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Sample records for human aldo-keto reductase

  1. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  2. Roles of rat and human aldo-keto reductases in metabolism of farnesol and geranylgeraniol

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Chisato; Soda, Midori; Kanamori, Ayano; Kitade, Yukio; Ohno, Satoshi; Tajima, Kazuo; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol (FOH) and geranylgeraniol (GGOH) with multiple biological actions are produced from the mevalonate pathway, and catabolized into farnesoic acid and geranylgeranoic acid, respectively, via the aldehyde intermediates (farnesal and geranylgeranial). We investigated the intracellular distribution, sequences and properties of the oxidoreductases responsible for the metabolic steps in rat tissues. The oxidation of FOH and GGOH into their aldehyde intermediates were mainly mediated by alcohol dehydrogenases 1 (in the liver and colon) and 7 (in the stomach and lung), and the subsequent step into the carboxylic acids was catalyzed by a microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. In addition, high reductase activity catalyzing the aldehyde intermediates into FOH (or GGOH) was detected in the cytosols of the extra-hepatic tissues, where the major reductase was identified as aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15. Human reductases with similar specificity were identified as AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, which most efficiently reduced farnesal and geranylgeranial among seven enzymes in the AKR1A-1C subfamilies. The overall metabolism from FOH to farnesoic acid in cultured cells was significantly decreased by overexpression of AKR1C15, and increased by addition of AKR1C3 inhibitors, tolfenamic acid and R-flurbiprofen. Thus, AKRs (1C15 in rats, and 1B10 and 1C3 in humans) may play an important role in controlling the bioavailability of FOH and GGOH. PMID:21187079

  3. Dydrogesterone metabolism in human liver by aldo-keto reductases and cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Matthias; Weigl, Kevin; Kahler, Elke; Mihara, Katsuhiro

    2016-10-01

    1. The metabolism of dydrogesterone was investigated in human liver cytosol (HLC) and human liver microsomes (HLM). Enzymes involved in dydrogesterone metabolism were identified and their relative contributions were estimated. 2. Dydrogesterone clearance was clearly higher in HLC compared to HLM. The major active metabolite 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone (20α-DHD) was only produced in HLC. 3. The formation of 20α-DHD by cytosolic aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) was confirmed with isoenzyme-specific AKR inhibitors. 4. Using recombinantly expressed human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, dydrogesterone was shown to be metabolically transformed by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. 5. A clear contribution of CYP3A4 to microsomal metabolism of dydrogesterone was demonstrated with HLM and isoenzyme-specific CYP inhibitors, and confirmed by a significant correlation between dydrogesterone clearance and CYP3A4 activity. 6. Contribution of CYP2C19 was shown to be clearly less than CYP3A4 and restricted to a small group of human individuals with very high CYP2C19 activity. Therefore, it is expected that CYP2C19 genetic variations will not affect dydrogesterone pharmacokinetics in man. 7. In conclusion, dydrogesterone metabolism in the liver is dominated primarily by cytosolic enzymes (particularly AKR1C) and secondarily by CYP3A4, with the former exclusively responsible for 20α-DHD formation. PMID:26796435

  4. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases: Function, Gene Regulation, and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Drury, Jason E.

    2007-01-01

    Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs) are a superfamily of NAD(P)H linked oxidoreductases that are generally monomeric 34- 37 kDa proteins present in all phyla. The superfamily consists of 15 families, which contains 151 members (www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Thirteen human AKRs exist that use endogenous substrates (sugar and lipid aldehydes, prostaglandins, retinals and steroid hormones), and in many instances they regulate nuclear receptor signaling. Exogenous substrates include metabolites implicated in chemical carcinogenesis: NNK (4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon trans-dihydrodiols, and aflatoxin dialdehyde. Promoter analysis of the human genes identifies common elements involved in their regulation which include osmotic response elements, antioxidant response elements, xenobiotic response elements, AP-1 sites and steroid response elements. The human AKRs are highly polymorphic, and in some instances single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of high penetrance exist. This suggests that there will be inter-individual variation in endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism which in turn affect susceptibility to nuclear receptor signaling and chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:17537398

  5. Human Aldo-Keto Reductases and the Metabolic Activation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1–AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  6. Human aldo-keto reductases and the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2014-11-17

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are promiscuous NAD(P)(H) dependent oxidoreductases implicated in the metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of non-K-region trans-dihydrodiols to the corresponding o-quinones with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The PAH o-quinones are Michael acceptors and can form adducts but are also redox-active and enter into futile redox cycles to amplify ROS formation. Evidence exists to support this metabolic pathway in humans. The human recombinant AKR1A1 and AKR1C1-AKR1C4 enzymes all catalyze the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols to PAH o-quinones. Many human AKRs also catalyze the NADPH-dependent reduction of the o-quinone products to air-sensitive catechols, exacerbating ROS formation. Moreover, this pathway of PAH activation occurs in a panel of human lung cell lines, resulting in the production of ROS and oxidative DNA damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Using stable-isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, this pathway of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolism was found to contribute equally with the diol-epoxide pathway to the activation of this human carcinogen in human lung cells. Evaluation of the mutagenicity of anti-B[a]P-diol epoxide with B[a]P-7,8-dione on p53 showed that the o-quinone produced by AKRs was the more potent mutagen, provided that it was permitted to redox cycle, and that the mutations observed were G to T transversions, reminiscent of those observed in human lung cancer. It is concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation of PAH in human lung cell lines and that they may contribute to the causation of human lung cancer. PMID:25279998

  7. Metabolism of the Synthetic Progestogen Norethynodrel by Human Ketosteroid Reductases of the Aldo-Keto Reductase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yi; Duan, Ling; Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.

    2012-01-01

    Human ketosteroid reductases of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily, i.e. AKR1C1-4, are implicated in the biotransformation of synthetic steroid hormones. Norethynodrel (NOR, 17α-ethynyl-17β-hydroxy-estra-5(10)-en-3-one), the progestin component of the first marketed oral contraceptive, is known to undergo rapid and extensive metabolism to 3α- and 3β-hydroxy metabolites. The ability of the four human AKR1C enzymes to catalyze the metabolism of NOR has now been characterized. AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 almost exclusively converted NOR to 3β-hydroxy NOR, while AKR1C3 gave 3β-hydroxy NOR as the main product and AKR1C4 predominantly formed 3α-hydroxy NOR. Individual AKR1C enzymes also displayed distinct kinetic properties in the reaction of NOR. In contrast, norethindrone (NET), the Δ4-isomer of NOR and the most commonly used synthetic progestin, was not a substrate for the AKR1C enzymes. NOR is also structurally identical to the hormone replacement therapeutic tibolone (TIB), except TIB has a methyl group at the 7α-position. Product profiles and kinetic parameters for the reduction of NOR catalyzed by each individual AKR1C isoform were identical to those for the reduction of TIB catalyzed by the respective isoform. These data suggest that the presence of the 7α-methyl group has a minimal effect on the stereochemical outcome of the reaction and kinetic behavior of each enzyme. Results indicate a role of AKR1C in the hepatic and peripheral metabolism of NOR to 3α- and 3β-hydroxy NOR and provide insights into the differential pharmacological properties of NOR, NET and TIB. PMID:22210085

  8. Oxidation of PAH trans-Dihydrodiols by Human Aldo-Keto Reductase AKR1B10

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Amy M.; Harvey, Ronald G.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2009-01-01

    AKR1B10 has been identified as a potential biomarker for human non-small cell lung carcinoma and as a tobacco exposure and response gene. AKR1B10 functions as an efficient retinal reductase in vitro, and may regulate retinoic acid homeostasis. However, the possibility that this enzyme is able to activate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) trans-dihydrodiols to form reactive and redox-active o-quinones has not been investigated to date. AKR1B10 was found to oxidize a wide range of PAH trans-dihydrodiol substrates in vitro to yield PAH o-quinones. Reactions of AKR1B10 proceeded with improper stereochemistry, since it was specific for the minor (+)-benzo[a]pyrene-7S,8S-dihydrodiol diastereomer formed in vivo. However, AKR1B10 displayed reasonable activity in the oxidation of both the (−)-R,R and (+)-S,S stereoisomers of benzo[g]chrysene-11,12-dihydrodiol and oxidized the potentially relevant, albeit minor, (+)-benz[a]anthracene-3S,4S-dihydrodiol metabolite. We find that AKR1B10 is therefore likely to play a contributing role in the activation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols in human lung. AKR1B10 retinal reductase activity was confirmed in vitro and found to be 5- to 150-fold greater than the oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols examined. AKR1B10 was highly expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, and robust retinal reductase activity was measured in lysates of these cells. The much greater catalytic efficiency of retinal reduction compared to PAH trans-dihydrodiol metabolism suggests AKR1B10 may play a greater role in lung carcinogenesis through dysregulation of retinoic acid homeostasis than through oxidation of PAH trans-dihydrodiols. PMID:18788756

  9. Glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation by aldo-keto reductase 1C2 promotes adipogenesis in human preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Veilleux, Alain; Côté, Julie-Anne; Blouin, Karine; Nadeau, Mélanie; Pelletier, Mélissa; Marceau, Picard; Laberge, Philippe Y; Luu-The, Van; Tchernof, André

    2012-04-15

    Adipogenesis and lipid storage in human adipose tissue are inhibited by androgens such as DHT. Inactivation of DHT to 3α-diol is stimulated by glucocorticoids in human preadipocytes. We sought to characterize glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation in human preadipocytes and to establish its role in the antiadipogenic action of DHT. Subcutaneous and omental primary preadipocyte cultures were established from fat samples obtained in subjects undergoing abdominal surgeries. Inactivation of DHT to 3α/β-diol for 24 h was measured in dexamethasone- or vehicle-treated cells. Specific downregulation of aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) enzymes in human preadipocytes was achieved using RNA interference. In whole adipose tissue sample, cortisol production was positively correlated with androgen inactivation in both subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue (P < 0.05). Maximal dexamethasone (1 μM) stimulation of DHT inactivation was higher in omental compared with subcutaneous fat from men as well as subcutaneous and omental fat from women (P < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between BMI and maximal dexamethasone-induced DHT inactivation rates in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue of men and women (r = 0.24, n = 26, P < 0.01). siRNA-induced downregulation of AKR1C2, but not AKR1C1 or AKR1C3, significantly reduced basal and glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation rates (P < 0.05). The inhibitory action of DHT on preadipocyte differentiation was potentiated following AKR1C2 but not AKR1C1 or AKR1C3 downregulation. Specifically, lipid accumulation, G3PDH activity, and FABP4 mRNA expression in differentiated preadipocytes exposed to DHT were reduced further upon AKR1C2 siRNA transfection. We conclude that glucocorticoid-induced androgen inactivation is mediated by AKR1C2 and is particularly effective in omental preadipocytes of obese men. The interplay between glucocorticoids and AKR1C2-dependent androgen inactivation may locally modulate

  10. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  11. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A. Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions. PMID:27499746

  12. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: genomics and annotation.

    PubMed

    Mindnich, Rebekka D; Penning, Trevor M

    2009-07-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglandins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AKRs form a protein superfamily based on their high sequence identity and common protein fold, the (alpha/beta) 8 -barrel structure. Well over 150 AKR enzymes, from diverse organisms, have been annotated so far and given systematic names according to a nomenclature that is based on multiple protein sequence alignment and degree of identity. Annotation of non-vertebrate AKRs at the National Center for Biotechnology Information or Vertebrate Genome Annotation (vega) database does not often include the systematic nomenclature name, so the most comprehensive overview of all annotated AKRs is found on the AKR website (http://www.med.upenn.edu/akr/). This site also hosts links to more detailed and specialised information (eg on crystal structures, gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). The protein-based AKR nomenclature allows unambiguous identification of a given enzyme but does not reflect the wealth of genomic and transcriptomic variation that exists in the various databases. In this context, identification of putative new AKRs and their distinction from pseudogenes are challenging. This review provides a short summary of the characteristic features of AKR biochemistry and structure that have been reviewed in great detail elsewhere, and focuses mainly on nomenclature and database entries of human AKRs that so far have not been subject to systematic annotation. Recent developments in the annotation of SNP and transcript variance in AKRs are also summarised. PMID:19706366

  13. cDNA cloning, expression and activity of a second human aflatoxin B1-metabolizing member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, AKR7A3.

    PubMed

    Knight, L P; Primiano, T; Groopman, J D; Kensler, T W; Sutter, T R

    1999-07-01

    The aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aldehyde metabolite of AFB1 may contribute to the cytotoxicity of this hepatocarcinogen via protein adduction. Aflatoxin B1 aldehyde reductases, specifically the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductases of rat (AKR7A1) and human (AKR7A2), are known to metabolize the AFB1 dihydrodiol by forming AFB1 dialcohol. Using a rat AKR7A1 cDNA, we isolated and characterized a distinct aldo-keto reductase (AKR7A3) from an adult human liver cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of AKR7A3 shares 80 and 88% identity with rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A2, respectively. Recombinant rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A3 were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine tagged fusion proteins. These proteins catalyzed the reduction of several model carbonyl-containing substrates. The NADPH-dependent formation of AFB1 dialcohol by recombinant human AKR7A3 was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies produced using recombinant rat AKR7A1 protein were shown to detect nanogram amounts of rat and human AKR7A protein. The amount of AKR7A-related protein in hepatic cytosols of 1, 2-dithiole-3-thione-treated rats was 18-fold greater than in cytosols from untreated animals. These antibodies detected AKR7A-related protein in normal human liver samples ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 microg/mg cytosolic protein. Northern blot analysis showed varying levels of expression of AKR7A RNA in human liver and in several extrahepatic tissues, with relatively high levels in the stomach, pancreas, kidney and liver. Based on the kinetic parameters determined using recombinant human AKR7A3 and AFB1 dihydrodiol at pH 7.4, the catalytic efficiency of this reaction (k2/K, per M/s) equals or exceeds those reported for other enzymes, for example cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases, known to metabolize AFB1 in vivo. These findings indicate that, depending on the extent of AFB1 dihydrodiol formation, AKR

  14. The Aldo-Keto Reductase Superfamily and its Role in Drug Metabolism and Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Barski, Oleg A.; Tipparaju, Srinivas M.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2008-01-01

    The Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR) superfamily comprises of several enzymes that catalyze redox transformations involved in biosynthesis, intermediary metabolism and detoxification. Substrates of the family include glucose, steroids, glycosylation end products, lipid peroxidation products, and environmental pollutants. These proteins adopt a (β/α)8 barrel structural motif interrupted by a number of extraneous loops and helixes that vary between proteins and bring structural identity to individual families. The human AKR family differs from the rodent families. Due to their broad substrate specificity, AKRs play an important role in the Phase II detoxification of a large number of pharmaceuticals, drugs, and xenobiotics. PMID:18949601

  15. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B8 is secreted via non-classical pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenwang; Xia, Chenglai; Huang, Renbin; Li, Xiaoning; Wang, Wan-Chun; Guo, Wangyuan; Duan, Lili; Luo, Weihao; Cao, Deliang; Luo, Di-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Mouse aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B8 (AKR1B8) has the highest similarity to human aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10), a secretory protein through lysosomes-mediated non-classical secretory pathway. To identify whether AKR1B8 is secreted through the same pathway, we carried out this study. Self-developed sandwich ELISA and western blot were used to detect AKR1B8 in cells and culture medium of CT-26 murine colon carcinoma cells. AKR1B8 releases in an independent manner to Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of ER-to-Golgi classical secretion pathway. Several factors, which are involved in the non-classical secretion pathway, such as temperature, ATP and calcium ion, regulated AKR1B8 secretion from mouse colorectal cancer cells CT-26. Lysosomotropic NH4Cl increased AKR1B8 secretion, and AKR1B8 was located in isolated lysosomes. Therefore, AKR1B8 is a new secretory protein through the lysosomes-mediated non-classical pathway. PMID:25120755

  16. Purification and partial characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, A; van Zyl, C; van Tonder, A; Prior, B A

    1995-01-01

    A cytosolic aldo-keto reductase was purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 to homogeneity by affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The relative molecular weights of the aldo-keto reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography were 36,800 and 35,000, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is monomeric. Amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme is closely related to the aldose reductases of xylose-fermenting yeasts and mammalian tissues. The enzyme was apparently immunologically unrelated to the aldose reductases of other xylose-fermenting yeasts. The aldo-keto reductase is NADPH specific and catalyzes the reduction of a variety of aldehydes. The best substrate for the enzyme is the aromatic aldehyde p-nitrobenzaldehyde (Km = 46 microM; kcat/Km = 52,100 s-1 M-1), whereas among the aldoses, DL-glyceraldehyde was the preferred substrate (Km = 1.44 mM; kcat/Km = 1,790 s-1 M-1). The enzyme failed to catalyze the reduction of menadione and p-benzoquinone, substrates for carbonyl reductase. The enzyme was inhibited only slightly by 2 mM sodium valproate and was activated by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The optimum pH of the enzyme is 5. These data indicate that the S. cerevisiae aldo-keto reductase is a monomeric NADPH-specific reductase with strong similarities to the aldose reductases. PMID:7747971

  17. Molecular cloning, expression and catalytic activity of a human AKR7 member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily: evidence that the major 2-carboxybenzaldehyde reductase from human liver is a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, L S; Harrison, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1998-01-01

    The masking of charged amino or carboxy groups by N-phthalidylation and O-phthalidylation has been used to improve the absorption of many drugs, including ampicillin and 5-fluorouracil. Following absorption of such prodrugs, the phthalidyl group is hydrolysed to release 2-carboxybenzaldehyde (2-CBA) and the pharmaceutically active compound; in humans, 2-CBA is further metabolized to 2-hydroxymethylbenzoic acid by reduction of the aldehyde group. In the present work, the enzyme responsible for the reduction of 2-CBA in humans is identified as a homologue of rat aflatoxin B1-aldehyde reductase (rAFAR). This novel human aldo-keto reductase (AKR) has been cloned from a liver cDNA library, and together with the rat protein, establishes the AKR7 family of the AKR superfamily. Unlike its rat homologue, human AFAR (hAFAR) appears to be constitutively expressed in human liver, and is widely expressed in extrahepatic tissues. The deduced human and rat protein sequences share 78% identity and 87% similarity. Although the two AKR7 proteins are predicted to possess distinct secondary structural features which distinguish them from the prototypic AKR1 family of AKRs, the catalytic- and NADPH-binding residues appear to be conserved in both families. Certain of the predicted structural features of the AKR7 family members are shared with the AKR6 beta-subunits of voltage-gated K+-channels. In addition to reducing the dialdehydic form of aflatoxin B1-8,9-dihydrodiol, hAFAR shows high affinity for the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolite succinic semialdehyde (SSA) which is structurally related to 2-CBA, suggesting that hAFAR could function as both a SSA reductase and a 2-CBA reductase in vivo. This hypothesis is supported in part by the finding that the major peak of 2-CBA reductase activity in human liver co-purifies with hAFAR protein. PMID:9576847

  18. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers. PMID:22876234

  19. Specificity of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases, NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase and Carbonyl Reductases to Redox-Cycle Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Diones and 4-Hydroxyequilenin-o-Quinone

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Carol A.; Quinn, Amy M.; Park, Jong-Heum; Harvey, Ronald G.; Bolton, Judy L; Maser, Edmund; Penning, Trevor M.

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are suspect human lung carcinogens and can be metabolically activated to remote quinones, e.g. benzo[a]pyrene-1,6-dione (B[a]P-1,6-dione) and B[a]P-3,6-dione by the action of either P450 monooxygenase or peroxidases and to non-K region o-quinones by aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). B[a]P-7,8-dione also structurally resembles 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. These three classes of quinones can redox cycle, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and produce the mutagenic lesion 8-oxo-dGuo, and may contribute to PAH- and estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. We compared the ability of a complete panel of human recombinant AKRs to catalyze reduction of PAH o-quinones in the phenanthrene, chrysene, pyrene and anthracene series. The specific activities for NADPH-dependent quinone reduction were often 100-1,000 times greater than the ability of the same AKR isoform to oxidize the cognate PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. However, the AKR with the highest quinone reductase activity for a particular PAH o-quinone was not always identical to the AKR isoform with the highest dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activity for the respective PAH-trans-dihydrodiol. Discrete AKRs also catalyzed the reduction of B[a]P-1,6-dione, B[a]P-3,6-dione and 4-hydroxyequilenin o-quinone. Concurrent measurements of oxygen consumption, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation established that ROS were produced as a result of the redox-cycling. When compared with human recombinant NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) and carbonyl reductases (CBR1 and CBR3), NQO1 was a superior catalyst of these reactions followed by AKRs and lastly CBR1 and CBR3. In A549 cells two-electron reduction of PAH o-quinones causes intracellular ROS formation. ROS formation was unaffected by the addition of dicumarol suggesting that NQO1 is not responsible for the two-electron reduction observed and does not offer protection against ROS formation from PAH o-quinones. PMID:21910479

  20. Structure and Promoter Characterization of Aldo-Keto Reductase Family 1 B10 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziwen; Zhong, Linlin; Krishack, Paulette A; Robbins, Sarah; Cao, Julia X; Zhao, Yupei; Chung, Stephen; Cao, Deliang

    2009-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is overexpressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma, lung squamous carcinoma, and lung adenocarcinoma in smokers. Our recent studies have showed that AKR1B10 plays a critical role in the growth and proliferation of cancer cells by detoxifying reactive carbonyls and regulating fatty acid biosynthesis. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of AKR1B10 expression. In this study, we determined the structure of AKR1B10 gene and characterized its promoter. The results demonstrated that AKR1B10 consists of 10 exons and 9 introns, stretching approximately 13.8 kb. A 5′-RACE study determined the transcriptional start site of AKR1B10 at 320 bp upstream of the ATG translational start codon. A TATA-like (TAATAA) and a CAAT box are present from −145 to −140 bp and −193 to −190 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site, respectively. Motif analysis recognized multiple putative oncogenic and tumor suppressor protein binding sites in the AKR1B10 promoter, including c-Ets-1, C/EBP, AP-1, and p53, but osmolytic response elements were not found. A -4,091 bp of the 5′-flanking fragment of the AKR1B10 gene was capable of driving GFP and luciferase reporter gene expression in HepG2 cells derived from human hepatocellular carcinoma; progressive 5′-deletions revealed that a −255 bp fragment possesses full promoter activity. PMID:19236911

  1. Aldo-keto Reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15)

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Susanne; Salabei, Joshua K.; Möller, Gabriele; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Adamski, Jerzy; Barski, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) comprise a superfamily of proteins involved in the reduction and oxidation of biogenic and xenobiotic carbonyls. In humans, at least 15 AKR superfamily members have been identified so far. One of these is a newly identified gene locus, AKR1B15, which clusters on chromosome 7 with the other human AKR1B subfamily members (i.e. AKR1B1 and AKR1B10). We show that alternative splicing of the AKR1B15 gene transcript gives rise to two protein isoforms with different N termini: AKR1B15.1 is a 316-amino acid protein with 91% amino acid identity to AKR1B10; AKR1B15.2 has a prolonged N terminus and consists of 344 amino acid residues. The two gene products differ in their expression level, subcellular localization, and activity. In contrast with other AKR enzymes, which are mostly cytosolic, AKR1B15.1 co-localizes with the mitochondria. Kinetic studies show that AKR1B15.1 is predominantly a reductive enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of androgens and estrogens with high positional selectivity (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity) as well as 3-keto-acyl-CoA conjugates and exhibits strong cofactor selectivity toward NADP(H). In accordance with its substrate spectrum, the enzyme is expressed at the highest levels in steroid-sensitive tissues, namely placenta, testis, and adipose tissue. Placental and adipose expression could be reproduced in the BeWo and SGBS cell lines, respectively. In contrast, AKR1B15.2 localizes to the cytosol and displays no enzymatic activity with the substrates tested. Collectively, these results demonstrate the existence of a novel catalytically active AKR, which is associated with mitochondria and expressed mainly in steroid-sensitive tissues. PMID:25577493

  2. 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone promotes secretion of pulmonary aldo-keto reductases with surfactant.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Haga, Mariko; Watanabe, Gou; Shinoda, Yuhki; Endo, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Naoki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2012-02-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust particles, induces apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because of 9,10-PQ redox cycling. We have found that intratracheal infusion of 9,10-PQ facilitates the secretion of surfactant into rat alveolus. In the cultured rat lung, treatment with 9,10-PQ results in an increase in a lower-density surfactant by ROS generation through redox cycling of the quinone. The surfactant contains aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15, which reduces 9,10-PQ and the enzyme level in the surfactant increases on treatment with 9,10-PQ suggesting an involvement of AKR1C15 in the redox cycling of the quinone. In six human cell types (A549, MKN45, Caco2, Hela, Molt4 and U937) only type II epithelial A549 cells secrete three human AKR1C subfamily members (AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3) with the surfactant into the medium; this secretion is highly increased by 9,10-PQ treatment. Using in vitro enzyme inhibition analysis, we have identified AKR1C3 as the most abundantly secreted AKR1C member. The AKR1C enzymes in the medium efficiently reduce 9,10-PQ and initiate its redox cycling accompanied by ROS production. The exposure of A549 cells to 9,10-PQ provokes viability loss, which is significantly protected by the addition of the AKR1C3 inhibitor and antioxidant enzyme and by the removal of the surfactants from the culture medium. Thus, the AKR1C enzymes secreted in pulmonary surfactants probably participate in the toxic mechanism triggered by 9,10-PQ. PMID:22281686

  3. Substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency of aldo-keto reductases with phospholipid aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Spite, Matthew; Baba, Shahid P.; Ahmed, Yonis; Barski, Oleg A.; Nijhawan, Kanchan; Petrash, J. Mark; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    Phospholipid oxidation generates several bioactive aldehydes that remain esterified to the glycerol backbone (‘core’ aldehydes). These aldehydes induce endothelial cells to produce monocyte chemotactic factors and enhance monocyte–endothelium adhesion. They also serve as ligands of scavenger receptors for the uptake of oxidized lipoproteins or apoptotic cells. The biochemical pathways involved in phospholipid aldehyde metabolism, however, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we have examined the efficacy of the three mammalian AKR (aldo-keto reductase) families in catalysing the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes. The model phospholipid aldehyde POVPC [1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine] was efficiently reduced by members of the AKR1, but not by the AKR6 or the ARK7 family. In the AKR1 family, POVPC reductase activity was limited to AKR1A and B. No significant activity was observed with AKR1C enzymes. Among the active proteins, human AR (aldose reductase) (AKR1B1) showed the highest catalytic activity. The catalytic efficiency of human small intestinal AR (AKR1B10) was comparable with the murine AKR1B proteins 1B3 and 1B8. Among the murine proteins AKR1A4 and AKR1B7 showed appreciably lower catalytic activity as compared with 1B3 and 1B8. The human AKRs, 1B1 and 1B10, and the murine proteins, 1B3 and 1B8, also reduced C-7 and C-9 sn-2 aldehydes as well as POVPE [1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine]. AKR1A4, B1, B7 and B8 catalysed the reduction of aldehydes generated in oxidized C16:0-20:4 phosphatidylcholine with acyl, plasmenyl or alkyl linkage at the sn-1 position or C16:0-20:4 phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid. AKR1B1 displayed the highest activity with phosphatidic acids; AKR1A4 was more efficient with long-chain aldehydes such as 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl derivatives, whereas AKR1B8 preferred phosphatidylglycerol. These results suggest that proteins of the AKR1A and B families are

  4. The CCAAT-box binding transcription factor, Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) regulates transcription of human aldo-keto reductase 1C1 (AKR1C1) gene

    PubMed Central

    Pallai, Rajash; Simpkins, Henry; Chen, Jianli; Parekh, Hemant K.

    2010-01-01

    Dihydrodiol dehydrogenases are a family of aldo-keto reductases (AKR1Cs) involved in the metabolism of steroid hormones and xenobiotics. Herein, we have cloned and characterized the proximal promoter region of the human AKR1C1 gene. The 5’ flanking proximal promoter region of the AKR1C1 gene consists of a TATA box and an inverted CCAAT binding site. Deletion analysis of the 5’-flanking, ~3.0 kb region of the human AKR1C1 gene identified the region between −128 to −88 as the minimal proximal promoter essential for basal transcription of AKR1C1 in human ovarian (2008 & 2008/C13*), lung (H23 & A549) and liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicated that the transcription factor binding sites for NF-Y/CEBP were involved in controlling the basal transcription of AKR1C1 in all the cancer cells studied. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSAs) and gel supershift assays demonstrated that the transcription factor NF-Y preferentially binds to the inverted CCAAT box at −109ATTGG−105 of the AKR1C1 gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed the in vivo association between NF-Y and human AKR1C1 gene promoter in human ovarian, lung and liver carcinoma cells. Ectopic expression of NF-Y’s increased the AKR1C1 gene transcription, whereas expression of a dominant-negative NF-YA or suppression of NF-YA decreased the AKR1C1 gene transcription. A 2-fold increase in AKR1C1 transcription was observed specifically in cisplatin-treated 2008 cells that was CCAAT box-dependent. These results indicate that the NF-Y regulates the basal transcription of AKR1C1 in human ovarian, lung and liver carcinoma cells and the cisplatin-induced transcription in human ovarian carcinoma cells. PMID:20338228

  5. Aldo-keto reductase 1C subfamily genes in skin are UV-inducible: possible role in keratinocytes survival.

    PubMed

    Marín, Yarí E; Seiberg, Miri; Lin, Connie B

    2009-07-01

    Please cite this paper as: Aldo-keto reductase 1C subfamily genes in skin are UV-inducible: possible role in keratinocytes survival. Experimental Dermatology 2009; 18: 611-618.Abstract: Human skin is endowed with the capacity to synthesize and metabolize steroid hormones, a function of importance in skin physiology and pathology. It is the hormone-regulatory enzymes, including the aldo-keto reductase 1C subfamily (AKR1Cs) that are largely responsible for the local levels of active steroid hormones. AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 inactivate progesterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, respectively, whereas AKR1C3 activates oestradiol and testosterone. Here, we show that AKR1C1-3 are expressed in keratinocytes and fibroblasts, with marginal expression in melanocytes. In human primary keratinocytes, AKR1C1 and -2 were UVB-inducible in a dose-dependent manner, as shown by quantitative PCR and Western blot analyses. The induction of AKR1C1 by UVB was concomitant with the presence of an apoptotic marker, the cleavage product of poly-ADP ribose polymerase. Similarly, the activation of AKR1C1 and -2 upon UVB exposure was demonstrated in swine skin in vivo and in human skin explants. As expected, hydrogen peroxide-derived reactive oxygen species also induced AKR1C1 and -2 mRNA and protein levels in keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, down-regulation of AKR1Cs by small interfering ribonucleic acid led to significantly reduced cell viability. Based on the combined evidence of the presence of an apoptotic marker in the UVB-exposed keratinocytes with increased AKR1Cs expression and reduced cell viability in down-regulated AKR1Cs, we suggest that AKR1C subfamily genes are stress-inducible and might function as survival factors in keratinocytes. PMID:19320734

  6. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form p-p interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  7. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form π-π interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  8. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases. PMID:26856844

  9. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis. PMID:26959479

  10. Aldo Keto Reductase 1B7 and Prostaglandin F2α Are Regulators of Adrenal Endocrine Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Volat, Fanny; Manin, Michèle; Coudoré, François; Val, Pierre; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Ragazzon, Bruno; Louiset, Estelle; Delarue, Catherine; Lefebvre, Hervé; Urade, Yoshihiro; Martinez, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), represses ovarian steroidogenesis and initiates parturition in mammals but its impact on adrenal gland is unknown. Prostaglandins biosynthesis depends on the sequential action of upstream cyclooxygenases (COX) and terminal synthases but no PGF2α synthases (PGFS) were functionally identified in mammalian cells. In vitro, the most efficient mammalian PGFS belong to aldo-keto reductase 1B (AKR1B) family. The adrenal gland is a major site of AKR1B expression in both human (AKR1B1) and mouse (AKR1B3, AKR1B7). Thus, we examined the PGF2α biosynthetic pathway and its functional impact on both cortical and medullary zones. Both compartments produced PGF2α but expressed different biosynthetic isozymes. In chromaffin cells, PGF2α secretion appeared constitutive and correlated to continuous expression of COX1 and AKR1B3. In steroidogenic cells, PGF2α secretion was stimulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and correlated to ACTH-responsiveness of both COX2 and AKR1B7/B1. The pivotal role of AKR1B7 in ACTH-induced PGF2α release and functional coupling with COX2 was demonstrated using over- and down-expression in cell lines. PGF2α receptor was only detected in chromaffin cells, making medulla the primary target of PGF2α action. By comparing PGF2α-responsiveness of isolated cells and whole adrenal cultures, we demonstrated that PGF2α repressed glucocorticoid secretion by an indirect mechanism involving a decrease in catecholamine release which in turn decreased adrenal steroidogenesis. PGF2α may be regarded as a negative autocrine/paracrine regulator within a novel intra-adrenal feedback loop. The coordinated cell-specific regulation of COX2 and AKR1B7 ensures the generation of this stress-induced corticostatic signal. PMID:19809495

  11. Characterization and identification of three novel aldo-keto reductases from Lodderomyces elongisporus for reducing ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chenxi; Su, Erzheng; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-12-15

    Lodderomyces elongisporus LH703 isolated from soil samples contained three novel aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) (LEAKR 48, LEAKR 49, and LEAKR 50). The three enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity for characterization. These three AKRs shared <40% amino acid identity with each other. LEAKR 50 was identified as a member of AKR3 family, whereas the other two LEAKRs were identified as members of two novel AKR families, respectively. All the three AKRs required nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate as a cofactor. However, they showed diverse characteristics, including optimum catalyzing conditions, resistance to adverse reaction conditions, and substrate specificity. LEAKR 50 was estimated to be a promising biocatalyst that could reduce ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate with high enantiomeric excess (98% e. e.) and high activity residue under adverse conditions. PMID:25447817

  12. A potassium channel beta subunit related to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily is encoded by the Drosophila hyperkinetic locus.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, S W; Wilson, G F; Schlimgen, A K; Ganetzky, B

    1995-07-18

    Genetic and physiological studies of the Drosophila Hyperkinetic (Hk) mutant revealed defects in the function or regulation of K+ channels encoded by the Shaker (Sh) locus. The Hk polypeptide, determined from analysis of cDNA clones, is a homologue of mammalian K+ channel beta subunits (Kv beta). Coexpression of Hk with Sh in Xenopus oocytes increases current amplitudes and changes the voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation, consistent with predicted functions of Hk in vivo. Sequence alignments show that Hk, together with mammalian Kv beta, represents an additional branch of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. These results are relevant to understanding the function and evolutionary origin of Kv beta. PMID:7542775

  13. Pyrithione-based ruthenium complexes as inhibitors of aldo-keto reductase 1C enzymes and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kljun, Jakob; Anko, Maja; Traven, Katja; Sinreih, Maša; Pavlič, Renata; Peršič, Špela; Ude, Žiga; Codina, Elisa Esteve; Stojan, Jure; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea; Turel, Iztok

    2016-08-01

    Four ruthenium complexes of clinically used zinc ionophore pyrithione and its oxygen analog 2-hydroxypyridine N-oxide were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of enzymes of the aldo-keto reductase subfamily 1C (AKR1C). A kinetic study assisted with docking simulations showed a mixed type of inhibition consisting of a fast reversible and a slow irreversible step in the case of both organometallic compounds 1A and 1B. Both compounds also showed a remarkable selectivity towards AKR1C1 and AKR1C3 which are targets for breast cancer drug design. The organoruthenium complex of ligand pyrithione as well as pyrithione itself also displayed toxicity on the hormone-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cell line with EC50 values in the low micromolar range. PMID:27357845

  14. Gene expression and promoter analysis of a novel tomato aldo-keto reductase in response to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Suekawa, Marina; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Inada, Shuhei; Murano, Asako; Esaka, Muneharu

    2016-08-01

    The functional role of an uncharacterized tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) aldo-keto reductase 4B, denoted as SlAKR4B, was investigated. The gene expression of tomato SlAKR4B was detected at a high level in the senescent leaves and the ripening fruits of tomato. Although d-galacturonic acid reductase activities tended to be higher in tomato SlAKR4B-overexpressing transgenic tobacco BY-2 cell lines than those in control cell lines, SlAKR4B gene expression was not well correlated with l-ascorbic acid content among the cell lines. The analysis of the transgenic cell lines showed that tomato SlAKR4B has enzyme activities toward d-galacturonic acid as well as glyceraldehyde and glyoxal, suggesting that the SlAKR4B gene encodes a functional enzyme in tomato. Gene expression of SlAKR4B was induced by NaCl, H2O2, and plant hormones such as salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, suggesting that SlAKR4B is involved in the stress response. The transient expression assay using protoplasts showed the promoter activity of the SlAKR4B gene was as high as that of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Also, the promoter region of the SlAKR4B gene was suggested to contain cis-element(s) for abiotic stress-inducible expression. PMID:27337067

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Cindy; Mueller, Uwe; Panjikar, Santosh; Sun, Lianli; Ruppert, Martin; Zhao, Yu; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2006-12-01

    Perakine reductase, a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily of higher plants, is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina. The enzyme has been crystallized in C-centered orthorhombic space group and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution. Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å.

