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Sample records for human cannabinoid pharmacokinetics

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  2. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the plant cannabinoids, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol.

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A

    2005-01-01

    Increasing interest in the biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of cannabinoids and in the development of cannabinoid medications necessitates an understanding of cannabinoid pharmacokinetics and disposition into biological fluids and tissues. A drug's pharmacokinetics determines the onset, magnitude, and duration of its pharmacodynamic effects. This review of cannabinoid pharmacokinetics encompasses absorption following diverse routes of administration and from different drug formulations, distribution of analytes throughout the body, metabolism by different tissues and organs, elimination from the body in the feces, urine, sweat, oral fluid, and hair, and how these processes change over time. Cannabinoid pharmacokinetic research has been especially challenging due to low analyte concentrations, rapid and extensive metabolism, and physicochemical characteristics that hinder the separation of drugs of interest from biological matrices--and from each other--and lower drug recovery due to adsorption of compounds of interest to multiple surfaces. delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa, and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol are the focus of this chapter, although cannabidiol and cannabinol, two other cannabinoids with an interesting array of activities, will also be reviewed. Additional material will be presented on the interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations in human biological tissues and fluids following controlled drug administration. PMID:16596792

  3. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself. PMID:26427296

  4. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  5. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  6. Pharmacokinetics of (synthetic) cannabinoids in pigs and their relevance for clinical and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Wojtyniak, Jan-Georg; Kettner, Mattias; Schlote, Julia; Laschke, Matthias W; Ewald, Andreas H; Lehr, Thorsten; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2016-06-24

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are gaining increasing importance in clinical and forensic toxicology. They are consumed without any preclinical safety studies. Thus, controlled human pharmacokinetic (PK) studies are not allowed, although being relevant for interpretation of analytical results in cases of misuse or poisoning. As alternative, in a controlled animal experiment, six pigs per drug received a single intravenous dose of 200μg/kg BW each of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 4-ethylnaphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-210), or 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4). In addition, six pigs received a combination of the three drugs with the identical dose each. The drugs were determined in serum using LC-MS/MS. A population (pop) PK analysis revealed that a three-compartment model described best the PK data of all three cannabinoids. Central volumes of distribution were estimated at 0.29L/kg, 0.20L/kg, and 0.67L/kg for THC, JWH-210, and RCS-4, respectively. Clearances were 0.042L/min/kg, 0.048L/min/kg, and 0.093L/min/kg for THC, JWH-210, and RCS-4, respectively. The popPK THC pig model was upscaled to humans using allometric techniques. Comparison with published human data revealed that the concentration-time profiles could successfully be predicted. These findings indicate that pigs in conjunction with PK modeling technique may serve as a tool for prediction of human PK of SCs. PMID:27113702

  7. Human studies of cannabinoids and medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Robson, P

    2005-01-01

    Cannabis has been known as a medicine for several thousand years across many cultures. It reached a position of prominence within Western medicine in the nineteenth century but became mired in disrepute and legal controls early in the twentieth century. Despite unremitting world-wide suppression, recreational cannabis exploded into popular culture in the 1960s and has remained easily obtainable on the black market in most countries ever since. This ready availability has allowed many thousands of patients to rediscover the apparent power of the drug to alleviate symptoms of some of the most cruel and refractory diseases known to humankind. Pioneering clinical research in the last quarter of the twentieth century has given some support to these anecdotal reports, but the methodological challenges to human research involving a pariah drug are formidable. Studies have tended to be small, imperfectly controlled, and have often incorporated unsatisfactory synthetic cannabinoid analogues or smoked herbal material of uncertain composition and irregular bioavailability. As a result, the scientific evaluation of medicinal cannabis in humans is still in its infancy. New possibilities in human research have been opened up by the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, a rapidly expanding knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology, and a more sympathetic political environment in several countries. More and more scientists and clinicians are becoming interested in exploring the potential of cannabis-based medicines. Future targets will extend beyond symptom relief into disease modification, and already cannabinoids seem to offer particular promise in the treatment of certain inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions. This chapter will begin with an outline of the development and current status of legal controls pertaining to cannabis, following which the existing human research will be reviewed. Some key safety issues will then be considered, and the chapter will conclude with

  8. Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2005-10-01

    Since the discovery of an endogenous cannabinoid system, research into the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of cannabinoids has steadily increased. Two subtypes of G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB(1) and CB(1), have been cloned and several putative endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) have been detected during the past 15 years. The main endocannabinoids are arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), derivatives of arachidonic acid, that are produced "on demand" by cleavage of membrane lipid precursors. Besides phytocannabinoids of the cannabis plant, modulators of the cannabinoid system comprise synthetic agonists and antagonists at the CB receptors and inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues, including immune system, reproductive and gastrointestinal tracts, sympathetic ganglia, endocrine glands, arteries, lung and heart. There is evidence for some non-receptor dependent mechanisms of cannabinoids and for endocannabinoid effects mediated by vanilloid receptors. Properties of CB receptor agonists that are of therapeutic interest include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, antiallergic effects, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, antiemesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects. The current main focus of clinical research is their efficacy in chronic pain and neurological disorders. CB receptor antagonists are under investigation for medical use in obesity and nicotine addiction. Additional potential was proposed for the treatment of alcohol and heroine dependency, schizophrenia, conditions with lowered blood pressure, Parkinson's disease and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16266285

  9. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  10. Targeted metabolomic approach for assessing human synthetic cannabinoid exposure and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Patton, Amy L; Seely, Kathryn A; Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Tran, Johnny P; Trass, Matthew; Miranda, Art; Fantegrossi, William E; Kennedy, Paul D; Dobrowolski, Paul; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; McCain, Keith R; James, Laura P; Endres, Gregory W; Moran, Jeffery H

    2013-10-01

    Designer synthetic cannabinoids like JWH-018 and AM2201 have unique clinical toxicity. Cytochrome-P450-mediated metabolism of each leads to the generation of pharmacologically active (ω)- and (ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolites that retain high affinity for cannabinoid type-1 receptors, exhibit Δ(9)-THC-like effects in rodents, and are conjugated with glucuronic acid prior to excretion in human urine. Previous studies have not measured the contribution of the specific (ω-1)-monohydroxyl enantiomers in human metabolism and toxicity. This study uses a chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy approach (LC-MS/MS) to quantify each specific enantiomer and other nonchiral, human metabolites of JWH-018 and AM2201 in human urine. The accuracy (average % RE = 18.6) and reproducibility (average CV = 15.8%) of the method resulted in low-level quantification (average LLQ = 0.99 ng/mL) of each metabolite. Comparisons with a previously validated nonchiral method showed strong correlation between the two approaches (average r(2) = 0.89). Pilot data from human urine samples demonstrate enantiospecific excretion patterns. The (S)-isomer of the JWH-018-(ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolite was predominantly excreted (>87%) in human urine as the glucuronic acid conjugate, whereas the relative abundance of the corresponding AM2201-(ω-1)-metabolite was low (<5%) and did not demonstrate enantiospecificity (approximate 50:50 ratio of each enantiomer). The new chiral method provides a comprehensive, targeted metabolomic approach for studying the human metabolism of JWH-018 and AM2201. Preliminary evaluations of specific enantiomeric contributions support the use of this approach in future studies designed to understand the pharmacokinetic properties of JWH-018 and/or AM2201. PMID:23987522

  11. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area. PMID:25801347

  12. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  13. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  14. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S.; Abelson, James L.; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R.; Phan, K. Luan

    2012-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 hours prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 hours after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. PMID:22796109

  15. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S; Abelson, James L; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R; Phan, K Luan

    2013-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 h prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 h after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22796109

  16. Distribution of free and conjugated cannabinoids in human bile samples.

    PubMed

    Fabritius, Marie; Staub, Christian; Mangin, Patrice; Giroud, Christian

    2012-11-30

    The metabolism of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is relatively complex, and over 80 metabolites have been identified. However, much less is known about the formation and fate of cannabinoid conjugates. Bile excretion is known to be an important route for the elimination of phase II metabolites. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry LC-MS/MS procedure for measuring cannabinoids in oral fluid was adapted, validated and applied to 10 bile samples. THC, 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THC-A), 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol glucuronide (THC-gluc) were determined following solid-phase extraction and LC-MS/MS. High concentrations of THCCOOH-gluc were found in bile samples (range: 139-21,275 ng/mL). Relatively high levels of THCCOOH (7.7-1548 ng/mL) and THC-gluc (38-1366 ng/mL) were also measured. THC-A, the plant precursor of THC, was the only cannabinoid that was not detected. These results show that biliary excretion is an important route of elimination for cannabinoids conjugates and that their enterohepatic recirculation is a significant factor to consider when analyzing blood elimination profiles of cannabinoids. Furthermore, we suggest that the bile is the matrix of choice for the screening of phase II cannabinoid metabolites. PMID:22980143

  17. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. PMID:25116250

  18. Self-Administration of Cannabinoids by Experimental Animals and Human Marijuana Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R.; Heishman, Stephen J.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2009-01-01

    Drug self-administration behavior has been one of the most direct and productive approaches for studying the reinforcing effects of psychoactive drugs, which are critical in determining their abuse potential. Cannabinoids, which are usually abused by humans in the form of marijuana, have become the most frequently abused illicit class of drugs in the United States. The early elucidation of the structure and stereochemistry of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in 1964, which is now recognized as the principal psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, activated cannabinoid research worldwide. This review examines advances in research on cannabinoid self-administration behavior by humans and laboratory animals. There have been numerous laboratory demonstrations of the reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in human subjects, but reliable self-administration of cannabinoids by laboratory animals has only recently been demonstrated. It has now been shown that strong and persistent self-administration behavior can be maintained in experimentally and drug-naïve squirrel monkeys by doses of THC comparable to those in marijuana smoke inhaled by humans. Furthermore, reinforcing effects of some synthetic CB1 cannabinoid agonists have been recently reported using intravenous and intracerebroventricular self-administration procedures in rats and mice. These findings support previous conclusions that THC has a pronounced abuse liability comparable to other drugs of abuse under certain experimental conditions. Self-administration of THC by squirrel monkeys provides the most reliable animal model for human marijuana abuse available to date. This animal model now makes it possible to study the relative abuse liability of other natural and synthetic cannabinoids and to preclinically assess new therapeutic strategies for the treatment or prevention of marijuana abuse in humans. PMID:15932767

  19. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  20. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  1. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Experimental Approach Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2-receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Key Results Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Conclusions and Implications Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. PMID:24467410

  2. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC)

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4–7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection. PMID:26733986

  3. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  4. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-01-01

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders. PMID:23010766

  5. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, binds to the cloned human cannabinoid receptor and stimulates receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Briley, E M; Axelrod, J; Simpson, J T; Mackie, K; Devane, W A

