterostilbene as a chemopreventive agent using the HT-29 colon cancer cell line to study the modulation of GST and NQO1 activities as well as the GSH level. Initially, our group, established the optimum dose of 24 hours pterostilbene treatment using MTT assays. Then, effects of pterostilbene (0-50 μM) on GST and NQO1 activity and GSH levels were determined using GST, NQO1 and Ellman assays, respectively. MTT assay of pterostilbene (0-100 μM) showed no cytotoxicity toward the HT-29 cell line. Treatment increased GST activity in the cell line significantly (p<0.05) at 12.5 and 25.0 μM. In addition, treatment at 50 μM increased the GSH level significantly (p<0.05). Pterostilbene also enhanced NQO1 activity significantly (p<0.05) at 12.5 μM and 50 μM. Hence, pterostilbene is a potential chemopreventive agent capable of modulation of detoxifiying enzyme levels in HT-29 cells. PMID:23464466

  3. Aqueous Extract of Solanum nigrum Leaves Induces Autophagy and Enhances Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, Docetaxel, and 5-Fluorouracil in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chen-Jei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Lin, Yi-Feng; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Jia; Chang, Chun-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common cancer worldwide, and chemotherapy is a mainstream approach for advanced and recurrent cases. Development of effective complementary drugs could help improve tumor suppression efficiency and control adverse effects from chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves (AE-SN) is an essential component in many traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating cancer, but there is a lack of evidence verifying its tumor suppression efficacy in colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tumor suppression efficacy of AE-SN using DLD-1 and HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells and examine the combined drug effect when combined with the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin, doxorubicin, docetaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. The results indicated that AE-SN induced autophagy via microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 A/B II accumulation but not caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in both cell lines. The IC50s after 48 hours of treatment were 0.541 and 0.948 mg/ml AE-SN in DLD-1 and HT-29, respectively. AE-SN also demonstrated a combined drug effect with all tested drugs by enhancing cytotoxicity in tumor cells. Our results suggest that AE-SN has potential in the development of complementary chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:23843876

  4. Aqueous Extract of Solanum nigrum Leaves Induces Autophagy and Enhances Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, Docetaxel, and 5-Fluorouracil in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chen-Jei; Wang, Chien-Kai; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Lin, Yi-Feng; Lin, Chi-Shian; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Jia; Chang, Chun-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common cancer worldwide, and chemotherapy is a mainstream approach for advanced and recurrent cases. Development of effective complementary drugs could help improve tumor suppression efficiency and control adverse effects from chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves (AE-SN) is an essential component in many traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating cancer, but there is a lack of evidence verifying its tumor suppression efficacy in colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tumor suppression efficacy of AE-SN using DLD-1 and HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells and examine the combined drug effect when combined with the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin, doxorubicin, docetaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. The results indicated that AE-SN induced autophagy via microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 A/B II accumulation but not caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in both cell lines. The IC50s after 48 hours of treatment were 0.541 and 0.948 mg/ml AE-SN in DLD-1 and HT-29, respectively. AE-SN also demonstrated a combined drug effect with all tested drugs by enhancing cytotoxicity in tumor cells. Our results suggest that AE-SN has potential in the development of complementary chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:23843876

  5. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z; Farias, Iria Luiza G; Rigo, Melânia L; Glanzner, Werner G; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D; Cadoná, Francine C; Cruz, Ivana B; Farias, Júlia G; Duarte, Marta M M F; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C; Rocha, João Batista T; Leal, Daniela B R

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  6. Effect of Uncaria tomentosa Extract on Apoptosis Triggered by Oxaliplatin Exposure on HT29 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Liliane Z.; Farias, Iria Luiza G.; Rigo, Melânia L.; Glanzner, Werner G.; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard D.; Cadoná, Francine C.; Cruz, Ivana B.; Farias, Júlia G.; Duarte, Marta M. M. F.; Franco, Luzia; Bertol, Gustavo; Colpo, Elisangela; Brites, Patricia C.; Rocha, João Batista T.; Leal, Daniela B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. The use of herbal products as a supplement to minimize the effects of chemotherapy for cancer treatment requires further attention with respect to the activity and toxicity of chemotherapy. Uncaria tomentosa extract, which contains oxindole alkaloids, is one of these herbal products. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Uncaria tomentosa extract modulates apoptosis induced by chemotherapy exposure. Materials and Methods. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT29 cells) were grown in the presence of oxaliplatin and/or Uncaria tomentosa extract. Results. The hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa enhanced chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, with an increase in the percentage of Annexin positive cells, an increase in caspase activities, and an increase of DNA fragments in culture of the neoplastic cells. Moreover, antioxidant activity may be related to apoptosis. Conclusion. Uncaria tomentosa extract has a role for cancer patients as a complementary therapy. Further studies evaluating these beneficial effects with other chemotherapy drugs are recommended. PMID:25505920

  7. Surface expression and CEA binding of hnRNP M4 protein in HT29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Laguinge, Luciana; Bajenova, Olga; Bowden, Emma; Sayyah, Jacqueline; Thomas, Peter; Juhl, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to participate in the progression and metastatic growth of colorectal cancer. However, its biological function remains elusive. Recently, we found that CEA protects colon cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis, suggesting a complex role that includes signal transduction activity. Additionally, it was reported that CEA binds to Kupffer cells and macrophages to a membrane-anchored homolog of heterogeneous nuclear protein M4 (hnRNP M4), which subsequently was named CEA-receptor (CEAR). Cytoplasmatic and membranous expression of CEAR in CEA-positive colon cancer tissues prompted us to analyze the CEA-CEAR interaction in HT29 colon cancer cells. Both, CEA and CEAR were found on the cell surface of HT29 cells, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Imaging analysis suggested co-localization and, thus, interaction of both molecules. To confirm this observation, immunoprecipitation experiments and Western blot analysis were performed and indicated binding of CEA and CEAR. Immunoprecipitation of CEA resulted in a pull down of CEAR. The pull down of CEAR correlated with the amount of CEA as demonstrated by ribozyme targeting of CEA. Finally, external treatment of HT29 cells with soluble CEA induced tyrosine phosphorylation of CEAR, suggesting a CEA-dependent role of CEAR in signal transduction. Future experiments will elucidate whether the CEA-CEAR interaction is involved in CEA's antiapoptotic role and mediates the prometastatic properties of CEA in colon cancer cells. PMID:15816515

  8. Aged black garlic extract inhibits HT29 colon cancer cell growth via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Menghua; Yang, Guiqing; Liu, Hanchen; Liu, Xiaoxu; Lin, Sixiang; Sun, Dongning; Wang, Yishan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that aged black garlic extract (ABGE) may prove beneficial in preventing or inhibiting oncogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ABGE on the proliferation and apoptosis of HT29 colon cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that ABGE inhibited HT29 cell growth via the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We further investigated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signal transduction pathway and the molecular mechanisms underlying the ABGE-induced inhibition of HT29 cell proliferation. We observed that ABGE may regulate the function of the PI3K/Akt pathway through upregulating PTEN and downregulating Akt and p-Akt expression, as well as suppressing its downstream target, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway is crucial for the development of colon cancer. ABGE inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in HT29 cells through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, suggesting that ABGE may be effective in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer in humans. PMID:24649105

  9. Monitoring in real time the cytotoxic effect of Clostridium difficile upon the intestinal epithelial cell line HT29.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Lorena; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) has been increased not only among hospitalized patients, but also in healthy individuals traditionally considered as low risk population. Current treatment of CDI involves the use of antibiotics to eliminate the pathogen, although recurrent relapses have also been reported. For this reason, the search of new antimicrobials is a very active area of research. The strategy to use inhibitors of toxin's activity has however been less explored in spite of being a promising option. In this regard, the lack of fast and reliable in vitro screening methods to search for novel anti-toxin drugs has hampered this approach. The aim of the current study was to develop a method to monitor in real time the cytotoxicity of C. difficile upon the human colonocyte-like HT29 line, since epithelial intestinal cells are the primary targets of the toxins. The label-free, impedance based RCTA (real time cell analyser) technology was used to follow overtime the behaviour of HT29 in response to C. difficile LMG21717 producing both A and B toxins. Results obtained showed that the selection of the medium to grow the pathogen had a great influence in obtaining toxigenic supernatants, given that some culture media avoided the release of the toxins. A cytotoxic dose- and time-dependent effect of the supernatant obtained from GAM medium upon HT29 and Caco2 cells was detected. The sigmoid-curve fit of data obtained with HT29 allowed the calculation of different toxicological parameters, such as EC50 and LOAEL values. Finally, the modification in the behaviour of HT29 reordered in the RTCA was correlated with the cell rounding effect, typically induced by these toxins, visualized by time-lapsed captures using an optical microscope. Therefore, this RTCA method developed to test cytotoxicity kinetics of C. difficile supernatants upon IEC could be a valuable in vitro model for the screening of new anti-CDI agents. PMID:26436983

  10. Effects of Oplopanax horridus on Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAO-LI; SUN, SHI; WANG, CHONG-ZHI; WILLIAMS, STAINLEY; YUAN, CHUN-SU

    2011-01-01

    Aim In this study, we investigated the inhibitive effects of Oplopanax horridus extract (OhE) and its fractions (OhF1, OhF2, OhF3, OhF4 and OhF5) on the growth of human colorectal cancer cells and the possible mechanisms. Materials and Methods The anti-proliferative effects were evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay. Apoptotic effects and cell cycle distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry after staining with Annexin V/PI or PI/RNase. Results After treatment for 48 hr, OhE, OhF4 and OhF5 (10–100 μg/ml) inhibited proliferation of HCT-116, SW-480 and HT-29 cell lines. And cell growth decreased most with the treatment of OhF4. On the other hand, OhF1, OhF2 and OhF3 were not observed to have obvious suppressive effects on these cell lines at concentrations of 10–100 μg/ml. OhE, OhF4 and OhF5 (1–10 μg/ml) noticeably induced apoptosis time- and concentration-dependently compared to the control at the same time point. Treatement with OhE, OhF4 or OhF5 (1–10 μg/ml) for 24 hr distinctly induced the G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle in a dose-dependent manner. The trend of increasing cyclin A and cyclin B1 were similar to the increase of G2/M phase cells in all treated groups. Conclusion These results showed that OhE had potential anti-proliferation effects on human colorectal cancer cells, and the active components were enriched in the fractions OhF4 and OhF5. The anticancer mechanism of OhE, OhF4 and OhF5 might be attributed to the induction of apoptotic cells and the regulation of cell cycle transition. PMID:20332432

  11. Ciprofloxacin decreases survival in HT-29 cells via the induction of TGF-β1 secretion and enhances the anti-proliferative effect of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Bourikas, Leonidas A; Kolios, George; Valatas, Vassilis; Notas, George; Drygiannakis, Ioannis; Pelagiadis, Iordanis; Manousou, Pinelopi; Klironomos, Stefanos; Mouzas, Ioannis A; Kouroumalis, Elias

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fluoroquinolones are potent anti-microbial agents with multiple effects on host cells and tissues. Previous studies have highlighted their pro-apoptotic effect on human cancer cells and an immunoregulatory role in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effect of ciprofloxacin on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of HT-29 cells, a human colonic epithelial cell line sensitive to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated growth inhibition and its role in TGF-β1 production. We also examined the effect of ciprofloxacin on proliferation of HT-29 cells in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a well-established pro-apoptotic agent. Experimental approach: Using subconfluent cultures of HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, we studied the effect of ciprofloxacin, TGF-β1 and 5-FU on proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and cell cycle. The effect of ciprofloxacin on TGF-β1 mRNA expression and production was studied in RNA extracts and cell culture supernatants respectively, using confluent cultures. Key results: Ciprofloxacin decreased proliferation of HT-29 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This was mediated by accumulation of HT-29 cells into the S-phase but without any effect on apoptosis or necrosis. Additionally, ciprofloxacin enhanced the antiproliferative effect of 5-FU. Interestingly, ciprofloxacin was found to up-regulate TGF-β1 production by HT-29 cells and its anti-proliferative effect was abolished when TGF-β1 was blocked. Confirming this mechanism further, ciprofloxacin had no effect on Caco-2, a human colonic epithelial cell line that lacks functional TGF-β1 receptors. Conclusions and implications: We demonstrate a novel anti-proliferative and immunoregulatory effect of ciprofloxacin on human intestinal epithelial cells mediated via TGF-β1. PMID:19371339

  12. Lactobacillus plantarum Lipoteichoic Acid Alleviates TNF-α-Induced Inflammation in the HT-29 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hangeun; Jung, Bong Jun; Jung, Ji Hae; Kim, Joo Yun; Chung, Sung Kyun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2012-01-01

    We recently observed that lipoteichoic acid (LTA) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum inhibited endotoxin-mediated inflammation of the immune cells and septic shock in a mouse model. Here, we examined the inhibitory role of L. plantarum LTA (pLTA) on the inflammatory responses of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The human colon cell line, HT-29, increased interleukin (IL)-8 expression in response to recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, but not in response to bacterial ligands and interferon (IFN)-gamma. TNF-α also increased the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) from HT-29 cells. However, the inflammatory response of HT-29 on TNF-α stimulation was significantly inhibited by pLTA treatment. This pLTA-mediated inhibition accompanied the inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-kappa B and MAPKs. Our data suggest that pLTA regulates cytokine-mediated immune responses and may be a good candidate for maintaining intestinal homeostasis against excessive inflammation. PMID:22526394

  13. Modulation of cell growth and PPARgamma expression in human colorectal cancer cell lines by ciglitazone.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Darus, Halisa Mohd; Norazmi, Mohd Nor

    2008-09-01

    Studies have shown that ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) can induce differentiation and inhibit proliferation of several cancer cells. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of the PPARgamma ligand, ciglitazone, and the involvement of PPARgamma in modulating the growth of human colorectal cancer cells. Lactate dehydrogenase release assay showed that ciglitazone potently inhibited HT-29 (well-differentiated) and COLO-205 (poorly differentiated) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell growth. Measurement of apoptosis by flow cytometry using a fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody against cytokeratin 18 revealed a high induction of apoptosis by ciglitazone in a time-dependent fashion. The expression of PPARgamma1 but not PPARgamma2 mRNA was significantly downregulated as measured by real-time quantitative PCR, and the PPARgamma protein levels were decreased as determined by Western blot analysis. We conclude that ciglitazone treatment suppressed colon cancer cell growth via induction of apoptosis. However, the anticancer effects of ciglitazone may not depend solely on PPARgamma activation. PMID:18579355

  14. Fermented nondigestible fraction from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 modulates HT-29 cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bravo, R K; Guevara-Gonzalez, R; Ramos-Gomez, M; Garcia-Gasca, T; Campos-Vega, R; Oomah, B D; Loarca-Piña, G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a fermented nondigestible fraction (FNDF) of cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 on human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell survival. Negro 8025 was chosen for in vitro fermentation based on comparison of chemical composition with 2 other cultivars: Azufrado Higuera and Pinto Durango. Negro 8025 had 58% total dietary fiber, 27% resistant starch, and 20 mg of (+)-catechin equivalents per gram of sample. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and pH of the medium were measured after fermentation as indicators of colon protection through induced arrest on cell culture and apoptosis. Butyrate and pH of FNDF of Negro 8025 were higher than the control fermented raffinose extract. The FNDF inhibited HT-29 cell survival in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The lethal concentration 50 (LC(50)) was 13.63% FNDF (equivalent to 7.36, 0.33, and 3.31 mmol of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, respectively). DNA fragmentation, an apoptosis indicator, was detected by the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method in cells treated with the LC(50)-FNDF and a synthetic mixture of SCFAs mimicking LC(50)-FNDF. Our results suggest that common bean is a reliable source of fermentable substrates in colon, producing compounds with potential chemoprotective effect on HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells, so it may present an effective alternative to mitigate colon cancer development. PMID:21535793

  15. Tumour Cell Lines HT-29 and FaDu Produce Proinflammatory Cytokines and Activate Neutrophils In Vitro: Possible Applications for Neutrophil-Based Antitumour Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Souto, Juan-Carlos; Alcolea, Sonia; Antón, Rosa; Remacha, Angel; Camacho, Mercedes; Soler, Marta; Brú, Isabel; Porres, Amelia; Vila, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) can exert severe antineoplastic effects. Cross-talk between tumour cells and endothelial cells (ECs) is necessary for the accumulation of PMN around a tumour. This work reports the ability of two PMN-sensitive, human, permanent cell lines—colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and pharyngeal squamous-cell carcinoma (FaDu) cells—to act as inflammatory foci. PMNs were cytotoxic to both lines, the adhesion of the PMNs to the tumour cells being important in this effect. The tumour cells released appreciable amounts of IL-8 and GROα, and induced the transmigration of PMN through human microvascular-EC monolayers. Conditioning media associated with both lines induced the adhesion of PMN and the surface expression of ICAM-1 in microvascular-EC. In addition, FaDu-conditioning-medium strongly induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines by microvascular-EC. These results support the idea that tumour cells might normally induce a potent acute inflammatory response, leading to their own destruction. PMID:20169105

  16. The anti-proliferative effect of TI1B, a major Bowman-Birk isoinhibitor from pea (Pisum sativum L.), on HT29 colon cancer cells is mediated through protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Carmen Marín-Manzano, M; Jiménez, Elisabeth; Carmen Arques, M; Domoney, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI) from legumes, such as soyabean, pea, lentil and chickpea, are naturally occurring plant protease inhibitors which have potential health-promoting properties within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. BBI can survive both acidic conditions and the action of proteolytic enzymes within the stomach and small intestine, permitting significant amounts to reach the large intestine in active form to exert their reported anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. In a previous study, we reported the ability of a recombinant form of TI1B (rTI1B), representing a major BBI isoinhibitor from pea, to influence negatively the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT29 cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigate if this effect is related directly to the intrinsic ability of BBI to inhibit serine proteases. rTI1B and a novel engineered mutant, having amino acid substitutions at the P1 positions in the two inhibitory domains, were expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The rTI1B proved to be active against trypsin and chymotrypsin, showing K i values at nanomolar concentrations, whereas the related mutant protein was inactive against both serine proteases. The proliferation of HT29 colon cancer cells was significantly affected by rTI1B in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 31 (sd 7) μm), whereas the inactive mutant did not show any significant effect on colon cancer cell growth. In addition, neither recombinant protein affected the growth of non-malignant colonic fibroblast CCD-18Co cells. These findings suggest that serine proteases should be considered as important targets in investigating the potential chemopreventive role of BBI during the early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:22916809

  17. The effects of oral and enteric Campylobacter concisus strains on expression of TLR4, MD-2, TLR2, TLR5 and COX-2 in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Yazan; Lee, Hoyul; Riordan, Stephen M; Grimm, Michael C; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter concisus, a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity, has been shown to be associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The effects of different C. concisus strains on intestinal epithelial expression of Toll like receptors (TLR) have not been investigated. This study examined the effects of C. concisus strains isolated from patients with IBD and controls on expression of TLR4, its co-receptor myeloid differentiation factor (MD)-2; TLR2, TLR5, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin (IL)-8 in HT-29 cells.Fourteen oral and enteric C. concisus strains isolated from patients with IBD and healthy controls were co-incubated with HT-29 cells. Expression of TLR4, MD-2, TLR2, TLR5 and COX-2 in HT-29 cells in response to C. concisus infection was examined by Western blot, flow cytometry analysis and immunofluorescent staining visualized by confocal microscope. Production of IL-8 was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Both oral and enteric C. concisus strains upregulated expression of TLR4 in HT-29 cells. The levels of glycosylated TLR4 (Gly-TLR4) and surface TLR4 induced by C. concisus strains isolated from patients with IBD were significantly higher than those induced by C. concisus strains isolated from the healthy controls. Four C. concisus strains isolated from patients with IBD induced more than two-fold increase of surface expression of MD-2. C. concisus did not affect expression of TLR2 and TLR5. All C. concisus strains induced production of IL-8 and COX-2 in HT-29 cells.This study shows that some C. concisus strains, most from patients with IBD, upregulate surface expression of TLR4 and MD-2 in HT-29 cells. These data suggest that a potential role of specific C. concisus strains in modulating the intestinal epithelial responses to bacterial LPS needs to be investigated. PMID:23437263

  18. Metabolism and apoptotic properties of elevated ceramide in HT29rev cells.

    PubMed Central

    Veldman, R J; Klappe, K; Hoekstra, D; Kok, J W

    1998-01-01

    Ceramide (Cer) has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. In this study, we elevated cellular Cer levels in human colon-carcinoma (HT29(rev)) cells by incubating the cells in the presence of bacterial sphingomyelinase (bSMase) or, alternatively, in the presence of C2-Cer, a short-chain analogue of the sphingolipid. bSMase treatment did not induce apoptosis in these cells, as revealed by a lack of both DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase. In contrast, apoptosis did occur upon addition of C2-Cer. These findings led us to study whether differences in the metabolic fate of the excess of Cer, as generated by both treatments, contributed to the observed difference in apoptosis-inducing capacity. C2-Cer was rapidly taken up by HT29(rev) cells and accumulated due to the absence of substantial metabolic conversion. Upon addition of bSMase, hydrolysis of sphingomyelin resulted in a reduction of that pool to 20% compared with control values, accompanied by a multi-fold increase in Cer level. In spite of the continuous presence of active bSMase, the Cer increase turned out to be transient. Cer levels reached their maximum 1-2 h after addition of bSMase, followed by a significant decrease. Excessive Cer was mainly turned over via cerebrosides into complex glycolipids, including gangliosides. In the presence of glucosylceramide synthase- and/or ceramidase inhibitors, this conversion was significantly blocked and bSMase-generated Cer accumulated in the cells. However, even under these conditions apoptosis did not occur. In conclusion, the inability of bSMase to induce apoptosis of HT29(rev) cells does not appear to be due to rapid metabolic conversion of excessive Cer. Since apoptosis is induced upon addition of C2-Cer, we therefore propose that the intracellular target involved in the propagation of the apoptotic signal is reached by C2-Cer, but not by bSMase-generated Cer. PMID:9531498

  19. Characterization of Caco-2 and HT29-MTX co-cultures in an in vitro digestion/cell culture model used to predict iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Co-cultures of two human cell lines, Caco-2 and HT29-MTX mucus producing cells, have been incorporated into an in vitro digestion/cell culture model used to predict iron bioavailability. A range of different foods were subjected to in vitro digestion and iron bioavailability from digests was assesse...

  20. New insight into the influence of carob extract and gallic acid on hemin induced modulation of HT29 cell growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Klenow, Stefanie; Glei, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Red meat intake is associated with an increased risk of developing cancer. This is possibly related to the heme content of red meat. Plant derived polyphenols might protect from cancer development via their antioxidant activities. In this study, the impact of an aqueous extract of carob (CE) on hemin-modulated proliferation was investigated. CE, gallic acid (GA) and a known iron chelator (deferoxamine: DFO) significantly reduced the number of human colon cancer HT29 cells. CE and GA were more effective under serum-free conditions than in normal cell culture medium. These effects were abolished by addition of 1 microM hemin at low concentrations of CE and GA. At higher concentrations of CE and GA, both substances reduced cell number despite hemin supplementation. Effects of CE, GA and DFO on cell number could not be linked to iron chelation even though CE and DFO were capable of chelating iron. Furthermore, the effects of high CE concentration point to antioxidative effects other than iron chelation. However, a connection to a reduction of colorectal cancer risk due to consumption of meat with high heme content by CE could not be drawn, since the effective concentrations are beyond the physiologically relevant concentrations. PMID:19527781

  1. Polarised interleukin 8 secretion by HT 29/19A cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, K M; Jansen, J; Bijlsma, P B; Ceska, M; Tytgat, G N; Laboisse, C L; van Deventer, S J

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin 8 is a neutrophil chemotactic and stimulating cytokine induced by various inflammatory stimuli, including tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and endotoxin. The ability of HT 29/19A enterocytes to synthesise interleukin 8 was studied. The results show that interleukin 1 is an important stimulus for interleukin 8 synthesis and secretion by HT 29/19A cells, being more potent than tumour necrosis factor. The tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 1 induced interleukin 8 secretion by HT 29/19A cells was seen to be polarised according to the direction of stimulation. These results support the concept that mucosal cells (enterocytes) may play an important part in initiating mucosal inflammation. Furthermore, it is proposed that HT 29/19A cells constitute a tool to study stimulus directed polarised cytokine secretion. Images Figure 3 PMID:8150343

  2. Ethanol Extract of Oldenlandia diffusa – an Effective Chemotherapeutic for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soojin; Shim, Ji Hwan; Gim, Huijin; Park, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Oldenlandia diffusa is traditionally used to relieve the symptoms of and to treat various diseases, but its anti-cancer activity has not been well studied. In the present study, the authors investigated the anti-cancer effects of an ethanol extract of Oldenlandia diffusa (EOD) on HT-29 human adenocarcinoma cells. Methods: Cells were treated with different concentrations of an EOD, and cell death was assessed by using a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Analyses of the sub G1 peak, the caspase-3 and -9 activities, and the mitochondrial membrane depolarizations were conducted to confirm cell death by apoptosis. Also, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined using carboxy-H2DCFDA (5-(and-6)-carboxy-20,70-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate). Results: EOD inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells for 24 hours by 78.6% ± 8.1% at 50 μg/mL, 74.4% ± 4.6% at 100 μg/mL, 65.9% ± 5.2% at 200 μg/mL, 51.4% ± 6.2% at 300 μg/mL, and by 41.7% ± 8.9% at 400 μg/mL, and treatment for 72 hours reduced the proliferation at the corresponding concentrations by 43.3% ± 8.8%, 24.3 ± 5.1 mV, 13.5 ± 3.2 mV, 6.5 ± 2.3 mV, and by 2.6 ± 2.3 mV. EOD increased the number of cells in the sub-G1 peak in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondrial membrane depolarization was elevated by EOD. Also, caspase activities were dose-dependently elevated in the presence of EOD, and these activities were repressed by a pan-caspase inhibitor (zVAD-fmk). The ROS generation was significantly increased by EOD and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; a ROS scavenger) remarkably abolished EOD-induced cell death. In addition, a combination of sub-optimal doses of EOD and chemotherapeutic agents noticeably suppressed the growth of HT-29 cancer cells. Conclusion: These results indicate that EOD might be an effective chemotherapeutic for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:27280050

  3. Increased expression of S100A4, a metastasis-associated gene, in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Takenaga, K; Nakanishi, H; Wada, K; Suzuki, M; Matsuzaki, O; Matsuura, A; Endo, H

    1997-12-01

    The S100A4 gene (also known as pEL98/mts1/p9Ka/18A2/42A/calvasculin /FSP1/CAPL) encoding an S100-related calcium-binding protein is implied to be involved in the invasion and metastasis of murine tumor cells. In the present study, the expression of S100A4 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines (SW837, LoVo, DLD-1, HT-29, SW480, SW620, WiDr, and Colo201) and surgically resected neoplastic tissues was examined to investigate whether S100A4 plays a role in the invasion and metastasis of human tumor cells. Northern blot analysis using total RNA isolated from the adenocarcinoma cell lines revealed that five of the eight cell lines expressed substantial amounts of S100A4 mRNA. Normal colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) expressed little of the RNA. Using surgically resected specimens, it seemed that the amount of S100A4 mRNA in adenomas was nearly equal to that in normal colonic mucosa, whereas adenocarcinomas expressed a significantly higher amount of the RNA than did the adjacent normal colonic mucosa. Immunohistochemical analysis using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical specimens and monoclonal anti-S100A4 antibody demonstrated that none of 12 adenoma specimens were immunopositive, whereas 8 of 18 (44%) focal carcinomas in carcinoma in adenoma specimens and 50 of 53 (94%) adenocarcinoma specimens were immunopositive. Interestingly, the incidence of immunopositive cells increased according to the depth of invasion, and nearly all of the carcinoma cells in 14 metastases in the liver were positive. These results suggest that S100A4 may be involved in the progression and the metastatic process of human colorectal neoplastic cells. PMID:9815629

  4. Aeromonas hydrophila Beta-Hemolysin Induces Active Chloride Secretion in Colon Epithelial Cells (HT-29/B6)

    PubMed Central

    Epple, H. J.; Mankertz, J.; Ignatius, R.; Liesenfeld, O.; Fromm, M.; Zeitz, M.; Chakraborty, T.; Schulzke, J. D.