  16. Disruption of aldo-keto reductase genes leads to elevated markers of oxidative stress and inositol auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Mark Petrash, J.

    2008-01-01

    A large family of aldo-keto reductases with similar kinetic and structural properties but unknown physiological roles is expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains with one or two AKR genes disrupted have apparently normal phenotypes, but disruption of at least three AKR genes results in a heat shock phenotype and slow growth in inositol-deficient culture medium (Ino-). The present study was carried out to identify metabolic or signaling defects that may underlie phenotypes that emerge in AKR deficient strains. Here we demonstrate that pre-treatment of a pentuple AKR null mutant with the anti-oxidative agent N-acetyl-cysteine rescues the heat shock phenotype. This indicates that AKR gene disruption may be associated with defects in oxidative stress response. We observed additional markers of oxidative stress in AKR-deficient strains, including reduced glutathione levels, constitutive nuclear localization of the oxidation-sensitive transcription factor Yap1 and up regulation of a set of Yap1 target genes whose function as a group is primarily involved in response to oxidative stress and redox balance. Genetic analysis of the Ino- phenotype of the null mutants showed that defects in transcriptional regulation of the INO1, which encodes for inositol-1-phosphate synthase, can be rescued through ectopic expression of a functional INO1. Taken together, these results suggest potential roles for AKRs in oxidative defense and transcriptional regulation. PMID:17919749

  17. A pathogenesis related-10 protein CaARP functions as aldo/keto reductase to scavenge cytotoxic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Khandal, Hitaishi; Khurana, Jitendra Paul; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis related-10 (PR-10) proteins are present as multigene family in most of the higher plants. The role of PR-10 proteins in plant is poorly understood. A sequence analysis revealed that a large number of PR-10 proteins possess conserved motifs found in aldo/keto reductases (AKRs) of yeast and fungi. We took three PR-10 proteins, CaARP from chickpea, ABR17 from pea and the major pollen allergen Bet v1 from silver birch as examples and showed that these purified recombinant proteins possessed AKR activity using various cytotoxic aldehydes including methylglyoxal and malondialdehyde as substrates and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as co-factor. Essential amino acids for this catalytic activity were identified by substitution with other amino acids. CaARP was able to discriminate between the reduced and oxidized forms of NADP independently of its catalytic activity and underwent structural change upon binding with NADPH. CaARP protein was preferentially localized in cytosol. When expressed in bacteria, yeast or plant, catalytically active variants of CaARP conferred tolerance to salinity, oxidative stress or cytotoxic aldehydes. CaARP-expressing plants showed lower lipid peroxidation product content in presence or absence of stress suggesting that the protein functions as a scavenger of cytotoxic aldehydes produced by metabolism and lipid peroxidation. Our result proposes a new biochemical property of a PR-10 protein. PMID:26577640

  18. Structural characterization of an aldo-keto reductase (AKR2E5) from the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Sugahara, Ryohei; Fujii, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-05-20

    We report a new member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily in the silkworm Bombyx mori. Based on its amino acid sequence, the new enzyme belongs to the AKR2 family and was previously assigned the systematic name AKR2E5. In the present study, recombinant AKR2E5 was expressed, purified to homogeneity, and characterized. The X-ray crystal structures were determined at 2.2 Å for the apoenzyme and at 2.3 Å resolution for the NADPH-AKR2E5 complex. Our results demonstrate that AKR2E5 is a 40-kDa monomer and includes the TIM- or (β/α)8-barrel typical for other AKRs. We found that AKR2E5 uses NADPH as a cosubstrate to reduce carbonyl compounds such as DL-glyceraldehyde, xylose, 3-hydroxy benzaldehyde, 17α-hydroxy progesterone, 11-hexadecenal, and bombykal. No NADH-dependent activity was detected. Site-directed mutagenesis of AKR2E5 indicates that amino acid residues Asp70, Tyr75, Lys104, and His137 contribute to catalytic activity, which is consistent with the data on other AKRs. To the best of our knowledge, AKR2E5 is only the second AKR characterized in silkworm. Our data should contribute to further understanding of the functional activity of insect AKRs. PMID:27103441

  19. Characterization of the aldo-keto reductase 1C gene cluster on pig chromosome 10: possible associations with reproductive traits

    PubMed Central

    Nonneman, Dan J; Wise, Tommy H; Ford, J Joe; Kuehn, Larry A; Rohrer, Gary A

    2006-01-01

    Background The rate of pubertal development and weaning to estrus interval are correlated and affect reproductive efficiency of swine. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for age of puberty, nipple number and ovulation rate have been identified in Meishan crosses on pig chromosome 10q (SSC10) near the telomere, which is homologous to human chromosome 10p15 and contains an aldo-keto reductase (AKR) gene cluster with at least six family members. AKRs are tissue-specific hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that interconvert weak steroid hormones to their more potent counterparts and regulate processes involved in development, homeostasis and reproduction. Because of their location in the swine genome and their implication in reproductive physiology, this gene cluster was characterized and evaluated for effects on reproductive traits in swine. Results Screening the porcine CHORI-242 BAC library with a full-length AKR1C4 cDNA identified 7 positive clones and sample sequencing of 5 BAC clones revealed 5 distinct AKR1C genes (AKR1CL2 and AKR1C1 through 4), which mapped to 126–128 cM on SSC10. Using the IMpRH7000rad and IMNpRH212000rad radiation hybrid panels, these 5 genes mapped between microsatellite markers SWR67 and SW2067. Comparison of sequence data with the porcine BAC fingerprint map show that the cluster of genes resides in a 300 kb region. Twelve SNPs were genotyped in gilts observed for age at first estrus and ovulation rate from the F8 and F10 generations of one-quarter Meishan descendants of the USMARC resource population. Age at puberty, nipple number and ovulation rate data were analyzed for association with genotypes by MTDFREML using an animal model. One SNP, a phenylalanine to isoleucine substitution in AKR1C2, was associated with age of puberty (p = 0.07) and possibly ovulation rate (p = 0.102). Two SNP in AKR1C4 were significantly associated with nipple number (p ≤ 0.03) and another possibly associated with age at puberty (p = 0.09). Conclusion AKR1C genotypes

  20. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Linlin; Liu, Ziwen; Yan, Ruilan; Johnson, Stephen; Zhao, Yupei; Fang, Xiubin; Cao, Deliang

    2009-09-18

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 {mu}M, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 {mu}M, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 {mu}M, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 {mu}M, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 {mu}M (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  1. The Aldo-Keto Reductase AKR1B10 Is Up-Regulated in Keloid Epidermis, Implicating Retinoic Acid Pathway Dysregulation in the Pathogenesis of Keloid Disease.

    PubMed

    Jumper, Natalie; Hodgkinson, Tom; Arscott, Guyan; Har-Shai, Yaron; Paus, Ralf; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-07-01

    Keloid disease is a recurrent fibroproliferative cutaneous tumor of unknown pathogenesis for which clinical management remains unsatisfactory. To obtain new insights into hitherto underappreciated aspects of keloid pathobiology, we took a laser capture microdissection-based, whole-genome microarray analysis approach to identify distinct keloid disease-associated gene expression patterns within defined keloid regions. Identification of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme AKR1B10 as highly up-regulated in keloid epidermis suggested that an imbalance of retinoic acid metabolism is likely associated with keloid disease. Here, we show that AKR1B10 transfection into normal human keratinocytes reproduced the abnormal retinoic acid pathway expression pattern we had identified in keloid epidermis. Cotransfection of AKR1B10 with a luciferase reporter plasmid showed reduced retinoic acid response element activity, supporting the hypothesis of retinoic acid synthesis deficiency in keloid epidermis. Paracrine signals released by AKR1B10-overexpressing keratinocytes into conditioned medium resulted in up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1, transforming growth factor-β2, and collagens I and III in both keloid and normal skin fibroblasts, mimicking the typical profibrotic keloid profile. Our study results suggest that insufficient retinoic acid synthesis by keloid epidermal keratinocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of keloid disease. We refocus attention on the role of injured epithelium in keloid disease and identify AKR1B10 as a potential new target in future management of keloid disease. PMID:27025872

  2. The role of cytochromes p450 and aldo-keto reductases in prognosis of breast carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Hlaváč, Viktor; Brynychová, Veronika; Václavíková, Radka; Ehrlichová, Marie; Vrána, David; Pecha, Václav; Trnková, Markéta; Kodet, Roman; Mrhalová, Marcela; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Gatěk, Jiří; Vážan, Petr; Souček, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Metabolism of anticancer drugs affects their antitumor effects. This study has investigated the associations of gene expression of enzymes metabolizing anticancer drugs with therapy response and survival of breast carcinoma patients. Gene expression of 13 aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), carbonyl reductase 1, and 10 cytochromes P450 (CYPs) was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in tumors and paired adjacent nonneoplastic tissues from 68 posttreatment breast carcinoma patients. Eleven candidate genes were then evaluated in an independent series of 50 pretreatment patients. Protein expression of the most significant genes was confirmed by immunoblotting. AKR1A1 was significantly overexpressed and AKR1C1-4, KCNAB1, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 downregulated in tumors compared with control nonneoplastic tissues after correction for multiple testing. Significant association of CYP2B6 transcript levels in tumors with expression of hormonal receptors was found in the posttreatment set and replicated in the pretreatment set of patients. Significantly higher intratumoral levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, or CYP2W1 were found in responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy compared with nonresponders. Patients with high AKR7A3 or CYP2B6 levels in the pretreatment set had significantly longer disease-free survival than patients with low levels. Protein products of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR7A3, CYP3A4, and carbonyl reductase (CBR1) were found in tumors and those of AKR1C1, AKR7A3, and CBR1 correlated with their transcript levels. Small interfering RNA-directed knockdown of AKR1C2 or vector-mediated upregulation of CYP3A4 in MDA-MB-231 model cell line had no effect on cell proliferation after paclitaxel treatment in vitro. Prognostic and predictive roles of drug-metabolizing enzymes strikingly differ between posttreatment and pretreatment breast carcinoma patients. Mechanisms of action of AKR1C2, AKR7A3, CYP2B6, CYP3A4, and CBR1 should continue to be further followed in

  3. Structure of xylose reductase bound to NAD+ and the basis for single and dual co-substrate specificity in family 2 aldo-keto reductases.

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2003-01-01

    The co-ordinates reported have been submitted to the Protein Data Bank under accession number 1MI3. Xylose reductase (XR; AKR2B5) is an unusual member of aldo-keto reductase superfamily, because it is one of the few able to efficiently utilize both NADPH and NADH as co-substrates in converting xylose into xylitol. In order to better understand the basis for this dual specificity, we have determined the crystal structure of XR from the yeast Candida tenuis in complex with NAD(+) to 1.80 A resolution (where 1 A=0.1 nm) with a crystallographic R -factor of 18.3%. A comparison of the NAD(+)- and the previously determined NADP(+)-bound forms of XR reveals that XR has the ability to change the conformation of two loops. To accommodate both the presence and absence of the 2'-phosphate, the enzyme is able to adopt different conformations for several different side chains on these loops, including Asn(276), which makes alternative hydrogen-bonding interactions with the adenosine ribose. Also critical is the presence of Glu(227) on a short rigid helix, which makes hydrogen bonds to both the 2'- and 3'-hydroxy groups of the adenosine ribose. In addition to changes in hydrogen-bonding of the adenosine, the ribose unmistakably adopts a 3'- endo conformation rather than the 2'- endo conformation seen in the NADP(+)-bound form. These results underscore the importance of tight adenosine binding for efficient use of either NADH or NADPH as a co-substrate in aldo-keto reductases. The dual specificity found in XR is also an important consideration in designing a high-flux xylose metabolic pathway, which may be improved with an enzyme specific for NADH. PMID:12733986

  4. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  5. An ethoxyquin-inducible aldehyde reductase from rat liver that metabolizes aflatoxin B1 defines a subfamily of aldo-keto reductases.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, E M; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1993-01-01

    Protection of liver against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) can be achieved through the induction of detoxification enzymes by chemoprotectors such as the phenolic antioxidant ethoxyquin. We have cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding an aldehyde reductase (AFB1-AR), which is expressed in rat liver in response to dietary ethoxyquin. Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli and purification of the recombinant enzyme reveals that the protein exhibits aldehyde reductase activity and is capable of converting the protein-binding dialdehyde form of AFB1-dihydrodiol to the nonbinding dialcohol metabolite. We show that the mRNA encoding this enzyme is markedly elevated in the liver of rats fed an ethoxyquin-containing diet, correlating with acquisition of resistance to AFB1. AFB1-AR represents the only carcinogen-metabolizing aldehyde reductase identified to date that is induced by a chemoprotector. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of AFB1-AR with other known and putative aldehyde reductases shows that it defines a subfamily within the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8234296

  6. Aldo-keto Reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) is overexpressed in skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and affects SCC growth via prostaglandin metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mantel, Alon; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; VanBuskirk, JoAnne; Pentland, Alice P.

    2014-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) is an enzyme involved in metabolizing prostaglandins (PGs) and sex hormones. It metabolizes PGD2 to 9α11β-PGF2, diverting the spontaneous conversion of PGD2 to the PPARγ agonist, 15-Deoxy-Delta-12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2). AKR1C3 is overexpressed in various malignancies, suggesting a tumor promoting function. This work investigates AKR1C3 expression in human non-melanoma skin cancers, revealing overexpression in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Effects of AKR1C3 overexpression were then evaluated using 3 SCC cell lines. AKR1C3 was detected in all SCC cell lines and its expression was upregulated in response to its substrate, PGD2. Although attenuating AKR1C3 expression in SCC cells by siRNA did not affect growth, treatment with PGD2 and its dehydration metabolite, 15d-PGJ2, decreased SCC proliferation in a PPARγ-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone profoundly inhibited SCC proliferation. Finally, we generated an SCC cell line that stably overexpressed AKR1C3 (SCC-AKR1C3). SCC-AKR1C3 metabolized PGD2 to 9α11β-PGF2 12 fold faster than the parent cell line and was protected from the anti-proliferative effect mediated by PGD2. This work suggests that PGD2 and its metabolite 15d-PGJ2 attenuate SCC proliferation in a PPARγ-dependent manner, therefore activation of PPARγ by agonists such as Pioglitazone may benefit those at high risk of SCC. PMID:24917395

  7. Genetic variation in aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) affects the expression and activity of multiple cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Amarjit S; Thirumaran, Ranjit K; Yasuda, Kazuto; Yang, Xia; Fan, Yiping; Strom, Stephen C; Schuetz, Erin G

    2013-08-01

    Human liver gene regulatory (Bayesian) network analysis was previously used to identify a cytochrome P450 (P450) gene subnetwork with Aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) as a key regulatory driver of this subnetwork. This study assessed the biologic importance of AKR1D1 [a key enzyme in the synthesis of bile acids, ligand activators of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), known transcriptional regulators of P450s] to hepatic P450 expression. Overexpression of AKR1D1 in primary human hepatocytes led to increased expression of CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6. Conversely, AKR1D1 knockdown decreased expression of these P450s. We resequenced AKR1D1 from 98 donor livers and identified a 3'-untranslated region (UTR) (rs1872930) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) significantly associated with higher AKR1D1 mRNA expression. AKR1D1 3'-UTR-luciferase reporter studies showed that the variant allele resulted in higher luciferase activity, suggesting that the SNP increases AKR1D1 mRNA stability and/or translation efficiency. Consistent with AKR1D1's putative role as a driver of the P450 subnetwork, the AKR1D1 3'-UTR SNP was significantly associated with increased hepatic mRNA expression of multiple P450s (CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6) and CYP3A4, CYP2C8, CYP2C19, and CYP2B6 activities. After adjusting for multiple testing, the association remained significant for AKR1D1, CYP2C9, and CYP2C8 mRNA expression and CYP2C8 activity. These results provide new insights into the variation in expression and activity of P450s that can account for interindividual differences in drug metabolism/efficacy and adverse drug events. In conclusion, we provide the first experimental evidence supporting a role for AKR1D1 as a key genetic regulator of the P450 network. PMID:23704699

  8. Purification from rat liver of a novel constitutively expressed member of the aldo-keto reductase 7 family that is widely distributed in extrahepatic tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, V P; Ireland, L S; Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    2000-01-01

    Antiserum raised against human aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase 1 (hAFAR1) has been used to identify a previously unrecognized rat aldo-keto reductase (AKR). This novel enzyme is designated rat aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase 2 (rAFAR2) and it characteristically migrates faster during SDS/PAGE than does the archetypal ethoxyquin-inducible rAFAR protein (now called rAFAR1). Significantly, rAFAR2 is essentially unreactive with polyclonal antibodies raised against rAFAR1. Besides its distinct electrophoretic and immunochemical properties, rAFAR2 appears to be regulated differently from rAFAR1 as it is expressed in most rat tissues and does not appear to be induced by ethoxyquin. Multiple forms of rAFAR2 have been identified. Anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, followed by adsorption chromatography on columns of Matrex Orange A and Cibacron Blue, have been employed to purify rAFAR2 from rat liver cytosol. The Q-Sepharose chromatography step resulted in the resolution of rAFAR2 into three peaks of AKR activity, two of which were purified and shown to be capable of catalysing the reduction of 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, succinic semialdehyde, 4-nitrobenzaldehyde and 9,10-phenathrenequinone. The two most highly purified rAFAR2-containing preparations eluted from the Cibacron Blue column were 91 and 98% homogeneous. Analysis of these by SDS/PAGE indicated that the least anionic (peak CBA5) comprised a polypeptide of 37.0 kDa, whereas the most anionic (peak CBA6) contained two closely migrating polypeptides of 36.8 and 37.0 kDa; by contrast, in the present study, rAFAR1 was estimated by SDS/PAGE to be composed of 38.0 kDa subunits. Final purification of the 37 kDa polypeptide in CBA5 and CBA6 was accomplished by reversed-phase HPLC. Partial proteolysis of the two preparations of the 37 kDa polypeptide with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease yielded fragments of identical size, suggesting that they represent the product of a single gene. Furthermore, the peptide maps

  9. Novel homodimeric and heterodimeric rat gamma-hydroxybutyrate synthases that associate with the Golgi apparatus define a distinct subclass of aldo-keto reductase 7 family proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Vincent P; Sherratt, Philip J; Crouch, Dorothy H; Hayes, John D

    2002-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 7 family is composed of the dimeric aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase (AFAR) isoenzymes. In the rat, two AFAR subunits exist, designated rAFAR1 and rAFAR2. Herein, we report the molecular cloning of rAFAR2, showing that it shares 76% sequence identity with rAFAR1. By contrast with rAFAR1, which comprises 327 amino acids, rAFAR2 contains 367 amino acids. The 40 extra residues in rAFAR2 are located at the N-terminus of the polypeptide as an Arg-rich domain that may form an amphipathic alpha-helical structure. Protein purification and Western blotting have shown that the two AFAR subunits are found in rat liver extracts as both homodimers and as a heterodimer. Reductase activity in rat liver towards 2-carboxybenzaldehyde (CBA) was resolved by anion-exchange chromatography into three peaks containing rAFAR1-1, rAFAR1-2 and rAFAR2-2 dimers. These isoenzymes are functionally distinct; with NADPH as cofactor, rAFAR1-1 has a low K(m) and high activity with CBA, whereas rAFAR2-2 exhibits a low K(m) and high activity towards succinic semialdehyde. These data suggest that rAFAR1-1 is a detoxication enzyme, while rAFAR2-2 serves to synthesize the endogenous neuromodulator gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Subcellular fractionation of liver extracts showed that rAFAR1-1 was recovered in the cytosol whereas rAFAR2-2 was associated with the Golgi apparatus. The distinct subcellular localization of the rAFAR1 and rAFAR2 subunits was confirmed by immunocytochemistry in H4IIE cells. Association of rAFAR2-2 with the Golgi apparatus presumably facilitates secretion of GHB, and the novel N-terminal domain may either determine the targeting of the enzyme to the Golgi or regulate the secretory process. A murine AKR protein of 367 residues has been identified in expressed sequence tag databases that shares 91% sequence identity with rAFAR2 and contains the Arg-rich extended N-terminus of 40 amino acids. Further bioinformatic evidence is presented that full

  10. A comparative structural analysis reveals distinctive features of co-factor binding and substrate specificity in plant aldo-keto reductases.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira de; Santos, Marcelo Leite Dos; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Koch, Karen E; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2016-06-10

    Plant aldo-keto reductases of the AKR4C subfamily play key roles during stress and are attractive targets for developing stress-tolerant crops. However, these AKR4Cs show little to no activity with previously-envisioned sugar substrates. We hypothesized a structural basis for the distinctive cofactor binding and substrate specificity of these plant enzymes. To test this, we solved the crystal structure of a novel AKR4C subfamily member, the AKR4C7 from maize, in the apo form and in complex with NADP(+). The binary complex revealed an intermediate state of cofactor binding that preceded closure of Loop B, and also indicated that conformational changes upon substrate binding are required to induce a catalytically-favorable conformation of the active-site pocket. Comparative structural analyses of homologues (AKR1B1, AKR4C8 and AKR4C9) showed that evolutionary redesign of plant AKR4Cs weakened interactions that stabilize the closed conformation of Loop B. This in turn decreased cofactor affinity and altered configuration of the substrate-binding site. We propose that these structural modifications contribute to impairment of sugar reductase activity in favor of other substrates in the plant AKR4C subgroup, and that catalysis involves a three-step process relevant to other AKRs. PMID:27154221

  11. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    PubMed

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26995646

  12. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase, HdRed, from the Pacific Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Which Reduces Alginate-derived 4-Deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid to 2-Keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shogo; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2015-12-25

    Abalone feeds on brown seaweeds and digests seaweeds' alginate with alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3). However, it has been unclear whether the end product of alginate lyases (i.e. unsaturated monouronate-derived 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH)) is assimilated by abalone itself, because DEH cannot be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway of animals. Under these circumstances, we recently noticed the occurrence of an NADPH-dependent reductase, which reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate, in hepatopancreas extract of the pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. In the present study, we characterized this enzyme to some extent. The DEH reductase, named HdRed in the present study, could be purified from the acetone-dried powder of hepatopancreas by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by conventional column chromatographies. HdRed showed a single band of ∼ 40 kDa on SDS-PAGE and reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate with an optimal temperature and pH at around 50 °C and 7.0, respectively. HdRed exhibited no appreciable activity toward 28 authentic compounds, including aldehyde, aldose, ketose, α-keto-acid, uronic acid, deoxy sugar, sugar alcohol, carboxylic acid, ketone, and ester. The amino acid sequence of 371 residues of HdRed deduced from the cDNA showed 18-60% identities to those of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily enzymes, such as human aldose reductase, halophilic bacterium reductase, and sea hare norsolorinic acid (a polyketide derivative) reductase-like protein. Catalytic residues and cofactor binding residues known in AKR superfamily enzymes were fairly well conserved in HdRed. Phylogenetic analysis for HdRed and AKR superfamily enzymes indicated that HdRed is an AKR belonging to a novel family. PMID:26555267

  13. Fluoxetine elevates allopregnanolone in female rat brain but inhibits a steroid microsomal dehydrogenase rather than activating an aldo-keto reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fry, J P; Li, K Y; Devall, A J; Cockcroft, S; Honour, J W; Lovick, T A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, elevates brain concentrations of the neuroactive progesterone metabolite allopregnanolone, an effect suggested to underlie its use in the treatment of premenstrual dysphoria. One report showed fluoxetine to activate the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) component of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), which catalyses production of allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone. However, this action was not observed by others. The present study sought to clarify the site of action for fluoxetine in elevating brain allopregnanolone. Experimental Approach Adult male rats and female rats in dioestrus were treated with fluoxetine and their brains assayed for allopregnanolone and its precursors, progesterone and 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Subcellular fractions of rat brain were also used to investigate the actions of fluoxetine on 3α-HSD activity in both the reductive direction, producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone, and the reverse oxidative direction. Fluoxetine was also tested on these recombinant enzyme activities expressed in HEK cells. Key Results Short-term treatment with fluoxetine increased brain allopregnanolone concentrations in female, but not male, rats. Enzyme assays on native rat brain fractions and on activities expressed in HEK cells showed fluoxetine did not affect the AKR producing allopregnanolone from 5α-dihydroprogesterone but did inhibit the microsomal dehydrogenase oxidizing allopregnanolone to 5α-dihydroprogesterone. Conclusions and Implications Fluoxetine elevated allopregnanolone in female rat brain by inhibiting its oxidation to 5α-dihydroprogesterone by a microsomal dehydrogenase. This is a novel site of action for fluoxetine, with implications for the development of new agents and/or dosing regimens to raise brain allopregnanolone. PMID:25161074

  14. Characterization of hamster NAD+-dependent 3(17)β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase belonging to the aldo-keto reductase 1C subfamily.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Noda, Misato; Ikari, Akira; Tatematsu, Kenjiro; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    The cDNAs for morphine 6-dehydrogenase (AKR1C34) and its homologous aldo-keto reductase (AKR1C35) were cloned from golden hamster liver, and their enzymatic properties and tissue distribution were compared. AKR1C34 and AKR1C35 similarly oxidized various xenobiotic alicyclic alcohols using NAD(+), but differed in their substrate specificity for hydroxysteroids and inhibitor sensitivity. While AKR1C34 showed 3α/17β/20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities, AKR1C35 efficiently oxidized various 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroids, including biologically active 3β-hydroxy-5α/β-dihydro-C19/C21-steroids, dehydroepiandrosterone and 17β-estradiol. AKR1C35 also differed from AKR1C34 in its high sensitivity to flavonoids, which inhibited competitively with respect to 17β-estradiol (Ki 0.11-0.69 μM). The mRNA for AKR1C35 was expressed liver-specific in male hamsters and ubiquitously in female hamsters, whereas the expression of the mRNA for AKR1C34 displayed opposite sexual dimorphism. Because AKR1C35 is the first 317Β-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASE IN THE AKR SUPERFAMILY: , we also investigated the molecular determinants for the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity by replacement of Val54 and Cys310 in AKR1C35 with the corresponding residues in AKR1C34, Ala and Phe, respectively. The mutation of Val54Ala, but not Cys310Phe, significantly impaired this activity, suggesting that Val54 plays a critical role in recognition of the steroidal substrate. PMID:26002966

  15. Plant aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) as multi-tasking soldiers involved in diverse plant metabolic processes and stress defense: A structure-function update.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Debashree; Naik, Dhiraj; Reddy, Attipalli R

    2015-05-01

    The aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily comprises of a large number of primarily monomeric protein members, which reduce a broad spectrum of substrates ranging from simple sugars to potentially toxic aldehydes. Plant AKRs can be broadly categorized into four important functional groups, which highlight their roles in diverse plant metabolic reactions including reactive aldehyde detoxification, biosynthesis of osmolytes, secondary metabolism and membrane transport. Further, multiple overlapping functional aspects of plant AKRs including biotic and abiotic stress defense, production of commercially important secondary metabolites, iron acquisition from soil, plant-microbe interactions etc. are discussed as subcategories within respective major groups. Owing to the broad substrate specificity and multiple stress tolerance of the well-characterized AKR4C9 from Arabidopsis thaliana, protein sequences of all the homologues of AKR4C9 (A9-like proteins) from forty different plant species (Phytozome database) were analyzed. The analysis revealed that all A9-like proteins possess strictly conserved key catalytic residues (D-47, Y-52 and K-81) and belong to the pfam00248 and cl00470 AKR superfamilies. Based on structural homology of the three flexible loops of AKR4C9 (Loop A, B and C) responsible for broad substrate specificity, A9-like proteins found in Brassica rapa, Phaseolus vulgaris, Cucumis sativus, Populus trichocarpa and Solanum lycopersicum were predicted to have a similar range of substrate specificity. Thus, plant AKRs can be considered as potential breeding targets for developing stress tolerant varieties in the future. The present review provides a consolidated update on the current research status of plant AKRs with an emphasis on important functional aspects as well as their potential future prospects and an insight into the overall structure-function relationships of A9-like proteins. PMID:25840343

  16. Exposure to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone accelerates malignant progression of lung cancer cells through up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase 1B10

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Haga, Mariko; Endo, Satoshi; Soda, Midori; Yamamura, Keiko; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Tajima, Kazuo; Ikari, Akira; Hara, Akira

    2014-07-15

    Inhalation of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust, exerts fatal damage against a variety of cells involved in respiratory function. Here, we show that treatment with high concentrations of 9,10-PQ evokes apoptosis of lung cancer A549 cells through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, 9,10-PQ at its concentrations of 2 and 5 μM elevated the potentials for proliferation, invasion, metastasis and tumorigenesis, all of which were almost completely inhibited by addition of an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, inferring a crucial role of ROS in the overgrowth and malignant progression of lung cancer cells. Comparison of mRNA expression levels of six aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells advocated up-regulation of AKR1B10 as a major cause contributing to the lung cancer malignancy. In support of this, the elevation of invasive, metastatic and tumorigenic activities in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells was significantly abolished by the addition of a selective AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid. Intriguingly, zymographic and real-time PCR analyses revealed remarkable increases in secretion and expression, respectively, of matrix metalloproteinase 2 during the 9,10-PQ treatment, and suggested that the AKR1B10 up-regulation and resultant activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are predominant mechanisms underlying the metalloproteinase induction. In addition, HPLC analysis and cytochrome c reduction assay in in vitro 9,10-PQ reduction by AKR1B10 demonstrated that the enzyme catalyzes redox-cycling of this quinone, by which ROS are produced. Collectively, these results suggest that AKR1B10 is a key regulator involved in overgrowth and malignant progression of the lung cancer cells through ROS production due to 9,10-PQ redox-cycling. - Highlights: • 9,10-PQ promotes invasion, metastasis and tumorigenicity in lung cancer cells. • The 9,10-PQ-elicited promotion is possibly due to AKR1B10 up

  17. Regulation of Aldo-keto-reductase family 1 B10 by 14-3-3ε and their prognostic impact of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Jhu; Liang, Shu-Man; Liu, Chia-Chia; Chen, Shyh-Chang; Wang, John; Shyue, Song-Kun; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    14-3-3ε is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its expression significantly associates with a poor prognostic outcome. To uncover how 14-3-3ε contributes to the tumor progression of HCC, we investigated the potential downstream targets regulated by 14-3-3ε. We found that 14-3-3ε increases expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin and that 14-3-3ε-induced cell proliferation is attenuated by β-catenin silencing in HCC cells. Moreover, 14-3-3ε induces aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) expression through the activation of β-catenin signaling. Knockdown of AKR1B10 by siRNAs abolished 14-3-3ε-induced in vitro cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth as well as in vivo tumor growth. Furthermore, AKR1B10 silencing increased retinoic acid (RA) levels in the serum of tumor-bearing mice and RA treatment attenuated 14-3-3ε-induced HCC cell proliferation. We further examined 14-3-3ε and AKR1B10 expression and clinicopathological characteristics of HCC tumors. Although the expression of AKR1B10 was significantly correlated with 14-3-3ε, an increase of AKR1B10 expression in 14-3-3ε positive patients paradoxically had better overall survival and disease-free survival rates as well as lower metastatic incidence than those without an AKR1B10 increase. Finally, we found a loss of AKR1B10 expression in cells exhibiting a high capacity of invasiveness. Silencing of AKR1B10 resulted in inducing snail and vimentin expression in HCC cells. These results indicate that AKR1B10 may play a dual role during HCC tumor progression. Our results also indicate that 14-3-3ε regulates AKR1B10 expression by activating β-catenin signaling. A combination of 14-3-3ε with AKR1B10 is a potential therapeutic target and novel prognostic biomarker of HCC. PMID:26516929

  18. The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3)-mediated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) metabolism in keloids.