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), a candidate endogenous cannabinoid ligand, has recently been isolated from porcine brain and displayed cannabinoid-like binding activity to synaptosomal membrane preparations and mimicked cannabinoid-induced inhibition of the twitch response in isolated murine vas deferens. In this study, anandamide and several congeners were evaluated as cannabinoid agonists by examining their ability to bind to the cloned cannabinoid receptor, inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, inhibit N-type calcium channels, and stimulate one or more functional second messenger responses. Synthetic anandamide, and all but one congener, competed for [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the rat cannabinoid receptor. The ability of anandamide to activate receptor-mediated signal transduction was evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human cannabinoid receptor (HCR, termed CHO-HCR cells) and compared to control CHO cells expressing the muscarinic m5 receptor (CHOm5 cells). Anandamide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in CHO-HCR cells, but not in CHOm5 cells, and this response was blocked with pertussis toxin. N-type calcium channels were inhibited by anandamide and several active congeners in N18 neuroblastoma cells. Anandamide stimulated arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release in both CHOm5 and CHO-HCR cells and had no effect on the release of inositol phosphates or phosphatidylethanol, generated after activation of phospholipase C and D, respectively. Anandamide appears to exhibit the essential criteria required to be classified as a cannabinoid/anandamide receptor agonist and shares similar nonreceptor effects on arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release as other cannabinoid agonists. PMID:8395053

  6. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic characterization of the cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, GW405833, utilizing rodent models of acute and chronic pain, anxiety, ataxia and catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Kenneth J; Tafesse, Laykea; Lee, Gary; Harrison, James E; Boulet, Jamie M; Gottshall, Susan L; Mark, Lilly; Pearson, Michelle S; Miller, Wendy; Shan, Shen; Rabadi, Leyana; Rotshteyn, Yakov; Chaffer, Suzanne M; Turchin, Paul I; Elsemore, David A; Toth, Mathew; Koetzner, Lee; Whiteside, Garth T

    2005-04-01

    To date, two cannabinoid receptors have been identified, CB1 and CB2. Activation of these receptors with non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonists reduces pain sensitivity in animals and humans. However, activation of CB1 receptors is also associated with central side effects, including ataxia and catalepsy. More recently, a role for selective CB2 agonists in pain modification has been demonstrated. GW405833, a selective CB2 agonist, was recently reported to partially reverse the inflammation and hyperalgesia in a rat model of acute inflammation. In the current report, we extend the characterization and therapeutic potential of this compound. For the first time, we show that GW405833 selectively binds both rat and human CB2 receptors with high affinity, where it acts as a partial agonist (approximately 50% reduction of forskolin-mediated cAMP production compared to the full cannabinoid agonist, CP55,940). We also report for the first time that intraperitoneal administration of GW405833 (0.3-100 mg/kg) to rats shows linear, dose-dependent increases in plasma levels and substantial penetration into the central nervous system. In addition, GW405833 (up to 30 mg/kg) elicits potent and efficacious antihyperalgesic effects in rodent models of neuropathic, incisional and chronic inflammatory pain, the first description of this compound in these models. In contrast, analgesia, sedation and catalepsy were not observed in this dose range, but were apparent at 100 mg/kg. Additionally, GW405833 was not antihyperalgesic against chronic inflammatory pain in CB2 knockout mice. These data support the tenet that selective CB2 receptor agonists have the potential to treat pain without eliciting the centrally-mediated side effects associated with non-selective cannabinoid agonists, and highlight the utility of GW405833 for the investigation of CB2 physiology. PMID:15814101

  7. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  8. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  9. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  10. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  11. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  12. 76 FR 71351 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based Therapeutics To Treat Hepatic Encephalopathy in Humans. AGENCY... be limited to: The development and sale of cannabinoid(s) and cannabidiol(s) based therapeutics as... chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as Cannabidiol (CBD),...

  13. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  14. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  15. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in human sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, A; Ritschel, W A

    1996-05-01

    To determine whether melatonin pharmacokinetics change during puberty, we infused melatonin iv in 9 prepubertal, 8 pubertal, and 16 adult subjects and measured melatonin in serum and saliva, and 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in urine. A pilot study of 3 adult males showed dose linearity, absence of saturation kinetics, and unaltered metabolism and urinary excretion for doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 5.0 micrograms/kg. All other subjects received 0.5 microgram/kg melatonin. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from serum melatonin showed no significant gender differences in adults. However, developmental differences were significant between prepubertal children and adults for terminal elimination rate constant (1.08 +/- 0.25 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.11 h-1), elimination half-life (0.67 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.79 +/- 0.10 h), and area under the concentration-time curve (250.9 +/- 91.8 vs. 376.9 +/- 154.3 (pg/mL).h, respectively). At all time points melatonin levels were higher in serum than in saliva, and the ratio between serum and salivary melatonin varied up to 55-fold within and between individuals. Results based on salivary melatonin showed significant differences between prepubertal children and adults for the terminal elimination rate constant (1.90 +/- 0.95 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.28 h-1). The described group differences in pharmacokinetic parameters suggest that prepubertal children metabolize melatonin faster than adults. The inconsistent ratio between serum and salivary melatonin calls for caution in the use of salivary melatonin for pharmacokinetic studies or to infer pineal function. The present findings, suggestive of faster melatonin metabolism in prepubertal children, combined with the known decline of serum melatonin with age and higher excretion rate of the metabolite in prepubertal children lead us to conclude that the prepubertal pineal gland has a higher melatonin secretion rate than the adult gland. PMID:8626852

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Hoasca alkaloids in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C; McKenna, D J; Grob, C S; Brito, G S; Raymon, L P; Poland, R E; Andrade, E N; Andrade, E O; Mash, D C

    1999-06-01

    N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine (THH) are the characteristic alkaloids found in Amazonian sacraments known as hoasca, ayahuasca, and yajè. Such beverages are characterized by the presence of these three harmala alkaloids, where harmine and harmaline reversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) while tetrahydroharmine weakly inhibits the uptake of serotonin. Together, both actions increase central and peripheral serotonergic activity while facilitating the psychoactivity of DMT. Though the use of such 'teas' has be known to western science for over 100 years, little is known of their pharmacokinetics. In this study, hoasca was prepared and administered in a ceremonial context. All four alkaloids were measured in the tea and in the plasma of 15 volunteers, subsequent to the ingestion of 2 ml hoasca/kg body weight, using gas (GC) and high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and peak times of psychoactivity coincided with high alkaloid concentrations, particularly DMT which had an average Tmax of 107.5 +/- 32.5 min. While DMT parameters correlated with those of harmine, THH showed a pharmacokinetic profile relatively independent of harmine's. PMID:10404423

  17. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  18. A frequent polymorphism in the coding exon of the human cannabinoid receptor (CNR1) gene.

    PubMed

    Gadzicki, D; Müller-Vahl, K; Stuhrmann, M

    1999-08-01

    The central cannabinoid receptor (CB1) mediates the pharmacological activities of cannabis, the endogenous agonist anandamide and several synthetic agonists. The cloning of the human cannabinoid receptor (CNR1) gene facilitates molecular genetic studies in disorders like Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease or other neuro psychiatric or neurological diseases, which may be predisposed or influenced by mutations or variants in the CNR1 gene. We detected a frequent silent mutation (1359G-->A) in codon 453 (Thr) of the CNR1 gene that turned out to be a common polymorphism in the German population. Allele frequencies of this polymorphism are 0.76 and 0.24, respectively. We developed a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay by artificial creation of a Msp I restriction site in amplified wild-type DNA (G-allele), which is destroyed by the silent mutation (A-allele). The intragenic CNR1 polymorphism 1359(G/A) should be useful for association studies in neuro psychiatric disorders which may be related to anandamide metabolism disturbances. PMID:10441206

  19. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  20. Involvement of cannabinoid CB2 receptor in alcohol preference in mice and alcoholism in humans.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, H; Iwasaki, S; Teasenfitz, L; Higuchi, S; Horiuchi, Y; Saito, T; Arinami, T; Onaivi, E S

    2007-12-01

    We tested if cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2) in the central nervous system plays a role in alcohol abuse/dependence in animal model and then examined an association between the CB2 gene polymorphism and alcoholism in human. Mice experiencing more alcohol preference by drinking showed reduced Cb2 gene expression, whereas mice with little preference showed no changes of it in ventral midbrain. Alcohol preference in conjunction with chronic mild stress were enhanced in mice treated with CB2 agonist JWH015 when subjected to chronic stress, whereas antagonist AM630 prevented development of alcohol preference. There is an association between the Q63R polymorphism of the CB2 gene and alcoholism in a Japanese population (P=0.007; odds ratio 1.25, 95% CI, (1.06-1.47)). CB2 under such environment is associated with the physiologic effects of alcohol and CB2 antagonists may have potential as therapies for alcoholism. PMID:17189959

  1. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of brotizolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in healthy young volunteers and in elderly patients after oral administration of single doses (0.5 mg), increasing doses (0.5-1.5 mg), and multiple doses (1.0 mg) of brotizolam. 2 Brotizolam was absorbed quickly from the gastro-intestinal tract. Elimination half-lives were in the range of 3.6-7.9 h. 3 In healthy young volunteers as well as in elderly patients, there was neither a tendency for brotizolam to accumulate nor was there any indication of enzyme induction. 4 Brotizolam was metabolized almost completely into hydroxylated compounds which were conjugated prior to renal excretion. 5 After oral administration of [14C]-brotizolam, two-thirds of excretion of radioactivity was renal and was completed within 4 days. PMID:6661373

  2. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse. PMID:26433054

  3. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  4. Dynamic of expression and localization of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MGLL in relation to CB1 during meiotic maturation of human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Totorikaguena, Lide; Expósito, Antonia; Mendoza, Rosario; Matorras, Roberto; Agirregoitia, Naiara

    2016-08-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system has been characterized in some female reproductive organs but little is known about the expression and localization pattern of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes in relation to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in human oocytes. In this study, we focus on the investigation of the presence and differential distribution of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in relation to CB1 during the maturation of human oocytes. We used a total of 290 human oocytes not suitable for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI): germinal-vesicle (GV) and metaphase-I (MI) stages and metaphase-II (MII) oocytes that had not developed into an embryo after ICSI. Cannabinoid-degrading enzymes and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were present in human oocytes. Specifically, FAAH was detected in the periphery of the oocyte from the GV to MI stage and co-localized with CB1. Later, by the MII stage, FAAH was spread within the oocyte, whereas MGLL immunostaining was homogeneous across the oocyte at all stages of maturation and only overlapped with CB1 at the GV stage. This coordinated redistribution of cannabinoid system proteins suggests a role for this system in the maturation of the female gamete. PMID:26948343

  5. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Soy Isoflavone Extracts in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Farré, Magí; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Papaseit, Esther; Martínez-Riera, Roser; de la Torre, Rafael; Pizarro, Nieves