    2004-01-01

    The diarrheal mechanisms in Aeromonas enteritis are not completely understood. In this study we investigated the effect of aeromonads and of their secretory products on ion secretion and barrier function of monolayers of human intestinal cells (HT-29/B6). Ion secretion was determined as a short-circuit current (ISC) of HT-29/B6 monolayers mounted in Ussing-type chambers. Transepithelial resistance (Rt) served as a measure of permeability. A diarrheal strain of Aeromonas hydrophila (strain Sb) added to the mucosal side of HT-29/B6 monolayers induced a significant ISC (39 ± 3 μA/cm2) and decreased the Rt to ∼10% of the initial value. A qualitatively identical response was obtained with sterile supernatant of strain Sb, and Aeromonas supernatant also induced a significant ISC in totally stripped human colon. Tracer flux and ion replacement studies revealed the ISC to be mainly accounted for by electrogenic Cl− secretion. Supernatant applied serosally completely abolished basal ISC. The supernatant-induced ISC was inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine, whereas a protein kinase A inhibitor (H8) and a Ca2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM) had no effect. Physicochemical properties indicated that the supernatant's active compound was an aerolysin-related Aeromonas beta-hemolysin. Accordingly, identical ISC and Rt responses were obtained with Escherichia coli lysates harboring the cloned beta-hemolysin gene from strain SB or the aerA gene encoding for aerolysin. Sequence comparison revealed a 64% homology between aerolysin and the beta-hemolysin cloned from Aeromonas sp. strain Sb. In conclusion, beta-hemolysin secreted by pathogenic aeromonads induces active Cl− secretion in the intestinal epithelium, possibly by channel insertion into the apical membrane and by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:15271947

  5. Screening of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli Able to Antagonize the Cytotoxic Effect of Clostridium difficile upon Intestinal Epithelial HT29 Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Varela, Lorena; Alonso-Guervos, Marta; García-Suárez, Olivia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen inhabiting the human gut, often being the aetiological agent of infections after a microbiota dysbiosis following, for example, an antibiotic treatment. C. difficile infections (CDI) constitute a growing health problem with increasing rates of morbidity and mortality at groups of risk, such as elderly and hospitalized patients, but also in populations traditionally considered low-risk. This could be related to the occurrence of virulent strains which, among other factors, have high-level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, more efficient sporulation and markedly high toxin production. Several novel intervention strategies against CDI are currently under study, such as the use of probiotics to counteract the growth and/or toxigenic activity of C. difficile. In this work, we have analyzed the capability of twenty Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains, from human intestinal origin, to counteract the toxic effect of C. difficile LMG21717 upon the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29. For this purpose, we incubated the bacteria together with toxigenic supernatants obtained from C. difficile. After this co-incubation new supernatants were collected in order to quantify the remnant A and B toxins, as well as to determine their residual toxic effect upon HT29 monolayers. To this end, the real time cell analyser (RTCA) model, recently developed in our group to monitor C. difficile toxic effect, was used. Results obtained showed that strains of Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve were able to reduce the toxic effect of the pathogen upon HT29, the RTCA normalized cell-index values being inversely correlated with the amount of remnant toxin in the supernatant. The strain B. longum IPLA20022 showed the highest ability to counteract the cytotoxic effect of C. difficile acting directly against the toxin, also having the highest capability for removing the toxins from the clostridial toxigenic supernatant. Image analysis

  6. Screening of Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli Able to Antagonize the Cytotoxic Effect of Clostridium difficile upon Intestinal Epithelial HT29 Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Varela, Lorena; Alonso-Guervos, Marta; García-Suárez, Olivia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen inhabiting the human gut, often being the aetiological agent of infections after a microbiota dysbiosis following, for example, an antibiotic treatment. C. difficile infections (CDI) constitute a growing health problem with increasing rates of morbidity and mortality at groups of risk, such as elderly and hospitalized patients, but also in populations traditionally considered low-risk. This could be related to the occurrence of virulent strains which, among other factors, have high-level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, more efficient sporulation and markedly high toxin production. Several novel intervention strategies against CDI are currently under study, such as the use of probiotics to counteract the growth and/or toxigenic activity of C. difficile. In this work, we have analyzed the capability of twenty Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains, from human intestinal origin, to counteract the toxic effect of C. difficile LMG21717 upon the human intestinal epithelial cell line HT29. For this purpose, we incubated the bacteria together with toxigenic supernatants obtained from C. difficile. After this co-incubation new supernatants were collected in order to quantify the remnant A and B toxins, as well as to determine their residual toxic effect upon HT29 monolayers. To this end, the real time cell analyser (RTCA) model, recently developed in our group to monitor C. difficile toxic effect, was used. Results obtained showed that strains of Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve were able to reduce the toxic effect of the pathogen upon HT29, the RTCA normalized cell-index values being inversely correlated with the amount of remnant toxin in the supernatant. The strain B. longum IPLA20022 showed the highest ability to counteract the cytotoxic effect of C. difficile acting directly against the toxin, also having the highest capability for removing the toxins from the clostridial toxigenic supernatant. Image analysis

  7. Synthesis and biological investigations of a ZnPc-antiCEA bioconjugate for imaging of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Inder; Li, Hairong; Ongarora, Benson; Devillier, Daniel; Vicente, M. Graça H.

    2014-01-01

    Two zinc(II) phthalocyanines (ZnPcs) were conjugated with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), using an in situ activated carboxylic acid on the ZnPcs. The bioconjugate with the highest ZnPc/MAb ratio of 3 was investigated in vitro for its ability to target and fluorescently label human colorectal HT-29 cells. The ZnPc-CEA MAb 2 was observed to efficiently target HT-29 cells, about 37 times more than unconjugated ZnPc. Furthermore, in the presence of a 4-fold excess of unlabelled anti-CEA antibody, the fluorescence signal of 2 was reduced by ~90% showing that the targeting is CEA-mediated. These studies further confirm the high specificity of Pc-antibody conjugates for antigens over-expressed on tumor cells and warrant further investigations of these immunoconjugates and their derivatives for imaging of colorectal cancer. PMID:25328375

  8. Expression of the hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE increases ferritin levels by inhibiting iron export in HT29 cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paige S; Enns, Caroline A

    2004-06-11

    Iron is essential for life in almost all organisms and, in mammals, is absorbed through the villus cells of the duodenum. Using a human colonic carcinoma cell line that has many duodenal characteristics, HT29, we show that genes involved in intestinal iron transport are endogenously expressed. When stably transfected to express the hereditary hemochromatosis protein HFE these cells have increased ferritin levels. We demonstrate that this is not due to an effect on the transferrin (TF)-mediated iron uptake pathway but rather due to inhibition of iron efflux from the cell. The effect of HFE was independent of its interaction with TF receptor 1 as indicated by similar results using both the wild type HFE and the W81A mutant that binds TF receptor 1 with greatly reduced affinity. HFE expression did not affect the mRNA levels of most of the genes involved in iron absorption that were tested; however, it did correspond to a decrease in hephaestin message levels. These results point to a role for HFE in inhibition of iron efflux in HT29 cells. This is a distinct role from that in HeLa and human embryonic kidney 293 cells where HFE has been shown to inhibit TF-mediated iron uptake resulting in decreased ferritin levels. Such a distinction suggests a multifunctional role for HFE that is dependent upon expression levels of proteins involved in iron transport. PMID:15044462

  9. Culturing in serum-free culture medium on collagen type-I-coated plate increases expression of CD133 and retains original phenotype of HT-29 cancer stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mehdi; Saberi, Alihossein; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Manshaee, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sub-population of tumor cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) has an important role in tumor initiation, progression, and recurrence. Selecting a suitable procedure for isolation and enrichment of CSCs is the biggest challenge in the study of CSCs. In the present study, the role of the combination of stem cell culture medium and collagen type-I was evaluated for successful isolation and enrichment of HT-29 CSCs. Materials and Methods: HT-29 cells were cultured in serum-containing medium (parental culture medium: Medium + 10% fetal bovine serum) and serum-free medium (stem cell culture medium); both on collagen-coated plates. Spheres forming ability and CD133 expression, as a potential marker of colorectal CSCs, were evaluated in two culture mediums. Results: The results show spheroids usually give rise completely within 15 days in the stem cell culture medium on the collagen-coated plate. CD133 expression in spheroid cells (84%) is extensively higher than in parental cells (25%). Moreover, relative to parental cells, spheroid cells were more radioresistance. Conclusion: Finding of this study suggested that CSCs derived from colon cancer cell line (HT-29) can be propagated and form colonospheres in serum-free culture medium on collagen type-I. According to maintenance of their original phenotype in these conditions, it seems serum-free culture medium on collagen type-I is a suitable way to drug screening of HT-29 CSCs. PMID:27135028

  10. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  11. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, MasamichI; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  12. All Trans-Retinoic Acid Mediates MED28/HMG Box-Containing Protein 1 (HBP1)/β-Catenin Signaling in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Hsieh, Nien-Tsu; Huang, Chun-Yin; Li, Chun-I

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin A is required for normal body function, including vision, epithelial integrity, growth, and differentiation. All trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), a family member of vitamin A, has been explored in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and other types of cancer. Dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and disrupted cadherin-catenin complex often contribute to colorectal malignancy. MED28, a mammalian Mediator subunit, is found highly expressed in breast and colorectal cancers. Our laboratory has also reported that MED28 regulates cell growth, migration, and invasion in human breast cancer cells. In the current study we investigated the effect of ATRA on MED28 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer. HCT116, HT29, SW480, and SW620, four human colorectal cancer cell lines representing different stages of carcinogenesis and harboring critical genetic changes, were employed. Our data indicated that regardless of genetic variations among these cells, suppression of MED28 reduced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and nuclear β-catenin, but increased the expression of E-cadherin and HMG box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) where HBP1 has been described as a negative regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The reporter activity of an HBP1 promoter increased upon MED28 knockdown, but decreased upon MED28 overexpression. ATRA reduced the expression of MED28 and mimicked the effect of MED28 suppression in down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, ATRA can reverse the suppressive effect of MED28 on HBP1 and E-cadherin and inactivate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in colorectal cancer, suggesting a protective effect of ATRA against colorectal cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1796-1803, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660958

  13. HT-29 and Caco-2 Reporter Cell Lines for Functional Studies of Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mastropietro, Giuliana; Tiscornia, Inés; Perelmuter, Karen; Astrada, Soledad; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB is a transcription factor which plays a key role in regulating biological processes. In response to signals, NF-κB activation occurs via phosphorylation of its inhibitor, which dissociates from the NF-κB dimer allowing the translocation to the nucleus, inducing gene expression. NF-κB activation has direct screening applications for drug discovery for several therapeutic indications. Thus, pathway-specific reporter cell systems appear as useful tools to screen and unravel the mode of action of probiotics and natural and synthetic compounds. Here, we describe the generation, characterization, and validation of human epithelial reporter cell lines for functional studies of NF-κB activation by different pro- and anti-inflammatory agents. Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were transfected with a pNF-κB-hrGFP plasmid which contains the GFP gene under the control of NF-κB binding elements. Three proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and LPS) were able to activate the reporter systems in a dose-response manner, which corresponds to the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Finally, the reporter cell lines were validated using lactic acid bacteria and a natural compound. We have established robust Caco-2-NF-κB-hrGFP and HT-29-NF-κB-hrGFP reporter cell lines which represent a valuable tool for primary screening and identification of bacterial strains and compounds with a potential therapeutic interest. PMID:25861164

  14. Cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-Glucoside Demonstrates Apoptogenesis in Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells (HT-29): Involvement of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Regulation.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hassan, Loiy Elsir Ahmed; Abdul Majid, Amin M S; Yagi, Sakina M Ahmed; Mohan, Syam; Elhassan Taha, Manal Mohamed; Ahmad, Syahida; Chuen, Cheah Shiau; Narrima, Putri; Rais, Mohd Mustafa; Syam, Suvitha; Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Hadi, A Hamid A

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species can contribute to diverse signalling pathways of inflammatory and tumour cells. Cucurbitacins are a group of highly oxygenated triterpenes. Many plants used in folk medicine to treat cancer have been found to contain cucurbitacins displaying potentially important anti-inflammatory actions. The current study was designed to investigate the anti-ROS and -RNS effects of cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-glucoside (CLG) and the role of these signaling factors in the apoptogenic effects of CLG on human colon cancer cells (HT-29). This natural cucurbitacin was isolated purely from Citrullus lanatus var. citroides (Cucurbitaceae). The results revealed that CLG was cytotoxic to HT-29. CLG increased significantly (P < 0.05) RNA and protein levels of caspase-3 in HT-29 cells when verified using a colorimetric assay and realtime qPCR, respectively. The results showed that lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma (LPS/INF-γ) increased nitrous oxide (NO) production inR AW264.7macrophages, whereas N(G)-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME) and CLG curtailed it. This compound did not reveal any cytotoxicity on RAW264.7 macrophages and human normal liver cells (WRL-68) when tested using the MTT assay. Findings of ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) assays demonstrate the antioxidant properties of CLG. The apoptogenic property of CLG on HT-29 cells is thus related to inhibition of reactive nitrogen and oxygen reactive species and the triggering of caspase-3-regulated apoptosis. PMID:22685485

  15. Cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-Glucoside Demonstrates Apoptogenesis in Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells (HT-29): Involvement of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwahab, Siddig Ibrahim; Hassan, Loiy Elsir Ahmed; Abdul Majid, Amin M. S.; Yagi, Sakina M. Ahmed; Mohan, Syam; Elhassan Taha, Manal Mohamed; Ahmad, Syahida; Chuen, Cheah Shiau; Narrima, Putri; Rais, Mohd Mustafa; Syam, Suvitha; Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Hadi, A. Hamid A.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species can contribute to diverse signalling pathways of inflammatory and tumour cells. Cucurbitacins are a group of highly oxygenated triterpenes. Many plants used in folk medicine to treat cancer have been found to contain cucurbitacins displaying potentially important anti-inflammatory actions. The current study was designed to investigate the anti-ROS and -RNS effects of cucurbitacin L 2-O-β-glucoside (CLG) and the role of these signaling factors in the apoptogenic effects of CLG on human colon cancer cells (HT-29). This natural cucurbitacin was isolated purely from Citrullus lanatus var. citroides (Cucurbitaceae). The results revealed that CLG was cytotoxic to HT-29. CLG increased significantly (P < 0.05) RNA and protein levels of caspase-3 in HT-29 cells when verified using a colorimetric assay and realtime qPCR, respectively. The results showed that lipopolysaccharide/interferon-gamma (LPS/INF-γ) increased nitrous oxide (NO) production inR AW264.7macrophages, whereas N(G)-nitro-L-argininemethyl ester (L-NAME) and CLG curtailed it. This compound did not reveal any cytotoxicity on RAW264.7 macrophages and human normal liver cells (WRL-68) when tested using the MTT assay. Findings of ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC) assays demonstrate the antioxidant properties of CLG. The apoptogenic property of CLG on HT-29 cells is thus related to inhibition of reactive nitrogen and oxygen reactive species and the triggering of caspase-3-regulated apoptosis. PMID:22685485

  16. Curcumin induces apoptosis through the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway in HT-29 cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-bo; Qi, Li-li; Zheng, Shui-di; Wu, Tian-xing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of curcumin on release of cytochrome c and expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, Bad, Bcl-xL, caspase-3, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), and survivin of HT-29 cells. Methods: HT-29 cells were treated with curcumin (0~80 μmol/L) for 24 h. The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and the apoptosis-related proteins Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Bad, caspase-3, PARP, and survivin were determined by Western blot analysis and their mRNA expressions by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Curcumin significantly induced the growth inhibition and apoptosis of HT-29 cells. A decrease in expressions of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and survivin was observed after exposure to 10~80 μmol/L curcumin, while the levels of Bax and Bad increased in the curcumin-treated cells. Curcumin also induced the release of cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-3, and the cleavage of PARP in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion: These data suggest that curcumin induced the HT-29 cell apoptosis possibly via the mitochondria-mediated pathway. PMID:19235267

  17. Dichloroacetate induces autophagy in colorectal cancer cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lin, G; Hill, D K; Andrejeva, G; Boult, J K R; Troy, H; Fong, A-C L F W T; Orton, M R; Panek, R; Parkes, H G; Jafar, M; Koh, D-M; Robinson, S P; Judson, I R; Griffiths, J R; Leach, M O; Eykyn, T R; Chung, Y-L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dichloroacetate (DCA) has been found to have antitumour properties. Methods: We investigated the cellular and metabolic responses to DCA treatment and recovery in human colorectal (HT29, HCT116 WT and HCT116 Bax-ko), prostate carcinoma cells (PC3) and HT29 xenografts by flow cytometry, western blotting, electron microscopy, 1H and hyperpolarised 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results: Increased expression of the autophagy markers LC3B II was observed following DCA treatment both in vitro and in vivo. We observed increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mTOR inhibition (decreased pS6 ribosomal protein and p4E-BP1 expression) as well as increased expression of MCT1 following DCA treatment. Steady-state lactate excretion and the apparent hyperpolarised [1-13C] pyruvate-to-lactate exchange rate (kPL) were decreased in DCA-treated cells, along with increased NAD+/NADH ratios and NAD+. Steady-state lactate excretion and kPL returned to, or exceeded, control levels in cells recovered from DCA treatment, accompanied by increased NAD+ and NADH. Reduced kPL with DCA treatment was found in HT29 tumour xenografts in vivo. Conclusions: DCA induces autophagy in cancer cells accompanied by ROS production and mTOR inhibition, reduced lactate excretion, reduced kPL and increased NAD+/NADH ratio. The observed cellular and metabolic changes recover on cessation of treatment. PMID:24892448

  18. Dual Anti-Metastatic and Anti-Proliferative Activity Assessment of Two Probiotics on HeLa and HT-29 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Zahra; Karami, Fatemeh; Neyazi, Nadia; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Karimi, Roya; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Taheri, Behrooz; Motevaseli, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lactobacilli are a group of probiotics with beneficial effects on prevention of cancer. However, there is scant data in relation with the impacts of probiotics in late-stage cancer progration, especially metastasis. The present original work was aimed to evaluate the anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activity of lactobacillus rhamnosus supernatant (LRS) and lactobacillus crispatus supernatant (LCS) on the human cervical and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines (HeLa and HT-29, respectively). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, the anti-proliferative activities of LRS and LCS were determined through MTT assay. MRC-5 was used as a normal cell line. Expression analysis of CASP3, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 genes was performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), following the cell synchronization. Results Supernatants of these two lactobacilli had cytotoxic effect on HeLa, however LRS treatment was only effective on HT-29 cell line. In addition, LRS had no side-effect on normal cells. It was shown that CASP3 gene expression has been reduced after treatment with supernatants of two studied lactobacilli. According to our study, LRS and LCS are efficacious in the prevention of metastasis potency in HeLa cells with decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and increased expression of their inhibitors. In the case of HT-29 cells, only LRS showed this effect. Conclusion Herein, we have demonstrated two probiotics which have anti-metastatic effects on malignant cells and they can be administrated to postpone late-stage of cancer disease. LRS and LCS are effective on HeLa cell lines while only the effect of LRS is significant on HT-29, through cytotoxic and anti-metastatic mechanisms. Further assessments are required to evaluate our results on the other cancer cell lines, in advance to use these probiotics in other extensive trial studies. PMID:27551673

  19. Conditioned media from macrophages of M1, but not M2 phenotype, inhibit the proliferation of the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and CACO-2

    PubMed Central

    ENGSTRÖM, ALEXANDER; ERLANDSSON, ANN; DELBRO, DICK; WIJKANDER, JONNY

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are infiltrated by stroma cells including macrophages and these cells can affect tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. We have investigated the effects of conditioned media (CM) from different macrophages on the proliferation of the colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and CACO-2. CM from THP-1 macrophages and monocyte-derived human macrophages of the M1 phenotype, but not the M2 phenotype, inhibited proliferation of the tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lipopolysaccaharide and interferon γ was used for differentiation of macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and CM were generated both during differentiation (M1DIFF) and after differentiation (M1). M1 and M1DIFF CM as well as THP-1 macrophage CM resulted in cell cycle arrest in HT-29 cells with a decrease of cells in S phase and an increase in G2/M phase. Treatment of HT-29 cells with M1DIFF, but not M1 or THP-1 macrophage CM, resulted in apoptosis of about 20% of the tumor cells and this was accompanied by lack of recovery of cell growth after removal of CM and subsequent culture in fresh media. A protein array was used to identify cytokines released from M1 and M2 macrophages. Among the cytokines released by M1 macrophages, tumor necrosis factor α and CXCL9 were tested by direct addition to HT-29 cells, but neither affected proliferation. Our results indicate that M1 macrophages inhibit colon cancer cell growth and have the potential of contributing to reducing tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24296981

  20. (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate inhibits the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kengo; Hara, Takeshi; Shimizu, Masahito; Nagano, Junji; Ohno, Tomohiko; Hoshi, Masato; Ito, Hiroyasu; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2012-09-01

    Immune escape, the ability of tumor cells to avoid tumor-specific immune responses, occurs during the development and progression of several types of human malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the tryptophan catabolic enzyme, plays a significant role in regulating the immune response and provides tumor cells with a potent tool to evade the immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major catechin in green tea, on the inhibition of IDO expression induced by interferon (IFN)-γ in human CRC cells. We found that IFN-γ increased the expression levels of IDO protein and mRNA in HT29 and SW837 CRC cell lines. Treatment of SW837 cells with EGCG significantly decreased IFN-γ-induced expression of IDO protein and mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. Enzymatic activity of IDO, determined by the concentration of L-kynurenine in the culture medium, was also significantly inhibited by EGCG treatment. Phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) induced by IFN-γ was also significantly inhibited by EGCG. Reporter assays indicated that EGCG inhibited the transcriptional activities of IDO promoters, IFN-stimulated response element and IFN-γ activation sequence, activated by STAT1 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that EGCG may exert antitumor effects on CRC, at least in part, by inhibiting the expression and function of IDO through the suppression of STAT1 activation. EGCG may, thus, serve as a potential agent for antitumor immunotherapy and be useful in the chemoprevention and/or treatment of CRC. PMID:23741252

  1. Glycoprotein isolated from Solanum nigrum L. kills HT-29 cells through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2005-01-01

    Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) has been used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity. We previously isolated glycoprotein from SNL and observed that it decreased viable HT-29 cell numbers at a low concentration (60 microg/mL). This study investigated the apoptotic signal pathway triggered by glycoprotein isolated from SNL in HT-29 cells. Treatment of HT-29 cells with SNL glycoprotein (60 microg/mL) for 4 hours resulted in a cytotoxic effect of more than 60%, compared with the control. To explain the apoptotic effects of SNL glycoprotein, we investigated its effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) alpha activity and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor (NF) kappaB in HT-29 cells, using western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results from these experiments showed that SNL glycoprotein has remarkable inhibitory effects on the activities of TPA (100 nM)-stimulated PKCalpha and NF-kappaB in HT-29 cells. They also substantiated that PKCalpha is a part of the TPA-activated upstream signal pathway of NF-kappaB, since NF-kappaB activity was inhibited by staurosporine (a PKC inhibitor) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an NF-kappaB inhibitor) in a western blot analysis. Furthermore, to verify the triggering of apoptosis by the SNL glycoprotein, we performed DNA fragmentation, nuclear staining, and protein expression assays of apoptotic-related proteins. The amount of DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell numbers increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with SNL glycoprotein. Apoptosis-related protein assays demonstrated that SNL glycoprotein-induced apoptosis is associated with the regulation of bcl-2 and Bax expression. Taken together, the results of this study showed that the activation of PKCalpha, NF-kappaB, and Bax expression by SNL glycoprotein is possibly involved in the apoptotic process. Consequently, these results indicate that SNL glycoprotein causes HT-29 cell death through

  2. 111In-cetuximab as a diagnostic agent by accessible epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor targeting in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lee, Shin-Yu; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-06-30

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a common cause death cancer in the whole world. The aim of this study is to define the 111In-cetuximab as a diagnosis tracer of human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In this research, cell uptake, nano-SPECT/CT scintigraphy, autoradiography, biodistribution and immunohitochemical staining of EGF receptor were included. HCT-116 and HT-29 cell expressed a relatively high and moderate level of EGF receptor, respectively. The nano-SPECT/CT image of 111In-cetuximab showed tumor radiation uptake of subcutaneous HCT-116 xenograft tumor was higher than SW-620. Autoradiography image also showed that tumor of HCT-116 had high 111In-cetuximab uptake. Mice that bearing CT-26 in situ xenograft colorectal tumors showed similar high uptake in vivo and ex vivo through nano-SPECT/CT imaging at 72 hours. Metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors demonstrated the highest uptake at 72 hours after the injection of 111In-cetuximab. Relatively, results of 111In-DTPA showed that metabolism through urinary system, especially in the kidney. The quantitative analysis of biodistribution showed count value of metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors that treated with 111In-cetuximab had a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that treated with 111In-DTPA after injection 72 hours. Result of immunohistologic staining of EGF receptor also showed high EGF receptor expression and uptake in metastatic colorectal tumors. In summary, we suggested that 111In-cetuximab will be a potential tool for detecting EGF receptor expression in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26062654

  3. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world’s most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers. PMID:27304964

  4. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world's most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers. PMID:27304964

  5. Hedyotis diffusa Willd. extract suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis via IL-6-inducible STAT3 pathway inactivation in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JIUMAO; LI, QIONGYU; CHEN, HONGWEI; LIN, HUI; LAI, ZIJUN; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the inflammatory microenvironment plays a significant role in colorectal cancer (CRC). The interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (IL-6/STAT3) signaling pathway mediates the proliferative and anti-apoptotic activities required for oncogenesis under inflammatory conditions; thus, suppressing tumor growth by targeting the IL-6/STAT3 pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for CRC. Our previous study reported that the ethanol extract obtained from Hedyotis diffusa Willd. (EEHDW) can induce apoptosis, and inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells and tumor angiogenesis by modulating various signaling pathways; however, less is known regarding the activity of EEHDW in a cancer-promoting inflammatory environment. Therefore, the present study investigated whether EEHDW inhibits the growth of the CRC HT-29 cell line via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. Pretreatment of HT-29 cells with IL-6 led to an increase in cell viability, colony formation and phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) expression. Treatment of these cells with EEHDW prior to IL-6 stimulation resulted in a significant reduction in the IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. In addition, EEHDW treatment significantly reduced the mRNA expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), and upregulated the expression levels of Bcl-2-associated X protein (P<0.05), which are important target genes of the IL-6/STAT3 pathway. These findings strongly indicated that EEHDW suppresses tumor cell growth and induces the apoptosis of human CRC cells via inactivation of the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25789077

  6. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  7. Correction: Chemopreventive activity of ellagitannins and their derivatives from black raspberry seeds on HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunnho; Jung, Hana; Lee, Heejae; Yi, Hae Chang; Kwak, Ho-Kyung; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-08-01

    Correction for 'Chemopreventive activity of ellagitannins and their derivatives from black raspberry seeds on HT-29 colon cancer cells' by Hyunnho Cho et al., Food Funct., 2015, 6, 1675-1683. PMID:26211477

  8. Elucidation of a novel phenformin derivative on glucose-deprived stress responses in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh-Hashi, Kentaro; Irie, Nao; Sakai, Takayuki; Okuda, Kensuke; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    Recently, we developed a variety of phenformin derivatives as selective antitumor agents. Based on previous findings, this study evaluated a promising compound, 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethylbiguanide (2-Cl-Phen), on the basis of stress responses in the human colon cancer cell line HT-29 under a serum- and glucose-deprived condition. 2-Cl-Phen triggered morphological changes such as shrinkage and plasma membrane disintegration, as well as a decrease in mitochondrial activity and an increase in LDH leakage. To understand intracellular issues relating to 2-Cl-Phen, this study focused on the expression levels of ER stress-inducible genes and several oncogenic genes. Serum and glucose deprivation significantly induced a variety of ER stress-inducible genes, but a 12-h treatment of 2-Cl-Phen down-regulated expression of several ER stress-related genes, with the exception of GADD153. Interestingly, the expression levels of ATF6α, GRP78, MANF, and CRELD2 mRNA were almost completely decreased by 2-Cl-Phen. This study also observed that a 24-h treatment of 2-Cl-Phen attenuated the expression levels of GRP78, GADD153, and c-Myc protein. The decrease in c-Myc protein occurred before the fluctuation of GRP78 protein, while the expression of c-Myc mRNA showed little change with cotreatment of serum and glucose deprivation with 2-Cl-Phen. To further understand the 2-Cl-Phen-induced down-regulation of ATF6-related genes, this study investigated the stability of ATF6α and GRP78 proteins using NanoLuc-tagged constructs. The expression levels of NanoLuc-tagged ATF6α and GRP78 were significantly down-regulated by 2-Cl-Phen in the presence or absence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. Taken together, our novel phenformin derivative 2-Cl-Phen has the unique characteristic of diminishing tumor adaptive responses, especially the expression of ATF6-related genes, as well as that of c-Myc protein, in a transcriptional and posttranscriptional manner under a serum- and glucose

  9. Improvement of biodistribution and therapeutic index via increase of polyethylene glycol on drug-carrying liposomes in an HT-29/luc xenografted mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chow, Tong-Hsien; Lin, Yi-Yu; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Yang, Chung-Shi; Ting, Gann

    2009-06-01

    Liposomes modified with a high concentration of polyethylene glycol (PEG) could significantly prolong the retention time of the carried drug in the circulation, thus improving the drug accumulation in the tumor. In this study, 6 mol% rather than 0.9 mol% PEGylated liposomes (100 nm in diameter) encapsulated with indium-111 were used in a human colorectal carcinoma HT-29/luc tumor-bearing mouse model for comparing the PEGylation effect. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, passive-targeted assay, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and tumor growth measurements were used for the spatial and temporal distribution, tumor localization and therapeutic evaluation of the drug. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the terminal half-life (T((1/2))lambdaz) and C(max) of 6 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes were similar to those of 0.9 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes. In the blood, the total body clearance (Cl) of 6 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes was about 1.7-fold lower and the area under the curve (AUC) was 1.7-fold higher than those of 0.9 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes. These results showed that the long-term circulation and localization of 6 mol% PEGylated liposomes was more appropriate for use in the tumor-bearing animal model. In addition, the biodistribution of 6 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes showed significantly lower uptake in the liver, spleen, kidneys, small intestine and bone marrow than those of 0.9 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes. The clearance rate of both drugs from the blood decreased with time, with the maximum at 24 h post intravenous (i.v.) injection. Prominent tumor uptake and the highest tumor/muscle ratios were found at 48 h post injection. Both AUC and relative ratio of the AUCs (RR-AUC) also showed that 6 mol% PEGylated liposomes significantly reduced the uptake of drugs in the reticuloendothelial system (RES), yet enhanced the uptake in the tumor. Gamma scintigraphy at 48 h post injection also demonstrated more distinct tumor uptake with 6 mol% PEG (111)In liposomes as compared to

  10. Radiosensitization of Human Colorectal Cancer Cells by MLN4924: An Inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juefeng; Zhu, Ji; Li, Guichao; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer and the combination of radiation with capecitabine has been shown to achieve only 15% to 25% of pathologic complete response. This study aimed to investigate the effect of MLN4924, a potent small molecule inhibitor of SKP1-Cullin-F-box proteins E3 ubiquitin ligases, as a novel radiosensitizing agent in colorectal cancer cells. Indeed, we found that MLN4924 effectively sensitized colorectal cancer cells to radiation with a sensitivity-enhancement ratio of 1.61 for HT-29 cells and 1.35 for HCT-116 cells. Mechanistically, MLN4924 significantly enhanced radiation-induced G2/M arrest, apoptosis, and DNA damage response through accumulation of p27. Knockdown of p27 via small interfering RNA partially inhibited MLN4924-induced radiosensitization, indicating a causal role played by p27. Our study suggested that MLN4924 could be further developed as a novel radiosensitizing agent against colorectal cancer. PMID:26082455

  11. Production of immune response mediators by HT-29 intestinal cell-lines in the presence of Bifidobacterium-treated infant microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, S; Bahrami, B; Macfarlane, S; Gueimonde, M; Macfarlane, G T; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G

    2015-01-01

    The colonisation and establishment of the intestinal microbiota starts immediately at birth and is essential for the development of the intestine and the immune system. This microbial community gradually increases in number and diversity until the age of two or three years when it becomes a stable ecosystem resembling that of adults. This period constitutes a unique window of opportunity to modulate it through probiotic action, with a potential impact in later health. In the present work we have investigated how putative bifidobacterial probiotics modify the metabolic profiles and immune-modulatory properties of faecal microbiotas. An in vitro pH-controlled single-stage continuous-culture system (CCS) inoculated with infant faeces was employed to characterise the effects of two Bifidobacterium species on the intestinal microbiotas in three children, together with the effects of these modified microbiotas on cytokine production by HT-29 cells. Intestinal bacterial communities, production of short-chain fatty acids and lactate were determined by quantitative PCR and gas chromatography, respectively. Cytokines production by HT-29 cells was measured by ELISA. The combination of CCS with infant faeces and human intestinal cells provided a suitable model to evaluate the specific modulation of the intestinal microbiota and immune system by probiotics. In the CCS, infant faecal microbiotas were influenced by the addition of bifidobacteria, resulting in changes in their ability to induce the production of immune mediators by HT-29 cells. The different metabolic and immunological responses induced by the bifidobacterial species tested indicate the need to assess potential probiotics in model systems including complex intestinal microbiotas. Potential probiotic bifidobacteria can modulate the infant microbiota and its ability to induce the production of mediators of the immune response by intestinal cells. PMID:25691102

  12. Diverse effect of WWOX overexpression in HT29 and SW480 colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Magdalena; Pospiech, Karolina; Lewandowska, Urszula; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka W; Bednarek, Andrzej Kazimierz

    2014-09-01

    WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is the tumour suppressor gene from the common fragile site FRA16D, whose altered expression has been observed in tumours of various origins. Its suppressive role and influence on basic cellular processes such as proliferation and apoptosis have been confirmed in many in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, its protein is thought to take part in the regulation of tissue morphogenesis and cell differentiation. However, its role in colon cancer formation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of WWOX on the process of colon cancerogenesis, the basic features of the cancer cell and its expression profiles. Multiple biological tests, microarray experiments and quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR were performed on two colon cancer cell lines, HT29 and SW480, which differ in morphology, expression of differentiation markers, migratory characteristics and metastasis potential and which represent negative (HT29) and low (SW480) WWOX expression levels. The cell lines were subjected to retroviral transfection, inducting WWOX overexpression. WWOX was found to have diverse effects on proliferation, apoptosis and the adhesion potential of modified cell lines. Our observations suggest that in the HT29 colon cancer cell line, increased expression of WWOX may result in the transition of cancer cells into a more normal colon epithelium phenotype, while in SW480, WWOX demonstrated well-known tumour suppressor properties. Our results also suggest that WWOX does not behave as classical tumour suppressor gene, and its influence on cell functioning is more global and complicated. PMID:24938873

  13. miR-451 regulates FoxO3 nuclear accumulation through Ywhaz in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Jijun; Dai, Xiaorong; Zhou, Zhengbin; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yan; Hou, Yaying; Pang, Lei; Wang, Xiaohong; Wang, Chenhai; Hao, Zhenfeng; Zhang, Yanqing; Jiang, Jixin; Cheng, Hongwei; Yu, Duonan

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Our previous studies reported that miR-451 could protect against erythroid oxidant stress target gene-Ywhaz (14-3-3zeta) via inhibiting FoxO3 in the erythropoiesis. This study aimed to investigate the potential mechanism underlying the regulatory effect of miR-451 on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods: In this study, expressions of miR-451 and Ywhaz in CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry respectively. Human colon cancer cell lines were transfected with miR-451-MSCV-PIG retroviral vector to restore miR-451 expression. Ywhaz-3’UTR luciferase reporter assay confirmed Ywhaz as a direct target gene of miR-451. HCT116 cells and H29 cells were transfected with -shRNA-Ywhaz (pSGU6-Ywahz-shRNA-GFP) and the protein level of FoxO3 in the nucleus and cytoplasm was detected via Western blot assay. The anti-tumor effects of miR-451 were further verified in nude mice. Results: miR-451 was significantly down-regulated in human colon cancer tissues and cell lines (HCT116 and HT29), and inversely correlated with Dukes stage of colon cancer. Ywhaz was a candidate target gene of miR-451 and able to stimulate tumor growth via binding to FoxO3, inhibiting the FoxO3 nuclear accumulation. Conclusion: miR-451 may inhibit the colon cancer growth in vitro and in vivo, likely through directly targeting Ywhaz and indirectly regulating the nuclear accumulation of FoxO3. PMID:26885274

  14. Preclinical evaluation of destruxin B as a novel Wnt signaling target suppressing proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer using non-invasive bioluminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chi-Tai; Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Ye, Min; Wu, Wen-Shi; Chang, Tung-Chen; Wang, Liang-Shun; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2012-05-15

    In continuation to our studies toward the identification of direct anti-cancer targets, here we showed that destruxin B (DB) from Metarhizium anisopliae suppressed the proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in human colorectal cancer (CRC) HT29, SW480 and HCT116 cells. Additionally, DB induced apoptosis in HT29 cells by decreased expression level of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL while increased pro-apoptotic Bax. On the other hand, DB attenuated Wnt-signaling by downregulation of β-catenin, Tcf4 and β-catenin/Tcf4 transcriptional activity, concomitantly with decreased expression of β-catenin target genes cyclin D1, c-myc and survivin. Furthermore, DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through suppressed MMPs-2 and -9 enzymatic activities. We also found that DB targeted the MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt pathway by reduced expression of Akt, IKK-α, JNK, NF-κB, c-Jun and c-Fos while increased that of IκBα. Finally, we demonstrated that DB inhibited tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice using non-invasive bioluminescence technique. Consistently, tumor samples from DB-treated mice demonstrated suppressed expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1, survivin, and endothelial marker CD31 while increased caspase-3 expression. Collectively, our data supports DB as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin/Tcf signaling pathway that may be beneficial in the CRC management. Highlights: ► Destruxin B (DB) inhibited colorectal cancer cells growth and induced apoptosis. ► MAPK and/or PI3K/Akt cascade cooperates in DB induced apoptosis. ► DB affected the migratory and invasive ability of HT29 cells through MMP-9. ► DB attenuated Wnt-signaling components β-catenin, Tcf4. ► DB attenuated cyclin D1, c-myc, survivin and tumorigenesis in HT29 xenograft mice.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  17. 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside suppresses human colorectal cancer cell metastasis through inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Hsieh, Shu-Ling; Leung, Wan; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Lee, Chining-Ting; Wu, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG), a major component of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb (He-Shou-Wu), has been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. However, its anti-metastatic effect against colorectal cancer is still unclear. In this study, cell migration, invasion and adhesion abilities as well as metastasis-associated protein and NF-κB pathway signaling factor expression were analyzed after treating HT-29 cells with THSG. According to the results, the migration and invasiveness of HT-29 cells were reduced after treatment with 5 or 10 mM THSG (p<0.05). Additionally, the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and phosphorylated VE-cadherin in HT-29 cells were reduced and the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of EA.hy926 endothelial cell monolayers was increased after incubation in THSG for 24 h (p<0.05). Cell adhesion ability and the E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein levels were reduced when EA.hy926 endothelial cells were treated with THSG (p<0.05). In addition, the cytoplasmic phosphorylation of IκB, the nuclear p65 level and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB were reduced after treating HT-29 or EA.hy926 cells with 5 or 10 mM THSG (p<0.05). These results suggest that THSG inhibits HT-29 cell metastasis by suppressing cell migration, invasion and adhesion. Furthermore, THSG inhibits metastasis-associated protein expression by suppressing NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:27278328

  18. Protective Effect of Carnobacterium spp. against Listeria monocytogenes during Host Cell Invasion Using In vitro HT29 Model.

    PubMed

    Pilchová, Tereza; Pilet, Marie-France; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Pazlarová, Jarmila; Tresse, Odile

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of listeriosis results mainly from the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to attach, invade, replicate and survive within various cell types in mammalian tissues. In this work, the effect of two bacteriocin-producing Carnobacterium (C. divergens V41 and C. maltaromaticum V1) and three non-bacteriocinogenic strains: (C. divergens V41C9, C. divergens 2763, and C. maltaromaticum 2762) was investigated on the reduction of L. monocytogenes Scott A plaque-forming during human infection using the HT-29 in vitro model. All Carnobacteria tested resulted in a reduction in the epithelial cell invasion caused by L. monocytogenes Scott A. To understand better the mechanism underlying the level of L. monocytogenes infection inhibition by Carnobacteria, infection assays from various pretreatments of Carnobacteria were assessed. The results revealed the influence of bacteriocin production combined with a passive mechanism of mammalian cell monolayers protection by Carnobacteria. These initial results showing a reduction in L. monocytogenes virulence on epithelial cells by Carnobacteria would be worthwhile analyzing further as a promising probiotic tool for human health. PMID:27617232

  19. Protective Effect of Carnobacterium spp. against Listeria monocytogenes during Host Cell Invasion Using In vitro HT29 Model

    PubMed Central

    Pilchová, Tereza; Pilet, Marie-France; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Pazlarová, Jarmila; Tresse, Odile

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of listeriosis results mainly from the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to attach, invade, replicate and survive within various cell types in mammalian tissues. In this work, the effect of two bacteriocin-producing Carnobacterium (C. divergens V41 and C. maltaromaticum V1) and three non-bacteriocinogenic strains: (C. divergens V41C9, C. divergens 2763, and C. maltaromaticum 2762) was investigated on the reduction of L. monocytogenes Scott A plaque-forming during human infection using the HT-29 in vitro model. All Carnobacteria tested resulted in a reduction in the epithelial cell invasion caused by L. monocytogenes Scott A. To understand better the mechanism underlying the level of L. monocytogenes infection inhibition by Carnobacteria, infection assays from various pretreatments of Carnobacteria were assessed. The results revealed the influence of bacteriocin production combined with a passive mechanism of mammalian cell monolayers protection by Carnobacteria. These initial results showing a reduction in L. monocytogenes virulence on epithelial cells by Carnobacteria would be worthwhile analyzing further as a promising probiotic tool for human health. PMID:27617232

  20. Bacteroides fragilis enterotoxin induces cytoskeletal changes and surface blebbing in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Donelli, G; Fabbri, A; Fiorentini, C

    1996-01-01

    Certain strains of the anaerobic bacterium Bacteroides fragilis are known to produce an enterotoxin of about 20 kDa which is able to induce a fluid response in ligated intestinal loops and a cytotoxic response in HT-29 cells. It presents protease activity, belonging to a family of metalloproteases termed metzincins. In order to investigate the mode of action of the enterotoxin in cultured cells, we performed a study with HT-29 cells, using both fluoresence and electron microscopy. Treated cells underwent morphological changes, mainly consisting of the retraction of the cell body and the formation of numerous blebs on the cell surface. The microfilament system was reorganized, the F-actin being condensed as a ring at the cell periphery, whereas other cell organelles appeared to be unaffected. All these changes, clearly visible after 3 h of exposure to the toxin, were reversed within 24 h of treatment. By inhibiting the protease activity of the toxin with specific metal chelators, the cytoskeletal effects were also prevented. Thus, B. fragilis enterotoxin appears to act on cells by reversibly modifying the actin cytoskeleton, an effect probably dependent on its proteolytic activity. PMID:8557328

  1. Various Acylglycerols from Common Oils Exert Different Antitumor Activities on Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Bueno, Rebeca P; González-Fernández, María J; Guil-Guerrero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Western countries; therefore, the implementation of healthy dietary habits in order to prevent its occurrence is a desirable action. We show here that both free fatty acids (FFAs) and some acylglycerols induce antitumoral actions in the colorectal cancer cell line HT-29. We tested several C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched oils (e.g., sunflower and Echium) as well as other oils, such as arachidonic acid-enriched (Arasco®) and docosahexaenoic acid-enriched (Marinol® and cod liver oil), in addition to coconut and olive oils. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide test indicated inhibitory effects on HT-29 cells viability for FFAs, and monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol (DAG) species, while the lactate dehydrogenase test proved that FFAs were the more effective species to induce membrane injury. Conversely, all species did not exhibit actions on CCD-18 normal human colon cells viability. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of necrosis and apoptosis, while the monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibition test demonstrated high activity for 2-monoacylglycerols derived from Arasco and sunflower oils. However, different monoacylglycerols and DAGs have also the potential for MAGL inhibition. Therefore, checking for activity on colon cancer cells of specifically designed acylglycerol-derivative species would be a suitable way to design functional foods destined to avoid colorectal cancer initiation. PMID:27007804

  2. Effects of meloxicam on vascular endothelial growth factor and angiopoietin-2 expression in colon carcinoma cell line HT-29.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Tao, Kaixiong; Huang, Tao

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the effect of meloxicam, a selected NSAIDs, on cell growth, expression of VEGF and angiopointin-2 (Ang-2) protein in HT-29 cell line, cultured HT-29 cells were treated with meloxicam of various concentrations for various lengths of time. The proliferation of HT-29 was detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), the cell cycle was determined by flow cytometer and the levels of VEGF and Ang-2 protein in supernatants were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mRNA expressions of VEGF and Ang-2 in cultured HT-29 were determined by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that treatment of meloxicam of different concentrations and for various lengths of time had a cytotoxicic effect on the cell proliferation of HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependant and time-dependant manner. Cell cycle analysis showed that the cells were mainly blocked in G0/G1 phase. The VEGF and Ang-2 protein levels in supernatants of the culture medium were decreased gradually in a concentration-dependent or time-dependent fashion. The mRNA expression of cox-2, VEGF and Ang-2 showed a gradual and concentration-dependent reduction. It is concluded that meloxicam can reduce the expression of VEGF and Ang-2 at the protein and mRNA level in colon carcinoma cell line. PMID:17828495

  3. A novel synthetic C-1 analogue of 7-deoxypancratistatin induces apoptosis in p53 positive and negative human colorectal cancer cells by targeting the mitochondria: enhancement of activity by tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dennis; Tremblay, Phillip; Mahngar, Kevinjeet; Akbari-Asl, Pardis; Collins, Jonathan; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2012-06-01

    The natural compound pancratistatin (PST), isolated from the Hymenocallis littoralis plant, specifically induces apoptosis in many cancer cell lines. Unlike many other chemotherapeutics, PST is not genotoxic and has minimal adverse effects on non-cancerous cells. However, its availability for preclinical and clinical work is limited due to its low availability in its natural source and difficulties in its chemical synthesis. Several synthetic analogues of 7-deoxypancratistatin with different modifications at C-1 were synthesized and screened for apoptosis inducing activity in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We found that a C-1 acetoxymethyl derivative of 7-deoxypancratistatin, JC-TH-acetate-4 (JCTH-4), was effective in inducing apoptosis in both p53 positive (HCT 116) and p53 negative (HT-29) human CRC cell lines, demonstrating similar efficacy to that of natural PST. JCTH-4 was able to decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increase levels of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria, cause release of the apoptogenic factor cytochrome c (Cyto c) from isolated mitochondria, and induce autophagy in HCT 116 and HT-29 cells. Interestingly, when JCTH-4 was administered with tamoxifen (TAM), there was an enhanced effect in apoptosis induction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and Cyto c release by isolated mitochondria, and autophagic induction by CRC cells. Minimal toxicity was exhibited by a normal human fetal fibroblast (NFF) and a normal colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cell line. Hence, JCTH-4 is a novel compound capable of selectively inducing apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cells alone and in combination with TAM and may serve as a safer and more effective alternative to current cancer therapies. PMID:21494837