    PubMed

    Mantel, Alon; Newsome, Austin; Thekkudan, Theresa; Frazier, Robert; Katdare, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Keloids are progressively expanding scars, mostly prevalent in individuals of African descent. Previous data identified increased mast cell number and activation state in keloids suggesting a role in disease progression. The major eicosanoid secreted by mast cells is prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a relatively unstable pro-inflammatory mediator which can be spontaneously converted to 15-deoxy-(Delta12,14)-prostaglandin J2(15d-PGJ2) or enzymatically metabolized to 9α,11β-PGF2 by aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3). In this work, we investigated the possible role of PGD2 and its metabolites in keloids using CRL1762 keloid fibroblasts (KF) and immunohistochemical staining. Our data suggested approximately 3-fold increase of tryptase-positive mast cell count in keloids compared with normal skin. Furthermore, AKR1C3 was overexpressed in the fibrotic area of keloids while relatively weak staining detected in normal skin. Metabolism of PGD2 to 9α,11β-PGF2 by both, KF and normal fibroblasts, was dependent on AKR1C3 as this reaction was attenuated in the presence of the AKR1C3 inhibitor, 2'-hydroxyflavanone, or in cells with decreased AKR1C3 expression. 15d-PGJ2, but not the other tested PGs, inhibited KF proliferation, attenuated KF-mediated collagen gel contraction and increased caspase-3 activation. In addition, treatment with 15d-PGJ2 activated P38-MAPK, induced reactive oxygen species and upregulated superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1). Finally, inhibition of P38-MAPK further augmented 15d-PGJ2-induced caspase-3 cleavage and attenuated its effect on SOD-1 transcription. This work suggests that localized dual inhibition of AKR1C3 and P38-MAPK may inhibit keloid progression. Inhibiting AKR1C3 activity may generate oxidative environment due to redirection of PGD2 metabolism towards 15d-PGJ2 while inhibition of P38-MAPK will sensitize keloid cells to ROS-induced apoptosis. PMID:26308156

  19. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as— (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26372161

  20. Development of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1C3 (type 5 17β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase) Based on N-Phenyl-Aminobenzoates and Their Structure Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Adegoke O.; Twenter, Barry M.; Byrns, Michael C.; Jin, Yi; Chen, Mo; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3; type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) is overexpressed in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and is implicated in the intratumoral biosynthesis of testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Selective AKR1C3 inhibitors are required since compounds should not inhibit the highly related AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 isoforms which are involved in the inactivation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone. NSAIDs, N-phenylanthranilates in particular are potent but non-selective AKR1C3 inhibitors. Using flufenamic acid, 2-{[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino}benzoic acid as lead compound, five classes of structural analogs were synthesized and evaluated for AKR1C3 inhibitory potency and selectivity. Structure activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that a meta-carboxylic acid group relative to the amine conferred pronounced AKR1C3 selectivity without loss of potency, while electron withdrawing groups on the phenylamino B-ring were optimal for AKR1C3 inhibition. Lead compounds did not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2 but blocked the AKR1C3 mediated production of testosterone in LNCaP-AKR1C3 cells. These compounds offer promising leads towards new therapeutics for CRPC. PMID:22263837

  1. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as- (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis. PMID:26372161

  2. Crystal structure of perakine reductase, founding member of a novel aldo-keto reductase (AKR) subfamily that undergoes unique conformational changes during NADPH binding.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lianli; Chen, Yixin; Rajendran, Chitra; Mueller, Uwe; Panjikar, Santosh; Wang, Meitian; Mindnich, Rebekka; Rosenthal, Cindy; Penning, Trevor M; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2012-03-30

    Perakine reductase (PR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the aldehyde perakine to yield the alcohol raucaffrinoline in the biosynthetic pathway of ajmaline in Rauvolfia, a key step in indole alkaloid biosynthesis. Sequence alignment shows that PR is the founder of the new AKR13D subfamily and is designated AKR13D1. The x-ray structure of methylated His(6)-PR was solved to 2.31 Å. However, the active site of PR was blocked by the connected parts of the neighbor symmetric molecule in the crystal. To break the interactions and obtain the enzyme-ligand complexes, the A213W mutant was generated. The atomic structure of His(6)-PR-A213W complex with NADPH was determined at 1.77 Å. Overall, PR folds in an unusual α(8)/β(6) barrel that has not been observed in any other AKR protein to date. NADPH binds in an extended pocket, but the nicotinamide riboside moiety is disordered. Upon NADPH binding, dramatic conformational changes and movements were observed: two additional β-strands in the C terminus become ordered to form one α-helix, and a movement of up to 24 Å occurs. This conformational change creates a large space that allows the binding of substrates of variable size for PR and enhances the enzyme activity; as a result cooperative kinetics are observed as NADPH is varied. As the founding member of the new AKR13D subfamily, PR also provides a structural template and model of cofactor binding for the AKR13 family. PMID:22334702

  3. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 promotes development of cisplatin resistance in gastrointestinal cancer cells through down-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ayaka; Kezuka, Chihiro; Okumura, Naoko; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Ikuo; Soda, Midori; Endo, Satoshi; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-08-25

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs that are used for treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer cells, but its continuous administration often evokes the development of chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated alterations in antioxidant molecules and functions using a newly established CDDP-resistant variant of gastric cancer MKN45 cells, and found that aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is significantly up-regulated with acquisition of the CDDP resistance. In the nonresistant MKN45 cells, the sensitivity to cytotoxic effect of CDDP was decreased and increased by overexpression and silencing of AKR1B10, respectively. In addition, the AKR1B10 overexpression markedly suppressed accumulation and cytotoxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal that is produced during lipid peroxidation by CDDP treatment, suggesting that the enzyme acts as a crucial factor for facilitation of the CDDP resistance through inhibiting induction of oxidative stress by the drug. Transient exposure to CDDP and induction of the CDDP resistance decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) in MKN45 and colon cancer LoVo cells. Additionally, overexpression of PPARγ in the cells elevated the sensitivity to the CDDP toxicity, which was further augmented by concomitant treatment with a PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone. Intriguingly, overexpression of AKR1B10 in the cells resulted in a decrease in PPARγ expression, which was recovered by addition of an AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid, inferring that PPARγ is a downstream target of AKR1B10-dependent mechanism underlying the CDDP resistance. Combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand elevated the CDDP sensitivity, which was almost the same level as that in the parental cells. These results suggest that combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand is an effective adjuvant therapy for overcoming CDDP resistance of

  4. Identification, cloning and regulation of cDNA encoding aldo-keto reductase 1B7 in the adrenal gland of two Saharan rodents Meriones libycus (Libyan jird) and Gerbillus gerbillus (gerbil).

    PubMed

    Mataoui-Mazari, Houria; Amirat, Zaïna; Khammar, Farida; Martinez, Antoine

    2011-12-01

    Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B7 (AKR1B7) is a mouse aldose reductase-like protein with two major sites of expression, the vas deferens and the adrenal cortex. In the adrenal cortex, Akr1b7 is an adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-responsive-gene whose product scavenges harmful byproducts of steroidogenesis and limits stress response through the biosynthesis of prostaglandin F2α. The purpose of the present study was to explore the possible expression of AKR1B7 in the adrenal glands of two saharan rodents, Libyan jird and Lesser Egyptian gerbil. Western blot analyses demonstrated that a protein related to murine/rat AKR1B7 was highly expressed in adrenals and absent from vas deferens of both saharan species. Based on conserved sequences between mouse and rat, full length cDNA were cloned and sequenced in both species while hormonal regulation and tissue localization were explored in Libyan jird. Both cDNA encoded the expected 316 amino acids protein typical of AKR1B subfamily and contained the highly conserved catalytic tetrad consisting in Asp-44, Tyr-49, Lys-78 and His-111 residues. The deduced proteins shared higher identities with aldose reductase-like, i.e. AKR1B7 (86-94%), AKR1B8 and AKR1B10 (83-86%) than with aldose reductase group, i.e. AKR1B1 and AKR1B3 (70%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the Libyan jird and gerbil enzymes were more closely related to murine and rat AKR1B7 than to the other AKR1B members. Northern blot analyses of total RNA from Libyan jird adrenals showed a single mRNA transcript of 1.4 kb whose expression was dependent on circulating ACTH levels. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that adrenal glands of Libyan jird and gerbil express both an ortholog of the murine/rat Akr1b7 gene and that ACTH-responsiveness is at least conserved in Libyan jird. PMID:21963864

  5. Protective roles of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 and autophagy against toxicity induced by p-quinone metabolites of tert-butylhydroquinone in lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Ayako; Suyama, Miho; Takemura, Mayuko; Soda, Midori; Chen, Huayue; Tajima, Kazuo; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Bunai, Yasuo; Hara, Akira; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ikari, Akira

    2015-06-01

    tert-Butylhydroquinone (BHQ), an antioxidant used as a food additive, exhibits an anticancer effect at low doses, but is carcinogenic in rodents at high doses. BHQ is metabolized into cytotoxic tert-butylquinone (TBQ), which is further converted to 6-tert-butyl-2,3-epoxy-4-hydroxy-5-cyclohexen-1-one (TBEH) through 6-tert-butyl-2,3-epoxy-4-benzoquinone (TBE). Both TBQ and TBE are cytotoxic, but their toxic mechanisms have not been fully characterized. In this study, we have investigated the toxic mechanisms of TBQ and TBE, and the defense system against the two p-quinones using lung cancer A549 cells. TBQ and TBE, but not BHQ and TBEH, showed cytotoxicity to A549 cells. Neither caspase-3 activation nor an increase in the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associating target genes was observed. TBQ and TBE reacted with reduced glutathione, and significantly decreased the glutathione level in A549 cells, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of the p-quinones is caused by their high electrophilicity reacting with biomolecules. The A549 cells treated with the p-quinones also showed increased levels of autophagic vacuoles and LC3-II protein, which are specific autophagy markers. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine (3MA), decreased the LC3-II production by the p-quinones, but enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by TBQ and TBE, suggesting that autophagy contributes to alleviating the p-quinone-triggered cytotoxicity. In addition, the TBE-induced cytotoxicity and autophagy activation in the cells were significantly suppressed by overexpression of aldo-keto reductase (AKR)1B10 that efficiently reduces TBE into TBEH, and were augmented by pretreatment with a potent AKR1B10 inhibitor, C1. The effects of 3MA and C1 on the TBE-induced cytotoxicity were additive. The data provides evidence for the first time that autophagy and AKR1B10 contribute to the defense system against the cytotoxicity caused by the electrophilic p-quinone metabolites of BHQ. PMID:25289770

  6. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, N. ); Malfoy, B. ); Forrest, G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Fine tuning of coenzyme specificity in family 2 aldo-keto reductases revealed by crystal structures of the Lys-274 → Arg mutant of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) bound to NAD + and NADP +

    SciTech Connect

    Leitgeb, Stefan; Petschacher, Barbara; Wilson, David K.; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2005-01-11

    Aldo-keto reductases of family 2 employ single site replacement Lys → Arg to switch their cosubstrate preference from NADPH to NADH. X-ray crystal structures of Lys-274 → Arg mutant of Candida tenuis xylose reductase (AKR2B5) bound to NAD+ and NADP+ were determined at a resolution of 2.4 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Due to steric conflicts in the NADP+-bound form, the arginine side chain must rotate away from the position of the original lysine side chain, thereby disrupting a network of direct and water-mediated interactions between Glu-227, Lys-274 and the cofactor 2'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxy groups. Because anchoring contacts of its Glu-227 are lost, the coenzyme-enfolding loop that becomes ordered upon binding of NAD(P)+ in the wild-type remains partly disordered in the NADP+-bound mutant. The results delineate a catalytic reaction profile for the mutant in comparison to wild-type.

  8. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Human Monomeric Carbonyl Reductases

    PubMed Central

    El-Hawari, Yasser; Dunford, James E.; Kochan, Grazyna; Wsol, Vladimir; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Maser, Edmund; Oppermann, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Carbonyl reduction constitutes a phase I reaction for many xenobiotics and is carried out in mammals mainly by members of two protein families, namely aldo-keto reductases and short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases. In addition to their capacity to reduce xenobiotics, several of the enzymes act on endogenous compounds such as steroids or eicosanoids. One of the major carbonyl reducing enzymes found in humans is carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) with a very broad substrate spectrum. A paralog, carbonyl reductase 3 (CBR3) has about 70% sequence identity and has not been sufficiently characterized to date. Screening of a focused xenobiotic compound library revealed that CBR3 has narrower substrate specificity and acts on several orthoquinones, as well as isatin or the anticancer drug oracin. To further investigate structure-activity relationships between these enzymes we crystallized CBR3, performed substrate docking, site-directed mutagenesis and compared its kinetic features to CBR1. Despite high sequence similarities, the active sites differ in shape and surface properties. The data reveal that the differences in substrate specificity are largely due to a short segment of a substrate binding loop comprising critical residues Trp229/Pro230, Ala235/Asp236 as well as part of the active site formed by Met141/Gln142 in CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The data suggest a minor role in xenobiotic metabolism for CBR3. Enhanced version This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the web plugin are available in Text S1. PMID:19841672

  9. Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1)

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzo, L.; Drury, J; Christianson, D; Penning, T

    2009-01-01

    Human steroid 5{beta}-reductase (aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1D1) catalyzes reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-ene double bonds in steroid hormones and bile acid precursors. We have reported the structures of an AKR1D1-NADP{sup +} binary complex, and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-cortisone, AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-progesterone and AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-testosterone ternary complexes at high resolutions. Recently, structures of AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone complexes showed that the product is bound unproductively. Two quite different mechanisms of steroid double bond reduction have since been proposed. However, site-directed mutagenesis supports only one mechanism. In this mechanism, the 4-pro-R hydride is transferred from the re-face of the nicotinamide ring to C5 of the steroid substrate. E120, a unique substitution in the AKR catalytic tetrad, permits a deeper penetration of the steroid substrate into the active site to promote optimal reactant positioning. It participates with Y58 to create a 'superacidic' oxyanion hole for polarization of the C3 ketone. A role for K87 in the proton relay proposed using the AKR1D1-NADP{sup +}-5{beta}-dihydroprogesterone structure is not supported.

  10. Induction and inhibition of NAD(P)H: quinone reductase in murine and human skin.

    PubMed

    Merk, H; Jugert, F; Bonnekoh, B; Mahrle, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the human cutaneous NAD(P)H: quinone reductase (NQR) activity by known inhibitors of different reductases and to compare it with the murine skin and liver NQR activity. This enzyme plays a major role in the defence of cells against oxygen stress because it inhibits the 1-electron reduction of quinones to semiquinones and their subsequent oxidation to quinones termed as quinone redox cycle. It belongs to the aromatic hydrocarbon-responsive (Ah) battery. This gene battery includes Cyp1a1 (cytochrome P-450 IA1), Cyp1a2 (cytochrome P-450 IA2) and Nmo-1 [NAD(P)H: quinone reductase]. In the skin cytochrome P-450 IA1-dependent activity is about 1-5% compared to the corresponding activity in the liver, whereas NQR has the same activity in skin and liver. NQR was determined in the cytoplasm of murine skin, liver, and human keratinocytes using 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol as the substrate. The Ah-receptor binding compounds, such as coal tar constituents, or 3-methylcholanthrene induce cytochrome P-450-dependent activities such as aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase or 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-de-ethylase and NQR, whereas butyl hydroxytoluol, which does not bind to the Ah receptor, induces only NQR. For inhibition studies several known inhibitors of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, aldo-keto and carbonyl reductase activities were used. There was a similar pattern of inhibition of the basal and induced activity in all tissues investigated. Pyrazole, progesterone and phenobarbital did not inhibit, whereas dicoumarol, rutin and indomethacin inhibited NQR activity in murine skin and liver as well as in human keratinocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1768430

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  12. The C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase determines the substrate and inhibitor specificity.

    PubMed

    Barski, O A; Gabbay, K H; Bohren, K M

    1996-11-12

    Human aldehyde reductase has a preference for carboxyl group-containing negatively charged substrates. It belongs to the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase superfamily whose members are in part distinguished by unique C-terminal loops. To probe the role of the C-terminal loops in determining substrate specificities in these enzymes, two arginine residues, Arg308 and Arg311, located in the C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase, and not found in any other C-terminal loop, were replaced with alanine residues. The catalytic efficiency of the R311A mutant for aldehydes containing a carboxyl group is reduced 150-250-fold in comparison to that of the wild-type enzyme, while substrates not containing a negative charge are unaffected. The R311A mutant is also significantly less sensitive to inhibition by dicarboxylic acids, indicating that Arg311 interacts with one of the carboxyl groups. The inhibition pattern indicates that the other carboxyl group binds to the anion binding site formed by Tyr49, His112, and the nicotinamide moiety of NADP+. The correlation between inhibitor potency and the length of the dicarboxylic acid molecules suggests a distance of approximately 10 A between the amino group of Arg311 and the anion binding site in the aldehyde reductase molecule. The sensitivity of inhibition of the R311A mutant by several commercially available aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) was variable, with tolrestat and zopolrestat becoming more potent inhibitors (30- and 5-fold, respectively), while others remained the same or became less potent. The catalytic properties, substrate specificity, and susceptibility to inhibition of the R308A mutant remained similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The data provide direct evidence for C-terminal loop participation in determining substrate and inhibitor specificity of aldo-keto reductases and specifically identifies Arg311 as the basis for the carboxyl-containing substrate preference of aldehyde reductase. PMID:8916913

  13. Substrate specificity and inhibitor analyses of human steroid 5β-reductase (AKR1D1)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2011-01-01

    Human steroid 5β-reductase (Aldo-keto Reductase 1D1) catalyzes the stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction of the C4-C5 double bond of Δ4-ketosteroids to yield an A/B cis-ring junction. This cis-configuration is crucial for bile acid biosynthesis and plays important roles in steroid metabolism. The biochemical properties of the enzyme have not been thoroughly studied and conflicting data have been reported, partially due to the lack of highly homogeneous protein. In the present study, we systematically determined the substrate specificity of homogeneous human recombinant AKR1D1 using C18, C19, C21, and C27 Δ4-ketosteroids and assessed the pH-rate dependence of the enzyme. Our results show that AKR1D1 proficiently reduced all the steroids tested at physiological pH, indicating AKR1D1 is the only enzyme necessary for all the 5β-steroid metabolite present in humans. Substrate inhibition was observed with C18 to C21 steroids provided that the side-chain at C17 was unsubstituted. This structure activity relationship can be explained by the existence of a small alternative substrate binding pocket revealed by the AKR1D1 crystal structure. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs which are potent inhibitors of the related AKR1C enzymes do not inhibit AKR1D1 by contrast chenodeoxycholate and ursodeoxycholate were found to be potent non-competitive inhibitors suggesting that bile-acids may regulate their own synthesis at the level of AKR1D1 inhibition. PMID:21255593

  14. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hazemann, I; Dauvergne, M T; Blakeley, M P; Meilleur, F; Haertlein, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Mitschler, A; Myles, D A A; Podjarny, A

    2005-10-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Angstrom resolution from a small (0.15 mm(3)) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm(3) are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 Angstrom resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 Angstrom. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples. PMID:16204895

  15. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M. T.; Blakeley, M. P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A A; Podjarny, A.

    2005-08-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution from a small (0.15 mm{sup 3}) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase [h-AR(D)], subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm{sup 3} are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 {angstrom} resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 {angstrom}. This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  16. The role of aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 in the metabolism of γ-hydroxybutyrate in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alzeer, Samar; Ellis, Elizabeth M

    2011-05-30

    The role of the aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 in the biosynthesis of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been investigated in cell lines using a specific double stranded siRNA designed to knock down expression of the enzyme. This enzyme, along with the aldo-keto reductase AKR7A2, has been proposed previously to be one of the major succinic semialdehyde reductases in brain. The AKR1A1 siRNA was introduced into the human astrocytoma cell line (1321N1) and AKR1A1 expression was monitored using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blots. Results show an 88% reduction in mRNA levels and a 94% reduction in AKR1A1 protein expression 72 h after transfection with the siRNA. Aldehyde reductase activity was examined in silenced cells by following the aldehyde-dependent conversion of NADPH to NADP at 340 nm. This revealed a 30% decrease in pNBA reductase activity in cell extracts after AKR1A1 silencing. Succinic semialdehyde reductase activity was significantly lower in silenced cells when measured using high concentrations (1mM) of succinic semialdehyde, but not with low concentrations (10 μM). The effect of silencing on intracellular and extracellular GHB levels was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that AKR1A1 has little effect on the production of GHB, indicating that in this cell line alternative enzymes such as the AKR7A2 are likely to play a more significant role in GHB biosynthesis. PMID:21276435

  17. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  18. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25500069

  19. Non-stereo-selective cytosolic human brain tissue 3-ketosteroid reductase is refractory to inhibition by AKR1C inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Steckelbroeck, Stephan; Lütjohann, Dieter; Bauman, David R.; Ludwig, Michael; Friedl, Anke; Hans, Volkmar H.J.; Penning, Trevor M.; Klingmüller, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) activity was suggested to be responsible for the local directed formation of neuroactive 5α,3α-tetrahydrosteroids (5α,3α-THSs) from 5α-dihydrosteroids. We show for the first time that within human brain tissue 5α-dihydroprogesterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone are converted via non-stereo-selective 3-ketosteroid reductase activity to produce the respective 5α,3α-THSs and 5α,3β-THSs. Apart from this, we prove that within the human temporal lobe and limbic system cytochrome P450c17 and 3β-HSD/Δ5−4 ketosteroid isomerase are not expressed. Thus, it appears that these brain regions are unable to conduct de novo biosynthesis of Δ4-3-ketosteroids from Δ5-3β-hydroxysteroids. Consequently, the local formation of THSs will depend on the uptake of circulating Δ4-3-ketosteroids such as progesterone and testosterone. 3α- and 3β-HSD activity were (i) equally enriched in the cytosol, (ii) showed equal distribution between cerebral neocortex and subcortical white matter without sex- or age-dependency, (iii) demonstrated a strong and significant positive correlation when comparing 46 different specimens and (iv) exhibited similar sensitivities to different inhibitors of enzyme activity. These findings led to the assumption that cerebral 3-ketosteroid reductase activity might be catalyzed by a single enzyme and is possibly attributed to the expression of a soluble AKR1C aldo-keto reductase. AKR1Cs are known to act as non-stereo-selective 3-ketosteroid reductases; low AKR1C mRNA expression was detected. However, the cerebral 3-ketosteroid reductase was clearly refractory to inhibition by AKR1C inhibitors indicating the expression of a currently unidentified enzyme. Its lack of stereo-selectivity is of physiological significance, since only 5α,3α-THSs enhance the effect of GABA on the GABAA receptor, whereas 5α,3β-THSs are antagonists. PMID:20673851

  20. Inhibition of aldose reductase prevents growth factor-induced G1-S phase transition through the AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/E2F-1 pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramana, Kota V; Tammali, Ravinder; Srivastava, Satish K

    2010-04-01

    Colon cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women worldwide. The deregulated cell cycle control or decreased apoptosis of normal epithelial cells leading to uncontrolled proliferation is one of the major features of tumor progression. We have previously shown that aldose reductase (AR), a NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase, has been shown to be involved in growth factor-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells. Herein, we report that inhibition of AR prevents epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced HT29 cell proliferation by accumulating cells at G(1) phase of cell cycle. Similar results were observed in SW480 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells. Treatment of HT29 cells with AR inhibitor, sorbinil or zopolrestat, prevented the EGF- and bFGF-induced DNA binding activity of E2F-1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Inhibition of AR also prevented EGF- and bFGF-induced phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2 and expression of G(1)-S transition regulatory proteins such as cyclin D1, cdk4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin E, and c-myc. More importantly, inhibition of AR prevented the EGF- and bFGF-induced activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and reactive oxygen species generation in colon cancer cells. Further, inhibition of AR also prevented the tumor growth of human colon cancer cells in nude mouse xenografts. Collectively, these results show that AR mediates EGF- and bFGF-induced colon cancer cell proliferation by activating or expressing G(1)-S phase proteins such as E2F-1, cdks, and cyclins through the reactive oxygen species/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway, indicating the use of AR inhibitors in the prevention of colon carcinogenesis. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 813-24. (c)2010 AACR. PMID:20354121

  1. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  2. Conversion of Human Steroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) into 3[beta]-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase by Single Point Mutation E120H: Example of Perfect Enzyme Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mo; Drury, Jason E.; Christianson, David W.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-10-10

    Human aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) and AKR1C enzymes are essential for bile acid biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism. AKR1D1 catalyzes the 5{beta}-reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids, whereas AKR1C enzymes are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs). These enzymes share high sequence identity and catalyze 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH to an electrophilic carbon but differ in that one residue in the conserved AKR catalytic tetrad, His120 (AKR1D1 numbering), is substituted by a glutamate in AKR1D1. We find that the AKR1D1 E120H mutant abolishes 5{beta}-reductase activity and introduces HSD activity. However, the E120H mutant unexpectedly favors dihydrosteroids with the 5{alpha}-configuration and, unlike most of the AKR1C enzymes, shows a dominant stereochemical preference to act as a 3{beta}-HSD as opposed to a 3{alpha}-HSD. The catalytic efficiency achieved for 3{beta}-HSD activity is higher than that observed for any AKR to date. High resolution crystal structures of the E120H mutant in complex with epiandrosterone, 5{beta}-dihydrotestosterone, and {Delta}{sup 4}-androstene-3,17-dione elucidated the structural basis for this functional change. The glutamate-histidine substitution prevents a 3-ketosteroid from penetrating the active site so that hydride transfer is directed toward the C3 carbonyl group rather than the {Delta}{sup 4}-double bond and confers 3{beta}-HSD activity on the 5{beta}-reductase. Structures indicate that stereospecificity of HSD activity is achieved because the steroid flips over to present its {alpha}-face to the A-face of NADPH. This is in contrast to the AKR1C enzymes, which can invert stereochemistry when the steroid swings across the binding pocket. These studies show how a single point mutation in AKR1D1 can introduce HSD activity with unexpected configurational and stereochemical preference.

  3. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  4. Intracrine Androgens Enhance Decidualization and Modulate Expression of Human Endometrial Receptivity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Douglas A.; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Cousins, Fiona L.; Critchley, Hilary O. D.; Saunders, Philippa T. K.

    2016-01-01

    The endometrium is a complex, steroid-dependent tissue that undergoes dynamic cyclical remodelling. Transformation of stromal fibroblasts (ESC) into specialised secretory cells (decidualization) is fundamental to the establishment of a receptive endometrial microenvironment which can support and maintain pregnancy. Androgen receptors (AR) are present in ESC; in other tissues local metabolism of ovarian and adrenal-derived androgens regulate AR-dependent gene expression. We hypothesised that altered expression/activity of androgen biosynthetic enzymes would regulate tissue availability of bioactive androgens and the process of decidualization. Primary human ESC were treated in vitro for 1–8 days with progesterone and cAMP (decidualized) in the presence or absence of the AR antagonist flutamide. Time and treatment-dependent changes in genes essential for a) intra-tissue biosynthesis of androgens (5α-reductase/SRD5A1, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3/AKR1C3), b) establishment of endometrial decidualization (IGFBP1, prolactin) and c) endometrial receptivity (SPP1, MAOA, EDNRB) were measured. Decidualization of ESC resulted in significant time-dependent changes in expression of AKR1C3 and SRD5A1 and secretion of T/DHT. Addition of flutamide significantly reduced secretion of IGFBP1 and prolactin and altered the expression of endometrial receptivity markers. Intracrine biosynthesis of endometrial androgens during decidualization may play a key role in endometrial receptivity and offer a novel target for fertility treatment. PMID:26817618

  5. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  6. Substrate specificity of an aflatoxin-metabolizing aldehyde reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, E M; Hayes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme from rat liver that reduces aflatoxin B1-dialdehyde exhibits a unique catalytic specificity distinct from that of other aldo-keto reductases. This enzyme, designated AFAR, displays high activity towards dicarbonyl-containing compounds with ketone groups on adjacent carbon atoms; 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, acenaphthenequinone and camphorquinone were found to be good substrates. Although AFAR can also reduce aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes such as succinic semialdehyde, it is inactive with glucose, galactose and xylose. The enzyme also exhibits low activity towards alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl-containing compounds. Determination of the apparent Km reveals that AFAR has highest affinity for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and succinic semialdehyde, and low affinity for glyoxal and DL-glyceraldehyde. PMID:8526867

  7. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  8. Toward the identification of liver toxicity markers: a proteome study in human cell culture and rats.

    PubMed

    Thome-Kromer, Birgit; Bonk, Ines; Klatt, Mathias; Nebrich, Grit; Taufmann, Marion; Bryant, Stewart; Wacker, Ulrich; Köpke, Andreas

    2003-10-01

    The effects of toxic and nontoxic compound treatments were investigated by high resolution custom developed 2-11 pH gradient NEPHGE (non equilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) two-dimensional electrophoresis. Two models were compared: (i) in vivo rat and (ii) the human cell line HepG2, to test their suitability in a proteomics based approach to identify a toxicity marker. 163 and 321 proteins were identified from the rat liver and the HepG2 proteome. These represent various isoforms of 113 and 194 different NCBI annotated gene sequences, respectively. Nine compounds were selected to induce proteome variations associated with liver toxicity and metabolism. The rat liver proteome database consists of 78 gels, the HepG2 database of 52 gels. Variant proteins were assessed regarding their usefulness as a toxicity marker by evaluating their treatment specificity against multiple control treatments. Thirteen potential toxicity marker proteins were found in rat liver and eight in HepG2. Catalase and carbamoylphosphate synthetase-1 isoforms were found to be significantly changed after treatment by 4/4 and 3/4 toxic compounds in rat liver, respectively. Aldo-keto-reductase family 1, member C1 was implicated for 3/4 liver cell toxic compounds in HepG2. Our approach was able to differentiate the quality of potential toxicity markers and provided useful information for an ongoing characterization of more compounds in a wider number of toxicity classes. PMID:14625847

  9. Structure-function of human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases: genes and proteins.

    PubMed

    Penning, T M; Jin, Y; Steckelbroeck, S; Lanisnik Rizner, T; Lewis, M

    2004-02-27

    Four soluble human 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) isoforms exist which are aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily members. They share 86% sequence identity and correspond to: AKR1C1 (20 alpha(3 alpha)-HSD); AKR1C2 (type 3 3 alpha-HSD and bile-acid binding protein); AKR1C3 (type 2 3 alpha-HSD and type 5 17 beta-HSD); and AKR1C4 (type 1 3 alpha-HSD). Each of the homogeneous recombinant enzymes are plastic and display 3-, 17- and 20-ketosteroid reductase and 3 alpha- 17 beta- and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidase activities with different k(cat)/K(m) ratios in vitro. The crystal structure of the AKR1C2.NADP(+).ursodeoxycholate complex provides an explanation for this functional plasticity. Ursodeoxycholate is bound backwards (D-ring in the A-ring position) and upside down (beta-face of steroid inverted) relative to the position of 3-ketosteroids in the related rat liver 3 alpha-HSD (AKR1C9) structure. Transient transfection indicates that in COS-1 cells, AKR1C enzymes function as ketosteroid reductases due to potent inhibition of their oxidase activity by NADPH. By acting as ketosteroid reductases they may regulate the occupancy of the androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptors. RT-PCR showed that AKRs are discretely localized. AKR1C4 is virtually liver specific, while AKR1C2 and AKR1C3 are dominantly expressed in prostate and mammary gland. AKR1C genes are highly conserved in structure and may be transcriptionally regulated by steroid hormones and stress. PMID:15026176

  10. Reductive metabolism of nabumetone by human liver microsomal and cytosolic fractions: exploratory prediction using inhibitors and substrates as marker probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kaori; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Koyanagi, Junichi; Takahashi, Tamiko; Akimoto, Masayuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    The metabolic reduction of nabumetone was examined by inhibition and correlation studies using human liver microsomes and cytosol. This reduction was observed in both fractions, with the V(max) values for reduction activity being approximately fourfold higher, and the V(max)/K(m) values approximately three-fold higher, in the microsomes than in the cytosol. The reduction of nabumetone was inhibited by 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, an 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) inhibitor, in the microsomal fraction. The reduction activity was also inhibited by quercetin and menadione [carbonyl reductase (CBR) inhibitors], and by phenolphthalein and medroxyprogesterone acetate [potent inhibitors of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C1, 1C2 and 1C4] in the cytosol. A good correlation (r² = 0.93) was observed between the reduction of nabumetone and of cortisone, as a marker of 11β-HSD activity, in the microsomal fractions. There was also an excellent relationship between reduction of nabumetone and of the AKR1C substrates, acetohexamide, and ethacrynic acid (r 2 = 0.92 and 0.93, respectively), in the cytosol fractions. However, a poor correlation was observed between the formation of 4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-butan-2-ol (MNBO) from nabumetone and CBR activity (with 4-benzoyl pyridine reduction as a CBR substrate) in the cytosol fractions (r² = 0.24). These findings indicate that nabumetone may be metabolized by 11β-HSD in human liver microsomes, and primarily by AKR1C4 in human liver cytosol, although multiple enzymes in the AKR1C subfamily may be involved. It cannot be completely denied that CBR is involved to some extent in the formation of MNBO from nabumetone in the cytosol fraction. PMID:24659525

  11. Pregnane X receptor activation and silencing promote steatosis of human hepatic cells by distinct lipogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Andreas; Rümmele, Petra; Klein, Kathrin; Kandel, Benjamin A; Rieger, Jessica K; Nüssler, Andreas K; Zanger, Ulrich M; Trauner, Michael; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    In addition to its well-characterized role in the regulation of drug metabolism and transport by xenobiotics, pregnane X receptor (PXR) critically impacts on lipid homeostasis. In mice, both ligand-dependent activation and knockout of PXR were previously shown to promote hepatic steatosis. To elucidate the respective pathways in human liver, we generated clones of human hepatoma HepG2 cells exhibiting different PXR protein levels, and analyzed effects of PXR activation and knockdown on steatosis and expression of lipogenic genes. Ligand-dependent activation as well as knockdown of PXR resulted in increased steatosis in HepG2 cells. Activation of PXR induced the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) 1-dependent lipogenic pathway via PXR-dependent induction of SREBP1a, which was confirmed in primary human hepatocytes. Inhibiting SREBP1 activity by blocking the cleavage-dependent maturation of SREBP1 protein impaired the induction of lipogenic SREBP1 target genes and triglyceride accumulation by PXR activation. On the other hand, PXR knockdown resulted in up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1B10, which enhanced the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)-catalyzed reaction step of de novo lipogenesis. In a cohort of human liver samples histologically classified for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, AKR1B10, SREBP1a and SREBP1 lipogenic target genes proved to be up-regulated in steatohepatitis, while PXR protein was reduced. In summary, our data suggest that activation and knockdown of PXR in human hepatic cells promote de novo lipogenesis and steatosis by induction of the SREBP1 pathway and AKR1B10-mediated increase of ACC activity, respectively, thus providing mechanistic explanations for a putative dual role of PXR in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis. PMID:25182422

  12. Characterization of human liver enzymes involved in the biotransformation of boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anima; Yuan, Yuan; Tong, Wei; Su, Ai-Duen; Gu, Chunyan; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Kishnani, Narendra S; Alton, Kevin B

    2011-03-01

    Boceprevir (SCH 503034), a protease inhibitor, is under clinical development for the treatment of human hepatitis C virus infections. In human liver microsomes, formation of oxidative metabolites after incubations with [(14)C]boceprevir was catalyzed by CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. In addition, the highest turnover was observed in recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. After a single radiolabeled dose to human, boceprevir was subjected to two distinct pathways, namely cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation and ketone reduction. Therefore, attempts were made to identify the enzymes responsible for the formation of carbonyl-reduced metabolites. Human liver S9 and cytosol converted ∼ 28 and ∼ 68% of boceprevir to M28, respectively, in the presence of an NADPH-generating system. Screening of boceprevir with recombinant human aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) revealed that AKR1C2 and AKR1C3 exhibited catalytic activity with respect to the formation of M+2 metabolites (M28 and M31). The formation of M28 was inhibited by 100 μM flufenamic acid (80.3%), 200 μM mefenamic acid (83.7%), and 100 μM phenolphthalein (86.1%), known inhibitors of AKRs, suggesting its formation through carbonyl reduction pathway. Formation of M28 was also inhibited by 100 μM diazepam (75.1%), 1 mM ibuprofen (70%), and 200 μM diflunisal (89.4%). These data demonstrated that CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 are primarily responsible for the formation of oxidative metabolites and the formation of M28 and M31, the keto-reduced metabolites, are most likely mediated by AKR1C2 and AKR1C3. Because the biotransformation and clearance of boceprevir involves two different enzymatic pathways, boceprevir is less likely to be a victim of significant drug-drug interaction with concomitant medication affecting either of these pathways. PMID:21123164

  13. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A

    PubMed Central

    Erzinger, Melanie M.; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M.; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W.; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J.

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  14. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A.

    PubMed

    Erzinger, Melanie M; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  15. DNA from uncultured organisms as a source of 2,5-diketo-L-gluconic acid reductases.

    SciTech Connect

    Eschenfeldt, W. H.; Stols, L.; Rosenbaum, H.; Khambatta, Z. S.; Quaite, E. R.; Wu, S.; Kilgore, D. C.; Trent, J. D.; Donnelly, M. I.; Genencor International; Eastman Chemical Company

    2001-09-01

    Total DNA of a population of uncultured organisms was extracted from soil samples, and by using PCR methods, the genes encoding two different 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductases (DKGRs) were recovered. Degenerate PCR primers based on published sequence information gave internal gene fragments homologous to known DKGRs. Nested primers specific for the internal fragments were combined with random primers to amplify flanking gene fragments from the environmental DNA, and two hypothetical full-length genes were predicted from the combined sequences. Based on these predictions, specific primers were used to amplify the two complete genes in single PCRs. These genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified gene products catalyzed the reduction of 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Compared to previously described DKGRs isolated from Corynebacterium spp., these environmental reductases possessed some valuable properties. Both exhibited greater than 20-fold-higher k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values than those previously determined, primarily as a result of better binding of substrate. The K{sub m} values for the two new reductases were 57 and 67 {mu}M, versus 2 and 13 mM for the Corynebacterium enzymes. Both environmental DKGRs accepted NADH as well as NADPH as a cosubstrate; other DKGRs and most related aldo-keto reductases use only NADPH. In addition, one of the new reductases was more thermostable than known DKGRs.