    2015-08-12

    The soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein produce several biological activities related to health benefits. A number of isoflavone extracts are commercially available, but there is little information concerning the specific isoflavone content of these products or differences in their bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method to detect and quantify daidzein, genistein, and equol in human plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method was applied in a crossover, randomized, bioavailability study. Twelve healthy volunteers were administered the same total isoflavones dose from two isoflavone supplement preparations (Super-Absorbable Soy Isoflavones (Life Extension, USA) and Fitoladius (Merck, Spain)). The pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-24/dose and Cmax/dose) of the isoflavones from the two preparations differed significantly. Such differences in bioavailability and kinetics may have relevant effects on the health benefits derived from their intake. PMID:26186408

  6. Prolonged activation of human islet cannabinoid receptors in vitro induces adaptation but not dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vilches-Flores, Alonso; Franklin, Zara; Hauge-Evans, Astrid C.; Liu, Bo; Huang, Guo C.; Choudhary, Pratik; Jones, Peter M.; Persaud, Shanta J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although in vivo studies have implicated endocannabinoids in metabolic dysfunction, little is known about direct, chronic activation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in human islets. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of prolonged exposure to cannabinoid agonists on human islet gene expression and function. Methods Human islets were maintained for 2 and 5 days in the absence or presence of CB1r (ACEA) or CB2r (JWH015) agonists. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR, hormone levels by radioimmunoassay and apoptosis by caspase activities. Results Human islets express an ECS, with mRNAs encoding the biosynthetic and degrading enzymes NAPE-PLD, FAAH and MAGL being considerably more abundant than DAGLα, an enzyme involved in 2-AG synthesis, or CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNAs. Prolonged activation of CB1r and CB2r altered expression of mRNAs encoding ECS components, but did not have major effects on islet hormone secretion. JWH015 enhanced insulin and glucagon content at 2 days, but had no effect after 5 days. Treatment with ACEA or JWH015 for up to 5 days did not have marked effects on islet viability, as assessed by morphology and caspase activities. Conclusions Maintenance of human islets for up to 5 days in the presence of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists causes modifications in ECS element gene expression, but does not have any major impact on islet function or viability. General Significance These data suggest that the metabolic dysfunction associated with over-activation of the ECS in obesity and diabetes in humans is unlikely to be secondary to impaired islet function. PMID:27114924

  7. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  8. A new methodology for predicting human pharmacokinetics for inhaled drugs from oratracheal pharmacokinetic data in rats.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rhys M; Harrison, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of pharmacokinetic (PK) profile for inhaled drugs in humans provides valuable information to aid toxicology safety assessment, evaluate the potential for systemic accumulation on multiple dosing and enable an estimate for the clinical plasma assay requirements. The accuracy in prediction of inhaled human PK profiles for seven inhaled drugs or drug candidates (salmeterol, salbutamol, formoterol, fluticasone propionate, budesonide, CP-325366 and UK-432097) was assessed using rat oratracheal solution and dry powder PK data. The prediction methodology incorporates allometric scaling and mean residence time (MRT) principles with a two compartmental PK approach. Across the range of compounds tested, the prediction of human inhaled maximum concentration (C(max)) and MRT was within 2-fold for 5 of the 7 compounds, providing an accuracy of prediction similar to the current methodologies used to predict human oral C(max) from preclinical data ( De Buck et al. 2007 ). Administering as a dry powder formulation slowed the rat lung absorption rate of the least soluble compound (fluticasone propionate), impacting the prediction of C(max) and MRT. This flags the potential for preclinical studies with dry powder formulations to positively influence predictive accuracy, although further studies with low solubility inhaled drugs are required to confirm this. This study illustrates the value of preclinical assessment of PKs following administration to the lung, and provides a viable means of predicting the human PK profile for inhaled drugs. PMID:22077102

  9. Simultaneous determination of five naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites and their deposition in human and rat hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sangbeom

    2015-01-01

    The continuing appearance of new synthetic cannabinoids has been a major issue in the field of forensic and clinical toxicology. In response to that, analytical methods for synthetic cannabinoids have been increasingly established in a variety of biological matrices. Since most of synthetic cannabinoids with structure similarity share some enzymatic metabolites, making the interpretation of analytical results and the discovery of the parent drug actually ingested very complicated, the investigation on metabolites of the first generation of synthetic cannabinoids with their relatively short side chains in chemical structure could be more important. Therefore, in the present study, we developed the analytical method for AM-2201, JWH-122 and MAM-2201 with JWH-018 as a precursor and their monohydroxylated metabolites in hair matrix. Also, using a rat model, AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites were identified and then the ratios of metabolite-to-parent drug were estimated to be used as criteria on external contamination. All analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were injected into LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in the positive ionization mode. Matrix effect and recovery were evaluated in hair matrices and no significant variations were observed. The validation results for precision and accuracy were satisfactory in both human and rat hair. The LOD and LOQ were 0.5 pg/10mg and 1.0 pg/10mg in human hair and 0.5 pg/20mg and 1.0 pg/20mg in pigmented and non-pigmented rat hair, respectively. Additionally, as a result of the animal study, there were not significant differences in the effect of pigmentation on the distribution of AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites in hair. Wide variations were observed for the concentrations of the naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in authentic hair samples from nine cases; those were 0.4-59.2 pg/mg for JWH-018, 0.1-0.8 pg/mg for JWH-073, 1

  10. Pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in rabbit and human.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, G A; Kovach, J S

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and specific high-pressure liquid chromatographic assay was developed to characterize the plasma elimination and urinary excretion of mitomycin C in humans. Extraction of mitomycin C and an internal standard, porfiromycin, from plasma by chromatography over a non-ionic resin, Porapak Q, yields high recovery of both compounds and facilitates measurement of as little as 5 ng mitomycin C by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The assay was used to characterize the plasma elimination of mitomycin C in rabbits and was shown to be applicable to the characterization of the pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in humans receiving as little as 8 mg/m2. PMID:6809356

  11. Eravacycline Pharmacokinetics and Challenges in Defining Humanized Exposure In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Abrar K; Monogue, Marguerite L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-08-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetic profile of eravacycline, a novel antibiotic of the tetracycline class, and determined the dose in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model that would provide free-drug exposure similar to that observed in humans after the administration of 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h). Eravacycline demonstrated a nonlinear protein-binding profile. The 2.5-mg/kg i.v. q12h dose in mice resulted in an area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug of 1.64 mg · h/liter, which closely resembles the human exposure level. PMID:27353264

  12. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable - instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and - in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity - just to monitor these side effects carefully. PMID:18286801

  13. Pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil after oral administration in humans.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, F; Ripa, S; Prenna, M; Ghezzi, A; Pfeffer, M

    1982-02-01

    The human oral pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil were studied in parallel at doses of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg in three groups of 10 healthy young male volunteers. Renal excretion of intact cefadroxil, accounted for 82, 79, and 77% of the above doses. Mean peak serum levels were dose linear: 9, 18, and 35 microgram/ml at 250, 500, and 1,000 mg, respectively. However, overall pharmacokinetics were linear only in the 250- to 500-mg dose range; apparent serum clearances were 10 liters/h, and true renal clearances were 9 and 8 liters/h at 250 and 500 mg. At 1,000 mg, apparent serum clearance dropped to about 7 liters/h, true renal clearance, dropped to 6 liters/h, and the area under the curve increased disproportionately. At 250 and 500 mg, mean half-life was about 1.2 h; at 1,000 mg, however, it was 1.6h. The nonlinear decrease in clearance could be related to saturation of active renal tubular secretion of cefadroxil between the 500- and 1,000-mg doses. Previous results indicating that cefadroxil has greater persistence than other oral cephalosporins such as cephalexin, cephradine, cefaclor were confirmed. PMID:7073267

  14. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  15. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  16. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. PMID:26912385

  17. Cannabinoid WIN‑55,212‑2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS‑4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan‑1.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ying; Wang, Wanchun; Zhang, Changjie; Wu, Yi; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Xiaorong

    2016-06-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS‑4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan‑1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS‑4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN‑55,212‑2 mesylate (WIN‑55) on the expression of syndecan‑1 and ADAMTS‑4, as well as ADAMTS‑4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)‑1β‑stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN‑55 in the presence or absence of IL‑1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN‑55 inhibited ADAMTS‑4 activity in unstimulated and IL‑1β‑stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration‑dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN‑55 on ADAMTS‑4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan‑1 but not ADAMTS‑4, and overexpression of syndecan‑1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN‑55 on the ADAMTS‑4 activity in unstimulated and IL‑1β‑stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan‑1 gene promoter activity, WIN‑55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan‑1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic

  18. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  19. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  20. Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors coupled to cholinergic motorneurones inhibit neurogenic circular muscle contractility in the human colon

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Nicholas M; Ullrich, Katja; Smid, Scott D

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB1) receptor activation were determined on smooth muscle, inhibitory and excitatory motorneuronal function in strips of human colonic longitudinal muscle (LM) and circular muscle (CM) in vitro. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 0.5–20 Hz, 50 V) evoked a relaxation in LM and CM precontracted with a neurokinin-2 (NK-2) selective receptor agonist (β-ala8-neurokinin A; 10−6 M) in the presence of atropine (10−6 M); this was unaltered following pretreatment with the CB1-receptor selective agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA; 10−6 M). In the presence of nitric oxide synthase blockade with N-nitro-L-arginine (10−4 M), EFS evoked a frequency-dependent ‘on-contraction' during stimulation and an ‘off-contraction' following stimulus cessation. On-contractions were significantly inhibited in CM strips by pretreatment with ACEA (10−6 M). These inhibitory effects were reversed in the presence of the CB1 receptor-selective antagonist N-(piperidine-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (10−7 M). ACEA did not alter LM or CM contractile responses to acetylcholine or NK-2 receptor-evoked contraction. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a colocalisation of CB1 receptors to cholinergic neurones in the human colon based on colabelling with choline acetyltransferase, in addition to CB1 receptor labelling in unidentified structures in the CM. In conclusion, activation of CB1 receptors coupled to cholinergic motorneurones selectively and reversibly inhibits excitatory nerve transmission in colonic human colonic CM. These results provide evidence of a direct role for cannabinoids in the modulation of motor activity in the human colon by coupling to cholinergic motorneurones. PMID:16520743

  1. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 abate the inflammatory activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation. PMID:24644287

  2. The Endocannabinoid/Endovanilloid N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine (NADA) and Synthetic Cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 Abate the Inflammatory Activation of Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation. PMID:24644287

  3. A Humanized Mouse Model to Study Human Albumin and Albumin Conjugates Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Low, Benjamin E; Wiles, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Albumin is a large, highly abundant protein circulating in the blood stream which is regulated and actively recycled via the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In humans this results in serum albumin having an exceptional long half-life of ~21 days. Some time ago it was realized that these intrinsic properties could be harnessed and albumin could be used as a privileged drug delivery vehicle. However, active development of albumin based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of economic, relevant experimental models which can accurately recapitulate human albumin metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In mice for example, introduced human albumin is not recycled and is catabolized rapidly. This is mainly due to the failure of mouse FcRn to bind human albumin consequently, human albumin has a half-life of only 2-3 days in mice. To overcome this we developed and characterized a humanized mouse model which is null for mouse FcRn and mouse albumin, but is transgenic for, and expressing functional human FcRn. Published data clearly demonstrate that upon injection of human albumin into this model animal that it accurately recapitulates human albumin FcRn dependent serum recycling, with human albumin now having a half-life ~24 days, closely mimicking that observed in humans. In this practical review we briefly review this model and outline its use for pharmacokinetic studies of human albumin. PMID:27150087

  4. Cefoxitin and Cephalothin: Antimicrobial Activity, Human Pharmacokinetics, and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Brumfitt, William; Kosmidis, John; Hamilton-Miller, Jeremy M. T.; Gilchrist, James N. G.

