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Sample records for human astrocytoma cell

  1. Expression of the somatostatin gene in human astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Tannenbaum, G S; Schipper, H M; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting hormone; SRIH) has been demonstrated in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in endocrine cells of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract and can suppress various immune functions including lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and cytokine production. Since astrocytes possess antigen-presenting activity and can secrete a wide array of immunoregulatory and inflammatory cytokines, we studied SRIH gene expression in both astrocyte cell lines and mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from healthy donors. We now report by means of a complementary DNA-based reverse transcription PCR that differential levels of SRIH mRNA were expressed in 9 of 11 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but were undetectable in activated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes as well as in a variety of human lymphocyte and monocyte cell lines. The synthesis and secretion of SRIH protein by astrocytoma cells that expressed SRIH transcripts were confirmed by specific radioimmunoassay of cell culture fluids. These findings support the notion that SRIH gene expression occurs in human astrocytoma cells but not in mature lymphoid cells of the immune system. PMID:8991628

  2. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells. PMID:26882972

  3. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications. PMID:24666692

  4. Growth promoting effect of recombinant interleukin I and tumor necrosis factor for human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Giulian, D.; Dinarello, C.A.; Brown, D.C.; Lachman, L.B.

    1986-03-01

    Human IL I has been demonstrated to stimulate the growth of rat astrocytes in vitro. To determine if IL I has a similar growth promoting effect upon human brain cells, two astrocytoma cell lines were tested for their ability to incorporate /sup 3/H-thymidine in response to various types of IL I and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The U373 astrocytoma was found to respond mitogenically to human native IL I, human recombinant IL I, rat IL I and murine recombinant IL I. The cell line failed to respond to recombinant IL 2 and recombinant ..cap alpha.. and ..gamma.. interferon. The sensitivity of the U373 cells paralleled the murine thymocyte assay for IL I. Interestingly, the U373 responded mitogenically to recombinant TNF prepared by two different companies, thus indicating that TNF stimulates proliferation of this cell line and does not lead to cell death. In the murine thymocyte assay for IL I, TNF was not active. The results indicate that 1) both IL I and TNF are mitogenic for a human astrocytoma cell line and 2) the U373 cells may be used to assay both IL I and TNF in a highly sensitive mitogenic assay.

  5. MicroRNA-542-3p Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion via Targeting AKT Pathway in Human Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Cai, Junchao; Zhao, JingJing; Zhang, Nu; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Rong; Yi, Yang; Fang, Lishan; Zhang, Le; Li, Mengfeng; Wu, Jueheng; Zhang, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying constitutive activation of AKT signaling, which plays essential roles in astrocytoma progression, is not fully characterized. Increasing numbers of studies have reported that microRNAs are involved in the malignant behavior of astrocytoma cells via directly targeting multiple oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Here, we found that microRNA (miR)-542-3p expression was decreased in glioblastoma cell lines and astrocytoma tissues, and reduced levels of miR-542-3p expression correlated with high histopathological grades and poor prognosis of astrocytoma patients. Exogenous miR-542-3p suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion through not only targeting AKT1 itself but also directly down-regulating its two important upstream regulators, namely, integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1. Notably, overexpressing miR-542-3p decreased AKT1 phosphorylation and directly and indirectly repressed nuclear translocation and transactivation activity of β-catenin to exert its anti-invasive effect. Furthermore, the miR-542-3p expression level negatively correlated with AKT activity as well as levels of integrin-linked kinase and PIK3R1 in human astrocytoma specimens. These findings suggest that miR-542-3p acts as a negative regulator in astrocytoma progression and that miR-542-3p down-regulation contributes to aberrant activation of AKT signaling, leaving open the possibility that miR-542-3p may be a potential therapeutic target for high grade astrocytoma. PMID:26286747

  6. Expression of immediate early genes after treatment of human astrocytoma cells with radiation and taxol

    SciTech Connect

    Gubits, R.M.; Geard, C.R.; Schiff, P.B.

    1993-10-20

    The promising chemotherapeutic agent, taxol, has been shown to sensitize the G18 line of human astrocytoma cells to ionizing radiation. The present studies were performed to identify specific changes in gene expression associated with this altered sensitivity. The products of immediate early genes, which are induced transiently in cells in response to a variety of treatments, including growth factors, neurotransmitters, and irradiation with UV light or X rays, are thought to initiate a cascade of genetic responses to alterations in cellular environment. The present results demonstrate a dramatic attenuation in one immediate early gene response in association with a treatment that enhances radiosensitivity in a refractory human brain tumor line. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Effect of brefelamide on HGF-induced survival of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Honma, Shigeyoshi; Takasaka, Sachina; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibuya, Takahiro; Mitazaki, Satoru; Abe, Sumiko; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by their high level of resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy and new treatment options are urgently required. We previously demonstrated that brefelamide, an aromatic amide isolated from methanol extracts of cellular slime molds Dictyostelium brefeldianum and D. giganteum, had antiproliferative effects on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells, a model of glioma. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which brefelamide inhibited 1321N1 and PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cell proliferation. When cells were cultured in serum-free medium, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased survival of 1321N1 cells but not PC12 cells. HGF receptor, c-MET, was strongly expressed in 1321N1 cells, but not in PC12 cells. Pretreatment of 1321N1 cells with brefelamide inhibited both HGF-induced cell survival and expression of c-MET. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT was increased by HGF, but these changes were inhibited by brefelamide pretreatment. Moreover, HGF mRNA levels and secretion were reduced by brefelamide. These results suggest that brefelamide reduces survival of 1321N1 cells via multiple effects including suppression of HGF receptor expression and HGF secretion and inhibition of ERK and AKT phosphorylation. PMID:27130674

  8. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the 1321N1 human astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of muscarinic agonists, partial agonists and antagonists to muscarinic receptors of 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells was studied. Binding was studied in both intact cells and cell lysates. Partial agonists and antagonists exhibited similar apparent affinities in intact cell competition binding assays with either the lipophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)QNB or the hydrophilic radioligand ({sup 3}H)NMS. In contrast, full agonists exhibited markedly lower apparent affinities in intact cells with ({sup 3}H)QNB than with ({sup 3}H)NMS. Treatment of cells with antimycin A to deplete intracellular ATP prevented agonist-induced internalization of muscarinic receptors as assessed by sucrose density gradient assays of receptor subcellular distribution. In ATP-depleted cells, the apparent affinities of full agonists vs ({sup 3}H)QNB were markedly higher. The apparent affinities of partial agonists and of antagonists were unaffected by ATP depletion. In other studies, the effects of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) on muscarinic receptor downregulation and internalization in 1321N1 cells were determined. PMA alone did not induce muscarinic receptor downregulation but instead decreased both the rate and final extent of downregulation induced by the agonist carbachol. The specificity of other protein kinase C activators for inhibiting carbachol-induced downregulation indicated involvement of protein kinase C. Furthermore, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented the inhibitory effect of PMA on downregulation. However, staurosporine did not inhibit agonist-induced downregulation.

  9. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  10. Cytotoxicity effects of different surfactant molecules conjugated to carbon nanotubes on human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M; Craig, Michael M; Greenwade, Molly M; Joseph, Katherine L

    2009-01-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system. PMID:20652100

  11. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood–brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system. PMID:20652100

  12. Phytometabolite Dehydroleucodine Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and DNA Damage in Human Astrocytoma Cells through p73/p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bailon-Moscoso, Natalia; González-Arévalo, Gabriela; Velásquez-Rojas, Gabriela; Malagon, Omar; Vidari, Giovanni; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Ratovitski, Edward A.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the idea that secondary metabolites obtained from medicinal plants (phytometabolites) may be important contributors in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents to reduce the occurrence or recurrence of cancer. Our study focused on Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene found in the provinces of Loja and Zamora-Chinchipe. In this study, we showed that DhL displayed cytostatic and cytotoxic activities on the human cerebral astrocytoma D384 cell line. With lactone isolated from Gynoxys verrucosa Wedd, a medicinal plant from Ecuador, we found that DhL induced cell death in D384 cells by triggering cell cycle arrest and inducing apoptosis and DNA damage. We further found that the cell death resulted in the increased expression of CDKN1A and BAX proteins. A marked induction of the levels of total TP73 and phosphorylated TP53, TP73, and γ-H2AX proteins was observed in D384 cells exposed to DhL, but no increase in total TP53 levels was detected. Overall these studies demonstrated the marked effect of DhL on the diminished survival of human astrocytoma cells through the induced expression of TP73 and phosphorylation of TP73 and TP53, suggesting their key roles in the tumor cell response to DhL treatment. PMID:26309132

  13. Progesterone Induces the Growth and Infiltration of Human Astrocytoma Cells Implanted in the Cerebral Cortex of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Germán-Castelán, Liliana; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquín; González-Arenas, Aliesha; González-Morán, María Genoveva; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) promotes cell proliferation in several types of cancer, including brain tumors such as astrocytomas, the most common and aggressive primary intracerebral neoplasm in humans. In this work, we studied the effects of P4 and its intracellular receptor antagonist, RU486, on growth and infiltration of U373 cells derived from a human astrocytoma grade III, implanted in the motor cortex of adult male rats, using two treatment schemes. In the first one, fifteen days after cells implantation, rats were daily subcutaneously treated with vehicle (propylene glycol, 160 μL), P4 (1 mg), RU486 (5 mg), or P4 + RU486 (1 mg and 5 mg, resp.) for 21 days. In the second one, treatments started 8 weeks after cells implantation and lasted for 14 days. In both schemes we found that P4 significantly increased the tumor area as compared with the rest of the treatments, whereas RU486 blocked P4 effects. All rats treated with P4 showed tumor infiltration, while 28.6% and 42.9% of the animals treated with RU486 and P4 + RU486, respectively, presented it. Our data suggest that P4 promotes growth and migration of human astrocytoma cells implanted in the motor cortex of the rat through the interaction with its intracellular receptor. PMID:24982875

  14. H/sub 1/-histamine receptors regulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis in human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahata, N.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Activation of H/sub 1/-histamine receptors on 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells resulted in a rapid formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), IP/sub 3/, IP/sub 2/, and IP/sub 1/. Histamine-induced mobilization of Ca/sup + +/ and stimulated of a Ca/sup + +/ calmodulin-regulated phosphodiesterase occurred concurrently with histamine-stimulated InsP formation. The K/sub 0.5/ values for histamine for activation of phosphodiesterase, mobilization of Ca/sup + +/, and stimulation of InsP formation were 3,4, and 10 ..mu..M, respectively. The K/sub i/ for histamine determined in competition binding experiments with the H/sub 1/-receptor antagonist, /sup 3/H-mepyramine, was 11 ..mu..M. As with muscarinic receptor-mediated effects in these cells, inactivation of G/sub i/ with pertussis toxin had no effect on H/sub 1/-receptor mediated responses. Both histamine and muscarinic receptor stimulation resulted in the formation of Ins 1,4,5P/sub 3/ and Ins 1,3,4P/sub 3/. In contrast to muscarinic receptor stimulation, which results in a linear accumulation of InsP for greater than 30 min, histamine-stimulated formation of InsP rapidly desensitized.

  15. Energy-dependent cell volume maintenance in UC-11MG human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Lomneth, R; Gruenstein, E I

    1989-10-01

    Swelling of astrocytes in the brain is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with stroke and head trauma. Using a human astrocytoma cell line (UC-11MG) as a model system, we studied cell volume changes caused by ATP depletion under conditions mimicking hypoxia. ATP levels were reduced to less than 10% of control using the metabolic inhibitors KCN or antimycin in combination with glucose deprivation. This was sufficient to eliminate ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake, indicating the Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase was not operating. Furosemide-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake was reduced by approximately 60%, indicating Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport was also sensitive to ATP loss. ATP depletion resulted in a 30-40% reduction of cell volume within 60 min. ATP depletion also resulted in a net loss of intracellular K+. This loss of K+ could be blocked by Ba2+, indicating the K+ loss was through a conductive channel. When the net K+ loss was blocked by Ba2+, the volume decrease was also prevented. The cells remained viable throughout the time period as judged by exclusion of ethidium bromide by 99% of the cells and recovery of ATP levels to 75% of control within 60 min. We conclude that ATP depletion, following inhibition of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, causes astrocytes to shrink because of a more rapid loss of K+ than uptake of Na+. Thus it appears that ATP depletion alone is not sufficient to account for the rapid phase of astrocytic swelling observed during cerebral ischemia. PMID:2801931

  16. Proteome alteration of U251 human astrocytoma cell after inhibiting retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Wan, Chunling; Ji, Baohu; Zhang, Zhao; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Nan; La, Yujuan; Huang, Ke; Jiang, Lei; He, Guang; Gao, Linhan; Zhao, Xinzhi; Shi, Yongyong; Huang, Gang; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin

    2009-03-01

    Retinoic acid (Ra) is crucial for the patterning and neuronal differentiation in the central nervous system (CNS). Ra deficiency in animals disrupts the motor activities and memory abilities. The molecular mechanisms underlying these behavior abnormalities remain largely unknown. In the current study, we treated the astrocytoma cells with citral, an inhibitor of Ra synthesis. We analyzed the differences in the protein concentrations between the treated and untreated astrocytoma cells by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), Imagemaster software, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In total, 39 of 46 altered protein spots with significant mascot scores were identified representing 36 proteins, that were involved in significantly altered glutamate metabolism, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress response by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Altered 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) was also observed in western blot. These data provide some clues for explaining the behavioral changes caused by Ra deficiency, and support the hypothesis that Ra signaling is associated with some symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders and schizophrenia. PMID:19089318

  17. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRalpha and ERRgamma proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC(50) and IC(50) values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRalpha and ERRgamma are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  18. Identification and characterization of estrogen receptor-related receptor alpha and gamma in human glioma and astrocytoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gandhari, Mukesh K; Frazier, Chester R; Hartenstein, Julia S; Cloix, Jean-Francois; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine expression and function of estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) in human glioma and astrocytoma cell lines. These estrogen receptor-negative cell lines expressed ERRα and ERRγ proteins to varying degree in a cell context dependent manner, with U87MG glioma cells expressing both orphan nuclear receptors. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence of ERR isoform-specific agonists and antagonists, and the calculated EC50 and IC50 values were consistent with previous reported values determined in other types of cancer cell lines. Induction of luciferase expression under the control of ERR isoform-specific promoters was also observed in these cells. These results indicate that ERRα and ERRγ are differentially expressed in these tumor cell lines and likely contribute to agonist-dependent ERR transcriptional activity. PMID:19822186

  19. Expression of aquaporin8 in human astrocytomas: Correlation with pathologic grade

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Shu-juan; Wang, Ke-jian; Gan, Sheng-wei; Xu, Jin; Xu, Shi-ye; Sun, Shan-quan

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •AQP8 is mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of human astrocytoma cells. •AQP8 over-expressed in human astrocytomas, especially glioblastoma. •The up-regulation of AQP8 is related to the pathological grade of human astrocytomas. •AQP8 may contribute to the growth and proliferation of astrocytomas. -- Abstract: Aquaporin8 (AQP8), a member of the aquaporin (AQP) protein family, is weakly distributed in mammalian brains. Previous studies on AQP8 have focused mainly on the digestive and the reproductive systems. AQP8 has a pivotal role in keeping the fluid and electrolyte balance. In this study, we investigated the expression changes of AQP8 in 75 cases of human brain astrocytic tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that AQP8 was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of astrocytoma cells. The expression levels and immunoreactive score of AQP8 protein and mRNA increased in low-grade astrocytomas, and further increased in high-grade astrocytomas, especially in glioblastoma. Therefore, AQP8 may contribute to the proliferation of astrocytomas, and may be a biomarker and candidate therapy target for patients with astrocytomas.

  20. The interaction of bee products with temozolomide in human diffuse astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme and astroglia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Borawska, Maria H; Markiewicz-Żukowska, Renata; Naliwajko, Sylwia K; Moskwa, Justyna; Bartosiuk, Emilia; Socha, Katarzyna; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Kochanowicz, Jan; Mariak, Zenon

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of extracts from Salix spp. honey (ESH), beebread (EBB), and royal jelly (ERJ) with and without temozolomide (TMZ) on cell lines derived from a patient with diffuse astrocytoma (DASC), human glioblastoma multiforme (U87MG), and normal human astroglia (SVGp12). DASC was identified by immunocytochemistry. TMZ (20 μM) in combination with ESH (30 μg/mL), EBB (50 μg/mL), and ERJ (30 μg/mL) has stronger cytotoxic activity on U87MG cells after 72 h (20.0, 26.5, and 29.3% of control, respectively) than TMZ alone (about 6% of control). An increase of the cytotoxic effect and inhibition of DNA synthesis in SVGp12 were detected after administering TMZ with the studied extracts. NF-κB p50 subunit was reduced in U87MG cells after treatment with ESH (70.9%) and ESH + TMZ (74.7%). A significant decline of MMP-9 and MMP-2 secretion in cultured U87MG was detected after incubation with EBB (42.9% and 73.0%, respectively) and EBB + TMZ (38.4% and 68.5%, respectively). In conclusion, the use of bee products may increase the cytotoxic effect of TMZ in U87MG but also in SVGp12 cell line. It is important to note that the U87MG cells were sensitive to natural bee products, although there was no influence of natural bee products on the DASC cells. PMID:25256634

  1. Restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 production in a human astrocytoma cell line is associated with a cellular block in Rev function.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, M; Felber, B K; Kleinschmidt, A; Froese, B; Erfle, V; Pavlakis, G N; Brack-Werner, R

    1995-01-01

    Chronically human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB-infected human TH4-7-5 astrocytoma cells show low-level virus production. Cocultivation of TH4-7-5 cells with myelomonocytic cells led to active virus production in these target cells after a lag period, indicating cell-determined restriction of virus replication in the glial cells. HIV-1 transcript patterns of TH4-7-5 cells contained only a small proportion of Rev-dependent mRNA species, mimicking a Rev-negative phenotype despite the presence of rev mRNAs and protein. Sequencing of the single provirus integrated in TH4-7-5 cells demonstrated that the rev gene and the Rev-responsive element are intact. These results suggested inhibited function of the Rev-regulatory unit in these astrocytoma cells. Transfection of TH4-7-5 cells with a Rev expression plasmid resulted in weak or no induction of proviral p24gag antigen levels compared with the dramatic increase observed in Rev-permissive HeLa cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of TH4-7-5 cells transfected with a rev-expressing plasmid revealed prominent cytoplasmic and nuclear-nucleolar localization of Rev, in contrast to the predominant nuclear-nucleolar localization pattern of Rev in HeLa cells. We conclude that restriction of virus production in TH4-7-5 cells is at least partially due to a block in Rev-dependent posttranscriptional regulation of HIV expression. PMID:7884864

  2. Comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) on human neuroblastoma and astrocytoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yongchang; Venkatraj, Jijayanagaram; Barhoumi, Rola; Pal, Ranadip; Datta, Aniruddha; Wild, James R.; Tiffany-Castiglioni, Evelyn . E-mail: ecastiglioni@cvm.tamu.edu

    2007-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the comparative non-cholinergic neurotoxic effects of paraoxon, which is acutely neurotoxic, and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), which induces OPIDN, in the human neuroblastoma SY5Y and the human astrocytoma cell line CCF-STTG1. SY5Y cells have been studied extensively as a model for OP-induced neurotoxicity, but CCF cells have not previously been studied. We conducted a preliminary human gene array assay of OP-treated SY5Y cells in order to assess at the gene level whether these cells can distinguish between OP compounds that do and do not cause OPIDN. Paraoxon and DFP induced dramatically different profiles of gene expression. Two genes were upregulated and 13 downregulated by at least 2-fold in paraoxon-treated cells. In contrast, one gene was upregulated by DFP and none was downregulated at the 2-fold threshold. This finding is consistent with current and previous observations that SY5Y cells can distinguish between OPs that do or do not induce OPIDN. We also examined gene array results for possible novel target proteins or metabolic pathways for OP neurotoxicity. Protein levels of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) revealed that paraoxon exposure at 3 {mu}M for 24 h significantly reduced GRP78 levels by 30% in neuroblastoma cells, whereas DFP treatment had no effect. In comparison with SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, paraoxon and DFP (3 {mu}M for 24 h) each significantly increased GRP78 levels by 23-24% in CCF astrocytoma cells. As we have previously evaluated intracellular changes in Ca{sup 2+} levels in SY5Y cells, we investigated the effects of paraoxon and DFP on cellular Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis in CCF by studying cytosolic and mitochondrial basal calcium levels. A significant decrease in the ratio of mitochondrial to cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence was detected in CCF cultures treated for either 1 or 3 days with 1, 3, 10, or 30 {mu}M paraoxon. In contrast, treatment with DFP for 1 day had no significant effect

  3. Effect of lonidamine on the utilization of /sup 14/C-labeled glucose by human astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, M.G.; Zupi, G.; Fanciulli, M.; Del Carlo, C.; Giorno, S.; Laudonio, N.; Silvestrini, B.; Caputo, A.; Floridi, A.

    1987-10-01

    The effect of lonidamine (LND), 1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-1H-indazol-3 carboxylic acid, on the utilization of carbon from /sup 14/C-labeled glucose by cell cultures of the permanent strain LI derived from a human glioblastoma multiforme (astrocytoma) has been investigated. The results may be summarized as follows. Aerobic glycolysis is the main energy-yielding process as shown by the fact that the greatest part of glucose carbon atoms is incorporated into lactate. Nevertheless, the amount of glucose converted accounts for only 63% of the lactate produced, indicating the presence of an elevated endogenous aerobic glycolysis. The amount of glucose carbon atoms incorporated into CO/sub 2/, lipids, nucleic acid, and supporting structures is low. LND decreased the incorporation of /sup 14/C activity in all the above mentioned isolated compounds because of its ability to inhibit glucose phosphorylation. Consequently, there is a lower concentration of glucose-6-phosphate which, in turn, affects the rate of formation of several metabolites in glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways. Experiments with (1-/sup 14/C)-2-deoxy-D-glucose further substantiate the idea of glucose phosphorylation as a main target of LND and strongly suggest the presence of a mitochondrially bound hexokinase. The higher inhibition of glucose phosphorylation in exponentially growing cells indicates a further shift of the enzyme toward mitochondria-bound form and confirms the importance of the energy status of the cell in eliciting the response to LND. The reduced capacity of LND-treated cells to synthetize ATP and glucose-6-phosphate reflects the decreased synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids, which affects cell growth and duplication.

  4. Interferon-gamma-dependent cytotoxic activation of human astrocytes and astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hashioka, Sadayuki; Klegeris, Andis; Schwab, Claudia; McGeer, Patrick L

    2009-12-01

    Astrocytes and microglia become activated in a broad spectrum of inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases. Activated microglia are widely believed to be the principal source of inflammation-induced neuronal degeneration in these disorders. To investigate the neurotoxic potential of human astrocytes, we exposed them and human astrocytic U-373 MG cells to a variety of inflammatory stimulants. We then assessed the effects of their supernatants on human SH-SY5 cells. When astrocytes and U-373 MG cells were stimulated with interferon (IFN)-gamma (150U/ml), their supernatants significantly reduced SH-SY5Y cell viability. Other powerful inflammatory stimulants such as lipopolysaccharide (0.5mug/ml), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10ng/ml) and interleukin-1beta (10ng/ml), alone or in combination, were without effect. These combinations were also unable to enhance the IFN-gamma effect. The induced cytotoxicities were reversed by JAK inhibitor I, a potent and specific inhibitor of JAKs. This result indicates that the neurotoxic effect was proceeding through the IFN-gamma receptor (IFNGR)-JAK-STAT intracellular pathway. To establish that the IFNGR is expressed on both cultured astrocytes and U-373 MG cells, we performed RT-PCR on total RNA extracts to identify a specific IFNGR product. We showed the protein product on these cultured cells by immunocytochemistry using an antibody to IFNGR. Finally, using human postmortem material, we showed sharp upregulation of the IFNGR on activated astrocytes in affected areas in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis. These findings suggest that activated astrocytes may become neurotoxic when stimulated by IFN-gamma and may therefore exacerbate the pathology in a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18375019

  5. A human astrocytoma cell line is highly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Zambrano, Juan Camilo; Lasso, Paola; Cuellar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción Judith; González, John Mario

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes play a vital role in neuronal protection, homeostasis, vascular interchange and the local immune response. Some viruses and parasites can cross the blood-brain barrier and infect glia. Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, can seriously compromise the central nervous system, mainly in immune-suppressed individuals, but also during the acute phase of the infection. In this report, the infective capacity of T. cruzi in a human astrocyte tumour-derived cell line was studied. Astrocytes exposed to trypomastigotes (1:10 ratio) produced intracellular amastigotes and new trypomastigotes emerged by day 4 post-infection (p.i.). At day 6 p.i., 93% of the cells were infected. Using flow cytometry, changes were observed in both the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and the chemokine secretion pattern of astrocytes exposed to the parasite. Blocking the low-density lipoprotein receptor on astrocytes did not reduce parasite intracellular infection. Thus, T. cruzi can infect astrocytes and modulate the immune response during central nervous system infection. PMID:23579802

  6. Nitroproteins in Human Astrocytomas Discovered by Gel Electrophoresis and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Fang; Li, Jianglin; Guo, Tianyao; Yang, Haiyan; Li, Maoyu; Sang, Shushan; Li, Xuejun; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of highly fatal astrocytomas, a type of brain cancer. To understand the molecular mechanisms of astrocytomas and to discover new biomarkers/therapeutic targets, we sought to identify nitroproteins in human astrocytoma tissue. Anti-nitrotyrosine immunoreaction-positive proteins from a high-grade astrocytoma tissue were detected with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE)-based nitrotyrosine immunoblots, and identified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Fifty-seven nitrotyrosine immunopositive protein spots were detected. A total of 870 proteins (nitrated and non-nitrated) in nitrotyrosine-immunopositive 2D gel spots were identified, and 18 nitroproteins and their 20 nitrotyrosine sites were identified with MS/MS analysis. These nitroproteins participate in multiple processes, including drug-resistance, signal transduction, cytoskeleton, transcription and translation, cell proliferation and apoptosis, immune response, phenotypic dedifferentiation, cell migration, and metastasis. Among those nitroproteins that might play a role in astrocytomas was nitro-sorcin, which is involved in drug resistance and metastasis and might play a role in the spread and treatment of an astrocytoma. Semiquantitative immune-based measurements of different sorcin expressions were found among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls, and a semiquantitative increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Nitro-β-tubulin functions in cytoskeleton and cell migration. Semiquantitative immunoreactivity of β-tubulin showed increased expression among different grades of astrocytomas relative to controls and semiquantitatively increased nitration level in high-grade astrocytoma relative to control. Each nitroprotein was rationalized and related to the corresponding functional system to provide new insights into tyrosine nitration and its potential role in the

  7. Caveolin-1 Regulates the P2Y2 Receptor Signaling in Human 1321N1 Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Namyr A; Ayala, Alondra M; Martinez, Magdiel; Martinez-Rivera, Freddyson J; Miranda, Jorge D; Silva, Walter I

    2016-06-01

    Damage to the CNS can cause a differential spatio-temporal release of multiple factors, such as nucleotides, ATP and UTP. The latter interact with neuronal and glial nucleotide receptors. The P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) has gained prominence as a modulator of gliotic responses after CNS injury. Still, the molecular mechanisms underlying these responses in glia are not fully understood. Membrane-raft microdomains, such as caveolae, and their constituent caveolins, modulate receptor signaling in astrocytes; yet, their role in P2Y2R signaling has not been adequately explored. Hence, this study evaluated the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in modulating P2Y2R subcellular distribution and signaling in human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Recombinant hP2Y2R expressed in 1321N1 cells and Cav-1 were found to co-fractionate in light-density membrane-raft fractions, co-localize via confocal microscopy, and co-immunoprecipitate. Raft localization was dependent on ATP stimulation and Cav-1 expression. This hP2Y2R/Cav-1 distribution and interaction was confirmed with various cell model systems differing in the expression of both P2Y2R and Cav-1, and shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Cav-1 expression decreased nucleotide-induced increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in 1321N1 and C6 glioma cells without altering TRAP-6 and carbachol Ca(2+) responses. In addition, Cav-1 shRNA knockdown also decreased AKT phosphorylation and altered the kinetics of ERK1/2 activation in 1321N1 cells. Our findings strongly suggest that P2Y2R interaction with Cav-1 in membrane-raft caveolae of 1321N1 cells modulates receptor coupling to its downstream signaling machinery. Thus, P2Y2R/Cav-1 interactions represent a novel target for controlling P2Y2R function after CNS injury. PMID:27129210

  8. Superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) degrades methylmercury to inorganic mercury in human astrocytoma cell line (CCF-STTG1).