  16. Modulated expression of genes encoding estrogen metabolizing enzymes by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Domenico, Joanne; Swasey, Christina; Wang, Meiqin; Gelfand, Erwin W; Lucas, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    G1-phase cell cycle defects, such as alterations in cyclin D1 or cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) levels, are seen in most tumors. For example, increased cyclin D1 and decreased cdk6 levels are seen in many human breast tumors. Overexpression of cdk6 in breast tumor cells in culture has been shown to suppress proliferation, unlike the growth stimulating effects of its close homolog, cdk4. In addition to directly affecting proliferation, alterations in cdk6 or cdk4 levels in breast tumor cells also differentially influence levels of numerous steroid metabolic enzymes (SMEs), including those involved in estrogen metabolism. Overexpression of cdk6 in tumor cell lines having low cdk6 resulted in decreased levels of mRNAs encoding aldo-keto reductase (AKR)1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, which are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) involved in steroid hormone metabolism. In contrast, increasing cdk4 dramatically increased these transcript levels, especially those encoding AKR1C3, an enzyme that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, a change that could result in a pro-estrogenic state favoring tumor growth. Effects on other estrogen metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19 aromatase, 17β-HSD2, and CYP1B1 transcripts, were also observed. Interactions of cdk6 and cdk4, but not cyclin D1, with the promoter region of a cdk-regulated gene, 17β-HSD2, were detected. The results uncover a previously unsuspected link between the cell cycle and hormone metabolism and differential roles for cdk6 and cdk4 in a novel mechanism for pre-receptor control of steroid hormone action, with important implications for the origin and treatment of steroid hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:24848372

  17. Activated and unactivated forms of human erythrocyte aldose reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S K; Hair, G A; Das, B

    1985-01-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21) has been partially purified from human erythrocytes by DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) column chromatography. This enzyme is activated severalfold upon incubation with 10 microM each glucose 6-phosphate, NADPH, and glucose. The activation of the enzyme was confirmed by following the oxidation of NADPH as well as the formation of sorbitol with glucose as substrate. The activated form of aldose reductase exhibited monophasic kinetics with both glyceraldehyde and glucose (Km of glucose = 0.68 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 0.096 mM), whereas the native (unactivated) enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics (Km of glucose = 9.0 and 0.9 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 1.1 and 0.14 mM). The unactivated enzyme was strongly inhibited by aldose reductase inhibitors such as sorbinil, alrestatin, and quercetrin, and by phosphorylated intermediates such as ADP, glycerate 3-phosphate, glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, and glycerate 2,3-trisphosphate. The activated form of the enzyme was less susceptible to inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors and phosphorylated intermediates. PMID:3933003

  18. Molecular cloning of mannose-6-phosphate reductase and its developmental expression in celery.

    PubMed Central

    Everard, J D; Cantini, C; Grumet, R; Plummer, J; Loescher, W H

    1997-01-01

    Compared with other primary photosynthetic products (e.g. sucrose and starch), little is known about sugar alcohol metabolism, its regulation, and the manner in which it is integrated with other pathways. Mannose-6-phosphate reductase (M6PR) is a key enzyme that is involved in mannitol biosynthesis in celery (Apium graveolens L.). The M6PR gene was cloned from a leaf cDNA library, and clonal authenticity was established by assays of M6PR activity, western blots, and comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequence with a celery M6PR tryptic digestion product. Recombinant M6PR, purified from Escherichia coli, had specific activity, molecular mass, and kinetic characteristics indistinguishable from those of authentic celery M6PR. Sequence analyses showed M6PR to be a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, which includes both animal and plant enzymes. The greatest sequence similarity was with aldose-6-phosphate reductase (EC 1.1.1.200), a key enzyme in sorbitol synthesis in Rosaceae. Developmental studies showed M6PR to be limited to green tissues and to be under tight transcriptional regulation during leaf initiation, expansion, and maturation. These data confirmed a close relationship between the development of photosynthetic capacity, mannitol synthesis, and M6PR activity. PMID:9112783

  19. Aldose reductase C-106T polymorphism is associated with the risk of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqin; Yu, Min; Mo, Long; Li, Zhenyu; Wang, Junjie; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng

    2016-10-10

    Aldose Reductase (AR), encoded by AKR1B1, is a member of NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The C-106T polymorphism of AKR1B1 is closely related to the diabetic complications. Our previous studies have indicated that the expression of AR was increased in spontaneously hypertensive rats, suggesting the effect of AR in hypertension. Here we investigated whether AKR1B1 C-106T polymorphism was associated with essential hypertension (EH). AKR1B1 C-106T polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and the direct sequencing methods. 383 healthy subjects and 383 essential hypertensive patients were recruited in this study. The polymorphism of AKR1B1 C-106T in EH and normal tensive (NT) groups was in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. -106T allele of AKR1B1 C-106T variants was more frequent in EH patients compared with normal tensive subjects, indicating that -106T allele was a risk factor of EH (OR=1.841, 95%CI=1.366-2.481). In male patients, C-106T polymorphism was associated significantly with decreased serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol and higher systolic blood pressure levels. Our results suggest that -106T allele of AKR1B1 C-106T polymorphism may be associated with increased risk for EH in Chinese Han population. PMID:27343777

  20. Structure of conjugated polyketone reductase from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 reveals conformational changes for substrate recognition upon NADPH binding.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hui-Min; Yamamura, Akihiro; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Nagai, Takahiro; Kitamura, Nahoko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708, identified as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ketopantoyl lactone reductase, belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. This enzyme reduces ketopantoyl lactone to D-pantoyl lactone in a strictly stereospecific manner. To elucidate the structural basis of the substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structures of the apo CPR-C2 and CPR-C2/NADPH complex at 1.70 and 1.80 Å resolutions, respectively. CPR-C2 adopted a triose-phosphate isomerase barrel fold at the core of the structure. Binding with the cofactor NADPH induced conformational changes in which Thr27 and Lys28 moved 15 and 5.0 Å, respectively, in the close vicinity of the adenosine 2'-phosphate group of NADPH to form hydrogen bonds. Based on the comparison of the CPR-C2/NADPH structure with 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and mutation analyses, we constructed substrate binding models with ketopantoyl lactone, which provided insight into the substrate specificity by the cofactor-induced structure. The results will be useful for the rational design of CPR-C2 mutants targeted for use in the industrial manufacture of ketopantoyl lactone. PMID:23828603

  1. Catalytic Cycle of Human Glutathione Reductase Near 1 Å Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Berkholz, Donald S.; Faber, H. Richard; Savvides, Savvas N.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2008-09-08

    Efficient enzyme catalysis depends on exquisite details of structure beyond those resolvable in typical medium- and high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Here we report synchrotron-based cryocrystallographic studies of natural substrate complexes of the flavoenzyme human glutathione reductase (GR) at nominal resolutions between 1.1 and 0.95 {angstrom} that reveal new aspects of its mechanism. Compression in the active site causes overlapping van der Waals radii and distortion in the nicotinamide ring of the NADPH substrate, which enhances catalysis via stereoelectronic effects. The bound NADPH and redox-active disulfide are positioned optimally on opposite sides of the flavin for a 1,2-addition across a flavin double bond. The new structures extend earlier observations to reveal that the redox-active disulfide loop in GR is an extreme case of sequential peptide bonds systematically deviating from planarity -- a net deviation of 53 deg. across five residues. But this apparent strain is not a factor in catalysis, as it is present in both oxidized and reduced structures. Intriguingly, the flavin bond lengths in oxidized GR are intermediate between those expected for oxidized and reduced flavin, but we present evidence that this may not be due to the protein environment but instead due to partial synchrotron reduction of the flavin by the synchrotron beam. Finally, of more general relevance, we present evidence that the structures of synchrotron-reduced disulfide bonds cannot generally be used as reliable models for naturally reduced disulfide bonds.

  2. Cloning, expression and characterization of a putative 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase in Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanan; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Yuanhua

    2015-06-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are a superfamily of soluble NAD(P)(H) oxidoreductases. The function of the enzymes is to reduce aldehydes and ketones into primary and secondary alcohols. We have cloned a 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase (2,5DKGR) gene from Comamonas testosteroni (C. testosteroni) ATCC11996 (a Gram-negative bacterium which can use steroids as carbon and energy source) into plasmid pET-15b and over expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was purified by His-tag Metal chelating affinity chromatography column. The 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase (2,5DKGR) gene contains 1062 bp and could be translated into a protein of 353 amino acid residues. Three consensus sequences of the AKR superfamily are found as GxxxxDxAxxY, LxxxGxxxPxxGxG and LxxxxxxxxxDxxxxH. GxxxxDxAxxY is the active site, LxxxGxxxPxxGxG is the Cofactor-binding site for NAD(P)(H), LxxxxxxxxxDxxxxH is used for supporting the 3D structure. 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase gene of C. testosteroni was knocked out and a mutant M-AKR was obtained. Compared to wild type C. testosteroni, degradations of testosterone, estradiol, oestrone and methyltestosterone in mutant M-AKR were decreased. Therefore, 2,5-diketo-D-gluconic acid reductase in C. testosteroni is involved in steroid degradation. PMID:25614138

  3. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G; Pajares, María A; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  4. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  5. Interception of benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione by UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Huang, Meng; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2013-10-21

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental and tobacco carcinogens. Proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols are activated by human aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) to yield electrophilic and redox-active o-quinones. Interconversion among benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-7,8-dione, a representative PAH o-quinone, and its corresponding catechol generates a futile redox-cycle with the concomitant production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether glucuronidation of B[a]P-7,8-catechol by human UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) could intercept the catechol in three different human lung cells. RT-PCR showed that UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 were only expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The corresponding recombinant UGTs were examined for their kinetic constants and product profile using B[a]P-7,8-catechol as a substrate. B[a]P-7,8-dione was reduced to B[a]P-7,8-catechol by dithiothreitol under anaerobic conditions and then further glucuronidated by the UGTs in the presence of uridine-5'-diphosphoglucuronic acid as a glucuronic acid group donor. UGT1A1 catalyzed the glucuronidation of B[a]P-7,8-catechol and generated two isomeric O-monoglucuronsyl-B[a]P-7,8-catechol products that were identified by RP-HPLC and by LC-MS/MS. By contrast, UGT1A3 and 2B7 catalyzed the formation of only one monoglucuronide, which was identical to that formed in A549 cells. The kinetic profiles of three UGTs followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. On the basis of the expression levels of UGT1A3 and UGT2B7 and the observation that a single monoglucuronide was produced in A549 cells, we suggest that the major UGT isoforms in A549 cells that can intercept B[a]P-7,8-catechol are UGT1A3 and 2B7. PMID:24047243

  6. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  7. Purification of NADPH-dependent dehydroascorbate reductase from rat liver and its identification with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Del Bello, B; Maellaro, E; Sugherini, L; Santucci, A; Comporti, M; Casini, A F

    1994-01-01

    Rat liver cytosol has been found to reduce dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA) to ascorbic acid in the presence of NADPH. The enzyme responsible for such activity has been purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-Sepharose, Sephadex G-100 SF and Reactive Red column chromatography, with an overall recovery of 27%. SDS/PAGE of the purified enzyme showed one single protein band with an M(r) of 37,500. A similar value (36,800) was found by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 SF column. The results indicate that the enzyme is a homogeneous monomer. The Km for DHAA was 4.6 mM and the Vmax. was 1.55 units/mg of protein; for NADPH Km and Vmax. were 4.3 microM and 1.10 units/mg of protein respectively. The optimum pH was around 6.2. Several typical substrates and inhibitors of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily have been tested. The strong inhibition of DHAA reductase effected by steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, together with the ability to reduce 5 alpha-androstane-3,17-dione strongly, suggest the possibility that DHAA reductase corresponds to 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Microsequence analysis performed on the electro-transferred enzyme band shows that the N-terminus is blocked. Internal primary structure data were obtained from CNBr-derived fragments and definitely proved the identity of NADPH-dependent DHAA reductase with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7998972

  8. Curcumin is a tight-binding inhibitor of the most efficient human daunorubicin reductase--Carbonyl reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Hornung, Jan; Ebert, Bettina; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2015-06-01

    Curcumin is a major component of the plant Curcuma longa L. It is traditionally used as a spice and coloring in foods and is an important ingredient in curry. Curcuminoids have anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and gained increasing attention as potential neuroprotective and cancer preventive compounds. In the present study, we report that curcumin is a potent tight-binding inhibitor of human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1, Ki=223 nM). Curcumin acts as a non-competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate 2,3-hexandione as revealed by plotting IC50-values against various substrate concentrations and most likely as a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH. Molecular modeling supports the finding that curcumin occupies the cofactor binding site of CBR1. Interestingly, CBR1 is one of the most effective human reductases in converting the anthracycline anti-tumor drug daunorubicin to daunorubicinol. The secondary alcohol metabolite daunorubicinol has significantly reduced anti-tumor activity and shows increased cardiotoxicity, thereby limiting the clinical use of daunorubicin. Thus, inhibition of CBR1 may increase the efficacy of daunorubicin in cancer tissue and simultaneously decrease its cardiotoxicity. Western-blots demonstrated basal expression of CBR1 in several cell lines. Significantly less daunorubicin reduction was detected after incubating A549 cell lysates with increasing concentrations of curcumin (up to 60% less with 50 μM curcumin), suggesting a beneficial effect in the co-treatment of anthracycline anti-tumor drugs together with curcumin. PMID:25541467

  9. Regulation of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Activity in Human Fibroblasts by Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael S.; Dana, Suzanna E.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1973-01-01

    The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.34), the rate-limiting enzyme of hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis, is suppressed in human fibroblasts cultured in the presence of serum. This enzyme activity increases by more than 10-fold after the removal of serum from the medium. The rise in enzyme activity requires de novo protein synthesis and is not accompanied by changes in the activities of several other cellular enzymes. The factor responsible for the suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in cultured fibroblasts is present in the sera of at least four mammalian species, and in human serum it is found in the low-density lipoproteins. Human high-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins from chicken egg yolk, and the fraction of human serum containing no lipoproteins do not suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. PMID:4352976

  10. Quantitation of Benzo[a]pyrene Metabolic Profiles in Human Bronchoalveolar H358) Cells by Stable Isotope Dilution Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ding; Harvey, Ronald G.; Blair, Ian A.; Penning, Trevor M.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants and are carcinogenic in multiple organs and species. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is a representative PAH and has been studied extensively for its carcinogenicity and toxicity. B[a]P itself is chemically inert and requires metabolic activation to exhibit its toxicity and carcinogenicity. Three major metabolic pathways have been well documented. The signature metabolites generated from the radical cation (peroxidase or monooxygenase mediated) pathway are B[a]P-1,6-dione and B[a]P-3,6-dione, the signature metabolite generated from the diol-epoxide (P450 mediated) pathway is B[a]P-r-7,t-8,t-9,c-10-tetrahydrotetrol (B[a]P-tetrol-1) and the signature metabolite generated from the o-quinone (aldo-keto reductase mediated) pathway is B[a]P-7,8-dione. The contributions of these different metabolic pathways to cancer initiation and the exploitation of this information for cancer prevention are still under debate. With the availability of a library of [13C4]-labeled B[a]P metabolite internal standards, we developed a sensitive stable isotope dilution atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method to address this issue by quantitating B[a]P metabolites from each metabolic pathway in human lung cells. This analytical method represents a 500 fold increased sensitivity compared with a method using HPLC-radiometric detection. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 6 fmol on column for 3-hydroxybenzo[a]pyrene (3-OH-B[a]P), the generally accepted biomarker for B[a]P exposure. This high level of sensitivity and robustness of the method was demonstrated in a study of B[a]P metabolic profiles in human bronchoalveolar H358 cells induced or uninduced with the AhR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD). All the signature metabolites were detected and successfully quantitated. Our results suggest that all three metabolic pathways contribute equally in the overall

  11. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  12. Crustacean oxi-reductases protein sequences derived from a functional genomic project potentially involved in ecdysteroid hormones metabolism - a starting point for function examination.

    PubMed

    Tom, Moshe; Manfrin, Chiara; Giulianini, Piero G; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    A transcriptomic assembly originated from hypodermis and Y organ of the crustacean Pontastacus leptodactylus is used here for in silico characterization of oxi-reductase enzymes potentially involved in the metabolism of ecdysteroid molting hormones. RNA samples were extracted from male Y organ and its neighboring hypodermis in all stages of the molt cycle. An equimolar RNA mix from all stages was sequenced using next generation sequencing technologies and de novo assembled, resulting with 74,877 unique contigs. These transcript sequences were annotated by examining their resemblance to all GenBank translated transcripts, determining their Gene Ontology terms and their characterizing domains. Based on the present knowledge of arthropod ecdysteroid metabolism and more generally on steroid metabolism in other taxa, transcripts potentially related to ecdysteroid metabolism were identified and their longest possible conceptual protein sequences were constructed in two stages, correct reading frame was deduced from BLASTX resemblances, followed by elongation of the protein sequence by identifying the correct translation frame of the original transcript. The analyzed genes belonged to several oxi-reductase superfamilies including the Rieske non heme iron oxygenases, cytochrome P450s, short-chained hydroxysteroid oxi-reductases, aldo/keto oxireductases, lamin B receptor/sterol reductases and glucose-methanol-cholin oxi-reductatses. A total of 68 proteins were characterized and the most probable participants in the ecdysteroid metabolism where indicated. The study provides transcript and protein structural information, a starting point for further functional studies, using a variety of gene-specific methods to demonstrate or disprove the roles of these proteins in relation to ecdysteroid metabolism in P. leptodactylus. PMID:24055302

  13. Proteasome inhibitors MG-132 and bortezomib induce AKR1C1, AKR1C3, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in human colon cancer cell lines SW-480 and HT-29.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Wsól, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play central roles in the reductive metabolism of endogenous signaling molecules and in the detoxification of xenobiotics. AKRC1-1C3, AKR1B1 and AKR1B10 have been shown to be regulated via nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that is activated upon oxidative stress. Proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and MG-132 produce mild oxidative stress that activates Nrf2-mediated gene expression that in turn may have cytoprotective effects. Bortezomib is clinically approved to treat haematological malignancies and it has also proven activity in solid tumors such as colon cancer. The present study investigated the effect of bortezomib and MG-132 on the expression of AKR1C1-1C4, AKR1B1, and AKR1B10 in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and SW-480. Human cancer cell lines derived from different organs (lung, colon, pancreas, skin, liver, ovary) were initially assayed for the expression of the AKRs, showing a very unequal distribution. Even among the colon cell lines HT-29, Caco-2, HCT116 and SW-480, the AKRs were expressed quite non-uniformly. HT-29 cells expressed all AKRs on the mRNA level including liver-specific AKR1C4, but AKR1B1 was almost undetectable. In SW-480 cells, treatment with bortezomib (50 nM, 48 h) dramatically increased mRNA levels of AKR1B10 (32-fold), AKR1B1 (5.5-fold), and, to a lesser extent, AKR1C1 and AKR1C3. Drug-efflux transporter MRP2 (ABCC2) and Cox-2 were induced as well. AKR1C2 mRNA was down-regulated in SW-480 but induced in HT-29 cells. MG-132 increased mRNA amounts of AKR1C1, 1C3, 1B1, and 1B10 in a concentration-dependent manner. AKR1B10 and AKR1B1 protein expression was inducible by bortezomib in HT-29 cells, but not detectable in SW-480 cells. In conclusion, treatment with proteasome inhibitors increased the expression of several AKRs as well as of MRP2. It remains to be investigated whether this enzyme induction may contribute to enhanced cell survival and thereby supporting the

  14. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin - A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance.

    PubMed

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC50- and Ki-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. PMID:26773812

  15. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J; Gathercole, Laura L; Tomlinson, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  17. 5α-Reductase Type 2 Regulates Glucocorticoid Action and Metabolic Phenotype in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Maryam; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Parajes, Silvia; Krone, Nils P.; Valsamakis, George; Mastorakos, George; Hughes, Beverly; Taylor, Angela; Bujalska, Iwona J.; Gathercole, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and androgens have both been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); androgen deficiency in males, androgen excess in females, and glucocorticoid excess in both sexes are associated with NAFLD. Glucocorticoid and androgen action are regulated at a prereceptor level by the enzyme 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2), which inactivates glucocorticoids to their dihydrometabolites and converts T to DHT. We have therefore explored the role of androgens and glucocorticoids and their metabolism by SRD5A2 upon lipid homeostasis in human hepatocytes. In both primary human hepatocytes and human hepatoma cell lines, glucocorticoids decreased de novo lipogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas androgen treatment (T and DHT) increased lipogenesis in cell lines and in primary cultures of human hepatocytes from female donors, it was without effect in primary hepatocyte cultures from men. SRD5A2 overexpression reduced the effects of cortisol to suppress lipogenesis and this effect was lost following transfection with an inactive mutant construct. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition using the 5α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride augmented cortisol action. We have demonstrated that manipulation of SRD5A2 activity can regulate lipogenesis in human hepatocytes in vitro. This may have significant clinical implications for those patients prescribed 5α-reductase inhibitors, in particular augmenting the actions of glucocorticoids to modulate hepatic lipid flux. PMID:25974403

  18. Cloning, Overexpression, and Mutagenesis of the Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AKU4429 Gene Encoding a New Aldehyde Reductase, Which Catalyzes the Stereoselective Reduction of Ethyl 4-Chloro-3-Oxobutanoate to Ethyl (S)-4-Chloro-3-Hydroxybutanoate

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Keiko; Fukura, Takanobu; Nakase, Koh-Ichi; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi; Kataoka, Michihiko; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1999-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the gene encoding an NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase (ARII) in Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AKU4429, which reduces ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (4-COBE) to ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate. The ARII gene is 1,032 bp long, is interrupted by four introns, and encodes a 37,315-Da polypeptide. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited significant levels of similarity to the amino acid sequences of members of the mammalian 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase–plant dihydroflavonol 4-reductase superfamily but not to the amino acid sequences of members of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily or to the amino acid sequence of an aldehyde reductase previously isolated from the same organism (K. Kita, K. Matsuzaki, T. Hashimoto, H. Yanase, N. Kato, M. C.-M. Chung, M. Kataoka, and S. Shimizu, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 62:2303–2310, 1996). The ARII protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli about 2,000-fold compared to the production in the original yeast cells. The enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified to homogeneity and had the same catalytic properties as ARII purified from S. salmonicolor. To examine the contribution of the dinucleotide-binding motif G19-X-X-G22-X-X-A25, which is located in the N-terminal region, during ARII catalysis, we replaced three amino acid residues in the motif and purified the resulting mutant enzymes. Substrate inhibition of the G19→A and G22→A mutant enzymes by 4-COBE did not occur. The A25→G mutant enzyme could reduce 4-COBE when NADPH was replaced by an equimolar concentration of NADH. PMID:10583966

  19. Cloning, overexpression, and mutagenesis of the Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AKU4429 gene encoding a new aldehyde reductase, which catalyzes the stereoselective reduction of ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate to ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Keiko; Fukura, Takanobu; Nakase, Kohichi; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi; Kataoka, Michihiko; Shimizu, Sakayu

    1999-12-01

    The authors cloned and sequenced the gene encoding and NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase (ARII) in Sporobolomyces salmonicolor AKU4429, which reduces ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (4-COBE) to ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate. The ARII gene is 1,032 bp long, is interrupted by four introns, and encodes a 37,315-Da polypeptide. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited significant levels of similarity to the amino acid sequences of members of the mammalian 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-plant dihydroglavonol 4-reductase superfamily but not to the amino acid sequences of members of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily or to the amino acid sequence of an aldehyde reductase previously isolated from the same organism. The ARII protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli about 2,000-fold compared to the production in the original y east cells. The enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified to homogeneity and had the same catalytic properties as ARII purified from S. Salmonicolor. To examine the contribution of the dinucleotide-binding motif G{sub 19}-X-X-G{sub 22}-X-X-A{sub 25}, which is located in the N-terminal region, during ARII catalysis, they replaced three amino acid residues in the motif and purified the resulting mutant enzymes. Substrate inhibition of the G{sub 19}{r{underscore}arrow}A and G{sub 22}{r{underscore}arrow}A mutant enzymes by 4-COBE die not occur. The A{sub 25}{r{underscore}arrow}G mutant enzyme could reduce 4-COBE when NADPH was replaced by an equimolar concentration of NADH.

  20. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbery, S.P.; Iqbal, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahdrofolate:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of (/sup 3/H)methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme.

  1. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, S P; Iqbal, M P

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of [3H]methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme. Images PMID:6952216

  2. Human monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) reductase is a member of the glutathione-S-transferase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zakharyan, R A; Sampayo-Reyes, A; Healy, S M; Tsaprailis, G; Board, P G; Liebler, D C; Aposhian, H V

    2001-08-01

    The drinking of water containing large amounts of inorganic arsenic is a worldwide major public health problem because of arsenic carcinogenicity. Yet an understanding of the specific mechanism(s) of inorganic arsenic toxicity has been elusive. We have now partially purified the rate-limiting enzyme of inorganic arsenic metabolism, human liver MMA(V) reductase, using ion exchange, molecular exclusion, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. When SDS-beta-mercaptoethanol-PAGE was performed on the most purified fraction, seven protein bands were obtained. Each band was excised from the gel, sequenced by LC-MS/MS and identified according to the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL Protein Sequence databases. Human liver MMA(V) reductase is 100% identical, over 92% of sequence that we analyzed, with the recently discovered human glutathione-S-transferase Omega class hGSTO 1-1. Recombinant human GSTO1-1 had MMA(V) reductase activity with K(m) and V(max) values comparable to those of human liver MMA(V) reductase. The partially purified human liver MMA(V) reductase had glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. MMA(V) reductase activity was competitively inhibited by the GST substrate, 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene and also by the GST inhibitor, deoxycholate. Western blot analysis of the most purified human liver MMA(V) reductase showed one band when probed with hGSTO1-1 antiserum. We propose that MMA(V) reductase and hGSTO 1-1 are identical proteins. PMID:11511179

  3. Insights into the redox cycle of human quinone reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Reybier, Karine; Perio, Pierre; Ferry, Gilles; Bouajila, Jalloul; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A; Nepveu, Françoise

    2011-10-01

    NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (QR2) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of quinones, such as menadione and co-enzymes Q. With the aim of understanding better the mechanisms of action of QR2, we approached this enzyme catalysis via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the by-products of the QR2 redox cycle. The variation in the production of oxidative species such as H(2)O(2), and subsequent hydroxyl radical generation, was measured during the course of QR2 activity under aerobic conditions and using pure human enzyme. The effects on the activity of the following were compared: (i) synthetic (N-benzyldihydronicotinamide, BNAH) or natural (nicotinamide riboside, NRH) co-substrates; (ii) synthetic (menadione) or natural (co-enzyme Q0, Q2) substrates; (iii) QR2 modulators and inhibitors (melatonin, resveratrol and S29434); (iv) a pro-drug activated via a redox cycle [CB1954, 5-(aziridin-1-yl)-2,4-dinitrobenzamide]. The results were also compared with those obtained with human QR1. The production of hydroxyl radicals is: (i) observed whatever the substrate/co-substrate used; ii) quenched by adding catalase; (iii) not observed with the specific QR2 inhibitor S29434; (iv) observed with the pro-drug CB1954. While QR2 produced free radicals with this pro-drug, QR1 gave no EPR signal showing the strong reducing capacity of QR2. In conclusion, EPR analysis of QR2 enzyme activity through free radical production enables modulators and effective inhibitors to be distinguished. PMID:21762045

  4. Pharmacokinetic interactions of breast cancer chemotherapeutics with human doxorubicin reductases.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Skarka, Adam; Havrankova, Jana; Wsol, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DTX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CYC) or tamoxifen (TMX) are combined with doxorubicin (DOX) in first-line chemotherapy regimens that are indicated for breast cancer patients. Although the efficacies of these drugs in combination treatments have been demonstrated in clinical practice, their possible interference with DOX metabolism has not been described in detail to date. In the present study, we investigated the possible interactions of human carbonyl reducing enzymes with 5-FU, PTX, DTX, CYC and TMX. First, the reducing activities of carbonyl reducing enzymes toward DOX were tested using incubations with purified recombinant enzymes. In the subsequent studies, we investigated the possible effects of the tested anticancer agents on the DOX-reducing activities of the most potent enzymes (AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1) and on the DOX metabolism driven by MCF7, HepG2 and human liver cytosols. In both of these assays, we observed that CYC and its active metabolites inhibited DOX metabolism. In the final study, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1 expression levels following exposure to the tested cytostatics in MCF7 and HepG2 cells. Consequently, no significant changes in the expression levels of tested enzymes were detected in either cell line. Based on these findings, it is feasible to presume that inhibition rather than induction plays a role in the interactions of the tested anticancer agents with DOX-reducing enzymes. In conclusion, our results describe important molecular events that occur during combination breast cancer therapies and might modulate pharmacokinetic DOX resistance and/or behaviour. PMID:25986883

  5. Identification of the reactive cysteine residue (Cys227) in human carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Tinguely, J N; Wermuth, B

    1999-02-01

    Carbonyl reductase is highly susceptible to inactivation by organomercurials suggesting the presence of a reactive cysteine residue in, or close to, the active site. This residue is also close to a site which binds glutathione. Structurally, carbonyl reductase belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family and contains five cysteine residues, none of which is conserved within the family. In order to identify the reactive residue and investigate its possible role in glutathione binding, alanine was substituted for each cysteine residue of human carbonyl reductase by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Four of the five mutants (C26A, C122A C150A and C226A) exhibited wild-type-like enzyme activity, although K(m) values of C226A for three structurally different substrates were increased threefold to 10-fold. The fifth mutant, C227A, showed a 10-15-fold decrease in kcat and a threefold to 40-fold increase in K(m), resulting in a 30-500-fold drop in kcat/K(m). NaCl (300 mM) increased the activity of C227A 16-fold, whereas the activity of the wild-type enzyme was only doubled. Substitution of serine rather than alanine for Cys227 similarly affected the kinetic constants with the exception that NaCl did not activate the enzyme. Both C227A and C227S mutants were insensitive to inactivation by 4-hydroxymercuribenzoate. Unlike the parent carbonyl compounds, the glutathione adducts of menadione and prostaglandin A1 were better substrates for the C227A and C227S mutants than the wild-type enzyme. Conversely, the binding of free glutathione to both mutants was reduced. Our findings indicate that Cys227 is the reactive residue and suggest that it is involved in the binding of both substrate and glutathione. PMID:10091578

  6. Adventitious Arsenate Reductase Activity of the Catalytic Domain of the Human Cdc25B and Cdc25C Phosphatases†

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Sheng, Ju; Ajees, A. Abdul; Mukhopadhyay, Rita; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    A number of eukaryotic enzymes that function as arsenate reductases are homologues of the catalytic domain of the human Cdc25 phosphatase. For example, the Leishmania major enzyme LmACR2 is both a phosphatase and an arsenate reductase, and its structure bears similarity to the structure of the catalytic domain of human Cdc25 phosphatase. These reductases contain an active site C-X5-R signature motif, where C is the catalytic cysteine, the five X residues form a phosphate binding loop, and R is a highly conserved arginine, which is also present in human Cdc25 phosphatases. We therefore investigated the possibility that the three human Cdc25 isoforms might have adventitious arsenate reductase activity. The sequences for the catalytic domains of Cdc25A, -B, and -C were cloned individually into a prokaryotic expression vector, and their gene products were purified from a bacterial host using nickel affinity chromatography. While each of the three Cdc25 catalytic domains exhibited phosphatase activity, arsenate reductase activity was observed only with Cdc25B and -C. These two enzymes reduced inorganic arsenate but not methylated pentavalent arsenicals. Alteration of either the cysteine and arginine residues of the Cys-X5-Arg motif led to the loss of both reductase and phosphatase activities. Our observations suggest that Cdc25B and -C may adventitiously reduce arsenate to the more toxic arsenite and may also provide a framework for identifying other human protein tyrosine phosphatases containing the active site Cys-X5-Arg loop that might moonlight as arsenate reductases. PMID:20025242

  7. DT-diaphorase and cytochrome B5 reductase in human lung and breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Marín, A.; López de Cerain, A.; Hamilton, E.; Lewis, A. D.; Martinez-Peñuela, J. M.; Idoate, M. A.; Bello, J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of expression of enzymes that can activate or detoxify bioreductive agents within tumours has emerged as an important feature in the development of these anti-tumour compounds. The levels of two such reductase enzymes have been determined in 19 human non-small-cell lung tumours and 20 human breast tumours, together with the corresponding normal tissue. DT-diaphorase (DTD) enzyme levels (both expression and activity) were determined in these samples. Cytochrome b5 reductase (Cytb5R) activity was also assessed. With the exception of six patients, the levels of DTD activity were below 45 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) in the normal tissues assayed. DTD tumour activity was extremely variable, distinguishing two different groups of patients, one with DTD activity above 79 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) and the other with levels that were in the same range as found for the normal tissues. In 53% of the lung tumour samples, DTD activity was increased with respect to the normal tissue by a factor of 2.4-90.3 (range 79-965 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). In 70% of the breast tumour samples, DTD activity was over 80 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) (range 83-267 nmol min[-1] mg[-1]). DTD expression measured by Western blot correlated well with the enzyme activity measured in both tumour and normal tissues. The levels of the other reductase enzyme, Cytb5R, were not as variable as those for DTD, being in the same range in both tumour and normal tissue or slightly higher in the normal tissues. The heterogeneous nature of DTD activity and expression reinforces the need to measure enzyme levels in individual patients before therapy with DTD-activated bioreductive drugs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9328153

  8. Malaria antifolate resistance with contrasting Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) polymorphisms in humans and Anopheles mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Mharakurwa, Sungano; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa A. P.; Musapa, Mulenga; Chishimba, Sandra; Shiff, Clive J.; Sullivan, David J.; Thuma, Philip E.; Liu, Kun; Agre, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance for drug-resistant parasites in human blood is a major effort in malaria control. Here we report contrasting antifolate resistance polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum when parasites in human blood were compared with parasites in Anopheles vector mosquitoes from sleeping huts in rural Zambia. DNA encoding P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (EC 1.5.1.3) was amplified by PCR with allele-specific restriction enzyme digestions. Markedly prevalent pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were evident in human P. falciparum infections—S108N (>90%), with N51I, C59R, and 108N+51I+59R triple mutants (30–80%). This resistance level may be from selection pressure due to decades of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use in the region. In contrast, cycloguanil-resistant mutants were detected in very low frequency in parasites from human blood samples—S108T (13%), with A16V and 108T+16V double mutants (∼4%). Surprisingly, pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were of very low prevalence (2–12%) in the midguts of Anopheles arabiensis vector mosquitoes, but cycloguanil-resistant mutants were highly prevalent—S108T (90%), with A16V and the 108T+16V double mutant (49–57%). Structural analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase by in silico modeling revealed a key difference in the enzyme within the NADPH binding pocket, predicting the S108N enzyme to have reduced stability but the S108T enzyme to have increased stability. We conclude that P. falciparum can bear highly host-specific drug-resistant polymorphisms, most likely reflecting different selective pressures found in humans and mosquitoes. Thus, it may be useful to sample both human and mosquito vector infections to accurately ascertain the epidemiological status of drug-resistant alleles. PMID:22065788