    1974-01-01

    Cefoxitin, a semisynthetic cephamycin, has been compared with the widely used parenteral cephalosporin, cephalothin, in terms of antibacterial activity, human pharmacokinetics, and toxicity. For both compounds, minimal inhibitory concentrations were within the therapeutic range against the 156 gram-positive cocci tested (except group D streptococci), but cephalothin was 8 to 20 times more active. Regarding the 313 gram-negative organisms tested, both antibiotics were of approximately equal activity against cephalothin-susceptible strains, but cefoxitin was outstandingly superior against Providencia spp. and indole-producing Proteus spp., and markedly better against Serratia marcescens and Bacteroides fragilis. Against these organisms, cefoxitin but not cephalothin would be expected to be therapeutically valuable. Antibiotic activity levels in the serum and urine of 18 human volunteers after parenteral administration were higher and more prolonged in the case of cefoxitin, which had an average terminal serum half-life of about 45 min and a urinary recovery of about 90%. Cefoxitin was entirely nontoxic and, given intramuscularly, slightly less painful then cephalothin. These preliminary results suggest that cephamycins may prove to be a significant chemotherapeutic advance. PMID:15830475

  5. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  6. Pharmacokinetics of furagin, a new nitrofurantoin congener, on human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Männistö, P; Karttunen, P

    1979-06-01

    The human pharmacokinetics of a nitrofurantoin congener furagin was studied after a single oral dose of 200 mg and during a 9-day continuous treatment with a dose of 100 mg t.i.d. The same dose of nitrofurantoin served as a reference medication. In the acute cross-over phase food greatly speeded up and atropine somewhat retarded the absorption of furagin, but the total absorption remained virtually unchanged as judged from the unchanged AUC values. The furagin concentrations in serum remain several hours above the MIC concentrations of many pathogenic bacteria. Despite the high concentrations in serum, the urine levels of furagin were generally lower than those of nitrofurantoin. The 24 hr recoveries in urine were 8--13% for furagin and about 36% for nitrofurantoin. In the prolonged trial furagin was absorbed and excreted in the same way as in the acute trial. On the 9th day the concentrations in serum and urine were higher than on the first day. The urinary concentrations of both furagin and nitrofurantoin always remained well above the MIC values of the most susceptible bacteria. Several volunteers complained of nightly cramps in their calves after taking furagin for some days, otherwise the side effects were minimal. PMID:468451

  7. Application of allometric principles for the prediction of pharmacokinetics in human and veterinary drug development.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2007-09-30

    The concept of correlating pharmacokinetic parameters with body weight (termed as pharmacokinetic interspecies scaling) from different animal species has become a useful tool in drug development. Interspecies scaling is based on the power function, where the body weight of the species is plotted against the pharmacokinetic parameter of interest. Clearance, volume of distribution, and elimination half-life are the three most frequently extrapolated pharmacokinetic parameters. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameter clearance can be used for estimating a first-in-human dose. Over the years, many approaches have been suggested to improve the prediction of aforementioned pharmacokinetic parameters in humans from animal data. A literature review indicates that there are different degrees of success with different methods for different drugs. Interspecies scaling is also a very useful tool in veterinary medicine. The knowledge of pharmacokinetics in veterinary medicine is important for dosage selection, particularly in the treatment of large animals such as horses, camels, elephants, or other large zoo animals. Despite the potential for extrapolation error, the reality is that interspecies scaling is needed across many veterinary practice situations, and therefore will be used. For this reason, it is important to consider mechanisms for reducing the risk of extrapolation errors that can seriously affect animal safety and therapeutic response. Overall, although interspecies scaling requires continuous refinement and better understanding, the rationale approach of interspecies scaling has a lot of potential during the drug development process. PMID:17826864

  8. Pharmacokinetic interactions of breast cancer chemotherapeutics with human doxorubicin reductases.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jakub; Skarka, Adam; Havrankova, Jana; Wsol, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX), docetaxel (DTX), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CYC) or tamoxifen (TMX) are combined with doxorubicin (DOX) in first-line chemotherapy regimens that are indicated for breast cancer patients. Although the efficacies of these drugs in combination treatments have been demonstrated in clinical practice, their possible interference with DOX metabolism has not been described in detail to date. In the present study, we investigated the possible interactions of human carbonyl reducing enzymes with 5-FU, PTX, DTX, CYC and TMX. First, the reducing activities of carbonyl reducing enzymes toward DOX were tested using incubations with purified recombinant enzymes. In the subsequent studies, we investigated the possible effects of the tested anticancer agents on the DOX-reducing activities of the most potent enzymes (AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1) and on the DOX metabolism driven by MCF7, HepG2 and human liver cytosols. In both of these assays, we observed that CYC and its active metabolites inhibited DOX metabolism. In the final study, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3, CBR1 and AKR1A1 expression levels following exposure to the tested cytostatics in MCF7 and HepG2 cells. Consequently, no significant changes in the expression levels of tested enzymes were detected in either cell line. Based on these findings, it is feasible to presume that inhibition rather than induction plays a role in the interactions of the tested anticancer agents with DOX-reducing enzymes. In conclusion, our results describe important molecular events that occur during combination breast cancer therapies and might modulate pharmacokinetic DOX resistance and/or behaviour. PMID:25986883

  9. Reductions in log P improved protein binding and clearance predictions enabling the prospective design of cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists with desired pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Bruce A; Sher, Philip M; Wu, Ximao; Wu, Gang; Sulsky, Richard B; Gu, Zhengxiang; Murugesan, Natesan; Zhu, Yeheng; Yu, Guixue; Sitkoff, Doree F; Carlson, Kenneth E; Kang, Liya; Yang, Yifan; Lee, Ning; Baska, Rose A; Keim, William J; Cullen, Mary Jane; Azzara, Anthony V; Zuvich, Eva; Thomas, Michael A; Rohrbach, Kenneth W; Devenny, James J; Godonis, Helen E; Harvey, Susan J; Murphy, Brian J; Everlof, Gerry G; Stetsko, Paul I; Gudmundsson, Olafur; Johnghar, Susan; Ranasinghe, Asoka; Behnia, Kamelia; Pelleymounter, Mary Ann; Ewing, William R

    2013-12-12

    Several strategies have been employed to reduce the long in vivo half-life of our lead CB1 antagonist, triazolopyridazinone 3, to differentiate the pharmacokinetic profile versus the lead clinical compounds. An in vitro and in vivo clearance data set revealed a lack of correlation; however, when compounds with <5% free fraction were excluded, a more predictable correlation was observed. Compounds with log P between 3 and 4 were likely to have significant free fraction, so we designed compounds in this range to give more predictable clearance values. This strategy produced compounds with desirable in vivo half-lives, ultimately leading to the discovery of compound 46. The progression of compound 46 was halted due to the contemporaneous marketing and clinical withdrawal of other centrally acting CB1 antagonists; however, the design strategy successfully delivered a potent CB1 antagonist with the desired pharmacokinetic properties and a clean off-target profile. PMID:24182233

  10. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB1 cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2014-03-01

    Human OX1 orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX1, OX2 and CB1 receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP(2) green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB1 receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP(2) to CB1 produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX1-OX2 interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB1 receptors, dimerization could be an effective way of forming signal complexes with optimal cannabinoid concentrations available for cannabinoid receptors. PMID:24530395

  11. Systemic availability and pharmacokinetics of thymol in humans.

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Claudia; Schindler, Gernot; März, Reinhard W; Abel, Gudrun; Brinkhaus, Benno; Derendorf, Hartmut; Gräfe, Eva-Ulrike; Veit, Markus

    2002-07-01

    Essential oil compounds such as found in thyme extract are established for the therapy of chronic and acute bronchitis. Various pharmacodynamic activities for thyme extract and the essential thyme oil, respectively, have been demonstrated in vitro, but availability of these compounds in the respective target organs has not been proven. Thus, investigation of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion are necessary to provide the link between in vitro effects and in vivo studies. To determine the systemic availability and the pharmacokinetics of thymol after oral application to humans, a clinical trial was carried out in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received a single dose of a Bronchipret TP tablet, which is equivalent to 1.08 mg thymol. No thymol could be detected in plasma or urine. However, the metabolites thymol sulfate and thymol glucuronide were found in urine and identified by LC-MS/MS. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed after enzymatic hydrolysis of the metabolites by headspace solid-phase microextraction prior to GC analysis and flame ionization detection. Thymol sulfate, but not thymol glucuronide, was detectable in plasma. Peak plasma concentrations were 93.1+/-24.5 ng ml(-1) and were reached after 2.0+/-0.8 hours. The mean terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 hours. Thymol sulfate was detectable up to 41 hours after administration. Urinary excretion could be followed over 24 hours. The amount of both thymol sulfate and glucuronide excreted in 24-hour urine was 16.2%+/-4.5% of the dose. PMID:12092740

  12. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  13. Targeting cannabinoid receptor-2 pathway by phenylacetylamide suppresses the proliferation of human myeloma cells through mitotic dysregulation and cytoskeleton disruption.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rentian; Tong, Qin; Xie, Zhaojun; Cheng, Haizi; Wang, Lirong; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Roodman, G David; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) is expressed dominantly in the immune system, especially on plasma cells. Cannabinergic ligands with CB2 selectivity emerge as a class of promising agents to treat CB2-expressing malignancies without psychotropic concerns. In this study, we found that CB2 but not CB1 was highly expressed in human multiple myeloma (MM) and primary CD138+ cells. A novel inverse agonist of CB2, phenylacetylamide but not CB1 inverse agonist SR141716, inhibited the proliferation of human MM cells (IC50 : 0.62 ∼ 2.5 μM) mediated by apoptosis induction, but exhibited minor cytotoxic effects on human normal mononuclear cells. CB2 gene silencing or pharmacological antagonism markedly attenuated phenylacetylamide's anti-MM effects. Phenylacetylamide triggered the expression of C/EBP homologous protein at the early treatment stage, followed by death receptor-5 upregulation, caspase activation, and β-actin/tubulin degradation. Cell cycle related protein cdc25C and mitotic regulator Aurora A kinase were inactivated by phenylacetylamide treatment, leading to an increase in the ratio inactive/active cdc2 kinase. As a result, phosphorylation of CDK substrates was decreased, and the MM cell mitotic division was largely blocked by treatment. Importantly, phenylacetylamide could overcome the chemoresistance of MM cells against dexamethasone or melphalan. Thus, targeting CB2 may represent an attractive approach to treat cancers of immune origin. PMID:25640641

  14. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models. PMID:26652678

  15. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling. PMID:27350550

  16. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  17. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake. PMID:26810398

  19. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics from preclinical information: comparative accuracy of quantitative prediction approaches.