  4. Transforming growth factor-β, a whey protein component, strengthens the intestinal barrier by upregulating claudin-4 in HT-29/B6 cells.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Andres, Susanne; Fromm, Anja; van Tol, Eric A; Amasheh, Maren; Mankertz, Joachim; Fromm, Michael; Schulzke, Joerg D

    2011-05-01

    TGFβ (isoforms 1-3) has barrier-protective effects in the intestine. The mechanisms involved in regulating tight junction protein expression are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate TGFβ-dependent protective effects with special attention to promoter regulation of tight junction proteins using the HT-29/B6 cell model. In addition, the effects of whey protein concentrate 1 (WPC1), a natural source of TGFβ in human nutrition, were examined. For this purpose, the claudin-4 promoter was cloned and tested for its activity. It exhibited transactivation in response to TGFβ1, which was intensified when Smad-4 was cotransfected, indicating a Smad-4-dependent regulatory component. Shortening and mutation of the promoter altered and attenuated this effect. WPC1 induced an increase in the claudin-4 protein level and resistance of HT-29/B6 cell monolayers. Anti-TGFβ(1-3) antibodies blocked these whey protein effects, suggesting that a main part of this function was mediated through TGFβ. This effect was observed on intact monolayers as well as when barrier function was impaired by preexposure to IFNγ. In conclusion, TGFβ1 affects claudin-4 gene expression via Smad-4-dependent and -independent transcriptional regulation, resulting in barrier protection, a cytokine effect that is also found in whey protein concentrates used in enteral nutrition. PMID:21430244

  5. MicroSPECT/CT imaging and pharmacokinetics of 188Re-(DXR)-liposome in human colorectal adenocarcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Yu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Lee, Wan-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lee, Te-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi; Ting, Gann

    2010-01-01

    Nanoliposome can be designed as a drug delivery carrier to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drug administration. (188)Re-labeled nanoliposomes are useful for diagnostic imaging as well as for targeted radionuclide therapy. In this study, the in vivo nuclear imaging, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of administered nanoliposomes were investigated as drug and radionuclide carriers for targeting solid tumor via intravenous (i.v.) administration. The radiotherapeutics ((188)Re-liposome) and radiochemotherapeutics ((188)Re-DXR-liposome) were i.v. administered to nude mice bearing human HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposomes show similar biodistribution profile; both have higher tumor uptake, higher blood retention time, and lower excretion rate than (188)Re-N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA). In contrast to tumor uptake, the area under the curve (AUC) value of tumor for (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome was 16.5- and 11.5-fold higher than that of free (188)Re-BMEDA, respectively. Additionally, (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome had a higher tumor-to-muscle ratio at 24 h (14.4+/-2 .7 and 17.14+/-4.1, respectively) than (188)Re-BMEDA (1.6+/-0.1). The tumor targeting and distribution of (188)Re-(DXR)-liposome (representing (188)Re-DXR-liposome and (188)Re-liposome) can also be acquired by signal photon-emission computed tomography/computed tomography images as well as whole body autoradiograph. These results suggest that (188)Re-(DXR)-liposomes are potentially promising agents for passive targeting treatment of malignant disease. PMID:20150618

  6. Effects of a Multikinase Inhibitor Motesanib (AMG 706) Alone and Combined with the Selective DuP-697 COX-2 Inhibitor on Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Tijen Temiz; Altun, Ahmet; Turgut, Nergiz Hacer; Ataseven, Hilmi; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of motesanib (AMG 706), a multikinase inhibitor alone and in combination with DuP-697, an irreversible selective inhibitor of COX-2, on cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis induction in a human colorectal cancer cell line (HT29). Real time cell analysis (RTCA, Xcelligence system) was used to determine the effects on colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Apoptosis was assessed with annexin V staining and angiogenesis was determined with chorioallantoic membrane model. We found that motesanib alone exerted antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects on HT29 colorectal cancer cells. Combination with DUP-697 increased the antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and apoptotic effects. Results of this study indicate that motesanib may be a good choice in treatment of colorectal tumors. In addition, the increased effects of combination of motesanib with DuP-697 raise the possibility of using lower doses of these drugs and therefore avoid/minimize the dose-dependent side effects generally observed. PMID:27039732

  7. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  8. Antiproliferative effects of β-blockers on human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coelho, M; Moz, M; Correia, G; Teixeira, A; Medeiros, R; Ribeiro, L

    2015-05-01

    Colon cancer is the fourth and third most common cancer, respectively in men and women worldwide and its incidence is on the increase. Stress response has been associated with the incidence and development of cancer. The catecholamines (CA), adrenaline (AD) and noradrenaline (NA), are crucial mediators of stress response, exerting their effects through interaction with α- and β-adrenergic receptors (AR). Colon cancer cells express β-AR, and their activation has been implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Interest concerning the efficacy of β-AR blockers as possible additions to cancer treatment has increased. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of several AR agonists and β-blockers following cell proliferation of HT-29 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. For this purpose, HT-29 cells were incubated in the absence (control) or in the presence of the AR-agonists, AD, NA and isoprenaline (ISO) (0.1-100 µM) for 12 or 24 h. The tested AR agonists revealed proliferative effects on HT-29 cells. In order to study the effect of several β-blockers following proliferation induced by AR activation, the cells were treated with propranolol (PRO; 50 µM), carvedilol (CAR; 5 µM), atenolol (ATE; 50 µM), or ICI 118,551 (ICI; 5 µM) for 45 min prior, and simultaneously, to incubation with each of the AR agonists, AD and ISO, both at 1 and 10 µM. The results suggested that adrenergic activation plays an important role in colon cancer cell proliferation, most probably through β-AR. The β-blockers under study were able to reverse the proliferation induced by AD and ISO, and some of these blockers significantly decreased the proliferation of HT-29 cells. The elucidation of the intracellular pathways involved in CA-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells, and in the reversion of this effect by β-blockers, may contribute to identifying promising strategies in cancer treatment. PMID:25812650

  9. Comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz, Teresa; Ramos Gómez, Yassel; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Fernández Masso, Julio R; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Arielis; Cruz García, Yiliam; Guirola-Cruz, Osmany; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Javier González, Luis; Tiscornia, Inés; Victoria, Sabina; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Besada Pérez, Vladimir; Guerra Vallespi, Maribel

    2015-08-01

    The second generation peptide CIGB-552 has a pro-apoptotic effect on H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells and displays a potent cytotoxic effect in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells though its action mechanism is ill defined. Here, we present the first proteomic study of peptide effect in HT-29 cells using subcellular fractionation, protein and peptide fractionation by DF-PAGE and LC-MS/MS peptide identification. In particular, we explored the nuclear proteome of HT-29 cells at a 5h treatment identifying a total of 68 differentially modulated proteins, 49 of which localize to the nucleus. The differentially modulated proteins were analyzed following a system biology approach. Results pointed to a modulation of apoptosis, oxidative damage removal, NF-κB activation, inflammatory signaling and of cell adhesion and motility. Further Western blot and flow-cytometry experiments confirmed both pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 cells. PMID:26013411

  10. Adrenaline promotes cell proliferation and increases chemoresistance in colon cancer HT29 cells through induction of miR-155

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Jun; Bai, Danna; Yang, Xia; Lu, Xiaozhao; Xu, Lijuan; Lu, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline increases colon cancer cell proliferation and its resistance to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adrenaline activates NF{kappa}B in a dose dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway contributes to cell proliferation and resistance to cisplatin. -- Abstract: Recently, catecholamines have been described as being involved in the regulation of cancer genesis and progression. Here, we reported that adrenaline increased the cell proliferation and decreased the cisplatin induced apoptosis in HT29 cells. Further study found that adrenaline increased miR-155 expression in an NF{kappa}B dependent manner. HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 had a higher cell growth rate and more resistance to cisplatin induced apoptosis. In contrast, HT29 cells overexpressing miR-155 inhibitor displayed decreased cell proliferation and sensitivity to cisplatin induced cell death. In summary, our study here revealed that adrenaline-NF{kappa}B-miR-155 pathway at least partially contributes to the psychological stress induced proliferation and chemoresistance in HT29 cells, shedding light on increasing the therapeutic strategies of cancer chemotherapy.

  11. Data for comparative proteomics analysis of the antitumor effect of CIGB-552 peptide in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Núñez de Villavicencio-Díaz, Teresa; Ramos Gómez, Yassel; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Fernández Masso, Julio R; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Arielis; Cruz García, Yiliam; Guirola-Cruz, Osmany; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Javier González, Luis; Tiscornia, Inés; Victoria, Sabina; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Besada Pérez, Vladimir; Guerra Vallespi, Maribel

    2015-09-01

    CIGB-552 is a second generation antitumor peptide that displays potent cytotoxicity in lung and colon cancer cells. The nuclear subproteome of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells treated with CIGB-552 peptide was identified and analyzed [1]. This data article provides supporting evidence for the above analysis. PMID:26306321

  12. RhoA-dependent Switch between α2β1 and α3β1 Integrins Is Induced by Laminin-5 during Early Stage of HT-29 Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Stéphanie P.; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel R.; Rouard-Talbot, Laurence; Rousselle, Patricia; Block, Marc R.

    2001-01-01

    Integrin-mediated interactions between the basement membrane and epithelial cells control the differentiation of epithelia. We characterized the modulation of adhesive behaviors to basement membrane proteins and of integrin function in the human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell line, which differentiates into enterocytes after the substitution of galactose for glucose in the medium. We demonstrate an increased capability of these cells to adhere to collagen type IV during the early stage of differentiation. This effect occurs without any changes in integrin cell surface expression but rather results from an α2β1/α3β1 integrin switch, α3β1 integrin becoming the major collagen receptor. The increase in laminin-5 secretion and deposit on the matrix is a key factor in the mechanism regulating cell adhesion, because it is responsible for the activation of α3β1 integrin. Furthermore, down-regulation of RhoA GTPase activity occurs during HT-29 cell differentiation and correlates with the activation of the integrin α3β1. Indeed, C3 transferase, a RhoA GTPase inhibitor, induces a similar α2β1/α3β1 switch in undifferentiated HT-29 cells. These results indicate that the decrease in RhoA activation is the biochemical mechanism underlying this integrin switch observed during cell differentiation. The physiological relevance of such modulation of integrin activity in the functioning of the crypt-villus axis is discussed. PMID:11598208

  13. RhoA-dependent switch between alpha2beta1 and alpha3beta1 integrins is induced by laminin-5 during early stage of HT-29 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gout, S P; Jacquier-Sarlin, M R; Rouard-Talbot, L; Rousselle, P; Block, M R

    2001-10-01

    Integrin-mediated interactions between the basement membrane and epithelial cells control the differentiation of epithelia. We characterized the modulation of adhesive behaviors to basement membrane proteins and of integrin function in the human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell line, which differentiates into enterocytes after the substitution of galactose for glucose in the medium. We demonstrate an increased capability of these cells to adhere to collagen type IV during the early stage of differentiation. This effect occurs without any changes in integrin cell surface expression but rather results from an alpha2beta1/alpha3beta1 integrin switch, alpha3beta1 integrin becoming the major collagen receptor. The increase in laminin-5 secretion and deposit on the matrix is a key factor in the mechanism regulating cell adhesion, because it is responsible for the activation of alpha3beta1 integrin. Furthermore, down-regulation of RhoA GTPase activity occurs during HT-29 cell differentiation and correlates with the activation of the integrin alpha3beta1. Indeed, C3 transferase, a RhoA GTPase inhibitor, induces a similar alpha2beta1/alpha3beta1 switch in undifferentiated HT-29 cells. These results indicate that the decrease in RhoA activation is the biochemical mechanism underlying this integrin switch observed during cell differentiation. The physiological relevance of such modulation of integrin activity in the functioning of the crypt-villus axis is discussed. PMID:11598208

  14. A comparative study of the cellular uptake, localization and phototoxicity of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl) chlorin encapsulated in surface-modified submicronic oil/water carriers in HT29 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, O; Mosqueira, V; Legrand, P; Blais, J

    2000-01-01

    The poor selectivity of photosensitizers for tumor tissue remains a drawback in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and could be improved by adapted formulations. The cellular uptake, localization and phototoxicity of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) encapsulated in submicronic colloidal carriers have been studied in macrophage-like J774 cells and HT 29 human adenocarcinoma cells. Nanocapsules with an external layer made of poly(D,L lactic acid) (PLA NCs), PLA grafted with polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG NCs), PLA coated with poloxamer 188 (polox PLA NCs) and oil/water nanoemulsion (NE) have been examined. The cellular uptake by J774, as determined by microspectroflorimetry, is reduced with mTHPC encapsulated into surface-modified NCs--PLA-PEG and polox PLA--compared with naked PLA, indicating a possible limitation of the clearance of such carriers by the reticuloendothelial system. Encapsulation also modifies the interaction between mTHPC and HT29 cells. Compared with the manufacturer's solution (PEG, ethanol, water), the cellular uptake is strongly reduced. However, the HT29 phototoxicity is much less affected and a protecting effect against plasma proteins is observed. Fluorescence microscopy reveals a specific punctate fluorescence pattern with PLA-PEG and polox PLA NCs in contrast to a more diffuse distribution with NE and solution, indicating that photodamage targeting could be different. These findings suggest that photosensitizers encapsulated into surface-modified nanocapsules could be a promising approach for improving PDT efficacy and this has to be confirmed in vivo. PMID:10942081

  15. Plasminogen activators in human colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Gelister, J S; Mahmoud, M; Lewin, M R; Gaffney, P J; Boulos, P B

    1986-01-01

    A crucial step in the transition from adenomatous polyp to invasive colorectal cancer is the degradation of the epithelial basement membrane. Plasminogen activators may play a part in regulating the extracellular protease environment necessary for this to occur. Both functional and antigenic activity of the two principal activators of plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator and urokinase, were measured in 30 colorectal cancers, matched samples of mucosa, and eight adenomatous polyps. Both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) had raised urokinase activities compared with normal mucosa, the activity being highest in the carcinomas. Activity of tissue plasminogen activator, however, was diminished in both polyps (p less than 0.01) and carcinomas (p less than 0.001) compared with normal mucosa, the values being lowest in carcinomas. Plasmin generation by urokinase--in contrast with tissue plasminogen activator--is fibrin independent and thus less subject to physiological control. Images p730-a PMID:3094628

  16. Integration of genomic and proteomic data to identify candidate genes in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Gui; Wu, Yaoping; Qiu, Liang; Shah, Nagendra P; Xu, Feng; Wei, Hua

    2016-09-01

    As the predominant group inhabiting the human gastrointestinal tract, bifidobacteria play a vital role in human nutrition, therapeutics, and health by shaping and maintaining the gut ecosystem, reducing blood cholesterol, and promoting the supply of nutrients. The interaction between bacterial cells and human intestinal epithelial cell lines has been studied for decades in an attempt to understand the mechanisms of action. These studies, however, have been limited by lack of genomic and proteomic database to aid in achieving comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms at molecular levels. Microarray data (GSE: 74119) coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) were performed to detect differentially expressed genes and proteins in HT-29 cells after incubation with Bifidobacterium bifidum. Real-time quantitative PCR, gene ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were further conducted for mRNA validation, functional annotation, and pathway identification, respectively. According to the results of microarray, 1,717 differentially expressed genes, including 1,693 upregulated and 24 downregulated genes, were selected and classified by the gene ontology database. The iTRAQ analysis identified 43 differentially expressed proteins, where 29 proteins were upregulated and 14 proteins were downregulated. Eighty-two candidate genes showing consistent differences with microarray and iTRAQ were further validated in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells by real-time quantitative PCR. Nine of the top genes showing interesting results with high confidence were further investigated in vivo in mice intestine samples. Integration of genomic and proteomic data provides an approach to identify candidate genes that are more likely to function in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, positive regulation of apoptosis, membrane proteins, and transferase catalysis. These findings might contribute to our understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating the

  17. Human gut flora-fermented nondigestible fraction from cooked bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modifies protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Campos-Vega, Rocio; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramón; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva; Oomah, B Dave; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2012-12-26

    Metabolism of the nondigested fraction (NDF) from common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) by the human gut flora (hgf) produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that may benefit cancer by reducing colorectal tumor risks. This paper reports the effect of fermentation products (FP) by hgf (FP-hgf) from NDF of cooked beans on survival and protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation in human adenocarcinoma colon cancer cells. FP-hgf was the only inoculum eliciting butyrate production after 24 h of NDF fermentation using different bacterial sources. FP-hgf inhibited HT-29 cell growth and modulated protein expression associated with apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and proliferation, as well as morphological changes linked to apoptosis evaluated by TUNEL and hematoxylin and eosin stains, confirming previous results on gene expression. The current results suggest that fermentation of NDF from common beans can elicit beneficial chemoprotective effects in colon cancer by modulating protein expression in HT-29 cells. PMID:23194196

  18. NHERF-1 regulation of EGF and neurotensin signalling in HT-29 epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Wade A.; Monteith, Gregory R.; Poronnik, Philip

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► NHERF-1 expression was abundant throughout HT-29 cells consistent with a cancerous phenotype. ► Knockdown of NHERF-1 lead to a significant reduction in cell proliferation. ► EGF and neurotensin-mediated proliferation was inhibited by knockdown of NHERF-1. ► Neurotensin-mediated Ca{sup 2+} response was abolished by knockdown of NHERF-1. -- Abstract: Neurotensin receptors (NT-R) and the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-R) are commonly overexpressed in many epithelial origin tumours. In addition to their role as mitogenic mediators through specific cell signalling, recent studies indicate that the activity/expression of scaffold proteins responsible for the assembly and coordination of the signalling complexes may also have central roles in epithelial transformation. In particular, the “epithelial” PSD-95/Dlg/Zo-1 (PDZ) scaffold/adapter protein, Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger regulatory factor isoform one (NHERF-1), has been identified as a potential regulator of cellular transformation. NHERF-1 is a known regulator of EGF-R function and plays numerous roles in G-protein-coupled receptor signalling. Because of the synergistic signalling between these two potent mitogens, we investigated a potential role for NHERF-1 in the molecular mechanism linking the aberrant proliferative phenotype initiated by some G-Protein-coupled receptor activators in the colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell line. Knockdown (80%) of endogenous NHERF-1 leads to significant reduction in proliferation rate; an effect that could not be recovered by exogenous application of either NT or EGF. Inhibition of the EGF-R with AG1487 also inhibited proliferation and this effect could not be recovered with NT. Knockdown of NHERF-1 significantly altered the expression of the EGF-R, and almost completely abolished the NT-mediated increases in intracellular free Ca{sup 2+}. Knockdown of NHERF-1 also attenuated UTP-mediated purinergic Ca{sup 2+} signalling. Taken together, these data

  19. Antiproliferative effects of triterpenoidal derivatives, obtained from the marine sponge Siphonochalina sp., on human hepatic and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Lateff, Ahmed; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Alarif, Walied M; Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N; Al-Lihaibi, Sultan S; Hegazy, Mohamed E; Al Mohammadi, Ameen; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Moustafa, Mohamed A A; Banjer, Zainy M; Azhar, Ahmad S

    2016-01-01

    Three triterpenoidal derivatives [Sipholenol A (1), sipholenol L (2) and sipholenone A (3)] were isolated from the Red Sea sponge Siphonochalina sp. The structures were determined based on spectroscopic measurements (NMR, UV, IR and MS). The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against three cancer cell lines; HepG2, Caco-2 and HT-29. Moreover, the effects of these metabolites on cell cycle progression as well as cell cycle regulating proteins were assessed. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 showed moderate activity against HepG2 cells with IC(50) values of 17.18 ± 1.18, 24.01 ± 0.59 and 35.06 ± 1.10 μM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 exerted a considerable antiproliferative effect with IC(50) values of 4.80 ± 0.18 and 26.64 ± 0.30 μM, respectively, against Caco-2 cells. Finally, 1 and 2 exhibited antiproliferative activity against colorectal cancer cells (HT-29) with IC(50) values of 24.65 ± 0.80 and 4.48 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Cell cycle analysis indicated that these compounds induced cell cycle arrest particularly in G0/G1 and S phases. Furthermore, the triterpenoids increased the expression of cyclin-B1, cyclin-D1 and cleaved caspase-3, as determined by immunofluorescence, indicating an important role of apoptosis in cell death induced by these compounds. PMID:26845717

  20. Lactobacillus plantarum LB95 impairs the virulence potential of Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogens in HT-29 and Vero cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Virna; Silva, Ana Carla; Cabrita, Paula; Peres, Cidália; Malcata, Xavier; Brito, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica and verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) are amongst the most important agents responsible for food outbreaks occurring worldwide. In this work, two Lactobacillus spp. strains (LABs), Lactobacillus plantarum (LB95) and Lactobacillus paraplantarum (LB13), previously isolated from spontaneously fermenting olive brines, and two reference probiotic strains, Lactobacillus casei Shirota and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, were investigated for their ability to attenuate the virulence of the aforementioned pathogens using animal cell culture assays. In competitive exclusion assays, the relative percentages of adhesion and invasion of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis were significantly reduced when the human HT-29 cell line was previously exposed to LB95. The relative percentage of invasion by Listeria monocytogenes was significantly reduced when HT-29 cells were previously exposed to LB95. In the cytotoxicity assays, the cell-free supernatant of the co-culture (CFSC)of VTEC with LB95 accounted for the lowest value obtained amongst the co-cultures of VTEC with LABs, and was significantly lower than the value obtained with the co-culture of VTEC with the two probiotic reference strains. The cytotoxicity of CFSC of VTEC with both LB95 and LB13 exhibited values not significantly different from the cell-free supernatant of the nonpathogenic E. coli B strain. Our results suggested that LB95 may be able to attenuate the virulence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative food-borne pathogens; together with other reported features of these strains, our data reveal their possible use in probiotic foods due to their interesting potential in preventing enteric infections in humans. PMID:26506821

  1. Protective effects of Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria and Staphylococci on the infection of cultured HT29 cells with different enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotypes are strain-specific.