  9. Malaria antifolate resistance with contrasting Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) polymorphisms in humans and Anopheles mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Mharakurwa, Sungano; Kumwenda, Taida; Mkulama, Mtawa A P; Musapa, Mulenga; Chishimba, Sandra; Shiff, Clive J; Sullivan, David J; Thuma, Philip E; Liu, Kun; Agre, Peter

    2011-11-15

    Surveillance for drug-resistant parasites in human blood is a major effort in malaria control. Here we report contrasting antifolate resistance polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum when parasites in human blood were compared with parasites in Anopheles vector mosquitoes from sleeping huts in rural Zambia. DNA encoding P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (EC 1.5.1.3) was amplified by PCR with allele-specific restriction enzyme digestions. Markedly prevalent pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were evident in human P. falciparum infections--S108N (>90%), with N51I, C59R, and 108N+51I+59R triple mutants (30-80%). This resistance level may be from selection pressure due to decades of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use in the region. In contrast, cycloguanil-resistant mutants were detected in very low frequency in parasites from human blood samples-S108T (13%), with A16V and 108T+16V double mutants (∼4%). Surprisingly, pyrimethamine-resistant mutants were of very low prevalence (2-12%) in the midguts of Anopheles arabiensis vector mosquitoes, but cycloguanil-resistant mutants were highly prevalent-S108T (90%), with A16V and the 108T+16V double mutant (49-57%). Structural analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase by in silico modeling revealed a key difference in the enzyme within the NADPH binding pocket, predicting the S108N enzyme to have reduced stability but the S108T enzyme to have increased stability. We conclude that P. falciparum can bear highly host-specific drug-resistant polymorphisms, most likely reflecting different selective pressures found in humans and mosquitoes. Thus, it may be useful to sample both human and mosquito vector infections to accurately ascertain the epidemiological status of drug-resistant alleles. PMID:22065788

  10. Effects of some analgesic anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Murat; Irfan Kufrevioglu, O; Ciftci, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    Inhibitory effects of some analgesic and anaesthetic drugs on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase were investigated. For this purpose, human erythrocyte glutathione reductase was initially purified 2139-fold in a yield of 29% by using 2', 5'-ADP Sepharose 4B affinity gel and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the purity of the enzyme by sharing a single band. A constant temperature (+4 degrees C) was maintained during the purification process. Diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam, etomidate, morphine and propofol exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme in vitro using the Beutler assay method. K(i) constants and IC(50) values for drugs were determined from Lineweaver-Burk graphs and plotting activity % versus [I] graphs, respectively. The IC(50) values of diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, propofol, tenoxicam, etomidate and morphine were 7.265, 6.278, 0.3, 0.242, 0.082, 0.0523 and 0.0128 mM and the K(i) constants were 23.97 +/- 2.1, 22.14 +/- 7.6, 0.42 +/- 0.18, 0.418 +/- 0.056, 0.13 +/- 0.025, 0.0725 +/- 0.0029 and 0.0165 +/- 0.0013 mM, respectively. While diclofenac sodium, ketoprofen, lornoxicam, tenoxicam etomidate and morphine showed competitive inhibition, propofol displayed noncompetitive inhibition. PMID:18608753

  11. Human castration resistant prostate cancer rather prefer to decreased 5α-reductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Takeo; Miyajima, Akira; Nagata, Hirohiko; Maeda, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2013-01-01

    Physiologically relevant steroid 5α-reductase (SRD5A) activity that is essential for dihydrotestosterone (DHT) biosynthesis in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has not been fully characterized yet. In this study to ascertain the potential SRD5A activity, we cultured two human CRPC cell lines, C4-2 and C4-2AT6, with the steroid precursor: 13C-[2,3,4]-androstenedione (13C-Adione), and analyzed the sequential biosynthesis of 13C-[2,3,4]-testosterone (13C-T) and 13C-[2,3,4]-DHT (13C-DHT) by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The 13C-DHT/13C-T concentration ratio detected by LC/MS/MS in C4-2AT6 cells appeared to reflect the SRD5A activity. The ratio in C4-2AT6 was significantly lower than that in C4-2. An increased concentration of DHT did not have a positive effect on cell proliferation, rather it exhibited inhibitory effects. 5α-reductase inhibitors did not have any inhibitory effect at clinically achievable concentrations. These results indicate that CRPC cells may have an unknown regulation system to protect themselves from an androgenic suppressive effect mediated by SRD5A activity. PMID:23429215

  12. Key Residues Regulating the Reductase Activity of the Human Mitochondrial Apoptosis Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Raquel; Ferreira, Patricia; Marcuello, Carlos; Usón, Alejandro; Miramar, M Dolores; Peleato, M Luisa; Lostao, Anabel; Susin, Santos A; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-25

    The human Apoptosis Inducing Factor (hAIF) is a bifunctional NAD(P)H-dependent flavoreductase involved in both mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent cell death. Even though several studies indicate that both functions are redox controlled by NADH binding, the exact role of hAIF as a reductase in healthy mitochondria remains unknown. Upon reduction by NADH, hAIF dimerizes and produces very stable flavin/nicotinamide charge transfer complexes (CTC), by stacking of the oxidized nicotinamide moiety of the NAD(+) coenzyme against the re-face of the reduced flavin ring of its FAD cofactor. Such complexes are critical to restrict the hAIF efficiency as a reductase. The molecular basis of the hAIF reductase activity is here investigated by analyzing the role played by residues contributing to the interaction of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and of the nicotinamide moiety of NADH at the active site. Mutations at K177 and E314 produced drastic effects on the hAIF ability to retain the FAD cofactor, indicating that these residues are important to set up the holo-enzyme active site conformation. Characterization of P173G hAIF indicates that the stacking of P173 against the isoalloxazine ring is relevant to determine the flavin environment and to modulate the enzyme affinity for NADH. Finally, the properties of the F310G and H454S hAIF mutants indicate that these two positions contribute to form a compact active site essential for NADH binding, CTC stabilization, and NAD(+) affinity for the reduced state of hAIF. These features are key determinants of the particular behavior of hAIF as a NADH-dependent oxidoreductase. PMID:26237213

  13. Metabolism of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Abdelrahman, Doaa R.; Fokina, Valentina M.; Hankins, Gary D.V.; Ahmed, Mahmoud S.; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the biotransformation of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes, identify the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reaction(s) and determine its kinetics. Bupropion was metabolized by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes to hydroxybupropion (OH-BUP), threo- (TB) and erythrohydrobupropion (EB). OH-bupropion was the major metabolite formed by hepatic microsomes (Km 36 ± 6 µM, Vmax 258 ± 32 pmol mg protein−1 min−1), however the formation of OH-BUP by placental microsomes was below the limit of quantification. The apparent Km values of bupropion for the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes were similar. The selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 (ticlopidine and phencyclidine) and monoclonal antibodies raised against human CYP2B6 isozyme caused 80% inhibition of OH-BUP formation by baboon hepatic microsomes. The chemical inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases (flufenamic acid), carbonyl reductases (menadione), and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (18β-glycyrrhetinic acid) significantly decreased the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes. Data indicate that CYP2B of baboon hepatic microsomes is responsible for biotransformation of bupropion to OH-BUP, while hepatic and placental short chain dehydrogenases/reductases and to a lesser extent aldo-keto reductases are responsible for the reduction of bupropion to TB and EB. PMID:21570381

  14. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel erythrose reductase from Candida magnoliae JH110

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Erythrose reductase (ER) catalyzes the final step of erythritol production, which is reducing erythrose to erythritol using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. ER has gained interest because of its importance in the production of erythritol, which has extremely low digestibility and approved safety for diabetics. Although ERs were purified and characterized from microbial sources, the entire primary structure and the corresponding DNA for ER still remain unknown in most of erythritol-producing yeasts. Candida magnoliae JH110 isolated from honeycombs produces a significant amount of erythritol, suggesting the presence of erythrose metabolizing enzymes. Here we provide the genetic sequence and functional characteristics of a novel NADPH-dependent ER from C. magnoliae JH110. Results The gene encoding a novel ER was isolated from an osmophilic yeast C. magnoliae JH110. The ER gene composed of 849 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 31.4 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of ER showed a high degree of similarity to other members of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily including three ER isozymes from Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42. The intact coding region of ER from C. magnoliae JH110 was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli using a combined approach of gene fusion and molecular chaperone co-expression, and subsequently purified to homogeneity. The enzyme displayed a temperature and pH optimum at 42°C and 5.5, respectively. Among various aldoses, the C. magnoliae JH110 ER showed high specific activity for reduction of erythrose to the corresponding alcohol, erythritol. To explore the molecular basis of the catalysis of erythrose reduction with NADPH, homology structural modeling was performed. The result suggested that NADPH binding partners are completely conserved in the C. magnoliae JH110 ER. Furthermore, NADPH interacts with the side chains Lys252, Thr255, and Arg258, which could account for the enzyme

  15. Transcriptional regulation of human ferredoxin reductase through an intronic enhancer in steroidogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ju, Yunfeng; Matsumura, Takehiro; Kawabe, Shinya; Kanno, Masafumi; Yazawa, Takashi; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Ferredoxin reductase (FDXR, also known as adrenodoxin reductase) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein that transfers electrons from NADPH to mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzymes, mediating the function of an iron-sulfur cluster protein, ferredoxin. FDXR functions in various metabolic processes including steroidogenesis. It is well known that multiple steroidogenic enzymes are regulated by a transcription factor steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1, also known as Ad4BP). Previously, we have shown that SF-1 transduction causes human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into steroidogenic cells. Genome-wide analysis of differentiated cells, using a combination of DNA microarray and promoter tiling array analyses, showed that FDXR is a novel SF-1 target gene. In this study, the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of FDXR was examined in steroidogenic cells. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that a novel SF-1 binding region was located within intron 2 of the human FDXR gene. Luciferase reporter assays showed that FDXR transcription was activated through the novel SF-1 binding site within intron 2. Endogenous SF-1 knockdown in human adrenocortical H295R and KGN cells decreased FDXR expression. In H295R cells, strong binding of two histone markers of active enhancers, histones H3K27ac and H3K4me2, were detected near the SF-1 binding site within intron 2. Furthermore, the binding of these histone markers was decreased concurrent with SF-1 knockdown in H295R cells. These results indicated that abundant FDXR expression in these steroidogenic cells was maintained through SF-1 binding to the intronic enhancer of the FDXR gene. PMID:24321386

  16. Membrane composition influences the activity of in vitro refolded human vitamin K epoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Jaenecke, Frank; Friedrich-Epler, Beatrice; Parthier, Christoph; Stubbs, Milton T

    2015-10-27

    Human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR) is an integral membrane protein responsible for the maintenance of reduced vitamin K pools, a prerequisite for the action of γ-glutamyl carboxylase and hence for hemostasis. Here we describe the recombinant expression of hVKOR as an insoluble fusion protein in Escherichia coli, followed by purification and chemical cleavage under denaturing conditions. In vitro renaturation and reconstitution of purified solubilized hVKOR in phospholipids could be established to yield active protein. Crucially, the renatured enzyme is inhibited by the powerful coumarin anticoagulant warfarin, and we demonstrate that enzyme activity depends on lipid composition. The completely synthetic system for protein production allows a rational investigation of the multiple variables in membrane protein folding and paves the way for the provision of pure, active membrane protein for structural studies. PMID:26435421

  17. Altered aldose reductase gene regulation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, D N; Del Monte, M; Greene, D A; Killen, P D

    1993-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR2), a putative "hypertonicity stress protein" whose gene is induced by hyperosmolarity, protects renal medullary cells against the interstitial hyperosmolarity of antidiuresis by catalyzing the synthesis of millimolar concentrations of intracellular sorbitol from glucose. Although AR2 gene induction has been noted in a variety of renal and nonrenal cells subjected to hypertonic stress in vitro, the functional significance of AR2 gene expression in cells not normally exposed to a hyperosmolar milieu is not fully understood. The physiological impact of basal AR2 expression in such cells may be limited to hyperglycemic states in which AR2 promotes pathological polyol accumulation, a mechanism invoked in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Since AR2 overexpression in the retinal pigment epithelium has been associated with diabetic retinopathy, the regulation of AR2 gene expression and associated changes in sorbitol and myo-inositol were studied in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture. The relative abundance of aldehyde reductase (AR1) and AR2 mRNA was quantitated by filter hybridization of RNA from several human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines exposed to hyperglycemic and hyperosmolar conditions in vitro. AR2 but not AR1 mRNA was significantly increased some 11- to 18-fold by hyperosmolarity in several retinal pigment epithelial cell lines. A single cell line with a 15-fold higher basal level of AR2 mRNA than other cell lines tested demonstrated no significant increase in AR2 mRNA in response to hypertonic stress. This cell line demonstrated accelerated and exaggerated production of sorbitol and depletion of myo-inositol upon exposure to 20 mM glucose. Therefore, abnormal AR2 expression may enhance the sensitivity of cells to the biochemical consequences of hyperglycemia potentiating the development of diabetic complications. Images PMID:8349800

  18. Nitrite and nitrite reductases: from molecular mechanisms to significance in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    Castiglione, Nicoletta; Rinaldo, Serena; Giardina, Giorgio; Stelitano, Valentina; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2012-08-15

    Nitrite, previously considered physiologically irrelevant and a simple end product of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, is now envisaged as a reservoir of NO to be activated in response to oxygen (O(2)) depletion. In the first part of this review, we summarize and compare the mechanisms of nitrite-dependent production of NO in selected bacteria and in eukaryotes. Bacterial nitrite reductases, which are copper or heme-containing enzymes, play an important role in the adaptation of pathogens to O(2) limitation and enable microrganisms to survive in the human body. In mammals, reduction of nitrite to NO under hypoxic conditions is carried out in tissues and blood by an array of metalloproteins, including heme-containing proteins and molybdenum enzymes. In humans, tissues play a more important role in nitrite reduction, not only because most tissues produce more NO than blood, but also because deoxyhemoglobin efficiently scavenges NO in blood. In the second part of the review, we outline the significance of nitrite in human health and disease and describe the recent advances and pitfalls of nitrite-based therapy, with special attention to its application in cardiovascular disorders, inflammation, and anti-bacterial defence. It can be concluded that nitrite (as well as nitrate-rich diet for long-term applications) may hold promise as therapeutic agent in vascular dysfunction and ischemic injury, as well as an effective compound able to promote angiogenesis. PMID:22304560

  19. Establishment and characterization of two human cell lines with amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, P.; Kapp, L.N.; Painter, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Two SV40-transformed human cell lines, GM637, derived from a normal human subject, and GM5849, derived from a patient with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), were grown in increasing concentrations of the cytotoxic agent methotrexate (MTX). The GM637 line was naturally more resistant to methotrexate than was GM5849 and, over a 5-month period, became resistant even to very high concentrations (up to 100 ..mu..M). The GM5849 line became resistant to 500 nM methotrexate during the same period. However, dot blot and Southern blot analyses showed that both cell lines had amplified their dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) genes to about the same extent, approx. 50-fold. Using the GM5849 line with amplified dhrf, the authors attempted to determine if interruption of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea would cause DNA to be replicated twice within a single cell cycle, as has been reported for Chinese hamster ovary cells. No evidence for such a phenomenon was obtained.

  20. Association of C677T transition of the human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with male infertility.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Mohammad; Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh

    2016-04-01

    The human methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene encodes one of the key enzymes in folate metabolism. This gene is located on chromosome 1 (1p36.3), which has 12 exons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of the two (C677T and A1298C) polymorphisms of this gene with male infertility. In a case-control study, 250 blood samples were collected from IVF centres in Sari and Babol (Iran): 118 samples were from oligospermic men and 132 were from controls. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR genotype were detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. There was no association found between the A1298C variant and male infertility. However, carriers of the 677T allele (CT and TT genotypes) were at a higher risk of infertility than individuals with other genotypes (odds ratio 1.84; 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.04; P=0.0174). Structural analysis of human MTHFR flavoprotein showed that C677T transition played an important role in the change in affinity of the MTHFR-Flavin adenine dinucleotide binding site. Based on our results, we suggest that C677T transition in MTHFR may increase the risk of male infertility, and detection of the C677T polymorphism biomarker may be helpful in the screening of idiopathic male infertility. PMID:25412139

  1. The silkworm mutant lemon (lemon lethal) is a potential insect model for human sepiapterin reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Katsuma, Susumu; Daimon, Takaaki; Banno, Yutaka; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2009-04-24

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for aromatic acid hydroxylases, which control the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. BH4 deficiency has been associated with many neuropsychological disorders. An inherited defect in BH4 biosynthesis is caused by the deficiency of sepiapterin reductase (SPR), which catalyzes the biosynthesis of BH4 from guanosine triphosphate at the terminal step. The human SPR gene has been mapped at the PARK3 locus, which is related to the onset of Parkinson disease. In this study, we report that mutant strains, lemon (lem) and its lethal allele lemon lethal (lem(1)) with yellow body coloration, of the silkworm Bombyx mori could be used as the first insect model for human SPR deficiency diseases. We demonstrated that mutations in the SPR gene (BmSpr) were responsible for the irregular body coloration of lem and lem(l). Moreover, biochemical analysis revealed that SPR activity in lem(l) larvae was almost completely diminished, resulting in a lethal phenotype that the larvae cannot feed and that die immediately after the first ecdysis. Oral administration of BH4 and dopamine to lem(l) larvae effectively increased their survival rates and feeding abilities. Our data demonstrate that BmSPR plays a crucial role in the generation of BH4, and monoamine neurotransmitters in silkworms and the lem (lem(l)) mutant strains will be an invaluable resource to address many questions regarding SPR and BH4 deficiencies. PMID:19246455

  2. Differential thioredoxin reductase activity from human normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haeng-Im; Lim, Hye-Won; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2004-04-30

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), a component of the thioredoxin system, including thioredoxin (Trx) and NADPH, catalyzes the transfer of electrons from NADPH to Trx, acts as a reductant of disulfide-containing proteins and participates in the defense system against oxidative stresses. In this study, the regulation pattern of TrxR in the presence of various stressful reagents was compared between Chang (human normal hepatic cell) and HepG2 (human hepatoma cell) cell lines. Aluminum chloride (0.5 mM) and zinc chloride (0.5 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the Chang cell line to a higher degree than in the HepG2 cell line, but cupric chloride (0.2 mM) and cadmium chloride (0.1 mM) enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line to a greater degree. The TrxR activities in both Chang and HepG2 cell lines were similarly induced by treatment with sodium selenite (0.02 mM) and menadione (0.5 and 1.0 mM). Lipopolysaccharide (2 micro g/m1) increased the TrxR activity upto 4.02- and 2.2-fold in the Chang and HepG2 cell lines, respectively, in time-dependent manners. Hydrogen peroxide (5 mM) markedly enhanced the TrxR activity in the HepG2 cell line, but not in the Chang cell line. NO-generating sodium nitroprusside (3.0 and 6.0 mM) induced TrxR activities in both human liver cell lines. The TrxR activity was also induced in human liver cells under limited growth conditions by serum deprivation. These results imply that the TrxR activities in normal hepatic and hepatoma cell lines are subject to different regulatory responses to various stresses. PMID:15118998

  3. Human biliverdin reductase, a previously unknown activator of protein kinase C betaII.

    PubMed

    Maines, Mahin D; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Gibbs, Peter E M

    2007-03-16

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), a dual specificity kinase (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is, as protein kinase C (PKC) betaII, activated by insulin and free radicals (Miralem, T., Hu, Z., Torno, M. D., Lelli, K. M., and Maines, M. D. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 17084-17092; Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Shen, J., Torno, M. D., Kravets, A., Hu, Z., and Maines, M. D. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 7109-7114). Here, by using 293A cells co-transfected with pcDNA3-hBVR and PKC betaII plasmids, we report the co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins and co-purification in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay. hBVR and PKC betaII, but not the reductase and PKC zeta, transphosphorylated in assay systems supportive of activity of only one of the kinases. PKC betaII K371R mutant protein ("kinase-dead") was also a substrate for hBVR. The reductase increased the Vmax but not the apparent Km values of PKC betaII for myelin basic protein; activation was independent of phospholipids and extended to the phosphorylation of S2, a PKC-specific substrate. The increase in substrate phosphorylation was blocked by specific inhibitors of conventional PKCs and attenuated by sihBVR. The effect of the latter could be rescued by subsequent overexpression of hBVR. To a large extent, the activation was a function of the hBVR N-terminal chain of valines and intact ATP-binding site and the cysteine-rich C-terminal segment. The cobalt protoporphyrin-activated hBVR phosphorylated a threonine in a peptide corresponding to the Thr500 in the human PKC betaII activation loop. Neither serine nor threonine residues in peptides corresponding to other phosphorylation sites of the PKC betaII nor PKC zeta activation loop-derived peptides were substrates. The phosphorylation of Thr500 was confirmed by immunoblotting of hBVR.PKC betaII immunocomplex. The potential biological relevance of the hBVR activation of PKC betaII was suggested by the finding that in cells transfected with the PKC betaII, h

  4. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  5. A fluorimetric readout reporting the kinetics of nucleotide-induced human ribonucleotide reductase oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hong-Yu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2014-11-24

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typically trigger α-dimerization. Currently, both knowledge of and tools to interrogate the oligomeric assembly pathway of RNR in any species in real time are lacking. We therefore developed a fluorimetric assay that reliably reports on oligomeric state changes of α with high sensitivity. The oligomerization-directed fluorescence quenching of hRNR-α, covalently labeled with two fluorophores, allows for direct readout of hRNR dimeric and hexameric states. We applied the newly developed platform to reveal the timescales of α self-assembly, driven by the feedback regulator dATP. This information is currently unavailable, despite the pharmaceutical relevance of hRNR oligomeric regulation. PMID:25256246

  6. Glucose and collagen regulate human platelet activity through aldose reductase induction of thromboxane

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Ho; Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott; Di Febbo, Concetta; Porreca, Ettore; Fava, Cristiano; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta; Evangelista, Virgilio; Levantesi, Giacomo; Wen, Li; Martin, Kathleen; Minuz, Pietro; Rade, Jeffrey; Patrignani, Paola; Hwa, John

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This is coupled with enhanced levels of thromboxane (TX), an eicosanoid that facilitates platelet aggregation. Although intensely studied, the mechanism underlying the relationship among hyperglycemia, TX generation, and platelet hyperactivity remains unclear. We sought to identify key signaling components that connect high levels of glucose to TX generation and to examine their clinical relevance. In human platelets, aldose reductase synergistically modulated platelet response to both hyperglycemia and collagen exposure through a pathway involving ROS/PLCγ2/PKC/p38α MAPK. In clinical patients with platelet activation (deep vein thrombosis; saphenous vein graft occlusion after coronary bypass surgery), and particularly those with diabetes, urinary levels of a major enzymatic metabolite of TX (11-dehydro-TXB2 [TX-M]) were substantially increased. Elevated TX-M persisted in diabetic patients taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), suggesting that such patients may have underlying endothelial damage, collagen exposure, and thrombovascular disease. Thus, our study has identified multiple potential signaling targets for designing combination chemotherapies that could inhibit the synergistic activation of platelets by hyperglycemia and collagen exposure. PMID:22005299

  7. Glucose and collagen regulate human platelet activity through aldose reductase induction of thromboxane.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Stitham, Jeremiah; Gleim, Scott; Di Febbo, Concetta; Porreca, Ettore; Fava, Cristiano; Tacconelli, Stefania; Capone, Marta; Evangelista, Virgilio; Levantesi, Giacomo; Wen, Li; Martin, Kathleen; Minuz, Pietro; Rade, Jeffrey; Patrignani, Paola; Hwa, John

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which leads to increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. This is coupled with enhanced levels of thromboxane (TX), an eicosanoid that facilitates platelet aggregation. Although intensely studied, the mechanism underlying the relationship among hyperglycemia, TX generation, and platelet hyperactivity remains unclear. We sought to identify key signaling components that connect high levels of glucose to TX generation and to examine their clinical relevance. In human platelets, aldose reductase synergistically modulated platelet response to both hyperglycemia and collagen exposure through a pathway involving ROS/PLCγ2/PKC/p38α MAPK. In clinical patients with platelet activation (deep vein thrombosis; saphenous vein graft occlusion after coronary bypass surgery), and particularly those with diabetes, urinary levels of a major enzymatic metabolite of TX (11-dehydro-TXB2 [TX-M]) were substantially increased. Elevated TX-M persisted in diabetic patients taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), suggesting that such patients may have underlying endothelial damage, collagen exposure, and thrombovascular disease. Thus, our study has identified multiple potential signaling targets for designing combination chemotherapies that could inhibit the synergistic activation of platelets by hyperglycemia and collagen exposure. PMID:22005299

  8. Thioredoxin reductase 1 upregulates MCP-1 release in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Bo; Shen, Xun

    2009-09-04

    To know if thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) plays a role in antioxidant defense mechanisms against atherosclerosis, effect of TrxR1 on expression/release of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) was investigated in activated human endothelial-like EAhy926 cells. The MCP-1 release and expression, cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B subunit p65 were assayed in cells either overexpressing recombinant TrxR1 or having their endogenous TrxR1 knocked down. It was found that overexpression of TrxR1 enhanced, while knockdown of TrxR1 reduced MCP-1 release and expression. Upregulation of MCP-1 by TrxR1 was associated with increasing generation of intracellular ROS generation, enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. Assay using NF-{kappa}B reporter revealed that TrxR1 upregulated transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. This study suggests that TrxR1 enhances ROS generation, NF-{kappa}B activity and subsequent MCP-1 expression in endothelial cells, and may promote rather than prevent vascular endothelium from forming atherosclerotic plaque.

  9. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  10. Structural Basis for Allosteric Regulation of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase by Nucleotide-induced Oligomerization

    SciTech Connect

    J Fairman; S Wijerathna; M Ahmad; H Xu; R nakano; S jha; J Prendergast; R Welin; S Flodin; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an {alpha}{sub n}{beta}{sub n} (RR1-RR2) complex that maintains balanced dNTP pools by reducing NDPs to dNDPs. RR1 is the catalytic subunit, and RR2 houses the free radical required for catalysis. RR is allosterically regulated by its activator ATP and its inhibitor dATP, which regulate RR activity by inducing oligomerization of RR1. Here, we report the first X-ray structures of human RR1 bound to TTP alone, dATP alone, TTP-GDP, TTP-ATP, and TTP-dATP. These structures provide insights into regulation of RR by ATP or dATP. At physiological dATP concentrations, RR1 forms inactive hexamers. We determined the first X-ray structure of the RR1-dATP hexamer and used single-particle electron microscopy to visualize the {alpha}{sub 6}-{beta}{beta}'-dATP holocomplex. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays confirm that hexamerization is a prerequisite for inhibition by dATP. Our data indicate a mechanism for regulating RR activity by dATP-induced oligomerization.

  11. Molecular interaction of ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase from human malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Saitoh, Takashi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Horii, Toshihiro; Hase, Toshiharu

    2007-12-01

    The malaria parasite possesses plant-type ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) in a plastid-derived organelle called the apicoplast. This Fd/FNR redox system, which potentially provides reducing power for essential biosynthetic pathways in the apicoplast, has been proposed as a target for the development of specific new anti-malarial agents. We studied the molecular interaction of Fd and FNR of human malaria parasite (Plasmodium falciparum), which were produced as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis mapped the location of the possible FNR interaction sites on the surface of P. falciparum Fd. Site-specific mutation of acidic Fd residues in these regions and the resulting analyses of electron transfer activity and affinity chromatography of those mutants revealed that two acidic regions (a region including Asp26, Glu29 and Glu34, and the other including Asp65 and Glu66) dominantly contribute to the electrostatic interaction with P. falciparum FNR. The combination of Asp26/Glu29/Glu34 conferred a larger contribution than that of Asp65/Glu66, and among Asp26, Glu29 and Glu34, Glu29 was shown to be the most important residue for the interaction with P. falciparum FNR. These findings provide the basis for understanding molecular recognition between Fd and FNR of the malaria parasite. PMID:17938142

  12. Determination of triapine, a ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Kunos, Charles A; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Triapine is an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). Studies have shown that triapine significantly decreases the activity of RNR and enhanced the radiation-mediated cytotoxicity in cervical and colon cancer. In this work, we have developed and validated a selective and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the determination of triapine in human plasma. In this method, 2-[(3-fluoro-2-pyridinyl)methylene] hydrazinecarbothioamide (NSC 266749) was used as the internal standard (IS); plasma samples were prepared by deproteinization with acetonitrile; tripaine and the IS were separated on a Waters Xbridge Shield RP18 column (3.5 µm; 2.1 × 50 mm) using a mobile phase containing 25.0% methanol and 75.0% ammonium bicarbonate buffer (10.0 mM, pH 8.50; v/v); column eluate was monitored by positive turbo-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry; and quantitation of triapine was carried out in multiple-reaction-monitoring mode. The method developed had a linear calibration range of 0.250-50.0 ng/mL with correlation coefficient of 0.999 for triapine in human plasma. The IS-normalized recovery and the IS-normalized matrix factor of triapine were 101-104% and 0.89-1.05, respectively. The accuracy expressed as percentage error and precision expressed as coefficient of variation were ≤±6 and ≤8%, respectively. The validated LC-MS/MS method was applied to the measurement of triapine in patient samples from a phase I clinical trial. PMID:25677991

  13. Carbonyl reduction of warfarin: Identification and characterization of human warfarin reductases.

    PubMed

    Malátková, Petra; Sokolová, Simona; Chocholoušová Havlíková, Lucie; Wsól, Vladimír

    2016-06-01

    Warfarin is a widely used anticoagulant and, unfortunately, is a drug that is commonly implicated in serious adverse events including fatalities. Although several factors, including the metabolism of warfarin via CYP450, have been reported to affect the safety and efficacy of warfarin therapy, the wide variance in the warfarin dosage in patients has not been completely clarified. In addition to the oxidative metabolism of warfarin mediated by CYP450, reductive metabolism is involved in warfarin biotransformation. However, the reductive metabolism of warfarin has been largely unexplored and deserves further investigation. We studied warfarin reduction by human liver fractions and found a 9-fold higher velocity of warfarin reduction in the cytosol than in microsomes (Vmax=77.2 vs. 8.7pmol/mgprotein/min, respectively). Furthermore, of nine recombinant cytosolic carbonyl reducing enzymes tested for their ability to reduce warfarin, AKR1C3 and CBR1 were identified as warfarin reductases and their kinetic parameters were determined. The internal clearance of warfarin was 3 orders of magnitude higher with AKR1C3 than with CBR1 (CLint=65.922 vs. 0.070μl/mgprotein/min, respectively). This is the first time that warfarin reducing enzymes in human liver subcellular fraction have been identified. Moreover, we have described the chiral aspects of warfarin reduction using an HPLC method that enabled the detection of individual warfarin alcohol stereoisomers. Cytosol and AKR1C3 exhibit the stereoselective metabolism of (R)-warfarin to preferentially form (SR)-warfarin alcohol as the primary in vivo metabolite of warfarin. On the other hand, microsomes and CBR1 preferentially reduce (S)-warfarin to form (RS)-warfarin alcohol and (SS)-warfarin alcohol, respectively. PMID:27055738

  14. Sequence-specific sup 1 H and sup 15 N resonance assignments for human dihydrofolate reductase in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Stockman, B.J.; Nirmala, N.R.; Wagner, G. ); Delcamp, T.J.; DeYarman, M.T.; Freisheim, J.H. )

    1992-01-14

    Dihydrofolate reductase is an intracellular target enzyme for folate antagonists, including the anticancer drug methotrexate. In order to design novel drugs with altered binding properties, a detailed description of protein-drug interactions in solution is desirable to understand the specificity of drug binding. As a first step in this process, heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy has been used to make sequential resonance assignments for more than 90% of the residues in human dihydrofolate reductase complexed with methotrexate. Uniform enrichment of the 21.5-kDa protein with {sup 15}N was required to obtain the resonance assignments via heteronuclear 3D NMR spectroscopy since homonuclear 2D spectra did not provide sufficient {sup 1}H resonance dispersion. Medium- and long-range NOE's have been used to characterize the secondary structure of the binary ligand-enzyme complex in solution.

  15. Overexpression of human NADPH:cytochrome c (P450) reductase confers enhanced sensitivity to both tirapazamine (SR 4233) and RSU 1069.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Saunders, M. P.; Chinje, E. C.; Talbot, D. C.; Harris, A. L.; Strafford, I. J.

    1997-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH: cytochrome c (P450) reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) plays an important role in the reductive activation of the bioreductive drug tirapazamine (SR4233). Thus, in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, expression of P450 reductase correlated with both the hypoxic toxicity and the metabolism of tirapazamine [Patterson et al (1995) Br J Cancer 72: 1144-1150]. To examine this dependence in more detail, the MDA231 cell line, which has the lowest activity of P450 reductase in our breast cell line panel, was transfected with the human P450 reductase cDNA. Isolated clones expressed a 78-kDa protein, which was detected with anti-P450 reductase antibody, and were shown to have up to a 53-fold increase in activity of the enzyme. Using six stable transfected clones covering the 53-fold range of activity of P450 reductase, it was shown that the enzyme activity correlated directly with both hypoxic and aerobic toxicity of tirapazamine, and metabolism of the drug under hypoxic conditions. No metabolism was detected under aerobic conditions. For RSU1069, toxicity was also correlated with P450 reductase activity, but only under hypoxic conditions. Measurable activity of P450 reductase was found in a selection of 14 primary human breast tumours. Activity covered an 18-fold range, which was generally higher than that seen in cell lines but within the range of activity measured in the transfected clones. These results suggest that if breast tumours have significant areas of low oxygen tension, then they are likely to be highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of tirapazamine and RSU 1069. Images Figure 1 PMID:9374381

  16. Molecular cloning of cDNAs of human liver and placenta NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Yubisui, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Zenno, S.; Tamura, M.; Takeshita, M.; Sakaki, Y.