    PubMed

    Hosea, Natilie A; Collard, Wendy T; Cole, Susan; Maurer, Tristan S; Fang, Rick X; Jones, Hannah; Kakar, Shefali M; Nakai, Yasuhiro; Smith, Bill J; Webster, Rob; Beaumont, Kevin

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative prediction of human pharmacokinetics is critical in assessing the viability of drug candidates and in determining first-in-human dosing. Numerous prediction methodologies, incorporating both in vitro and preclinical in vivo data, have been developed in recent years, each with advantages and disadvantages. However, the lack of a comprehensive data set, both preclinical and clinical, has limited efforts to evaluate the optimal strategy (or strategies) that results in quantitative predictions of human pharmacokinetics. To address this issue, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis using 50 proprietary compounds for which in vitro, preclinical pharmacokinetic data and oral single-dose human pharmacokinetic data were available. Five predictive strategies, involving either allometry or use of unbound intrinsic clearance from microsomes or hepatocytes, were then compared for their ability to predict human oral clearance, half-life through predictions of systemic clearance, volume of distribution, and bioavailability. Use of a single-species scaling approach with rat, dog, or monkey was as accurate as or more accurate than using multiple-species allometry. For those compounds cleared almost exclusively by P450-mediated pathways, scaling from human liver microsomes was as predictive as single-species scaling of clearance based on data from rat, dog, or monkey. These data suggest that use of predictive methods involving either single-species in vivo data or in vitro human liver microsomes can quantitatively predict human in vivo pharmacokinetics and suggest the possibility of streamlining the predictive methodology through use of a single species or use only of human in vitro microsomal preparations. PMID:19299532

  20. A Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seyeon; Yi, Sodam; Seo, Won Jong; Lee, Myeong Jung; Song, Young Keun; Baek, Seung Yong; Yu, Jinha; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Shin, Dong Wook; Jeong, Lak Shin; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids can affect multiple cellular targets, such as cannabinoid (CB) receptors, transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). The stimuli to induce adipocyte differentiation in hBM-MSCs increase the gene transcription of the CB1 receptor, TRPV1 and PPARγ. In this study, the effects of three endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (AEA), N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), on adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs were evaluated. The adipocyte differentiation was promoted by AEA whereas inhibited by NADA. No change was observed by the treatment of non-cytotoxic concentrations of 2-AG. The difference between AEA and NADA in the regulation of adipogenesis is associated with their effects on PPARγ transactivation. AEA can directly activate PPARγ. The effect of AEA on PPARγ in hBM-MSCs may prevail over that on the CB1 receptor mediated signal transduction, giving rise to the AEA-induced promotion of adipogenesis. In contrast, NADA had no effect on the PPARγ activity in the PPARγ transactivation assay. The inhibitory effect of NADA on adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs was reversed not by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, but by rimonabant, a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant by itself promoted adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs, which may be interpreted as the result of the inverse agonism of the CB1 receptor. This result suggests that the constantly active CB1 receptor may contribute to suppress the adipocyte differentiation of hBM-MSCs. Therefore, the selective CB1 agonists that are unable to affect cellular PPARγ activity inhibit adipogenesis in hBM-MSCs. PMID:25995819

  1. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data. PMID:25004823

  2. Preclinical pharmacokinetics of a novel HIV-1 attachment inhibitor BMS-378806 and prediction of its human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheng; Zadjura, Lisa; D'Arienzo, Celia; Marino, Anthony; Santone, Kenneth; Klunk, Lewis; Greene, Douglas; Lin, Pin-Fang; Colonno, Richard; Wang, Tao; Meanwell, Nicholas; Hansel, Steven

    2005-12-01

    BMS-378806 is a prototype of novel HIV attachment inhibitors that block the gp120 and CD4 interaction, the first step of HIV-1 entry into cells. The present work investigated the pharmacokinetics of BMS-378806 in rats, dogs and monkeys and assessed its in vitro permeability and metabolism. BMS-378806 exhibited species-dependent oral bioavailability which was 19%-24% in rats and monkeys and 77% in dogs. In rats and monkeys, absorption was prolonged, with an apparent terminal half-life of 2.1 and 6.5 h, respectively. In rats, linear pharmacokinetics was observed between i.v. doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg and between p.o. doses of 5 and 25 mg/kg. The total body clearance was intermediate in rats and low in dogs and monkeys. The steady-state volume of distribution was moderate (0.4-0.6 l/kg), contributing to a short half-life (0.3-1.2 h) after i.v. dosing. Studies in bile-duct cannulated rats together with intraportal infusion studies revealed that the renal and hepatic clearance each accounted for 30% and 70% of the total elimination in rats, with the hepatic clearance largely being oxidative metabolism. In vitro, BMS-378806 was not highly protein bound (44%-73%). The Caco-2 permeability was modest (51 nm/s) and confounded by P-glycoprotein mediated efflux transport. Both of these may contribute to the low brain penetration observed in rats (brain/plasma AUC ratio=0.06). In human liver microsomes BMS-378806 was equally metabolized by cytochrome P450 1A2, 2D6 and 3A4 and did not inhibit major drug-metabolizing enzymes to a significant extent. Based on in vitro and animal data, a mechanistic approach that factors in absorption and first-pass metabolism was employed to predict the human oral bioavailability of BMS-378806 (ca 20%). This, together with the complex Dedrick plot method, was used to simulate human oral profiles and to project an efficacious dose. These study results offer a comprehensive assessment of the developability of BMS-378806 and provide important guidance

  3. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  4. Current Knowledge on Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is a new biological matrix for clinical and forensic drug testing, offering non-invasive and directly observable sample collection reducing adulteration potential, ease of multiple sample collections, lower biohazard risk during collection, recent exposure identification, and stronger correlation with blood than urine concentrations. Because cannabinoids are usually the most prevalent analytes in illicit drug testing, application of OF drug testing requires sufficient scientific data to support sensitive and specific OF cannabinoid detection. This review presents current knowledge on OF cannabinoids, evaluating pharmacokinetic properties, detection windows, and correlation with other biological matrices and impairment from field applications and controlled drug administration studies. In addition, on-site screening technologies, confirmatory analytical methods, drug stability, and effects of sample collection procedure, adulterants, and passive environmental exposure are reviewed. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol OF concentrations could be > 1000 μg/L shortly after smoking, whereas minor cannabinoids are detected at 10-fold and metabolites at 1000-fold lower concentrations. OF research over the past decade demonstrated that appropriate interpretation of test results requires a comprehensive understanding of distinct elimination profiles and detection windows for different cannabinoids, which are influenced by administration route, dose, and drug use history. Thus, each drug testing program should establish cutoff criteria, collection/analysis procedures, and storage conditions tailored to its purposes. Building a scientific basis for OF testing is on-going, with continuing OF cannabinoids research on passive environmental exposure, drug use history, donor physiological conditions, and oral cavity metabolism needed to better understand mechanisms of cannabinoid OF disposition and expand OF drug testing applicability. PMID:23983217

  5. Oral and dermal pharmacokinetics of triclopyr in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, N G; Nolan, R J; Perkins, J M; Davies, R; Warrington, S J

    1989-11-01

    Blood levels and urinary excretion of triclopyr, the active ingredient in Garlon herbicides, were followed in six volunteers given single oral doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg body weight. Five of these volunteers later received dermal applications of Garlon 4 herbicide formulation equivalent to 3.7 mg triclopyr/kg body weight applied to the forearm. Following oral administration blood levels peaked at 2-3 h and declined to undetectable levels within 48 h; more than 80% of the dose was found as unchanged triclopyr in the urine. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of triclopyr clearance; half-lives for the rapid initial and slower terminal phases were 1.3 h and 5.1 h respectively, and were independent of dose. Due to the slow half-life for dermal absorption (t1/2 = 16.8 h) the rapid initial elimination phase was obscured and the pharmacokinetics could be simplified by a one-compartment model. An average of 1.37% of the applied dose was recovered in the urine; when corrected for recovery after oral administration this was equivalent to an absorption of 1.65%. Triclopyr is slowly absorbed through skin and is rapidly eliminated. It has very low potential to accumulate in man or to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts. PMID:2591984

  6. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas W; Newton, Catherine A

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoid-based drugs modeled on cannabinoids originally isolated from marijuana are now known to significantly impact the functioning of the endocannabinoid system of mammals. This system operates not only in the brain but also in organs and tissues in the periphery including the immune system. Natural and synthetic cannabinoids are tricyclic terpenes, whereas the endogenous physiological ligands are eicosanoids. Several receptors for these compounds have been extensively described, CB1 and CB2, and are G protein-coupled receptors; however, cannabinoid-based drugs are also demonstrated to function independently of these receptors. Cannabinoids regulate many physiological functions and their impact on immunity is generally antiinflammatory as powerful modulators of the cytokine cascade. This anti-inflammatory potency has led to the testing of these drugs in chronic inflammatory laboratory paradigms and even in some human diseases. Psychoactive and nonpsychoactive cannabinoid-based drugs such as Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, HU-211, and ajulemic acid have been tested and found moderately effective in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, arthritis, and neuropathic pain. Furthermore, although clinical trials are not yet reported, preclinical data with cannabinoid-based drugs suggest efficacy in other inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. PMID:17713029

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. PMID:26297692

  8. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d6-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d6-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d6-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. PMID:26522835

  9. The pharmacokinetics of ciclazindol (Wy 23409) in human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Swaisland, A J; Franklin, R A; Southgate, P J; Coleman, A J

    1977-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of ciclazindol, a potential anti-depressant drug, have been studied after oral administration of the compound to male and female volunteers. 2. The mean +/- S.E. mean maximum plasma concentration of the unchanged drug was 422 +/- 31 ng/ml. This level was seen between 2 and 4 h after dosing. 3. Elimination of the ciclazindol from plasma was apparently monexponential with a half-life of approximately 32 h. A large proportion of the drug-related substances in the plasma was unchanged drug. 4. Excretion of radioactivity took place predominantly via the renal route, less than 15% of the dose being recovered in the faeces. The urinary elimination process was apparently monoexponential with a half-life of 28 h. 5. Daily dosing with ciclazindol for 3 weeks did not appear to induce the enzymes of its own metabolism. PMID:843425

  10. Paracetamol pharmacokinetics during the first trimester of human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beaulac-Baillargeon, L; Rocheleau, S