    PubMed

    Stöber, Helen; Maier, Eva; Schmidt, Herbert

    2010-11-15

    In this study, we investigated the interaction of 19 benign strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), bifidobacteria and staphylococci with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains of different serotypes and virulence gene spectrum in a HT29 cell culture infection model. As markers of infection, the secretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB by the infected cells were determined. With 12 of 19 tested strains, a weak reduction <30% of IL-8 secretion of HT29 cells after co-infection with EHEC O157:H7 strain EDL933 was observed. Six strains reduced the IL-8 secretion up to 60% and the strain B. adolescentis DSMZ 20086 decreased the IL-8 production about 73%. In further co-infection assays with EHEC strains of the serotypes O103:H2, O26:H⁻, 0157:H⁻ and O113:H21, different abilities of the LAB strains to influence the infection with the different EHEC strains were noted. Therefore, the protective anti-inflammatory effect is strain specific for LAB and also depends on the application of EHEC strains with different sero- and virulence types. The differences in efficacy of protective bacteria against certain EHEC strains were unexpected and have not been shown so far. Furthermore, we could show that the inhibitory effects were not attributed to lower adhesion abilities of EHEC to the production of organic acids by the benign bacteria. In addition, viable bacteria are needed to inhibit the IL-8 secretion. Moreover, the NF-κB activation was reduced significantly by all tested LAB strains in co-infection trials, but was not strain-specific. The model described here is useful to screen for basic effects of protective bacteria that are able to counteract EHEC-mediated effects on human cells, and to study the molecular interaction between bacteria as well as between bacteria and human cultured cells. PMID:20920833

  2. Development of drug-loaded chitosan-vanillin nanoparticles and its cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu-Wang; Wang, Guang; Yang, Zi-Ming; Duan, Wei; Peng, Zheng; Kong, Ling-Xue; Wang, Qing-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan as a natural polysaccharide derived from chitin of arthropods like shrimp and crab, attracts much interest due to its inherent properties, especially for application in biomedical materials. Presently, biodegradable and biocompatible chitosan nanoparticles are attractive for drug delivery. However, some physicochemical characteristics of chitosan nanoparticles still need to be further improved in practice. In this work, chitosan nanoparticles were produced by crosslinking chitosan with 3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) through a Schiff reaction. Chitosan nanoparticles were 200-250 nm in diameter with smooth surface and were negatively charged with a zeta potential of - 17.4 mV in neutral solution. Efficient drug loading and drug encapsulation were achieved using 5-fluorouracil as a model of hydrophilic drug. Drug release from the nanoparticles was constant and controllable. The in vitro cytotoxicity against HT-29 cells and cellular uptake of the chitosan nanoparticles were evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium method, confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometer, respectively. The results indicate that the chitosan nanoparticles crosslinked with vanillin are a promising vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:24712731

  3. Cell internalization and traffic pathway of Clostridium botulinum type C neurotoxin in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Uotsu, Nobuo; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Tonozuka, Takashi; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Oguma, Keiji

    2006-01-01

    The bacterium Clostridium botulinum type C produces a progenitor toxin (C16S toxin) that binds to O-linked sugar chains terminating with sialic acid on the surface of HT-29 cells prior to internalization [A. Nishikawa, N. Uotsu, H. Arimitsu, J.C. Lee, Y. Miura, Y. Fujinaga, H. Nakada, T. Watanabe, T. Ohyama, Y. Sakano, K. Oguma, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 319 (2004) 327-333] [21]. Based on this, it was hypothesized that the C16S toxin is internalized via clathrin-coated pits. To examine this possibility, the internalized toxin was observed with a fluorescent antibody using confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The confocal images clearly indicated that the C16S toxin was internalized mainly via clathrin-coated pits and localized in early endosomes. The toxin was colocalized with caveolin-1 which is one of the components of caveolae, however, implying the toxin was also internalized via caveolae. The confocal images also showed that the neurotoxin transported to the endosome was transferred to the Golgi apparatus. However, the non-toxic components were not merged with the Golgi marker protein, TGN38, implying the neurotoxin was dissociated from progenitor toxin in endosomes. These results suggested that the C16S toxin was separated to the neurotoxin and other proteins in endosome and the neurotoxin was further transferred to the Golgi apparatus which is the center for protein sorting. PMID:16413070

  4. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  5. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  6. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  7. Multiple MTS Assay as the Alternative Method to Determine Survival Fraction of the Irradiated HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mahdi; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple colorimetric assay has been introduced to evaluate the proliferation and determination of survival fraction (SF) of irradiated cells. The estimation of SF based on the cell-growth curve information is the major advantage of this assay. In this study, the utility of multiple-MTS assay for the SF estimation of irradiated HT-29 colon cancer cells, which were plated before irradiation, was evaluated. The SF of HT-29 colon cancer cells under irradiation with 9 MV photon was estimated using multiple-MTS assay and colony assay. Finally, the correlation between two assays was evaluated. Results showed that there are no significant differences between the SF obtained by two assays at different radiation doses (P > 0.05), and the survival curves have quite similar trends. In conclusion, multiple MTS-assay can be a reliable method to determine the SF of irradiated colon cancer cells that plated before irradiation. PMID:27186539

  8. Interaction of Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG13195 with HT29 Cells Influences Regulatory-T-Cell-Associated Chemokine Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Sánchez, Borja; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Suárez, Ana; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics play an important role in the maintenance of the gastrointestinal barrier. In addition to direct effects on mucosal integrity, the interaction with the intestinal mucosa may have an active immunoregulatory effect. In the present work, we exposed HT29 intestinal epithelial cells to two Bifidobacterium species to determine their effect on gene expression profile, enterocyte monolayer integrity, and T-cell response. Bifidobacterium breve IPLA 20004 triggered a more pronounced increase in the transepithelial resistance of the enterocyte monolayer than Bifidobacterium bifidum LMG13195. The transcriptome profile of HT29 cells cultured in the presence of B. bifidum LMG13195 showed an increased expression of immune mediators and, interestingly, chemotactic molecules (CXCL10, CCL20, CXCL11 and CCL22) able to recruit lymphocytes. Since regulatory T cells (Treg cells) may express receptors for specific chemokines, we cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells with supernatants of HT29 cells previously treated with Bifidobacterium strains and analyzed FOXP3 and CD25 Treg markers and CCR6, CXCR3, CCR4, and CCR3 expression on CD4+ lymphocytes. The proportion of CD25high FOXP3+ cells was significantly increased after culture with B. bifidum LMG13195-conditioned HT29 supernatant. Moreover, this treatment led to the largest amount of CCR6+ CXCR3− CCR4+ CCR3+ CD4+ cells expressing high levels of CD25, corresponding to the Treg population. These results suggest that soluble factors secreted after B. bifidum LMG13195 contact with intestinal epithelial cells favored the generation of CD4+ CD25high lymphocytes expressing chemokine receptor Treg markers, thus making possible their recruitment to the intestinal mucosa. PMID:22344636

  9. Functional TLR5 genetic variants affect human colorectal cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Klimosch, Sascha N; Försti, Asta; Eckert, Jana; Knezevic, Jelena; Bevier, Melanie; von Schönfels, Witigo; Heits, Nils; Walter, Jessica; Hinz, Sebastian; Lascorz, Jesus; Hampe, Jochen; Hartl, Dominik; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Hemminki, Kari; Schafmayer, Clemens; Weber, Alexander N R

    2013-12-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are overexpressed on many types of cancer cells, including colorectal cancer cells, but little is known about the functional relevance of these immune regulatory molecules in malignant settings. Here, we report frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the flagellin receptor TLR5 and the TLR downstream effector molecules MyD88 and TIRAP that are associated with altered survival in a large cohort of Caucasian patients with colorectal cancer (n = 613). MYD88 rs4988453, a SNP that maps to a promoter region shared with the acetyl coenzyme-A acyl-transferase-1 (ACAA1), was associated with decreased survival of patients with colorectal cancer and altered transcriptional activity of the proximal genes. In the TLR5 gene, rs5744174/F616L was associated with increased survival, whereas rs2072493/N592S was associated with decreased survival. Both rs2072493/N592S and rs5744174/F616L modulated TLR5 signaling in response to flagellin or to different commensal and pathogenic intestinal bacteria. Notably, we observed a reduction in flagellin-induced p38 phosphorylation, CD62L shedding, and elevated expression of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β mRNA in human primary immune cells from TLR5 616LL homozygote carriers, as compared with 616FF carriers. This finding suggested that the well-documented effect of cytokines like IL-6 on colorectal cancer progression might be mediated by TLR5 genotype-dependent flagellin sensing. Our results establish an important link between TLR signaling and human colorectal cancer with relevance for biomarker and therapy development. PMID:24154872

  10. Different effects of lipoteichoic acid from C. butyricum and S. aureus on inflammatory responses of HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Qi, Lili; Wu, Zhige; Mei, Lehe; Wang, Hengzheng

    2016-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and represents one of the most critical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules. In this study, we isolated and purified LTA from Clostridium butyricum (bLTA) and compared its effects on the inflammatory responses of HT-29 cells with those of LTA from Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA). We also compared the effects of bLTA and aLTA on cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. The results showed that the length and saturation degree of the acyl chains in the two LTA molecules were obviously different. aLTA stimulated the phosphorylation of p65 and activated the NF-κB signaling pathway, inducing the expression and secretion of cytokines. Moreover, aLTA also inhibited the growth and proliferation of HT-29 cells and induced cell apoptosis. However, bLTA had no significant effects on the NF-κB signaling pathway in HT-29 cells and did not stimulate cellular inflammatory responses or induce apoptosis. These differences in activity may result from the different lengths and saturation degrees of the acyl fatty acid chains of the two LTA molecules. These differences may also account for the distinct effects elicited by probiotic bacteria and pathogenic bacteria on host cells. PMID:26968924

  11. C. butyricum lipoteichoic acid inhibits the inflammatory response and apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by S. aureus lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Qi, Lili; Mei, Lehe; Wu, Zhige; Wang, Hengzheng

    2016-07-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is one of microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules of gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated that Clostridium butyricum LTA (bLTA) significantly inhibited the inflammatory response and apoptosis induced by Staphylococcus aureus LTA (aLTA) in HT-29 cells. aLTA stimulated the inflammatory responses by activating a strong signal transduction cascade through NF-κB and ERK, but bLTA did not activate the signaling pathway. bLTA pretreatment inhibited the activation of the NF-κB and ERK signaling pathway induced by aLTA. The expression and release of cytokines such as IL-8 and TNF-α were also suppressed by bLTA pretreatment. aLTA treatment induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells, but bLTA did not affect the viability of the cells. Further study indicated that bLTA inhibited apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by aLTA. These results suggest that bLTA may act as an aLTA antagonist and that an antagonistic bLTA may be a useful agent for suppressing the pro-inflammatory activities of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27020942

  12. Combination Therapy of Lactobacillus plantarum Supernatant and 5-Fluouracil Increases Chemosensitivity in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    An, JaeJin; Ha, Eun-Mi

    2016-08-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world. Although 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the representative chemotherapy drug for colorectal cancer, it has therapeutic limits due to its chemoresistant characteristics. Colorectal cancer cells can develop into cancer stem cells (CSCs) with self-renewal potential, thereby causing malignant tumors. The human gastrointestinal tract contains a complex gut microbiota that is essential for the host's homeostasis. Recently, many studies have reported correlations between gut flora and the onset, progression, and treatment of CRC. The present study confirms that the most representative symbiotic bacteria in humans, Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) supernatant (SN), selectively inhibit the characteristics of 5-FU-resistant colorectal cancer cells (HT-29 and HCT- 116). LP SN inhibited the expression of the specific markers CD44, 133, 166, and ALDH1 of CSCs. The combination therapy of LP SN and 5-FU inhibited the survival of CRCs and led to cell death by inducing caspase-3 activity. The combination therapy of LP SN and 5-FU induced an anticancer mechanism by inactivating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling of chemoresistant CRC cells, and reducing the formation and size of colonospheres. In conclusion, our results show that LP SN can enhance the therapeutic effect of 5-FU for colon cancer, and reduce colorectal cancer stem-like cells by reversing the development of resistance to anticancer drugs. This implies that probiotic substances may be useful therapeutic alternatives as biotherapeutics for chemoresistant CRC. PMID:27221111

  13. Scutellaria barbata D. Don inhibits growth and induces apoptosis by suppressing IL-6-inducible STAT3 pathway activation in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, QIQIN; LI, QIONGYU; CHEN, HONGWEI; SHEN, ALING; CAI, QIAOYAN; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical cellular signal transduction pathways known to malfunction in colorectal cancer is the interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (IL-6/STAT3) pathway. Scutellaria barbata D. Don (SB) is well-known traditional medicine in China that targets STAT3 signaling, and it has long been used to treat various types of cancer; however, the precise mechanism of its antitumor activity remains largely unclear. In order to further elucidate this underlying mechanism, an ethanol extract of SB (EESB) in cancer treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of EESB on the IL-6-inducible STAT3 pathway. We tested the dose-response association between EESB, IL-6-induced proliferaion and apoptosis using an MTT assay, colony formation and flow cytometry analysis in vitro. In addition, caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation was determined using a colorimetric assay, the activity of IL-6-induced STAT3 pathway was evaluated using western blot analysis, and the expression levels of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, Bcl2 and Bcl2-associated X were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In the present study it was found that EESB could significantly inhibit the IL-6-mediated increase in STAT3 phosphorylation levels and transcriptional activity in HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells, resulting in the suppression of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis. In addition, treatment with EESB markedly inhibited the IL-6-induced upregulation of cyclin D1 and B-cell lymphoma-2, two key target genes of the STAT3 pathway. These results suggest that treatment with EESB could effectively inhibit the proliferation and promote the apoptosis of human colon carcinoma cells via modulation of the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway and its target genes. PMID:26622533

  14. Identification of differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Zhang, Yi-Zeng; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Wang, Gang; Yi, Zeng-Ni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differently expressed genes in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: The integrated approach for gene expression profiling that couples suppression subtractive hybridization, high-throughput cDNA array, sequencing, bioinformatics analysis, and reverse transcriptase real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. A set of cDNA clones including 1260 SSH inserts amplified by PCR was arrayed using robotic printing. The cDNA arrays were hybridized with florescent-labeled probes prepared from RNA of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HCRAC) and normal colorectal tissues. RESULTS: A total of 86 genes were identified, 16 unknown genes and 70 known genes. The transcription factor Sox9 influencing cell differentiation was downregulated. At the same time, Heat shock protein 10 KDis downregulated and Calmoulin is up-regulated. CONCLUSION: Downregulation of heat shock protein 10 KD lost its inhibition of Ras, and then attenuated the Ras GTPase signaling pathway, increased cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. Down-regulated transcription factor So x 9 influences cell differentiation and cell-specific gene expression. Down-regulated So x 9 also decreases its binding to calmodulin, accumulates calmodulin as receptor-activated kinase and phosphorylase kinase due to the activation of PhK. PMID:16534841

  15. Erastin Disrupts Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore (mPTP) and Induces Apoptotic Death of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Haizhong; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Qin, Jian; Liu, Wenyong; Wang, Bing; Gu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We here evaluated the potential anti-colorectal cancer activity by erastin, a voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)-binding compound. Our in vitro studies showed that erastin exerted potent cytotoxic effects against multiple human colorectal cancer cell lines, possibly via inducing oxidative stress and caspase-9 dependent cell apoptosis. Further, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was observed in erastin-treated cancer cells, which was evidenced by VDAC-1 and cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D) association, mitochondrial depolarization, and cytochrome C release. Caspase inhibitors, the ROS scavenger MnTBAP, and mPTP blockers (sanglifehrin A, cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid), as well as shRNA-mediated knockdown of VDAC-1, all significantly attenuated erastin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells. On the other hand, over-expression of VDAC-1 augmented erastin-induced ROS production, mPTP opening, and colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that intraperitoneal injection of erastin at well-tolerated doses dramatically inhibited HT-29 xenograft growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that erastin is cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic to colorectal cancer cells. Erastin may be further investigated as a novel anti-colorectal cancer agent. PMID:27171435

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 modulates upregulation of mutT homolog-1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yuan; Zheng, Hong; Sun, Li-Hua; Peng, Ke; Xiao, Wei-Dong; Yang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the roles and interactions of mutT homolog (MTH)-1 and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in human colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: The expression and distribution of HIF-1α and MTH-1 proteins were detected in human CRC tissues by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). SW480 and HT-29 cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. Protein and mRNA levels of HIF-1α and MTH-1 were analyzed by western blotting and qRT-PCR, respectively. In order to determine the effect of HIF-1α on the expression of MTH-1 and the amount of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) in SW480 and HT-29 cells, HIF-1α was silenced with small interfering RNA (siRNA). Growth studies were conducted on cells with HIF-1α inhibition using a xenograft tumor model. Finally, MTH-1 protein was detected by western blotting in vivo. RESULTS: High MTH-1 mRNA expression was detected in 64.2% of cases (54/84), and this was significantly correlated with tumor stage (P = 0.023) and size (P = 0.043). HIF-1α protein expression was correlated significantly with MTH-1 expression (R = 0.640; P < 0.01) in human CRC tissues. Hypoxic stress induced mRNA and protein expression of MTH-1 in SW480 and HT-29 cells. Inhibition of HIF-1α by siRNA decreased the expression of MTH-1 and led to the accumulation of 8-oxo-dGTP in SW480 and HT-29 cells. In the in vivo xenograft tumor model, expression of MTH-1 was decreased in the HIF-1α siRNA group, and the tumor volume was much smaller than that in the mock siRNA group. CONCLUSION: MTH-1 expression in CRC cells was upregulated via HIF-1α in response to hypoxic stress, emphasizing the crucial role of HIF-1α-induced MTH-1 in tumor growth. PMID:26730155

  17. Optimization of in vitro inhibition of HT-29 colon cancer cell cultures by Solanum tuberosum L. extracts.

    PubMed

    Zuber, T; Holm, D; Byrne, P; Ducreux, L; Taylor, M; Kaiser, M; Stushnoff, C

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites in potato have been reported to possess bioactive properties, including growth inhibition of cancer cells. Because potatoes are widely consumed globally, potential health benefits may have broad application. Thus we investigated growth inhibition of HT-29 colon cancer cell cultures by extracts from 13 diverse genetic breeding clones. Extracts from three pigmented selections (CO97226-2R/R, CO97216-1P/P, CO04058-3RW/RW) inhibited growth of in vitro HT-29 cell cultures more effectively than other clones tested. While inhibition was highest from pigmented selections and pigmented tuber tissue sectors, not all pigmented breeding lines tested had appreciable inhibitory properties. Thus, inhibition was not uniquely linked to pigmentation. Immature tubers had the highest inhibitory properties, and in most cases mature tubers retained very low inhibition properties. Flowers and skins inhibited strongly at lower extract concentrations. An extract consisting of 7.2 mg mL⁻¹ cell culture medium was the lowest effective concentration. While raw tuber extracts inhibited most effectively, a few clones at higher concentrations retained inhibition after cooking. Heated whole tubers retained higher inhibition than heated aqueous extracts. While all aqueous extracts from the two tuber selections (CO97216-1P/P and CO97226-2R/R) inhibited HT-29 cell cultures, inhibition was significantly enhanced in purple pigmented tubers of CO97216-1P/P prepared cryogenically as liquid nitrogen powders compared to extracts from freeze dried samples. Upregulation of caspase-3 protease activity, indicative of apoptosis, was highest among the most inhibitory clone samples. The unique sectorial red pigment expressing selection (CO04058-3RW/RW) provided a model system that isolated expression in pigmented sectors, and thus eliminated developmental, environmental and genetic confounding. PMID:25338312

  18. The chemopotential effect of Annona muricata leaves against azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats and the apoptotic effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 cells: a bioassay-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  19. The Chemopotential Effect of Annona muricata Leaves against Azoxymethane-Induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rats and the Apoptotic Effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 Cells: A Bioassay-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  20. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2009-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 μg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified β-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as antitumorgenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement. PMID:19271284

  1. End-to-End Thiocyanato-Bridged Helical Chain Polymer and Dichlorido-Bridged Copper(II) Complexes with a Hydrazone Ligand: Synthesis, Characterisation by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Variable-Temperature Magnetic Studies, and Inhibitory Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Kuheli; Datta, Amitabha; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Huang, Jui-Hsien; Garribba, Eugenio; Hsiao, Ching-Sheng; Hsu, Chin-Lin

    2012-04-01

    The reactions of the tridentate hydrazone ligand, N'-[1-(pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene]acetohydrazide (HL), obtained by condensation of 2-acetylpyridine with acetic hyadrazide, with copper nitrate trihydrate in the presence of thiocyanate, or with CuCl2 produce two distinct coordination compounds, namely a one-dimensional helical coordination chain of [CuL(NCS)] n (1) units, and a doubly chlorido-bridged dinuclear complex [Cu2L2Cl2] (2) (where L=CH3C(O)=N-N=CCH3C5H4N). Single-crystal X-ray structural determination studies reveal that in complex 1, a deprotonated hydrazone ligand L(-) coordinates a copper(II) ion that is bridged to two neighbouring metal centres by SCN(-) anions, generating a one-dimensional helical coordination chain. In complex 2, two symmetry-related, adjacent copper(II) coordination entities are doubly chlorido-bridged, producing a dicopper entity with a Cu⋅⋅⋅Cu distance of 3.402 (1) Å. The two coordination compounds have been fully characterised by elemental analysis, spectroscopic techniques including IR, UV-vis and electron paramagnetic resonance, and variable-temperature magnetic studies. The biological effects of 1 and 2 on the viability of human colorectal carcinoma cells (COLO-205 and HT-29) were evaluated using an MTT assay, and the results indicate that these complexes induce a decrease in cell-population growth of human colorectal carcinoma cells with apoptosis. PMID:24551495

  2. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-07-28

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  3. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  4. B-Raf inhibitors induce epithelial differentiation in BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Ricarda; Köhler, Martin; Andrlová, Hana; Weinberg, Florian; Möller, Yvonne; Halbach, Sebastian; Lutz, Lisa; Mastroianni, Justin; Klose, Martin; Bittermann, Nicola; Kowar, Silke; Zeiser, Robert; Olayioye, Monilola A; Lassmann, Silke; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Brummer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    BRAF mutations are associated with aggressive, less-differentiated and therapy-resistant colorectal carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms for these correlations remain unknown. To understand how oncogenic B-Raf contributes to carcinogenesis, in particular to aspects other than cellular proliferation and survival, we generated three isogenic human colorectal carcinoma cell line models in which we can dynamically modulate the expression of the B-Raf(V600E) oncoprotein. Doxycyclin-inducible knockdown of endogenous B-Raf(V600E) decreases cellular motility and invasion in conventional and three-dimensional (3D) culture, whereas it promotes cell-cell contacts and induces various hallmarks of differentiated epithelia. Importantly, all these effects are recapitulated by B-Raf (PLX4720, vemurafenib, and dabrafenib) or MEK inhibitors (trametinib). Surprisingly, loss of B-Raf(V600E) in HT29 xenografts does not only stall tumor growth, but also induces glandular structures with marked expression of CDX2, a tumor-suppressor and master transcription factor of intestinal differentiation. By performing the first transcriptome profiles of PLX4720-treated 3D cultures of HT29 and Colo-205 cells, we identify several upregulated genes linked to epithelial differentiation and effector functions, such as claudin-1, a Cdx-2 target gene encoding a critical tight junction component. Thereby, we provide a mechanism for the clinically observed correlation between mutant BRAF and the loss of Cdx-2 and claudin-1. PLX4720 also suppressed several metastasis-associated transcripts that have not been implicated as targets, effectors or potential biomarkers of oncogenic B-Raf signaling so far. Together, we identify a novel facet of clinically applied B-Raf or MEK inhibitors by showing that they promote cellular adhesion and differentiation of colorectal carcinoma cells. PMID:25381152

  5. Peptides in common bean fractions inhibit human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luna Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Dia, Vermont P; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to characterize peptides present in common bean non-digestible fractions (NDF) produced after enzymatic digestion and determine their antiproliferative action on human colorectal cancer cells. Five NDF peptides represented 70% of total protein (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) with antiproliferative activity on human colon cancer cells. Based on the antiproliferative effect, HCT116 cell line was most sensitive to bean Azufrado Higuera (IC50=0.53 mg/ml) and RKO to Bayo Madero (IC50=0.51 mg/ml) peptide extracts. Both cultivars increased significantly (p<0.05) the expression of p53 in HCT116 by 76% and 68%, respectively. Azufrado Higuera modified the expression of cell cycle regulation proteins p21 and cyclin B1. Bayo Madero modified the expression of mitochondrial activated apoptotic proteins BAD, cytC, c-casp3, Survivin, BIRC7. Results suggest that peptides present in common bean NDF contributed to the antiproliferative effect on human colorectal cancer cells by modifying molecules involved in either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. PMID:24679790

  6. Histogenesis of human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps: the role of cell proliferation and crypt fission

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W-M; Mandir, N; Goodlad, R A; Wong, B C Y; Garcia, S B; Lam, S-K; Wright, N A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The histogenesis of human colorectal hyperplastic polyps and colorectal adenomas is poorly understood even now. Method: Human colorectal adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, and normal colorectal mucosae (patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal carcinoma were excluded) were obtained during colonoscopy and microdissected into individual crypts. Morphology, cell proliferation characteristics, and fission indices of crypts isolated from these lesions were then studied. Results: Crypts isolated from colorectal adenomas and colorectal hyperplastic polyps were significantly larger (p<0.001) than crypts from normal colorectal mucosae. Crypt fission was an uncommon event in normal colonic mucosae but common in crypts isolated from adenomas and hyperplastic polyps (p<0.001). Analysis of the distribution of mitoses suggested an upward expansion of the proliferation compartment in adenomas to the surface of the crypt with no reversal of proliferating cell distribution, as has previously been described. Conclusions: Sporadic human colorectal adenomas and hyperplastic polyps grow by the process of crypt fission. Expansion of the proliferative compartment was demonstrated in crypts from adenomas, consistent with deregulation of cell cycle control. PMID:11788562

  7. TcpC protein from E. coli Nissle improves epithelial barrier function involving PKCζ and ERK1/2 signaling in HT-29/B6 cells.