    1987-06-01

    A cDNA coding for human liver NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase was cloned from a human liver cDNA library constructed in phage lambdagt11. The library was screened by using an affinity-purified rabbit antibody against NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase of human erythrocytes. A cDNA about 1.3 kilobase pairs long was isolated. By using the cDNA as a probe, another cDNA (pb/sub 5/R141) of 1817 base pairs was isolated that hybridized with a synthetic oligonucleotide encoding Pro-Asp-Ile-Lys-Tyr-Pro, derived from the amino acid sequence at the amino-terminal region of the enzyme from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, by using the pb/sub 5/R141 as a probe, cDNA clones having more 5' sequence were isolated from a human placenta cDNA library. The amino acid sequences deduced from the nucleotide sequences of these cDNA clones overlapped each other and consisted of a sequence that completely coincides with that of human erythrocytes and a sequence of 19 amino acid residues extended at the amino-terminal side. The latter sequence closely resembles that of the membrane-binding domain of steer liver microsomal enzyme

  17. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase is upregulated in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jennifer; Bernert, Richard; In, Kevin; Kang, Paul; Sebastiao, Noemi; Hu, Chengcheng; Hastings, K Taraszka

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity has the ability to produce durable antimelanoma responses, resulting in improved survival of patients with advanced melanoma. Antigen presentation is a key determinant of T-cell responses. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is critical for MHC class II-restricted presentation of multiple melanoma antigens to CD4+ T cells. However, GILT expression in melanoma has not been defined. We evaluated GILT and MHC class II expression in human primary and metastatic melanomas and nevi using immunohistochemical analysis. GILT staining in melanocytes was observed in 70% of primary and 58% of metastatic melanomas versus 0% of nevi. When present, the GILT staining intensity in melanocytes was typically faint. Both GILT and MHC class II expression were increased in melanocytes of primary and metastatic melanomas compared with nevi. GILT staining in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) was detected in 100% of primary and metastatic melanomas versus 31% of nevi, and it was typically intense. GILT expression was increased in APCs of primary and metastatic melanomas compared with nevi, whereas MHC class II had equivalent high expression in APCs of all melanocytic lesions. GILT staining in keratinocytes was detected in 67% of primary melanomas versus 14% of nevi and 6% of metastatic melanomas. GILT, but not MHC class II, expression was increased in keratinocytes of primary melanomas compared with nevi and metastases. GILT expression is anticipated to result in improved presentation of melanoma antigens and more effective antimelanoma T-cell responses. GILT expression may be a biomarker of immune recognition of melanoma. PMID:26930048

  18. Expression and characterization of truncated human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) and a fusion protein of hHO-1 with human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Wilks, A; Black, S M; Miller, W L; Ortiz de Montellano, P R

    1995-04-01

    A human heme oxygenase (hHO-1) gene without the sequence coding for the last 23 amino acids has been expressed in Escherichia coli behind the pho A promoter. The truncated enzyme is obtained in high yields as a soluble, catalytically-active protein, making it available for the first time for detailed mechanistic studies. The purified, truncated hHO-1/heme complex is spectroscopically indistinguishable from that of the rat enzyme and converts heme to biliverdin when reconstituted with rat liver cytochrome P450 reductase. A self-sufficient heme oxygenase system has been obtained by fusing the truncated hHO-1 gene to the gene for human cytochrome P450 reductase without the sequence coding for the 20 amino acid membrane binding domain. Expression of the fusion protein in pCWori+ yields a protein that only requires NADPH for catalytic turnover. The failure of exogenous cytochrome P450 reductase to stimulate turnover and the insensitivity of the catalytic rate toward changes in ionic strength establish that electrons are transferred intramolecularly between the reductase and heme oxygenase domains of the fusion protein. The Vmax for the fusion protein is 2.5 times higher than that for the reconstituted system. Therefore, either the covalent tether does not interfere with normal docking and electron transfer between the flavin and heme domains or alternative but equally efficient electron transfer pathways are available that do not require specific docking. PMID:7703255

  19. Inhibition of Human Steroid 5-Reductase (AKR1D1) by Finasteride and Structure of the Enzyme-Inhibitor Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, J.; Di Costanzo, L; Penning, T; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    The {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid functionality is present in nearly all steroid hormones apart from estrogens. The first step in functionalization of the A-ring is mediated in humans by steroid 5{alpha}- or 5{beta}-reductase. Finasteride is a mechanism-based inactivator of 5{alpha}-reductase type 2 with subnanomolar affinity and is widely used as a therapeutic for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. It is also used for androgen deprivation in hormone-dependent prostate carcinoma, and it has been examined as a chemopreventive agent in prostate cancer. The effect of finasteride on steroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1) has not been previously reported. We show that finasteride competitively inhibits AKR1D1 with low micromolar affinity but does not act as a mechanism-based inactivator. The structure of the AKR1D1 {center_dot} NADP{sup +} {center_dot} finasteride complex determined at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution shows that it is not possible for NADPH to reduce the {Delta}{sup 1-2}-ene of finasteride because the cofactor and steroid are not proximal to each other. The C3-ketone of finasteride accepts hydrogen bonds from the catalytic residues Tyr-58 and Glu-120 in the active site of AKR1D1, providing an explanation for the competitive inhibition observed. This is the first reported structure of finasteride bound to an enzyme involved in steroid hormone metabolism.

  20. The 5 Alpha-Reductase Isozyme Family: A Review of Basic Biology and Their Role in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Azzouni, Faris; Godoy, Alejandro; Li, Yun; Mohler, James

    2012-01-01

    Despite the discovery of 5 alpha-reduction as an enzymatic step in steroid metabolism in 1951, and the discovery that dihydrotestosterone is more potent than testosterone in 1968, the significance of 5 alpha-reduced steroids in human diseases was not appreciated until the discovery of 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency in 1974. Affected males are born with ambiguous external genitalia, despite normal internal genitalia. The prostate is hypoplastic, nonpalpable on rectal examination and approximately 1/10th the size of age-matched normal glands. Benign prostate hyperplasia or prostate cancer does not develop in these patients. At puberty, the external genitalia virilize partially, however, secondary sexual hair remains sparse and male pattern baldness and acne develop rarely. Several compounds have been developed to inhibit the 5 alpha-reductase isozymes and they play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many common diseases. This review describes the basic biochemical properties, functions, tissue distribution, chromosomal location, and clinical significance of the 5 alpha-reductase isozyme family. PMID:22235201

  1. Effects of 3G cell phone exposure on the structure and function of the human cytochrome P450 reductase.

    PubMed

    Tanvir, Shazia; Thuróczy, György; Selmaoui, Brahim; Silva Pires Antonietti, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Lévêque, Philippe; Pulvin, Sylviane; de Seze, René

    2016-10-01

    Cell phones increase exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Whether EMFs exert specific effects on biological systems remains debatable. This study investigated the effect of cell phone exposure on the structure and function of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). CPR plays a key role in the electron transfer to cytochrome P450, which takes part in a wide range of oxidative metabolic reactions in various organisms from microbes to humans. Human CPR was exposed for 60min to 1966-MHz RF inside a transverse electromagnetic cell (TEM-cell) placed in an incubator. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was 5W·kg(-1). Conformation changes have been detected through fluorescent spectroscopy of flavin and tryptophan residues, and investigated through circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and microelectrophoresis. These showed that CPR was narrowed. By using cytochrome C reductase activity to assess the electron flux through the CPR, the Michaelis Menten constant (Km) and the maximum initial velocity (Vmax) decreased by 22% as compared with controls. This change was due to small changes in the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein at 37°C. The relevance of these findings to an actual RF exposure scenario demands further biochemical and in-vivo confirmation. PMID:27243445

  2. Real-time analysis of conformational control in electron transfer reactions of human cytochrome P450 reductase with cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Hedison, Tobias M; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-11-01

    Protein domain dynamics and electron transfer chemistry are often associated, but real-time analysis of domain motion in enzyme-catalysed reactions and the elucidation of mechanistic schemes that relate these motions to the reaction chemistry are major challenges for biological catalysis research. Previously we suggested that reduction of human cytochrome P450 reductase with the reducing coenzyme NADPH is accompanied by major structural re-orientation of the FMN- and FAD-binding domains through an inferred dynamic cycle of 'open' and 'closed' conformations of the enzyme (PLoS Biol, 2011, e1001222). However, these studies were restricted to stopped-flow/FRET analysis of the reductive half-reaction, and were compromised by fluorescence quenching of the acceptor by the flavin cofactors. Here we have improved the design of the FRET system, by using dye pairs with near-IR fluorescence, and extended studies on human cytochrome P450 reductase to the oxidative half-reaction using a double-mixing stopped-flow assay, thereby analysing in real-time conformational dynamics throughout the complete catalytic cycle. We correlate redox changes accompanying the reaction chemistry with protein dynamic changes observed by FRET, and show that redox chemistry drives a major re-orientation of the protein domains in both the reductive and oxidative half-reactions. Our studies using the tractable (soluble) surrogate electron acceptor cytochrome c provide a framework for analysing mechanisms of electron transfer in the endoplasmic reticulum between cytochrome P450 reductase and cognate P450 enzymes. More generally, our work emphasizes the importance of protein dynamics in intra- and inter-protein electron transfer, and establishes methodology for real-time analysis of structural changes throughout the catalytic cycle of complex redox proteins. PMID:26307151

  3. The Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Physiology of Human Steroidogenesis and Its Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Auchus, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Steroidogenesis entails processes by which cholesterol is converted to biologically active steroid hormones. Whereas most endocrine texts discuss adrenal, ovarian, testicular, placental, and other steroidogenic processes in a gland-specific fashion, steroidogenesis is better understood as a single process that is repeated in each gland with cell-type-specific variations on a single theme. Thus, understanding steroidogenesis is rooted in an understanding of the biochemistry of the various steroidogenic enzymes and cofactors and the genes that encode them. The first and rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis is the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone by a single enzyme, P450scc (CYP11A1), but this enzymatically complex step is subject to multiple regulatory mechanisms, yielding finely tuned quantitative regulation. Qualitative regulation determining the type of steroid to be produced is mediated by many enzymes and cofactors. Steroidogenic enzymes fall into two groups: cytochrome P450 enzymes and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. A cytochrome P450 may be either type 1 (in mitochondria) or type 2 (in endoplasmic reticulum), and a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may belong to either the aldo-keto reductase or short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase families. The activities of these enzymes are modulated by posttranslational modifications and by cofactors, especially electron-donating redox partners. The elucidation of the precise roles of these various enzymes and cofactors has been greatly facilitated by identifying the genetic bases of rare disorders of steroidogenesis. Some enzymes not principally involved in steroidogenesis may also catalyze extraglandular steroidogenesis, modulating the phenotype expected to result from some mutations. Understanding steroidogenesis is of fundamental importance to understanding disorders of sexual differentiation, reproduction, fertility, hypertension, obesity, and physiological homeostasis. PMID:21051590

  4. A human fatty acid synthase inhibitor binds β-ketoacyl reductase in the keto-substrate site.

    PubMed

    Hardwicke, Mary Ann; Rendina, Alan R; Williams, Shawn P; Moore, Michael L; Wang, Liping; Krueger, Julie A; Plant, Ramona N; Totoritis, Rachel D; Zhang, Guofeng; Briand, Jacques; Burkhart, William A; Brown, Kristin K; Parrish, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (hFAS) is a complex, multifunctional enzyme that is solely responsible for the de novo synthesis of long chain fatty acids. hFAS is highly expressed in a number of cancers, with low expression observed in most normal tissues. Although normal tissues tend to obtain fatty acids from the diet, tumor tissues rely on de novo fatty acid synthesis, making hFAS an attractive metabolic target for the treatment of cancer. We describe here the identification of GSK2194069, a potent and specific inhibitor of the β-ketoacyl reductase (KR) activity of hFAS; the characterization of its enzymatic and cellular mechanism of action; and its inhibition of human tumor cell growth. We also present the design of a new protein construct suitable for crystallography, which resulted in what is to our knowledge the first co-crystal structure of the human KR domain and includes a bound inhibitor. PMID:25086508

  5. Role of DNA Methylation on the Expression of the Anthracycline Metabolizing Enzyme AKR7A2 in Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Hoefer, Carrie C; Quiñones-Lombraña, Adolfo; Blair, Rachael Hageman; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-04-01

    The intracardiac synthesis of anthracycline alcohol metabolites by aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) contributes to the pathogenesis of anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity. AKR7A2 is the most abundant anthracycline reductase in hearts from donors with and without Down syndrome (DS), and its expression varies between individuals (≈tenfold). We investigated whether DNA methylation impacts AKR7A2 expression in hearts from donors with (n = 11) and without DS (n = 30). Linear models were used to test for associations between methylation status and cardiac AKR7A2 expression. In hearts from donors without DS, DNA methylation status at CpG site -865 correlated with AKR7A2 mRNA (Pearson's regression coefficient, r = -0.4051, P = 0.0264) and AKR7A2 protein expression (r = -0.5818, P = 0.0071). In heart tissue from donors with DS, DNA methylation status at CpG site -232 correlated with AKR7A2 protein expression (r = 0.8659, P = 0.0025). Multiple linear regression modeling revealed that methylation at several CpG sites is associated with the synthesis of cardiotoxic daunorubicinol. AKR7A2 methylation status in lymphoblastoid cell lines from donors with and without DS was examined to explore potential parallelisms between cardiac tissue and lymphoid cells. These results suggest that DNA methylation impacts AKR7A2 expression and the synthesis of cardiotoxic daunorubicinol. PMID:25962911

  6. Human biliverdin reductase: a member of the insulin receptor substrate family with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Torno, Michael D; Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Maines, Mahin D

    2005-05-17

    We describe here the tyrosine kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (BVR) and its potential role in the insulin-signaling pathway. BVR is both a substrate for insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (IRK) activity and a kinase for serine phosphorylation of IR substrate 1 (IRS-1). Our previous studies have revealed serine/threonine kinase activity of BVR. Y198, in the YMKM motif found in the C-terminal domain of BVR, is shown to be a substrate for insulin-activated IRK. This motif in IRS proteins provides a docking site for proteins that contain a Src homology 2 domain. Additionally, Y228 in the YLSF sequence and Y291 are IRK substrates; the former sequence provides optimum recognition motif in the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, and for SHC (Src homology 2 domain containing transfroming protein 1). BVR autophosphorylates N-terminal tyrosines Y72 and Y83. Serine residues in IRS-1 are targets for BVR phosphorylation, and point mutation of serine residues in the kinase domain of the reductase inhibits phosphotransferase activity. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 activates the insulin signaling pathway and serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 blocks insulin action, our findings that insulin increases BVR tyrosine phosphorylation and that there is an increase in glucose uptake in response to insulin when expression of BVR is "knocked down" by small interfering RNA suggest a potential role for BVR in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:15870194

  7. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Huang, Kao-Jean; Weng, Ching-Feng; Shiuan, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR). The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank) database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. PMID:26170618

  8. Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Efficiently Catabolizes Heme in the Absence of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) uses molecular oxygen and electrons from NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase to convert heme to CO, ferrous iron, and biliverdin (BV). Enzymatic studies with the purified 30-kDa form of HO-1 routinely use a coupled assay containing biliverdin reductase (BVR), which converts BV to bilirubin (BR). BVR is believed to be required for optimal HO-1 activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether HO-1 activity could be monitored directly by following BV generation or iron release (using the ferrous iron chelator, ferrozine) in the absence of BVR. Using assays for each of the three end products, we found that HO-1 activity was stimulated in the presence of catalase and comparable rates were measured with each assay. Absorbance scans revealed characteristic spectra for BR, BV, and/or the ferrozine-iron complex. The optimal conditions were slightly different for the direct and coupled assays. BSA activated the coupled but inhibited the direct assays, and the assays had different pH optima. By measuring the activity of BVR directly using BV as a substrate, these differences were attributed to different enzymatic properties of BVR and HO-1. Thus, BVR is not needed to measure the activity of HO-1 when catalase is present. In fact, the factors affecting catalysis by HO-1 are better understood using the direct assays because the coupled assay can be influenced by properties of BVR. PMID:20679134

  9. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit V.; Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  10. Methotrexate supports in vivo selection of human embryonic stem cell derived-hematopoietic cells expressing dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L; McIvor, R Scott

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hES Cs) are an attractive alternative cell source for hematopoietic gene therapy applications as the cells are easily modified with lentiviral or other vectors and can be subsequently induced to differentiate into hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, demonstration of the full hematopoietic potential of hESC-derived progeny is challenging due to low marrow engraftment and the difficulty of detecting cells in the peripheral blood of human/mouse xenografts. Methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy coupled with expression of a drug resistant dihydrofolate reductase such as Tyr22 (Tyr22DHFR) has the potential to selectively increase engraftment of gene-modified human hematopoietic cells in mice, which would allow for better phenotypic characterization of hESC-derived cells in vivo. We showed that hES Cs transduced with Tyr22DHFR-GFP encoding lentivirus vectors differentiate into MTX resistant (MTXr) hemato-endothelial cells. MTX treatment of immunodeficient mice infused with Tyr22DHFR hESC-derived hemato-endothelial cells increased the long-term engraftment of human cells in the bone marrow of MTX-treated mice. In contrast to previous studies, these results indicate that MTX administration has the potential to support in vivo selection that is maintained after cessation of treatment. The MTX/Tyr22DHFR system may therefore be useful for enrichment of gene-modified cell populations in human stem cell and gene therapy applications. PMID:21468213

  11. Model of the catalytic mechanism of human aldose reductase based on quantum chemical calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Cachau, R. C.; Howard, E. H.; Barth, P. B.; Mitschler, A. M.; Chevrier, B. C.; Lamour, V.; Joachimiak, A.; Sanishvili, R.; Van Zandt, M.; Sibley, E.; Moras, D.; Podjarny, A.; UPR de Biologie Structurale; National Cancer Inst.; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Inst. for Diabetes Discovery, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose Reductase is an enzyme involved in diabetic complications, thoroughly studied for the purpose of inhibitor development. The structure of an enzyme-inhibitor complex solved at sub-atomic resolution has been used to develop a model for the catalytic mechanism. This model has been refined using a combination of Molecular Dynamics and Quantum calculations. It shows that the proton donation, the subject of previous controversies, is the combined effect of three residues: Lys 77, Tyr 48 and His 110. Lys 77 polarises the Tyr 48 OH group, which donates the proton to His 110, which becomes doubly protonated. His 110 then moves and donates the proton to the substrate. The key information from the sub-atomic resolution structure is the orientation of the ring and the single protonafion of the His 110 in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. This model is in full agreement with all available experimental data.

  12. Targeting the Large Subunit of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase for Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wijerathna, Sanath R.; Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W.; Zhang, Andrew; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Kiser, Jianying; Dealwis, Chris G.

    2011-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is a crucial enzyme in de novo DNA synthesis, where it catalyses the rate determining step of dNTP synthesis. RRs consist of a large subunit called RR1 (α), that contains two allosteric sites and one catalytic site, and a small subunit called RR2 (β), which houses a tyrosyl free radical essential for initiating catalysis. The active form of mammalian RR is an αnβm hetero oligomer. RR inhibitors are cytotoxic to proliferating cancer cells. In this brief review we will discuss the three classes of RR, the catalytic mechanism of RR, the regulation of the dNTP pool, the substrate selection, the allosteric activation, inactivation by ATP and dATP, and the nucleoside drugs that target RR. We will also discuss possible strategies for developing a new class of drugs that disrupts the RR assembly. PMID:23115527

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZO(A)PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[alpyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  14. LC/MSMS STUDY OF BENZO[A]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE ADDUCTION TO GLOBIN TRYPTIC PEPTIDES AND N-ACETYLAMINO ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-quinone (BPQ) is regarded as a reactive genotoxic compound enzymatically formed from a xenobiotic precursor benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol by aldo-keto-reductase family of enzymes. Because BPQ, a Michael electrophile, was previously shown to react with oligonucleotide...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZOLALPYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA AND POLYDEOXYNUCLEOTIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bcnzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  16. New evidence of similarity between human and plant steroid metabolism: 5alpha-reductase activity in Solanum malacoxylon.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Danza, Giovanna; Guarna, Antonio; Cini, Nicoletta; Racchi, Milvia Luisa; Serio, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of steroid hormones in humans is well known, and the metabolic pathway and mechanisms of action are almost completely elucidated. The role of plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids, is less known, but an increasing amount of data on brassinosteroid biosynthesis is showing unexpected similarities between human and plant steroid metabolic pathways. Here we focus our attention on the enzyme 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) for which a plant ortholog of the mammalian system, DET2, was recently described in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that campestenone, the natural substrate of DET2, is reduced to 5alpha-campestanone by both human 5alphaR isozymes but with different affinities. Solanum malacoxylon, which is a calcinogenic plant very active in the biosynthesis of vitamin D-like molecules and sterols, was used to study 5alphaR activity. Leaves and calli were chosen as examples of differentiated and undifferentiated tissues, respectively. Two separate 5alphaR activities were found in calli and leaves of Solanum using campestenone as substrate. The use of progesterone allowed the detection of both activities in calli. Support for the existence of two 5alphaR isozymes in S. malacoxylon was provided by the differential actions of inhibitors of the human 5alphaR in calli and leaves. The evidence for the presence of two isozymes in different plant tissues extends the analogies between plant and mammalian steroid metabolic pathways. PMID:12488348

  17. Transcriptional regulation of human and murine short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases (SDRs) - an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Maser, Edmund

    2016-05-01

    Numerous physiological functions of the body are controlled by endogenous (e.g. steroids, retinoids, lipid mediators) or exogenous molecules (e.g. drugs, xenobiotics) that bind to transcription factors (TF). The biosynthesis and catabolism of these signaling molecules depend, apart from CYPs, on enzymes belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Moreover, the contribution of SDRs to the metabolism of therapeutic drugs and xenobiotics is increasingly recognized. However, only scarce information exists regarding the transcriptional regulation of most SDR proteins. This work aims to illustrate the role of nuclear receptors (NR) and TF related to oxidative stress, inflammation, hypoxia, and xenobiotics in the regulation of selected human and murine SDRs that play crucial roles in steroid, retinoid, eicosanoid, fatty acid, and xenobiotic metabolism. These include, for example, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, retinol dehydrogenases, and carbonyl reductases. Because existing experimental data are limited, an in silico analysis (TRANSFAC(®) Professional database) of the 5'-upstream sequences for putative response elements was performed. Experimental and in silico data suggest that pharmaceutical, environmental, or dietary NR ligands may alter SDR-mediated retinoid, steroid, and xenobiotic metabolism, likely affecting basic cellular events like energy expenditure, cell proliferation/differentiation, or aging processes. Also, some SDRs are possibly induced by their own substrates. Further experimental work is urgently needed to fully understand the NR-mediated transcriptional regulation of SDRs. This is essential for deducing their possible involvement in drug side effects and will help to identify new substrates and further physiological functions of these SDRs. PMID:27362327

  18. In vivo selection of human embryonic stem cell-derived cells expressing methotrexate-resistant dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Tian, Xinghui; Swanson, Debra; Gunther, Roland; Shultz, Leonard D.; McIvor, R. Scott; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a novel source of hematopoietic and other cell populations suitable for gene therapy applications. Preclinical studies to evaluate engraftment of hESC-derived hematopoietic cells transplanted into immunodeficient mice demonstrate only limited repopulation. Expression of a drug resistance gene, such as Tyr22-dihydrofolate reductase (Tyr22-DHFR), coupled to methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy has the potential to selectively increase engraftment of gene-modified hESC-derived cells in mouse xenografts. Here, we describe the generation of Tyr22-DHFR – GFP expressing hESCs that maintain pluripotency, produce teratomas and can differentiate into MTXr-hemato-endothelial cells. We demonstrate that MTX administered to nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient/IL-2Rγcnull (NSG) mice after injection of Tyr22-DHFR-derived cells significantly increases human CD34+ and CD45+ cell engraftment in the bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood of transplanted MTX-treated mice. These results demonstrate that MTX treatment supports selective, long-term engraftment of Tyr22-DHFR-cells in vivo, and provides a novel approach for combined human cell and gene therapy. PMID:19829316

  19. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  20. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 11 is a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Miyagi, Namiki; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-03-25

    We report characterization of a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily encoded in a human gene, DHRS11. The recombinant protein (DHRS11) efficiently catalyzed the conversion of the 17-keto group of estrone, 4- and 5-androstenes and 5α-androstanes into their 17β-hydroxyl metabolites with NADPH as a coenzyme. In contrast, it exhibited reductive 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity toward 5β-androstanes, 5β-pregnanes, 4-pregnenes and bile acids. Additionally, DHRS11 reduced α-dicarbonyls (such as diacetyl and methylglyoxal) and alicyclic ketones (such as 1-indanone and loxoprofen). The enzyme activity was inhibited in a mixed-type manner by flavonoids, and competitively by carbenoxolone, glycyrrhetinic acid, zearalenone, curcumin and flufenamic acid. The expression of DHRS11 mRNA was observed widely in human tissues, most abundantly in testis, small intestine, colon, kidney and cancer cell lines. Thus, DHRS11 represents a novel type of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase with unique catalytic properties and tissue distribution. PMID:26920053

  1. Radiosensitization of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Ribonucleotide Reductase: Enhanced Radiation Response at Low-Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Pink, John; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To test whether pharmacologic inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC no. 663249) enhances radiation sensitivity during low-dose-rate ionizing radiation provided by a novel purpose-built iridium-192 cell irradiator. Methods and Materials: The cells were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (11, 23, 37, 67 cGy/h) using a custom-fabricated cell irradiator or to high-dose-rate radiation (330 cGy/min) using a conventional cell irradiator. The radiation sensitivity of human cervical (CaSki, C33-a) cancer cells with or without RNR inhibition by 3-AP was evaluated using a clonogenic survival and an RNR activity assay. Alteration in the cell cycle distribution was monitored using flow cytometry. Results: Increasing radiation sensitivity of both CaSki and C33-a cells was observed with the incremental increase in radiation dose rates. 3-AP treatment led to enhanced radiation sensitivity in both cell lines, eliminating differences in cell cytotoxicity from the radiation dose rate. RNR blockade by 3-AP during low-dose-rate irradiation was associated with low RNR activity and extended G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: We conclude that RNR inhibition by 3-AP impedes DNA damage repair mechanisms that rely on deoxyribonucleotide production and thereby increases radiation sensitivity of human cervical cancers to low-dose-rate radiation.

  2. High-level expression of human dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7), without N-terminal amino acid protection, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Armarego, W L; Cotton, R G; Dahl, H H; Dixon, N E

    1989-01-01

    The cDNA coding for human dihydropteridine reductase [Dahl, Hutchinson, McAdam, Wake, Morgan & Cotton (1987) Nucleic Acids Res. 15, 1921-1936] was inserted downstream of tandem bacteriophage lambda PR and PL promoters in Escherichia coli vector pCE30. Since pCE30 also expresses the lambda c1857ts gene, transcription may be controlled by variation of temperature. The recombinant plasmid in an E. coli K12 strain grown at 30 degrees C, then at 45 degrees C, directed the synthesis of dihydropteridine reductase to very high levels. The protein was soluble, at least as active as the authentic human enzyme, and lacked the N-terminal amino acid protection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2673215

  3. Thioredoxin reductase activity may be more important than GSH level in protecting human lens epithelial cells against UVA light.

    PubMed

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A; Leverenz, Victor R; Bhat, Aparna V; Pelliccia, Sara E; Giblin, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2 , 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 h exposure of the cells to 25 J cm(-2) of UVA radiation (338-400 nm wavelength, peak at 365 nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  4. Thioredoxin Reductase Activity may be More Important than GSH Level in Protecting Human Lens Epithelial Cells Against UVA Light

    PubMed Central

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Bhat, Aparna V.; Pelliccia, Sara E.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2, 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 hr exposure of the cells to 25 J/cm2 of UVA radiation (338-400nm wavelength, peak at 365nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well-tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  5. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein’s internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  6. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2015-11-14

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties. PMID:26567650

  7. Delineation of myotoxicity induced by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors in human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Julia; Weigl, Lukas; Werner, Martin; Szegedi, Csaba; Hohenegger, Martin

    2005-09-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used and well tolerated cholesterol-lowering drugs. In rare cases, side effects occur in skeletal muscle, including myositis or even rhabdomyolysis. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood that lead to these muscle-specific side effects. Here, we show that statins cause apoptosis in differentiated human skeletal muscle cells. The prototypical representative of statins, simvastatin, triggered sustained intracellular Ca(2+) transients, leading to calpain activation. Intracellular chelation of Ca(2+) completely abrogated cell death. Moreover, ryanodine also completely prevented the simvastatin-induced calpain activation. Nevertheless, an activation of the ryanodine receptor by simvastatin could not be observed. Downstream of the calpain activation simvastatin led to a translocation of Bax to mitochondria in a caspase 8-independent manner. Consecutive activation of caspase 9 and 3 execute apoptotic cell death that was in part reversed by the coadministration of mevalonic acid. Conversely, the simvastatin-induced activation of calpain was not prevented by mevalonic acid. These data delineate the signaling cascade that leads to muscle injury caused by statins. Our observations also have implications for improving the safety of this important medication and explain to some extent why physical exercise aggravates skeletal muscle side effects. PMID:15914674

  8. Quantum mechanical calculation of electric fields and vibrational Stark shifts at active site of human aldose reductase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, John Z. H.; He, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Recent advance in biophysics has made it possible to directly measure site-specific electric field at internal sites of proteins using molecular probes with C = O or C≡N groups in the context of vibrational Stark effect. These measurements directly probe changes of electric field at specific protein sites due to, e.g., mutation and are very useful in protein design. Computational simulation of the Stark effect based on force fields such as AMBER and OPLS, while providing good insight, shows large errors in comparison to experimental measurement due to inherent difficulties associated with point charge based representation of force fields. In this study, quantum mechanical calculation of protein's internal electrostatic properties and vibrational Stark shifts was carried out by using electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps method. Quantum calculated change of mutation-induced electric field and vibrational Stark shift is reported at the internal probing site of enzyme human aldose reductase. The quantum result is in much better agreement with experimental data than those predicted by force fields, underscoring the deficiency of traditional point charge models describing intra-protein electrostatic properties.

  9. Thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase influence estrogen receptor alpha-mediated gene expression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Abhi K; Ziegler, Yvonne S; McLeod, Ian X; Yates, John R; Nardulli, Ann M

    2009-12-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells damages resident proteins, lipids, and DNA. In order to overcome the oxidative stress that occurs with ROS accumulation, cells must balance free radical production with an increase in the level of antioxidant enzymes that convert free radicals to less harmful species. We identified two antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin (Trx) and Trx reductase (TrxR), in a complex associated with the DNA-bound estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). Western analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to demonstrate that Trx and TrxR are expressed in the cytoplasm and in the nuclei of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. More importantly, endogenously expressed ERalpha, Trx, and TrxR interact and ERalpha and TrxR associate with the native, estrogen-responsive pS2 and progesterone receptor genes in MCF-7 cells. RNA interference assays demonstrated that Trx and TrxR differentially influence estrogen-responsive gene expression and that together, 17beta-estradiol, Trx, and TrxR alter hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels in MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that Trx and TrxR are multifunctional proteins that, in addition to modulating H(2)O(2) levels and transcription factor activity, aid ERalpha in regulating the expression of estrogen-responsive genes in target cells. PMID:19620238

  10. Different patterns of 5{alpha}-reductase expression, cellular distribution, and testosterone metabolism in human follicular dermal papilla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shicheng Yamauchi, Hitoshi

    2008-04-18

    Androgens regulate hair growth, and 5{alpha}-reductase (5{alpha}R) plays a pivotal role in the action of androgens on target organs. To clarify the molecular mechanisms responsible for controlling hair growth, the present study presents evidence that the human follicular dermal papilla cells (DPCs) from either beard (bDPCs) or scalp hair (sDPCs) possess endogenous 5{alpha}R activity. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that the highest level of 5{alpha}R1 mRNA was found in bDPCs, followed by sDPCs, and a low but detectable level of 5{alpha}R1 mRNA was observed in fibroblasts. Minimally detectable levels of 5{alpha}R2 mRNA were found in all three cell types. A weak band at 26 kDa corresponding to the human 5{alpha}R1 protein was detected by Western blot in both DPCs, but not in fibroblasts. Immuonofluorescence analysis confirmed that 5{alpha}R1 was localized to the cytoplasm rather than in the nuclei in both DPCs Furthermore, a 5{alpha}R assay using [{sup 14}C]testosterone labeling in intact cells revealed that testosterone was transformed primarily into androstenedione, and in small amounts, into DHT. Our results demonstrate that the 5{alpha}R activities of either bDPCs or sDPCs are stronger than that of dermal fibroblasts, despite the fact that the major steroidogenic activity is attributed to 17{beta}-HSD rather than 5{alpha}R among the three cell types. The 5{alpha}R1 inhibitor MK386 exhibited a more potent inhibitory effect on 5{alpha}R activity than finasteride (5{alpha}R2 inhibitor) in bDPCs.

  11. Chromate Reductase YieF from Escherichia coli Enhances Hexavalent Chromium Resistance of Human HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Wu, Gaofeng; Zhang, Yanli; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a serious environmental pollutant and human toxicant. Mammalian cells are very sensitive to chromate as they lack efficient chromate detoxifying strategy, e.g., chromate-reducing genes that are widely present in prokaryotes. To test whether introduction of prokaryotic chromate-reducing gene into mammalian cells could render higher chromate resistance, an Escherichia coli chromate-reducing gene yieF was transfected into human HepG2 cells. The expression of yieF was measured in stably transfected cells HepG2-YieF by quantitative RT-PCR and found up-regulated by 3.89-fold upon Cr(VI) induction. In chromate-reducing ability test, HepG2-YieF cells that harbored the reductase showed significantly higher reducing ability of Cr(VI) than HepG2 control cells. This result was further supported by the evidence of increased Cr(VI)-removing ability of crude cell extract of HepG2-YieF. Moreover, HepG2-YieF demonstrated 10% higher viability and decreased expression of GSH synthesizing enzymes under Cr(VI) stress. Subcellular localization of YieF was determined by tracing GFP-YieF fusion protein that was detected in both nucleus and cytoplasm by laser confocal microscopy. Altogether, this study successfully demonstrated that the expression of a prokaryotic Cr(VI)-reducing gene yieF endowed mammalian cell HepG2 with enhanced chromate resistance, which brought new insight of Cr(VI) detoxification in mammalian cells. PMID:26016500

  12. Control of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Activity in Cultured Human Fibroblasts by Very Low Density Lipoproteins of Subjects with Hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Jackson, Richard L.; Patsch, Josef R.; Sybers, Harley D.; Taunton, O. David; Yeshurun, Daniel L.; Smith, Louis C.