    1994-01-01

    Paracetamol pharmacokinetics was evaluated in groups of pregnant (8-12 weeks) and non pregnant women given the standard oral dose of 650 mg. The mean half-life was significantly lower and oral clearance was significantly higher in the first trimester group compared to the control group. The AUC was lower in the first trimester but the difference was not significant. The maximum serum concentration (Cmax) was reached 48 min after administration in both groups, and the mean maximal serum concentration was similar in the pregnant and non-pregnant women (11.16 and 11.58 micrograms.ml-1). A correlation of r = 0.85 was found between Cmax and the weight of the pregnant women (P < 0.01) but not with the weight of the control women, this suggests that weight gain might be used to determine the women in whom dosage adjustment is needed. PMID:7957542

  11. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  12. The pharmacokinetics of anthocyanins and their metabolites in humans

    PubMed Central

    de Ferrars, R M; Czank, C; Zhang, Q; Botting, N P; Kroon, P A; Cassidy, A; Kay, C D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Anthocyanins are phytochemicals with reported vasoactive bioactivity. However, given their instability at neutral pH, they are presumed to undergo significant degradation and subsequent biotransformation. The aim of the present study was to establish the pharmacokinetics of the metabolites of cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a widely consumed dietary phytochemical with potential cardioprotective properties. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A 500 mg oral bolus dose of 6,8,10,3′,5′-13C5-C3G was fed to eight healthy male participants, followed by a 48 h collection (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 h) of blood, urine and faecal samples. Samples were analysed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS with elimination kinetics established using non-compartmental pharmacokinetic modelling. KEY RESULTS Seventeen 13C-labelled compounds were identified in the serum, including 13C5-C3G, its degradation products, protocatechuic acid (PCA) and phloroglucinaldehyde (PGA), 13 metabolites of PCA and 1 metabolite derived from PGA. The maximal concentrations of the phenolic metabolites (Cmax) ranged from 10 to 2000 nM, between 2 and 30 h (tmax) post-consumption, with half-lives of elimination observed between 0.5 and 96 h. The major phenolic metabolites identified were hippuric acid and ferulic acid, which peaked in the serum at approximately 16 and 8 h respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Anthocyanins are metabolized to a structurally diverse range of metabolites that exhibit dynamic kinetic profiles. Understanding the elimination kinetics of these metabolites is key to the design of future studies examining their utility in dietary interventions or as therapeutics for disease risk reduction. PMID:24602005

  13. Pharmacology of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Dronabinol (Delta 9-tetrahydocannabinol, THC), the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the use of cannabis, is an agonist to both the CB1 and the CB2 subtype of cannabinoid receptors. It is available on prescription in several countries. The non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), some analogues of natural cannabinoids and their metabolites, antagonists at the cannabinoid receptors and modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues including spleen, leukocytes; reproductive, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts; endocrine glands, arteries and heart. Five endogenous cannabinoids have been detected so far, of whom anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol are best characterized. There is evidence that besides the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes cloned so far additional cannabinoid receptor subtypes and vanilloid receptors are involved in the complex physiological functions of the cannabinoid system that include motor coordination, memory procession, control of appetite, pain modulation and neuroprotection. Strategies to modulate their activity include inhibition of re-uptake into cells and inhibition of their degradation to increase concentration and duration of action. Properties of cannabinoids that might be of therapeutic use include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, anti-allergic effects, sedation, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, anti-emesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects. PMID:15159677

  14. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names “K2” and “Spice,” are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20 years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:23827241

  15. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2014-02-27

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names "K2" and "Spice," are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:23827241

  16. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorobutyrate in Rats, Mice,Monkeys, and Humans and Relevance to Human Exposurevia Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) has been detected in precipitation, surface waters, water treatment effluent, and in public and private wells in Minnesota at up to low mg/l concentrations. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of PFBA in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans to provide a rati...

  17. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption. PMID:26794662

  18. Emerging Insights for Translational Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Studies: Towards Prediction of Nose-to-Brain Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Mitchel J R; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential added value of intranasal drug administration, preclinical studies to date have typically used the area under the curve (AUC) in brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to plasma following intranasal and intravenous administration to calculate measures of extent like drug targeting efficiencies (%DTE) and nose-to-brain transport percentages (%DTP). However, CSF does not necessarily provide direct information on the target site concentrations, while total brain concentrations are not specific to that end either as non-specific binding is not explicitly considered. Moreover, to predict nose-to-brain transport in humans, the use of descriptive analysis of preclinical data does not suffice. Therefore, nose-to-brain research should be performed translationally and focus on preclinical studies to obtain specific information on absorption from the nose, and distinguish between the different transport routes to the brain (absorption directly from the nose to the brain, absorption from the nose into the systemic circulation, and distribution between the systemic circulation and the brain), in terms of extent as well as rate. This can be accomplished by the use of unbound concentrations obtained from plasma and brain, with subsequent advanced mathematical modeling. To that end, brain extracellular fluid (ECF) is a preferred sampling site as it represents most closely the site of action for many targets. Furthermore, differences in nose characteristics between preclinical species and humans should be considered. Finally, pharmacodynamic measurements that can be obtained in both animals and humans should be included to further improve the prediction of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of intranasally administered CNS drugs in humans. PMID:25693488

  19. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  20. Pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of a recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase bioscavenger in macaques following intravenous and pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J; Adams, Robert J; Hernandez-Abanto, Segundo; Jiang, Xiaoming; Sun, Wei; Mao, Lingjun; Lee, K David

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant (r) and native butyrylcholinesterse (BChE) are potent bioscavengers of organophosphates (OPs) such as nerve agents and pesticides and are undergoing development as antidotal treatments for OP-induced toxicity. Because of the lethal properties of such agents, regulatory approval will require extensive testing under the Animal Rule. However, human (Hu) glycoprotein biologicals, such as BChE, present a challenge for assessing immunogenicity and efficacy in heterologous animal models since any immune responses to the small species differences in amino acids or glycans between the host and biologic may alter pharmacodynamics and preclude accurate efficacy testing; possibly underestimating their potential protective value in humans. To establish accurate pharmacokinetic and efficacy data, an homologous animal model has been developed in which native and PEGylated forms of CHO-derived rMaBChE were multiply injected into homologous macaques with no induction of antibody. These now serve as controls for assessing the pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity in macaques of multiple administrations of PEGylated and unmodified human rBChE (rHuBChE) by both intravenous (IV) and pulmonary routes. The results indicate that, except for maximal concentration (Cmax), the pharmacokinetic parameters following IV injection with heterologous PEG-rHuBChE were greatly reduced even after the first injection compared with homologous PEG-rMaBChE. Anti-HuBChE antibody responses were induced in all monkeys after the second and third administrations regardless of the route of delivery; impacting rates of clearance and usually resulting in reduced endogenous MaBChE activity. These data highlight the difficulties inherent in assessing pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity in animal models, but bode well for the efficacy and safety of rHuBChE pretreatments in homologous humans. PMID:26415620

  1. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  2. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  3. Human intravenous pharmacokinetics and absolute oral bioavailability of cefatrizine.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, M; Gaver, R C; Ximenez, J

    1983-01-01

    Cefatrizine was administered intravenously and orally at dose levels of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg to normal male volunteers in a crossover study. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were dose linear over this range; mean peak plasma concentrations at the end of 30-min infusions were, respectively, 18, 37, and 75 micrograms/ml, total body clearance was 218 ml/min per 1.73 m2, renal clearance was 176 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and mean retention time in the body was 1.11 h. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine was 80% of the dose, and half-lives ranged from 1 to 1.4 h. Steady-state volume of distribution was 0.22 liters/kg. On oral administration, the absolute bioavailabilities of cefatrizine were 75% at 250 and 500 mg and 50% at 1,000 mg. The mean peak plasma concentrations and peak times were, respectively, 4.9, 8.6, and 10.2 micrograms/ml at 1.4, 1.6, and 2.0 h, mean residence times were 2.4, 2.6, and 3.1 h, and mean absorption times were 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 h. Oral renal clearance and half-life values corresponded well to the intravenous values. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine (as percentage of dose) was 60 at 250 mg, 56 at 500 mg, and 42 at 1,000 mg. It is hypothesized that the lack of oral dose linearity between the 500- and 1,000-mg doses is due to a component of cefatrizine absorption by a saturable transport process. Relative absorption at the high dose would be sufficiently slow that an absorption "window" would be passed before maximum bioavailability could be attained. It is not expected that the observed bioavailability decrease at doses exceeding 500 mg will have any therapeutic significance, since clinical studies are establishing efficacy for a recommended unit dosage regimen of 500 mg. PMID:6660858

  4. Human intravenous pharmacokinetics and absolute oral bioavailability of cefatrizine.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, M; Gaver, R C; Ximenez, J

    1983-12-01

    Cefatrizine was administered intravenously and orally at dose levels of 250, 500, and 1,000 mg to normal male volunteers in a crossover study. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were dose linear over this range; mean peak plasma concentrations at the end of 30-min infusions were, respectively, 18, 37, and 75 micrograms/ml, total body clearance was 218 ml/min per 1.73 m2, renal clearance was 176 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and mean retention time in the body was 1.11 h. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine was 80% of the dose, and half-lives ranged from 1 to 1.4 h. Steady-state volume of distribution was 0.22 liters/kg. On oral administration, the absolute bioavailabilities of cefatrizine were 75% at 250 and 500 mg and 50% at 1,000 mg. The mean peak plasma concentrations and peak times were, respectively, 4.9, 8.6, and 10.2 micrograms/ml at 1.4, 1.6, and 2.0 h, mean residence times were 2.4, 2.6, and 3.1 h, and mean absorption times were 1.3, 1.6, and 1.9 h. Oral renal clearance and half-life values corresponded well to the intravenous values. Cumulative urinary excretion of intact cefatrizine (as percentage of dose) was 60 at 250 mg, 56 at 500 mg, and 42 at 1,000 mg. It is hypothesized that the lack of oral dose linearity between the 500- and 1,000-mg doses is due to a component of cefatrizine absorption by a saturable transport process. Relative absorption at the high dose would be sufficiently slow that an absorption "window" would be passed before maximum bioavailability could be attained. It is not expected that the observed bioavailability decrease at doses exceeding 500 mg will have any therapeutic significance, since clinical studies are establishing efficacy for a recommended unit dosage regimen of 500 mg. PMID:6660858

  5. Pharmacokinetics in Animals and Humans of a First-in-Class Peptide Deformylase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan-Girish, Sandhya; McColm, Juliet; Clements, John M.; Taupin, Phil; Barrowcliffe, Sue; Hevizi, John; Safrin, Sharon; Moore, Clive; Patou, Gary; Moser, Heinz; Gadd, Alison; Hoch, Ute; Jiang, Vernon; Lofland, Denene; Johnson, Kirk W.