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global pollutant that is affecting the health of millions of people worldwide. However, the mechanism of MeHg toxicity still remains somewhat elusive and there is no treatment. It has been known for some time that MeHg can be progressively converted to inorganic mercury (iHg) in various tissues including the brain. Recent work has suggested that cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg in a biological environment is facilitated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the oxyradical species that actually mediates this process has not been identified. Here, we provide evidence that superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) can convert MeHg to iHg. The calculated second-order rate constant for the degradation of 1μM MeHg by O2(-) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase was calculated to be 2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). We were also able to show that this bioconversion can proceed in intact CCF-STTG1 human astrocytoma cells exposed to paraquat (PQ), a O2(-) generating viologen. Notably, exposure of cells to increasing amounts of PQ led to a dose dependent increase in both MeHg and iHg. Indeed, a 24h exposure to 500μM PQ induced a ∼13-fold and ∼18-fold increase in intracellular MeHg and iHg respectively. These effects were inhibited by superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBAP. In addition, we also observed that a 24h exposure to a biologically relevant concentration of MeHg (1μM) did not induce cell death, oxidative stress, or even changes in cellular O2(-) and H2O2. However, co-exposure to PQ enhanced MeHg toxicity which was associated with a robust increase in cell death and oxidative stress. Collectively our results show that O2(-) can bioconvert MeHg to iHg in vitro and in intact cells exposed to conditions that simulate high intracellular O2(-) production. In addition, we show for the first time that O2(-) mediated degradation of MeHg to iHg enhances the toxicity of MeHg by facilitating an accumulation of both MeHg and iHg in the intracellular

  9. Expression Profile of MiR-128 in the Astrocytoma Patients and Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Liu, Yuqiong; Guo, Si; Ma, Shengli; Xiao, Lin; Wei, Na; Xue, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are the most common primary brain tumors. The critical characterizes of astrocyomas are their aggressive and infiltrative in the brain, which leads to uncontrollable by conventional forms of therapy. MicroRNAs are small RNAs that had been found to regulate their targets by specific binding to the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of mRNA. Recent advances in understanding the molecular biology of these tumors have revealed that microRNA (miRNA) disruption may play important roles in the pathogenesis of astrocytomas. And some of the miRNA alterations were found in the serum of astrocytoma patients. In this study, we studied the expression profile of miR-128, in the different stages of astrocytoma tissues and two human astrocytoma cell lines, A172 and T98G cells. We found that the levels of miR-128 are decreased in the A172 and T98G cells when compared to normal human astrocyte (NHA). Furthermore, the levels of miR-128 decreased gradually to the pathological stages of astrocytomas. We also identified that TROVE2 is a novel target of miR-128 by the luciferase reporter system. Furthermore, the expression levels of TROVE2 are dramatically increased with the pathological stages increasing. Finally, the levels of TROVE2 are negatively correlated with miR-128 in astrocytoma tissues. Our data provided novel evidence for the miR-128 and TROVE2 in the development of human astrocytomas. PMID:26307612

  10. Effects of La0.2Ce0.6Eu0.2F3 nanoparticles capped with polyethylene glycol on human astrocytoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Nathan J.; Brandt, Yekaterina; Rivera, Antonio C.; Armijo, Leisha M.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Osiński, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Lanthanide fluoride colloidal nanocrystals offer a way to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer through the enhanced absorption of ionizing radiation, as well as providing visible luminescence. In order to explore this possibility, cytotoxicity assays need to be performed on mammalian cells in vitro, to show minimum levels of biocompatibility for future experiments. 20% lanthanum 60% cerium and 20% europium lanthanide fluoride nanocrystals were capped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of molecular weight 4000 and suspended in deionized water. These nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, muffle furnace ashing, absorbance spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Visible light microscopy and trypan blue staining was performed on the cells to assay the cytotoxicity of the nanocrystal on the human astrocytoma line U-87 MG, purchased from ATCC.

  11. Methylmercury alters glutathione homeostasis by inhibiting glutaredoxin 1 and enhancing glutathione biosynthesis in cultured human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Stephan; Mailloux, Ryan J; Chan, Hing Man

    2016-08-10

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that binds strongly to thiol residues on protein and low molecular weight molecules like reduced glutathione (GSH). The mechanism of its effects on GSH homeostasis particularly at environmentally relevant low doses is not fully known. We hypothesized that exposure to MeHg would lead to a depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and an accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) leading to alterations in S-glutathionylation of proteins. Our results showed exposure to low concentrations of MeHg (1μM) did not significantly alter GSH levels but increased GSSG levels by ∼12-fold. This effect was associated with a significant increase in total cellular glutathione content and a decrease in GSH/GSSG. Immunoblot analyses revealed that proteins involved in glutathione synthesis were upregulated accounting for the increase in cellular glutathione. This was associated an increase in cellular Nrf2 protein levels which is required to induce the expression of antioxidant genes in response to cellular stress. Intriguingly, we noted that a key enzyme involved in reversing protein S-glutathionylation and maintaining glutathione homeostasis, glutaredoxin-1 (Grx1), was inhibited by ∼50%. MeHg treatment also increased the S-glutathionylation of a high molecular weight protein. This observation is consistent with the inhibition of Grx1 and elevated H2O2 production however; contrary to our original hypothesis we found few S-glutathionylated proteins in the astrocytoma cells. Collectively, MeHg affects multiple arms of glutathione homeostasis ranging from pool management to protein S-glutathionylation and Grx1 activity. PMID:27180086

  12. The role of aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 in the metabolism of γ-hydroxybutyrate in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alzeer, Samar; Ellis, Elizabeth M

    2011-05-30

    The role of the aldehyde reductase AKR1A1 in the biosynthesis of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been investigated in cell lines using a specific double stranded siRNA designed to knock down expression of the enzyme. This enzyme, along with the aldo-keto reductase AKR7A2, has been proposed previously to be one of the major succinic semialdehyde reductases in brain. The AKR1A1 siRNA was introduced into the human astrocytoma cell line (1321N1) and AKR1A1 expression was monitored using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blots. Results show an 88% reduction in mRNA levels and a 94% reduction in AKR1A1 protein expression 72 h after transfection with the siRNA. Aldehyde reductase activity was examined in silenced cells by following the aldehyde-dependent conversion of NADPH to NADP at 340 nm. This revealed a 30% decrease in pNBA reductase activity in cell extracts after AKR1A1 silencing. Succinic semialdehyde reductase activity was significantly lower in silenced cells when measured using high concentrations (1mM) of succinic semialdehyde, but not with low concentrations (10 μM). The effect of silencing on intracellular and extracellular GHB levels was measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that AKR1A1 has little effect on the production of GHB, indicating that in this cell line alternative enzymes such as the AKR7A2 are likely to play a more significant role in GHB biosynthesis. PMID:21276435

  13. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-b in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gollmer, J. C.; Ladoux, A.; Gioanni, J.; Paquis, P.; Dubreuil, A.; Chatel, M.; Frelin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of human malignant gliomas is stringently dependent on an angiogenic process that probably involves vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expressions of mRNA coding for the different forms of VEGF were analyzed in surgical specimens from human astrocytomas. Low levels of placental growth factor (PGF) and VEGFC mRNA were observed in polymerase chain reaction, but not in Northern blot experiments. VEGF mRNA was found in some but not all grade and grade IV astrocytomas. VEGFB mRNA was observed in all tissue samples analyzed irrespective of the tumor grade. A new splice variant of VEGFB (VEGFB155) that lacks exons 5 and 6 is described. Expressions of VEGF mRNA in cultured glioblastomas cells were upregulated by hypoxia, but the sensitivity of the cells to hypoxia was reduced as compared with normal rat astrocytes. VEGF expression was depressed by dexamethasone. Expressions of VEGFB mRNA were affected neither by hypoxia nor by dexamethasone. The results indicate a coexpression of VEGF mRNA and VEGFB mRNA in human astrocytomas. Expression of VEGFB is markedly different from that of VEGF. Possible roles of VEGFB as a cofactor for hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in human astrocytomas are discussed. PMID:11303624

  14. The inhibitory effect of CIL-102 on the growth of human astrocytoma cells is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of ERK1/2 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Chih-Chuan; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Cheng, Ho-Chen; Wang, Ting-Chung; Sze, Chun-I

    2012-08-15

    CIL-102 (1-[4-(furo[2,3-b]quinolin-4-ylamino)phenyl]ethanone) is the major active agent of the alkaloid derivative of Camptotheca acuminata, with multiple pharmacological activities, including anticancer effects and promotion of apoptosis. The mechanism by which CIL-102 inhibits growth remains poorly understood in human astrocytoma cells. Herein, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which CIL-102 affects the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle G2/M arrest in glioma cells. Treatment of U87 cells with 1.0 μM CIL-102 resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2), downregulation of cell cycle-related proteins (cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, and cdk1), and phosphorylation of cdk1Tyr{sup 15} and Cdc25cSer{sup 216}. Furthermore, treatment with the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 abolished CIL-102-induced Cdc25cSer{sup 216} expression and reversed CIL-102-inhibited cdk1 activation. In addition, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an ROS scavenger, blocked cell cycle G2/M arrest and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} in U87 cells. CIL-102-mediated ERK1/2 and ROS production, and cell cycle arrest were blocked by treatment with specific inhibitors. In conclusion, we have identified a novel CIL-102-inhibited proliferation in U87 cells by activating the ERK1/2 and Cdc25cSer{sup 216} cell cycle-related proteins and inducing ROS production; this might be a new mechanism in human astrocytoma cells. -- Highlights: ► We show the effects of CIL-102 on the G2/M arrest of human astrocytoma cells. ► ROS and the Ras/ERK1/2 triggering pathways are involved in the CIL-102 treatment. ► CIL-102 induces sustained activation of ERK1/2 and Cdc25c and ROS are required.

  15. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  16. Ammonium-induced calcium mobilization in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hillmann, Petra; Koese, Meryem; Soehl, Kristina; Mueller, Christa E.

    2008-02-15

    High blood levels of ammonium/ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3}) are associated with severe neurotoxicity as observed in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Astrocytes are the main targets of ammonium toxicity, while neuronal cells are less vulnerable. In the present study, an astrocytoma cell line 1321N1 and a neuroblastoma glioma hybrid cell line NG108-15 were used as model systems for astrocytes and neuronal cells, respectively. Ammonium salts evoked a transient increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in astrocytoma (EC{sub 50} = 6.38 mM), but not in NG108-15 cells. The ammonium-induced increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was due to an intracellular effect of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} and was independent of extracellular calcium. Acetate completely inhibited the ammonium effect. Ammonium potently reduced calcium signaling by G{sub q} protein-coupled receptors (H{sub 1} and M3) expressed on the cells. Ammonium (5 mM) also significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. While mRNA for the mammalian ammonium transporters RhBG and RhCG could not be detected in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, both transporters were expressed in NG108-15 cells. RhBG and RhBC in brain may promote the excretion of NH{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}{sup +} from neuronal cells. Cellular uptake of NH{sub 4}{sup +}/NH{sub 3} was mainly by passive diffusion of NH{sub 3}. Human 1321N1 astrocytoma cells appear to be an excellent, easily accessible human model for studying HE, which can substitute animal studies, while NG108-15 cells may be useful for investigating the role of the recently discovered Rhesus family type ammonium transporters in neuronal cells. Our findings may contribute to the understanding of pathologic ammonium effects in different brain cells, and to the treatment of hyperammonemia.

  17. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:27106762

  18. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  19. Intraoperative Squash Cytologic Features of Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra; Vaghsiya, Viren; Hiryur, Srilaxmi; Patel, Smita

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a low grade (WHO Grade I) tumor, usually seen in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and commonly occurs at a lateral ventricular location. Intraoperative squash cytologic features can help in differentiating SEGA from gemistocytic astrocytoma (GA), giant cell glioblastoma and ependymoma, in proper clinical context and radiological findings, which may alter the surgical management. Here, we present a case of SEGA with squash cytologic findings and a review of cytology findings of SEGA presently available in the literature. Loose cohesive clusters of large polygonal cells containing an eccentric nucleus, evenly distributed granular chromatin, distinct to prominent nucleoli, and moderate to the abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm in a hair-like fibrillar background are the key cytologic features of SEGA. Other important features are moderate anisonucleosis and frequent binucleation and multinucleation. The absence of mitoses, necrosis, and vascular endothelial proliferation are important negative features. Other consistent features are cellular smears, few dispersed cells, few spindly strap-like cells, rare intranuclear cytoplasmic inclusion, and perivascular pseudorosettes. PMID:27013816

  20. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas via stimulation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St. J.; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A.; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R.; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Primary astrocytomas of World Health Organization grade 3 and grade 4 (HG-astrocytomas) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite multimodal therapy. Here, we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HG-astrocytomas. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HG-astrocytomas, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival by releasing a group of fatty acid ethanolamides that have agonistic activity on the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1; TRPV1). TRPV1 expression is higher in HG-astrocytomas than in tumor-free brain and TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death via the activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) controlled branch of the ER stress pathway. The anti-tumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid Arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists hold potential as new HG-astrocytoma therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  1. Expression of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 is inversely correlated with pathological grade, angiogenesis and peritumoral brain edema in human astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; DA, RONG; WANG, MAODE; WANG, TUO; QI, LEI; JIANG, HAITAO; CHEN, WEI; LI, QI

    2013-01-01

    As the most common intracranial malignant neoplasms, astrocytomas are characterized by high neovascularization and severe peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for the growth of solid tumors, including astrocytoma, and brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) is a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. In the present study, the expression levels of BAI1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were investigated using immunohistochemical methods in 90 human brain astrocytoma specimens of various pathological grades and in 11 normal human brain tissues. Vascular endothelial cells were stained for CD105 and the microvessel density (MVD) was assessed. The volume of astrocytoma and PTBE in each case was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results showed that BAI1 was highly expressed in the normal brain tissues, but that the expression decreased with the rising pathological grades of astrocytoma, MVD number and PTBE, indicating that BAI1 expression was inversely correlated with these factors. Furthermore, it was observed that the expression of VEGF and bFGF were inversely correlated with BAI1 expression in the human brain astrocytomas. These results indicate that the BAI1 gene may be used as a marker of decreased tumor progression and tumoral neovascularization, as well as PTBE. PMID:23761815

  2. Modeling Astrocytoma Pathogenesis In Vitro and In Vivo Using Cortical Astrocytes or Neural Stem Cells from Conditional, Genetically Engineered Mice

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Robert S.; Schmid, Ralf S.; Bash, Ryan E.; Vitucci, Mark; White, Kristen K.; Werneke, Andrea M.; Constance, Brian H.; Huff, Byron; Miller, C. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Current astrocytoma models are limited in their ability to define the roles of oncogenic mutations in specific brain cell types during disease pathogenesis and their utility for preclinical drug development. In order to design a better model system for these applications, phenotypically wild-type cortical astrocytes and neural stem cells (NSC) from conditional, genetically engineered mice (GEM) that harbor various combinations of floxed oncogenic alleles were harvested and grown in culture. Genetic recombination was induced in vitro using adenoviral Cre-mediated recombination, resulting in expression of mutated oncogenes and deletion of tumor suppressor genes. The phenotypic consequences of these mutations were defined by measuring proliferation, transformation, and drug response in vitro. Orthotopic allograft models, whereby transformed cells are stereotactically injected into the brains of immune-competent, syngeneic littermates, were developed to define the role of oncogenic mutations and cell type on tumorigenesis in vivo. Unlike most established human glioblastoma cell line xenografts, injection of transformed GEM-derived cortical astrocytes into the brains of immune-competent littermates produced astrocytomas, including the most aggressive subtype, glioblastoma, that recapitulated the histopathological hallmarks of human astrocytomas, including diffuse invasion of normal brain parenchyma. Bioluminescence imaging of orthotopic allografts from transformed astrocytes engineered to express luciferase was utilized to monitor in vivo tumor growth over time. Thus, astrocytoma models using astrocytes and NSC harvested from GEM with conditional oncogenic alleles provide an integrated system to study the genetics and cell biology of astrocytoma pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo and may be useful in preclinical drug development for these devastating diseases. PMID:25146643

  3. Interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) 60, as well as ISG56 and ISG54, positively regulates TLR3/IFN-β/STAT1 axis in U373MG human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Yoshida, Hidemi; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Wang, Lian; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Tanji, Kunikazu; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Murakami, Manabu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of cells with interferons (IFNs) induces the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), leading to the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). ISGs exert various antiviral and pro-inflammatory reactions. We have previously reported that ISG56 and ISG54 are induced by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic agonist for Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), in U373MG human astrocytoma cells. ISG56 and ISG54 are also named as IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT) 1 and IFIT2, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrated that poly IC induces the expression of ISG60, also named as IFIT3, in U373MG cells. RNA interference experiments showed that the induction of ISG60 by poly IC was mediated by TLR3, IFN-β, ISG56 and ISG54, whereas ISG60 is involved in poly IC-induced expression of ISG56, ISG54 and a chemokine CXCL10. The level of phosphorylated STAT1 was enhanced by poly IC, and it was inhibited by knockdown of ISG56, ISG54 or ISG60. These results suggest that there is a positive feedback loop between phosphorylated STAT1 and these ISGs. PMID:26423178

  4. MicroRNA-124-3p regulates cell proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and bioenergetics by targeting PIM1 in astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Danni; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yao; Li, Bowen; Xue, Lian; Shao, Naiyuan; Wang, Qiang; Xia, Xiwei; Yang, Yilin; Zhi, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The PIM1 protein is an important regulator of cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, and metabolism in various human cancers. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful post-transcriptional gene regulators that function through translational repression or transcript destabilization. Therefore, we aimed to identify whether a close relationship exists between PIM1 and miRNAs. PIM1 protein levels and mRNA levels were significantly upregulated in astrocytoma tissues, indicating the oncogenic role of PIM1 in astrocytoma. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that miR-124-3p targeted the 3'-UTR of PIM1. We also observed an inverse correlation between the miR-124-3p levels and PIM1 protein or mRNA levels in astrocytoma samples. Next, we experimentally confirmed that miR-124-3p directly recognizes the 3'-UTR of the PIM1 transcript and regulates PIM1 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels. Furthermore, we examined the biological consequences of miR-124-3p targeting PIM1 in vitro. We showed that the repression of PIM1 in astrocytoma cancer cells by miR-124-3p suppressed proliferation, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis and promoted apoptosis. We observed that the restoration or inhibition of PIM1 activity resulted in effects that were similar to those induced by miR-124-3p inhibitors or mimics in cancer cells. Finally, overexpression of PIM1 rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-124-3p. In summary, these findings aid in understanding the tumor-suppressive role of miR-124-3p in astrocytoma pathogenesis through the inhibition of PIM1 translation. PMID:27088547

  5. Carnosic acid suppresses the production of amyloid-β 1-42 and 1-43 by inducing an α-secretase TACE/ADAM17 in U373MG human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hidemi; Meng, Pengfei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Tanji, Kunikazu; Hayakari, Ryo; Xing, Fei; Wang, Liang; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Mimura, Junsei; Kosaka, Kunio; Itoh, Ken; Takahashi, Ippei; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2014-02-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides are key molecules in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases generates Aβ peptides; however, the alternate cleavage of APP by the α- and γ-secretases decreases Aβ production. We previously reported that carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene compound found in the labiate herbs rosemary and sage, suppresses Aβ (1-40 and 1-42) production by activating α-secretase in cultured SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells (Neurosci. Res. 2013; 75: 94-102). Here, we investigated the effect of CA on the production of Aβ peptides (1-40, 1-42 and 1-43) in U373MG human astrocytoma cells. The treatment of cells with CA suppressed Aβ40/42/43 release (55-71% decrease at 50μM). CA treatment enhanced the mRNA expressions of an α-secretase TACE (tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme, also called a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-17, ADAM17); however, the β-secretase BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme-1) was not increased by CA. Knockdown of TACE by siRNA reduced soluble-APPα release enhanced by CA and partially recovered the CA-suppressed Aβ40/42/43 release. These results suggest that CA reduces Aβ production, at least partially, by activating TACE in human astroglial cells. The use of CA may have a potential in the prevention of Aβ-mediated diseases. PMID:24295810

  6. Assessment of cellular responses after short- and long-term exposure to silver nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and astrocytoma (D384) cells.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Bellotti, Vittorio; De Simone, Uliana

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP, 20 nm) neurotoxicity was evaluated by an integrated in vitro testing protocol employing human cerebral (SH-SY5Y and D384) cell lines. Cellular response after short-term (4-48 h, 1-100 μ g/ml) and prolonged exposure (up to 10 days, 0.5-50 μ g/ml) to AgNP was assessed by MTT, calcein-AM/PI, clonogenic tests. Pulmonary A549 cells were employed for data comparison along with silver nitrate as metal ionic form. Short-term data: (i) AgNP produced dose- and time-dependent mitochondrial metabolism changes and cell membrane damage (effects starting at 25 μ g/ml after 4 h: EC50s were 40.7 ± 2.0 and 49.5 ± 2.1 μ g/ml for SH-SY5Y and D384, respectively). A549 were less vulnerable; (ii) AgNP doses of ≤ 18 μ g/ml were noncytotoxic; (iii) AgNO3 induced more pronounced effects compared to AgNP on cerebral cells. Long-term data: (i) low AgNP doses (≤ 1 μ g/ml) compromised proliferative capacity of all cell types (cell sensibility: SHSY5Y > A549 > D384). Colony number decrease in SH-SY5Y and D384 was 50% and 25%, respectively, at 1 μ g/ml, and lower dose (0.5 μ g/ml) was significantly effective towards SH-SY5Y and pulmonary cells; (ii) cell proliferation activity was more affected by AgNO3 than AgNPs. In summary, AgNP-induced cytotoxic effects after short-term and prolonged exposure (even at low doses) were evidenced regardless of cell model types. PMID:24693232

  7. Assessment of Cellular Responses after Short- and Long-Term Exposure to Silver Nanoparticles in Human Neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) and Astrocytoma (D384) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Luigi; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP, 20 nm) neurotoxicity was evaluated by an integrated in vitro testing protocol employing human cerebral (SH-SY5Y and D384) cell lines. Cellular response after short-term (4–48 h, 1–100 μg/ml) and prolonged exposure (up to 10 days, 0.5–50 μg/ml) to AgNP was assessed by MTT, calcein-AM/PI, clonogenic tests. Pulmonary A549 cells were employed for data comparison along with silver nitrate as metal ionic form. Short-term data: (i) AgNP produced dose- and time-dependent mitochondrial metabolism changes and cell membrane damage (effects starting at 25 μg/ml after 4 h: EC50s were 40.7 ± 2.0 and 49.5 ± 2.1 μg/ml for SH-SY5Y and D384, respectively). A549 were less vulnerable; (ii) AgNP doses of ≤ 18 μg/ml were noncytotoxic; (iii) AgNO3 induced more pronounced effects compared to AgNP on cerebral cells. Long-term data: (i) low AgNP doses (≤1 μg/ml) compromised proliferative capacity of all cell types (cell sensibility: SHSY5Y > A549 > D384). Colony number decrease in SH-SY5Y and D384 was 50% and 25%, respectively, at 1 μg/ml, and lower dose (0.5 μg/ml) was significantly effective towards SH-SY5Y and pulmonary cells; (ii) cell proliferation activity was more affected by AgNO3 than AgNPs. In summary, AgNP-induced cytotoxic effects after short-term and prolonged exposure (even at low doses) were evidenced regardless of cell model types. PMID:24693232

  8. Everolimus Treatment for an Early Infantile Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Watanabe, Toshihide; Takayama, Rumiko; Minagawa, Kimio; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Subependymal giant cell astrocytomas are benign tumors often observed with tuberous sclerosis complex. These tumors are rarely diagnosed during fetal life or early infancy. Until recently, the only available treatment has been surgical resection. Current clinical research has demonstrated that everolimus can induce these tumors' regression. We report a 19-month-old boy with tuberous sclerosis complex. At 2 months of age, he presented with congenital subependymal giant cell astrocytoma that was complicated by refractory epilepsy and severe mental retardation. Treatment with everolimus was started when he was 10 months old. Three months after initiating everolimus, the tumor was significantly reduced in size, and the reduction was subsequently maintained. His seizures decreased and he showed cognitive and developmental improvement. No severe adverse events have been observed to date. Everolimus has promise as an effective alternative to surgery for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas during early infancy. PMID:25143481

  9. Specific localization of thallium 201 in human high-grade astrocytoma by microautoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.; Raymond, P.A.; McKeever, P.E.; Modell, J.G.; Hood, T.W.; Barthel, L.K.; Stafford-Schuck, K.A. )

    1989-07-15

    The ability to accurately distinguish remaining or recurrent high-grade astrocytoma from necrosis or edema following treatment is essential to optimal patient management. Thallium 201 planar gamma-camera imaging has been shown to be helpful in detecting recurrent high-grade astrocytoma; however, due to tissue heterogeneity adjacent to and within tumor, the cellular specificity and quantification of 201Tl uptake are largely unknown. In order to determine which tissues are responsible for the radioisotope uptake, microautoradiographic techniques were used to examine multiple tissue sections from five patients with high-grade astrocytoma. Each patient received 5 mCi of 201Tl i.v. 1 h prior to tumor removal. Additionally, all patients received computerized tomographic and 201Tl planar gamma-camera scans prior to surgery. Following surgery, the excised tissue specimens were tentatively classified by gross pathological examination and then immediately processed for dry mount autoradiography; grain density was determined over regions containing tumor, adjacent and uninvolved brain tissue, necrotic tissue, and background. Highly significant differences were found in grain densities (201Tl uptake) between tumor and uninvolved brain tissue, as well as between uninvolved brain tissue and necrotic tissue; there was no significant difference between background grain density and that in necrotic tissue. Mean grain densities (grains/cm2 +/- 1 SD) across patients were: tumor, 102 +/- 23; adjacent, uninvolved brain tissue, 29 +/- 11; necrotic tissue, 6.2 +/- 1.1; and background, 7.0 +/- 4.1. We conclude that the ability of 201Tl to selectively image high-grade astrocytoma is due to its preferential uptake into tumor cells.

  10. Neural precursor cells induce cell death of high-grade astrocytomas through stimulation of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Kumar, Jitender; Synowitz, Michael; Petrosino, Stefania; Imperatore, Roberta; Smith, Ewan St J; Wend, Peter; Purfürst, Bettina; Nuber, Ulrike A; Gurok, Ulf; Matyash, Vitali; Wälzlein, Joo-Hee; Chirasani, Sridhar R; Dittmar, Gunnar; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Momma, Stefan; Lewin, Gary R; Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Cristino, Luigia; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Kettenmann, Helmut; Glass, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    Primary astrocytomas of grade 3 or 4 according to the classification system of the World Health Organization (high-grade astrocytomas or HGAs) are preponderant among adults and are almost invariably fatal despite the use of multimodal therapy. Here we show that the juvenile brain has an endogenous defense mechanism against HGAs. Neural precursor cells (NPCs) migrate to HGAs, reduce glioma expansion and prolong survival time by releasing endovanilloids that activate the vanilloid receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1 or TRPV1) on HGA cells. TRPV1 is highly expressed in tumor and weakly expressed in tumor-free brain. TRPV1 stimulation triggers tumor cell death through the branch of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway that is controlled by activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3). The antitumorigenic response of NPCs is lost with aging. NPC-mediated tumor suppression can be mimicked in the adult brain by systemic administration of the synthetic vanilloid arvanil, suggesting that TRPV1 agonists have potential as new HGA therapeutics. PMID:22820645

  11. Imaging Manifestations of a Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in Tuberous Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joseph R.; Reidman, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis is a rare genetic disorder resulting in benign tumor growth in various organs including the brain, heart, skin, eyes, kidney, and lung as well as systemic manifestations including seizures, cognitive impairment, and dermatologic abnormalities. This report shows the radiological findings and differentiation between a subependymal nodule and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma in a patient with tuberous sclerosis presenting with new onset seizures. PMID:26942030

  12. Apoptosis and telomeres shortening related to HIV-1 induced oxidative stress in an astrocytoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Pollicita, Michela; Muscoli, Carolina; Sgura, Antonella; Biasin, Alberto; Granato, Teresa; Masuelli, Laura; Mollace, Vincenzo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Del Duca, Claudio; Rodinò, Paola; Perno, Carlo Federico; Aquaro, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in the neuropathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection causing apoptosis of astroglia cells and neurons. Recent data have shown that oxidative stress is also responsible for the acceleration of human fibroblast telomere shortening in vitro. In the present study we analyzed the potential relations occurring between free radicals formation and telomere length during HIV-1 mediated astroglial death. Results To this end, U373 human astrocytoma cells have been directly exposed to X4-using HIV-1IIIB strain, for 1, 3 or 5 days and treated (where requested) with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a cysteine donor involved in the synthesis of glutathione (GSH, a cellular antioxidant) and apoptosis has been evaluated by FACS analysis. Quantitative-FISH (Q-FISH) has been employed for studying the telomere length while intracellular reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio has been determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Incubation of U373 with HIV-1IIIB led to significant induction of cellular apoptosis that was reduced in the presence of 1 mM NAC. Moreover, NAC improved the GSH/GSSG, a sensitive indicator of oxidative stress, that significantly decreased after HIV-1IIIB exposure in U373. Analysis of telomere length in HIV-1 exposed U373 showed a statistically significant telomere shortening, that was completely reverted in NAC-treated U373. Conclusion Our results support the role of HIV-1-mediated oxidative stress in astrocytic death and the importance of antioxidant compounds in preventing these cellular damages. Moreover, these data indicate that the telomere structure, target for oxidative damage, could be the key sensor of cell apoptosis induced by oxidative stress after HIV infection. PMID:19463156

  13. Granular cell astrocytoma: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Caporalini, Chiara; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Scoccianti, Silvia; Moscardi, Selene; Simoni, Antonella; Pansini, Luigi; Bordi, Lorenzo; Ammannati, Franco; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with no remarkable past medical history was referred to our hospital for the appearance of generalized tonic clonic seizures with loss of consciousness, preceded by phosphenes at the right eye. On magnetic resonance imaging, a contrast-enhanced tumor in the left occipital lobe with peripheral edema was noted. He underwent craniotomy, and the entire mass was removed. Microscopic examination revealed infiltrative atypical astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, positive) with discrete borders and granular cytoplasm. Ki-67 labeling index was 40%. The tumor was diagnosed as a high-grade granular cell astrocytoma (GCA). Postoperative radiotherapy combined with temozolomide was administered. GCAs are aggressive lesions and should not to be confused with localized, benign granular cell tumors or with other non neoplastic granular cell changes in the central nervous system (CNS). GCAs are rare tumors. At this time, only 63 supratentorial/ hemispheric cases, including our case, have been reported in literature. PMID:27125869