    1978-01-01

    Very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human normolipemic plasma, and the VLDL, the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL), and LDL from patients with Type III hyperlipoproteinemic plasma were tested for their abilities to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase in cultured human fibroblasts from normal subjects and a Type III patient. Regulation of cholesterol synthesis in the fibroblasts of a patient with Type III hyperlipoproteinemia appears to be normal. VLDL from normal subjects, isolated by angle head ultracentrifugation (d < 1.006) or by gel filtration on BioGel A-5m, were about 5 times less effective than LDL in suppressing HMG-CoA reductase activity, based on protein content, in agreement with previous reports with normal fibroblasts. Zonal centrifugation of normal VLDL isolated by both methods showed that the VLDL contained IDL. Normal VLDL from the angle head rotor, refractionated by the zonal method, had little, if any, ability to suppress the HMG-CoA reductase activity in either normal or Type III fibroblasts. VLDL, IDL, and LDL fractionated by zonal ultracentrifugation from Type III plasma gave half-maximum inhibition at 0.2-0.5 μg of protein/ml, indistinguishable from the suppression caused by normal LDL. Type III VLDL did not suppress HMG-CoA reductase in mutant LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. Zonally isolated VLDL obtained from one Type IV and one Type V patient gave half-maximal suppression at 5 and 0.5 μg of protein/ml, respectively. Molecular diameters and apoprotein compositions of the zonally isolated normal and Type III VLDL were similar; the major difference in composition was that Type III VLDL contained more cholesteryl esters and less triglyceride than did normal VLDL. The compositions and diameters of the Type IV and Type V VLDL were similar to normal VLDL. These findings show that the basic defect in Type III hyperlipoproteinemia is qualitatively

  13. Organization of the human [zeta]-crystallin/quinone reductase gene (CRYZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, P.; Rao, P.V.; Zigler, J.S. Jr. )

    1994-05-15

    [zeta]-Crystallin is a protein highly expressed in the lens of guinea pigs and camels, where it comprises about 10% of the total soluble protein. It has recently been characterized as a novel quinone oxidoreductase present in a variety of mammalian tissues. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of the human [zeta]-crystallin gene (CRYZ) and its processed pseudogene. The functional gene is composed of nine exons and spans about 20 kb. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene is rich in G and C (58%) and lacks TATA and CAAT boxes. Previous analysis of the guinea pig gene revealed the presence of two different promoters, one responsible for the high lens-specific expression and the other for expression at the enzymatic level in numerous tissues. Comparative analysis with the guinea pig gene shows that a region of [approximately]2.5 kb that includes the promoter responsible for the high expression in the lens in guinea pig is not present in the human gene. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Impaired Self-Renewal and Increased Colitis and Dysplastic Lesions in Colonic Mucosa of AKR1B8 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Ma, Jun; Yan, Ruilan; Ling, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Yang, Wancai; Gao, John; Huang, Chenfei; Bu, Yiwen; Cao, Yu; He, Yingchun; Wan, Laxiang; Zu, Xuyu; Liu, Jianghua; Huang, Mei Chris; Stenson, William F; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) is a serious health issue, but etiopathological factors remain unclear. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is specifically expressed in the colonic epithelium, but down-regulated in colorectal cancer. This study was aimed to investigate the etiopathogenic role of AKR1B10 in UC and CAC. Experimental design UC and CAC biopsies (paraffin-embedded sections) and frozen tissues were collected to examine AKR1B10 expression. Aldo-keto reductase 1B8 (the ortholog of human AKR1B10) knockout (AKR1B8 −/−) mice were produced to estimate its role in the susceptibility and severity of chronic colitis and associated dysplastic lesions, induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) at a low dose (2%). Genome-wide Exome sequencing was used to profile DNA damage in DSS-induced colitis and tumors. Results AKR1B10 expression was markedly diminished in over 90% of UC and CAC tissues. AKR1B8 deficiency led to reduced lipid synthesis from butyrate and diminished proliferation of colonic epithelial cells. The DSS-treated AKR1B8 −/− mice demonstrated impaired injury repair of colonic epithelium and more severe bleeding, inflammation, and ulceration. These AKR1B8 −/− mice had more severe oxidative stress and DNA damage, and dysplasias were more frequent and at a higher grade in the AKR1B8 −/− mice than in wild type mice. Palpable masses were seen in the AKR1B8 −/− mice only, not in wild type. Conclusion AKR1B8 is a critical protein in the proliferation and injury repair of the colonic epithelium and in the pathogenesis of UC and CAC, being a new etiopathogenic factor of these diseases. PMID:25538260

  15. Folding trajectories of human dihydrofolate reductase inside the GroEL GroES chaperonin cavity and free in solution.

    PubMed

    Horst, Reto; Fenton, Wayne A; Englander, S Walter; Wüthrich, Kurt; Horwich, Arthur L

    2007-12-26

    The chaperonin GroEL binds non-native polypeptides in an open ring via hydrophobic contacts and then, after ATP and GroES binding to the same ring as polypeptide, mediates productive folding in the now hydrophilic, encapsulated cis chamber. The nature of the folding reaction in the cis cavity remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether polypeptides take the same route to the native state in this cavity as they do when folding spontaneously free in solution. Here, we have addressed this question by using NMR measurements of the time course of acquisition of amide proton exchange protection of human dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) during folding in the presence of methotrexate and ATP either free in solution or inside the stable cavity formed between a single ring variant of GroEL, SR1, and GroES. Recovery of DHFR refolded by the SR1/GroES-mediated reaction is 2-fold higher than in the spontaneous reaction. Nevertheless, DHFR folding was found to proceed by the same trajectories inside the cis folding chamber and free in solution. These observations are consistent with the description of the chaperonin chamber as an "Anfinsen cage" where polypeptide folding is determined solely by the amino acid sequence, as it is in solution. However, if misfolding occurs in the confinement of the chaperonin cavity, the polypeptide chain cannot undergo aggregation but rather finds its way back to a productive pathway in a manner that cannot be accomplished in solution, resulting in the observed high overall recovery. PMID:18093916

  16. The Ontogeny and Population Variability of Human Hepatic NADPH Dehydrogenase Quinone Oxido-Reductase 1 (NQO1).

    PubMed

    Rougée, Luc R A; Riches, Zoe; Berman, Jacob M; Collier, Abby C

    2016-07-01

    The NADPH dehydrogenase quinone oxido-reductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme is an antioxidant and metabolic enzyme that performs two electron reduction of quinones and other chemicals. Based on the physiologic role(s) of NQO1, we hypothesized that expression and activity of this enzyme would vary with age and other demographic variables. Cytosols from 117 archived human livers were investigated for changes in NQO1 with age, sex, obesity, and ethnicity. Protein expression but not activity of NQO1 was weakly negatively correlated with age (Spearman r = -0.2, P = 0.03). No sex differences were observed for either protein expression or activity and for ethnicity; Caucasians had greater NQO1 activity than Asians (P < 0.05). Overweight children had statistically significantly higher NQO1 activity as compared with ideal weight children (P < 0.05) although this difference was not observed in adults. These findings establish that NQO1 is approximately as active in children as adults. However, modeled NQO1 clearance (both allometric and physiologically based pharmacokinetics) predicted maturation at 23 to 26 years. This is almost certainly an overestimate, with error in the model resulting from a small sample size and inability to scale for age-related changes in hepatic cellularity and/or cytosolic protein content, and indicates a delay in reaching maximum clearance through the NQO1 pathway that is affected by physiologic development as much, or more than, biochemical development. Obesity may increase hepatic NQO1 activity in children, which is likely a protective mechanism in oxidative stress, but may also have significant implications for drug and chemical disposition in obese children. PMID:26856346

  17. Is the Peroxiredoxin 2/Thioredoxin/Thioredoxin Reductase system in human erythrocytes designed for redox signaling?

    PubMed

    Benfeitas, Rui; Selvaggio, Gianluca; Antunes, Fernando; Coelho, Pedro; Salvador, Armindo

    2014-10-01

    In human erythrocytes H2O2 is mainly consumed by glutathione peroxidase, catalase and peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). Our previous analyses indicate that Prx2's peroxidase activity is subjected to a strong but quickly reversible inhibition (see companion abstract). If this activity is inhibited then the main role of Prx2 cannot be to eliminate H2O2. What functional advantages could then such an inhibition confer?We set up and validated a kinetic model of H2O2 metabolism human erythrocytes that shows quantitative agreement with extensive experimental observations. We then applied it to analyze the behavior of Prx2 and Trx under the H2O2 exposure dynamics that erythrocytes face in circulation. The significance of Prx2 inhibition was assessed by comparing the behavior of this model with that of an otherwise identical model lacking inhibition.Our analysis shows that Prx2 inhibition leads to 25-40% lower NADPH consumption under low to moderately high H2O2 supply (<0.8µM H2O2/s). Further, the inhibition extends the range where the concentrations of potential redox signaling readouts - H2O2, Prx2 sulfenic acid, Prx2 disulfide and Trx disulfide- show a proportional response to changes in H2O2 supply, covering practically the whole physiological range of the latter. This is desirable for analogic signal transduction and allows the Prx2/Trx/TrxR system to reliably transduce changes in H2O2 supply as changes in thiol oxidation. Finally, the inhibition allows other less abundant peroxiredoxins in the erythrocyte to be oxidized by H2O2 at physiological H2O2 supplies.Altogether, these results suggest that the postulated reversible inhibition of Prx2's peroxidase facilitates signal transduction by the peroxiredoxins and spares NADPH.We acknowledge: fellowship SFRH/BD/51199/2010, grants PEst-C/SAU/LA0001/2013-2014, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0612/2013, PEst-OE/QUI/UI0313/2014, and FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-020978 co-financed by FEDER through the COMPETE program and by FCT (project PTDC/QUI-BIQ/119657

  18. Human Vitamin K 2,3-Epoxide Reductase Complex Subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1) Mediates Vitamin K-dependent Intracellular Antioxidant Function*

    PubMed Central

    Westhofen, Philipp; Watzka, Matthias; Marinova, Milka; Hass, Moritz; Kirfel, Gregor; Müller, Jens; Bevans, Carville G.; Müller, Clemens R.; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Human vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1-like 1 (VKORC1L1), expressed in HEK 293T cells and localized exclusively to membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to support both vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase (VKOR) and vitamin K reductase enzymatic activities. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for dithiothreitol-driven VKOR activity were: Km (μm) = 4.15 (vitamin K1 epoxide) and 11.24 (vitamin K2 epoxide); Vmax (nmol·mg−1·hr−1) = 2.57 (vitamin K1 epoxide) and 13.46 (vitamin K2 epoxide). Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 applied to cultured cells up-regulated VKORC1L1 expression and VKOR activity. Cell viability under conditions of no induced oxidative stress was increased by the presence of vitamins K1 and K2 but not ubinquinone-10 and was specifically dependent on VKORC1L1 expression. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels in cells treated with 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone were mitigated in a VKORC1L1 expression-dependent manner. Intracellular oxidative damage to membrane intrinsic proteins was inversely dependent on VKORC1L1 expression and the presence of vitamin K1. Taken together, our results suggest that VKORC1L1 is responsible for driving vitamin K-mediated intracellular antioxidation pathways critical to cell survival. PMID:21367861

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Liver delta {4}-3-Ketosteroid 5 beta-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo,L.; Drury, J.; Penning, T.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all 4-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an a,{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a 4-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90 bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human 4-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP+ at 1.79- and 1.35- Angstroms resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP+ and cortisone at 1.90- Angstroms resolution, NADP+ and progesterone at 2.03- Angstroms resolution, and NADP+ and testosterone at 1.62- Angstroms resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr58 and Glu120. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  20. The structure of the leukemia drug imatinib bound to human quinone reductase 2 (NQO2)

    PubMed Central

    Winger, Jonathan A; Hantschel, Oliver; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Kuriyan, John

    2009-01-01

    Background Imatinib represents the first in a class of drugs targeted against chronic myelogenous leukemia to enter the clinic, showing excellent efficacy and specificity for Abl, Kit, and PDGFR kinases. Recent screens carried out to find off-target proteins that bind to imatinib identified the oxidoreductase NQO2, a flavoprotein that is phosphorylated in a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line. Results We examined the inhibition of NQO2 activity by the Abl kinase inhibitors imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib, and obtained IC50 values of 80 nM, 380 nM, and >100 μM, respectively. Using electronic absorption spectroscopy, we show that imatinib binding results in a perturbation of the protein environment around the flavin prosthetic group in NQO2. We have determined the crystal structure of the complex of imatinib with human NQO2 at 1.75 Å resolution, which reveals that imatinib binds in the enzyme active site, adjacent to the flavin isoalloxazine ring. We find that phosphorylation of NQO2 has little effect on enzyme activity and is therefore likely to regulate other aspects of NQO2 function. Conclusion The structure of the imatinib-NQO2 complex demonstrates that imatinib inhibits NQO2 activity by competing with substrate for the active site. The overall conformation of imatinib when bound to NQO2 resembles the folded conformation observed in some kinase complexes. Interactions made by imatinib with residues at the rim of the active site provide an explanation for the binding selectivity of NQO2 for imatinib, nilotinib, and dasatinib. These interactions also provide a rationale for the lack of inhibition of the related oxidoreductase NQO1 by these compounds. Taken together, these studies provide insight into the mechanism of NQO2 inhibition by imatinib, with potential implications for drug design and treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia in patients. PMID:19236722

  1. Dihydrofolate-Reductase Mutations in Plasmodium knowlesi Appear Unrelated to Selective Drug Pressure from Putative Human-To-Human Transmission in Sabah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Imwong, Mallika; William, Timothy; Bird, Elspeth; Piera, Kim A.; Aziz, Ammar; Boonyuen, Usa; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Cox, Jonathan; White, Nicholas J.; Cheng, Qin; Yeo, Tsin W.; Auburn, Sarah; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria caused by zoonotic Plasmodium knowlesi is an emerging threat in Eastern Malaysia. Despite demonstrated vector competency, it is unknown whether human-to-human (H-H) transmission is occurring naturally. We sought evidence of drug selection pressure from the antimalarial sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as a potential marker of H-H transmission. Methods The P. knowlesi dihdyrofolate-reductase (pkdhfr) gene was sequenced from 449 P. knowlesi malaria cases from Sabah (Malaysian Borneo) and genotypes evaluated for association with clinical and epidemiological factors. Homology modelling using the pvdhfr template was used to assess the effect of pkdhfr mutations on the pyrimethamine binding pocket. Results Fourteen non-synonymous mutations were detected, with the most common being at codon T91P (10.2%) and R34L (10.0%), resulting in 21 different genotypes, including the wild-type, 14 single mutants, and six double mutants. One third of the P. knowlesi infections were with pkdhfr mutants; 145 (32%) patients had single mutants and 14 (3%) had double-mutants. In contrast, among the 47 P. falciparum isolates sequenced, three pfdhfr genotypes were found, with the double mutant 108N+59R being fixed and the triple mutants 108N+59R+51I and 108N+59R+164L occurring with frequencies of 4% and 8%, respectively. Two non-random spatio-temporal clusters were identified with pkdhfr genotypes. There was no association between pkdhfr mutations and hyperparasitaemia or malaria severity, both hypothesized to be indicators of H-H transmission. The orthologous loci associated with resistance in P. falciparum were not mutated in pkdhfr. Subsequent homology modelling of pkdhfr revealed gene loci 13, 53, 120, and 173 as being critical for pyrimethamine binding, however, there were no mutations at these sites among the 449 P. knowlesi isolates. Conclusion Although moderate diversity was observed in pkdhfr in Sabah, there was no evidence this reflected selective antifolate drug

  2. Functioning methionine sulfoxide reductases A and B are present in human epidermal melanocytes in the cytosol and in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; Chavan, Bhaven; Gillbro, Johanna M.

    2006-03-31

    Oxidation of methionine residues by reactive oxygen (ROS) in protein structures leads to the formation of methionine sulfoxide which can consequently lead to a plethora of impaired functionality. The generation of methionine sulfoxide yields ultimately a diastereomeric mixture of the S and R sulfoxides. So far two distinct enzyme families have been identified. MSRA reduces methionine S-sulfoxide, while MSRB reduces the R-diastereomer. It has been shown that these enzymes are involved in regulation of protein function and in elimination of ROS via reversible methionine formation besides protein repair. Importantly, both enzymes require coupling to the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin electron donor system. In this report, we show for First time the expression and function of both sulfoxide reductases together with thioredoxin reductase in the cytosol as well as in the nucleus of epidermal melanocytes which are especially sensitive to ROS. Since this cell resides in the basal layer of the epidermis and its numbers and functions are reduced upon ageing and for instance also in depigmentation processes, we believe that this discovery adds an intricate repair mechanism to melanocyte homeostasis and survival.

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Liver [delta][superscript 4]-3-Ketosteroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) and Implications for Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Di Costanzo, Luigi; Drury, Jason E.; Penning, Trevor M.; Christianson, David W.

    2008-07-15

    AKR1D1 (steroid 5{beta}-reductase) reduces all {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids to form 5{beta}-dihydrosteroids, a first step in the clearance of steroid hormones and an essential step in the synthesis of all bile acids. The reduction of the carbon-carbon double bond in an {alpha}{beta}-unsaturated ketone by 5{beta}-reductase is a unique reaction in steroid enzymology because hydride transfer from NADPH to the {beta}-face of a {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid yields a cis-A/B-ring configuration with an {approx}90{sup o} bend in steroid structure. Here, we report the first x-ray crystal structure of a mammalian steroid hormone carbon-carbon double bond reductase, human {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroid 5{beta}-reductase (AKR1D1), and its complexes with intact substrates. We have determined the structures of AKR1D1 complexes with NADP{sup +} at 1.79- and 1.35-{angstrom} resolution (HEPES bound in the active site), NADP{sup +} and cortisone at 1.90-{angstrom} resolution, NADP{sup +} and progesterone at 2.03-{angstrom} resolution, and NADP{sup +} and testosterone at 1.62-{angstrom} resolution. Complexes with cortisone and progesterone reveal productive substrate binding orientations based on the proximity of each steroid carbon-carbon double bond to the re-face of the nicotinamide ring of NADP{sup +}. This orientation would permit 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH. Each steroid carbonyl accepts hydrogen bonds from catalytic residues Tyr{sup 58} and Glu{sup 120}. The Y58F and E120A mutants are devoid of activity, supporting a role for this dyad in the catalytic mechanism. Intriguingly, testosterone binds nonproductively, thereby rationalizing the substrate inhibition observed with this particular steroid. The locations of disease-linked mutations thought to be responsible for bile acid deficiency are also revealed.

  4. Thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin prevents membrane transport of diphtheria toxin into the cytosol and protects human cells from intoxication.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Dmochewitz-Kück, Lydia; Feigl, Peter; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-06-15

    During cellular uptake, diphtheria toxin delivers its catalytic domain DTA from acidified endosomes into the cytosol, which requires reduction of the disulfide linking DTA to the transport domain. In vitro, thioredoxin reduces this disulfide and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is part of a cytosolic complex facilitating DTA-translocation. We found that the TrxR-specific inhibitor auranofin prevented DTA delivery into the cytosol and intoxication of HeLa cells with diphtheria toxin, offering perspectives for novel pharmacological strategies against diphtheria. PMID:25911959

  5. Differential toxicity of mitomycin C and porfiromycin to aerobic and hypoxic Chinese hamster ovary cells overexpressing human NADPH:cytochrome c (P-450) reductase.

    PubMed

    Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1996-01-01

    Purified NADPH:cytochrome c (P-450) reductase (FpT; NADPH-ferrihemoprotein oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) can reductively activate mitomycin antibiotics through a one-electron reduction to species that alkylate DNA. To assess the involvement of FpT in the intracellular activation of the mitomycins, transfectants overexpressing a human FpT cDNA were established from a Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in dihydrofolate reductase (CHO-K1/dhfr-). The parental cell line was equisensitive to the cytotoxic action of mitomycin C under oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. In contrast, porfiromycin was considerably less cytotoxic to wild-type parental cells than was mitomycin C in air and markedly more cytotoxic under hypoxia. Two FpT-transfected clones were selected that expressed 19- and 27-fold more FpT activity than the parental line. Levels of other oxidoreductases implicated in the activation of the mitomycins were unchanged. Significant increases in sensitivity to mitomycin C and porfiromycin in the two FpT-transfected clones were seen under both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions, with the increases in toxicity being greater under hypoxia than in air. These findings demonstrate that FpT can bioreductively activate the mitomycins in living cells and implicate FpT in the differential aerobic/hypoxic toxicity of the mitomycins. PMID:8552660

  6. Reconstitution premixes for assays using purified recombinant human cytochrome P450, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, and cytochrome b5.

    PubMed

    Shaw, P M; Hosea, N A; Thompson, D V; Lenius, J M; Guengerich, F P

    1997-12-01

    The development of enzyme and buffer premixes for in vitro biotransformation assays is described. The protein premixes contain a mixture of three recombinant human proteins, cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4, NADPH-P450 reductase, cytochrome b5, and liposomes. The buffer premix contains reagents which, when diluted, provide for optimal metabolic activity with selected P450 3A4 substrates. P450 3A4 premixes were competent in the oxidation of known substrates including testosterone, midazolam, nifedipine, erythromycin, benzphetamine, and amitriptyline. Premixes stored at -80 degrees C for 2 months and those that underwent an additional five freeze/thaw cycles were able to hydroxylate testosterone at turnover rates similar to freshly prepared reconstitution mixes. In addition, premixes stored unfrozen at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks showed no significant loss in the rate of testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylation by P450 3A4. Premixes prepared with and without reduced glutathione, a component which had previously been found to be important for P450 3A4 reactions, were equally efficient at carrying out testosterone hydroxylation under these conditions. Kinetic parameters determined for the metabolism of testosterone, amitriptyline, nifedipine, and benzphetamine using P450 3A4 premixes were compared with human pooled microsomes and insect microsomes prepared from cells infected with a baculovirus containing two cDNA inserts coding for P450 3A4 and NADPH-P450 reductase. Each format gave different Vmax and K(m) values indicating different catalytic efficiencies. Analysis of P450 1A2 premixes which contained different lipid concentrations indicated that Vmax and K(m) could be altered. The availability of human P450 recombinant enzymes and the development of the P450 premixes that remain active after being stored frozen should allow for rapid identification of novel P450 substrates and inhibitors and the development of large-scale screening assays. PMID:9390180

  7. Human dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8): a description and evaluation of its biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Lundová, Tereza; Štambergová, Hana; Zemanová, Lucie; Svobodová, Markéta; Havránková, Jana; Šafr, Miroslav; Wsól, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 8 (DHRS8, SDR16C2) belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, one of the largest enzyme groups. In addition to the well-known members which participate in the metabolism of important eobiotics and xenobiotics, this superfamily contains many poorly characterized proteins. DHRS8 is a member of the Multisubstrate NADP(H)-dependent SDR16C family, which generally contains insufficiently described enzymes. Despite the limited knowledge about DHRS8, preliminary indicators have emerged regarding its significant function in the modulation of steroidal activity, at least in the case of 3α-adiol, lipid metabolism and detoxification. The aim of this study was to describe additional biochemical properties of DHRS8 and to unify knowledge about this enzyme. The DHRS8 was prepared in recombinant form and its membrane topology in the endoplasmic reticulum as an integral protein with cytosolic orientation was demonstrated. The enzyme participates in the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of steroid hormones as β-estradiol and testosterone in vitro; apparent K m and V max values were 39.86 µM and 0.80 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for β-estradiol and 1207.29 µM and 3.45 nmol × mg(-1) × min(-1) for testosterone. Moreover, synthetic steroids (methyltestosterone and nandrolone) used as anabolics as well as all-trans-retinol were for the first time identified as substrates of DHRS8. This knowledge of its in vitro activity together with a newly described expression pattern at the protein level in tissues involved in steroidogenesis (adrenal gland and testis) and detoxification (liver, lung, kidney and small intestine) could suggest a potential role of DHRS8 in vivo. PMID:26472732

  8. Molecular cloning of two human liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoenzymes that are identical with chlordecone reductase and bile-acid binder.

    PubMed Central

    Deyashiki, Y; Ogasawara, A; Nakayama, T; Nakanishi, M; Miyabe, Y; Sato, K; Hara, A

    1994-01-01

    Human liver contains two dihydrodiol dehydrogenases, DD2 and DD4, associated with 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. We have raised polyclonal antibodies that cross-reacted with the two enzymes and isolated two 1.2 kb cDNA clones (C9 and C11) for the two enzymes from a human liver cDNA library using the antibodies. The clones of C9 and C11 contained coding sequences corresponding to 306 and 321 amino acid residues respectively, but lacked 5'-coding regions around the initiation codon. Sequence analyses of several peptides obtained by enzymic and chemical cleavages of the two purified enzymes verified that the C9 and C11 clones encoded DD2 and DD4 respectively, and further indicated that the sequence of DD2 had at least additional 16 residues upward from the N-terminal sequence deduced from the cDNA. There was 82% amino acid sequence identity between the two enzymes, indicating that the enzymes are genetic isoenzymes. A computer-based comparison of the cDNAs of the isoenzymes with the DNA sequence database revealed that the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of DD2 and DD4 are virtually identical with those of human bile-acid binder and human chlordecone reductase cDNAs respectively. Images Figure 1 PMID:8172617

  9. Localization of TDPX1, a human homologue of the yeast thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase gene (TPX), to chromosome 13q12

    SciTech Connect

    Pahl, P.; Berger, R.; Hart, I. |

    1995-04-10

    Reactive oxygen species and free radicals that are produced during normal metabolism can potentially damage cellular macromolecules. Defenses against such damage include a number of antioxidant enzymes that specifically target the removal or dismutation of the reactive agent. We report here the isolation and regional mapping of a human gene, TDPX1, that encodes an enzyme homologous to a yeast thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase (thioredoxin peroxidase, TPX). The human TDPX1 coding sequence was determined from the product of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of human cDNA. Based on PCR analysis of DNA from a human/rodent somatic cell hybrid panel, the TDPX1 locus was assigned to chromosome 13. Further localization of the locus to 13q12 was accomplished by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, using as a probe DNA from a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) that contains the TDPX1 gene. It was also determined by PCR analysis of various YACs that the TDPX1 locus is in the region of the dinucleotide repeat markers D13S289 and D13S290. This regional mapping localizes the TDPX1 gene to a genomic region recently shown to contain the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 and a gene associated with a form of muscular dystrophy. Oxygen radical metabolism has been hypothesized to be important for cancer, muscular dystrophy, and other disorders, so TDPX1 should be considered a candidate gene for these diseases. 33 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Prostaglandin F Synthase Activity of the Human Aldose Reductase AKR1B1 Brings New Lenses to Look at Pathologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bresson, Eva; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Boucher-Kovalik, Sofia; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Fortier, Michel A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins are important regulators of female reproductive functions to which aldose reductases exhibiting hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity also contribute. Our work on the regulation of reproductive function by prostaglandins (PGs), lead us to the discovery that AKR1B5 and later AKR1B1were highly efficient and physiologically relevant PGF synthases. PGE2 and PGF2α are the main prostanoids produced in the human endometrium and proper balance in their relative production is important for normal menstruation and optimal fertility. Recent evidence suggests that PGE2/EP2 and PGF2α/FP may constitute a functional dyad with physiological relevance comparable to the prostacyclin-thromboxane dyad in the vascular system. We have recently reported that AKR1B1 was expressed and modulated in association with PGF2α production in response to IL-1β in the human endometrium. In the present study, we show that the human AKR1B1 (gene ID: 231) also known as ALDR1 or ALR2 is a functional PGF2α synthase in different models of living cells and tissues. Using human endometrial cells, prostate, and vascular smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells we demonstrate that IL-1β is able to up regulate COX-2 and AKR1B1 proteins as well as PGF2α production under normal glucose concentrations. We show that the promoter activity of AKR1B1 gene is increased by IL-1β particularly around the multiple stress response region containing two putative antioxidant response elements adjacent to TonE and AP1. We also show that AKR1B1 is able to regulate PGE2 production through PGF2α acting on its FP receptor and that aldose reductase inhibitors like alrestatin, Statil (ponalrestat), and EBPC exhibit distinct and characteristic inhibition of PGF2α production in different cell models. The PGF synthase activity of AKR1B1 represents a new and important target to regulate ischemic and inflammatory responses associated with several human pathologies. PMID:22654757

  11. E2F1 promote the aggressiveness of human colorectal cancer by activating the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zejun; Gong, Chaoju; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomin; Mei, Lingming; Song, Mintao; Qiu, Lanlan; Luo, Shuchai; Zhu, Zhihua; Zhang, Ronghui; Gu, Hongqian; Chen, Xiang

    2015-08-21

    As the ribonucleotide reductase small subunit, the high expression of ribonucleotide reductase small subunit M2 (RRM2) induces cancer and contributes to tumor growth and invasion. In several colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, we found that the expression levels of RRM2 were closely related to the transcription factor E2F1. Mechanistic studies were conducted to determine the molecular basis. Ectopic overexpression of E2F1 promoted RRM2 transactivation while knockdown of E2F1 reduced the levels of RRM2 mRNA and protein. To further investigate the roles of RRM2 which was activated by E2F1 in CRC, CCK-8 assay and EdU incorporation assay were performed. Overexpression of E2F1 promoted cell proliferation in CRC cells, which was blocked by RRM2 knockdown attenuation. In the migration and invasion tests, overexpression of E2F1 enhanced the migration and invasion of CRC cells which was abrogated by silencing RRM2. Besides, overexpression of RRM2 reversed the effects of E2F1 knockdown partially in CRC cells. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM2 and E2F1 were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. Further analysis showed that the protein expression levels of E2F1 and RRM2 were parallel with each other and positively correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM), TNM stage and distant metastasis. Consistently, the patients with low E2F1 and RRM2 levels have a better prognosis than those with high levels. Therefore, we suggest that E2F1 can promote CRC proliferation, migration, invasion and metastasis by regulating RRM2 transactivation. Understanding the role of E2F1 in activating RRM2 transcription will help to explain the relationship between E2F1 and RRM2 in CRC and provide a novel predictive marker for diagnosis and prognosis of the disease. - Highlights: • E2F1 promotes RRM2 transactivation in CRC cells. • E2F1 promotes the proliferation of CRC cells by activating RRM2. • E2F1 promotes the migration and

  12. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  13. The membrane topology of vitamin K epoxide reductase is conserved between human isoforms and the bacterial enzyme.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhenbo; van Lith, Marcel; Mitchell, Lorna J; Pringle, Marie Anne; Inaba, Kenji; Bulleid, Neil J

    2016-04-01

    The membrane topology of vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) is controversial with data supporting both a three transmembrane and a four transmembrane model. The positioning of the transmembrane domains and the loops between these domains is critical if we are to understand the mechanism of vitamin K oxidation and its recycling by members of the thioredoxin family of proteins and the mechanism of action of warfarin, an inhibitor of VKOR. Here we show that both mammalian VKOR isoforms adopt the same topology, with the large loop between transmembrane one and two facing the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We used a redox sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the N- or C-terminus to show that these regions face the cytosol, and introduction of glycosylation sites along with mixed disulfide formation with thioredoxin-like transmembrane protein (TMX) to demonstrate ER localization of the major loop. The topology is identical with the bacterial homologue fromSynechococcussp., for which the structure and mechanism of recycling has been characterized. Our results provide a resolution to the membrane topology controversy and support previous results suggesting a role for members of the ER protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family in recycling VKOR. PMID:26772871

  14. Exploration of Virtual Candidates for Human HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Using Pharmacophore Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Park, Chanin; John, Shalini; Lee, Keun Woo

    2013-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is a rate-controlling enzyme in the mevalonate pathway which involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol and other isoprenoids. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is regarded as a drug target to treat hypercholesterolemia. In this study, ten qualitative pharmacophore models were generated based on chemical features in active inhibitors of HMGR. The generated models were validated using a test set. In a validation process, the best hypothesis was selected based on the statistical parameters and used for virtual screening of chemical databases to find novel lead candidates. The screened compounds were sorted by applying drug-like properties. The compounds that satisfied all drug-like properties were used for molecular docking study to identify their binding conformations at active site of HMGR. The final hit compounds were selected based on docking score and binding orientation. The HMGR structures in complex with the hit compounds were subjected to 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations to refine the binding orientation as well as to check the stability of the hits. After simulation, binding modes including hydrogen bonding patterns and molecular interactions with the active site residues were analyzed. In conclusion, four hit compounds with new structural scaffold were suggested as novel and potent HMGR inhibitors. PMID:24386216

  15. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Sheng; Li, Hong-Yu; Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  16. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone, targets thioredoxin reductase to activate JNK and cell death pathways in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Bo; Wang, Guo-Cai; Ma, Dong-Lei; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Guang-Xiong; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei; Wang, Yi-Fei; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants and found to have potential anticancer activities. However, the intracellular molecular targets of SLs and the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well elucidated. In this study, we observed that EM23, a natural SL, exhibited anti-cancer activity in human cervical cancer cell lines by inducing apoptosis as indicated by caspase 3 activation, XIAP downregulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23-induced apoptosis was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the knockdown of thioredoxin (Trx) or thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) resulted in a reduction in apoptosis. EM23 attenuated TrxR activity by alkylation of C-terminal redox-active site Sec498 of TrxR and inhibited the expression levels of Trx/TrxR to facilitate ROS accumulation. Furthermore, inhibition of Trx/TrxR system resulted in the dissociation of ASK1 from Trx and the downstream activation of JNK. Pretreatment with ASK1/JNK inhibitors partially rescued cells from EM23-induced apoptosis. Additionally, EM23 inhibited Akt/mTOR pathway and induced autophagy, which was observed to be proapoptotic and mediated by ROS. Together, these results reveal a potential molecular mechanism for the apoptotic induction observed with SL compound EM23, and emphasize its putative role as a therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:26758418

  17. Silencing of the methionine sulfoxide reductase A gene results in loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS production in human lens cells

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Maria A.; Lee, Wanda; Cowell, Tracy L.; Wells, Tracy M.; Weissbach, Herbert; Kantorow, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of methionine sulfoxide (Met(O)) is a significant feature of human cataract and previous studies have shown that methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA), which acts to repair Met(O), can defend human lens cells against oxidative stress induced cell death. A key feature of oxidative stress is increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in association with loss of mitochondrial function. Here, we sought to establish a potential role for MsrA in the accumulation of ROS in lens cells and the corresponding mitochondrial membrane potential in these cells. Targeted gene silencing was used to establish populations of lens cells expressing different levels of MsrA, and the mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS levels of these cell populations were monitored. Decreased MsrA levels were found to be associated with loss of cell viability, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and increased ROS levels in the absence of oxidative stress. These effects were augmented upon oxidative stress treatment. These results provide evidence that MsrA is a major determinant for accumulation of ROS in lens cells and that increased ROS levels in lens cells are associated with a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential that is likely related to the requirement for MsrA in lens cell viability. PMID:16934804

  18. Crystal Structure of the Human Fatty Acid Synthase Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein-Reductase Domain Complexed with Triclosan Reveals Allosteric Protein-Protein Interface Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Sippel, Katherine H.; Vyas, Nand K.; Zhang, Wei; Sankaran, Banumathi; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2014-01-01

    Human fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a large, multidomain protein that synthesizes long chain fatty acids. Because these fatty acids are primarily provided by diet, FAS is normally expressed at low levels; however, it is highly up-regulated in many cancers. Human enoyl-acyl carrier protein-reductase (hER) is one of the FAS catalytic domains, and its inhibition by drugs like triclosan (TCL) can increase cytotoxicity and decrease drug resistance in cancer cells. We have determined the structure of hER in the presence and absence of TCL. TCL was not bound in the active site, as predicted, but rather at the protein-protein interface (PPI). TCL binding induces a dimer orientation change that causes downstream structural rearrangement in critical active site residues. Kinetics studies indicate that TCL is capable of inhibiting the isolated hER domain with an IC50 of ∼55 μm. Given the hER-TCL structure and the inhibition observed in the hER domain, it seems likely that TCL is observed in the physiologically relevant binding site and that it acts as an allosteric PPI inhibitor. TCL may be a viable scaffold for the development of anti-cancer PPI FAS inhibitors. PMID:25301948

  19. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM. PMID:25636870

  20. Identifying the emerging human pathogen Scedosporium prolificans by using a species-specific monoclonal antibody that binds to the melanin biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R; Ryder, Lauren S; Le Cocq, Kate; Soanes, Darren M

    2015-04-01

    The dematiaceous (melanized) fungus Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging and frequently fatal pathogen of immunocompromised humans and which, along with the closely related fungi Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium apiospermum and S. aurantiacum in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex, is a contributing aetiology to tsunami lung and central nervous system infections in near-drowning victims who have aspirated water laden with spores. At present, the natural habitat of the fungus is largely unknown, and accurate detection methods are needed to identify environmental reservoirs of infectious propagules. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (CA4) specific to S. prolificans, which does not cross-react with closely related fungi in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex or with a wide range of mould and yeast species pathogenic to humans. Using genome sequencing of a soil isolate and targeted gene disruption of the CA4 antigen-encoding gene, we show that mAb CA4 binds to the melanin-biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase. Enzyme-deficient mutants produce orange-brown or green-brown spore suspensions compared with the black spore suspension of the wild-type strain. Using mAb CA4 and a mAb (HG12) specific to the related fungi P. boydii, P. apiosperma, S. apiospermum and S. aurantiacum, we demonstrate how the mAbs can be used in combination with a semiselective isolation procedure to track these opportunistic pathogens in environmental samples containing mixed populations of human pathogenic fungi. Specificity of mAb CA4 was confirmed by sequencing of the internally transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA-encoding regions of fungi isolated from estuarine muds. PMID:24684242

  1. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  2. Computer modeling studies of the structural role of NADPH binding to active site mutants of human dihydrofolate reductase in complex with piritrexim.