    PubMed

    Hering, N A; Richter, J F; Fromm, A; Wieser, A; Hartmann, S; Günzel, D; Bücker, R; Fromm, M; Schulzke, J D; Troeger, H

    2014-03-01

    The probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) is widely used to maintain remission in ulcerative colitis. This is thought to be mediated by various immunomodulatory and barrier-stabilizing effects in the intestine. In this study, the mechanisms of barrier modulation by EcN were studied in the human epithelial HT-29/B6 cell culture model.EcN supernatant increased transepithelial resistance (TER) and reduced permeability to mannitol because of sealing of the paracellular passage pathway as revealed by two-path impedance spectroscopy. This increase in TER was attributed to the TcpC protein of EcN. TcpC induced protein kinase C-ζ (PKCζ) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, which in turn resulted in upregulation of the barrier-forming tight junction protein claudin-14. By specific silencing of protein expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA), the sealing function of claudin-14 was confirmed. In conclusion, the TcpC protein of EcN affects innate immunity by improving intestinal barrier function through upregulation of claudin-14 via PKCζ and ERK1/2 signaling. PMID:23900194

  8. (64)Cu-ATSM therapy targets regions with activated DNA repair and enrichment of CD133(+) cells in an HT-29 tumor model: Sensitization with a nucleic acid antimetabolite.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Kiyono, Yasushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-06-28

    (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis (N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) is a potential theranostic agent targeting the over-reduced state under hypoxia within tumors. Recent clinical Cu-ATSM positron emission tomography studies have revealed a correlation between uptake and poor prognosis; however, the reason is unclear. Here, using a human colon carcinoma HT-29 model, we demonstrated that the intratumoral (64)Cu-ATSM high-uptake regions exhibited malignant characteristics, such as upregulated DNA repair and elevated %CD133(+) cancer stem-like cells. Based on this evidence, we developed a strategy to enhance the efficacy of (64)Cu-ATSM internal radiotherapy (IRT) by inhibiting DNA repair with a nucleic acid (NA) antimetabolite. The results of the analyses showed upregulation of pathways related to DNA repair along with NA incorporation (bromodeoxyuridine uptake) and elevation of %CD133(+) cells in (64)Cu-ATSM high-uptake regions. In an in vivo(64)Cu-ATSM treatment study, co-administration of an NA antimetabolite and (64)Cu-ATSM synergistically inhibited tumor growth, with little toxicity, and effectively reduced %CD133(+) cells. (64)Cu-ATSM therapy targeted malignant tumor regions with activated DNA repair and high concentrations of CD133(+) cells in the HT-29 model. NA antimetabolite co-administration can be an effective approach to enhance the therapeutic effect of (64)Cu-ATSM IRT. PMID:26996296

  9. Hedyotis Diffusa Willd extract induces apoptosis via activation of the mitochondrion-dependent pathway in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiumao; Chen, Youqin; Wei, Lihui; Chen, Xuzhen; Xu, Wei; Hong, Zhenfeng; Sferra, Thomas J; Peng, Jun

    2010-11-01

    Hedyotis Diffusa Willd has been used as a major component in several Chinese medicine formulations for the clinical treatment of colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of the anti-cancer activity of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the cellular effects of the ethanol extract of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd (EEHDW) in the HT-29 human colon carcinoma cell line. We found that EEHDW inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells demonstrating EEHDW-induced cell morphological changes and reduced cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we observed that EEHDW treatment resulted in DNA fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane asymmetry, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and increase of the ratio of pro-apoptotic Bax to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, suggesting that the HT-29 cell growth inhibitory activity of EEHDW was due to mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis, which may partly explain the anti-cancer activity of Hedyotis Diffusa Willd. PMID:20878081

  10. Iron overload of human colon adenocarcinoma cells studied by synchrotron-based X-ray techniques.

    PubMed

    Mihucz, Victor G; Meirer, Florian; Polgári, Zsófia; Réti, Andrea; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Ingerle, Dieter; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Streli, Christina

    2016-04-01

    Fast- and slow-proliferating human adenocarcinoma colorectal cells, HT-29 and HCA-7, respectively, overloaded with transferrin (Tf), Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III) chloride and Fe(II) sulfate were studied by synchrotron radiation total-reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF), TXRF-X-ray absorption near edge structure (TXRF-XANES), and micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging to obtain information on the intracellular storage of overloaded iron (Fe). The determined TfR1 mRNA expression for the investigated cells correlated with their proliferation rate. In all cases, the Fe XANES of cells overloaded with inorganic Fe was found to be similar to that of deliquescent Fe(III) sulfate characterized by a distorted octahedral geometry. A fitting model using a linear combination of the XANES of Tf and deliquescent Fe(III) sulfate allowed to explain the near edge structure recorded for HT-29 cells indicating that cellular overload with inorganic Fe results in a non-ferritin-like fast Fe storage. Hierarchical cluster analysis of XANES spectra recorded for Fe overloaded HT-29 and HCA-7 cells was able to distinguish between Fe treatments performed with different Fe species with a 95 % hit rate, indicating clear differences in the Fe storage system. Micro-X-ray fluorescence imaging of Fe overloaded HT-29 cells revealed that Fe is primarily located in the cytosol of the cells. By characterizing the cellular Fe uptake, Fe/S content ratios were calculated based on the X-ray fluorescence signals of the analytes. These Fe/S ratios were dramatically lower for HCA-7 treated with organic Fe(III) treatments suggesting dissimilarities from the Tf-like Fe uptake. PMID:26759251

  11. Parthenolide enhances sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to TRAIL by inducing death receptor 5 and promotes TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Lim; Liu, Yu-Chuan; Park, Young Ran; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising cancer therapeutic agent. Recombinant human TRAIL has been evaluated in clinical trials, however, various malignant tumors are resistant to TRAIL. Parthenolide (PT) has recently been demonstrated as a highly effective anticancer agent and has been suggested to be used for combination therapy with other anticancer agents. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which PT sensitizes colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. HT-29 (TRAIL-resistant) and HCT116 (TRAIL-sensitive) cells were treated with PT and/or TRAIL. The results demonstrated that combined treatment induced apoptosis which was determined using MTT, cell cycle analysis, Annexin V assay and Hoechst 33258 staining. Interestingly, we confirmed that HCT116 cells have much higher death receptor (DR) 5 than HT-29 cells and PT upregulates DR5 protein level and surface expression in both cell lines. Apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway was confirmed by detecting regulation of Bcl-2 family members, p53 cytochrome C release, and caspase cascades. These results suggest that PT sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis via upregulation of DR5 and mitochondria-dependent pathway. Combination treatment using PT and TRAIL may offer an effective strategy to overcome TRAIL resistance of certain CRC cells. PMID:25502339

  12. Polyphenol stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles from Abutilon indicum leaf extract induce apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rani; Nakkala, Jayachandra Reddy; Sadras, Sudha Rani

    2016-07-01

    Green synthesized gold nanoparticles have received substantial attention owing to their biomedical applications, particularly in cancer therapy. Although anticancer activities of green synthesized gold nanoparticles have been reported earlier, the underlying mechanism behind their anticancer activity is still to be understood. The present study, describes the green synthesis of Abutilon indicum gold nanoparticles (AIGNPs) from Abutilon indicum leaf extract (AILE) and their cytotoxic mechanism in colon cancer cells. Dimensions of spherical shaped AIGNPs were found to be in the range of 1-20nm as determined by TEM. GC-MS and FTIR analysis indicated the presence of polyphenolic groups in AILE, which might have been involved in the stabilization of AIGNPs. In vitro free radical scavenging analysis revealed the radical quenching activity of AIGNPs. Further, the AIGNPs exhibited cytotoxicity in HT-29 colon cancer cells with IC50 values of 210 and 180μg/mL after 24 and 48h. This was mediated through nuclear morphological changes and cell membrane damage as evidenced by acridine orange/ethidium bromide, propidium iodide and AnnexinV-Cy3 staining methods. Mechanism of the observed cytotoxicity of AIGNPs was explained on the basis of increased levels of reactive oxygen species and simultaneous reduction in cellular antioxidants, which might have caused mitochondrial membrane potential loss, DNA damage and G1/S phase cell cycle arrest. Expression of cleaved Caspase-9, Caspase-8, Caspase-3, Lamin A/C and PARP, provided the clues for the induction of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways in AIGNPs treated HT-29 cells. The study provides a preliminary guidance towards the development of colon cancer therapy using green synthesized gold nanoparticles. PMID:27038915

  13. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  14. Genistein suppresses FLT4 and inhibits human colorectal cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Rui; Wang, Jiayin; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xiqiang; Wu, Kaichun; Bergan, Raymond C; Xu, Li; Fan, Daiming

    2015-02-20

    Dietary consumption of genistein, found in soy, has been associated with a potentially protective role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development and progression. Herein we demonstrate that genistein will inhibit human CRC cell invasion and migration, that it does so at non-cytotoxic concentrations and we demonstrate this in multiple human CRC cell lines. After orthotopic implantation of human CRC tumors into mice, oral genistein did not inhibit tumor growth, but did inhibit distant metastasis formation, and was non-toxic to mice. Using a qPCR array, we screened for genistein-induced changes in gene expression, followed by Western blot confirmation, demonstrating that genistein downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 and Fms-Related Tyrosine Kinase 4 (FLT4; vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3). After demonstrating that genistein suppressed neo-angiogenesis in mouse tumors, we examined FLT4 expression in primary CRC and adjacent normal colonic tissue from 60 human subjects, demonstrating that increased FLT4 significantly correlates with increased stage and decreased survival. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits human CRC metastasis at dietary, non-toxic, doses. FLT4 is identified as a marker of metastatic disease, and as a response marker for small molecule therapeutics that inhibit CRC metastasis. PMID:25605009

  15. Activation of JNK Contributes to Evodiamine-Induced Apoptosis and G2/M Arrest in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells: A Structure-Activity Study of Evodiamine

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ching-Huai; Chen, Chih-Hung; Yang, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2014-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO; 8,13,13b,14-tetrahydro-14-methylindolo[2′3′-3,4]pyrido[2,1-b]quinazolin-5-[7H]-one derived from the traditional herbal medicine Evodia rutaecarpa was reported to possess anticancer activity; however, the anticancer mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of EVO on human colon COLO205 and HT-29 cells and their potential mechanisms. MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays showed that the viability of COLOL205 and HT-29 cells was inhibited by EVO at various concentrations in accordance with increases in the percentage of apoptotic cells and cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. Disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential by EVO was accompanied by increased Bax, caspase-9 protein cleavage, and cytochrome (Cyt) c protein translocation in COLO205 and HT-29 cells. Application of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) inhibited H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis, but did not affect EVO-induced apoptosis of COLO205 or HT-29 cells. Significant increases in the G2/M ratio and cyclinB1/cdc25c protein expression by EVO were respectively identified in colon carcinoma cells via a flow cytometric analysis and Western blotting. Induction of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein phosphorylation was detected in EVO-treated cells, and the JNK inhibitor, SP600125, but not the ERK inhibitor, U0126, inhibited EVO-induced phosphorylated JNK protein expression, apoptosis, and G2/M arrest of colon carcinoma cells. Data of the structure-activity analysis showed that EVO-related chemicals containing an alkyl group at position 14 were able to induce apoptosis, G2/M arrest associated with increased DNA ladder formation, cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, and elevated cycB1 and cdc25c protein expressions in COLO205 and HT-29 cells. Evidence supporting JNK activation leading to EVO-induced apoptosis and G

  16. cis-Dichloroplatinum(II) complexes tethered to dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-ones: synthesis and cytotoxicity in human cancer cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Nicolas; Pertuit, David; Moretto, Johnny; Cachia, Claire; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    2013-11-01

    A novel family of cisplatin-type complexes tethered to dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one topoisomerase inhibitor via a polymethylene chain and their nonplatinated counterparts were prepared. Their potential cytotoxicity was assessed in three human colorectal cancer cell lines HCT 116, SW480 and HT-29 and compared to the reference molecules cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Platinated compounds were poorly active whilst nonplatinated dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one moieties exhibited higher cytotoxic properties than cisplatin and oxaliplatin whatever the length of the polymethylene chain; molecules containing the tri- and hexamethylene chain length were the most cytotoxic. PMID:24095763

  17. Molecular mechanism of anticancer effect of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin in HT29 cells involves differential expression of genes associated with multiple signaling pathways: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Barkeer, Srikanth; Guha, Nilanjan; Hothpet, Vishwanathreddy; Saligrama Adavigowda, Deepak; Hegde, Prajna; Padmanaban, Arunkumar; Yu, Lu-Gang; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R

    2015-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL) is a lectin isolated from fungus S. rolfsii and has high binding specificity toward the oncofetal Thomsen-Friedenreich carbohydrate antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAc-α-O-Ser/Thr, T or TF), which is expressed in more than 90% of human cancers. Our previous studies have shown that binding of SRL to human colon, breast and ovarian cancer cells induces cell apoptosis in vitro and suppresses tumor growth in vivo. This study investigated the SRL-mediated cell signaling in human colon cancer HT29 cells by mRNA and miRNA microarrays. It was found that SRL treatment results in altered expression of several hundred molecules including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-JUN-associated, apoptosis-associated and cell cycle and DNA replication-associated signaling molecules. Pathway analysis using GeneSpring 12.6.1 revealed that SRL treatment induces changes of MAPK and c-JUN-associated signaling pathways as early as 2 h while changes of cell cycle, DNA replication and apoptosis pathways were significantly affected only after 24 h. A significant change of cell miRNA expression was also observed after 12 h treatment of the cells with SRL. These changes were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. This study thus suggests that the presence of SRL affects multiple signaling pathways in cancer cells with early effects on cell proliferation pathways associated with MAPK and c-JUN, followed by miRNA-associated cell activity and apoptosis. This provides insight information into the molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of this fungal lectin. PMID:26347523

  18. Potentially probiotic and bioprotective lactic acid bacteria starter cultures antagonise the Listeria monocytogenes adhesion to HT29 colonocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Garriga, M; Rubio, R; Aymerich, T; Ruas-Madiedo, P

    2015-01-01

    The capability of five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to counteract the adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes to the epithelial intestinal cell line HT29 was studied. The highest adhesion ability to HT29 was achieved by the intestinal strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus CTC1679, followed by the meat-derived strains Lactobacillus sakei CTC494 and Enterococcus faecium CTC8005. Surprisingly, the meat strains showed significantly better adhesion to HT29 than two faecal isolates of Lactobacillus casei and even significantly higher than the reference strain L. rhamnosus GG. Additionally, the anti-listerial, bacteriocin-producer starter culture L. sakei CTC494 was able to significantly reduce the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to HT29 in experiments of exclusion, competition and inhibition. The performance was better than the faecal isolate L. rhamnosus CTC1679. Our results reinforce the fact that the ability of LAB to interact with a host epithelium model, as well as to antagonise with foodborne pathogens, is a strain-specific characteristic. Additionally, it is underlined that this trait is not dependent on the origin of the bacterium, since some food LAB behave better than intestinal ones. Therefore, the search for novel strains in food niches is a suitable approach to find those with potential health benefits. These strains are likely pre-adapted to the food environment, which would make their inclusion in the formulation of probiotic foods more feasible. PMID:25488261

  19. AXL is an oncotarget in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Erika; Martini, Giulia; Cardone, Claudia; Troiani, Teresa; Liguori, Giuseppina; Vitagliano, Donata; Napolitano, Stefania; Morgillo, Floriana; Rinaldi, Barbara; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Liotti, Federica; Nappi, Anna; Bianco, Roberto; Berrino, Liberato; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Ciardiello, Davide; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ferraiolo, Fiorella; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-09-15

    AXL is a tyrosine kinase receptor activated by GAS6 and regulates cancer cell proliferation migration and angiogenesis. We studied AXL as new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression and activation of AXL and GAS6 were evaluated in a panel of human CRC cell lines. AXL gene silencing or pharmacologic inhibition with foretinib suppressed proliferation, migration and survival in CRC cells. In an orthotopic colon model of human HCT116 CRC cells overexpressing AXL, foretinib treatment caused significant inhibition of tumour growth and peritoneal metastatic spreading. AXL and GAS6 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were found in 76,7% and 73.5%, respectively, of 223 human CRC specimens, correlating with less differentiated histological grading. GAS6 overexpression was associated with nodes involvement and tumour stage. AXL gene was found amplified by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 8/146 cases (5,4%) of CRC samples. Taken together, AXL inhibition could represent a novel therapeutic approach in CRC. PMID:25966280

  20. AXL is an oncotarget in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; Liguori, Giuseppina; Vitagliano, Donata; Napolitano, Stefania; Morgillo, Floriana; Rinaldi, Barbara; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Liotti, Federica; Nappi, Anna; Bianco, Roberto; Berrino, Liberato; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Ciardiello, Davide; Iaffaioli, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ferraiolo, Fiorella; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    AXL is a tyrosine kinase receptor activated by GAS6 and regulates cancer cell proliferation migration and angiogenesis. We studied AXL as new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer (CRC). Expression and activation of AXL and GAS6 were evaluated in a panel of human CRC cell lines. AXL gene silencing or pharmacologic inhibition with foretinib suppressed proliferation, migration and survival in CRC cells. In an orthotopic colon model of human HCT116 CRC cells overexpressing AXL, foretinib treatment caused significant inhibition of tumour growth and peritoneal metastatic spreading. AXL and GAS6 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were found in 76,7% and 73.5%, respectively, of 223 human CRC specimens, correlating with less differentiated histological grading. GAS6 overexpression was associated with nodes involvement and tumour stage. AXL gene was found amplified by Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 8/146 cases (5,4%) of CRC samples. Taken together, AXL inhibition could represent a novel therapeutic approach in CRC. PMID:25966280

  1. Zinc Sensing Receptor Signaling, Mediated by GPR39, Reduces Butyrate-Induced Cell Death in HT29 Colonocytes via Upregulation of Clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Limor; Azriel-Tamir, Hagit; Arotsker, Natan; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Zinc enhances epithelial proliferation, protects the digestive epithelial layer and has profound antiulcerative and antidiarrheal roles in the colon. Despite the clinical significance of this ion, the mechanisms linking zinc to these cellular processes are poorly understood. We have previously identified an extracellular Zn2+ sensing G-protein coupled receptor (ZnR) that activates Ca2+ signaling in colonocytes, but its molecular identity as well as its effects on colonocytes' survival remained elusive. Here, we show that Zn2+, by activation of the ZnR, protects HT29 colonocytes from butyrate induced cell death. Silencing of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR39 expression abolished ZnR-dependent Ca2+ release and Zn2+-dependent survival of butyrate-treated colonocytes. Importantly, GPR39 also mediated ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange activity as this activity was found in native colon tissue but not in tissue obtained from GPR39 knock-out mice. Although ZnR-dependent upregulation of Na+/H+ exchange reduced the cellular acid load induced by butyrate, it did not rescue HT29 cells from butyrate induced cell death. ZnR/GPR39 activation however, increased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein clusterin in butyrate-treated cells. Furthermore, silencing of clusterin abolished the Zn2+-dependent survival of HT29 cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that extracellular Zn2+, acting through ZnR, regulates intracellular pH and clusterin expression thereby enhancing survival of HT29 colonocytes. Moreover, we identify GPR39 as the molecular moiety of ZnR in HT29 and native colonocytes. PMID:22545109

  2. Distinct domain-dependent effect of syntaxin1A on amiloride-sensitive sodium channel (ENaC) currents in HT-29 colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sunil K; Singh, Madhurima; Kaur, Simarna; George, Constantine

    2007-01-01

    The amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a plasma membrane protein mediates sodium reabsorption in epithelial tissues, including the distal nephron and colon. Syntaxin1A, a trafficking protein of the t-SNARE family has been reported to inhibit ENaC in the Xenopus oocyte expression and artificial lipid bilayer systems. The present report describes the regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by syntaxin1A in a human cell line that is physiologically relevant as it expresses both components and also responds to aldosterone stimulation. In order to evaluate the physiological significance of syntaxin1A interaction with natively expressed ENaC, we over-expressed HT-29 with syntaxin1A constructs comprising various motifs. Unexpectedly, we observed the augmentation of amiloride-sensitive currents with wild-type syntaxin1A full-length construct (1-288) in this cell line. Both γENaC and neutralizing syntaxin1A antibodies blocked native expression as amiloride-sensitive sodium currents were inhibited while munc18-1 antibody reversed this effect. The coiled-coiled domain H3 (194-266) of syntaxin1A inhibited, however the inclusion of the transmembrane domain to this motif (194-288) augmented amiloride sensitive currents. More so, data suggest that ENaC interacts with multiple syntaxin1A domains, which differentially regulate channel function. This functional modulation is the consequence of the physical enhancement of ENaC at the cell surface in cells over-expressed with syntaxin(s). Our data further suggest that syntaxin1A up-regulates ENaC function by multiple mechanisms that include PKA, PLC, PI3 and MAP Kinase (p42/44) signaling systems. We propose that syntaxin1A possesses distinct inhibitory and stimulatory domains that interact with ENaC subunits, which critically determines the overall ENaC functionality/regulation under distinct physiological conditions. PMID:17200691

  3. The percentage of CD133+ cells in human colorectal cancer cell lines is influenced by Mycoplasma hyorhinis infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mollicutes contamination is recognized to be a critical issue for the cultivation of continuous cell lines. In this work we characterized the effect of Mycoplasma hyorhinis contamination on CD133 expression in human colon cancer cell lines. Methods MycoAlert® and mycoplasma agar culture were used to detect mycoplasma contamination on GEO, SW480 and HT-29 cell lines. Restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was used to determine mycoplasma species. All cellular models were decontaminated by the use of a specific antibiotic panel (Enrofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, BM Cyclin 1 and 2, Mycoplasma Removal Agent and MycoZap®). The percentage of CD133 positive cells was analyzed by flow cytometry on GEO, SW480 and HT-29 cell lines, before and after Mycoplasma hyorhinis eradication. Results Mycoplasma hyorhinis infected colon cancer cell lines showed an increased percentage of CD133+ cells as compared to the same cell lines rendered mycoplasma-free by effective exposure to antibiotic treatment. The percentage of CD133 positive cells increased again when mycoplasma negative cells were re-infected by Mycoplasma hyorhinis. Conclusions Mycoplasma hyorhinis infection has an important role on the quality of cultured human colon cancer cell lines giving a false positive increase of cancer stem cells fraction characterized by CD133 expression. Possible explanations are (i) the direct involvement of Mycoplasma on CD133 expression or (ii) the selective pressure on a subpopulation of cells characterized by constitutive CD133 expression. In keeping with United Kingdom Coordinating Committee on Cancer Research (UKCCCR) guidelines, the present data indicate the mandatory prerequisite, for investigators involved in human colon cancer research area, of employing mycoplasma-free cell lines in order to avoid the production of non-reproducible or even false data. PMID:20353562

  4. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  5. Oxaliplatin induces different cellular and molecular chemoresistance patterns in colorectal cancer cell lines of identical origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer cells frequently adopt cellular and molecular alterations and acquire resistance to cytostatic drugs. Chemotherapy with oxaliplatin is among the leading treatments for colorectal cancer with a response rate of 50%, inducing intrastrand cross-links on the DNA. Despite of this drug’s efficiency, resistance develops in nearly all metastatic patients. Chemoresistance being of crucial importance for the drug’s clinical efficiency this study aimed to contribute to the identification and description of some cellular and molecular alterations induced by prolonged oxaliplatin therapy. Resistance to oxaliplatin was induced in Colo320 (Colo320R) and HT-29 (HT-29R) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines by exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the drug. Alterations in morphology, cytotoxicity, DNA cross-links formation and gene expression profiles were assessed in the parental and resistant variants with microscopy, MTT, alkaline comet and pangenomic microarray assays, respectively. Results Morphology analysis revealed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the resistant vs parental cells suggesting alterations of the cells’ adhesion complexes, through which they acquire increased invasiveness and adherence. Cytotoxicity measurements demonstrated resistance to oxaliplatin in both cell lines; Colo320 being more sensitive than HT-29 to this drug (P < 0.001). The treatment with oxaliplatin caused major DNA cross-links in both parental cell lines; in Colo320R small amounts of DNA cross-links were still detectable, while in HT-29R not. We identified 441 differentially expressed genes in Colo320R and 613 in HT-29R as compared to their parental counterparts (at least 1.5 -fold up- or down- regulation, p < 0.05). More disrupted functions and pathways were detected in HT-29R cell line than in Colo320R, involving genes responsible for apoptosis inhibition, cellular proliferation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Several upstream

  6. Chlorpyrifos promotes colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth through the activation of EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway.

    PubMed

    Suriyo, Tawit; Tachachartvanich, Phum; Visitnonthachai, Daranee; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2015-12-01

    Aside from the effects on neuronal cholinergic system, epidemiological studies suggest an association between chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure and cancer risk. This in vitro study examined the effects of CPF and its toxic metabolite, chlorpyrifos oxon (CPF-O), on the growth of human colorectal adenocarcinoma H508, colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29, normal colon epithelial CCD841, liver hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and normal liver hepatocyte THLE-3 cells. The results showed that CPF (5-100 μM) concentration-dependently increased viability of H508 and CCD841 cells in serum-free conditions. This increasing trend was not found in HT-29, HepG2 and THLE-3 cells. In contrast, CPF-O (50-100 μM) reduced the viability of all cell lines. Cell cycle analysis showed the induction of cells in the S phase, and EdU incorporation assay revealed the induction of DNA synthesis in CPF-treated H508 cells indicating that CPF promotes cell cycle progression. Despite the observation of acetylcholinesterase activity inhibition and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, atropine (a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) and N-acetylcysteine (a potent antioxidant) failed to inhibit the growth-promoting effect of CPF. CPF increased the phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream effector, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2), in H508 cells. AG-1478 (a specific EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) and U0126 (a specific MEK inhibitor) completely mitigated the growth promoting effect of CPF. Altogether, these results suggest that EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway but not cholinergic pathway involves in CPF-induced colorectal adenocarcinoma H508 cell growth. PMID:26514924

  7. Claudin-3 Overexpression Increases the Malignant Potential of Colorectal Cancer Cells: Roles of ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt as Modulators of EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Waldemir F.; Fortunato-Miranda, Natalia; Robbs, Bruno K.; de Araujo, Wallace M.; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio C.; Bastos, Lilian G.; Viola, João P. B.; Morgado-Díaz, José A.