  14. NPAS3 Demonstrates Features of a Tumor Suppressive Role in Driving the Progression of Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Frederico; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; So, Kelvin; Ajeawung, Norbert F.; Honculada, Carmelita; Gould, Peter; Pieper, Russell O.; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas, the most common primary brain tumors, are predominantly fatal. Improved treatments will require a better understanding of the biological features of high-grade astrocytomas. To better understand the role of neuronal PAS 3 (NPAS3) in diseases in human beings, it was investigated as a candidate for astrocytomagenesis based on the presence of aberrant protein expression in greater than 70% of a human astrocytoma panel (n = 433) and most notably in surgically resected malignant lesions. In subsequent functional studies, it was concluded that NPAS3 exhibits features of a tumor-suppressor, which drives the progression of astrocytomas by modulating the cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell migration/invasion and has a further influence on the viability of endothelial cells. Of clinical importance, absence of NPAS3 expression in glioblastomas was a significantly negative prognostic marker of survival. In addition, malignant astrocytomas lacking NPAS3 expression demonstrated loss of function mutations, which were associated with loss of heterozygosity. While overexpressed NPAS3 in malignant glioma cell lines significantly suppressed transformation, the converse decreased expression considerably induced more aggressive growth. In addition, knockdown NPAS3 expression in a human astrocyte cell line in concert with the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes induced growth of malignant astrocytomas. In conclusion, NPAS3 drives the progression of human malignant astrocytomas as a tumor suppressor and is a negative prognostication marker for survival. PMID:21703424

  15. Identification of death receptors DR4 and DR5 in HTB-12 astrocytoma cell lines and determination of TRAIL sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Elenia; Evans, Shavonda; Rousch, Jeffrey; Gwebu, Ephraim; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytomas are tumors which arise from astrocytes, cells that form the blood-brain barrier. There are very few drugs that successfully treat brain tumors. In this study, the cytotoxic effects on the HTB-12 astrocytoma cell line by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) were studied. The presence of the TRAIL receptors, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and Death receptor 5 (DR5), were detected in HTB-12 cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity assay by Trypan Blue Exclusion Method showed effective cell killing by TRAIL treatment. Thus, the presence of death receptors and TRAIL efficacy raises the therapeutic potential for this type of brain tumor. PMID:25364476

  16. Congenital segmental lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis complex with associated subependymal giant cell astrocytomas treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prato, Giulia; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Janis, Sara; Vercellino, Nadia; Rossi, Andrea; Consales, Alessandro; Raso, Alessandro; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic, multisystemic disorder characterized by circumscribed benign lesions (hamartomas) in several organs, including brain. This is the result of defects in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes, encoding the hamartin-tuberin complex that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Specific inhibitors of this pathway have been shown to reduce the volume of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Congenital lymphedema is rarely seen in association with tuberous sclerosis, with only a few reported cases. Although this association can be coincidental, the dysgenetic lymphatic system can represent a hamartia as a consequence of gene mutation. We describe a child with congenital lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis and associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma who experienced lymphangitis under treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Because our patient did not show worsening of lymphedema, congenital lymphedema does not seem to be a contraindication for this therapy. PMID:24056156

  17. Targeting the MAP kinase pathway in astrocytoma cells using a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin as a way to inhibit cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Al-Dimassi, Saleh; Salloum, Gilbert; Saykali, Bechara; Khoury, Oula; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H; Abi-Habib, Ralph; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2016-05-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly invasive into adjacent and distant regions of the normal brain. Understanding and targeting cancer cell invasion is an important therapeutic approach. Cell invasion is a complex process that replies on many signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK). In many cell lines, the use of MAPK-targeted drugs proved to be a potential method to inhibit cancer cell motility. In the present study, we use a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), which selectively inhibits the MAPK pathway, in order to target invasion. LeTx proved ineffective on cell survival in astrocytoma (as well as normal cells). However, astrocytoma cells that were treated with LeTx showed a significant decrease in cell motility as seen by wound healing as well as random 2D motility in serum. The cells also showed a decrease in invasion across a collagen matrix. The effect of LeTx on cell migration was mediated though the deregulation of Rho GTPases, which play a role in cell motility. Finally, the effect of LeTx on cell migration and Rho GTPases was mimicked by the inhibition of the MAPK pathway. In this study, we describe for the first time the effect of the LeTx on cancer cell motility and invasion not cell survival making it a potentially selective brain tumor invasion inhibitor. PMID:26984023

  18. Regulation of connexin 43 and microRNA expression via β2-adrenoceptor signaling in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Khaksarian, Mojtaba; Mostafavi, Hossein; Soleimani, Masoud; Karimian, Seid Morteza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hassan; Joghataee, Mohammad Taghee; Khorashadizadeh, Mohsen; Aligholi, Hadi; Attari, Fatemeh; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2015-08-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) is the main gap junction protein in astrocytes and exerts the same effects on growth inhibition in astrocytoma and glioma as microRNA-146a (miR-146a) in glioma. β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) signaling modulates Cx43 expression in myocytes via components downstream of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). However, it remains to be elucidated how expression of Cx43 is modulated in astrocytes. In the present study, 1321N1 astrocytoma cells were treated with β2-AR signaling agents in order to evaluate the expression of Cx43 and miRNAs. RNA and protein were extracted from the cells for use in reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The results revealed that clenbuterol increased miR-146a level and upregulated Cx43 expression via cAMP/PKA at the mRNA and protein level. Pre-inhibition of adenyl cyclase decreased expression of Cx43 and miR-146a. PKA activation and overexpression of miR-146a in A-1321N1 cells increased the expression of Cx43. β2-AR stimulation and 6Bnz, a PKA activator, suppressed oncomiRs miR-155 and miR-27a, while 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, an Epac activator, increased their levels. The current findings demonstrated that β2-AR signaling has growth inhibitory effects via modulation of the cAMP/PKA pathway in A-1321N1 cells through increasing the expression level of Cx43 and miR-146a as well as decreasing miR-155 and miR-27a levels. Thus, stimulation of the β2-AR and PKA signaling pathway may be a useful approach for astrocytoma therapy. PMID:25873300

  19. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is cytotoxic to 36B10 malignant rat astrocytoma cells but not to 'normal' rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, S.; McCaw, R.; Davis, C. S.; Robbins, M. E.; Spector, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    This study compares the effect of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and its precursor linoleic acid (LA) on survival of 36B10 malignant rat astrocytoma cells and 'normal' rat astrocytes. GLA was cytotoxic to 36B10 cells but not to astrocytes. By contrast, LA supplementation did not affect the survival of either cell types. There were minor differences in the uptake, distribution and use of radiolabelled GLA and LA by the 36B10 cells and astrocytes. GLA and LA supplementation increased the total polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of the cells indicating increased oxidative potential. However, elevated levels of 8-isoprostane, an indicator of increased oxidative stress, were only observed in the GLA supplemented 36B10 cells. Addition of the antioxidant trolox to GLA-enriched 36B10 cells blocked the cytotoxic effect. Further, GLA enhanced the radiation sensitivity of the astrocytoma cells but not the astrocytes; trolox blocked the GLA-mediated increase in astrocytoma cell radiosensitivity. LA did not affect the radiation response of either cell type. While cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors did not affect GLA cytotoxicity, they blocked the enhanced radiation response of GLA-supplemented cells. The lipoxygenase inhibitor NDGA did not affect the toxicity produced by GLA. Thus, GLA is toxic to the neoplastic astrocytoma cells but not to normal astrocytes. PMID:9635836

  20. Guanine nucleotide-dependent, pertussis toxin-insensitive, stimulation of inositol phosphate formation by carbachol in a membrane preparation from astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hepler, J.R.; Harden, T.K.

    1986-03-05

    Formation of the inositol phosphates (InsP), InsP/sub 3/, InsP/sub 2/, and InsP/sub 1/ was increased in a concentration dependent manner (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 5 ..mu..M) by GTP..sigma..S in washed membranes prepared from /sup 3/H-inositol-prelabelled 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Both GTP..gamma..S and GppNHp stimulated InsP formation by 2-3 fold over control; GTP and GDP were much less efficacious and GMP had no effect. Although the muscarinic cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol had no effect in the absence of guanine nucleotide, in the presence of 10 ..mu..M GTP..gamma..S, carbachol stimulated (K/sub 0.5/ approx. 10 ..mu.. M) the formation of InsP above the level achieved with GTP..gamma..S alone. The effect of carbachol was completely blocked by atropine. The order of potency for a series of nucleotides for stimulation of InsP formation in the presence of 500 ..mu..M carbachol was GTP..gamma..S > GppNHp > GTP = GDP. Pertussis toxin, at concentrations that fully ADP-ribosylate and functionally inactivate G/sub i/, had no effect on InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S or GTP..gamma..S plus carbachol. Histamine and bradykinin also stimulated InsP formation in the presence of GTP..gamma..S in washed membranes from 1321N1 cells. These data are consistent with the idea that a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that is not G/sub i/ is involved in receptor-mediated stimulation of InsP formation in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells.

  1. ET-59DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A MEK1 INHIBITOR (AZD6244) SENSITIVE CHILDHOOD ASTROCYTOMA CELL LINE

    PubMed Central

    Studebaker, Adam; Bid, Hemant; Phelps, Doris; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We previously characterized the development and reversal of acquired resistance to the MEK1 inhibitor AZD6244 in an in vivo model of childhood astrocytoma. The BT-40 astrocytoma xenograft model expresses mutated BRAFV600E and is highly sensitive to AZD6244, but acquires resistance, which can be overcome with the addition of the STAT3 inhibitor LLL12. The purpose of this current study was to establish and characterize a cell line derived from the xenograft model as well as develop an orthotopic mouse model. Sensitivity to AZD6244 and LLL12, expression-profiling assessment of MEK signature and compensatory pathways, and cytokine levels were assessed in the newly developed BT-40 cell line. The BT-40 cell line exhibited sensitivity to AZD6244 and LLL12 with IC50 values of 350nM and 1 µM, respectively. Combination treatment was additive. Treatment with AZD6244 inhibited p-Erk and the mTOR downstream signaling molecule p-S6, while p-Akt, p-STAT3, p-4E-BP1 increased. Kinase expression arrays performed on cells treated with AZD6244 showed a decrease in IL-1α, G-CSF, and IL-6 and an increase in CXCL10. The decrease in IL-6 was restored to baseline levels with the addition of LLL12. Interestingly, the JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 failed to restore the IL-6 levels. The IL-6 results observed in the expression arrays were confirmed by ELISA. The BT-40 cell line, along with a cell line stably expressing luciferase (BT-40Luc), were implanted into the caudate putamen using stereotaxic guidance. The BT-40Luc cells exhibited exponential growth over time as evaluated with bioluminescent imaging. In conclusion, a cell line derived from a previously described in vivo model of childhood astrocytoma was developed that closely recapitulated our original findings in the xenograft model following treatment with the MEK1 inhibitor AZD6244. Furthermore, an orthotopic model of these cells was developed, which will allow us to characterize response to established and novel therapeutic agents

  2. Contemporary murine models in preclinical astrocytoma drug development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Robert S.; Vitucci, Mark; Wu, Jing; Miller, C. Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Despite 6 decades of research, only 3 drugs have been approved for astrocytomas, the most common malignant primary brain tumors. However, clinical drug development is accelerating with the transition from empirical, cytotoxic therapy to precision, targeted medicine. Preclinical animal model studies are critical for prioritizing drug candidates for clinical development and, ultimately, for their regulatory approval. For decades, only murine models with established tumor cell lines were available for such studies. However, these poorly represent the genomic and biological properties of human astrocytomas, and their preclinical use fails to accurately predict efficacy in clinical trials. Newer models developed over the last 2 decades, including patient-derived xenografts, genetically engineered mice, and genetically engineered cells purified from human brains, more faithfully phenocopy the genomics and biology of human astrocytomas. Harnessing the unique benefits of these models will be required to identify drug targets, define combination therapies that circumvent inherent and acquired resistance mechanisms, and develop molecular biomarkers predictive of drug response and resistance. With increasing recognition of the molecular heterogeneity of astrocytomas, employing multiple, contemporary models in preclinical drug studies promises to increase the efficiency of drug development for specific, molecularly defined subsets of tumors. PMID:25246428

  3. Anaplastic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sean A; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is a diffusely infiltrating, malignant, astrocytic, primary brain tumor. AA is currently defined by histology although future classification schemes will include molecular alterations. AA can be separated into subgroups, which share similar molecular profiles, age at diagnosis and median survival, based on 1p/19q co-deletion status and IDH mutation status. AA with co-deletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q and IDH mutation have the best prognosis. AA with IDH mutation and no 1p/19q co-deletion have intermediate prognosis and AA with wild-type IDH have the worst prognosis and share many molecular alterations with glioblastoma. Treatment of noncodeleted AA based on preliminary results from the CATNON clinical trial consists of maximal safe resection followed by radiotherapy with post-radiotherapy temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. The role of concurrent TMZ and whether IDH1 subgroups benefit from TMZ is currently being evaluated in the recently completed randomized, prospective Phase III clinical trial, CATNON. PMID:27230974

  4. Pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Miriam; Frappaz, Didier; Packer, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common pediatric brain tumor in children. PAs are a distinct histologic and biologic subset of glioma that have a slow growth rate and may even spontaneously regress. These tumors tend to arise in the cerebellum and chiasmatic/hypothalamic region, but can also occur in other regions of the central nervous system. Dissemination is uncommon, but may occur in newly diagnosed PAs. Alterations in the Ras/RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway (Ras/ERK) have been discovered in a majority of PAs, with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions being the most commonly identified alteration. Children with neurofibromatosis 1 are predisposed to developing PAs, primarily within the optic pathway. When required, treatment consists of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation, although new molecular agents targeting the Ras/ERK and related signaling pathways are promising new approaches. The 10-year survival rates are greater than 90% in pediatric patients; however, they are poorer in adults. Tumors that are amenable to complete resection (i.e., cerebellum and cortex) have the best overall survival. PMID:26948364

  5. Expression and prognostic value of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) and N-myc downstream regulated gene 2 (NDRG2) as potential markers in human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Peyman Karimi; Mehrabi, Farzad; Khoshnood, Reza Jalili; Bagheri, Ali Baradaran; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Yahaghi, Emad; Abdolhoseinpour, Hesam

    2016-05-01

    In this study, immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate the expression of ALDH1 and NDRG2 in astrocytoma tissue samples and normal brain tissues. ALDH1 protein staining displayed that AlDH1 expression was not detectable in eight astrocytoma tissues (8/36) and in all of normal brain tissues. There was a significant difference between ALDH1 expression and WHO grades (P = 0.03). Furthermore, no correlation was determined between expression levels of ALDH1 and other clinicopathological characteristics including age, sex, and tumor size. Immunohistochemistry showed that a high level of NDRG2 protein expression was markedly detected in normal brain tissues and expression of NDRG2 protein was significantly decreased in astrocytoma tissues. There was a significant association between pathological grading and NDRG2 expression level (P < 0.001, Table 1), but no correlation was determined between expression levels of NDRG2 and other clinicopathological characteristics including age, sex, and tumor size. We also obtained detailed follow-up data and evaluated the association of ALDH1/NDRG2 expressions with overall survival. Kaplan-Meier survival and log-rank analysis indicated that the patients with high proportion of ALDH1-positive cells and low proportion of NDRG2-positive had shorter overall survival (P < 0.001; P = 0.001). Univariate analysis indicated that the high proportion of ALDH1-positive cells (P < 0.001), the low proportion of NDRG2-positive cells (P = 0.009), and the advanced grade (P < 0.005) were markedly linked to the prognosis in patients. Furthermore, in the multivariate analysis, ALDH1 cells' expression (P = 0.012), low proportion of NDRG2-positive cells (P = 0.025), and advanced grade (P < 0.03) were linked to poor overall survival. Our results suggest that NDRG2 expression is related to decreased survival rates and NDRG2 may be a potential marker in the astrocytoma prognosis. NDRG2 may be a potential marker

  6. Network analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes in human anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    XUE, LUCHEN; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; ZHANG, XIAOXU; WANG, SHANG

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the roles played by various genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in neoplasms, including anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). However, the specific regulatory mechanisms involving these genes and miRNAs remain unclear. In the present study, associated biological factors (miRNAs, transcription factors, target genes and host genes) from existing studies of human AA were combined methodically through the interactions between genes and miRNAs, as opposed to studying one or several. Three regulatory networks, including abnormally expressed, related and global networks were constructed with the aim of identifying significant gene and miRNA pathways. Each network is composed of three associations between miRNAs targeted at genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs located on their host genes. Among these, the abnormally expressed network, which involves the pathways of previously identified abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs, partially indicated the regulatory mechanism underlying AA. The network contains numerous abnormal regulation associations when AA emerges. By modifying the abnormally expressed network factors to a normal expression pattern, the faulty regulation may be corrected and tumorigenesis of AA may be prevented. Certain specific pathways are highlighted in AA, for example PTEN which is targeted by miR-21 and miR-106b, regulates miR-25 which in turn targets TP53. PTEN and miR-21 have been observed to form feedback loops. Furthermore, by comparing and analyzing the pathway predecessors and successors of abnormally expressed genes and miRNAs in three networks, similarities and differences of regulatory pathways may be identified and proposed. In summary, the present study aids in elucidating the occurrence, mechanism, prevention and treatment of AA. These results may aid further investigation into therapeutic approaches for this disease. PMID:27347075

  7. A fraction of neurofibromin interacts with PML bodies in the nucleus of the CCF astrocytoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, Fabienne; Villette, Sandrine; Vallee, Beatrice; Doudeau, Michel; Morisset-Lopez, Severine; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Hevor, Tobias; Pichon, Chantal; Benedetti, Helene

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We validate the use of specific anti-Nf1 antibodies for immunofluorescence studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detect Nf1 in the cytoplasm and nucleus of CCF cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML nuclear bodies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that there is a direct interaction between a fraction of Nf1 and the PML bodies. -- Abstract: Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a common genetic disease that causes nervous system tumors, and cognitive deficits. It is due to mutations within the NF1 gene, which encodes the Nf1 protein. Nf1 has been shown to be involved in the regulation of Ras, cAMP and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In this study, using immunofluorescence experiments, we have shown a partial nuclear localization of Nf1 in the astrocytoma cell line: CCF and we have demonstrated that Nf1 partially colocalizes with PML (promyelocytic leukemia) nuclear bodies. A direct interaction between Nf1 and the multiprotein complex has further been demonstrated using 'in situ' proximity ligation assay (PLA).

  8. Subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: a lesion with activated mTOR pathway and constant expression of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Caporalini, Chiara; Giordano, Flavio; Mussa, Federico; Scagnet, Mirko; Moscardi, Selene; Baroni, Gianna; Genitori, Lorenzo; Taddei, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma (SEGA) is a rare tumor associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). TSC mainly involves the central nervous system (CNS) where SEGA, subependymal nodules, and cortical tubers may be present. First studies suggested the astrocytic nature of SEGA while successive studies demonstrated the mixed glio-neuronal nature. There are similarities between TSC-associated CNS lesions and type IIb focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). In all these pathologies, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway activation has been demonstrated. Recent data evidenced that balloon cells in FCD IIb express glutamine synthetase (GS). GS is involved in the clearance of glutamate. Cells expressing GS might exert an antiepileptic role. We evaluated by immunohistochemistry the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), neurofilaments (NF), and GS expression and the mTOR status (mTOR and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6) in 16 SEGAs and 2 cortical tubers. Our purpose was to emphasize the mixed nature of SEGA and to further investigate the similarities between TSC-related CNS lesions (in particular SEGA) and FCD IIb. We confirm the glio-neuronal nature and the common activation of the mTOR pathway in SEGAs. In addition, we report for the first time that these tumors, analogously to FCD IIb, commonly express GS. Notably, the expression of mTOR, phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6, and GS was restricted to gemistocytic-like GFAP-negative cells. GS expression and mTOR pathway activation were also documented in cortical tubers. Further studies are necessary to understand the significance of GS expression in SEGAs as well as in cortical tubers. PMID:27390104

  9. Expression of 300-kilodalton intermediate filament-associated protein distinguishes human glioma cells from normal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H Y; Lieska, N; Glick, R; Shao, D; Pappas, G D

    1993-01-01

    The availability of biochemical markers to distinguish glioma cells from normal astrocytes would have enormous diagnostic value. Such markers also may be of value in studying the basic biology of human astrocytomas. The vimentin-binding, 300-kDa intermediate filament (IF)-associated protein (IFAP-300kDa) has recently been shown to be developmentally expressed in radial glia of the central nervous system of the rat. It is not detected in the normal or reactive astrocytes of the adult rat nor in neonatal rat brain astrocytes in primary culture. In the present study, double-label immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies to IFAP-300kDa and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte-specific IF structural protein) identifies this IFAP in GFAP-containing tumor cells from examples of all three major types of human astrocytomas (i.e., well-differentiated, anaplastic, and glioblastoma multiforme). Astrocytoma cells in primary cultures prepared from all three astrocytomas also express this protein. It is not detectable in normal adult brain tissue. Immunoblot analyses using the IFAP-300kDa antibody confirm the presence of a 300-kDa polypeptide in fresh astrocytoma preparations enriched for IF proteins. These results suggest the utility of IFAP-300kDa as a marker for identification of human glioma cells both in vitro and in situ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8378327

  10. Pilocytic Astrocytoma of the Optic Pathway: A Tumour Deriving from Radial Glia Cells with a Specific Gene Signature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchoghandjian, Aurelie; Fernandez, Carla; Colin, Carole; El Ayachi, Ikbale; Voutsinos-Porche, Brigitte; Fina, Frederic; Scavarda, Didier; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Intagliata, Dominique; Ouafik, L'Houcine; Fraslon-Vanhulle, Caroline; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas are WHO grade I gliomas that occur predominantly in childhood. They share features of both astroglial and oligodendroglial lineages. These tumours affect preferentially the cerebellum (benign clinical course) and the optic pathway, especially the hypothalamo-chiasmatic region (poor prognosis). Understanding the molecular…

  11. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor Induced Complete Remission of a Recurrent Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma in a Patient Without Features of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Appalla, Deepika; Depalma, Andres; Calderwood, Stanley

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) have tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). In such patients, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus has been shown to induce responses. Isolated SEGA have been reported in patients without clinical or genetic features of TSC. The treatment of these patients with everolimus has not previously been reported. We treated a patient with a recurrent isolated SEGA with an mTOR inhibitor. The patient tolerated therapy well and had a sustained complete remission. MTOR inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of isolated SEGA. Further study is warranted. PMID:26929034

  12. General Information about Childhood Astrocytomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Childhood Astrocytomas Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Astrocytomas Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. Evidence for new targets and synergistic effect of metronomic celecoxib/fluvastatin combination in pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pilocytic astrocytomas occur predominantly in childhood. In contrast to the posterior fossa location, hypothalamo-chiasmatic pilocytic astrocytomas display a worse prognosis often leading to multiple surgical procedures and/or several lines of chemotherapy and radiotherapy to achieve long-term control. Hypothalamo-chiasmatic pilocytic astrocytomas and cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas have a distinctive gene signature and several differential expressed genes (ICAM1, CRK, CD36, and IQGAP1) are targets for available drugs: fluvastatin and/or celecoxib. Results Quantification by RT-Q-PCR of the expression of these genes was performed in a series of 51 pilocytic astrocytomas and 10 glioblastomas: they were all significantly overexpressed in hypothalamo-chiasmatic pilocytic astrocytomas relative to cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas, and CRK and ICAM1 were significantly overexpressed in pilocytic astrocytomas versus glioblastomas. We used two commercially available glioblastoma cell lines and three pilocytic astrocytoma explant cultures to investigate the effect of celecoxib/fluvastatin alone or in combination. Glioblastoma cell lines were sensitive to both drugs and a combination of 100 μM celecoxib and 240 μM fluvastatin was the most synergistic. This synergistic combination was used on the explant cultures and led to massive cell death of pilocytic astrocytoma cells. As a proof of concept, a patient with a refractory multifocal pilocytic astrocytoma was successfully treated with the fluvastatin/celecoxib combination used for 18 months. It was well tolerated and led to a partial tumor response. Conclusion This study reports evidence for new targets and synergistic effect of celecoxib/fluvastatin combination in pilocytic astrocytoma. Because it is non-toxic, this new strategy offers hope for the treatment of patients with refractory pilocytic astrocytoma. PMID:24252689

  14. Everolimus for the treatment of subependymal giant cell astrocytoma probably causing seizure aggravation in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Woerle, H; Strobl, K; Bast, T

    2014-04-01

    We are reporting on a 13.5-year-old girl with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) who was treated with everolimus because of giant cell astrocytoma and bilateral angiomyolipoma. She suffered from pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy with clusters of tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. Treatment with carbamazepine and sulthiame had led to a stable situation for more than 2.5 years. The dosage of everolimus had to be increased and refractory status epilepticus followed after 12 days. In the absence of any other possible cause, we believe that the status epilepticus was provoked by everolimus. So far, only a few cases of possible seizure aggravation by everolimus have been reported. The clinical relevance of possible negative effects in epileptic patients remains unclear. Similar observations should be documented and reported. PMID:24293099

  15. DNA methylation analysis of paediatric low-grade astrocytomas identifies a tumour-specific hypomethylation signature in pilocytic astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Jeyapalan, Jennie N; Doctor, Gabriel T; Jones, Tania A; Alberman, Samuel N; Tep, Alexander; Haria, Chirag M; Schwalbe, Edward C; Morley, Isabel C F; Hill, Alfred A; LeCain, Magdalena; Ottaviani, Diego; Clifford, Steven C; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Ellison, David W; Sheer, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade gliomas (LGGs) account for about a third of all brain tumours in children. We conducted a detailed study of DNA methylation and gene expression to improve our understanding of the biology of pilocytic and diffuse astrocytomas. Pilocytic astrocytomas were found to have a distinctive signature at 315 CpG sites, of which 312 were hypomethylated and 3 were hypermethylated. Genomic analysis revealed that 182 of these sites are within annotated enhancers. The signature was not present in diffuse astrocytomas, or in published profiles of other brain tumours and normal brain tissue. The AP-1 transcription factor was predicted to bind within 200 bp of a subset of the 315 differentially methylated CpG sites; the AP-1 factors, FOS and FOSL1 were found to be up-regulated in pilocytic astrocytomas. We also analysed splice variants of the AP-1 target gene, CCND1, which encodes cell cycle regulator cyclin D1. CCND1a was found to be highly expressed in both pilocytic and diffuse astrocytomas, but diffuse astrocytomas have far higher expression of the oncogenic variant, CCND1b. These findings highlight novel genetic and epigenetic differences between pilocytic and diffuse astrocytoma, in addition to well-described alterations involving BRAF, MYB and FGFR1. PMID:27229157

  16. Astrocytoma-associated antigens - IL13Rα2, Fra-1, and EphA2 as potential markers to monitor the status of tumour-derived cell cultures in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular heterogeneity of high-grade astrocytomas underlies the difficulties in the development of representative and valuable in vitro experimental models for their studies. The purpose of our study was to estimate the value of astrocytoma-associated antigens (AAAs) - IL13Rα2, Fra-1, EphA2 - and the most common molecular aberrations typical for astrocytomas as potential markers to screen the status of tumour-derived cell cultures in vitro. Methods The tumour-derived cell cultures were established from high-grade astrocytomas. The expression analyses of the tested genes were performed via semi-quantitative real-time PCR and subsequently verified by immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical technique. The analyses of molecular aberrations at DNA level included gene dosage status evaluation based on real-time PCR, sequencing analysis, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay. Results The expression analyses based on semi-quantitative real-time PCR showed that in the final stage of culture the expression level of all tested AAAs was significantly higher or at least comparable to that of primary tumours; however, two expression patterns were observed during cell culture establishment. Analysis at the single cell level via immunocytochemistry also demonstrated an increase of the level of tested proteins and/or selection of tumour cell populations strongly positive for AAAs vs. other cell types including admixed non-tumoural cells. Confrontation of AAA expression data with the results of molecular analyses at DNA level seems to support the latter, revealing that the expression pattern of astrocytoma-associated antigens in tumour-derived cells in subsequent stages of culture is convergent with changes in the molecular profile of examined cell populations. Conclusions The consistency of the obtained results seems to support the use of the selected AAAs, in particular IL13Rα2 and Fra-1, as tools facilitating the establishment of tumour-derived cultures

  17. The Tachykinin Peptide Neurokinin B Binds Copper Forming an Unusual [CuII(NKB)2] Complex and Inhibits Copper Uptake into 1321N1 Astrocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides that have neuroinflammatory, neuroimmunological, and neuroprotective functions. In a neuroprotective role, tachykinins can help protect cells against the neurotoxic processes observed in Alzheimer’s disease. A change in copper homeostasis is a clear feature of Alzheimer’s disease, and the dysregulation may be a contributory factor in toxicity. Copper has recently been shown to interact with neurokinin A and neuropeptide γ and can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species and peptide degradation, which suggests that copper may have a place in tachykinin function and potentially misfunction. To explore this, we have utilized a range of spectroscopic techniques to show that NKB, but not substance P, can bind CuII in an unusual [CuII(NKB)2] neutral complex that utilizes two N-terminal amine and two imidazole nitrogen ligands (from each molecule of NKB) and the binding substantially alters the structure of the peptide. Using 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, we show that copper can enter the cells and subsequently open plasma membrane calcium channels but when bound to neurokinin B copper ion uptake is inhibited. This data suggests a novel role for neurokinin B in protecting cells against copper-induced calcium changes and implicates the peptide in synaptic copper homeostasis. PMID:23875773

  18. HIV-1 propagates in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shapshak, P; Sun, N C; Resnick, L; Thornthwaite, J T; Schiller, P; Yoshioka, M; Svenningsson, A; Tourtellotte, W W; Imagawa, D T

    1991-01-01

    A major question in the pathogenesis of AIDS encephalopathy and dementia is whether HIV-1 directly infects cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The propagation of HIV was attempted in six cell lines: three related and three unrelated to the nervous system. HIV was able to propagate in two human neuroblastoma cell lines and a lymphocytic cell line control but did not result in infections of African green monkey kidney cells, human cervix carcinoma cells, and one human brain astrocytoma cell line. Neuroblastoma cell lines infected with HIV showed peaks of reverse transcriptase activity at 10-14 days postinfection. After prolonged growth in cell cultures, one of the neuroblastoma cell lines showed multiphasic virus production, additional high peaks of reverse transcriptase activity, 20-fold greater than the first, lasting from 36 to 74 days and 110 to 140 days postinfection. The presence of HIV was confirmed by p24 antigen capture. The neuroblastoma cell lines had weak but detectable levels of CD4 immunoreactivity by immunoperoxidase and flow immunocytometric analysis. Although no T4-specific RNA sequences were detected by hybridization of Northern blots of total and poly A-selected RNA extracted from the two neuroblastoma cell lines by using a T4 specific complimentary DNA probe, monoclonal antibodies to the CD4 receptor blocked HIV infection in both neuroblastoma cell lines. Thus, the infection of neuroblastoma cells by HIV occurs in part by a CD4-dependent mechanism. Passaging the neuroblastoma cell lines weekly and bimonthly resulted in similar cell cycle-DNA content patterns for the more permissive cell line and with significant numbers of cells in the S phase. HIV-infected neuroblastoma cell lines provide an in vitro model for the evaluation of virus-host cell interactions and may be useful in addressing the issue of the persistence of HIV in the human CNS. PMID:1704060

  19. Effects of dexamethasone on C6 astrocytoma radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lordo, C.D.; Stroude, E.C.; Del Maestro, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    Brain-tumor patients often undergo radiation therapy while receiving corticosteroids for the treatment of cerebral edema. Studies have demonstrated that dexamethasone is radioprotective in a number of cell lines. The C6 astrocytoma cell line is well established in vitro and is modulated by dexamethasone treatment. It has therefore been hypothesized that dexamethasone-treated C6 astrocytoma cells would be more resistant to radiation-induced damage. The present study was carried out to assess this hypothesis using both the in vitro C6 astrocytoma monolayer and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. Dexamethasone was inhibitory to the C6 astrocytoma cells in the monolayer preparation, increasing their doubling time by 13%. In the spheroid cultures, dexamethasone treatment decreased the number of cells per spheroid by 46%. Dexamethasone did not affect the plating efficiency of either the cells from the monolayer experiment or those dissociated from spheroids, however, suggesting that the inhibitory effect was not tumoricidal. At a clinical concentration (1.94 x 10(-5) M), dexamethasone did not significantly influence plating efficiency of irradiated C6 astrocytoma cells in monolayer or three-dimensional spheroid cultures.