    PubMed

    Nowak, W; Cody, V; Wojtczak, A

    2001-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR, EC 1.5.1.3) is one of the enzymes active in the folate cycle which plays an important role in DNA synthesis. Inhibition of DHFR is a key element in the treatment of many diseases, including cancer and AIDS related infections. A search for new selective inhibitors is motivated by the resistance to common drugs observed in the course of treatment. In this paper, results of a detailed computer analysis of human DHFR interactions with the lipophilic inhibitor piritrexim (PTX) are presented. It was found that the NADPH cofactor contributes 30% of the total PTX-enzyme interaction energy. Substitution of the highly conserved Glu30 with alanine does not lead to the release of the inhibitor from the hDHFR pocket. The important L22F point mutation does affect PTX orientation but does not changethe binding energy. Simulations of the dynamics of binary hDHFR-PTX complexes were performed with the use of Extensible Systematic Force Field (ESFF) and the results indicate structural changes in the enzyme induced by NADPH binding. PMID:11996001

  3. Overexpression of peptide-methionine sulfoxide reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human T cells provides them with high resistance to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Moskovitz, Jackob; Flescher, Eliezer; Berlett, Barbara S.; Azare, Janeen; Poston, J. Michael; Stadtman, Earl R.

    1998-01-01

    The yeast peptide-methionine sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) was overexpressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae null mutant of msrA by using a high-copy plasmid harboring the msrA gene and its promoter. The resulting strain had about 25-fold higher MsrA activity than its parent strain. When exposed to either hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, or 2,2′-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride treatment, the MsrA overexpressed strain grew better, had lower free and protein-bound methionine sulfoxide and had a better survival rate under these conditions than did the msrA mutant and its parent strain. Substitution of methionine with methionine sulfoxide in a medium lacking hydrogen peroxide had little effect on the growth pattern, which suggests that the oxidation of free methionine in the growth medium was not the main cause of growth inhibition of the msrA mutant. Ultraviolet A radiation did not result in obvious differences in survival rates among the three strains. An enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide treatment was shown in human T lymphocyte cells (Molt-4) that were stably transfected with the bovine msrA and exposed to hydrogen peroxide. The survival rate of the transfected strain was much better than its parent strain when grown in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. These results support the proposition that the msrA gene is involved in the resistance of yeast and mammalian cells to oxidative stress. PMID:9826655

  4. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2′-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  5. Human biliverdin reductase is a leucine zipper-like DNA-binding protein and functions in transcriptional activation of heme oxygenase-1 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Salim, Mohammad; Maines, Mahin D

    2002-03-15

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is a serine/threonine kinase that catalyzes reduction of the heme oxygenase (HO) activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. A domain of biliverdin reductase (BVR) has primary structural features that resemble leucine zipper proteins. A heptad repeat of five leucines (L(1)--L(5)), a basic domain, and a conserved alanine characterize the domain. In hBVR, a lysine replaces L(3). The secondary structure model of hBVR predicts an alpha-helix-turn-beta-sheet for this domain. hBVR translated by the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system appears on a nondenaturing gel as a single band with molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa. The protein on a denaturing gel separates into two anti-hBVR immunoreactive proteins of approximately 39.9 + 34.6 kDa. The dimeric form, but not purified hBVR, binds to a 100-mer DNA fragment corresponding to the mouse HO-1 (hsp32) promoter region encompassing two activator protein (AP-1) sites. The specificity of DNA binding is suggested by the following: (a) hBVR does not bind to the same DNA fragment with one or zero AP-1 sites; (b) a 56-bp random DNA with one AP-1 site does not form a complex with hBVR; (c) in vitro translated HO-1 does not interact with the 100-mer DNA fragment with two AP-1 sites; (d) mutation of Lys(143), Leu(150), or Leu(157) blocks both the formation of the approximately 69-kDa specimens and hBVR DNA complex formation; and (e) purified preparations of hBVR or hHO-1 do not bind to DNA with two AP-1 sites. The potential significance of the AP-1 binding is suggested by the finding that the response of HO-1, in COS cells stably transfected with antisense hBVR, with 66% reduced BVR activity, to superoxide anion (O(2)()) formed by menadione is attenuated, whereas induction by heme is not affected. We propose a role for BVR in the signaling cascade for AP-1 complex activation necessary for HO-1 oxidative stress response. PMID:11773068

  6. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  7. Mode of action of human pharmaceuticals in fish: the effects of the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride, on reproduction as a case study.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Hannah, Robert E; Sumpter, John P

    2013-03-15

    In recent years, a growing number of human pharmaceuticals have been detected in the aquatic environment, generally at low concentrations (sub-ng/L-low μg/L). In most cases, these compounds are characterised by highly specific modes of action, and the evolutionary conservation of drug targets in wildlife species suggests the possibility that pharmaceuticals present in the environment may cause toxicological effects by acting through the same targets as they do in humans. Our research addressed the question of whether or not dutasteride, a pharmaceutical used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, may cause adverse effects in a teleost fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), by inhibiting the activity of both isoforms of 5α-reductase (5αR), the enzyme that converts testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Mammalian pharmacological and toxicological information were used to guide the experimental design and the selection of relevant endpoints, according to the so-called "read-across approach", suggesting that dutasteride may affect male fertility and steroid hormone dynamics. Therefore, a 21-day reproduction study was conducted to determine the effects of dutasteride (10, 32 and 100 μg/L) on fish reproduction. Exposure to dutasteride significantly reduced fecundity of fish and affected several aspects of reproductive endocrine functions in both males and females. However, none of the observed adverse effects occurred at concentrations of exposure lower than 32 μg/L; this, together with the low volume of drug prescribed every year (10.34 kg in the UK in 2011), and the extremely low predicted environmental concentration (0.03 ng/L), suggest that, at present, the potential presence of dutasteride in the environment does not represent a threat to wild fish populations. PMID:23280489

  8. An Innovative Strategy for Dual Inhibitor Design and Its Application in Dual Inhibition of Human Thymidylate Synthase and Dihydrofolate Reductase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Cao, Guang ping; Lee, Keun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Due to the diligence of inherent redundancy and robustness in many biological networks and pathways, multitarget inhibitors present a new prospect in the pharmaceutical industry for treatment of complex diseases. Nevertheless, to design multitarget inhibitors is concurrently a great challenge for medicinal chemists. We have developed a novel computational approach by integrating the affinity predictions from structure-based virtual screening with dual ligand-based pharmacophore to discover potential dual inhibitors of human Thymidylate synthase (hTS) and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR). These are the key enzymes in folate metabolic pathway that is necessary for the biosynthesis of RNA, DNA, and protein. Their inhibition has found clinical utility as antitumor, antimicrobial, and antiprotozoal agents. A druglike database was utilized to perform dual-target docking studies. Hits identified through docking experiments were mapped over a dual pharmacophore which was developed from experimentally known dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. Pharmacophore mapping procedure helped us in eliminating the compounds which do not possess basic chemical features necessary for dual inhibition. Finally, three structurally diverse hit compounds that showed key interactions at both active sites, mapped well upon the dual pharmacophore, and exhibited lowest binding energies were regarded as possible dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. Furthermore, optimization studies were performed for final dual hit compound and eight optimized dual hits demonstrating excellent binding features at target systems were also regarded as possible dual inhibitors of hTS and hDHFR. In general, the strategy used in the current study could be a promising computational approach and may be generally applicable to other dual target drug designs. PMID:23577115

  9. Potent increased risk of the initiation of DNA replication in human prostate cancer with the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Takeo; Yasumizu, Yota; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Miyajima, Akira; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have raised the clinically important question of the relationship between dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and prostate cancer (PCa) progression. The significance of DHT or 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARI) in PCa development and progression has not yet been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to determine whether the initiation of DNA replication was influenced by DHT in PCa. Three cell lines were used. LNCaP: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-dependent proliferation, C4-2: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-independent proliferation, and C4-2AT6: a castration resistant prostate cancer cell line. Two 5ARIs, finasteride and dutasteride, were used. We examined the mRNA expression of the components of pre-replication complex (Pre-RC), CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. DHT induced cell proliferation of LNCaP accompanied by significantly increased CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7 expression. In contrast to LNCaP, DHT inhibited cell proliferation in C4-2AT6 cells accompanied by decreased expression of CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. These reverse effects resemble the effects of 5ARIs in Pre-RC. Treatment with finasteride or dutasteride inhibited CDC6 expression in LNCaP, but both 5ARIs induced CDC6 expression in C4-2 and C4-2AT6 cells.These results indicate that DHT showed reversal effects on PCa cell proliferation among prostate cancer cells based on androgen-dependence, accompanied by regulation of the initiation of DNA replication. 5ARIs may modulate the DNA replication system in someaggressive PCa through up-regulation of CDC6 expression. PMID:25374915

  10. The Conserved Lys-95 Charged Residue Cluster Is Critical for the Homodimerization and Enzyme Activity of Human Ribonucleotide Reductase Small Subunit M2*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinhuan; Xu, Zhijian; Zhang, Lingna; Liu, Hongchuan; Liu, Xia; Lou, Meng; Zhu, Lijun; Huang, Bingding; Yang, Cai-Guang; Zhu, Weiliang; Shao, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides for DNA synthesis. Human RR small subunit M2 exists in a homodimer form. However, the importance of the dimer form to the enzyme and the related mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we tried to identify the interfacial residues that may mediate the assembly of M2 homodimer by computational alanine scanning based on the x-ray crystal structure. Co-immunoprecipitation, size exclusion chromatography, and RR activity assays showed that the K95E mutation in M2 resulted in dimer disassembly and enzyme activity inhibition. In comparison, the charge-exchanging double mutation of K95E and E98K recovered the dimerization and activity. Structural comparisons suggested that a conserved cluster of charged residues, including Lys-95, Glu-98, Glu-105, and Glu-174, at the interface may function as an ionic lock for M2 homodimer. Although the measurements of the radical and iron contents showed that the monomer (the K95E mutant) was capable of generating the diiron and tyrosyl radical cofactor, co-immunoprecipitation and competitive enzyme inhibition assays indicated that the disassembly of M2 dimer reduced its interaction with the large subunit M1. In addition, the immunofluorescent and fusion protein-fluorescent imaging analyses showed that the dissociation of M2 dimer altered its subcellular localization. Finally, the transfection of the wild-type M2 but not the K95E mutant rescued the G1/S phase cell cycle arrest and cell growth inhibition caused by the siRNA knockdown of M2. Thus, the conserved Lys-95 charged residue cluster is critical for human RR M2 homodimerization, which is indispensable to constitute an active holoenzyme and function in cells. PMID:24253041

  11. Potent increased risk of the initiation of DNA replication in human prostate cancer with the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Takeo; Yasumizu, Yota; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Miyajima, Akira; Kikuchi, Eiji; Oya, Mototsugu

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have raised the clinically important question of the relationship between dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and prostate cancer (PCa) progression. The significance of DHT or 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARI) in PCa development and progression has not yet been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to determine whether the initiation of DNA replication was influenced by DHT in PCa. Three cell lines were used. LNCaP: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-dependent proliferation, C4-2: a human PCa cell line that exhibits androgen-independent proliferation, and C4-2AT6: a castration resistant prostate cancer cell line. Two 5ARIs, finasteride and dutasteride, were used. We examined the mRNA expression of the components of pre-replication complex (Pre-RC), CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. DHT induced cell proliferation of LNCaP accompanied by significantly increased CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7 expression. In contrast to LNCaP, DHT inhibited cell proliferation in C4-2AT6 cells accompanied by decreased expression of CDC6, CDT1, and MCM2-7. These reverse effects resemble the effects of 5ARIs in Pre-RC. Treatment with finasteride or dutasteride inhibited CDC6 expression in LNCaP, but both 5ARIs induced CDC6 expression in C4-2 and C4-2AT6 cells.These results indicate that DHT showed reversal effects on PCa cell proliferation among prostate cancer cells based on androgen-dependence, accompanied by regulation of the initiation of DNA replication. 5ARIs may modulate the DNA replication system in someaggressive PCa through up-regulation of CDC6 expression. PMID:25374915

  12. B5, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells by suppressing the thioredoxin system, disrupting mitochondrion-dependent pathways and triggering autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dong-Lei; Chen, Wen-Bo; Fu, Wu-Yu; Ruan, Bi-Bo; Rui, Wen; Zhang, Jia-Xuan; Wang, Sheng; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Li, Man-Mei; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-dong; Yan, Hai-Zhao; Wang, Yi-Fei; Chen, Chang-Yan; Liu, Zhong; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic curcumin analog B5 is a potent inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) that has potential anticancer effects. The molecular mechanism underlying B5 as an anticancer agent is not yet fully understood. In this study, we report that B5 induces apoptosis in two human cervical cancer cell lines, CaSki and SiHa, as evidenced by the downregulation of XIAP, activation of caspases and cleavage of PARP. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in B5-induced apoptosis was suggested by the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. In B5-treated cells, TrxR activity was markedly inhibited with concomitant accumulation of oxidized thioredoxin, increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of ASK1 and its downstream regulatory target p38/JNK. B5-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited in the presence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Microscopic examination of B5-treated cells revealed increased presence of cytoplasmic vacuoles. The ability of B5 to activate autophagy in cells was subsequently confirmed by cell staining with acridine orange, accumulation of LC3-II, and measurement of autophagic flux. Unlike B5-induced apoptosis, autophagy induced by B5 is not ROS-mediated but a role for the AKT and AMPK signaling pathways is implied. In SiHa cells but not CaSki cells, B5-induced apoptosis was promoted by autophagy. These data suggest that the anticarcinogenic effects of B5 is mediated by complex interplay between cellular mechanisms governing redox homeostasis, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:26439985

  13. B5, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells by suppressing the thioredoxin system, disrupting mitochondrion-dependent pathways and triggering autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Yuan; Du, Zhi-Yun; Ma, Dong-Lei; Chen, Wen-Bo; Fu, Wu-Yu; Ruan, Bi-Bo; Rui, Wen; Zhang, Jia-Xuan; Wang, Sheng; Wong, Nai Sum; Xiao, Hao; Li, Man-Mei; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Qiu-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Hai-Zhao; Wang, Yi-Fei; Chen, Chang-Yan; Liu, Zhong; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2015-10-13

    The synthetic curcumin analog B5 is a potent inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) that has potential anticancer effects. The molecular mechanism underlying B5 as an anticancer agent is not yet fully understood. In this study, we report that B5 induces apoptosis in two human cervical cancer cell lines, CaSki and SiHa, as evidenced by the downregulation of XIAP, activation of caspases and cleavage of PARP. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in B5-induced apoptosis was suggested by the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increased expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. In B5-treated cells, TrxR activity was markedly inhibited with concomitant accumulation of oxidized thioredoxin, increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of ASK1 and its downstream regulatory target p38/JNK. B5-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited in the presence of N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Microscopic examination of B5-treated cells revealed increased presence of cytoplasmic vacuoles. The ability of B5 to activate autophagy in cells was subsequently confirmed by cell staining with acridine orange, accumulation of LC3-II, and measurement of autophagic flux. Unlike B5-induced apoptosis, autophagy induced by B5 is not ROS-mediated but a role for the AKT and AMPK signaling pathways is implied. In SiHa cells but not CaSki cells, B5-induced apoptosis was promoted by autophagy. These data suggest that the anticarcinogenic effects of B5 is mediated by complex interplay between cellular mechanisms governing redox homeostasis, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:26439985

  14. Sulforaphane promotes murine hair growth by accelerating the degradation of dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Mari; Shinozaki, Shohei; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2016-03-25

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) causes the regression of human hair follicles in the parietal scalp, leading to androgenic alopecia (AGA). Sulforaphane (SFN) increases the expression of DHT degrading enzymes, such as 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3α-HSDs), and, therefore, SFN treatment may improve AGA. To determine the effects of SFN on hair growth, we administered SFN (10 mg/kg BW, IP) or vehicle (DMSO) to ob/ob mice for six weeks and examined hair regeneration and the plasma levels of testosterone and DHT. We also tested the effects of SFN on the expression of two forms of 3α-HSD, aldo-keto reductase 1c21 and dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 9, both in vitro and in vivo. SNF significantly enhanced hair regeneration in ob/ob mice. The mice treated with SFN showed lower plasma levels of testosterone and DHT than those treated with vehicle. SFN increased the mRNA and protein levels of the two forms of 3α-HSD in the liver of the mice and in cultured murine hepatocyte Hepa1c1c7 cells. These results suggest that SFN treatment increases the amount of 3α-HSDs in the liver, accelerates the degradation of blood DHT, and subsequently blocks the suppression of hair growth by DHT. PMID:26923074

  15. Analysis of the apo E/apo C-I, angiotensin converting enzyme and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase genes as candidates affecting human longevity.

    PubMed

    Galinsky, D; Tysoe, C; Brayne, C E; Easton, D F; Huppert, F A; Dening, T R; Paykel, E S; Rubinsztein, D C

    1997-03-21

    Genetic factors are likely to affect human survival, since twin studies have shown greater concordance for age of death in monozygotic compared to dizygotic twins. Coronary artery disease is an important contributor to premature mortality in the UK. Accordingly, we have chosen genes associated with cardiovascular risk, apo E/apo C-I, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), as candidates which may affect longevity/survival into old age. An association study was performed by comparing allele and genotype frequencies at polymorphic loci associated with these genes in 182 women and 100 men aged 84 years and older with 100 boys and 100 girls younger than 17 years. MTHFR allele and genotype frequencies were similar in the elderly and young populations. Apo C-I allele and genotype frequencies were significantly different in the elderly women compared to the younger sample (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in the elderly men. At the neighbouring apo E gene, we only observed a difference between genotypes in the elderly women and the young sample; however, this did not retain significance when the genotype frequencies of the young sample were adjusted to values expected from the allele frequencies on the basis of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and compared to observed genotypes in elderly men and women. In contrast to previous studies, apo E2 was not overrepresented in the elderly men or women. Thus, the proposition that apo E2, E3 and E4 protein isoforms are themselves functionally associated with increasing risks for early death, may be too simplistic. The I/I ACE was depleted in the elderly males but not the elderly females. Furthermore, significant differences were observed between ACE genotypes in elderly men and elderly women. These data suggest that the penetrance of loci which influence survival may vary according to sex. The depletion of the ACE I/I genotype in elderly men is generally consistent with a previous study

  16. Human type 3 5α-reductase is expressed in peripheral tissues at higher levels than types 1 and 2 and its activity is potently inhibited by finasteride and dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Kazutoshi; Labrie, Fernand; Luu-The, Van

    2010-08-01

    5α-Reductases are crucial enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone, the most potent natural androgen. To date, three types of 5α-reductases, chronologically named types 1, 2 and 3 5α-reductases (SRD5a-1, 2 and 3) have been described. In the present paper, we characterized the activity and compared the mRNA expression levels of SRD5a-3 with those of SRD5a-1 and 2 in various human tissues, and determined its sensitivity to finasteride and dutasteride. We have established HEK-293 cell line that stably expressed SRD5a-3 for studying its activity and the inhibitory effect of finasteride, using [14C]labeled steroids. mRNA expression levels were quantified using real-time PCR in many male and female human tissues including the prostate, adipose tissue, mammary gland, as well as breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Incubation of HEK-SRD5a-3 cells with [14C]4-androstenedione and [14C]testosterone allowed us to show that SRD5a-3 can catalyze very efficiently both substrates 4-androstenedione and testosterone into 5α-androstanedione and dihydrotestosterone, respectively. We observed that the affinity of the enzyme for 4-androstenedione is higher than for testosterone. The activity of SRD5a-3 and SRD5a-2 are similarly sensitive to finasteride, whereas dutasteride is a much more potent inhibitor of SRD5a-3 than SRD5a-2. Tissue distribution analysis shows that SRD5a-3 mRNA expression levels are higher than those of SRD5a-1 and SRD5a-2 in 20 analyzed tissues. In particular, it is highly expressed in the skin, brain, mammary gland and breast cancer cell lines, thus suggesting that SRD5a-3 could play an important role in the production of androgens in these and other peripheral tissues. PMID:25961201

  17. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by 32P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP. PMID:27404282

  18. Identification of Lactobacillus brevis using a species-specific AFLP-derived marker.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Vincenzina; Quero, Grazia Marina; Chieffi, Daniele; Franz, Charles M A P

    2016-09-01

    A simple and specific method for the rapid detection and identification of Lactobacillus brevis was developed. A fAFLP (Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms) marker for L. brevis was used to design oligonucleotide primers for a species-specific PCR assay, targeting a 125bp fragment of the gene encoding the aldo/keto reductase of the diketogulonate-reductase family of L. brevis. This assay resulted in 100% inclusivity and exclusivity of assignment of strains to the species L. brevis. The analytical specificity of this assay was successfully tested to identify L. brevis isolates from sourdoughs. PMID:27289191

  19. Inhibition of human steroid 5alpha reductases type I and II by 6-aza-steroids: structural determinants of one-step vs two-step mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moss, M L; Kuzmic, P; Stuart, J D; Tian, G; Peranteau, A G; Frye, S V; Kadwell, S H; Kost, T A; Overton, L K; Patel, I R

    1996-03-19

    We have discovered that 17beta-[N,N-(diethyl)carbamoyl]-6-azaandrost-4-en-3-one is a time-dependent inhibitor of type II 5alpha-reductase, as is the drug finasteride. Unlike finasteride, the 6-aza-steroid is not a time-dependent inhibitor of type I 5 alpha-reductase. Finasteride inhibition of type II enzyme proceeds in a two-step mechanism. At pH 6 and 37 degrees C, an initial finasteride-reductase complex is formed with a K(i)(app) of 11.9 +/- 4.1 nM. In a second step, an irreversible complex is formed with a rate constant of inactivation of 0.09 +/- 0.01 s(-1). In contrast, the 6-aza-steroid is a reversible inhibitor. From the results of a simplified mathematical analysis, based on the rapid equilibrium approximation, the inhibitor and the enzyme form an initial complex with a K(i) of 6.8 +/- 0.2 nM. The reversible formation of a final complex, with an overall K(i) of 0.07 +/- 0.02 nM, is characterized by a first-order isomerization rate constant 0.0035 +/- 0.0001 s(-1) for the forward step and 0.00025 +/- 0.00006 s(-1) for the backward step. All rate constants for the two-step mechanism were obtained by using a general numerical integration method. The best fit values for the association and dissociation rate constants were 5.0 microM(-1) s(-1) and 0.033 +/- 0.008 s(-1), respectively, and the isomerization rate constants were 0.0035 +/- 0.007 s(-1) and 0.000076 +/- 0.000019 s(-1). These values correspond to an initial K(i) of 6.5 nM and an overall dissociation constant of 0.14 nM. The data presented here show that both finasteride and the 6-aza-steroid analogs are potent against type II 5alpha-reductase, although their mechanisms of inhibition are different. PMID:8639496

  20. 17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one is an active site-directed slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase 1.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Stuart, J D; Moss, M L; Domanico, P L; Bramson, H N; Patel, I R; Kadwell, S H; Overton, L K; Kost, T A; Mook, R A

    1994-03-01

    17 beta-(N-tert-butylcarbamoyl)-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-1-en-3-one (finasteride), which has been approved for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, is shown here to be a slow time-dependent inhibitor of human steroid 5 alpha-reductase isozyme 1. This inhibition is characterized by an initial, fast step where the inhibitor binds to the enzyme followed by a slow step that leads to a final enzyme-inhibitor complex (EI*). No recovery of activity from this EI* complex was observed after dialysis for 3 days. The formation of EI* is diminished in the presence of a competitive, reversible inhibitor, indicating that the inhibition is active site-directed. At 37 degrees C and pH 7.0, the rate constant for the second, slow inhibition step, k3, is (1.40 +/- 0.04) x 10(-3) s-1 and the pseudo-bimolecular rate constant, k3/Ki, is (4.0 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) M-1 s-1. This latter rate constant is less than the value of 2.7 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 determined for the inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase 2 by finasteride [Faller, B., Farley, D., & Nick, H. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 5705-5710].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8117686

  1. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  2. Prostaglandin (PG) F2 Alpha Synthesis in Human Subcutaneous and Omental Adipose Tissue: Modulation by Inflammatory Cytokines and Role of the Human Aldose Reductase AKR1B1

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Andréanne; Lacroix-Pépin, Nicolas; Pelletier, Mélissa; Veilleux, Alain; Noël, Suzanne; Bouchard, Céline; Marceau, Picard; Fortier, Michel A.; Tchernof, André

    2014-01-01

    Introduction PGF2α may be involved in the regulation of adipose tissue function. Objectives 1) To examine PGF2α release by primary preadipocytes, mature adipocytes and whole tissue explants from the subcutaneous and omental fat compartments; 2) To assess which PGF synthase is the most relevant in human adipose tissue. Methods Fat samples were obtained by surgery in women. PGF2α release by preadipocytes, adipocytes and explants under stimulation by TNF-α, IL-1β or both was measured. Messenger RNA expression levels of AKR1B1 and AKR1C3 were measured by RT-PCR in whole adipose tissue and cytokine-treated preadipocytes. The effect of AKR1B1 inhibitor ponalrestat on PGF2α synthesis was investigated. Results PGF2α release was significantly induced in response to cytokines compared to control in omental (p = 0.01) and to a lesser extent in subcutaneous preadipocytes (p = 0.02). Messenger RNA of COX-2 was significantly higher in omental compared to subcutaneous preadipocytes in response to combined TNF-α and IL-1β (p = 0.01). Inflammatory cytokines increased AKR1B1 mRNA expression and protein levels (p≤0.05), but failed to increase expression levels of AKR1C3 in cultured preadipocytes. Accordingly, ponalrestat blunted PGF2α synthesis by preadipocytes in basal and stimulated conditions (p≤0.05). Women with the highest PGF2α release by omental adipocytes had a higher BMI (p = 0.05), waist circumference (p≤0.05) and HOMAir index (p≤0.005) as well as higher mRNA expression of AKR1B1 in omental (p<0.10) and subcutaneous (p≤0.05) adipose tissue compared to women with low omental adipocytes PGF2α release. Positive correlations were observed between mRNA expression of AKR1B1 in both compartments and BMI, waist circumference as well as HOMAir index (p≤0.05 for all). Conclusion PGF2α release by omental mature adipocytes is increased in abdominally obese women. Moreover, COX-2 expression and PGF2α release is particularly responsive to

  3. The fission yeast ferric reductase gene frp1+ is required for ferric iron uptake and encodes a protein that is homologous to the gp91-phox subunit of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, D G; Dancis, A; Anderson, G J; Klausner, R D

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a cell surface ferric reductase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutant strain deficient in this activity was also deficient in ferric iron uptake, while ferrous iron uptake was not impaired. Therefore, reduction is a required step in cellular ferric iron acquisition. We have cloned frp1+, the wild-type allele of the mutant gene. frp1+ mRNA levels were repressed by iron addition to the growth medium. Fusion of 138 nucleotides of frp1+ promoter sequences to a reporter gene, the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, conferred iron-dependent regulation upon the latter when introduced into S. pombe. The predicted amino acid sequence of the frp1+ gene exhibits hydrophobic regions compatible with transmembrane domains. It shows similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FRE1 gene product and the gp91-phox protein, a component of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase that is deficient in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:8321236

  4. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA species for mammalian dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenases.

    PubMed Central

    Arimitsu, E; Aoki, S; Ishikura, S; Nakanishi, K; Matsuura, K; Hara, A

    1999-01-01

    Cynomolgus and Japanese monkey kidneys, dog and pig livers and rabbit lens contain dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.1.20) associated with high carbonyl reductase activity. Here we have isolated cDNA species for the dimeric enzymes by reverse transcriptase-PCR from human intestine in addition to the above five animal tissues. The amino acid sequences deduced from the monkey, pig and dog cDNA species perfectly matched the partial sequences of peptides digested from the respective enzymes of these animal tissues, and active recombinant proteins were expressed in a bacterial system from the monkey and human cDNA species. Northern blot analysis revealed the existence of a single 1.3 kb mRNA species for the enzyme in these animal tissues. The human enzyme shared 94%, 85%, 84% and 82% amino acid identity with the enzymes of the two monkey strains (their sequences were identical), the dog, the pig and the rabbit respectively. The sequences of the primate enzymes consisted of 335 amino acid residues and lacked one amino acid compared with the other animal enzymes. In contrast with previous reports that other types of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, carbonyl reductases and enzymes with either activity belong to the aldo-keto reductase family or the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase showed no sequence similarity with the members of the two protein families. The dimeric enzyme aligned with low degrees of identity (14-25%) with several prokaryotic proteins, in which 47 residues are strictly or highly conserved. Thus dimeric dihydrodiol dehydrogenase has a primary structure distinct from the previously known mammalian enzymes and is suggested to constitute a novel protein family with the prokaryotic proteins. PMID:10477285

  5. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  6. Differential expression of type 2 3α/type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (AKR1C3) in tumors of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Aubrey L; Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Yang, Qing; Sing, Chor Wing; Fan, Michael; Mapstone, Timothy B; Gross, Naina L; Gumerlock, Mary K; Martin, Michael D; Rabb, Craig H; Fung, Kar-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Human aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C3, type 2 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSC)/ type 5 17β-HSD, is known to be involved in steroids, prostaglandins, and lipid aldehydes metabolism. The expression of AKR1C3 has been demonstrated in hormone-dependent normal tissues such as breast, endometrium, prostate, and testis; and de -regulated AKR1C3 expression has been shown in breast carcinoma, endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial carcinoma, and prostate carcinoma. AKR1C3 expression has also been demonstrated in hormone-independent normal tissues (renal tubules and urothelium) and neoplastic tissues (renal cell carcinoma, Wilm's tumor, and urothelial cell carcinoma). Extensive expression of AKR1C3 in normal and neoplastic as well as hormone-dependent and hormone-independent tissues indicates that AKR1C3 may have functions beyond steroid hormone metabolism. In this report, we describe a widespread expression of AKR1C3 in glial neoplasms and meningiomas, with limited expression in medulloblastoma and no expression in Schwannoma. These tumors, except meningioma, are not classically considered to be sex hormone-dependent or related brain tumors. The current results corroborate our earlier observations that AKR1C3 is expressed in both sex hormone-dependent and hormone-independent malignancies. Similar to AKR1C3 distribution in Wilm’s tumor, we also demonstrate that expression of AKR1C3 is reduced in tumors with embryonic phenotypes. PMID:21151387

  7. Induction of a Unique Isoform of the NCOA7 Oxidation Resistance Gene by Interferon β-1b

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lijian; Croze, Ed; Yamaguchi, Ken D.; Tran, Tiffany; Reder, Anthony T.; Litvak, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-β-1b induces an alternative-start transcript containing the C-terminal TLDc domain of nuclear receptor coactivator protein 7 (NCOA7), a member of the OXR family of oxidation resistance proteins. IFN-β-1b induces NCOA7-AS (alternative start) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy individuals and multiple sclerosis patients and human fetal brain cells, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, and fibrosarcoma cells. NCOA7-AS is a previously undocumented IFN-β-inducible gene that contains only the last 5 exons of full-length NCOA7 plus a unique first exon (exon 10a) that is not found in longer forms of NCOA7. This exon encodes a domain closely related to an important class of bacterial aldo-keto oxido-reductase proteins that play a critical role in regulating redox activity. We demonstrate that NCOA7-AS is induced by IFN and LPS, but not by oxidative stress and exhibits, independently, oxidation resistance activity. We further demonstrate that induction of NCOA7-AS by IFN is dependent on IFN-receptor activation, the Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, and a canonical IFN-stimulated response element regulatory sequence upstream of exon 10a. We describe a new role for IFN-βs involving a mechanism of action that leads to an increase in resistance to inflammation-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:25330068

  8. Induction of a unique isoform of the NCOA7 oxidation resistance gene by interferon β-1b.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijian; Croze, Ed; Yamaguchi, Ken D; Tran, Tiffany; Reder, Anthony T; Litvak, Vladimir; Volkert, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-β-1b induces an alternative-start transcript containing the C-terminal TLDc domain of nuclear receptor coactivator protein 7 (NCOA7), a member of the OXR family of oxidation resistance proteins. IFN-β-1b induces NCOA7-AS (alternative start) expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy individuals and multiple sclerosis patients and human fetal brain cells, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, and fibrosarcoma cells. NCOA7-AS is a previously undocumented IFN-β-inducible gene that contains only the last 5 exons of full-length NCOA7 plus a unique first exon (exon 10a) that is not found in longer forms of NCOA7. This exon encodes a domain closely related to an important class of bacterial aldo-keto oxido-reductase proteins that play a critical role in regulating redox activity. We demonstrate that NCOA7-AS is induced by IFN and LPS, but not by oxidative stress and exhibits, independently, oxidation resistance activity. We further demonstrate that induction of NCOA7-AS by IFN is dependent on IFN-receptor activation, the Janus kinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway, and a canonical IFN-stimulated response element regulatory sequence upstream of exon 10a. We describe a new role for IFN-βs involving a mechanism of action that leads to an increase in resistance to inflammation-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:25330068

  9. Identification and Validation of HCC-specific Gene Transcriptional Signature for Tumor Antigen Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Caruso, Francesca Pia; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Costa, Valerio; Aprile, Marianna; Esposito, Roberta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A novel two-step bioinformatics strategy was applied for identification of signatures with therapeutic implications in hepatitis-associated HCC. Transcriptional profiles from HBV- and HCV-associated HCC samples were compared with non-tumor liver controls. Resulting HCC modulated genes were subsequently compared with different non-tumor tissue samples. Two related signatures were identified, namely “HCC-associated” and “HCC-specific”. Expression data were validated by RNA-Seq analysis carried out on unrelated HCC samples and protein expression was confirmed according to The Human Protein Atlas" (http://proteinatlas.org/), a public repository of immunohistochemistry data. Among all, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10, and IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 3 were found strictly HCC-specific with no expression in 18/20 normal tissues. Target peptides for vaccine design were predicted for both proteins associated with the most prevalent HLA-class I and II alleles. The described novel strategy showed to be feasible for identification of HCC-specific proteins as highly potential target for HCC immunotherapy. PMID:27387388

  10. Studies of Human 2,4-Dienoyl CoA Reductase Shed New Light on Peroxisomal β-Oxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Tian; Wu, Dong; Ding, Wei; Wang, Jiangyun; Shaw, Neil; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-10-15

    Peroxisomes play an essential role in maintaining fatty acid homeostasis. Although mitochondria are also known to participate in the catabolism of fatty acids via β-oxidation, differences exist between the peroxisomal and mitochondrial β-oxidation. Only peroxisomes, but not mitochondrion, can shorten very long chain fatty acids. Here, we describe the crystal structure of a ternary complex of peroxisomal 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductases (pDCR) with hexadienoyl CoA and NADP, as a prototype for comparison with the mitochondrial 2,4-dienoyl CoA reductase (mDCR) to shed light on the differences between the enzymes from the two organelles at the molecular level. Unexpectedly, the structure of pDCR refined to 1.84 Å resolution reveals the absence of the tyrosine-serine pair seen in the active site of mDCR, which together with a lysine and an asparagine have been deemed a hallmark of the SDR family of enzymes. Instead, aspartate hydrogen-bonded to the Cα hydroxyl via a water molecule seems to perturb the water molecule for protonation of the substrate. Our studies provide the first structural evidence for participation of water in the DCR-catalyzed reactions. Biochemical studies and structural analysis suggest that pDCRs can catalyze the shortening of six-carbon-long substrates in vitro. However, the Km values of pDCR for short chain acyl CoAs are at least 6-fold higher than those for substrates with 10 or more aliphatic carbons. Unlike mDCR, hinge movements permit pDCR to process very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.