    2004-01-01

    BB-83698, a potent and selective inhibitor of peptide deformylase, was the first compound of this novel antibacterial class to progress to clinical trials. Single- and/or multiple-dose studies with doses ranging from 10 to 50 mg of BB-83698/kg of body weight were done with mice, rats, and dogs. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were characterized by low to moderate clearances and moderate volumes of distribution for all species. In dogs, but not in rodents, central nervous system (CNS) effects were dose limiting for intravenously administered BB-83698 and were suspected to be related to a high maximum concentration of the agent in plasma (Cmax) rather than to total systemic exposure. Controlled infusion studies with dogs demonstrated that CNS effects could be avoided without compromising systemic exposure by reducing the Cmax. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, five-way-crossover, single-dose-escalation, phase I study to explore the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of intravenous BB-83698 at doses ranging from 10 to 475 mg was performed with healthy male volunteers. Systemic exposures were generally in linear relationships with administered doses in animals and humans. Pharmacokinetics were consistent, predictable, and exhibited good allometric scaling among all species (r2 >0.98). Moreover, BB-83698 dosing in humans proceeded to a predicted efficacious exposure (the area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratio, up to 184) without any clinically significant adverse effects. PMID:15561864

  6. Pharmacokinetics in animals and humans of a first-in-class peptide deformylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan-Girish, Sandhya; McColm, Juliet; Clements, John M; Taupin, Phil; Barrowcliffe, Sue; Hevizi, John; Safrin, Sharon; Moore, Clive; Patou, Gary; Moser, Heinz; Gadd, Alison; Hoch, Ute; Jiang, Vernon; Lofland, Denene; Johnson, Kirk W

    2004-12-01

    BB-83698, a potent and selective inhibitor of peptide deformylase, was the first compound of this novel antibacterial class to progress to clinical trials. Single- and/or multiple-dose studies with doses ranging from 10 to 50 mg of BB-83698/kg of body weight were done with mice, rats, and dogs. Intravenous pharmacokinetics were characterized by low to moderate clearances and moderate volumes of distribution for all species. In dogs, but not in rodents, central nervous system (CNS) effects were dose limiting for intravenously administered BB-83698 and were suspected to be related to a high maximum concentration of the agent in plasma (Cmax) rather than to total systemic exposure. Controlled infusion studies with dogs demonstrated that CNS effects could be avoided without compromising systemic exposure by reducing the Cmax. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, five-way-crossover, single-dose-escalation, phase I study to explore the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of intravenous BB-83698 at doses ranging from 10 to 475 mg was performed with healthy male volunteers. Systemic exposures were generally in linear relationships with administered doses in animals and humans. Pharmacokinetics were consistent, predictable, and exhibited good allometric scaling among all species (r2 >0.98). Moreover, BB-83698 dosing in humans proceeded to a predicted efficacious exposure (the area under the concentration-time curve/MIC ratio, up to 184) without any clinically significant adverse effects. PMID:15561864

  7. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  8. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  9. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of squalene-containing adjuvant in human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Squalene is used in the oil phase of certain emulsion vaccine adjuvants, but its fate as a vaccine component following intramuscular (IM) injection in humans is unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for intramuscularly injected squalene-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion, in order to make a quantitative estimation of the tissue distribution of squalene following a single IM injection in humans. The PBPK model incorporates relevant physicochemical properties of squalene; estimates of the time course of cracking of a SQ/W emulsion; anatomical and physiological parameters at the injection site and beyond; and local, preferential lymphatic transport. The model predicts that a single dose of SQ/W emulsion will be removed from human deltoid muscle within six days following IM injection. The major proportion of the injected squalene will be distributed to draining lymph nodes and adipose tissues. The model indicates slow decay from the latter compartment most likely due to partitioning into neutral lipids and a low rate of squalene biotransformation there. Parallel pharmacokinetic modeling for mouse muscle suggests that the kinetics of SQ/W emulsion correspond to the immunodynamic time course of a commercial squalene-containing adjuvant reported in that species. In conclusion, this study makes important pharmacokinetic predictions of the fate of a squalene-containing emulsion in humans. The results of this study may be relevant for understanding the immunodynamics of this new class of vaccine adjuvants and may be useful in future quantitative risk analyses that incorporate mode-of-action data. PMID:23912214

  10. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine for comparing pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Kettner, Mattias; Laschke, Matthias W; Schlote, Julia; Peters, Benjamin; Bregel, Dietmar; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Ewald, Andreas H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    A series of new synthetic cannabinoids (SC) has been consumed without any toxicological testing. For example, pharmacokinetic data have to be collected from forensic toxicological case work and/or animal studies. To develop a corresponding model for assessing such data, samples of controlled pig studies with two selected SC (JWH-210, RCS-4) and, as reference, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) should be analyzed as well as those of human cases. Therefore, a method for determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, THC, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine samples is presented. Specimens were analyzed by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multiple-reaction monitoring with three transitions per compound. Full validation was carried out for the pig specimens and cross-validation for the human specimens concerning precision and bias. For the pig studies, the limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.50 ng/mL in serum and whole blood and between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL in urine, the lower limits of quantification between 0.25 and 1.0 ng/mL in serum and 0.50 and 2.0 ng/mL in whole blood and urine, and the intra- and interday precision values lower than 15% and bias values within ±15%. The applicability was tested with samples taken from a pharmacokinetic pilot study with pigs following intravenous administration of a mixture of 200 μg/kg body mass dose each of JWH-210, RCS-4, and THC. The cross-validation data for human serum, whole blood, and urine showed that this approach should also be suitable for human specimens, e.g., of clinical or forensic cases. PMID:25772567

  11. Voltammetry of naltrexone in commercial formulation and human body fluids: Quantification and pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Mohamed M; El-Desoky, Hanaa S; Abdel-Galeil, Mohamed M

    2011-06-01

    Naltrexone HCl (NAL.HCl) has been reduced at the mercury electrode in Britton-Robinson universal buffer of pH values 2-11 with a mechanism involving the quasi-reversible uptake of the first transferring electron followed by a rate-determining protonation step of its C=O double bond at position C-6. Simple, sensitive, selective and reliable linear-sweep and square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry methods have been described for trace quantitation of NAL.HCl in bulk form, commercial formulation and human body fluids without the necessity for sample pretreatment and/or time-consuming extraction steps prior to the analysis. Limits of quantitation of 6.0×10(-9)M and 8.0×10(-10)M NAL.HCl in bulk form or commercial formulation and of 9.0×10(-9) and 1.0×10(-9)M NAL.HCl in spiked human serum samples were achieved by the described linear and square-wave stripping voltammetry methods, respectively. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug in human plasma samples of healthy volunteers following the administration of an oral single dose of 50mg NAL.HCl (one Revia(®) tablet) were estimated by means of the described square-wave stripping voltammetry method without interferences from the drug's metabolites and/or endogenous human plasma constituents. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters were favorably compared with those reported in literature. PMID:21371948

  12. Disposition and pharmacokinetics of the antimigraine drug, rizatriptan, in humans.

    PubMed

    Vyas, K P; Halpin, R A; Geer, L A; Ellis, J D; Liu, L; Cheng, H; Chavez-Eng, C; Matuszewski, B K; Varga, S L; Guiblin, A R; Rogers, J D

    2000-01-01

    The absorption and disposition of rizatriptan (MK-0462, Maxalt(TM)), a selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist used in the treatment of migraine headaches, was investigated in humans. In a two-period, single i.v. (3 mg, 30-min infusion), and single oral (10 mg) dose study with [(14)C]rizatriptan in six healthy human males, total recovery of radioactivity was approximately 94%, with unchanged rizatriptan and its metabolites being excreted mainly in the urine (89% i.v. dose, 82% p.o. dose). Approximately 26 and 14% of i.v. and oral rizatriptan doses, respectively, were excreted in urine as intact parent drug. In a second, high-dose study (60 mg p.o.), five metabolites excreted into urine were identified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and NMR methods. They were triazolomethyl-indole-3-acetic acid, rizatriptan-N(10)-oxide, 6-hydroxy-rizatriptan, 6-hydroxy-rizatriptan sulfate, and N(10)-monodesmethyl-rizatriptan. Urinary excretion of triazolomethyl-indole-3-acetic acid after i.v. and oral administrations of rizatriptan accounted for 35 and 51% of the dose, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for rizatriptan-N(10)-oxide were 4 and 2% of the dose. Plasma clearance (CL) and renal clearance (CL(r)) were 1325 and 349 ml/min, respectively, after i.v. administration. A similar CL(r) value was obtained after oral administration (396 ml/min). The primary route of rizatriptan elimination occurred via nonrenal route(s) (i.e., metabolism) because the CL(r) of rizatriptan accounted for 25% of total CL. Furthermore, the CL(r) was higher than normal glomerular filtration rate ( approximately 130 ml/min), indicating that this compound was actively secreted by renal tubules. The absorption of rizatriptan was approximately 90%, but it experienced a moderate first-pass effect, resulting in a bioavailability estimate of 47%. PMID:10611145

  13. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  14. Impact of a synthetic cannabinoid (CP-47,497-C8) on protein expression in human cells: evidence for induction of inflammation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bileck, Andrea; Ferk, Franziska; Al-Serori, Halh; Koller, Verena J; Muqaku, Besnik; Haslberger, Alexander; Auwärter, Volker; Gerner, Christopher; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are marketed worldwide as legal surrogates for marihuana. In order to predict potential health effects in consumers and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action, we investigated the impact of a representative of the cyclohexylphenols, CP47,497-C8, which binds to both cannabinoid receptors, on protein expression patterns, genomic stability and on induction of inflammatory cytokines in human lymphocytes. After treatment of the cells with the drug, we found pronounced up-regulation of a variety of enzymes in nuclear extracts which are involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory signaling; some of the identified proteins are also involved in the endogenous synthesis of endocannabinoids. The assumption that the drug causes inflammation is further supported by results obtained in additional experiments with cytosols of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes which showed that the SC induces pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL12p40 and IL-6) as well as TNF-α. Furthermore, the proteome analyses revealed that the drug causes down-regulation of proteins which are involved in DNA repair. This observation provides an explanation for the formation of comets which was seen in single-cell gel electrophoresis assays and for the induction of micronuclei (which reflect structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations) by the drug. These effects were seen in experiments with human lymphocytes which were conducted under identical conditions as the proteome analysis. Taken together, the present findings indicate that the drug (and possibly other structurally related SCs) may cause DNA damage and inflammation in directly exposed cells of consumers. PMID:26194647

  15. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception —awareness of surrounding objects and conditions symptoms of ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception symptoms of psychosis Synthetic cannabinoids can also cause ...

  16. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  17. Cannabinoids and Dementia: A Review of Clinical and Preclinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Sebastian; Halpern, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. We review the preclinical and clinical data on cannabinoids and four neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and vascular dementia (VD). Numerous studies have demonstrated an involvement of the cannabinoid system in neurotransmission, neuropathology and neurobiology of dementias. In addition, several candidate compounds have demonstrated efficacy in vitro. However, some of the substances produced inconclusive results in vivo. Therefore, only few trials have aimed to replicate the effects seen in animal studies in patients. Indeed, the literature on cannabinoid administration in patients is scarce. While preclinical findings suggest causal treatment strategies involving cannabinoids, clinical trials have only assessed the suitability of cannabinoid receptor agonists, antagonists and cannabidiol for the symptomatic treatment of dementia. Further research is needed, including in vivo models of dementia and human studies.