  20. Use of EF5 to Measure the Oxygen Level in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma

  1. Unexpected expression of intermediate filament protein genes in human oligodendroglioma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kashima, Tsuyoshi; Vinters, H.V.; Campagnoni, A.T.

    1995-01-01

    From a human oligodendroglioma cell line cDNA library, ten intermediate filament (IF) cDNA clones were isolated. Five clones corresponded to vimentin mRNA, two corresponded to cytokeratin K7 mRNA, and two corresponded to cytokeratin K8 mRNA. One clone encoded a novel IF mRNA. The expression of these and other IF protein genes was examined in five cell lines derived from human oligodendroglioma, astrocytoma and neuroblastoma tumors. Vimentin mRNA and K18 mRNA were expressed in all the cell lines. The K7 and K8 genes were expressed only in the oligodendroglioma cell lines. Surprisingly, nestin mRNA was expressed in the astrocytoma lines and the neuroblastoma line, but was not expressed in the oligodendroglioma lines. These results indicate that oligodendroglioma cell lines express Types I and II cytokeratin genes. This pattern of IF gene expression was different from that of the astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines, which expressed IF genes usually associated with the mature cell types or with differentiating fetal neural precursor cells, i.e. GFAP and neurofilament-L. The results also suggest that the oligodendroglioma cell lines are more epithelial in character and do not reflect the gene expression of mature oligodendrocytes. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Characterization of a Multiple Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Cellular Membrane Affinity Chromatography Column and Identification of Endogenously Expressed Receptors in Astrocytoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kitabatake, T.; Moaddel, R.; Cole, R.; Gandhari, M.; Frazier, C.; Hartenstein, J.; Rosenberg, A.; Bernier, M.; Wainer, I. W.

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes obtained from the 1321N1 and A172 astrocytoma cell lines were immobilized on a chromatographic phase to create cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns, CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172). The columns were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography with [3H]-epibatidine as the marker ligand and epibatidine, nicotine, and methyllycaconitine as the displacers. The results indicated that the columns contained homomeric α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (αxβy nAChRs), which was confirmed by the addition of subtype-specific inhibitors, κ-bungarotoxin (α7 nAChR) and K-bungarotoxin (αxβy nAChR) to the mobile phase. The presence of two additional ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA), was established using frontal affinity chromatography with flunitrazepam and diazepam (GABAA receptor) and MK-801 and NMDA (NMDA receptor). The presence of the four LGICs was confirmed using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172) columns contain four independently functioning LGICs, that the columns can be used to characterize binding affinities of small molecules to each of the receptors, and that the CMAC approach can be used to probe the expression of endogenous membrane receptors. PMID:18847217

  3. Characterization of a multiple ligand-gated ion channel cellular membrane affinity chromatography column and identification of endogenously expressed receptors in astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kitabatake, T; Moaddel, R; Cole, R; Gandhari, M; Frazier, C; Hartenstein, J; Rosenberg, A; Bernier, M; Wainer, I W

    2008-11-15

    Cellular membranes obtained from the 1321N1 and A172 astrocytoma cell lines were immobilized on a chromatographic phase to create cellular membrane affinity chromatography (CMAC) columns, CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172). The columns were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography with [(3)H]-epibatidine as the marker ligand and epibatidine, nicotine, and methyllycaconitine as the displacers. The results indicated that the columns contained homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR) and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha(x)beta(y) nAChRs), which was confirmed by the addition of subtype-specific inhibitors, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha7 nAChR) and kappa-bungarotoxin (alpha(x)beta(y) nAChR) to the mobile phase. The presence of two additional ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA), was established using frontal affinity chromatography with flunitrazepam and diazepam (GABA(A) receptor) and MK-801 and NMDA (NMDA receptor). The presence of the four LGICs was confirmed using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the CMAC(1321N1) and CMAC(A172) columns contain four independently functioning LGICs, that the columns can be used to characterize binding affinities of small molecules to each of the receptors, and that the CMAC approach can be used to probe the expression of endogenous membrane receptors. PMID:18847217

  4. Transcriptional analysis of aggressiveness and heterogeneity across grades of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunjing; Funk, Cory C; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytoma is the most common glioma, accounting for half of all primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Late detection and the aggressive nature of high-grade astrocytomas contribute to high mortality rates. Though many studies identify candidate biomarkers using high-throughput transcriptomic profiling to stratify grades and subtypes, few have resulted in clinically actionable results. This shortcoming can be attributed, in part, to pronounced lab effects that reduce signature robustness and varied individual gene expression among patients with the same tumor. We addressed these issues by uniformly preprocessing publicly available transcriptomic data, comprising 306 tumor samples from three astrocytoma grades (Grade 2, 3, and 4) and 30 non-tumor samples (normal brain as control tissues). Utilizing Differential Rank Conservation (DIRAC), a network-based classification approach, we examined the global and individual patterns of network regulation across tumor grades. Additionally, we applied gene-based approaches to identify genes whose expression changed consistently with increasing tumor grade and evaluated their robustness across multiple studies using statistical sampling. Applying DIRAC, we observed a global trend of greater network dysregulation with increasing tumor aggressiveness. Individual networks displaying greater differences in regulation between adjacent grades play well-known roles in calcium/PKC, EGF, and transcription signaling. Interestingly, many of the 90 individual genes found to monotonically increase or decrease with astrocytoma grade are implicated in cancer-affected processes such as calcium signaling, mitochondrial metabolism, and apoptosis. The fact that specific genes monotonically increase or decrease with increasing astrocytoma grade may reflect shared oncogenic mechanisms among phenotypically similar tumors. This work presents statistically significant results that enable better characterization of different human astrocytoma grades

  5. (-)(125I)-iodopindolol, a new highly selective radioiodinated beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist: measurement of beta-receptors on intact rat astrocytoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barovsky, K.; Brooker, G.

    1980-01-01

    (-)-Pindolol, one of the most potent beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, was radioiodinated using chloramine-T oxidation of carrier-free Na 125I and separated from unreacted pindolol to yield 2200 Ci/mmole (-)-(125I)-iodopindolol ((-)-(125I)-IPin). Mass and ultraviolet spectra confirmed that the iodination occurred on the indole ring, presumably at the 3 position. The binding of radiolabeled (-)-(125I)-IPin to beta-adrenergic receptors has been studied using intact C6 rat astrocytoma cells (2B subclone) grown in monolayer cultures. Binding of (-)(125IPin was saturable with time and concentration. Using 13 pM (-)-(125I)IPin, binding equilibrium was reached in 90 min at 21-22 degrees C. The reverse rate constant was 0.026 min-1 at 21/sup 0/C. Specific binding (expressed as 1 microM(-)-propranolol displaceable counts) of (-)-(125I)-IPin was 95% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of (-)-(125I)-I)Pin binding revealed approximately 4300 receptors/cell and a dissociation constant of 30 pM. This was in excellent agreement with the kinetically determined dissociation constant of 35 pM. Displacement by propranolol and isoproterenol showed that (-)-(125I)-IPin binding sites were pharmacologically and stereospecifically selective. These results indicate that (-)-(125I)-IPin, a pure (-)-stereoisomer, high specific activity radioligand, selectively binds to beta-adrenergic receptors in whole cells with a high percentage of specific binding and should therefore be useful in the study and measurement of cellular beta-adrenergic receptors.

  6. Evolutionary etiology of high-grade astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yurong; Zhang, Qian; Kutlu, Burak; Difilippantonio, Simone; Bash, Ryan; Gilbert, Debra; Yin, Chaoying; O’Sullivan, T. Norene; Yang, Chunyu; Kozlov, Serguei; Bullitt, Elizabeth; McCarthy, Ken D.; Kafri, Tal; Louis, David N.; Miller, C. Ryan; Hood, Leroy; Van Dyke, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), the most common brain malignancy, remains fatal with no effective treatment. Analyses of common aberrations in GBM suggest major regulatory pathways associated with disease etiology. However, 90% of GBMs are diagnosed at an advanced stage (primary GBMs), providing no access to early disease stages for assessing disease progression events. As such, both understanding of disease mechanisms and the development of biomarkers and therapeutics for effective disease management are limited. Here, we describe an adult-inducible astrocyte-specific system in genetically engineered mice that queries causation in disease evolution of regulatory networks perturbed in human GBM. Events yielding disease, both engineered and spontaneous, indicate ordered grade-specific perturbations that yield high-grade astrocytomas (anaplastic astrocytomas and GBMs). Impaired retinoblastoma protein RB tumor suppression yields grade II histopathology. Additional activation of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) network drives progression to grade III disease, and further inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) yields GBM. Spontaneous missense mutation of tumor suppressor Trp53 arises subsequent to KRAS activation, but before grade III progression. The stochastic appearance of mutations identical to those observed in humans, particularly the same spectrum of p53 amino acid changes, supports the validity of engineered lesions and the ensuing interpretations of etiology. Absence of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation, asymptomatic low grade disease, and rapid emergence of GBM combined with a mesenchymal transcriptome signature reflect characteristics of primary GBM and provide insight into causal relationships. PMID:24114272

  7. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization. PMID:26645582

  8. Notch Signaling Activation in Pediatric Low-Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, William D.; Schreck, Karisa C.; Bar, Eli E.; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in development, stem cell biology, and the pathogenesis of several cancers but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomical sites compared to non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res 186 and Res 259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable but significant reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  9. Notch signaling activation in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William D; Schreck, Karisa C; Bar, Eli E; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-02-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in the development, stem cell biology, and pathogenesis of several cancers, but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomic sites compared with non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res186 and Res259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable, but significant, reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  10. Pilomyxoid astrocytomas with rare rosenthal fibers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaomei; Wang, Yin; Liu, Huimin; Yu, Hongyu; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytomas (PMAs) were first officially described in 2007. Since then, intermediate pilomyxoid tumors with histopathological features typical of both PMAs and pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) have been described. However, we found evidence of tumors that are histologically like PMAs but contain rare Rosenthal fibers, which have been reported in PAs but not in PMAs. We retrospectively analyzed four such cases involving a 16-year-old adolescent with a 3-cm recurring suprasellar tumor, an 11-year-old boy with a nonrecurring 3-cm mass in the left cerebellum, an 18-year-old adolescent with a mass in the suprasellar cistern who died 2 days after total tumor resection, and a 26-year-old woman with a nonrecurring 2-cm mass in the right temporal lobe. Microscopically, the tumors were a monomorphous population of small bipolar cells in a prominent myxoid/mucoid background with rare Rosenthal fibers. The tumor cells infiltrated the adjacent brain parenchyma. Findings for glial fibrillary acidic protein and oligodendrocyte transcription factor were positive, and the Ki-67 protein proliferation index was about 2%. Our findings document the existence of tumors that are histologically like PMAs but also have Rosenthal fibers. Studies of more such cases are needed for clarification of such tumors' clinical features. PMID:26670169

  11. Proteomic identification of glutamine synthetase as a differential marker for oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhengping; Qi, Meng; Li, Jie; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Xu, David S.; Iyer, Rajiv R.; Lu, Jie; Yang, Chunzhang; Weil, Robert J.; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Lonser, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Object Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are primary CNS tumors that remain a challenge to differentiate histologically because of their morphological variability and because there is a lack of reliable differential diagnostic markers. To identify proteins that are differentially expressed between astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, the authors analyzed the proteomic expression patterns and identified uniquely expressed proteins in these neoplasms. Methods Proteomes of astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas were analyzed using 2D gel electrophoresis and subsequent computerized gel analysis to detect differentially expressed proteins. The proteins were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography accompanied by tandem mass spectrometry. To determine the role of the differentially expressed proteins in astrocytes, undifferentiated glial cell cultures were treated with dibutyryl–cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Results Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that glutamine synthetase was differentially expressed in astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the increased expression of glutamine synthetase in astrocytomas compared with oligodendrogliomas. Whereas glutamine synthetase expression was demonstrated across all grades of astrocytomas (Grade II–IV [15 tumors]) and oligoastrocytomas (4 tumors), it was expressed in only 1 oligodendroglioma (6% [16 tumors]). Treatment of undifferentiated glial cell cultures with dibutyryl-cAMP resulted in astrocyte differentiation that was associated with increased levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase. Conclusions These data indicate that glutamine synthetase expression can be used to distinguish astrocytic from oligodendroglial tumors and may play a role in the pathogenesis of astrocytomas. PMID:21682567

  12. Overexpression of vascular adhesion protein-1 is associated with poor prognosis of astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Kostoro, Joanna; Chang, Shu-Jyuan; Clark Lai, Yen-Chang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Chai, Chee-Yin; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2016-06-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is one of the endothelial adhesion molecules that is believed to play a role in tumor progression and metastasis, supporting cancer cell extravasation. Very few studies have been performed on analyzing the contribution of VAP-1 in brain tumor. Astrocytomas are the most common type of brain tumors, which are classified by World Health Organization (WHO) into four grades according to the degree of malignancy. This study was designed to investigate VAP-1 expression level in different astrocytoma grades and its correlation with clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of astrocytoma patients. Eighty-seven patients with different grades of astrocytoma (WHO Grade I-Grade IV) were enrolled in this study. The expression of VAP-1 was assayed by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between VAP-1 expression and clinicopathological features was evaluated by Chi-square test, and overall survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression analysis was applied to analyze the independent influence of each parameter on overall survival. The expression level of VAP-1 was significantly higher in diffuse astrocytoma than those of pilocytic astrocytoma (p < 0.0001). In the subgroup analysis, upregulated VAP-1 expression was frequently found in older age patients (≥50 years). The VAP-1 expression was found to be significantly correlated with the overall survival (p = 0.0002). There was a statistical correlation between VAP-1(high) tumors in diffuse astrocytoma and VAP-1(low) tumors in pilocytic astrocytoma (p < 0.0001). Multivariate Cox analysis indicated VAP-1 was an independent predictive marker for poorer prognosis (p = 0.0036). Therefore, VAP-1 could be a promising prognostic biomarker in astrocytoma. PMID:26935340

  13. Mitochondrial Damage and Apoptosis Induced by Adenosine Deaminase Inhibition and Deoxyadenosine in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Balestri, Francesco; Colombaioni, Laura; Camici, Marcella

    2016-07-01

    The treatment with deoxycoformycin, a strong adenosine deaminase inhibitor, in combination with deoxyadenosine, causes apoptotic cell death of two human neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and LAN5. Herein we demonstrate that, in SH-SY5Y cells, this combination rapidly decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and, in parallel, increases mitochondrial mass, while, later, induces nuclear fragmentation, and activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3. In previous papers we have shown that a human astrocytoma cell line, subjected to the same treatment, undergoes apoptotic death as well. Therefore, both astrocytoma and neuroblastoma cell lines undergo apoptotic death following the combined treatment with deoxycoformycin and deoxyadenosine, but several differences have been found in the mode of action, possibly reflecting a different functional and metabolic profile of the two cell lines. Overall this work indicates that the neuroblastoma cell lines, like the line of astrocytic origin, are very sensitive to purine metabolism perturbation thus suggesting new therapeutic approaches to nervous system tumors. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1671-1679, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659614

  14. Postradiation astrocytoma. Report of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kitanaka, C.; Shitara, N.; Nakagomi, T.; Nakamura, H.; Genka, S.; Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Aoyama, H.; Takakura, K.

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe two cases of malignant astrocytomas associated with previous radiation therapy in childhood for intracranial germinoma and craniopharyngioma. In both patients, there was no recurrence at the primary tumor site. Because of a geometric coincidence between the tumor location and the radiation field, radiotherapy was strongly implicated as a cause of these two astrocytomas.33 references.

  15. p53 mutations are associated with 17p allelic loss in grade II and grade III astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    von Deimling, A; Eibl, R H; Ohgaki, H; Louis, D N; von Ammon, K; Petersen, I; Kleihues, P; Chung, R Y; Wiestler, O D; Seizinger, B R

    1992-05-15

    Loss of genetic material on the short arm of chromosome 17 is observed in approximately 40% of human astrocytomas (WHO grades II and III) and in approximately 30% of cases of glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade IV). Previous studies of glioblastoma multiforme have shown that the p53 gene, located on the short arm of chromosome 17, is frequently mutated in these glioblastomas. To explore whether lower-grade astrocytomas are also associated with corresponding mutations of the p53 gene, we have investigated a series of 22 human astrocytomas of WHO grades II and III both for loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 17p and for p53 mutations. Mutations in the conserved regions of the p53 gene were identified by single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of exons 5, 6, 7, and 8 and were verified by direct DNA sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products. p53 mutations were observed in 3 of 8 grade II astrocytomas and 4 of 14 grade II astrocytomas. In all 22 tumors, allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 17 was investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. One-half of the grade II astrocytomas (4 of 8) and grade III astrocytomas (7 of 14) exhibited allelic loss on chromosome 17p. Mutations in the p53 gene were exclusively observed in tumors with allelic loss on 17p. Our results show that p53 mutations are not restricted to glioblastoma multiforme and may be important in the tumorigenesis of lower-grade astrocytomas and that p53 mutations in lower-grade astrocytomas are associated with loss of chromosome 17p. These findings are consistent with a recessive mechanism of action of p53 in WHO grade II and III astrocytoma tumorigenesis. PMID:1349850

  16. Astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) displays 3 subtypes with unique expression profiles of intermediate filament proteins.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Omar; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Orndahl, Charlotte; Fekete, Boglarka; Malmgren, Kristina; Rydenhag, Bertil; Pekny, Milos

    2013-10-01

    Astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) is the most common and most malignant tumor of the central nervous system and is currently noncurable. Here, we have examined a population-based cohort of 47 patients with grade IV astrocytoma, who underwent tumor surgery at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Sweden and who survived after surgery for less than 200 days (short survivors, 28 patients) and more than 500 days (long survivors, 19 patients). For each tumor, we ascertained information on patient age, sex, tumor location, oncological treatment, and survival after surgery. The analysis of the tumor volume and the extent of tumor resection (incomplete versus complete resection of the macroscopic tumor) was made retrospectively from the preoperative radiological investigations and, when available, also from postoperative radiology. We performed semiquantitative immunohistochemical evaluation of the presence of intermediate filament (nanofilament) proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin in tumor cells. The intermediate filament system helps cells and tissues to cope with various types of stress, and thus, it might affect the malignant potential of grade IV astrocytoma. We propose a subclassification of astrocytomas grade IV with respect to the expression of the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin, namely, type A, B, and C. Our results suggest that the expression of the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, nestin, and synemin is coregulated in grade IV astrocytomas. The expression patterns of the intermediate filament proteins in astrocytoma type A, B, and C might have biological and clinical significance. PMID:23791210

  17. ADAR2 editing activity in newly diagnosed versus relapsed pediatric high-grade astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-grade (WHO grade III and IV) astrocytomas are aggressive malignant brain tumors affecting humans with a high risk of recurrence in both children and adults. To date, limited information is available on the genetic and molecular alterations important in the onset and progression of pediatric high-grade astrocytomas and, even less, on the prognostic factors that influence long-term outcome in children with recurrence. A-to-I RNA editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that can alter the nucleotide sequence of several RNAs and is mediated by the ADAR enzymes. ADAR2 editing activity is particularly important in mammalian brain and is impaired in both adult and pediatric high-grade astrocytomas. Moreover, we have recently shown that the recovered ADAR2 activity in high-grade astrocytomas inhibits in vivo tumor growth. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether changes may occur in ADAR2-mediated RNA editing profiles of relapsed high-grade astrocytomas compared to their respective specimens collected at diagnosis, in four pediatric patients. Methods Total RNAs extracted from all tumor samples and controls were tested for RNA editing levels (by direct sequencing on cDNA pools) and for ADAR2 mRNA expression (by qRT-PCR). Results A significant loss of ADAR2-editing activity was observed in the newly diagnosed and recurrent astrocytomas in comparison to normal brain. Surprisingly, we found a substantial rescue of ADAR2 editing activity in the relapsed tumor of the only patient showing prolonged survival. Conclusions High-grade astrocytomas display a generalized loss of ADAR2-mediated RNA editing at both diagnosis and relapse. However, a peculiar Case, in complete remission of disease, displayed a total rescue of RNA editing at relapse, intriguingly suggesting ADAR2 activity/expression as a possible marker for long-term survival of patients with high-grade astrocytomas. PMID:23697632

  18. SOX4 is overexpressed in diffusely infiltrating astrocytoma and confers poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Qiuyao; Chen, Xueqin; Xu, Miao; Li, Xinglan; Nie, Ling; Chen, Ni; Gong, Jing; Mao, Qing; Zhou, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    The SOX4 (sex-determining region Y-related high-mobility-group box transcription factor 4) gene plays critical roles in embryonic development and cell-fate determination. Recently, SOX4 overexpression has been found in various tumors. However, its expression status and prognostic significance in astrocytoma remain unknown. In this study, SOX4 expression in diffusely infiltrating astrocytoma (WHO grades II-IV) tissues (in comparison with pilocytic astrocytomas) was examined by immunohistochemistry, and its relevance with prognosis was analyzed. Our data showed that SOX4 was over-expressed in diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas and its expression was positively correlated with astrocytoma grade (WHO grades II-IV). Significantly, Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that SOX4 nuclear overexpression (SOX4-N) was associated with poorer progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in diffusely infiltrating astrocytoma patients (P < 0.05). Cox regression analysis further showed that nuclear SOX4-N was a significant independent negative prognostic factor for these patients. PMID:26096696

  19. Clinical significance of B7-H6 protein expression in astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian-gui; Guo, Cheng-cheng; He, Zhen-qiang; Liu, Zhi-gang; Wang, Yang; Mou, Yong-gao

    2016-01-01

    Currently, immunotherapy by blocking the immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as anti-PD-1, has been carried out in many clinical studies on recurrent glioma, and the preliminary results are satisfactory, which provides a rationale for the exploration of immune checkpoint inhibitors in glioma. B7-H6 is a newly discovered member of the B7 family, which triggers antitumor of natural killer cell cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion by binding the NKp30 receptor. B7-H6 mRNA and protein expressions, which are not detected in normal tissues, are expressed mainly on the cell surface of various primary tumors and cell lines. However, up until now, there is no data about the clinical significance of B7-H6 expression in astrocytoma patients. The present study provides an investigation on the relationship between prognostic and clinical value of B7-H6 protein in astrocytoma tissues. All the astrocytic glioma tissues were stained for B7-H6. Immunohistochemistry stain of 122 astrocytoma samples showed that immunoreactivity of B7-H6 was seen predominantly in the cytoplasm. The B7-H6 expression did not show significant relevance with patient age, sex distribution, Karnofsky performance status score, extent of resection, and tumor location in astrocytoma patients, but B7-H6 positive expression is significantly associated with World Health Organization grade (P=0.046). However, the survival rate after operation presented no significant difference of B7-H6 expression in astrocytoma patients. Kaplan–Meier analysis and the log-rank test revealed that B7-H6 expression cannot predict the overall survival. In all, it seems that the B7-H6 expression might be a marker to differentiate the World Health Organization grade level of astrocytoma, but the prognosis value of B7-H6 in astrocytoma should be studied in detail. PMID:27330308

  20. Astrocytoma

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Frontal lobe astrocytoma following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.S.; Kushner, M.J.; Dell, S.

    1981-05-01

    A young woman had a frontal lobe astrocytoma 14 years after successful treatment of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma by surgery and whole-neuraxis irradiation. The association of these two tumors is rare, and it is unlikely that the second tumor was the result of metastasis and differentiation of residual or recurrent medulloblastoma. We review the evidence supporting this view and also the likelihood that the astrocytoma was induced by the prior radiation.

  2. Radiation and taxol effects on synchronized human cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geard, C.R.; Jones, J.M. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the plant derived chemotherapeutic agent taxol alone and in combination with ionizing radiation on synchronous and asynchronous human cervical carcinoma cells and to define the mechanistic basis for this cytotoxic response. Asynchronous and synchronous cells (obtained by modified mitotic shake-off) derived from carcinomas of the human uterine cervix were treated with a range of concentrations of taxol (0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 nM) for either 8, 24, or 48 h. Synchronized cell cycling was evaluated by counting mitotic indices and by uptake of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd). Cells were irradiated ([sup 137]Cs [gamma] rays at 1.12 Gy/min) alone and after taxol treatment and plating efficiencies and radiosensitivity determined. Taxol treatment resulted in a dose time dependent loss of colony forming ability with 10 nM for 24 h producing about 10% cell survival. Irradiating taxol treated cells resulted in a strictly additive response in contrast to previous supra-additive results with astrocytoma and melanoma cells. Mitotically synchronized cells rapidly moved into G[sub 1] phase with a second mitotic peak at 28 h (total cycle time). Taxol treatment resulted in a continued accumulation of mitoses, and a failure and/or delay of entry of a fraction of cells into S phase after a G[sub 1] phase of at least 10 h. That is, taxol effects cell cycling at a stage other than G[sub 2]/M. Irradiating (3 Gy) synchronized cells showed a 10-fold variation in sensitivity, with mitosis as the most sensitive phase with taxol alone resulting in some cytotoxicity and combined effects additive or less than additive. This may explain the failure to obtain taxol radiosensitization with these cells and it may indicate that taxol has a multiplicity of actions with differences in effectiveness likely between cells of different origins. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Is Upregulation of Aquaporin 4-M1 Isoform Responsible for the Loss of Typical Orthogonal Arrays of Particles in Astrocytomas?

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Nieser, Maike; Wenzel, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Noell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic endfoot membranes of the healthy blood-brain barrier-contacting the capillary-are covered with a large number of the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). They form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs), which consist of AQP4 isoform M1 and M23. Under pathologic conditions, AQP4 is distributed over the whole cell and no or only small OAPs are found. From cell culture experiments, it is known that cells transfected only with AQP4-M1 do not form OAPs or only small ones. We hypothesized that in astrocytomas the situation may be comparable to the in vitro experiments expecting an upregulation of AQP4-M1. Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of different graded astrocytomas revealed an upregulation of both isoforms AQP4 M1 and M23 in all astrocytomas investigated. In freeze fracture replicas of low-grade malignancy astrocytomas, more OAPs than in high-grade malignancy astrocytomas were found. In vitro, cultured glioma cells did not express AQP4, whereas healthy astrocytes revealed a slight upregulation of both isoforms and only a few OAPs in freeze fracture analysis. Taken together, we found a correlation between the decrease of OAPs and increasing grade of malignancy of astrocytomas but this was not consistent with an upregulation of AQP4-M1 in relation to AQP4 M23. PMID:27483250

  4. Is Upregulation of Aquaporin 4-M1 Isoform Responsible for the Loss of Typical Orthogonal Arrays of Particles in Astrocytomas?