    2013-01-01

    The altered expressions of claudin proteins have been reported during the tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these events in this cancer type are poorly understood. Here, we report that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the expression of claudin-3 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. This increase was related to increased cell migration and the formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies. We further showed that the ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways were involved in the regulation of these effects because specific pharmacological inhibition blocked these events. Genetic manipulation of claudin-1 and claudin-3 in HT-29 cells showed that the overexpression of claudin-1 resulted in decreased cell migration; however, migration was not altered in cells that overexpressed claudin-3. Furthermore, the overexpression of claudin-3, but not that of claudin-1, increased the tight junction-related paracellular flux of macromolecules. Additionally, an increased formation of anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent colonies were observed in cells that overexpressed claudin-3, while no such changes were observed when claudin-1 was overexpressed. Finally, claudin-3 silencing alone despite induce increase proliferation, and the formation of anchoragedependent and -independent colonies, it was able to prevent the EGF-induced increased malignant potential. In conclusion, our results show a novel role for claudin-3 overexpression in promoting the malignant potential of colorectal cancer cells, which is potentially regulated by the EGF-activated ERK1/2 and PI3K-Akt pathways. PMID:24069372

  8. An in vitro study of mucoadhesion and biocompatibility of polymer coated liposomes on HT29-MTX mucus-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Adamczak, Małgorzata I; Hagesaether, Ellen; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2016-02-10

    Drug delivery to the oral cavity poses a significant challenge due to the short residence time of the formulations at the site of action. From this point of view, nanoparticulate drug delivery systems with ability to adhere to the oral mucosa are advantageous as they could increase the effectiveness of the therapy. Positively, negatively and neutrally charged liposomes were coated with four different types of polymers: alginate, low-ester pectin, chitosan and hydrophobically modified ethyl hydroxyethyl cellulose. The mucoadhesion was studied using a novel in vitro method allowing the liposomes to interact with a mucus-producing confluent HT29-MTX cell-line without applying any external force. MTT viability and paracellular permeability tests were conducted on the same cell-line. The alginate-coated liposomes achieved a high specific (genuine) mucin interaction, with a low potential of cell-irritation. The positively charged uncoated liposomes achieved the highest initial mucoadhesion, but also displayed a higher probability of cell-irritation. The chitosan-coated liposomes displayed the highest potential for long lasting mucoadhesion, but with the drawback of a higher general adhesion (tack) and a higher potential for irritating the cells. PMID:26706437

  9. Biphasic activity of chloroquine in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Deokbae; Lee, Youngki

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation process that is involved in tumor development and normal development. Autophagy is induced in cancer cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and inhibition of autophagy results in enhanced cancer cell death or survival. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial devrepug, is a lysosomotropic agent and is currently used as a potential anticancer agent as well as an autophagy inhibitor. Here, we evaluate the characteristics of these dual activities of CQ using human colorectal cancer cell line HCT15. The results show that CQ inhibited cell viability in dose-and time-dependent manner in the range between 20 to 80 uM, while CQ did not show any antiproliferative activity at 5 and 10 uM. Cotreatment of CQ with antitumor agent NVP-BEZ235, a dual inhibitor of PI3K/mTOR, rescued the cell viability at low concentrations meaning that CQ acted as an autophagy inhibitor, but CQ induced the lethal effect at high concentrations. Acridine orange staining revealed that CQ at high doses induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). High doses of CQ produced cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cotreatment of antioxidants, such as NAC and trolox, with high doses of CQ rescued the cell viability. These results suggest that CQ may exert its dual activities, as autophagy inhibitor or LMP inducer, in concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25949192

  10. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  11. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man. PMID:24396560

  12. c-MET inhibition enhances the response of the colorectal cancer cells to irradiation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    JIA, YITAO; DAI, GUANGYAO; WANG, JINXI; GAO, XING; ZHAO, ZHAOLONG; DUAN, ZHIHUI; GU, BIN; YANG, WEIGUANG; WU, JIANHUA; JU, YINGCHAO; WANG, MINGXIA; LI, ZHONGXIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET) inhibition on the viability of colon cancer cells and xenografts exposed to irradiation using short hairpin (sh)RNA or the c-MET inhibitor PHA665752. The underlying mechanisms were also investigated. Human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells were infected with a lentivirus expressing shRNAs against c-MET and were irradiated at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. The viability of the cells was assessed by alamarBlue® assays. Mice bearing human colon carcinoma SW620 xenografts were randomly selected to receive 2.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), 25 mg/kg PHA665752 intraperitoneally once every 2 days for 3 weeks, irradiation at 10 Gy, or 25 mg/kg PHA665752 intraperitoneally once every 2 days for 3 weeks followed 24 h later by irradiation at 10 Gy. The mean tumor volume (MTV) was measured. The apoptotic rate of cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assays, and double stranded break marker antibody γ-H2AX and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. alamarBlue assays revealed that c-MET downregulation by shRNA markedly accentuated the irradiation-induced reduction in the viability of HT-29 cells compared with HT-29 cells irradiated at the same doses (P<0.05). A combination of irradiation and PHA665752 caused an additional reduction in the MTV (382.8±42.4 mm3; P<0.01 vs. irradiation and PHA665752, 998.0±180.6 and 844.8±190.0 mm3, respectively). TUNEL assays revealed that irradiation and PHA665752 alone caused significant apoptosis of the SW620 cells in the tumor xenografts (P<0.01 vs. DMSO). The apoptotic index in the tumor xenografts of mice treated with a combination of irradiation and PHA665752 was significantly increased compared with mice treated with either agent alone (P<0.01). The combination of irradiation and PHA665752 was also associated with a marked increase in

  13. Anthocyanins and Phenolic Acids of Hybrid and Native Blue Maize (Zea mays L.) Extracts and Their Antiproliferative Activity in Mammary (MCF7), Liver (HepG2), Colon (Caco2 and HT29) and Prostate (PC3) Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Urias-Lugo, D A; Heredia, J B; Muy-Rangel, M D; Valdez-Torres, J B; Serna-Saldívar, S O; Gutiérrez-Uribe, J A

    2015-06-01

    Blue maize is an excellent source of bioactive components such as phenolic acids and anthocyanins but when it is processed for human consumption, these compounds decrease considerably. Therefore, blue maize could be directed to produce nutraceutical extracts. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between anthocyanins composition of acidified and non-acidified extracts from native and hybrid blue maize genotypes and their antiproliferative effect in mammary (MCF7), liver (HepG2), colon (Caco2 and HT29) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells. The most abundant phenolic acid was ferulic acid. Nine anthocyanins were quantified in the extracts, being Cy3-Glu the most abundant. Acylated forms were also obtained in high abundance depending of the extraction method. An extract concentration range of 4.31 to 7.23 mg/mL inhibited by 50% the growth of untransformed cells NIH3T3. Antiproliferative effect on PC3, Caco2, HepG2 and MCF7 cancer cells of acidified extracts from hybrid blue maize was larger than the observed using non-acidified extracts. Among the nine compounds that were quantified in the extracts tested, CyMalGlu I showed the strongest correlation with the reduction of cell viability in Caco2 (-0.876), HepG2 (-0.813), MCF7 (-0.765) and PC3 (-0.894). No significant correlation or differences in antiproliferative effect on HT29 was found among the extracts. The method of extraction of maize anthocyanins must be selected to obtain a high yield of CyMalGlu I more than only Cy3-Glu since acylation affects the inhibition of cancer cell growth. PMID:25762472

  14. Oxidative stress triggered by naturally occurring flavone apigenin results in senescence and chemotherapeutic effect in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kacoli; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies involving phytochemical polyphenolic compounds have suggested flavones often exert pro-oxidative effect in vitro against wide array of cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vitro pro-oxidative activity of apigenin, a plant based flavone against colorectal cancer cell lines and investigate cumulative effect on long term exposure. In the present study, treatment of colorectal cell lines HT-29 and HCT-15 with apigenin resulted in anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects characterized by biochemical and morphological changes, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential which aided in reversing the impaired apoptotic machinery leading to negative implications in cancer pathogenesis. Apigenin induces rapid free radical species production and the level of oxidative damage was assessed by qualitative and quantitative estimation of biochemical markers of oxidative stress. Increased level of mitochondrial superoxide suggested dose dependent mitochondrial oxidative damage which was generated by disruption in anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic protein balance. Continuous and persistent oxidative stress induced by apigenin at growth suppressive doses over extended treatment time period was observed to induce senescence which is a natural cellular mechanism to attenuate tumor formation. Senescence phenotype inducted by apigenin was attributed to changes in key molecules involved in p16-Rb and p53 independent p21 signaling pathways. Phosphorylation of retinoblastoma was inhibited and significant up-regulation of p21 led to simultaneous suppression of cyclins D1 and E which indicated the onset of senescence. Pro-oxidative stress induced premature senescence mediated by apigenin makes this treatment regimen a potential chemopreventive strategy and an in vitro model for aging research. PMID:25965143

  15. PET Imaging of Dll4 Expression in Glioblastoma and Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Using (64)Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody 61B.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Ren; Wang, Mengzhe; Deng, Huaifu; Giglio, Benjamin C; Gill, Parkash S; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo

    2015-10-01

    Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) expressed in tumor cells plays a key role to promote tumor growth of numerous cancer types. Based on a novel antihuman Dll4 monoclonal antibody (61B), we developed a (64)Cu-labeled probe for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor Dll4 expression. In this study, 61B was conjugated with the (64)Cu-chelator DOTA through lysine on the antibody. Human IgG (hIgG)-DOTA, which did not bind to Dll4, was also prepared as a control. The Dll4 binding activity of the probes was evaluated through the bead-based binding assay with Dll4-alkaline phosphatase. The resulting PET probes were evaluated in U87MG glioblastoma and HT29 colorectal cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. Our results demonstrated that the 61B-DOTA retained (77.2 ± 3.7) % Dll4 binding activity of the unmodified 61B, which is significantly higher than that of hIgG-DOTA (0.06 ± 0.03) %. Confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that 61B-Cy5.5, but not IgG-Cy5.5, predominantly located within the U87MG and HT29 cells cytoplasm. U87MG cells showed higher 61B-Cy5.5 binding as compared to HT29 cells. In U87MG xenografts, 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu demonstrated remarkable tumor accumulation (10.5 ± 1.7 and 10.2 ± 1.2%ID/g at 24 and 48 h postinjection, respectively). In HT29 xenografts, tumor accumulation of 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu was significantly lower than that of U87MG (7.3 ± 1.3 and 6.6 ± 1.3%ID/g at 24 and 48 h postinjection, respectively). The tumor accumulation of 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu was significantly higher than that of hIgG-DOTA-(64)Cu in both xenografts models. Immunofluorescence staining of the tumor tissues further confirmed that tumor accumulation of 61B-Cy5.5 was correlated well with in vivo PET imaging data using 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu. In conclusion, 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu PET probe was successfully synthesized and demonstrated prominent tumor uptake by targeting Dll4. 61B-DOTA-(64)Cu has great potential to be used for noninvasive Dll4 imaging, which could be valuable for tumor detection, Dll4

  16. The role of cyclooxygenase in n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid mediated effects on cell proliferation, PGE(2) synthesis and cytotoxicity in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dommels, Yvonne E M; Haring, Merel M G; Keestra, Nynke G M; Alink, Gerrit M; van Bladeren, Peter J; van Ommen, Ben

    2003-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and its prostaglandin product PGE(2) in n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-mediated effects on cellular proliferation of two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. The long chain PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n-3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4n-6) both inhibited cell proliferation of Caco-2 cells compared with the long chain fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) and linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n-6). Neither incubation with PGE(2) nor reduction in PGE(2) synthesis by EPA compared with AA led to differential effects on cell proliferation in Caco-2 cells. This suggests that n-6 and n-3 PUFA-mediated cell proliferation in Caco-2 cells is not regulated via PGE(2) levels. AA and EPA had no effect on growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells with a low COX activity. However, stimulation of COX-2 activity by IL-1 beta resulted in a decrease in cell proliferation and an induction of cytotoxicity by AA as well as by EPA. Both inhibition of the COX pathway by indomethacin as well as inhibition of direct lipid peroxidation by antioxidants such as vitamin E and C diminished the anti-proliferative effects of AA as well as EPA. Also, malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation and COX-activity was decreased by addition of vitamin E and partially decreased by indomethacin. These data support the hypothesis that growth inhibitory and cytotoxic effects of PUFAs with methylene-interrupted double bonds such as AA and EPA are due to peroxidation products that are generated during lipid peroxidation and COX activity. PMID:12663496

  17. Sildenafil inhibits the growth of human colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xiao-Long; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Li, Yong; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Xue, You-Qiu; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Qin, Wu-Ming; Wei, Meng-Ning; Shi, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common human cancer with frequent overexpression of the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). In the present study, we investigated that the anticancer effect of sildenafil on human colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo, which is a potent and selective inhibitor of PDE5 for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and pulmonary arterial hypertension in the clinic. Sildenafil significantly induced cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human colorectal cancer with increased intracellular reactive oxidative specie (ROS) levels, which were accompanied by obvious alterations of related proteins such as CDKs, Cyclins and PARP etc. Pretreatment with ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine could reverse sildenafil-induced ROS accumulation and cell apoptosis. Inhibition of the activity of protein kinase G with KT-5823 could enhance sildenafil-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, sildenafil caused the reduction of xenograft models of human colorectal cancer in nude mice. Overall, these findings suggest that sildenafil has the potential to be used for treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:26807313

  18. Piper betle leaf extract enhances the cytotoxicity effect of 5-fluorouracil in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 colon cancer cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Pek Leng; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Then, Sue Mian; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Pin, Kar Yong; Looi, Mee Lee

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The combination effect of Piper betle (PB) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in enhancing the cytotoxic potential of 5-FU in inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells was investigated. Methods: HT29 and HCT116 cells were subjected to 5-FU or PB treatment. 5-FU and PB were then combined and their effects on both cell lines were observed after 24 h of treatment. PB-5-FU interaction was elucidated by isobologram analysis. Apoptosis features of the treated cells were revealed by annexin V/PI stain. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was performed to exclude any possible chemical interaction between the compounds. Results: In the presence of PB extract, the cytotoxicity of 5-FU was observed at a lower dose (IC50 12.5 μmol/L) and a shorter time (24 h) in both cell lines. Both cell lines treated with 5-FU or PB alone induced a greater apoptosis effect compared with the combination treatment. Isobologram analysis indicated that PB and 5-FU interacted synergistically and antagonistically in inhibiting the growth of HT29 and HCT116 cells, respectively. Conclusions: In the presence of PB, a lower dosage of 5-FU is required to achieve the maximum drug effect in inhibiting the growth of HT29 cells. However, PB did not significantly reduce 5-FU dosage in HCT116 cells. Our result showed that this interaction may not solely contribute to the apoptosis pathway. PMID:25091987

  19. Anti-tumorigenicity of dietary α-mangostin in an HT-29 colon cell xenograft model and the tissue distribution of xanthones and their phase II metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Li, Jie; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Nontakham, Jannarin; Suksumrarn, Sunit; Clinton, Steven K.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Failla, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope This study investigated the in vivo and in vitro activity of α-mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen pericarp, on HT-29 cell tumorigenicity, proliferation, and several markers of tumor cell activity, as well as the profile and amounts of xanthones in serum, tumor, liver, and feces. Methods and results Balb/c nu/nu mice were fed either control diet or diet containing 900 mg α-MG/kg. After 1 week of acclimation to diet, mice were injected subcutaneously with HT-29 cells and fed the same diets ad libitum for an additional 2 or 4 weeks. After 2 and 4 weeks, tumor mass and the concentrations of BcL-2 and β-catenin in tumors of mice fed diet with α-MG were significantly less than in mice fed control diet. Xanthones and their metabolites were identified in serum, tumor, liver, and feces. In vitro treatment of HT-29 cells with α-MG also inhibited cell proliferation and decreased expression of BcL-2 and β-catenin. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the anti-neoplastic effect of dietary α-MG is associated with the presence of xanthones in the tumor tissue. Further investigation of the impact of beverages and food products containing xanthones on the prevention of colon cancer or as complementary therapy is merited. PMID:23239542

  20. Prolonged activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases during NSAID-induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, T I; Jin, S H; Kim, W H; Kang, E H; Choi, K Y; Kim, H J; Shin, S K; Kang, J K

    2001-06-01

    The mechanisms of the antineoplastic effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) still are unknown, but the induction of apoptosis is one of the possible mechanisms. We attempted to demonstrate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, generally considered to be important mediators of proliferative and apoptotic signals, in NSAID-induced colon cancer cell apoptosis. Apoptosis was detected by demonstration of DNA fragmentation in agarose gel electrophoresis. Cell death was assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion method. MAP kinase activation was assessed by Western blot using phosphospecific antibodies to MAP kinases. Kinase assay using activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2) fusion protein as a substrate was also performed for measuring p38 MAP kinase activity. For the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase, pyridinylimidazole compound (SB203580) was utilized. Caspase-3 activity was measured using the tetrapeptide fluorogenic substrate Ac-DEVD-AMC. Treatment of HT-29 cells with NSAIDs results in time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis, accompanied by sustained activation of all three MAP kinase subfamilies. The SB203580, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, reduced indomethacin-induced cell death by 43%, while PD098059, a MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)1 inhibitor, did not affect cell death. p38 MAP kinase and caspase-3 activation were not significantly interlinked in indomethacin-induced apoptosis. From these results, we conclude that NSAIDs can induce prolonged activation of MAP kinases in colon cancer cells and that, of these, p38 MAP kinase may play a partial but significant role in indomethacin-induced apoptosis. PMID:11459290

  1. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  2. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  3. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Fabien J; Jouan-Lanhouet, Sandrine; Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Jan, Gwénaël

    2016-02-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  4. The probiotic Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a new adjuvant for TRAIL-based therapy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Théret, Nathalie; Brenner, Catherine; Jouan, Elodie; Le Moigne-Muller, Gwénaëlle; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, which activates the extrinsic death pathway. TRAIL is pro-apoptotic on colon cancer cells, while not cytotoxic towards normal healthy cells. However, its clinical use is limited by cell resistance to cell death which occurs in approximately 50% of cancer cells. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) are also known to specifically induce apoptosis of cancer cells. In accordance, we have shown that food grade dairy propionibacteria induce intrinsic apoptosis of colon cancer cells, via the production and release of SCFA (propionate and acetate) acting on mitochondria. Here, we investigated possible synergistic effect between Propionibacterium freudenreichii and TRAIL. Indeed, we hypothesized that acting on both extrinsic and intrinsic death pathways may exert a synergistic pro-apoptotic effect. Whole transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that propionibacterial supernatant or propionibacterial metabolites (propionate and acetate), in combination with TRAIL, increased pro-apoptotic gene expression (TRAIL-R2/DR5) and decreased anti-apoptotic gene expression (FLIP, XIAP) in HT29 human colon cancer cells. The revealed synergistic pro-apoptotic effect, depending on both death receptors (TRAIL-R1/DR4, TRAIL-R2/DR5) and caspases (caspase-8, -9 and -3) activation, was lethal on cancer cells but not on normal human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC), and was inhibited by Bcl-2 expression. Finally, milk fermented by P. freudenreichii induced HT29 cells apoptosis and enhanced TRAIL cytotoxic activity, as did P. freudenreichii DMEM culture supernatants or its SCFA metabolites. These results open new perspectives for food grade P. freudenreichii-containing products in order to potentiate TRAIL-based cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. PMID:26771233

  5. Pre-treatment of HT-29 cells with 5-LOX inhibitor (MK-886) induces changes in cell cycle and increases apoptosis after photodynamic therapy with hypericin.

    PubMed

    Kleban, Ján; Szilárdiová, Beáta; Mikes, Jaromír; Horváth, Viktor; Sacková, Veronika; Brezáni, Peter; Hofmanová, Jirina; Kozubík, Alois; Fedorocko, Peter

    2006-08-01

    It may be hypothesized that the lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolic pathway plays an important role in photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours, and modification of this pathway may result in administration of lower doses of photodynamic active agents accompanied by reduced side effects. In this study, we examine in more detail the cytokinetic parameters of human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells pre-treated for 48 or 24h with LOX inhibitor MK-886, followed by PDT induced by hypericin. Based on MTT assay the concentrations of both agents (MK-886 and hypericin) with relatively slight (non-significant) cytotoxic effects were selected. These concentrations were used for combined treatment, where MTT response, total cell number, floating cells quantification, viability, cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis were detected. Hoechst/PI staining, PARP fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were evaluated to determine the extent of apoptosis. While MK-886 alone caused mainly necrosis, 48h pre-treatment of cells with MK-886 followed by PDT with hypericin clearly shifted the type of cell death to apoptosis. PDT with hypericin alone caused apoptosis in 19% of the cell population. Some combined modalities significantly potentiated the apoptotic effect (31% of apoptotic cells; 2.5microM MK-886/0.1microM hypericin), i.e., by 60% more than after single treatment with hypericin. Increased apoptosis was confirmed by PARP (116kDa) cleavage to characteristic 89kDa fragments and changes in MMP. Increasing concentration of MK-886 was accompanied by massive changes in the cell cycle progression. Combined treatment with lower concentrations of MK-886 and hypericin increased accumulation of cells in the S phase, accompanied by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Increasing concentration of MK-886 in this combination caused the opposite effect, manifesting significant accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. More pronounced effects were observed after the 48h pre

  6. Lactobacillus plantarum CS24.2 prevents Escherichia coli adhesion to HT-29 cells and also down-regulates enteropathogen-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, Akhilesh S; Bagchi, Tamishraha

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential of Lactobacillus plantarum CS24.2 to antagonize Escherichia coli adhesion and modulate expression of the responses by HT-29 cells of inflammatory molecules to E. coli adhesion. Experiments were performed under different adhesion conditions and findings compared with the responses of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Tests of competitive adhesion, adhesion inhibition and displacement assays were performed for lactobacilli (L. rhamnosus GG and L. plantarum CS24.2) and E. coli O26:H11 to HT-29 cells. Both the lactobacilli significantly reduced E. coli adhesion to HT-29 cells (P < 0.05). The ability of lactobacilli to modulate tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression was analyzed in HT-29 cells stimulated with E. coli using qRT-PCR. L. plantarum CS24.2 significantly down regulated expression of both the genes induced by E. coli in HT-29 cells at 6 hr as well as 24 hr, which was more significant than the corresponding findings for L. rhamnosus GG. The present findings suggest that L. plantarum CS24.2 inhibits pathogen adhesion to a similar extent as does the established probiotic strain L. rhamnosus GG. It may also attenuate tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 expression in HT-29 cells stimulated with E. coli. PMID:23586634

  7. Novel self-micellizing anticancer lipid nanoparticles induce cell death of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kyu Yoo, Bong; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we developed a novel drug-like self-micellizing anticancer lipid (SMAL), and investigated its anticancer activity and effects on cell death pathways in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Three self-assembled nanoparticles were prepared, namely, SMAL102 (lauramide derivative), SMAL104 (palmitamide derivative), and SMAL108 (stearamide derivative) by a thin-film hydration technique, and were characterized for physicochemical and biological parameters. SMAL102 were nanosized (160.23 ± 8.11 nm) with uniform spherical shape, while SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not form spherical shape but formed large size nanoparticles and irregular in shape. Importantly, SMAL102 showed a cytotoxic effect towards CRC cell lines (HCT116 and HT-29), and less toxicity to a normal colon fibroblast cell line (CCD-18Co). Conversely, SMAL104 and SMAL108 did not have an anti-proliferative effect on CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles were actively taken up by CRC cell lines, localized in the cell membrane, and exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. The normal colon cell line showed significantly less cellular uptake and non-cytotoxicity as compared with the CRC cell lines. SMAL102 nanoparticles induced caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells, indicating the induction of apoptosis; whereas LC3B was activated in HCT116 cells, indicating autophagy-induced cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SMAL102 induced cell death via activation of apoptosis and autophagy in CRC cell lines. The present study could be a pioneer for further preclinical and clinical development of such compounds. PMID:26342325

  8. Polyethylene glycol-mediated colorectal cancer chemoprevention: roles of epidermal growth factor receptor and Snail.

    PubMed

    Wali, Ramesh K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bissonnette, Marc; Roy, Hemant K

    2008-09-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a clinically widely used agent with profound chemopreventive properties in experimental colon carcinogenesis. We reported previously that Snail/beta-catenin signaling may mediate the suppression of epithelial proliferation by PEG, although the upstream events remain unclear. We report herein the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of Snail and overexpressed in approximately 80% of human colorectal cancers, on PEG-mediated antiproliferative and hence antineoplastic effects in azoxymethane (AOM) rats and HT-29 colon cancer cells. AOM rats were randomized to either standard diet or one with 10% PEG-3350 and euthanized 8 weeks later. The colonic samples were subjected to immunohistochemical or Western blot analyses. PEG decreased mucosal EGFR by 60% (P < 0.001). Similar PEG effects were obtained in HT-29 cells. PEG suppressed EGFR protein via lysosmal degradation with no change in mRNA levels. To show that EGFR antagonism per se was responsible for the antiproliferative effect, we inhibited EGFR by either pretreating cells with gefitinib or stably transfecting with EGFR-short hairpin RNA and measured the effect of PEG on proliferation. In either case, PEG effect was blunted, suggesting a vital role of EGFR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that EGFR-short hairpin RNA cells, besides having reduced membrane EGFR, also expressed low Snail levels (40%), corroborating a strong association. Furthermore, in EGFR silenced cells, PEG effect on EGFR or Snail was muted, similar to that on proliferation. In conclusion, we show that EGFR is the proximate membrane signaling molecule through which PEG initiates antiproliferative activity with Snail/beta-catenin pathway playing the central intermediary function. PMID:18790788

  9. No evidence for human papillomavirus in the etiology of colorectal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Mandelson, Margaret T.; Galloway, Denise A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Wurscher, Michelle A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Makar, Karen W.; Potter, John D.; Schwartz, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background While some studies have reported detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal tumors, others have not. Methods We examined the association between oncogenic HPV infection and colorectal polyps in a case-control study of individuals with colorectal adenomas (n=167), hyperplastic polyps (n=87), and polyp-free controls (n=250). We performed real-time PCR for HPV-16 /18 DNA, and SPF PCR covering 43 HPV types, on lesional and normal colorectal tissue samples. Plasma antibodies for oncogenic HPV types were assessed via a bead-based multiplex Luminex assay. Results HPV DNA was not found in any of the 609 successfully assayed colorectal tissue samples from adenomas, hyperplastic polyps, normal biopsies adjacent to polyps, or normal biopsies of the rectum of disease-free controls. Also, there was no association between HPV seropositivity for all oncogenic HPV types combined, for either polyp type, and for men or women. When analyses were restricted to participants without a previous history of polyps, among men [adenomas (n=31), hyperplastic polyps (n=28), and controls (n=68)], there was an association between seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps when all oncogenic HPV types were combined (odds ratio=3.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–7.9). Conclusions Overall, our findings do not support an etiologic relationship between HPV and colorectal adenomas or hyperplastic polyps; however, our finding suggesting an association between HPV seropositivity and hyperplastic polyps in men may warrant further investigations. Impact After stringent controls for contamination and three methods to assess HPV infection, we report no evidence for HPV in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia for either men or women. PMID:21817125

  10. Soy Consumption and Colorectal Cancer Risk in Humans: A Meta-Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between soy consumption and colorectal cancer risk in humans by conducting a meta-analysis of available epidemiologic studies. We systematically reviewed publications obtained through a Medline literature search and identified four ...