    PubMed Central

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Nieser, Maike; Wenzel, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Noell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic endfoot membranes of the healthy blood-brain barrier—contacting the capillary—are covered with a large number of the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4). They form orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs), which consist of AQP4 isoform M1 and M23. Under pathologic conditions, AQP4 is distributed over the whole cell and no or only small OAPs are found. From cell culture experiments, it is known that cells transfected only with AQP4-M1 do not form OAPs or only small ones. We hypothesized that in astrocytomas the situation may be comparable to the in vitro experiments expecting an upregulation of AQP4-M1. Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of different graded astrocytomas revealed an upregulation of both isoforms AQP4 M1 and M23 in all astrocytomas investigated. In freeze fracture replicas of low-grade malignancy astrocytomas, more OAPs than in high-grade malignancy astrocytomas were found. In vitro, cultured glioma cells did not express AQP4, whereas healthy astrocytes revealed a slight upregulation of both isoforms and only a few OAPs in freeze fracture analysis. Taken together, we found a correlation between the decrease of OAPs and increasing grade of malignancy of astrocytomas but this was not consistent with an upregulation of AQP4-M1 in relation to AQP4 M23. PMID:27483250

  5. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  6. Novel association between microglia and stem cells in human gliomas: A contributor to tumour proliferation?

    PubMed Central

    Noorani, Imran; Petty, Gareth; Grundy, Paul L; Sharpe, Geoff; Willaime‐Morawek, Sandrine; Harris, Scott; Thomas, Gareth J; Nicoll, James AR

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain tumour stem cells and microglia both promote the growth of astrocytomas, the commonest form of primary brain tumour, with recent emerging evidence that these cell types may interact in glioma models. It is unclear whether microglia and stem cells are associated in human gliomas. To investigate this question, we used the technique of tissue microarrays to perform a correlative study of a large number of tumour samples. We quantified immunostaining of human astrocytic tumour tissue microarrays (86 patients; World Health Organisation grade II–IV) for microglia Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and CD68, and stem cell nestin, SOX2 and CD133. Ki67 was used to assess proliferation and GFAP for astrocytic differentiation. Immunoreactivity for both microglial markers and stem cell markers nestin and SOX2 significantly increased with increasing tumour grade. GFAP was higher in low grade astrocytomas. There was a positive correlation between: (i) both microglial markers and nestin and CD133, (ii) nestin and tumour cell proliferation Ki67 and (iii) both microglial markers and Ki67. SOX2 was not associated with microglia or tumour proliferation. To test the clinical relevance, we investigated the putative association of these markers with clinical outcomes. High expression for nestin and Iba1 correlated with significantly shorter survival times, and high expression for nestin, Iba1, CD68 and Ki67 was associated with faster tumour progression on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, nestin, CD133 and Ki67 remained significant predictors of poorer survival, after adjustment for other markers. These results confirm previous in vitro findings, demonstrating their functional relevance as a therapeutic target in humans. This is the first report of a novel correlation between microglia and stem cells that may drive human astrocytic tumour development.

  7. Distinct sulfonation activities in resveratrol-sensitive and resveratrol-insensitive human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Li, Hong; Shu, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Kong, Qing-You; Wu, Mo-Li; Liu, Jia

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells show different responses to resveratrol, for unknown reasons. Our data from human medulloblastoma cells and primary cultures of rat brain cells revealed an inverse correlation of sulfonation activity with resveratrol sensitivities, providing a clue to the underlying mechanisms of the variable sensitivities of GBM cells to resveratrol. In this study, we found that U251 cells were sensitive and LN229 cells were insensitive to resveratrol. Thus, these two cell lines were taken as comparable models for elucidating the influence of sulfonation activities on resveratrol sensitivity. HPLC showed identical resveratrol metabolic patterns in both cell lines. LC/MS and high-resolution mass MS analyses further demonstrated that resveratrol monosulfate generated by sulfotransferases (SULTs) was the major metabolite of human GBM cells. The levels of brain-associated SULT (SULT1A1, SULT1C2, and SULT4A1) expression in U251 cells were lower than those in LN229 cells, suggesting the inverse relationship of SULT-mediated sulfonation activity with high intracellular resveratrol bioavailability and resveratrol sensitivity of human GBM cells. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining revealed reductions in expression of the three brain-associated SULTs in 72.8%, 47.5% and 66.3% of astrocytomas, respectively. Therefore, the levels of brain-associated SULTs and sulfonation activity mediated by them could be important parameters for evaluating the potential response of human GBM cells to resveratrol, and may have value in the personalized treatment of GBMs with resveratrol. PMID:22540632

  8. Radical proposal for the treatment of malignant astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, U.; Black, P.; Nair, S.; Yablon, J.S.; Brady, L.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The traditional treatment for anaplastic astrocytoma (AAF) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) leads to local relapse. The recurring element is assumed to be previously radioresistant, reorganizing hypoxic cells that require up to three times the traditional photon irradiation dose for inactivation. We are proposing to coagulate the original lesion with high-dose precision brachytherapy, immediately followed by resection to save the patient from secondary effects of the necrotic region. The treatment then continues with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy to the local surrounding brain and concomitant chemotherapy. The approach inverts the traditional regimen. It has the virtue of being precise, avoiding secondary effects of the necrotic tumor, and satisfying accepted radiobiological principles.

  9. Proinflammatory Cytokine Gene Induction by Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 Tax in Primary Human Glial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Prabal; Rochford, Rosemary; Antel, J.; Canute, G.; Wrzesinski, Stephen; Sieburg, Michelle; Feuer, Gerold

    2007-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) can result in the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). HTLV-2 is highly related to HTLV-1 at the genetic level and shares a high degree of sequence homology, but infection with HTLV-2 is relatively nonpathogenic compared to HTLV-1. Although the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP remains to be fully elucidated, previous evidence suggests that elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines in the CNS are associated with neuropathogenesis. We demonstrate that HTLV-1 infection in astrogliomas results in a robust induction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), TNF-β, and IL-6 expression. HTLV encodes for a viral transcriptional transactivator protein named Tax that also induces the transcription of cellular genes. To investigate and compare the effects of Tax1 and Tax2 expression on the dysregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, lentivirus vectors were used to transduce primary human astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. The expression of Tax1 in primary human astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas resulted in significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression compared to Tax2. Notably, Tax1 expression uniquely sensitized primary human astrocytomas to apoptosis. A Tax2/Tax1 chimera encoding the C-terminal 53 amino acids of the Tax1 fused to the Tax2 gene (Tax221) demonstrated a phenotype that resembled Tax1, with respect to proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and sensitization to apoptosis. The patterns of differential cytokine induction and sensitization to apoptosis displayed by Tax1 and Tax2 may reflect differences relating to the heightened neuropathogenicity associated with HTLV-1 infection and the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:17121800

  10. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma in the adult cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Annie S; Paldor, Iddo; Tsui, Alpha E; Yuen, Tanya I

    2016-05-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently recognised World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II tumour that was previously characterised as a subtype of the WHO Grade I pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). PMA has a histological appearance distinct from PA and a poorer prognosis due to its greater propensity for local recurrence and cerebrospinal dissemination. Although originally considered a paediatric tumour involving mainly the hypothalamic and chiasmatic region, reports of the lesion occurring in the adult population and other areas of the neuroaxis are emerging. We review the literature on PMA within the adult population and present the first case of PMA in the cerebellum of an adult female. PMID:26777083

  11. Analysis of Mammalian Septin Expression in Human Malignant Brain Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Seok; Hubbard, Sherri-Lynn; Peraud, Aurelia; Salhia, Bodour; Sakai, Keiichi; Rutka, James T

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Septins are a highly conserved subfamily of GTPases that play an important role in the process of cytokinesis. To increase our understanding of the expression and localization of the different mammalian septins in human brain tumors, we used antibodies against septins 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 11 in immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses of astrocytomas and medulloblastomas. We then characterized the expression and subcellular distribution of the SEPT2 protein in aphidicolin-synchronized U373 MG astrocytoma cells by immunofluorescence and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. To determine the role of SEPT2 in astrocytoma cytokinesis, we inducibly expressed a dominant-negative (DN) SEPT2 mutant in U373 MG astrocytoma cells. We show variable levels and expression patterns of the different septins in brain tissue, brain tumor specimens, and human brain tumor cell lines. SEPT2 was abundantly expressed in all brain tumor samples and cell lines studied. SEPT3 was expressed in medulloblastoma specimens and cell lines, but not in astrocytoma specimens or cell lines. SEPT2 expression was cell cycle-related, with maximal levels in G2-M. Immunocytochemical analysis showed endogenous levels of the different septins within the perinuclear and peripheral cytoplasmic regions. In mitosis, SEPT2 was concentrated at the cleavage furrow. By immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, we show that a DN SEPT2 mutant inhibits the completion of cell division and results in the accumulation of multinucleated cells. These results suggest that septins are variably expressed in human brain tumors. Stable expression of the DN SEPT2 mutant leads to a G2-M cell cycle block in astrocytoma cells. PMID:15140406

  12. Pilocytic astrocytoma: pathology, molecular mechanisms and markers.

    PubMed

    Collins, V Peter; Jones, David T W; Giannini, Caterina

    2015-06-01

    Pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs) were recognized as a discrete clinical entity over 70 years ago. They are relatively benign (WHO grade I) and have, as a group, a 10-year survival of over 90%. Many require merely surgical removal and only very infrequently do they progress to more malignant gliomas. While most show classical morphology, they may present a spectrum of morphological patterns, and there are difficult cases that show similarities to other gliomas, some of which are malignant and require aggressive treatment. Until recently, almost nothing was known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their development. The use of high-throughput sequencing techniques interrogating the whole genome has shown that single abnormalities of the mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are exclusively found in almost all cases, indicating that PA represents a one-pathway disease. The most common mechanism is a tandem duplication of a ≈2 Mb-fragment of #7q, giving rise to a fusion between two genes, resulting in a transforming fusion protein, consisting of the N-terminus of KIAA1549 and the kinase domain of BRAF. Additional infrequent fusion partners have been identified, along with other abnormalities of the MAP-K pathway, affecting tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors at the cell surface (e.g., FGFR1) as well as BRAF V600E, KRAS, and NF1 mutations among others. However, while the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion occurs in all areas, the incidence of the various other mutations identified differs in PAs that develop in different regions of the brain. Unfortunately, from a diagnostic standpoint, almost all mutations found have been reported in other brain tumor types, although some retain considerable utility. These molecular abnormalities will be reviewed, and the difficulties in their potential use in supporting a diagnosis of PA, when the histopathological findings are equivocal or in the choice of individualized therapy, will be discussed. PMID:25792358

  13. LOX Expression and Functional Analysis in Astrocytomas and Impact of IDH1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Roseli; Uno, Miyuki; Marie, Suely K. Nagahashi; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M.

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is involved in vital biological processes such as cell motility, cell signaling and gene regulation. Deregulation of this protein can contribute to tumor formation and progression. Although it is known that LOX is involved in invasion, proliferation and tumor migration in other types of tumors, studies of LOX in astrocytomas of different grades are scarce. The purpose of our study was to characterize LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A expression by real-time PCR in astrocytomas with WHO grades I to IV compared to non-neoplastic brain tissue. IDH1 mutational status was determined by PCR and sequencing. LOX protein expression was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry. LOX functional analyses were performed using siRNA knockdown and the specific inhibitor BAPN in two glioblastoma cell lines. The expression levels of LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A were correlated and analyzed according to IDH1 mutation status and to the clinical end-point of overall survival of glioblastoma patients. The results demonstrate that increased expression and activity of LOX, BMP1 and HIF1A were positively correlated with the malignant grade of astrocytomas. LOX protein expression also increased according to the degree of malignancy, with localization in the cytoplasm and nucleus and staining observed in endothelial cells. Glioblastoma with a mutation in IDH1 expressed lower levels of LOX in the nucleus, and IDH1-mutated cases showed lower LOX expression levels when compared to wild-type IDH1 cases. LOX knockdown and inhibition by BAPN in U87MG and A172 cell lines affected migration, invasion and soft agar colony formation. Taken together, these results corroborate the role of LOX in the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of astrocytomas. Furthermore, LOX expression is influenced by IDH1 mutational status. This work provides new insights for researchers aiming to design targeted therapies to control astrocytomas. PMID:25790191

  14. Sleeping Beauty-mediated somatic mutagenesis implicates CSF1 in the formation of high grade astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Aaron M.; Collier, Lara S.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Tieu, Christina; Larson, Jon D.; Halder, Chandralekha; Mahlum, Eric; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Akagi, Keiko; Sarkar, Gobinda; Largaespada, David A.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been used as an insertional mutagenesis tool to identify novel cancer genes. To identify glioma-associated genes, we evaluated tumor formation in brain tissue from 117 transgenic mice that had undergone constitutive SB-mediated transposition. Upon analysis, 21 samples (18%) contained neoplastic tissue with features of high grade astrocytomas. These tumors expressed glial markers and were histologically similar to human glioma. Genomic DNA from SB-induced astrocytoma tissue was extracted and transposon insertion sites were identified. Insertions in the growth factor gene Csf1 were found in 13 of the 21 tumors (62%), clustered in introns 5 and 8. Using RT-PCR, we documented increased Csf1 RNAs in tumor versus adjacent normal tissue, with identification of transposon-terminated Csf1 mRNAs in astrocytomas with SB insertions in intron 8. Analysis of human glioblastomas revealed increased levels of Csf1 RNA and protein. Together, these results indicate that SB-insertional mutagenesis can identify high-grade astrocytoma-associated genes, and they imply an important role for CSF1 in the development of these tumors. PMID:20388773

  15. Proteomic Identification of Biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Astrocytoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Fatima W.; Reed, Matthew S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Gillespie, G.Yancey; Guha, Abhijit; Groves, Morris D.; Kesari, Santosh; Pohl, Jan; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2008-01-01

    The monitoring of changes in the protein composition of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can be used as a sensitive indicator of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, yet its systematic application to analysis of CNS neoplasia has been limited. There is a pressing need for both a better understanding of gliomagenesis, and the development of reliable biomarkers of the disease. In this report, we used two proteomic techniques, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and cleavable Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag (cICAT), to compare CSF proteomes in order to identify tumor and grade specific biomarkers in patients bearing brain tumors of differing histologies and grades. Retrospective analyses were performed on 60 samples derived from astrocytomas WHO grade II, III and IV, schwannomas, metastastic brain tumors, inflammatory samples and non-neoplastic controls. We identified 103 potential tumor-specific markers; of which 20 were high-grade astrocytoma-specific. These investigations allowed us to identify a spectrum of signature proteins that could differentiate between low (AII) and high-grade (AIV) astrocytoma, which may represent new diagnostic, prognostic and disease follow-up markers when used alone or in combination. These candidate biomarkers may also have functional properties that play a critical role in the development and malignant progression of human astrocytomas, thus possibly representing novel therapeutic targets for this highly lethal disease. PMID:17269713

  16. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G. H.; Roholl, P. J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; Den Otter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for their in vitro sensitivity to histamine and histamine antagonists. Four continuous glioma cell lines were used to confirm the glioma-specificity of the effects observed in the primary cell lines. In low serum concentration (0 or 1%) the growth of 5/9 primary glioma-derived cultures could be stimulated with 0.2 mM histamine, and in 4/5 cases with 0.2 microM histamine. One mM of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine could inhibit the growth of 4/5 primary glioma cultures when tested in 1% human AB serum, and of 6/13 cases when tested in 1% FCS. Lower concentrations (down to 1 microM) were less effective. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine gave variable results. The specificity of the effects is indicated by the absence of a generalised toxic effect, by the observation that the antagonist-induced inhibition could be reversed with histamine, and by the correlation of the obtained cimetidine-induced growth inhibition with the maximal growth rate of the primary cell lines in 10% FCS. The observed cimetidine-induced inhibition of the in vitro proliferation of gliomas suggests that cimetidine is a relevant candidate for the in vivo growth inhibition of these tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8353038

  17. Acquired stuttering due to recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katherine B; Turner, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Acquired (neurogenic) stuttering is a rare phenomenon seen after cerebral infarction or brain injury. Aetiology of this symptom is unclear, but recent evidence supports that it is a disturbance in the left hemispheric neural network involving the interplay between the cortex and basal ganglia. We present the case of a patient who develops acquired stuttering after a recurrence of a right temporoparietal anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO grade III). We also review other cases of acquired stuttering and known anatomical correlates. PMID:24252834

  18. The effect of everolimus on renal angiomyolipoma in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma: subgroup results from the randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 trial EXIST-1

    PubMed Central

    Kingswood, J. Chris; Jozwiak, Sergiusz; Belousova, Elena D.; Frost, Michael D.; Kuperman, Rachel A.; Bebin, E. Martina; Korf, Bruce R.; Flamini, J. Robert; Kohrman, Michael H.; Sparagana, Steven P.; Wu, Joyce Y.; Brechenmacher, Thomas; Stein, Karen; Berkowitz, Noah; Bissler, John J.; Franz, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is characterized by benign tumours in multiple organs, including the brain, kidneys, skin, lungs and heart. Our objective was to evaluate everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in the treatment of angiomyolipoma in patients with subependymal giant cell astrocytoma (SEGA) associated with TSC. Methods EXamining everolimus In a Study of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex-1 (NCT00789828), a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study, examined everolimus in treating SEGA associated with TSC. Patients with serial SEGA growth from pre-baseline to baseline scans were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive 4.5 mg/m2/day everolimus (target blood trough: 5–15 ng/mL; n = 78) or placebo (n = 39). Angiomyolipoma response rates were analysed in patients (n = 44) with target baseline angiomyolipoma lesions (≥1 angiomyolipoma; longest diameter ≥1.0 cm). An angiomyolipoma response rate, defined as the proportion of patients with confirmed angiomyolipoma response, was assessed by kidney CT or MRI screening at baseline, at 12, 24 and 48 weeks and annually. Results Angiomyolipoma response rates were 53.3% (16/30) and 0% (0/14) for everolimus- and placebo-treated patients, respectively. Angiomyolipoma reductions ≥50% in the sum of volumes of all target lesions were seen only in everolimus-treated patients (56.5, 78.3 and 80.0%) compared with placebo-treated patients (0% at each time point) at Weeks 12, 24 and 48, respectively. Greater percentages of everolimus-treated patients had angiomyolipoma reductions ≥30% at these same time points (82.6, 100 and 100% versus 8.3, 18.2 and 16.7% for everolimus versus placebo, respectively). Conclusions Everolimus showed efficacy in reducing angiomyolipoma lesion volume in patients with SEGA associated with TSC. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00789828; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00789828?term=EXIST-1&rank=1. PMID:24729041

  19. Aromatase and estrogen receptor alpha mRNA expression as prognostic biomarkers in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Dueñas Jiménez, J M; Candanedo Arellano, A; Santerre, A; Orozco Suárez, S; Sandoval Sánchez, H; Feria Romero, I; López-Elizalde, R; Alonso Venegas, M; Netel, B; de la Torre Valdovinos, B; Dueñas Jiménez, S H

    2014-09-01

    Estrogens are oncogenic hormones at a high level in breast, prostate, endometrial and lung cancer. Estrogens are synthesized by aromatase which has been used as a biomarker both in breast and lung cancer. Estrogen biological activities are executed by their classic receptors (ERα and ERβ). ERα has been described as a cancer promoter and ERβ, as a possible tumor suppressor. Both receptors are present at low levels in primary multiforme glioblastoma (GBM). The GBM frequency is 50 % higher in men than in women. The GBM patient survival period ranges from 7 to 18 months. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate aromatase and estrogen receptor expression, as well as 17ß-estradiol concentration in astrocytoma patients biopsies to obtain a prognosis biomarker for these patients. We analyzed 36 biopsies of astrocytoma patients with a different grade (I-IV) of malignity. Aromatase and estrogen receptor mRNA expression were analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR, and the E2 levels, by ELISA. E2 concentration was higher in GBM, compared to grade II or III astrocytomas. The number of cells immunoreactive to aromatase and estrogen receptors decreased as the grade of tumor malignity increased. Aromatase mRNA expression was present in all biopsies, regardless of malignity grade or patient age or gender. The highest expression of aromatase mRNA in GBM patients was associated to the worst survival prognostic (6.28 months). In contrast lowest expression of ERα mRNA in astrocytoma patients had a worst prognosis. In conclusion, aromatase and ERα expression could be used as prognosis biomarkers for astrocytoma patients. PMID:25005528

  20. Expression and clinical significance of the proliferation marker minichromosome maintenance protein 2 (Mcm2) in diffuse astrocytomas WHO grade II

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WHO classification system for astrocytomas is not considered optimal, mainly because of the subjective assessment of the histopathological features. Few prognostic variables have been found that stratify the risk of clinical progression in patients with grade II astrocytoma. For that reason there is a continuous search for biomarkers that can improve the histopathological diagnosis and prognostication of these tumours. Aim This study was designed to investigate the prognostic significance of the proliferative marker Mcm2 (minichromosome maintenance protein 2) in diffuse astrocytomas WHO grade II and correlate the findings with histopathology, mitoses, and Ki67/MIB-1 immunostaining. Method 61 patients with histologically verified grade II astrocytoma (WHO 2007) were investigated. Paraffin sections were immunostained with anti-Mcm2, and the Mcm2 proliferative index (PI) was determined as the percentage of immunoreactive tumour cell nuclei. Results Mcm2 PI was not associated with any histopathological features but correlated significantly with mitotic count and Ki67/MIB-1 PI (p<0.05). In the survival analyses Mcm2 showed trends to poorer survival, however, statistical significance was not achieved in the univariate analyses (p>0.05). Conclusions In our hands Mcm2 immunostaining has no advantage over Ki67/MIB-1 in the evaluation of grade II astrocytomas. Larger studies are needed to fully clarify the prognostic role of this biomarker. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1715002791944037 PMID:23618321

  1. Knocking down nucleolin expression in gliomas inhibits tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Joshi, Neel; Agarwal, Ashima; Dahiya, Sonika; Bittner, Patrice; Smith, Erin; Taylor, Sara; Piwnica-Worms, David; Weber, Jason; Leonard, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Nucleolin is a multifunctional protein whose expression often correlates with increased cellular proliferation. While the expression of nucleolin is often elevated in numerous cancers, its expression in normal human brain and in astrocytomas has not been previously reported. Using paraffin-embedded sections from normal adult autopsy specimens and glioma resection specimens, we demonstrate that nucleolin expression is limited in the normal human brain specifically to mature neurons, ependymal cells, and granular cells of the dentate gyrus. While astrocytes in the normal human brain do not express nucleolin at significant levels, glioblastoma cell lines and primary human astrocytoma cells exhibit considerable nucleolin expression. Reduction of nucleolin expression through siRNA-mediated knockdown in the U87MG glioblastoma cell line caused a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in vitro. Moreover, conditional siRNA knockdown of nucleolin expression in U87MG intracranial xenografts in nude mice caused dramatic reduction in tumor size. Taken together, these results implicate nucleolin in the regulation of human astrocytoma proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo and suggest that nucleolin may represent a potential novel therapeutic target for astrocytomas. PMID:22382782

  2. Thallium-201 tumor/cardiac ratio estimation of residual astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mountz, J.M.; Stafford-Schuck, K.; McKeever, P.E.; Taren, J.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1988-05-01

    Treatment of high-grade astrocytoma includes surgery, chemotherapy, and various methods of irradiation. Radiation therapy usually results in necrosis and edema around the primary tumor site. Contrast-enhanced computerized tomography (CT) and standard radionuclide imaging techniques are unable to reliably distinguish recurrent tumor from necrosis or edema since these images depict localization of contrast material or tracer, which primarily depends on blood-brain barrier breakdown. Thallium-201 (201Tl) appears to incorporate into viable tumor cells more rapidly than into normal brain cells. This report describes a new method to quantify the uptake of 201T1 in the tumor: the tumor-to-cardiac uptake ratio (T/C). Twenty-three 201T1 brain scans were performed on eight patients to differentiate recurrent viable high-grade astrocytoma from posttherapy changes. Planar images of the head and heart were obtained in order to calculate the ratio of tumor counts to cardiac counts. This ratio represents a numerical estimation of 201T1 uptake in the brain tumor relative to cardiac counts and is expressed as the T/C index. The T/C index correlated well with the clinical course in all eight patients. In general, however, CT suggested more extensive regrowth of tumor than the actual clinical status suggested. In one patient's course of radiological monitoring, tumor recurrence was detected by means of 201T1 imaging four months prior to its appearance on CT. In conclusion, when performed serially, the T/C index can provide an accurate estimate of residual tumor burden or recurrence, and detect and quantify viable tumor during therapy.

  3. Selective acquisition of IDH1 R132C mutations in astrocytomas associated with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takuya; Vital, Anne; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Kleihues, Paul; Ohgaki, Hiroko

    2009-06-01

    Mutations of the IDH1 gene are frequent in gliomas, with R132H (CGT-->CAT) being the most common (>85%). In astrocytomas, IDH1 mutations are typically co-present with, or precede, TP53 mutations. We assessed IDH1 mutations in brain tumors diagnosed in patients from three families with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. We identified IDH1 mutations in five astrocytomas that developed in carriers of a TP53 germline mutation. Without exception, all were R132C (CGT-->TGT), which in sporadic astrocytomas accounts for <5% of IDH1 mutations. This remarkably selective occurrence of R132C mutations may reflect differences in the sequence of genetic events, with a preference for R132C mutations in astrocytes or precursor cells that already carry a germline TP53 mutation. PMID:19340432

  4. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  5. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma of the pineal region: cytopathological features and differential diagnostic considerations by intraoperative smear preparation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshitetsu; Haba, Reiji; Kushida, Yoshio; Katsuki, Naomi; Shibuya, Shinsuke; Kadota, Kyuichi; Matsunaga, Toru; Miyake, Keisuke; Tamiya, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently identified type of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) with shorter progression-free and overall survival, higher rate of recurrence, and higher risk of leptomeningeal spread compared to pilocytic tumors (WHO grade 2 designation). A case is presented here in which intraoperative imprint smears of a pineal region tumor in a 14-year-old girl revealed cytologic monomorphism, elongated cells with bland nuclei embedded in a myxoid background. The tumor cells possessed uniformly round nuclei with a smooth nuclear outline, fine granular chromatin, and small nucleoli. Slender cytoplasmic fibrillary processes and angiocentric arrangement were observed but Rosenthal fibers or eosinophilic granular bodies were absent. A cytologic diagnosis of PMA of the pineal region was suggested by intraoperative smear preparation. Histology and immunohistochemical results confirmed the final diagnosis. This report shows that smear preparation can be trustworthy for the intraoperative diagnosis of PMA, helping to determine the appropriate neurosurgical procedure and therapeutic implications. PMID:24578310

  6. High-grade astrocytoma (Glioblastoma Multiforme) in an Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis).

    PubMed

    Díaz-Delgado, J; Sacchini, S; Suárez-Bonnet, A; Sierra, E; Arbelo, M; Espinosa, A; Rodríguez-Grau Bassas, E; Mompeo, B; Pérez, L; Fernández, A

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the gross, microscopical and immunohistochemical features of a high-grade astrocytoma (glioblastoma multiforme) in an adult male Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis). On necropsy examination, a 5 × 2.5 × 2 cm, poorly demarcated, red, friable and locally expansile mass effaced the thalamus and the left periventricular region and extended to the left lateral ventricle of the brain. Microscopically, the mass consisted of haphazardly arranged bundles and rows of interweaving polygonal to spindle-shaped cells. These often palisaded along serpentine foci of necrosis and were surrounded by prominent vessels. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, but not vimentin, S100 protein, neuron-specific enolase or neurofilament protein. A diagnosis of high-grade astrocytoma was made and this represents the first description of a glioma in a cetacean species. PMID:25728810

  7. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I-IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN) Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  8. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  9. Radiation Therapy for Pilocytic Astrocytomas of Childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, David B.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; King, Allison A.; Hollander, Abby S.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Park, T.S.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Though radiation therapy is generally considered the most effective treatment for unresectable pilocytic astrocytomas in children, there are few data to support this claim. To examine the efficacy of radiation therapy for pediatric pilocytic astrocytomas, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients 18 years old or younger with unresectable tumors and without evidence of neurofibromatosis have been treated since 1982. Patients were treated with local radiation fields to a median dose of 54 Gy. Six patients were treated with radiosurgery to a median dose of 15.5 Gy. Five patients were treated with initial chemotherapy and irradiated after progression. Results: All patients were alive after a median follow-up of 5.0 years. However, progression-free survival was 68.7%. None of 11 infratentorial tumors progressed compared with 6 of 20 supratentorial tumors. A trend toward improved progression-free survival was seen with radiosurgery (80%) compared with external beam alone (66%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Eight of the 9 patients progressing after therapy did so within the irradiated volume. Conclusions: Although the survival of these children is excellent, almost one third of patients have progressive disease after definitive radiotherapy. Improvements in tumor control are needed in this patient population, and the optimal therapy has not been fully defined. Prospective trials comparing initial chemotherapy to radiation therapy are warranted.

  10. MicroRNA-132 targets PEA-15 and suppresses the progression of astrocytoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Geng, Fei; Wu, Jian-Lin; Lu, Gui-Feng; Liang, Zhi-Ping; Duan, Zhuo-Li; Gu, Xi

    2016-09-01

    Gliomas are highly malignant tumors, the most common of which are astrocytomas. A growing number of studies suggest that dysregulation of miRNAs is a frequent event contributing to the pathogenesis of gliomas. In this study, we found that over-expression of miR-132 inhibited cell proliferation and migration and triggered apoptosis, while knockdown of miR-132 showed opposite effects. PEA-15 was identified as a direct target of miR-132. Reintroduction of PEA-15 without 3'UTR region reversed the inhibitory effects of miR-132 on cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis. MiR-132 was inversely correlated with the PEA-15 expression. CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) and KLF (Krüppel-like factor 8) were conformed as transcription factors of miR-132, which bidirectionally regulate the expression of miR-132. Our study suggests that miR-132 is an important tumor suppressor of astrocytoma progression by targeting PEA-15, while CREB and KLF can modulate the expression of miR-132, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying astrocytoma progression in vitro. PMID:27294355

  11. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma in an adult woman: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kibola, Adam H; McClelland, Shearwood; Hlavin, Joseph; Friedman, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) is a recently classified WHO grade II astrocytoma that is histologically similar to pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Both tumors typically present in childhood, but PMA is more aggressive with higher rates of recurrence and cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Currently, there is no standardized treatment protocol for PMA although this will change with increased awareness of this disease entity within the neurosurgical community. We present a 22-year-old patient with a left frontal lobe PMA manifesting with atypical radiographic findings. This is the first reported case of PMA in an adult woman. PMID:26458706

  12. Amitosis in human adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Pignatelli, D; Magalhães, M M

    1991-04-01

    Adrenal pieces obtained from 3 female and 2 male patients showed morphological figures of amitosis in adrenal zona reticularis cells. Such aspects were observed in both normal and hyperactive adrenals. Nuclei appeared constricted, heavily stained, with coarse chromatin, sometimes scattered among cytoplasmic organelles, but never marginating in crescentic caps. Cleavage of the cells originated two halves with a nucleolus in each pole. Binucleated cells were also seen in zona reticularis. The meaning of amitosis in human adrenal is discussed. PMID:1802124

  13. Sleeping beauty-mediated somatic mutagenesis implicates CSF1 in the formation of high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bender, Aaron M; Collier, Lara S; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Tieu, Christina; Larson, Jon D; Halder, Chandralekha; Mahlum, Eric; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Akagi, Keiko; Sarkar, Gobinda; Largaespada, David A; Jenkins, Robert B

    2010-05-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been used as an insertional mutagenesis tool to identify novel cancer genes. To identify glioma-associated genes, we evaluated tumor formation in the brain tissue from 117 transgenic mice that had undergone constitutive SB-mediated transposition. Upon analysis, 21 samples (18%) contained neoplastic tissue with features of high-grade astrocytomas. These tumors expressed glial markers and were histologically similar to human glioma. Genomic DNA from SB-induced astrocytoma tissue was extracted and transposon insertion sites were identified. Insertions in the growth factor gene Csf1 were found in 13 of the 21 tumors (62%), clustered in introns 5 and 8. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we documented increased Csf1 RNAs in tumor versus adjacent normal tissue, with the identification of transposon-terminated Csf1 mRNAs in astrocytomas with SB insertions in intron 8. Analysis of human glioblastomas revealed increased levels of Csf1 RNA and protein. Together, these results indicate that SB-insertional mutagenesis can identify high-grade astrocytoma-associated genes and they imply an important role for CSF1 in the development of these tumors. PMID:20388773

  14. Characterization of the effect of Epilobium extracts on human cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vitalone, Annabella; McColl, Janice; Thome, Dean; Costa, Lucio G; Tita, Beatrice

    2003-10-01

    We have previously shown that extracts of different Epilobium species, a phytotherapeutic agent used in folk medicine as a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, inhibit proliferation of human prostate cells. The selectivity of this effect was evaluated in four different human cell lines (PZ-HPV-7, normal prostate cells; LNCaP, transformed prostate cells; HMEC, mammary cells, and 1321N1, astrocytoma cells). Different extracts of Epilobium species (E. rosmarinifolium, E. spicatum, and E. tetragonum) had similar growth-inhibitory effects in all cell lines tested, indicating a lack of specificity for prostate cells. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was mostly due to the nonpolar fraction of the extracts which is expected to contain flavonoids and sterols. Polar fractions were devoid of activity with the exception of that from E. rosmarinifolium. This species is the most potent in the antiproliferative effect and contains the highest concentration of oenothein B, a hydrolyzable ellagitannin. Oenothein B inhibited DNA synthesis in all four cell lines tested. Extracts of E. angustifolium (the Linné denomination of E. spicatum) and of E. spicatum from different sources were compared for their ability to inhibit DNA synthesis and for their oenothein B content. The E. angustifolium extract contained an amount of oenothein B 40-fold higher than the other extract of the same species and was ten times more potent in inhibiting DNA synthesis in a human prostate cell line. These results indicate that Epilobium extracts inhibit proliferation of prostate cells in a nonspecific manner. Oenothein B may play a role in this effect, but other active compounds are also present. The difference observed between extracts from the same species underscores the importance of determination and standardization of active ingredients in phytotherapeutic agents. PMID:12928581

  15. ZEB1 Promotes Invasion in Human Fetal Neural Stem Cells and Hypoxic Glioma Neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Ulf D; Suwala, Abigail K; Raabe, Eric H; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Suarez, Maria J; Orr, Brent A; Bar, Eli E; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Eberhart, Charles G

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse spread through brain parenchyma and the presence of hypoxic foci rimmed by neoplastic cells are two cardinal features of glioblastoma, and low oxygen is thought to drive movement of malignant gliomas in the core of the lesions. Transcription factors associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been linked to this invasion, and we found that hypoxia increased in vitro invasion up to fourfold in glioblastoma neurosphere lines and induced the expression of ZEB1. Immunohistochemical assessment of 295 surgical specimens consisting of various types of pediatric and adult brain cancers showed that ZEB1 expression was significantly higher in infiltrative lesions than less invasive tumors such as pilocytic astrocytoma and ependymoma. ZEB1 protein was also present in human fetal periventricular stem and progenitor cells and ZEB1 inhibition impaired migration of in vitro propagated human neural stem cells. The induction of ZEB1 protein in hypoxic glioblastoma neurospheres could be partially blocked by the HIF1alpha inhibitor digoxin. Targeting ZEB1 blocked hypoxia-augmented invasion of glioblastoma cells in addition to slowing them in normoxia. These data support the role for ZEB1 in invasive and high-grade brain tumors and suggest its key role in promoting invasion in the hypoxic tumor core as well as in the periphery. PMID:25521330

  16. Spinal hemangioblastoma combined with pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Qing; Wang, Xiang; Zhong, Nan-Zhe; Yi-Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The combination of vascular anomalies with gliomas is rarely seen in the CNS, and is defined as ‘angioglioma’. However, the definition, category, and histopathogenesis of angiogliomas remain controversial. Here, we present an unusual case of spinal hemangioblastoma (HB) combined with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Spinal MRI revealed lesions extending from T9 to T12 segments, in a “sandwich-like” fashion. After resection of the tumor, histopathologic study confirmed the diagnosis of HB as well as PA. A comprehensive review of the literature was further conducted. We describe a case of spinal HB combined with PA, in addition we discuss the clinicopathological relationship between HB and PA under these conditions, which may facilitate the understanding of the histogenesis of an angioglioma and guide its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26166599

  17. Spinal hemangioblastoma combined with pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Qing; Wang, Xiang; Zhong, Nan-Zhe; Li, Yi-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The combination of vascular anomalies with gliomas is rarely seen in the CNS, and is defined as "angioglioma". However, the definition, category, and histopathogenesis of angiogliomas remain controversial. Here, we present an unusual case of spinal hemangioblastoma (HB) combined with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA). Spinal MRI revealed lesions extending from T9 to T12 segments, in a "sandwich-like" fashion. After resection of the tumor, histopathologic study confirmed the diagnosis of HB as well as PA. A comprehensive review of the literature was further conducted. We describe a case of spinal HB combined with PA, in addition we discuss the clinicopathological relationship between HB and PA under these conditions, which may facilitate the understanding of the histogenesis of an angioglioma and guide its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26166599

  18. SIV replication in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Ryuta; Takeuchi, Hiroaki

    2012-01-01

    Current human immunodeficiency virus type 1 pandemic is believed to originate from cross-species transmission of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) into human population. Such cross-species transmission, however, is not efficient in general, because viral replication is modulated by host cell factors, with the species-specificity of these factors affecting viral tropism. An understanding of those host cell factors that affect viral replication contributes to elucidation of the mechanism for determination of viral tropism. This review will focus an anti-viral effect of ApoB mRNA editing catalytic subunit, tripartite motif protein 5 alpha, and cyclophilins on SIV replication and provide insight into the mechanism of species-specific barriers against viral infection in human cells. It will then present our current understanding of the mechanism that may explain zoonotic transmission of retroviruses. PMID:22679440

  19. Aminobisphosphonates Synergize with Human Cytomegalovirus To Activate the Antiviral Activity of Vγ9Vδ2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Daguzan, Charline; Moulin, Morgane; Kulyk-Barbier, Hanna; Davrinche, Christian; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Champagne, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells are activated through their TCR by neighboring cells producing phosphoantigens. Zoledronate (ZOL) treatment induces intracellular accumulation of the phosphoantigens isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ApppI. Few attempts have been made to use immunomanipulation of Vγ9Vδ2 lymphocytes in chronic viral infections. Although Vγ9Vδ2 T cells seem to ignore human CMV (HCMV)-infected cells, we examined whether they can sense HCMV when a TCR stimulus is provided with ZOL. Fibroblasts treated with ZOL activate Vγ9Vδ2 T cells to produce IFN-γ but not TNF. Following the same treatment, HCMV-infected fibroblasts stimulate TNF secretion and an increased production of IFN-γ, indicating that Vγ9Vδ2 cells can sense HCMV infection. Increased lymphokine production was observed with most clinical isolates and laboratory HCMV strains, HCMV-permissive astrocytoma, or dendritic cells, as well as "naive" and activated Vγ9Vδ2 cells. Quantification of intracellular isopentenyl pyrophosphate/ApppI following ZOL treatment showed that HCMV infection boosts their accumulation. This was explained by an increased capture of ZOL and by upregulation of HMG-CoA synthase and reductase transcription. Using an experimental setting where infected fibroblasts were cocultured with γδ cells in submicromolar concentrations of ZOL, we show that Vγ9Vδ2 cells suppressed substantially the release of infectious particles while preserving uninfected cells. Vγ9Vδ2 cytotoxicity was decreased by HCMV infection of targets whereas anti-IFN-γ and anti-TNF Abs significantly blocked the antiviral effect. Our experiments indicate that cytokines produced by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells have an antiviral potential in HCMV infection. This should lead to in vivo studies to explore the possible antiviral effect of immunostimulation with ZOL in this context. PMID:26819204

  20. Screening feature genes of astrocytoma using a combined method of microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yong; Zhong, Xingming; Wang, Yiqi; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find feature genes associated with astrocytoma and correlative gene functions which can distinguish cancer tissue from adjacent non-tumor astrocyte tissues. Gene expression profile GSE15824 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database which included 8 astrocytoma tissues and 3 adjacent non-tumor astrocyte samples. The raw data were first transformed into probe-level data and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between tissues of patients with astrocytoma and normal specimen were identified using T-test in samr package of R. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) was applied to analyze the gene ontology (GO) enrichment on gene functions and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Finally, corresponding protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of DEGs was constructed using the Cytoscape based on the data collected from STRING online datasets. A total of 3072 genes, including 1799 up-regulated genes and 1273 down-regulated genes, were filtered as DEGs, and we learnt that the DEGs including AQP4, PMP2, SRARCL1 and SLC1A2CAMs etc and that AQP4 was most significantly related to cell osmotic pressure. Three feature genes in KEGG pathway are highly enriched in cancer specimen while two genes are in the normal tissues. The discovery of featured genes significantly related to the regulation of cell osmotic pressure, has the potential to use in clinic for diagnosis of astrocytoma in future. In addition, it has a great significance on studying mechanism, distinguishing normal and cancer tissues, and exploring new treatments for astrocytoma. However, further experiments were needed to confirm our result. PMID:26770395

  1. Screening feature genes of astrocytoma using a combined method of microarray gene expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yong; Zhong, Xingming; Wang, Yiqi; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to find feature genes associated with astrocytoma and correlative gene functions which can distinguish cancer tissue from adjacent non-tumor astrocyte tissues. Gene expression profile GSE15824 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database which included 8 astrocytoma tissues and 3 adjacent non-tumor astrocyte samples. The raw data were first transformed into probe-level data and the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between tissues of patients with astrocytoma and normal specimen were identified using T-test in samr package of R. The Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) was applied to analyze the gene ontology (GO) enrichment on gene functions and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Finally, corresponding protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of DEGs was constructed using the Cytoscape based on the data collected from STRING online datasets. A total of 3072 genes, including 1799 up-regulated genes and 1273 down-regulated genes, were filtered as DEGs, and we learnt that the DEGs including AQP4, PMP2, SRARCL1 and SLC1A2CAMs etc and that AQP4 was most significantly related to cell osmotic pressure. Three feature genes in KEGG pathway are highly enriched in cancer specimen while two genes are in the normal tissues. The discovery of featured genes significantly related to the regulation of cell osmotic pressure, has the potential to use in clinic for diagnosis of astrocytoma in future. In addition, it has a great significance on studying mechanism, distinguishing normal and cancer tissues, and exploring new treatments for astrocytoma. However, further experiments were needed to confirm our result. PMID:26770395

  2. H-Ras Increases Urokinase Expression and Cell Invasion in Genetically Modified Human Astrocytes Through Ras/Raf/MEK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YUNGE; XIAO, AIZHEN; DIPIERRO, CHARLES G.; ABDEL-FATTAH, RANA; AMOS, SAMSON; REDPATH, GERARD T.; CARPENTER, JOAN E.; PIEPER, RUSSELL O.; HUSSAINI, ISA M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous study reported that the activation of Ras pathway cooperated with E6/E7-mediated inactivation of p53/pRb to transform immortalized normal human astrocytes (NHA/hTERT) into intracranial tumors strongly resembling human astrocytomas. The mechanism of how H-Ras contributes to astrocytoma formation is unclear. Using genetically modified NHA cells (E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells) as models, we investigated the mechanism of Ras-induced tumorigenesis. The overexpression of constitutively active H-RasV12 in E6/E7/hTERT cells robustly increased the levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) mRNA, protein, activity and invasive capacity of the E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. However, the expressions of MMP-9 and MMP-2 did not significantly change in the E6/E7/hTERT and E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. Furthermore, E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells also displayed higher level of uPA activity and were more invasive than E6/E7/hTERT cells in 3D culture, and formed an intracranial tumor mass in a NOD-SCID mouse model. uPA specific inhibitor (B428) and uPA neutralizing antibody decreased uPA activity and invasion in E6/E7/hTERT/Ras cells. uPA-deficient U-1242 glioblastoma cells were less invasive in vitro and exhibited reduced tumor growth and infiltration into normal brain in xenograft mouse model. Inhibitors of Ras (FTA), Raf (Bay 54−9085) and MEK (UO126), but not of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002) and of protein kinase C (BIM) pathways, inhibited uPA activity and cell invasion. Our results suggest that H-Ras increased uPA expression and activity via the Ras/Raf/MEK signaling pathway leading to enhanced cell invasion and this may contribute to increased invasive growth properties of astrocytomas. PMID:18383343

  3. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  4. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  5. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest. PMID:18522846

  6. Adult cervicomedullary pilocytic astrocytoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, YAODONG; FENG, LIJIN; WEI, QING; GAO, LIANG

    2015-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is a rare glioma, which generally occurs in children and young adults. In adult patients, the majority of PA tumors are supratentorial. Due to the low morbidity rate of the disease in adults, PA is frequently misdiagnosed and mistreated. In the present study, this rare disease was successfully treated. The study reported the case of a 48-year-old patient with a cervicomedullary occupying lesion, who complained of numbness and pain of the right limbs that persisted for >10 years, with aggravation for 1 month. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a sharp cervicomedullary mass extending from the lower medulla to the cervical vertebra C3 level. Intraoperatively, the medulla and upper cervical cord were found to be well-stacked. Immediately after ingression into the spinal cord along the dorsal median sulcus, the tumor mass was detected and had a gray fish-like appearance, moderate blood supply and clear boundary. After intratumoral decompression, total excision was achieved. Postoperative pathological examination confirmed that the tumor was a PA. Following discharge, the patient did not suffer from any symptoms of the lower cranial nerves and was able to walk with limited assistance. PMID:26668620

  7. Pilocytic astrocytoma presenting with atypical features on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoshiteru; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Takahashi, Mayu; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Akiba, Daisuke; Kitagawa, Takehiro; Ueta, Kunihiro; Miyaoka, Ryo; Umemura, Takeru; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma, which is classified as a grade I astrocytic tumor by the World Health Organization, is the most common type of glioma in children and young adults. Pilocytic astrocytoma generally appears as a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhancing lesion, frequently with cystic components on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it has been reported that the MRI appearance of pilocytic astrocytoma may be similar to that of high-grade gliomas in some cases. We here report on 6 cases of pilocytic astrocytoma with atypical MRI findings, including small cyst formation, heterogeneously enhancing tumor nodules, irregularly enhancing tumor nodules, and enhancing tumor nodules with internal hemorrhage. All tumors were successfully resected, and the histological diagnoses were pilocytic astrocytoma. When the tumor is located near a cerebral cistern or ventricle, the risk of leptomeningeal dissemination is increased. Furthermore, partial resection has also been associated with a higher risk of recurrence and leptomeningeal dissemination. To date, all but one patient are alive and recurrence-free. Because the preoperative diagnosis influences the decision on the extent of resection and because of the high risk of leptomeningeal dissemination associated with these tumors, careful and correct diagnosis by MRI is important. PMID:25454397

  8. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  9. The role of connexin43-Src interaction in astrocytomas: A molecular puzzle.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, A; Gangoso, E; Jaraíz-Rodríguez, M; Medina, J M

    2016-05-26

    Connexin43 (Cx43) as a building block of gap junction channels and hemichannels exerts important functions in astrocytes. When these cells acquire a malignant phenotype Cx43 protein but not mRNA levels are downregulated, being negligible in high-grade astrocytoma or glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and deadliest of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Some microRNAs associated to glioma target Cx43 and could explain the lack of correlation between mRNA and protein levels of Cx43 found in some high-grade astrocytomas. More importantly, these microRNAs could be a promising therapeutic target. A great number of studies have confirmed the relationship between cancer and connexins that was proposed by Loewenstein more than 40years ago, but these studies have also revealed that this is a very complex relationship. Indeed, restoring Cx43 to glioma cells reduces their rate of proliferation and their tumorigenicity but this tumor suppressor effect could be counterbalanced by its effects on invasiveness, adhesion and migration. The mechanisms underlying these effects suggest the participation of a great variety of proteins that bind to different regions of Cx43. The present review focuses on an intrinsically disordered region of the C-terminal domain of Cx43 in which converges the interaction of several proteins, including the proto-oncogene Src. We summarize data that indicate that Cx43-Src interaction inhibits the oncogenic activity of Src and promotes a conformational change in the structure of Cx43 that allosterically modifies the binding to other important signaling proteins. As a consequence, crucial cell functions, such as proliferation or migration, could be strongly affected. We propose that the knowledge of the structural basis of the antitumorigenic effect of Cx43 on astrocytomas could help to design new therapies against this incurable disease. PMID:25711938

  10. Pathological and Molecular Advances in Pediatric Low Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Lim, Kah Suan; Bowers, Daniel; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric low grade astrocytomas are the commonest brain tumors in children. They sometimes have similar microscopic and clinical features, making accurate diagnosis difficult. For patients whose tumors are in locations that do not permit full resection, or those with an intrinsically aggressive biology, more effective therapies are required. Until recently, little was known about the molecular changes that drive the initiation and growth of pilocytic and other low grade astrocytomas beyond the association of a minority of cases, primarily in the optic nerve, with neurofibromatosis type 1. Over the last several years, a wide range of studies have implicated the BRAF oncogene and other members of this signaling cascade in the pathobiology of pediatric low grade astrocytoma. In this review, we attempt to summarize this rapidly developing field, and discuss the potential for translating our growing molecular knowledge into improved diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and new targeted therapies. PMID:23121055

  11. A case report on paraneoplastic encephalitis associated with astrocytoma – An unknown entity

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Yogeshwari S; Atre, Ashish L; Vhora, Sanjay S; Karnik, Swapnil V

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic encephalitis is a multifocal inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that is associated with remote neoplasias. The most common malignancy associated with it is bronchial carcinoma, typically small cell carcinoma of lung. It has never been described in association with intracranial neoplasm. We present and discuss the clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings of paraneoplastic encephalitis with intracranial space-occupying lesions (SOLs) in a 55-year-old man. He was thoroughly investigated and biopsy revealed presence of astrocytoma with changes of paraneoplastic encephalitis. PMID:27081239

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1 content and pattern of expression correlates with histopathologic grade in diffusely infiltrating astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, H.; Lopes, M. B.; Laws, E. R.; Asakura, T.; Goto, M.; Carpenter, J. E.; Karns, L. R.; VandenBerg, S. R.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of experimental tumorigenesis have strongly implicated signaling of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) as a key component in astrocytic neoplasia; however, its role in the growth of low-grade and malignant human tumors is not well understood. Correlative analyses of IGF-1, p53, and Ki-67 (MIB-1) immunohistochemistry and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) mRNA expression were performed to examine the cellular pattern of IGF-1 signaling in 39 cases of astrocytoma (World Health Organization grades II-IV). Tumor cells expressing IGF-1 and IGF-1R were present in all tumor grades. The proportion of tumor cells that expressed IGF-1 correlated with both histopathologic grade and Ki-67 labeling indices, while expression of IGF-1R mRNA correlated with Ki-67 indices. In cases where stereotactic tissue sampling could be identified with a specific tumor area by neuroimaging features, the numbers of IGF-1 immunoreactive cells correlated with the tumor zones of highest cellularity and Ki-67 labeling. In glioblastomas, the localization of IGF-1 immunoreactivity was notable for several features: frequent accentuation in the perivascular tumor cells surrounding microvascular hyperplasia; increased levels in reactive astrocytes at the margins of tumor infiltration; and selective expression in microvascular cells exhibiting endothelial/pericytic hyperplasia. IGF-1R expression was particularly prominent in tumor cells adjacent to both microvascular hyperplasia and palisading necrosis. These data suggest that IGF-1 signaling occurs early in astroglial tumorigenesis in the setting of cell proliferation. The distinctive correlative patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R expression in glioblastomas also suggest that IGF-1 signaling has an association with the development of malignant phenotypes related to aberrant angiogenesis and invasive tumor interactions with reactive brain. PMID:11550306

  13. ME-07INFLUENCE OF REGIONAL MICROENVIROMENT AND ASTROCYTE HETEROGENEITY ON ASTROCYTOMA DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, David; Schmid, Ralf; Bash, Ryan; Miller, C. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The role of the local microenvironment during early astrocytoma development remains elusive. We previously showed that Rb and Pten inactivation and Kras activation (TRP) transforms Gfap+ astrocytes and induces low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis throughout the adult brain. To confirm that astrocytes are the cell of origin, we targeted them using an alternative astrocyte-specific promoter, Glast. In the absence of oncogenic mutations, genetic lineage tracing with Glast-CreER; floxed TdTomato mice produced recombination in 8-38% of Gfap/Blbp+ astrocytes in the cortex, diencephalon, brainstem, and olfactory bulb. EdU labeling showed <0.04% proliferated at 7 days. Astrocyte proliferation (EdU+) increased 8-29-fold 3 weeks and TdTomato+ cells increased 3-7-fold by 8 weeks after TRP transformation. Glast;TdTomato+ astrocytes were rare in the brainstem and their transformation produced minimal tumorigenesis. In contrast, hGFAP-CreER uniformly induced recombination in ∼50% of astrocytes in all regions, including the brainstem. Whereas TdTomato+ astrocytes increased 6-11-fold in hGFAP-TRP mice after 8 weeks, Glast-targeted transformation was 1-4 fold lower. Differences in growth rates were most pronounced in the brainstem (P<0.001), but olfactory bulb growth rates were similar (P>0.05). Both CreER driver and brain region significantly affected astrocyte growth rate (ANOVA P < 0.0003). In both models, transformed astrocytes maintained Gfap/Blbp expression, gained expression of the stem cell marker Nestin, and formed increasingly dense perineuronal satellites over time. Ki-67 labeling showed clonal expansion, as hypercellular foci with 11-fold higher proliferation relative to less-cellular areas of tumor developed by 16 weeks. Glast-, but not hGFAP-driven tumors contained dividing, but untransformed (TdTomato;T121−) BLBP+ astrocytes, IBA1+ microglia, and PDGFRα+ oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPC). Proliferating microglia (6-0%) and OPC (18-5%) decreased over time, while

  14. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  15. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  16. Phase I Study of Cellular Immunotherapy for Recurrent/Refractory Malignant Glioma Using Intratumoral Infusions of GRm13Z40-2, An Allogeneic CD8+ Cytolitic T-Cell Line Genetically Modified to Express the IL 13-Zetakine and HyTK and to be Resistant to Glucocorticoids, in Combination With Interleukin-2

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Anaplastic Ependymoma; Anaplastic Meningioma; Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Brain Stem Glioma; Ependymoblastoma; Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Glioblastoma; Gliosarcoma; Grade III Meningioma; Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Mixed Glioma; Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Brain Tumor

  17. Approaches to Study Human T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Van de Walle, Inge; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Not only is human T cell development characterized by unique changes in surface marker expression, but it also requires specific growth factors and conditions to mimic and study T cell development in vitro. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the specific aspects that need attention when performing T cell differentiation cultures with human progenitors. PMID:26294413

  18. Anaplastic astrocytoma in the spinal cord of an African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Gibson, C J; Parry, N M A; Jakowski, R M; Eshar, D

    2008-11-01

    A 2-year-old, female hedgehog presented with an 8-month history of progressive, ascending paresis/paralysis and was tentatively diagnosed with wobbly hedgehog syndrome. She died awaiting further diagnostic tests, and the owners consented to postmortem examination. Grossly, the bladder was large and flaccid and the cervical and lumbar spinal cord were regionally enlarged, light grey, and friable with multifocal hemorrhages. The thoracic spinal cord was grossly normal. Microscopically all regions of the spinal cord had similar changes, although the cervical and lumbar sections were most severely affected. These regions were completely effaced by a moderately cellular infiltration of highly pleomorphic polygonal to spindle shaped cells, mineralization, and necrosis, which were most consistent with anaplastic astrocytoma. The thoracic spinal cord white matter was similarly infiltrated by the neoplastic cells, with perivascular extension into the otherwise normal grey matter. A diagnosis of anaplastic astrocytoma was confirmed using immunohistochemical stains that were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100. PMID:18984799

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor is a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in human gliomas in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Karl H.; Breier, Georg; Weich, Herbert A.; Risau, Werner

    1992-10-01

    CLINICAL and experimental studies suggest that angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumour growth1,2. Several growth factors with mitogenic or chemotactic activity for endothelial cells in vitro have been described, but it is not known whether these mediate tumour vascularization in vivo3,4. Glioblastoma, the most common and most malignant brain tumour in humans, is distinguished from astrocytoma by the presence of necroses and vascular prolifer-ations5'6. Here we show that expression of an endothelial cell-specific mitogen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is induced in astrocytoma cells but is dramatically upregulated in two apparently different subsets of glioblastoma cells. The high-affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for VEGF, flt, although not expressed in normal brain endothelium, is upregulated in tumour endothelial cells in vivo. These observations strongly support the concept that tumour angiogenesis is regulated by paracrine mechanisms and identify VEGF as a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in vivo.

  20. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  1. Human cytomegalovirus carries serine/threonine protein phosphatases PP1 and a host-cell derived PP2A.