  11. Inhibition of Shigella sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells by lactobacilli from Chinese fermented food and preliminary characterization of S-layer protein involvement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Tuo, Yan-Feng; Guo, Chun-Feng; Yi, Hua-Xi; Li, Jing-Yan; Han, Xue; Du, Ming

    2010-10-01

    In this study, seven lactobacilli with a high degree of antagonistic activity against three pathogens and good adherence to HT-29 cells were selected. The ability of these seven lactobacilli to inhibit adhesion of Shigella sonnei to intestinal mucosa was studied on cultured HT-29 cells. Lactobacilli were added simultaneously with, before or after S. sonnei to test for their effectiveness in exclusion, competition and displacement assays, respectively. Lactobacillus paracasei subp. paracasei M5-L, Lactobacillus rhamnosus J10-L and Lactobacillus casei Q8-L all exhibited significant inhibitory activity. In order to elucidate the inhibitory functions of S-layer proteins, the S-layer proteins were removed with 5 M LiCl from the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains. Under such conditions, inhibition activity was decreased in all three strains, as revealed in exclusion, competition and displacement assays. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the presence of S-layer proteins with dominant bands of approximately 45 kDa. Further analysis of S-layer proteins revealed that the hydrophobic amino acids accounted for 40.5%, 41.5% and 43.8% of the total amino acid for the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains, respectively. These findings suggest that the M5-L, J10-L and Q8-L strains possess the ability to inhibit S. sonnei adherence to HT-29 cells, and S-layer proteins are involved in this adhesion inhibition. PMID:20600857

  12. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  13. Cell cycle modulation by a multitargeted antifolate, LY231514, increases the cytotoxicity and antitumor activity of gemcitabine in HT29 colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tonkinson, J L; Worzalla, J F; Teng, C H; Mendelsohn, L G

    1999-08-01

    The proliferation rate of HT29 colon carcinoma cells was decreased by the multitargeted antifolate (MTA), LY231514. This effect correlated with a buildup of cells near the G1-S interface after 24 h of incubation, and a synchronized progression of the population through S phase during the next 24 h. MTA treatment (0.03-3 microM) was minimally cytotoxic (20-30%) to HT29 cells after a 24-h exposure, and no dose response was observed. In contrast, the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine (GEM) was cytotoxic (IC50, 0.071 +/- 0.011 microM; IC90, 0.648 +/- 0.229 microM) after a 24-h exposure. We hypothesized that pretreatment of these cells with MTA would increase the potency of GEM by synchronizing the population for DNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of GEM increased 2-7-fold when MTA was administered 24 h before GEM (IC50, 0.032 +/- 0.009 microM; IC90, 0.094 +/- 0.019 microM). In addition, an increase in cell kill for the combination compared with GEM alone (IC99, 12 microM for GEM alone; IC99, 0.331 microM for combination) was observed. No increase in potency or cell kill was observed when the two compounds were added simultaneously. MTA pretreatment also potentiated the cytotoxicity of a 1-h exposure to GEM. These cell-based observations were extended to evaluate the schedule-dependent interaction of these two agents in vivo using a nude mouse HT29 xenograft tumor model. At the doses tested, MTA alone (100 mg/kg) had a marginal effect on tumor growth delay, whereas GEM (80 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant tumor growth delay. In combination, the increase in tumor growth delay was greatest when MTA was administered before GEM, compared with simultaneous drug administration or the reverse sequence, e.g., GEM followed by MTA. The effect of sequential administration of MTA followed by GEM was greater than additive, indicating synergistic interaction of these agents. Thus, in vitro, MTA induced cell cycle effects on HT29 cells that resulted in potentiation of the

  14. Chromosome 5 allele loss in human colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Voss, R; Hall, V; Bodmer, W F; Jass, J R; Jeffreys, A J; Lucibello, F C; Patel, I; Rider, S H

    That the sporadic and inherited forms of a particular cancer could both result from mutations in the same gene was first proposed by Knudson. He further proposed that these mutations act recessively at the cellular level, and that both copies of the gene must be lost for the cancer to develop. In sporadic cases both events occur somatically whereas in dominant familial cases susceptibility is inherited through a germline mutation and the cancer develops after a somatic change in the homologous allele. This model has since been substantiated in the case of retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, acoustic neuroma and several other tumours, in which loss of heterozygosity was shown in tumour material compared to normal tissue from the same patient. The dominantly inherited disorder, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, also called familial polyposis coli), which gives rise to multiple adenomatous polyps in the colon that have a relatively high probability of progressing to a malignant adenocarcinoma, provides a basis for studying recessive genes in the far more common colorectal carcinomas using this approach. Following a clue as to the location of the FAP gene given by a case report of an individual with an interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q, who had FAP and multiple developmental abnormalities, we have examined sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas for loss of alleles on chromosome 5. Using a highly polymorphic 'minisatellite' probe which maps to chromosome 5q we have shown that at least 20% of this highly heterogeneous set of tumours lose one of the alleles present in matched normal tissue. This parallels the assignment of the FAP gene to chromosome 5 (see accompanying paper) and suggests that becoming recessive for this gene may be a critical step in the progression of a relatively high proportion of colorectal cancers. PMID:2886919

  15. Preclinical evaluation of a novel CEA-targeting near-infrared fluorescent tracer delineating colorectal and pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Martin C; Tolner, Berend; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E; Boogerd, Leonora S F; Prevoo, Hendrica A J M; Bhavsar, Guarav; Kuppen, Peter J K; Sier, Cornelis F M; Bonsing, Bert A; Frangioni, John V; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Chester, Kerry A; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L

    2015-10-15

    Surgery is the cornerstone of oncologic therapy with curative intent. However, identification of tumor cells in the resection margins is difficult, resulting in nonradical resections, increased cancer recurrence and subsequent decreased patient survival. Novel imaging techniques that aid in demarcating tumor margins during surgery are needed. Overexpression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is found in the majority of gastrointestinal carcinomas, including colorectal and pancreas. We developed ssSM3E/800CW, a novel CEA-targeted near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) tracer, based on a disulfide-stabilized single-chain antibody fragment (ssScFv), to visualize colorectal and pancreatic tumors in a clinically translatable setting. The applicability of the tracer was tested for cell and tissue binding characteristics and dosing using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, cell-based plate assays and orthotopic colorectal (HT-29, well differentiated) and pancreatic (BXPC-3, poorly differentiated) xenogeneic human-mouse models. NIRF signals were visualized using the clinically compatible FLARE™ imaging system. Calculated clinically relevant doses of ssSM3E/800CW selectively accumulated in colorectal and pancreatic tumors/cells, with highest tumor-to-background ratios of 5.1 ± 0.6 at 72 hr postinjection, which proved suitable for intraoperative detection and delineation of tumor boarders and small (residual) tumor nodules in mice, between 8 and 96 hr postinjection. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging and pathologic examination confirmed tumor specificity and the distribution of the tracer. Our results indicate that ssSM3E/800CW shows promise as a diagnostic tool to recognize colorectal and pancreatic cancers for fluorescent-guided surgery applications. If successfully translated clinically, this tracer could help improve the completeness of surgery and thus survival. PMID:25895046

  16. Sphingosine kinase 1 is upregulated with lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Inoue, Satoru; Yoshida, Yuki; Kodaka, Atsushi; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Tsuiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of SphK1, an oncogenic kinase that produces sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and its correlation with the expression of LPAR2, a major lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor overexpressed in various cancers, in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of SphK1, LPAR2, and the three major S1P receptors in 27 colorectal cancer samples and corresponding normal tissue samples. We also examined the correlation between the expression of SphK1 and LPAR2. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer tissue in 22 of 27 patients had higher levels of SphK1 mRNA than in normal tissue. In two-thirds of the samples, SphK1 mRNA expression was more than two-fold higher than in normal tissue. Consistent with previous reports, LPAR2 mRNA expression in 20 of 27 colorectal cancer tissue samples was higher compared to normal tissue samples. Expression profiles of all three major S1P receptors, S1PR1, S1PR2, and S1PR3, varied without any trend, with no significant difference in expression between cancer and normal tissues. A highly significant positive correlation was found between SphK1 and LPAR2 expression [Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) = 0.784 and P < 0.01]. The mRNA levels of SphK1 and LPAR2 did not correlate with TNM stage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that S1P and LPA may play important roles in the development of colorectal cancer via the upregulation of SphK1 and LPAR2, both of which could serve as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26937138

  17. Continuous wave terahertz reflection imaging of human colorectal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2013-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-ionizing, and nondestructive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. Fresh excisions of normal colon tissue were obtained from surgeries performed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. Reflection measurements of thick sections of colorectal tissues, mounted in an aluminum sample holder, were obtained for both fresh and formalin fixed tissues. The two-dimensional reflection images were acquired by using an optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz with liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer detector. Using polarizers in the experiment both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance form the samples was collected. Analysis of the images showed the importance of understanding the effects of formalin fixation while determining reflectance level of tissue response. The resulting co- and cross-polarized images of both normal and formalin fixed tissues showed uniform terahertz response over the entire sample area. Initial measurements indicated a co-polarized reflectance of 16%, and a cross-polarized reflectance of 0.55% from fresh excisions of normal colonic tissues.

  18. Discerning apical and basolateral properties of HT-29/B6 and IPEC-J2 cell layers by impedance spectroscopy, mathematical modeling and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Thomas; Bogdan, Martin; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying changes in partial resistances of epithelial barriers in vitro is a challenging and time-consuming task in physiology and pathophysiology. Here, we demonstrate that electrical properties of epithelial barriers can be estimated reliably by combining impedance spectroscopy measurements, mathematical modeling and machine learning algorithms. Conventional impedance spectroscopy is often used to estimate epithelial capacitance as well as epithelial and subepithelial resistance. Based on this, the more refined two-path impedance spectroscopy makes it possible to further distinguish transcellular and paracellular resistances. In a next step, transcellular properties may be further divided into their apical and basolateral components. The accuracy of these derived values, however, strongly depends on the accuracy of the initial estimates. To obtain adequate accuracy in estimating subepithelial and epithelial resistance, artificial neural networks were trained to estimate these parameters from model impedance spectra. Spectra that reflect behavior of either HT-29/B6 or IPEC-J2 cells as well as the data scatter intrinsic to the used experimental setup were created computationally. To prove the proposed approach, reliability of the estimations was assessed with both modeled and measured impedance spectra. Transcellular and paracellular resistances obtained by such neural network-enhanced two-path impedance spectroscopy are shown to be sufficiently reliable to derive the underlying apical and basolateral resistances and capacitances. As an exemplary perturbation of pathophysiological importance, the effect of forskolin on the apical resistance of HT-29/B6 cells was quantified. PMID:23840862

  19. Effect of edible oils on quercetin, kaempferol and galangin transport and conjugation in the intestinal Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Jailani, Fadhilah; Williamson, Gary

    2014-04-01

    Solubility and matrix play an important role in the gut lumen in delivering bioactive compounds to the absorptive surface of enterocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of certain commonly consumed lipids, soybean, olive and corn oil, on the transport and conjugation of flavonols (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol and galangin) using the conjugation-competent co-cultured Caco-2/HT29-MTX intestinal cell monolayer model. To enable identification and quantification of conjugates, each flavonol was enzymatically glucuronidated or sulphated, then analysed by HPLC with triple quadrupole mass spectrometric detection. Quantification showed large differences in mass spectrometric peak area response factors between the aglycones and many of the conjugates, with galangin-sulphate for example ionising ∼15-fold better than galangin. Flavonol aglycones and conjugates were transported to the basolateral side of Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultures. The total amount of methyl, sulphate and glucuronide conjugates was in the order: galangin > quercetin > kaempferol > myricetin. All oils inhibited the transport and conjugation of galangin, the most hydrophobic flavonol, whereas they increased the sulphation, and to some extent glucuronidation, of quercetin and kaempferol. The results show that the lipid matrix has the potential to modify both transport and conjugation of dietary flavonols, but that the effect depends upon the structure and hydrophobicity. PMID:24525490

  20. Discerning Apical and Basolateral Properties of HT-29/B6 and IPEC-J2 Cell Layers by Impedance Spectroscopy, Mathematical Modeling and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thomas; Bogdan, Martin; Günzel, Dorothee

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying changes in partial resistances of epithelial barriers in vitro is a challenging and time-consuming task in physiology and pathophysiology. Here, we demonstrate that electrical properties of epithelial barriers can be estimated reliably by combining impedance spectroscopy measurements, mathematical modeling and machine learning algorithms. Conventional impedance spectroscopy is often used to estimate epithelial capacitance as well as epithelial and subepithelial resistance. Based on this, the more refined two-path impedance spectroscopy makes it possible to further distinguish transcellular and paracellular resistances. In a next step, transcellular properties may be further divided into their apical and basolateral components. The accuracy of these derived values, however, strongly depends on the accuracy of the initial estimates. To obtain adequate accuracy in estimating subepithelial and epithelial resistance, artificial neural networks were trained to estimate these parameters from model impedance spectra. Spectra that reflect behavior of either HT-29/B6 or IPEC-J2 cells as well as the data scatter intrinsic to the used experimental setup were created computationally. To prove the proposed approach, reliability of the estimations was assessed with both modeled and measured impedance spectra. Transcellular and paracellular resistances obtained by such neural network-enhanced two-path impedance spectroscopy are shown to be sufficiently reliable to derive the underlying apical and basolateral resistances and capacitances. As an exemplary perturbation of pathophysiological importance, the effect of forskolin on the apical resistance of HT-29/B6 cells was quantified. PMID:23840862

  1. Expression of set is downregulated by rapamycin in human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WEN, XIAOXIA; CHEN, YAO

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism through which rapamycin treatment affects the expression of the set gene in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The effect of rapamycin treatment on set expression was evaluated by assessing the mRNA and protein expression of set in the SW480 and LoVo human colon carcinoma cell lines following treatment with rapamycin by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blot analysis, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of set were significantly decreased subsequent to rapamycin treatment in the two cell lines, indicating that set expression may be downregulated by rapamycin in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Our findings suggested that the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway may play a role in tumorigenesis through the regulation of the set gene. PMID:24649018

  2. Intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin with different pharmaceutical formulations in human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Serpe, Loredana; Guido, Marilena; Canaparo, Roberto; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Cavalli, Roberta; Panzanelli, Patrizia; Della Pepal, Carlo; Bargoni, Alessandro; Mauro, Alessandro; Gasco, Maria Rosa; Eandi, Mario; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The structure of both carrier and anticancer drug affects the intracellular fate of a transported drug. The study investigated in vitro intracellular accumulation and cytotoxic activity of doxorubicin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), doxorubicin in pegylated liposomes (Caelyx) and free doxorubicin. Intracellular doxorubicin levels and cytotoxic activity were determined by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection, and by the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, respectively. Doxorubicin-loaded SLN inhibited cell growth more strongly than either free or liposomal doxorubicin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma, HT-29, retinoblastoma Y79, and glioblastoma U373 cell lines. The IC50 values for doxorubicin-loaded SLN were significantly lower after 24 h exposure than those for free doxorubicin in all cell lines; after 48 h exposure they were lower than those for liposomal doxorubicin in HT-29 and Y79 cells. The enhanced cytotoxic activity of doxorubicin-loaded SLN was associated with increased drug incorporation in cells: intracellular doxorubicin levels were significantly enhanced after exposure to drug-loaded SLN versus either free or liposomal drug. Rate of intracellular accumulation and cytotoxic activity also differed among different cell lines; in particular, cells of epithelial origin were found to be more sensitive to doxorubicin-loaded SLN. In conclusion, the greater sensitivity of HT-29, Y79, and U373 cells to doxorubicin-loaded SLN than to the other drug formulations may be due to the capability of the delivery system to enhance drug action, through a marked uptake and accumulation of SLN within the cell. PMID:17048519

  3. Genetic mapping of a locus predisposing to human colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peltomaeki, P.; Aaltonen, L.A.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la ); Sistonen, P. Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki ); Mecklin, J.P. ); Haervinen, H. ); Green, J.S. ); Jass, J.R. ); Weber, J.L. ); Leach, F.S.; Petersen, G.M.; Hamilton, S.R.; Vogelstein, B. Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD )

    1993-05-07

    Genetic linkage analysis was used to determine whether a specific chromosomal locus could be implicated in families with a history of early onset cancer but with no other unique features. Close linkage of disease to anonymous microsatellite markers on chromosome 2 was demonstrated in two large kindreds. The pairwise lod scores for linkage to marker D2S123 in these kindreds were 6.39 and 1.45 at zero recombination, and multipoint linkage with flanking markers resulted in lod scores of 6.47 and 6.01. These results prove the existence of a genetically determined predisposition to colorectal cancer that has important ramifications for understanding and preventing this disease. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Effect of CLN3 silencing by RNA interference on the proliferation and apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinguo; Huang, Zhilong; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Jian; Hu, Shuiqing; Zhi, Qiaoming; Song, Shiduo; Wang, Yanan; Wan, Daiwei; Gu, Wen; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Bo; Cao, Wei; He, Songbing

    2014-04-01

    Apoptosis constitutes a system for the removal of aged, or damaged cells, which is regulated by the interplay of pro-apoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins. Previous study has shown that Juvenile Batten disease protein, CLN3, is antiapoptotic gene in NT2 neuronal precursor cells and a few types of cancers. However, in colorectal cancer, whether CLN3 also play its antiapoptotic role and the effect of targeted controlling CLN3 on the biological behavior of human colorectal cancer cell is unknown. We employed the sequence-specific siRNA silencing the CLN3 gene and investigated its effects on growth and apoptosis of colorectal cancer HCT116 cells, which has highest elevation of CLN3 expression among four colorectal cancer cell lines. After CLN3 specific siRNA transfection, mRNA and protein expression levels of CLN3 in HCT116 cells were noticeably decreased. Moreover, CLN3-siRNA inhibited the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, promoted their apoptosis and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Our current study demonstrated that CLN3 was expressed in colorectal cancer cells at a high frequency. Moreover, CLN3 down-regulation with RNA interference can inhibit proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle progression of colorectal cancer cells. Our study represented a potential new approach to understanding the role of CLN3 in cancer and provides a potential novel strategy colorectal cancer therapy. PMID:24556023

  5. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Hamed, Mohamed R; Schoen, Robert E; Whelan, Richard L; Steele, Robert J; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M; Shantha Kumara, H M C; Robertson, John F R; Sewell, Herbert F

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  6. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Ola H.; Hamed, Mohamed R.; Schoen, Robert E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Steele, Robert J.; Scholefield, John; Dilnot, Elizabeth M.; Shantha Kumara, H. M. C.; Robertson, John F. R.; Sewell, Herbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls) from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls) and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls) were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19), stage II (n = 40), stage III (n = 34) and stage IV (n = 6) was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively), with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice. PMID:27383396

  7. Abnormal expression of GADD45B in human colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background GADD45B is a member of the growth arrest DNA damage-inducible gene family associated with cell growth control, apoptosis, and DNA damage repair response. The aim of this study is to detect the role of GADD45B in colorectal carcinoma (CRC); the area not studied in depth to date. Methods The mRNA and protein levels of GADD45B were examined by Real-Time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues (ANCT). Over-expression plasmids and SiRNA were used to regulate GADD45B expression in CRC cell lines in vitro and flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to detect apoptotic changes. Results The mRNA and protein levels of GADD45B were significantly higher in CRC tissues than those in ANCT (P<0.05). Up-regulation of GADD45B was also correlated with relapse and death of CRC patients (P<0.05). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves indicated that disease-free survival (DFS) was significantly worse in CRC patients who showed GADD45B overexpression. A Cox multivariate analysis revealed that GADD45B overexpression and TNM stage were significant factors affecting patients’ survival. On the other hand, as a tumor suppressor gene, GADD45B amplified from normal colorectal tissues could induce apoptosis in CRC cell lines and may be associated with the p53-mediated apoptotic pathways. Conclusion GADD45B, a tumor suppressor gene potentially through the p53-mediated apoptotic pathways, is paradoxically overexpressed in CRC and as such may play an unappreciated role in tumorigenesis. The exact mechanism of GADD45B inactivation and overexpression requires further investigation. GADD45B could be a potential therapeutic target for CRC treatment in future. PMID:23110778

  8. Targeting cytosolic phospholipase A2 α in colorectal cancer cells inhibits constitutively activated protein kinase B (AKT) and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chanlu; Hua, Sheng; Li, Jianfang; Wang, Tingfeng; Yao, Mu; Vignarajan, Soma; Teng, Ying; Hejazi, Leila; Liu, Bingya; Dong, Qihan

    2014-01-01

    A constitutive activation of protein kinase B (AKT) in a hyper-phosphorylated status at Ser473 is one of the hallmarks of anti-EGFR therapy-resistant colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to examine the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) on AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and cell proliferation in CRC cells with mutation in phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 was resistant to EGF stimulation in CRC cell lines of DLD-1 (PIK3CAE545K mutation) and HT-29 (PIK3CAP499T mutation). Over-expression of cPLA2α by stable transfection increased basal and EGF-stimulated AKT phosphorylation and proliferation in DLD-1 cells. In contrast, silencing of cPLA2α with siRNA or inhibition with Efipladib decreased basal and EGF-stimulated AKT phosphorylation and proliferation in HT-29. Treating animals transplanted with DLD-1 with Efipladib (10 mg/kg, i.p. daily) over 14 days reduced xenograft growth by >90% with a concomitant decrease in AKT phosphorylation. In human CRC tissue, cPLA2α expression and phosphorylation were increased in 63% (77/120) compared with adjacent normal mucosa determined by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that cPLA2α is required for sustaining AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and cell proliferation in CRC cells with PI3K mutation, and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of CRC resistant to anti-EGFR therapy. PMID:25365190

  9. Genotoxicity of Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT) on Isogenic Human Colorectal Cell Lines: Potential Promoting Effects for Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Graillot, Vanessa; Dormoy, Inge; Dupuy, Jacques; Shay, Jerry W.; Huc, Laurence; Mirey, Gladys; Vignard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The composition of the human microbiota influences tumorigenesis, notably in colorectal cancer (CRC). Pathogenic Escherichia coli possesses a variety of virulent factors, among them the Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT). CDT displays dual DNase and phosphatase activities and induces DNA double strand breaks, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a broad range of mammalian cells. As CDT could promote malignant transformation, we investigated the cellular outcomes induced by acute and chronic exposures to E. coli CDT in normal human colon epithelial cells (HCECs). Moreover, we conducted a comparative study between isogenic derivatives cell lines of the normal HCECs in order to mimic the mutation of three major genes found in CRC genetic models: APC, KRAS, and TP53. Our results demonstrate that APC and p53 deficient cells showed impaired DNA damage response after CDT exposure, whereas HCECs expressing oncogenic KRASV12 were more resistant to CDT. Compared to normal HCECs, the precancerous derivatives exhibit hallmarks of malignant transformation after a chronic exposure to CDT. HCECs defective in APC and p53 showed enhanced anchorage independent growth and genetic instability, assessed by the micronucleus formation assay. In contrast, the ability to grow independently of anchorage was not impacted by CDT chronic exposure in KRASV12 HCECs, but micronucleus formation is dramatically increased. Thus, CDT does not initiate CRC by itself, but may have promoting effects in premalignant HCECs, involving different mechanisms in function of the genetic alterations associated to CRC. PMID:27047802

  10. The fermented non-digestible fraction of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) triggers cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bravo, R K; Guevara-González, R G; Ramos-Gómez, M; Oomah, B D; Wiersma, P; Campos-Vega, R; Loarca-Piña, G

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide with colorectal cancer (CRC) ranking as the third contributing to overall cancer mortality. Non-digestible compounds such as dietary fiber have been inversely associated with CRC in epidemiological in vivo and in vitro studies. In order to investigate the effect of fermentation products from a whole non-digestible fraction of common bean versus the short-chain fatty acid (SCFAs) on colon cancer cells, we evaluated the human gut microbiota fermented non-digestible fraction (hgm-FNDF) of cooked common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 and a synthetic mixture SCFAs, mimicking their concentration in the lethal concentration 50 (SCFA-LC50) of FNDF (hgm-FNDF-LC50), on the molecular changes in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29). Total mRNA from hgm-FNDF-LC50 and SCFA-LC50 treated HT-29 cells were used to perform qPCR arrays to determine the effect of the treatments on the transcriptional expression of 84 genes related to the p53-pathway. This study showed that both treatments inhibited cell proliferation in accordance with modulating RB1, CDC2, CDC25A, NFKB and E2F genes. Furthermore, we found an association between the induction of apoptosis and the modulation of APAF1, BID, CASP9, FASLG, TNFR10B and BCL2A genes. The results suggest a mechanism of action by which the fermentation of non-digestible compounds of common bean exert a beneficial effect better than the SCFA mixture by modulating the expression of antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic genes in HT-29 cells to a greater extent, supporting previous results on cell behavior, probably due to the participation of other compounds, such as phenolic fatty acids derivatives and biopetides. PMID:24293398