    PubMed Central

    Michelson, S; Turowski, P; Picard, L; Goris, J; Landini, M P; Topilko, A; Hemmings, B; Bessia, C; Garcia, A; Virelizier, J L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a herpesvirus, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. When studying hyper-immediate-early events after contact between CMV virions and the cell membrane, we observed a hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins within 10 min. This can be explained in part by our finding that purified CMV contains serine/threonine protein phosphatase activities. Biochemical analyses indicate that this protein phosphatase activity has all characteristics of type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A). Specifically, PP1 accounts for approximately 30% and PP2A accounts for the remaining 70% of the phosphorylase phosphatase activity found. CMV produced in astrocytoma cells stably expressing an amino-terminally tagged PP2A catalytic subunit contained tagged enzyme, thus demonstrating the cellular origin of CMV-associated PP2A. PP2A is specifically found inside the virus, associated with the nucleocapsid fraction. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of purified virus revealed the presence of the catalytic subunits of PP2A and PP1. Furthermore, the catalytic subunit of PP2A appears to be complexed to the regulatory subunits PR65 and PR55, which is also the most abundant configuration of this enzyme found in the host cells. Incubation of virus with okadaic acid before contact of CMV with cells prevented hypophosphorylation of cellular proteins, thus demonstrating the role of CMV-associated phosphatases in this phenomenon. CMV can thus transport an active enzyme from one cell to another. PMID:8627658

  2. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  3. Symmetry breaking in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a characteristic of cancer stem cells, which exhibit high malignant potential. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate symmetric (self-renewal) and asymmetric cell divisions are mostly unknown. Using human neuroblastoma cells, we found that the oncosuppressor protein tripartite motif containing 32 (TRIM32) positively regulates ACD. PMID:27308367

  4. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  5. Human B-1 cells take the stage

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Thomas L.; Griffin, Daniel O.; Holodick, Nichol E.; Quach, Tam D.; Kaku, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    B-1cells play critical roles in defending against microbial invasion and in housekeeping removal of cellular debris. B-1cells secrete natural antibody and manifest functions that influence T cell expansion and differentiation and in these and other ways differ from conventional B-2 cells. B-1-cells were originally studied in mice where they are easily distinguished from B-2cells, but their identity in the human system remained poorly defined for many years. Recently, functional criteria for human B-1cells were established on the basis of murine findings, and reverse engineering resulted in identification of the phenotypic profile, CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70−, for B-1cells found in both umbilical cord blood and adult peripheral blood. Human B-1cells may contribute to multiple disease states through production of autoantibody and stimulation/modulation of T cell activity. Human B-1cells could be a rich source of antibodies useful in treating diseases present in elderly populations where natural antibody protection may have eroded. Manipulation of human B-1cell numbers and/or activity may be a new avenue for altering T cell function and treating immune dyscrasias. PMID:23692567

  6. Quantitative chromatin pattern description in Feulgen-stained nuclei as a diagnostic tool to characterize the oligodendroglial and astroglial components in mixed oligo-astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; Lopes, B S; Gordower, L; Camby, I; Cras, P; Martin, J J; Kiss, R; VandenBerg, S R; Salmon, I

    1997-04-01

    The oligoastrocytoma, as a mixed glioma, represents a nosologic dilemma with respect to precisely defining the oligodendroglial and astroglial phenotypes that constitute the neoplastic cell lineages of these tumors. In this study, cell image analysis with Feulgen-stained nuclei was used to distinguish between oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes in oligodendrogliomas and astrocytomas and then applied to mixed oligoastrocytomas. Quantitative features with respect to chromatin pattern (30 variables) and DNA ploidy (8 variables) were evaluated on Feulgen-stained nuclei in a series of 71 gliomas using computer-assisted microscopy. These included 32 oligodendrogliomas (OLG group: 24 grade II and 8 grade III tumors according to the WHO classification), 32 astrocytomas (AST group: 13 grade II and 19 grade III tumors), and 7 oligoastrocytomas (OLGAST group). Initially, image analysis with multivariate statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis) could identify each glial tumor group. Highly significant statistical differences were obtained distinguishing the morphonuclear features of oligodendrogliomas from those of astrocytomas, regardless of their histological grade. When compared with the 7 mixed oligoastrocytomas under study, 5 exhibited DNA ploidy and chromatin pattern characteristics similar to grade II oligodendrogliomas, I to grade III oligodendrogliomas, and I to grade II astrocytomas. Using multifactorial statistical analyses (Discriminant Analysis combined with Principal Component Analysis). It was possible to quantify the proportion of "typical" glial cell phenotypes that compose grade II and III oligodendrogliomas and grade II and III astrocytomas in each mixed glioma. Cytometric image analysis may be an important adjunct to routine histopathology for the reproducible identification of neoplasms containing a mixture of oligodendroglial and astrocytic phenotypes. PMID:9100670

  7. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Induction of high grade astrocytoma (HGA) by protons: Molecular mechanisms and RBE considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, G. V.; Leichner, P. K.; Harrison, K. A.; Cox, A. B.; Hardy, K. A.; Salmon, Y. L.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1994-10-01

    Protons of a specific energy, 55 MeV, have been found to induce primary high grade astrocytomas (HGA) in the Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Brain tumors of this type were not induced by protons of other energies (32-2,300 MeV). Induction of HGA has been identified in human patients who have had radiation therapy to the head. We believe that the induction of HGA in the monkey is a consequence of dose distribution, not some unique ``toxic'' property of protons. Comparison of the human experience with the monkey data indicates the RBE for induction of brain tumors to be about one. It is unlikely that protons cause an unusual change in oncogenic expression, as compared to conventional electromagnetic radiation.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging features of intracranial astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas in dogs.

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin D; Levine, Jonathan M; Porter, Brian F; Chen-Allen, Annie V; Rossmeisl, John H; Platt, Simon R; Kent, Marc; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Schatzberg, Scott J

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas represent one third of histologically confirmed canine brain tumors. Our purpose was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of histologically confirmed canine intracranial astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas and to examine for MR features that differentiate these tumor types. Thirty animals with confirmed astrocytoma (14) or oligodendroglioma (16) were studied. All oligodendrogliomas and 12 astrocytomas were located in the cerebrum or thalamus, with the remainder of astrocytomas in the cerebellum or caudal brainstem. Most (27/30) tumors were associated with both gray and white matter. The signal characteristics of both tumor types were hypointense on T1-weighted images (12 each) and hyperintense on T2-weighted images (11/14 astrocytomas, 12/16 oligodendrogliomas). For astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, respectively, common findings were contrast enhancement (10/13, 11/15), ring-like contrast enhancement (6/10, 9/11), cystic regions within the mass (7/14, 12/16), and hemorrhage (4/14, 6/16). Oligodendrogliomas were significantly more likely to contact the brain surface (meninges) than astrocytomas (14/16, 7/14, respectively, P=0.046). Contact with the lateral ventricle was the most common finding, occurring in 13/14 astrocytomas and 14/16 oligodendrogliomas. No MR features were identified that reliably distinguished between these two tumor types. Contrast enhancement was more common in high-grade tumors (III or IV) than low-grade tumors (II, P=0.008). PMID:21388463

  10. Human Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alice R.

    1980-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from various different human vessels, including aortas, pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical arteries, and pulmonary, ovarian, and umbilical veins. The cultured cells were identified as endothelial cells by the presence of Factor VIII antigen and antiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II). They retained these markers for at least five passages in culture, and some cells had them for seven passages or more. Endothelial cells from the various vessels were compared with respect to their ability to metabolize angiotensins I and II and bradykinin. Cells from arteries had three to five times the angiotensin I converting enzyme activity as cells from veins. The activity of angiotensinase A (aspartyl aminopeptidase) had a similar distribution, and cells from arteries were consistently more active than cells from veins. Cultures of endothelial cells from pulmonary and umbilical vessels formed prostacyclin in response to mechanical stimulation. Media from cell monolayers that were subjected to a change of medium and gentle agitation inhibited aggregation of human platelets. This inhibitory activity was generated within 2-5 min, and it was not formed by cells that were treated with indomethacin or tranylcypromine. Addition of prostaglandin (PG)H2 to indomethacin-treated cells restored the ability to form the inhibitor, but cells treated with tranylcypromine were not responsive to PGH2. In experiments where [14C]arachidonic acid was added to the cells before stimulation, the major metabolite identified by thin-layer chromatography was 6-keto PGF1α. Thus, it appears that pulmonary endothelial cells, as well as umbilical cord cells, can form prostacyclin. In experiments comparing the ability of arterial and venous cells to form prostacyclin, arterial cells were more active than venous cells. These studies of cells from various human vessels suggest that the vascular origin of cultured endothelial cells determines how they metabolize vasoactive

  11. Hepatic Differentiation from Human Ips Cells Using M15 Cells.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kahoko; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a procedure of human iPS cells differentiation into the definitive endoderm, further into albumin-expressing and albumin-secreting hepatocyte, using M15, a mesonephros- derived cell line. Approximately 90 % of human iPS cells differentiated into SOX17-positive definitive endoderm then approximately 50 % of cells became albumin-positive cells, and secreted ALB protein. This M15 feeder system for endoderm and hepatic differentiation is a simple and efficient method, and useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms for hepatic fate decision, and could represent an attractive approach for a surrogate cell source for pharmaceutical studies. PMID:25417065

  12. Non-random aneuploidy specifies subgroups of pilocytic astrocytoma and correlates with older age

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Bechet, Denise; Gayden, Tenzin; Kool, Marcel; De Jay, Nicolas; Jacob, Karine; Gerges, Noha; Hutter, Barbara; Şeker-Cin, Huriye; Witt, Hendrik; Montpetit, Alexandre; Brunet, Sébastien; Lepage, Pierre; Bourret, Geneviève; Klekner, Almos; Bognár, László; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklós; Farmer, Jean-Pierre; Montes, Jose-Luis; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lambert, Sally; Kwan, Tony; Korshunov, Andrey; Tabori, Uri; Collins, V. Peter; Albrecht, Steffen; Faury, Damien; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jones, David T.W.; Jabado, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children but is rare in adults, and hence poorly studied in this age group. We investigated 222 PA and report increased aneuploidy in older patients. Aneuploid genomes were identified in 45% of adult compared with 17% of pediatric PA. Gains were non-random, favoring chromosomes 5, 7, 6 and 11 in order of frequency, and preferentially affecting non-cerebellar PA and tumors with BRAF V600E mutations and not with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions or FGFR1 mutations. Aneuploid PA differentially expressed genes involved in CNS development, the unfolded protein response, and regulators of genomic stability and the cell cycle (MDM2, PLK2),whose correlated programs were overexpressed specifically in aneuploid PA compared to other glial tumors. Thus, convergence of pathways affecting the cell cycle and genomic stability may favor aneuploidy in PA, possibly representing an additional molecular driver in older patients with this brain tumor. PMID:26378811

  13. Non-random aneuploidy specifies subgroups of pilocytic astrocytoma and correlates with older age.

    PubMed

    Fontebasso, Adam M; Shirinian, Margret; Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Bechet, Denise; Gayden, Tenzin; Kool, Marcel; De Jay, Nicolas; Jacob, Karine; Gerges, Noha; Hutter, Barbara; Şeker-Cin, Huriye; Witt, Hendrik; Montpetit, Alexandre; Brunet, Sébastien; Lepage, Pierre; Bourret, Geneviève; Klekner, Almos; Bognár, László; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklós; Farmer, Jean-Pierre; Montes, Jose-Luis; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lambert, Sally; Kwan, Tony; Korshunov, Andrey; Tabori, Uri; Collins, V Peter; Albrecht, Steffen; Faury, Damien; Pfister, Stefan M; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin; Jones, David T W; Jabado, Nada

    2015-10-13

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common brain tumor in children but is rare in adults, and hence poorly studied in this age group. We investigated 222 PA and report increased aneuploidy in older patients. Aneuploid genomes were identified in 45% of adult compared with 17% of pediatric PA. Gains were non-random, favoring chromosomes 5, 7, 6 and 11 in order of frequency, and preferentially affecting non-cerebellar PA and tumors with BRAF V600E mutations and not with KIAA1549-BRAF fusions or FGFR1 mutations. Aneuploid PA differentially expressed genes involved in CNS development, the unfolded protein response, and regulators of genomic stability and the cell cycle (MDM2, PLK2),whose correlated programs were overexpressed specifically in aneuploid PA compared to other glial tumors. Thus, convergence of pathways affecting the cell cycle and genomic stability may favor aneuploidy in PA, possibly representing an additional molecular driver in older patients with this brain tumor. PMID:26378811

  14. Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L.; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state. PMID:23683578

  15. Adenosine Receptors Differentially Regulate the Expression of Regulators of G-Protein Signalling (RGS) 2, 3 and 4 in Astrocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eusemann, Till Nicolas; Willmroth, Frank; Fiebich, Bernd; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The “regulators of g-protein signalling” (RGS) comprise a large family of proteins that limit by virtue of their GTPase accelerating protein domain the signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors. RGS proteins have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, drug abuse, depression and anxiety and aggressive behaviour. Since conditions associated with a large increase of adenosine in the brain such as seizures or ischemia were reported to modify the expression of some RGS proteins we hypothesized that adenosine might regulate RGS expression in neural cells. We measured the expression of RGS-2,-3, and -4 in both transformed glia cells (human U373 MG astrocytoma cells) and in primary rat astrocyte cultures stimulated with adenosine agonists. Expression of RGS-2 mRNA as well as RGS2 protein was increased up to 30-fold by adenosine agonists in astrocytes. The order of potency of agonists and the blockade by the adenosine A2B-antagonist MRS1706 indicated that this effect was largely mediated by adenosine A2B receptors. However, a smaller effect was observed due to activation of adenosine A2A receptors. In astrocytoma cells adenosine agonists elicited an increase in RGS-2 expression solely mediated by A2B receptors. Expression of RGS-3 was inhibited by adenosine agonists in both astrocytoma cells and astrocytes. However while this effect was mediated by A2B receptors in astrocytoma cells it was mediated by A2A receptors in astrocytes as assessed by the order of potency of agonists and selective blockade by the specific antagonists MRS1706 and ZM241385 respectively. RGS-4 expression was inhibited in astrocytoma cells but enhanced in astrocytes by adenosine agonists. PMID:26263491

  16. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  17. Cloning and characterization of human RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of RTVP-1 in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang Cunli; Sarid, Ronit; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Lee, Hae-Kyung; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya

    2007-10-26

    Here, we report the cloning and characterization of RTVP-1b, a novel splice variant of human RTVP-1, which was isolated from the U87 glioma cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that RTVP-1b contains an additional 71 base exon between exons 2 and 3 that is missing in RTVP-1, leading to a frame-shift and a different putative protein. The deduced protein was 237 amino acids in length, sharing the N-terminal 141 amino acids with RTVP-1. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that RTVP-1b was expressed in a wide range of tissues and that its expression was different from that of RTVP-1. In contrast, RTVP-1 and RTVP-1b showed similar patterns of expression in astrocytic tumors; highly expressed in glioblastomas as compared to normal brains, low-grade astrocytomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. Overexpression of RTVP-1b increased glioma cell proliferation but did not affect cell migration. Our results suggest that RTVP-1b represents a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in gliomas.

  18. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for clinical cardiovascular therapies. Additional in vitro studies are needed, however, to understand their relative phenotypes and molecular regulation toward cardiovascular cell fates. Further studies in translational animal models are also needed to gain insights into the potential and function of both human ES- and iPS-derived cardiovascular cells, and enable translation from experimental and pre-clinical studies to human trials. PMID:20453170

  19. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  20. Unique multipotent cells in adult human mesenchymal cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Kitada, Masaaki; Wakao, Shohei; Nishikawa, Kouki; Tanimura, Yukihiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Goda, Makoto; Akashi, Hideo; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Niwa, Akira; Shigemoto, Taeko; Nabeshima, Yoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Dezawa, Mari

    2010-01-01

    We found adult human stem cells that can generate, from a single cell, cells with the characteristics of the three germ layers. The cells are stress-tolerant and can be isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells, or directly from bone marrow aspirates. These cells can self-renew; form characteristic cell clusters in suspension culture that express a set of genes associated with pluripotency; and can differentiate into endodermal, ectodermal, and mesodermal cells both in vitro and in vivo. When transplanted into immunodeficient mice by local or i.v. injection, the cells integrated into damaged skin, muscle, or liver and differentiated into cytokeratin 14-, dystrophin-, or albumin-positive cells in the respective tissues. Furthermore, they can be efficiently isolated as SSEA-3(+) cells. Unlike authentic ES cells, their proliferation activity is not very high and they do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mouse testes. Thus, nontumorigenic stem cells with the ability to generate the multiple cell types of the three germ layers can be obtained through easily accessible adult human mesenchymal cells without introducing exogenous genes. These unique cells will be beneficial for cell-based therapy and biomedical research. PMID:20421459

  1. Toxicity of diuron in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Marjo; Loikkanen, Jarkko; Naarala, Jonne; Vähäkangas, Kirsi

    2015-10-01

    Diuron is a substituted phenylurea used as a herbicide to control broadleaf and grass weeds and as a biocidal antifouling agent. Diuron is carcinogenic in rat urinary bladder and toxic to the reproductive system of oysters, sea urchins and lizards. The few studies carried out in human cells do not include the genotoxicity of diuron. We have investigated the toxicity of diuron in human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was statistically significantly increased in both cell lines but only at the highest 200 μM concentration. Diuron clearly reduced the viability of BeWo, but not MCF-7 cells. The relative cell number was decreased in both cell lines indicative of inhibition of cell proliferation. In the Comet assay, diuron increased DNA fragmentation in MCF-7 but not in BeWo cells. The expressions of p53 protein, a marker for cell stress, and p21 protein, a transcriptional target of p53, were increased, but only in MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that diuron is cytotoxic and potentially genotoxic in a tissue-specific manner and that ROS play a role in its toxicity. Thus, exposure to diuron may exert harmful effects on fetal development and damage human health. PMID:26086120

  2. Benign Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Human Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Alexei; Downey, Robert J.; Healey, John; Moreira, Andre L.; Lou, Emil; Leung, Roland; Edgar, Mark; Singer, Samuel; LaQuaglia, Michael; Maki, Robert G.; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that at least some sarcomas arise through aberrant differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), but MSCs have never been isolated directly from human sarcoma specimens. Experimental Design We examined human sarcoma cell lines and primary adherent cultures derived from human sarcoma surgical samples for features of MSCs. We further characterized primary cultures as either benign or malignant by the presence of tumor-defining genetic lesions and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. Results We show that a dedifferentiated liposarcoma cell line DDLS8817 demonstrates fat, bone and cartilage trilineage differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Primary sarcoma cultures have the morphology, surface immunophenotype and differentiation potential characteristic of MSCs. Surprisingly, many of these cultures are benign as they do not form tumors in mice and lack sarcoma-defining genetic lesions. Consistent with the recently proposed pericyte origin of MSCs in normal human tissues, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs express markers of pericytes and cooperate with endothelial cells in tube formation assays. In human sarcoma specimens, a subset of CD146-positive microvascular pericytes express CD105, an MSC marker, while malignant cells largely do not. In an in vitro co-culture model, sarcoma-derived benign MSCs as well as normal human pericytes markedly stimulate the growth of sarcoma cell lines. Conclusions Sarcoma-derived benign MSCs/pericytes represent a previously undescribed stromal cell type in sarcoma which may contribute to tumor formation. PMID:21138865

  3. Immortalisation of human urothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Petzoldt, J L; Leigh, I M; Duffy, P G; Sexton, C; Masters, J R

    1995-01-01

    A cell line derived from the urothelium lining the ureter of a 12-year-old girl was immortalised using a temperature-sensitive SV40 large T-antigen gene construct, and designated UROtsa. Following immortalisation, UROtsa cells expressed SV40 large T-antigen, but did not acquire characteristics of neoplastic transformation, including growth in soft agar or the development of tumours in nude mice. Metaphase spreads had a normal chromosomal appearance and number. UROtsa cells remained permissive for cell growth at 39 degrees C, indicating that they did not retain temperature sensitivity. UROtsa provides an in vitro model of "normal" urothelium. PMID:8788275

  4. Reprogramming of human somatic cells by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naofumi; Ohta, Kunimasa

    2015-05-01

    In general, it had been believed that the cell fate restriction of terminally differentiated somatic cells was irreversible. In 1952, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was introduced to study early embryonic development in frogs. So far, various mammalian species have been successfully cloned using the SCNT technique, though its efficiency is very low. Embryonic stem (ES) cells were the first pluripotent cells to be isolated from an embryo and have a powerful potential to differentiate into more than 260 types of cells. The generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells was a breakthrough in stem cell research, and the use of these iPS cells has solved problems such as low efficiency and cell fate restriction. These cells have since been used for clinical application, disease investigation, and drug selection. As it is widely accepted that the endosymbiosis of Archaea into eukaryotic ancestors resulted in the generation of eukaryotic cells, we examined whether bacterial infection could alter host cell fate. We previously showed that when human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were incorporated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB), the LAB-incorporated HDF cells formed clusters and expressed a subset of common pluripotent markers. Moreover, LAB-incorporated cell clusters could differentiate into cells derived from each of the three germinal layers both in vivo and in vitro, indicating successful reprogramming of host HDF cells by LAB. In the current review, we introduce the existing examples of cellular reprogramming by bacteria and discuss their nuclear reprogramming mechanisms. PMID:25866152

  5. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  6. The fate of human Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Manuela; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2009-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Miyara et al. (2009) demonstrate that FoxP3(+) cells in human peripheral blood are heterogeneous in function, and CD45RA expression defines their different stages of differentiation. PMID:19538927

  7. Germ cell quantitation in human testicular biopsy.

    PubMed

    Sinha Hikim, A P; Chakraborty, J; Jhunjhunwala, J S

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of human seminiferous epithelium was carried out using an improved method of glutaraldehyde and osmium fixation with plastic embedding. Part of each biopsy specimen was fixed in Bouin's fixative and embedded in paraffin for comparison. Epon embedded tissue had very little artifactual damage compared with paraffin embedded tissue sections. The germ cell to Sertoli cell ratios were determined by counting the various germ cells per "unit" tubular area. Data obtained by this method reflect a remarkable stability of Sertoli cell number and germ cell-Sertoli cell ratios both between biopsies from different individuals and between biopsies from right and left testes from the same individual. Agreement between the present results and those of earlier studies based on paraffin embedded testicular specimens supports the validity of this method of germ cell quantitation of human testicular biopsy samples. PMID:3927550

  8. REPLICATIVE POTENTIAL OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kakuda, Harumi; Imai, Chihaya; Mullighan, Charles G.; Campana, Dario

    2009-01-01

    The replicative potential of human CD56+ CD3− natural killer (NK) cells is unknown. We found that by exposing NK cells to the leukemic cell line K562 genetically modified to express 4-1BB ligand and interleukin 15 (K562-mb15-41BBL), they expanded for up to 30 population doublings, achieving numbers that ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 1.2 × 1011 percent (median, 5.9 × 106 percent; n = 7) of those originally seeded. However, NK cells eventually became unresponsive to stimulation and died. Their demise could be suppressed by enforcing the expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT-overexpressing NK cells continued to proliferate in response to K562-mb15-41BBL stimulation for more than 1 year of culture, while maintaining a normal karyotype and genotype. Long-lived NK cells had high cytotoxicity against myeloid and T-lineage leukemic cells. They remained susceptible to genetic manipulation, becoming highly cytotoxic to B-lineage leukemic cells after expression of anti-CD19 signaling receptors. Thus, human NK cells have a replicative potential similar to that of T lymphocytes and their lifespan can be significantly prolonged by an increase in TERT activity. We suggest that the methods described here should have many applications in studies of NK cell biology and NK cell-based therapies. PMID:19344420

  9. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  10. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies. PMID:23642054

  11. Derivation of Human Skin Fibroblast Lines for Feeder Cells of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christian; Felldin, Ulrika; Rodin, Sergey; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Dilber, Sirac; Hovatta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    After the first derivations of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines on fetal mouse feeder cell layers, the idea of using human cells instead of mouse cells as feeder cells soon arose. Mouse cells bear a risk of microbial contamination, and nonhuman immunogenic proteins are absorbed from the feeders to hESCs. Human skin fibroblasts can be effectively used as feeder cells for hESCs. The same primary cell line, which can be safely used for up to 15 passages after stock preparations, can be expanded and used for large numbers of hESC derivations and cultures. These cells are relatively easy to handle and maintain. No animal facilities or animal work is needed. Here, we describe the derivation, culture, and cryopreservation procedures for research-grade human skin fibroblast lines. We also describe how to make feeder layers for hESCs using these fibroblasts. PMID:26840224

  12. Nucleolipids of Canonical Purine ß‐d‐Ribo‐Nucleosides: Synthesis and Cytostatic/Cytotoxic Activities Toward Human and Rat Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Christine; Hammerbacher, Katharina; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report on the synthesis of two series of canonical purine ß‐d‐ribonucleoside nucleolipids derived from inosine and adenosine, which have been characterized by elemental analyses, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) as well as by 1H and 13C NMR, and pH‐dependent UV/Vis spectroscopy. A selection of the novel nucleolipids with different lipophilic moieties were first tested on their cytotoxic effect toward human macrophages. Compounds without a significant inhibitory effect on the viability of the macrophages were tested on their cytostatic/cytotoxic effect toward human astrocytoma/oligodendroglioma GOS‐3 cells as well as against the rat malignant neuroectodermal BT4Ca cell line. In order to additionally investigate the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic effects of the derivatives on GOS‐3 or BT4Ca cells, we evaluated the induction of apoptosis and observed the particular activity of the nucleolipid ethyl 3‐{4‐hydroxymethyl‐2‐methyl‐6‐[6‐oxo‐1‐(3,7,11‐trimethyl‐dodeca‐2,6,10‐trienyl)‐1,6‐dihydro‐purin‐9‐yl]‐tetrahydro‐furo[3,4‐d][1,3]dioxol‐2‐yl}propionate (8 c) toward both human and rat glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. PMID:27308225

  13. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  15. Human Stem Cells for Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  16. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    PubMed

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  17. Bioinformatics construction of the human cell surfaceome

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, J. P. C.; Galante, P. A. F.; de Souza, J. E.; de Souza, R. F.; Carvalho, P. M.; Ohara, D. T.; Moura, R. P.; Oba-Shinja, S. M.; Marie, S. K. N.; Silva, W. A.; Perez, R. O.; Stransky, B.; Pieprzyk, M.; Moore, J.; Caballero, O.; Gama-Rodrigues, J.; Habr-Gama, A.; Kuo, W. P.; Simpson, A. J.; Camargo, A. A.; Old, Lloyd J.; de Souza, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are excellent targets for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. By using bioinformatics tools, we generated a catalog of 3,702 transmembrane proteins located at the surface of human cells (human cell surfaceome). We explored the genetic diversity of the human cell surfaceome at different levels, including the distribution of polymorphisms, conservation among eukaryotic species, and patterns of gene expression. By integrating expression information from a variety of sources, we were able to identify surfaceome genes with a restricted expression in normal tissues and/or differential expression in tumors, important characteristics for putative tumor targets. A high-throughput and efficient quantitative real-time PCR approach was used to validate 593 surfaceome genes selected on the basis of their expression pattern in normal and tumor samples. A number of candidates were identified as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for colorectal tumors and glioblastoma. Several candidate genes were also identified as coding for cell surface cancer/testis antigens. The human cell surfaceome will serve as a reference for further studies aimed at characterizing tumor targets at the surface of human cells. PMID:19805368

  18. Human stem cells for craniomaxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Morteza; Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor; Pauklin, Siim; Vallier, Ludovic

    2014-07-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  19. Paracrine effects of haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell function decline during ageing can involve both cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Bone and blood formation are intertwined in bone marrow, therefore haematopoietic cells and bone cells could be extrinsic factors for each other. In this study, we assessed the paracrine effects of extrinsic factors from haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our data showed that haematopoietic cells stimulate proliferation, osteoblast differentiation and inhibit senescence of MSCs; TNF-α, PDGF-β, Wnt1, 4, 6, 7a and 10a, sFRP-3 and sFRP-5 are dominantly expressed in haematopoietic cells; the age-related increase of TNF-α in haematopoietic cells may perform as a negative factor in the interactions of haematopoietic cells on MSCs via TNF-α receptors and then activating NF-κB signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling to induce senescence and reduce osteoblast differentiation in MSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that there are paracrine interactions of haematopoietic cells on human MSCs; immunosenescence may be one of the extrinsic mechanisms by which skeletal stem cell function decline during human skeletal ageing. PMID:26030407

  20. Endocrine Cell Clustering During Human Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Ricordi, Camillo; Edlund, Helena; Diez, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of efficient, reproducible protocols for directed in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells into insulin-producing β cells will benefit greatly from increased knowledge regarding the spatiotemporal expression profile of key instructive factors involved in human endocrine cell generation. Human fetal pancreases 7 to 21 weeks of gestational age, were collected following consent immediately after pregnancy termination and processed for immunostaining, in situ hybridization, and real-time RT-PCR expression analyses. Islet-like structures appear from approximately week 12 and, unlike the mixed architecture observed in adult islets, fetal islets are initially formed predominantly by aggregated insulin- or glucagon-expressing cells. The period studied (7–22 weeks) coincides with a decrease in the proliferation and an increase in the differentiation of the progenitor cells, the initiation of NGN3 expression, and the appearance of differentiated endocrine cells. The present study provides a detailed characterization of islet formation and expression profiles of key intrinsic and extrinsic factors during human pancreas development. This information is beneficial for the development of efficient protocols that will allow guided in vitro differentiation of hES cells into insulin-producing cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:811–824, 2009) PMID:19365093

  1. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  2. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically. PMID:18724383

  3. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  4. Outcome of Patients With Pilocytic Astrocytoma and Leptomeningeal Dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Hodges, Joseph C.; Teh, Bin S.; Chintagumpala, Murali; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics of patients with pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and leptomeningeal dissemination (LMD). Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English-language studies pertaining to PA with LMD was performed using a combination of keywords that included juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma, low-grade astrocytoma, low-grade glioma, leptomeningeal dissemination, neuraxis spread, and radiotherapy. We found 26 studies with 58 patients between 1976 and 2005 that met these criteria. Results: The median survival for PA patients with LMD was 65 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival (OS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 81.1%, 75.7%, and 55.5%. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate after the diagnosis of LMD was 69.3%, 66.5%, and 34.6%, respectively. Age, gender, primary site location, timing of LMD presentation (synchronous vs. metachronous), and LMD location did not significantly influence OS or PFS. No statistically significant difference was found in OS or PFS between the chemotherapy and radiotherapy groups. Likewise, no difference was found in OS or PFS according to the use of craniospinal irradiation vs. less extensive RT fields. Conclusions: Approximately one-half of PA patients were alive 5 years after the diagnosis of LMD. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy have efficacy against LMD. Although the use of craniospinal irradiation did not have an effect on PFS, the patient numbers were small and a larger number treated with craniospinal irradiation is needed to determine its efficacy.

  5. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  6. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  7. Effect of cognitive rehabilitation in a case of thalamic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Buono, Viviana; Corallo, Francesco; De Cola, Maria Cristina; Chillemi, Antonino; Grugno, Rosario; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We describe the effectiveness of rehabilitative training for a neuropsychological deficit following the removal and treatment of a fibrillary astrocytoma (Grade II) in a young man. The rehabilitative training was based on cognitive and motivational techniques and has been carried out for a period of 3 months (2 times per week). The results, even if limited to a single case, seem to support the idea that cognitive rehabilitation should facilitate the brain's reorganization of basic cognitive functions in the neuro-oncologic field. PMID:26578385

  8. Management of Pediatric Spinal Cord Astrocytomas: Outcomes With Adjuvant Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Zachary D.; Moningi, Shalini; Jallo, George I.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Wharam, Moody D.; Terezakis, Stephanie A.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors are exceedingly rare; in the United States, 100 to 200 cases are recognized annually, of these, most are astrocytomas. The purpose of this study is to report the outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at a tertiary care center. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved retrospective single-institution study was performed for pediatric patients with spinal cord astrocytomas treated at our hospital from 1990 to 2010. The patients were evaluated on the extent of resection, progression-free survival (PFS), and development of radiation-related toxicities. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate regression model methods were used for analysis. Results: Twenty-nine patients were included in the study, 24 with grade 1 or 2 (low-grade) tumors and 5 with grade 3 or 4 (high-grade) tumors. The median follow-up time was 55 months (range, 1-215 months) for patients with low-grade tumors and 17 months (range, 10-52 months) for those with high-grade tumors. Thirteen patients in the cohort received chemotherapy. All patients underwent at least 1 surgical resection. Twelve patients received radiation therapy to a median radiation dose of 47.5 Gy (range, 28.6-54.0 Gy). Fifteen patients with low-grade tumors and 1 patient with a high-grade tumor exhibited stable disease at the last follow-up visit. Acute toxicities of radiation therapy were low grade, whereas long-term sequelae were infrequent and manageable when they arose. All patients with low-grade tumors were alive at the last follow-up visit, compared with 1 patient with a high-grade tumor. Conclusion: Primary pediatric spinal cord astrocytomas vary widely in presentation and clinical course. Histopathologic grade remains a major prognostic factor. Patients with low-grade tumors tend to have excellent disease control and long-term survival compared to those with high-grade tumors. This experience suggests that radiation therapy

  9. Low-grade astrocytoma in a child with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Brassesco, María Sol; Valera, Elvis Terci; Becker, Aline Paixão; Castro-Gamero, Angel Mauricio; de Aboim Machado, André; Santos, Antônio Carlos; Scrideli, Carlos Alberto; Oliveira, Ricardo Santos; Machado, Hélio Rubens; Tone, Luiz Gonzaga

    2010-02-01

    Encephalocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL), or Haberland syndrome, is an uncommon congenital disorder with unique cutaneous, ocular and neurological features. In the present article, we describe a 3-year-old boy with ECCL who developed an extensive and recurring intraventricular low-grade glioma with atypical pathological features and elevated mitotic index. Cytogenetic analysis from tumor sample was also performed. This is the first report of a low-grade astrocytoma occurring in a child with ECCL. Whether or not the origin of the tumor is associated to the pathogenesis of the underlying syndrome is a matter for further investigation. PMID:19652916

  10. [Clinicopathological Study of Pilomyxoid-Spectrum Astrocytomas:An Analysis of the BRAF Gene. Report of Two Cases].

    PubMed

    Ito, Tamio; Sato, Kenichi; Oikawa, Mitsuteru; Sugio, Hironori; Asanome, Taku; Ozaki, Yoshimaru; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Tanaka, Shinya; Tsuda, Masumi; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to pilocytic astrocytomas(PAs), pilomyxoid astrocytomas(PMAs)demonstrate monophasic piloid cells with angiocentric distribution and a more aggressive clinical course. Recently, several reports have described combined histological features of both subtypes;accordingly, these were termed intermediate pilomyxoid tumors(IPTs). The KIAA1549-BRAF fusion gene has been found in approximately 70% of PAs, but is reportedly rare in PMAs. We describe a clinicopathological study of two patients with pilomyxoid-spectrum astrocytoma(PMSA). Case 1 was of a 29-year-old man who presented with a generalized seizure. Gadolinium-magnetic resonance imaging(Gd-MRI)demonstrated a less enhanced tumor in the left temporal lobe. Case 2 was of a 9-year-old boy who presented with headache. Gd-MRI revealed an irregularly enhanced tumor in the left cerebellum. In Case 1, the tumor showed monomorphous bipolar cells in a myxoid background and angiocentric arrangement;therefore, the diagnosis was PMA. In Case 2, part of the tumor had a myxoid, angiocentric pattern characteristic of PMA;the other part had a biphasic pattern characteristic of PA. PMA and PA were mixed in a 7:3 ratio;therefore, IPT was diagnosed. No BRAF V600E mutations were found by immunohistochemistry and sequencing in either case. Three major KIAA1549-BRAF fusion subtypes were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and sequencing. No fusions were found in Case 1. However, K16-B9 fusion was identified in Case 2, and this fusion was more prevalent in the PA component than in the PMA component. In summary, no BRAF V600E mutations were found in PMSAs, but KIAA1549-BRAF fusion was identified in IPT, particularly in the PA component. PMID:26321697

  11. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4+ T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy. PMID:24870377

  12. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Joan Abbott, N; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-12-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be up-regulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb over-expression in C6 cells increased leptin permeation whereas ObRa over-expression showed no effect when compared with the control group of pcDNA-transfected C6 cells. By contrast, the paracellular permeability to the sodium fluorescein control was unchanged by over-expression of ObR subtypes. Leptin remained intact after crossing the monolayer as shown by HPLC and acid precipitation, and this was not affected by C6 cell co-culture or the over-expression of different ObR subtypes. Thus, increased expression of ObRb (and to a lesser extent ObRe) in C6 cells specifically increased the permeation of leptin across the hCMEC monolayer. Consistent with the evidence that the most apparent regulatory changes of ObR during obesity and inflammation occur in astrocytes, the results indicate that astrocytes actively regulate leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, a mechanism independent of reduction of paracellular permeability. PMID:20977476

  13. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  14. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Ann; Uchida, Nobuko; Capela, Alexandra; Gorba, Thorsten; Huhn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  15. Rotating cell culture systems for human cell culture: human trophoblast cells as a model.

    PubMed

    Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Warner, Jessica A; Machado, Heather L; Morris, Cindy A; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies. The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS

  16. Genetic Variations of Kinase Inserts Domain Receptor (KDR) Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yufei; Ma, Piyong; He, Yichun; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytomas is one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors with high mortality rate. Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) is involved in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, migration, and vascular permeability. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between KDR polymorphisms and risk of astrocytomas. Blood samples were collected from 157 astrocytomas patients and 160 healthy controls. Three tag-SNPs (rs2071559C/T, rs2305948T/C, and rs1870377A/T) were identified from the International HapMap Project Databases and genotyped using the method of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We evaluated the astrocytomas risk caused by individual SNPs and haplotype using odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall individual SNP analysis, the C allele of rs2071559 was correlated with an increased risk of astrocytomas. However, individuals with mutant allele A and genotype TA + AA of rs1870377 showed a protective effect against astrocytomas. Subgroup analysis based on WHO tumor grade revealed that the C allele of rs2071559 had more influence with the risk of astrocytomas in the grade III-IV (OR = 1.91) subgroup than the grade I-II (OR = 1.47) group. Genotype TT of rs2305948 was found to be significantly associated with susceptibility of astrocytomas only in the grade III-IV subgroup. The protective effect of rs1870377 did not reveal significant difference between the grade III-IV and grade I-II subgroups. Meanwhile, stratified analysis demonstrated that mutation of rs2071559 and rs2305948 could elevate the risk of astrocytomas more significantly in the subgroup of smokers than the nonsmokers. Interestingly, the protective effect of rs1870377 was more obvious in the nonsmokers than the smokers. Additionally, haplotype-specific analysis showed that haplotype CCT and CTT were related with an increased risk of astrocytomas. We found that individual with variants of rs

  17. Cell mechanics and human disease states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Subra

    2006-03-01

    This presentation will provide summary of our very recent studies exploring the effects of biochemical factors, influenced by foreign organisms or in vivo processes, on intracellular structural reorganization, single-cell mechanical response and motility of a population of cells in the context of two human diseases: malaria induced by Plasmodium falciparum merozoites that invade red blood cells, and gastrointestinal cancer metastasis involving epithelial cells. In both cases, particular attention will be devoted to systematic changes induced in specific molecular species in response to controlled alterations in disease state. The role of critical proteins in influencing the mechanical response of human red bloods during the intra-erythrocytic development of P. falciparum merozoites has also been assessed quantitatively using specific protein knock-out experiments by recourse to gene inactivation methods. Single-cell mechanical response characterization entails such tools as optical tweezers and mechanical plate stretchers whereas cell motility assays and cell-population biorheology characterization involves microfluidic channels. The experimental studies are accompanied by three-dimensional computational simulations at the continuum and mesoscopic scales of cell deformation. An outcome of such combined experimental and computational biophysical studies is the realization of how chemical factors influence single-cell mechanical response, cytoadherence, the biorheology of a large population of cells through microchannels representative of in vivo conditions, and the onset and progression of disease states.

  18. Gammaherpesvirus Infection of Human Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem Chandra; Mehta, Devan; Lu, Jie; El-Naccache, Darine; Shukla, Sanket K.; Kovacsics, Colleen; Kolson, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4) and HHV8 are two prominent members of the herpesvirus family associated with a number of human cancers. HHV4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus prevalent in 90 to 95% of the human population, is clinically associated with various neurological diseases such as primary central nervous system lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and encephalitis. However, the possibility that EBV and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can directly infect neurons has been largely overlooked. This study has, for the first time, characterized EBV infection in neural cell backgrounds by using the Sh-Sy5y neuroblastoma cell line, teratocarcinoma Ntera2 neurons, and primary human fetal neurons. Furthermore, we also demonstrated KSHV infection of neural Sh-Sy5y cells. These neuronal cells were infected with green fluorescent protein-expressing recombinant EBV or KSHV. Microscopy, genetic analysis, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses for specific viral antigens supported and validated the infection of these cells by EBV and KSHV and showed that the infection was efficient and productive. Progeny virus produced from infected neuronal cells efficiently infected fresh neuronal cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, acyclovir was effective at inhibiting the production of virus from neuronal cells similar to lymphoblastoid cell lines; this suggests active lytic replication in infected neurons in vitro. These studies represent a potentially new in vitro model of EBV- and KSHV-associated neuronal disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:26628726

  19. The G-quadruplex-stabilising agent RHPS4 induces telomeric dysfunction and enhances radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; Siteni, S; Tanzarella, C; Stevens, M F; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) interacting agents are a class of ligands that can bind to and stabilise secondary structures located in genomic G-rich regions such as telomeres. Stabilisation of G4 leads to telomere architecture disruption with a consequent detrimental effect on cell proliferation, which makes these agents good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. RHPS4 is one of the most effective and well-studied G4 ligands with a very high specificity for telomeric G4. In this work, we tested the in vitro efficacy of RHPS4 in astrocytoma cell lines, and we evaluated whether RHPS4 can act as a radiosensitising agent by destabilising telomeres. In the first part of the study, the response to RHPS4 was investigated in four human astrocytoma cell lines (U251MG, U87MG, T67 and T70) and in two normal primary fibroblast strains (AG01522 and MRC5). Cell growth reduction, histone H2AX phosphorylation and telomere-induced dysfunctional foci (TIF) formation were markedly higher in astrocytoma cells than in normal fibroblasts, despite the absence of telomere shortening. In the second part of the study, the combined effect of submicromolar concentrations of RHPS4 and X-rays was assessed in the U251MG glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Long-term growth curves, cell cycle analysis and cell survival experiments, clearly showed the synergistic effect of the combined treatment. Interestingly the effect was greater in cells bearing a higher number of dysfunctional telomeres. DNA double-strand breaks rejoining after irradiation revealed delayed repair kinetics in cells pre-treated with the drug and a synergistic increase in chromosome-type exchanges and telomeric fusions. These findings provide the first evidence that exposure to RHPS4 radiosensitizes astrocytoma cells, suggesting the potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25467559

  20. Prognostic significance of an apoptotic index and apoptosis/proliferation ratio for patients with high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Hiroko; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; O'Fallon, Judith R.; Iturria, N.; Sebo, Thomas; Schaefer, Paul L.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Buckner, Jan C.; Kuriyama, Nagato; Jenkins, Robert B.; Israel, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the association of spontaneous apoptosis and an apoptosis/proliferation index with survival to determine the potential of such measures to serve as predictive markers for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We examined the extent of spontaneous apoptosis in tumors from newly diagnosed patients, 75 with GBM and 21 with anaplastic astrocytoma, who were entered on treatment protocols of the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. In the group of GBM patients, those with a higher apoptotic index tended to live longer ( P = 0.04; Cox proportional hazards model including performance score, age, and extent of resection in a multivariate model). We found that the apoptotic index values for anaplastic astrocytoma patients tended to be lower than those in the GBM patients, although with small sample sizes, the result was not statistically significant ( P = 0.1). We also examined expression of the Ki-67 cell proliferation antigen immunohistochemically using the MIB-1 monoclonal antibody. Ki-67 expression did not provide additional information regarding the survival of patients with GBM. In this group of GBM patients, those patients with higher apoptotic index/proliferation ratios had a better prognosis than did those with a low ratio ( P < 0.021, same model as above). These findings suggest that both apoptosis and a cell death/cell proliferation ratio are associated with patient survival, and they may be useful for either the clinical evaluation of patients with GBM or the stratification of patients for treatment evaluation. PMID:12084348

  1. Capsaicin induces immunogenic cell death in human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hongyan; Wang, Yanlin; Peng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is characterized by the early surface exposure of calreticulin (CRT). As a specific signaling molecule, CRT on the surface of apoptotic tumor cells mediates the recognition and phagocytosis of tumor cells by antigen presenting cells. To date, only a small quantity of anti-cancer chemicals have been found to induce ICD, therefore it is clinically important to identify novel chemicals that may induce ICD. The purpose of the present study is to explore the function of capsaicin in inducing ICD. In the current study, MTT assays were used to examine the growth inhibiting effects of MG-63 cells when they were treated with capsaicin or cisplatin. Mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis were used to investigate capsaicin- and cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, the effects of capsaicin and cisplatin were evaluated for their abilities in inducing calreticulin membrane translocation and mediating ICD in human osteosarcoma cells (MG-63). The results demonstrated that capsaicin and cisplatin can induce the apoptosis of MG-63 cells. However, only capsaicin induced a rapid translocation of CRT from the intracellular space to the cell surface. Treatment with capsaicin increased phagocytosis of MG-63 cells by dendritic cells (DCs), and these MG-63-loaded DCs could efficiently stimulate the secretion of IFN-γ by lymphocytes. These results identify capsaicin as an anti-cancer agent capable of inducing ICD in human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. PMID:27446273

  2. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  3. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  4. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  5. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  6. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  7. [A case of astrocytoma of corpus callosum presented diagnostic dyspraxia].

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, K; Takeyama, E; Takeyama, E; Kizuki, H; Tei, H; Kubo, O

    1995-08-01

    A case of astrocytoma whose first clinical presentation was diagnostic dyspraxia was reported. A 38-year-old right-handed male experienced funny motion of his left hand triggered by voluntary movement of his right hand. One day, he tried to insert a coin into the vending machine with his right hand, then the left hand was against the other. One month after that event, he experienced headache and vertigo. On admission, there were no abnormal findings on neurological examination. On neuropsychological examination, he was cooperative, well orientated and attentive, and there were no callosal disconnection symptoms. Frontal lobe function tests were slightly impaired. T1-weighted MRI demonstrated irregular mixed signal intensity mass lesion extending from the genu to the body of the corpus callosum and the cingulate gyrus. This lesion was slightly enhanced with Gd-DTPA. Biopsy was performed and histological diagnosis was fibrillary astrocytoma. After irradiation and chemotherapy, he was discharged from the hospital without evident neurological deficit. About 20 cases of diagnostic dyspraxia have been reported and almost all of them were caused by cerebro-vascular disease. This is the first case of brain tumor who presented diagnostic dyspraxia. PMID:7546921

  8. Occupational factors associated with astrocytomas: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, R.G.; Ahlbom, A.; Lindberg-Navier, I.; Norell, S.E.; Spaennare, B.

    1987-01-01

    The most malignant form of all brain tumors is the supratentorial astrocytoma. Little is known about its etiology, but exogenous factors have been blamed. In this case-control study, 78 astrocytoma patients have been compared with 197 clinical and 92 population controls. An extensive questionnaire was used to gather information about occupational and residential environment exposure. Inquiries concerning groups of or individual chemicals elicited low rates of affirmative response, with negligible differences between cases and controls. However, the questions working at an airfield and living near a petrochemical plant indicated elevated risks in comparison with both control groups; so too did living near a municipal sewage treatment plant. These results focus attention on exposure to organic compounds and should be considered together with similar findings in current research. No other occupation, branch of industry, or vicinity questions showed differences between cases and controls, with the exception of living in the neighborhood of a paper mill or a saw mill, which gave moderately increased relative risks. A separate report gives the results from the nonoccupational part of the study.

  9. Optic nerve pilomyxoid astrocytoma in a patient with Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sushmita; Fort, John A; Yachnis, Anthony T; Williams, Charles A

    2015-06-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS; MIM 163950) is an autosomal dominant syndrome which is clinically diagnosed by the distinct facial features, short stature, cardiac anomalies and developmental delay. About 50% of cases are associated with gain of function mutations in PTPN11 gene which leads to activation of the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. This is known to have a role in tumorigenesis. Despite this, only limited reports of solid tumors (Fryssira H, Leventopoulos G, Psoni S, et al. Tumor development in three patients with Noonan syndrome. Eur J Pediatr 2008;167:1025-1031; Schuettpelz LG, McDonald S, Whitesell K et al. Pilocytic astrocytoma in a child with Noonan syndrome. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2009;53:1147-1149; Sherman CB, Ali-Nazir A, Gonzales-Gomez I, et al. Primary mixed glioneuronal tumor of the central nervous system in a patient with Noonan syndrome. J Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2009;31:61-64; Sanford RA, Bowman R, Tomita T, et al. A 16 year old male with Noonan's syndrome develops progressive scoliosis and deteriorating gait. Pediatr Neurosurg 1999;30:47-52) and no prior reports of optic gliomas have been described in patients with NS. We present here a patient with NS with a PTPN11 mutation and an optic pathway pilomyxoid astrocytoma. PMID:25585602

  10. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  11. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    PubMed

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  12. Induced pluripotency of human prostatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Sun, Ning; Young, Sarah R; Nolley, Rosalie; Santos, Jennifer; Wu, Joseph C; Peehl, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a valuable resource for discovery of epigenetic changes critical to cell type-specific differentiation. Although iPS cells have been generated from other terminally differentiated cells, the reprogramming of normal adult human basal prostatic epithelial (E-PZ) cells to a pluripotent state has not been reported. Here, we attempted to reprogram E-PZ cells by forced expression of Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4 using lentiviral vectors and obtained embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like colonies at a frequency of 0.01%. These E-PZ-iPS-like cells with normal karyotype gained expression of pluripotent genes typical of iPS cells (Tra-1-81, SSEA-3, Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4) and lost gene expression characteristic of basal prostatic epithelial cells (CK5, CK14, and p63). E-PZ-iPS-like cells demonstrated pluripotency by differentiating into ectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal cells in vitro, although lack of teratoma formation in vivo and incomplete demethylation of pluripotency genes suggested only partial reprogramming. Importantly, E-PZ-iPS-like cells re-expressed basal epithelial cell markers (CD44, p63, MAO-A) in response to prostate-specific medium in spheroid culture. Androgen induced expression of androgen receptor (AR), and co-culture with rat urogenital sinus further induced expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a hallmark of secretory cells, suggesting that E-PZ-iPS-like cells have the capacity to differentiate into prostatic basal and secretory epithelial cells. Finally, when injected into mice, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed basal epithelial cell markers including CD44 and p63. When co-injected with rat urogenital mesenchyme, E-PZ-iPS-like cells expressed AR and expression of p63 and CD44 was repressed. DNA methylation profiling identified epigenetic changes in key pathways and genes involved in prostatic differentiation as E-PZ-iPS-like cells converted to differentiated AR- and PSA-expressing cells. Our results suggest that

  13. Local cerebral blood flow and partition coefficients measured in cerebral astrocytomas of different grades of malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, H.; Meyer, J.S.; Rose, J.E.; Kandula, P.

    1984-02-01

    Local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients were measured in patients with different grades of malignant cerebral astrocytomas (n . 5) who inhaled 35% stable xenon during computed tomography scanning. Results were compared with those in age-matched normal subjects (n . 5. Mean values for local cerebral blood flow in the gray matter in patients with astrocytomas were decreased throughout the tumor mass and surrounding brain that was apparently free of tumor. Patients with highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme (astrocytoma grade IV; n . 2) showed more variable values for local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients compared to those with astrocytomas of lower grades (grades I-II; n . 3). Local partition coefficients in gray matter invaded by grade IV astrocytoma were significantly higher than those in gray matter invaded by grade I-III astrocytomas. Local cerebral blood flow and local partition coefficients in the brain tissue surrounding grade IV astrocytomas were reduced to a greater extent than those in more benign tumors.

  14. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  15. Cell-in-cell structures are involved in the competition between cells in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Huang, Hongyan; Overholtzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The engulfment of live cells may represent a mechanism of cell death. We reported that E-cadherin (epithelial cadherin) expression in human cancer cells favors the formation of cell-in-cell structures through the mechanism known as entosis, and that entosis contributes to a form of cellular competition in heterogeneous cancer cell populations. PMID:27308493

  16. CLOSTRIDIUM SPORE ATTACHMENT TO HUMAN CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    PANESSA-WARREN,B.; TORTORA,G.; WARREN,J.

    1997-08-10

    This paper uses high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with a LaB6 gun and the newest commercial field emission guns, to obtain high magnification images of intact clostridial spores throughout the activation/germination/outgrowth process. By high resolution SEM, the clostridial exosporial membrane can be seen to produce numerous delicate projections (following activation), that extend from the exosporial surface to a nutritive substrate (agar), or cell surface when anaerobically incubated in the presence of human cells (embryonic fibroblasts and colon carcinoma cells). Magnifications of 20,000 to 200,000Xs at accelerating voltages low enough to minimize or eliminate specimen damage (1--5 kV) have permitted the entire surface of C.sporogenes and C.difficile endospores to be examined during all stages of germination. The relationships between the spore and the agar or human cell surface were also clearly visible.

  17. Phospholipid composition of cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E J; Joseph, L; Stephens, R; Horrocks, L A

    1992-02-01

    Detailed analyses of the phospholipid compositions of cultured human endothelial cells are reported here. No significant differences were found between the phospholipid compositions of cells from human artery, saphenous and umbilical vein. However, due to the small sample sizes, relatively large standard deviations for some of the phospholipid classes were observed. A representative composition of endothelial cells is: phosphatidylcholine 36.6%, choline plasmalogen 3.7%, phosphatidylethanolamine 10.2%, ethanolamine plasmalogen 7.6%, sphingomyelin 10.8%, phosphatidylserine 7.1%, lysophosphatidylcholine 7.5%, phosphatidylinositol 3.1%, lysophosphatidylethanolamine 3.6%, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 1.8%, phosphatidic acid 1.9%, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 1.5%, and cardiolipin 1.9%. The cells possess high choline plasmalogen and lysophosphatidylethanolamine contents. The other phospholipids are within the normal biological ranges expected. Phospholipids were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and quantified by lipid phosphorus assay. PMID:1315902

  18. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Morgan, R T; Woods, L K; Moore, G E; McGavran, L; Quinn, L A; Semple, T U

    1981-06-01

    A continuous cell line, COLO 346, was established from a liver metastasis in a patient with adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. COLO 346 grew as an adherent monolayer of pleomorphic epithelioid cells. COLO 346 cells produced esterone, but no estradiol, progesterone, or cortisol. No adrenocorticotropic hormones, beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin, carcinoembryonic antigen, or alpha-fetoprotein production by the cells was detected. Cell doubling time was 36 h. Seven allelic isozymes were assayed. COLO 346 had a chromosome mode of 74 at 21 months postestablishment with 6 marker chromosomes present in 100% of the cells analyzed. COLO 346 has been in continuous culture for over 2 yr and is available to other investigators for their studies. PMID:7262900

  19. Human Colon Cancer Cells Cultivated in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  20. Neutron irradiation of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Mountford, M H; Allen, B J; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M; Parsons, P

    1989-01-01

    The biological characteristics and in vitro radiosensitivity of melanoma cells to thermal neutrons were investigated as a guide to the effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy. Plateau phase cultures of three human malignant melanoma-established cell lines were examined for cell density at confluence, doubling time, cell cycle parameters, chromosome constitution, and melanin content. Cell survival dose-response curves, for cells preincubated in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine. HCl (10B1-BPA), were measured over the dose range 0.6-8.0 Gy (N + gamma). The neutron fluence rate was 2.6 x 10(9) n/cm2/s and the total dose rate 3.7 Gy/h (31% gamma). Considerable differences were observed in the morphology and cellular properties of the cell lines. Two cell lines (96E and 96L) were amelanotic, and one was melanotic (418). An enhanced killing for neutron irradiation was found only for the melanotic cells after 20 h preincubation with 10 micrograms/ml 10B1-BPA. In view of the doubling times of the cell lines of about 23 h (96E and 96L) or of 36 h (418), it seems likely that an increased boron uptake, and hence increased radiosensitivity, might result if the preincubation period with 10B1-BPA is extended to several hours longer than the respective cell cycle times. PMID:2798324

  1. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:25520283

  2. Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pechoux, Christine; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J; Petersen, Ole

    1999-02-01

    The origin of the epithelial and myoepithelial cells in the human breast has not been delineated. In this study we have addressed whether luminal epithelial cells and myoepithelial cells are vertically connected, i.e., whether one is the precursor for the other. We used a primary culture assay allowing preservation of basic phenotypic traits of luminal epithelial and myoepithelial cells in culture. The two cell types were then separated immunomagnetically using antibodies directed against lineage-specific cell surface antigens into at best 100% purity. The cellular identity was ascertained by cytochemistry, immunoblotting, and 2-D gel electrophoresis. Luminal epithelial cells were identified by strong expression of cytokeratins 18 and 19 while myoepithelial cells were recognized by expression of vimentin and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin. We used a previously devised culture medium (CDM4) that allows vigorous expansion of proliferative myoepithelial cells and also devised a medium (CDM6) that allowed sufficient expansion of differentiated luminal epithelial cells based on addition of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. The two different culture media supported each lineage for at least five passages without signs of interconversion. We used parallel cultures where we switched culture media, thus testing the ability of each lineage to convert to the other. Whereas the myoepithelial lineage showed no signs of interconversion, a subset of luminal epithelial cells, gradually, but distinctly, converted to myoepithelial cells. We propose that in the mature human breast, it is the luminal epithelial cell compartment that gives rise to myoepithelial cells rather than the other way around.

  3. Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma (PMA) Shows Significant Differences in Gene Expression vs. Pilocytic Astrocytoma (PA) and Variable Tendency Toward Maturation to PA.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, Bette K; Donson, Andrew M; Vogel, Hannes; Foreman, Nicholas K

    2015-07-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytomas (PMAs) manifest a more aggressive clinical course than pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Development of effective therapies demands a better biological understanding of PMA. We first conducted gene expression microarray analysis of 9 PMA and 13 PA from infra- and supratentorial sites. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrated that tumors are grouped according to anatomic site, not diagnosis. Gene expression profiles were then contrasted between eight PMAs and six PAs, all supratentorial/hypothalamic/chiasmal. Clinical outcome of PMAs varied, with four out of four patients with diencephalic syndrome succumbing to disease, one of whom showed bulky metastatic leptomeningeal spread at autopsy, with bimodal maturation to PA in some areas and de-differentiation to glioblastoma in others. A surviving child has undergone multiple surgical debulking, with progressive maturation to PA over time. Ontology-enrichment analysis identified overexpression in PMAs of extracellular matrix and mitosis-related genes. Genes overexpressed in PMA vs. PA, ranked according to fold-change, included developmental genes H19, DACT2, extracellular matrix collagens (COL2A1; COL1A1) and IGF2BP3 (IMP3), the latter previously identified as an adverse prognostic factor in PMA and PA. PMID:25521223

  4. Pilomyxoid astrocytoma (PMA) shows significant differences in gene expression versus pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and variable tendency toward maturation to PA

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Donson, Andrew M.; Vogel, Hannes; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Pilomyxoid astrocytomas (PMAs) manifest a more aggressive clinical course than pilocytic astrocytomas (PAs). Development of effective therapies demands a better biological understanding of PMA. We first conducted gene expression microarray analysis of 9 PMA and 13 PA from infra- and supra-tentorial sites. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrated that tumors grouped according to anatomic site, not diagnosis. Gene expression profiles were then contrasted between 8 PMAs and 6 PAs, all supratentorial/hypothalamic/chiasmal. Clinical outcome of PMAs varied, with 4/4 patients with diencephalic syndrome succumbing to disease, one of whom showed bulky metastatic leptomeningeal spread at autopsy, with bimodal maturation to PA in some areas and de-differentiation to glioblastoma in others. A surviving child has undergone multiple surgical debulkings, with progressive maturation to PA over time. Ontology-enrichment analysis identified overexpression in PMAs of extracellular matrix and mitosis-related genes. Genes overexpressed in PMA versus PA, ranked according to fold-change, included developmental genes H19, DACT2, extracellular matrix collagens (COL2A1;COL1A1) and IGF2BP3 (IMP3), the latter previously identified as an adverse prognostic factor in PMA and PA. PMID:25521223

  5. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  6. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  7. Advances in Human B Cell Phenotypic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Denise A.; Wei, Chungwen; Qian, Yu; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (“Big Biology”), necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort. PMID:23087687

  8. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Kaushik Dilip; Sarda, Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic. PMID:18230169

  9. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  10. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671