  18. Cannabinoids and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Grędziński, Tomasz; Kisiel, Wioleta; Chabielska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system (cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, endocannabinoids, enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids) are located on the structures involved in the process of hemostasis. An increasing level of endocannabinoids was also observed in some pathological conditions, which may occur in disorders of hemostasis. At the same time, disconcertingly, there is an increased number of reports about incidents of cardiovascular events in smokers of marijuana. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrated multidirectional, often contradictory, effects of cannabinoids on hemostasis, including effects of the compounds on platelets, vascular endothelium, fibrinolysis and plasma coagulation systems. The mechanisms of action of cannabinoids on homeostasis depend on the cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, receptors of other systems stimulated by endocannabinoids, as well as metabolites of endocannabinoids and nitrogen oxide. The range of biological functions of endo- and plant cannabinoids, expanded to include the process of hemostasis, may constitute a condition for their recognition as a new factor responsible for thromboembolism in smokers of marijuana, in pathological disorders with increased levels of endocannabinoids and in individuals with polymorphisms of FAAH C385A and A385A. On the other hand, there are compelling reasons for anti‑hemostatic action of cannabinoids. PMID:27383573

  19. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  20. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  1. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of human cannabinoid receptor 2: covalent cysteine 6.47(257)-ligand interaction affording megagonist receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Dennis W; Papanastasiou, Malvina; Melchior, Katja; Zvonok, Nikolai; Mercier, Richard W; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Cha, Sangwon; Wu, Billy; Karger, Barry; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2011-10-01

    The lack of experimental characterization of the structures and ligand-binding motifs of therapeutic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) hampers rational drug discovery. The human cannabinoid receptor 2 (hCB2R) is a class-A GPCR and promising therapeutic target for small-molecule cannabinergic agonists as medicines. Prior mutational and modeling data constitute provisional evidence that AM-841, a high-affinity classical cannabinoid, interacts with cysteine C6.47(257) in hCB2R transmembrane helix 6 (TMH6) to afford improved hCB2R selectivity and unprecedented agonist potency. We now apply bottom-up mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to define directly the hCB2R-AM-841 interaction at the amino-acid level. Recombinant hCB2R, overexpressed as an N-terminal FLAG-tagged/C-terminal 6His-tagged protein (FLAG-hCB2R-6His) with a baculovirus system, was solubilized and purified by immunochromatography as functional receptor. A multiplex multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-MS method was developed that allowed us to observe unambiguously all seven discrete TMH peptides in the tryptic digest of purified FLAG-hCB2R-6His and demonstrate that AM-841 modifies hCB2R TMH6 exclusively. High-resolution mass spectra of the TMH6 tryptic peptide obtained by Q-TOF MS/MS analysis demonstrated that AM-841 covalently and selectively modifies hCB2R at TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257). These data demonstrate how integration of MS-based proteomics into a ligand-assisted protein structure (LAPS) experimental paradigm can offer guidance to structure-enabled GPCR agonist design. PMID:21861534

  2. Pharmacokinetics of PEGylated recombinant human endostatin (M2ES) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuo-gang; Jia, Lin; Guo, Li-fang; Yu, Min; Sun, Xu; Nie, Wen; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chun-ming; Wang, Jun-zhi; Luo, Yong-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: M2ES is PEGylated recombinant human endostatin. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of M2ES in rats. Methods: 125I-radiolabeled M2ES was administered to rats by intravenous bolus injection at 3 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of M2ES were investigated using the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method. Results: The serum M2ES concentration-time curve after a single intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg in rats was fitted with a non-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated as follows: Cmax=28.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=71.5 h, AUC(0–∞)=174.6 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=17.2 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=57.6 h, and Vss=989.8 mL/kg for the total radioactivity; Cmax=30.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=60.1 h, AUC(0–∞)=146.2 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=20.6 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=47.4 h, and Vss=974.6 mL/kg for the TCA precipitate radioactivity. M2ES was rapidly and widely distributed in various tissues and showed substantial deposition in kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. The radioactivity recovered in the urine and feces by 432 h post-dose was 71.3% and 8.3%, respectively. Only 0.98% of radioactivity was excreted in the bile by 24 h post-dose. Conclusion: PEG modification substantially prolongs the circulation time of recombinant human endostatin and effectively improves its pharmacokinetic behavior. M2ES is extensively distributed in most tissues of rats, including kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for M2ES. PMID:26027657

  3. Pharmacokinetics of CGP 36,742, an orally active GABAB antagonist, in humans.

    PubMed

    Gleiter, C H; Farger, G; Möbius, H J

    1996-05-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of CGP 36 742 (3-aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosphinic acid), an orally active gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) antagonist, in humans. Pharmacokinetic results after a single oral (600 mg) dose included maximum observed concentration (Cmax), 27 mumol/L (95% CI 22.9, 30.8); time to Cmax (tmax), 3 hours (median); half-life (t1/2), 3.6 hours (95% CI 3.24, 3.9); renal clearance (ClR), 125 mL/min (95% CI 114, 136); and absolute bioavailability (Fabs), 0.44 (95% CI 0.33, 0.47). Administration with food decreased the oral systemic availability (Frel) by 30%. The volume of distribution (285 L/kg) was in the order of magnitude of extracellular body water. The absorbed fraction of the compound was excreted completely and unchanged via the kidney, thus renal function would be the limiting factor for excretion. The rate of absorption and amount absorbed did not differ significantly between elderly and young healthy male volunteers, both after single and multiple doses. There was no gender-related difference in pharmacokinetics in healthy elderly volunteers. CGP 36 742 showed an excellent safety profile: there were no clinically relevant changes in cardiovascular variables, body temperature, or blood chemistry. In the placebo-controlled trial, adverse experiences were rare and evenly distributed among participants receiving placebo and the study drug. In addition, a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for measurement of CGP 36 742 concentrations in plasma and urine using fluorescence detection is described. PMID:8739022

  4. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor. PMID:16599912

  5. Cannabinoid system and cyclooxygenases inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coman, OA; Coman, L; Ghiţă, I; Georgescu, SR; Drăia, F; Fulga, I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale. The cannabinoid system consists of a complex array of receptors, substances with agonist/antagonist properties for those receptors, biosynthetic machineries and mechanisms for cellular uptake and degradation for endocannabinoids. This system is in interrelation with other systems that comprise lipid mediators like prostaglandins/leukotrienes systems. A clear antagonist, additive or synergic effect of nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)–cannabinoid associations was not yet demonstrated. Aim. The present study tried to summarize the existent data on NSAIDS-cannabinoid system interactions. Methods and results A bibliographic research in Medline, Scirus, Embase was made using as keywords cannabinoid, nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs, aspirin, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, acetaminophen, coxibs, antinociceptive, antinociception, analgesia DiscussionsA systematization of the results focusing on the NSAIDs drugs interaction with the cannabinoid system was presented. Out of all the substances analyzed in the present review, acetaminophen was studied the most regarding its interferences with the cannabinoid system, mainly due to contradictory results. Conclusions Some NSAIDs have additional influences on the cannabinoid system either by inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or by inhibiting a possible intracellular transporter of endocannabinoids. All the NSAIDs that inhibit COX2 can influence the cannabinoid system because a possible important degradative pathway for anandamide and 2–arachidonoyl glycerol might involve COX 2. One of the causes for the variety of experimental results presented might be due to pharmacokinetic mechanisms, depending on the route of administration and the dose Abbreviationsdelta9 THC, (–)–(6aR,10aR)–6,6,9–trimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a–tetrahydro–6H–benzo[c]chromen–1–ol; delta9–THC–11–oic acid, 1–hydroxy–6,6–dimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a

  6. Chiral Plasma Pharmacokinetics of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its Phase I and II Metabolites following Controlled Administration to Humans.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Schmidhauser, Corina; Schmid, Yasmin; Rickli, Anna; Liechti, Matthias E; Kraemer, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Generally, pharmacokinetic studies on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in blood have been performed after conjugate cleavage, without taking into account that phase II metabolites represent distinct chemical entities with their own effects and stereoselective pharmacokinetics. The aim of the present study was to stereoselectively investigate the pharmacokinetics of intact glucuronide and sulfate metabolites of MDMA in blood plasma after a controlled single MDMA dose. Plasma samples from 16 healthy participants receiving 125 mg of MDMA orally in a controlled study were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy after chiral derivatization. Pharmacokinetic parameters of R- and S-stereoisomers were determined. Sulfates of 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (DHMA), and sulfate and glucuronide of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA) were identified, whereas free phase I metabolites were not detected. Stereoselective differences in Cmax and AUC24 were observed with the following preferences: R>S for MDMA and DHMA 4-sulfate; S>R for 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), DHMA 3-sulfate, and HMMA glucuronide; and no preference in Cmax for HMMA sulfate. R/S ratios were >1 for all analytes after 24 hours, independent of the initial chiral preference. These are the first data on chiral pharmacokinetics of MDMA phase II metabolites in human plasma in vivo after controlled administration. The main human MDMA metabolites were shown to be sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. PMID:26395866

  7. Physiologically based modeling of the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its major metabolites in humans using a Bayesian population approach.

    PubMed

    Zurlinden, Todd J; Reisfeld, Brad

    2016-06-01

    The principal aim of this study was to develop, validate, and demonstrate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict and characterize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) in humans. A PBPK model was created that included pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant tissue compartments and incorporated mechanistic descriptions of the absorption and metabolism of APAP, such as gastric emptying time, cofactor kinetics, and transporter-mediated movement of conjugated metabolites in the liver. Through the use of a hierarchical Bayesian framework, unknown model parameters were estimated using a large training set of data from human pharmacokinetic studies, resulting in parameter distributions that account for data uncertainty and inter-study variability. Predictions from the model showed good agreement to a diverse test set of data across several measures, including plasma concentrations over time, renal clearance, APAP absorption, and pharmacokinetic and exposure metrics. The utility of the model was then demonstrated through predictions of cofactor depletion, dose response of several pharmacokinetic endpoints, and the relationship between APAP biomarker levels in the plasma and those in the liver. The model addressed several limitations in previous PBPK models for APAP, and it is anticipated that it will be useful in predicting the pharmacokinetics of APAP in a number of contexts, such as extrapolating across doses, estimating internal concentrations, quantifying population variability, assessing possible impacts of drug coadministration, and, when coupled with a suitable pharmacodynamic model, predicting toxicity. PMID:25636597

  8. Determination of phenazopyridine in human plasma by GC-MS and its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-jun; Chen, Qin-hua; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Peng; Li, Peng; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Jun

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive, selective, and simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method is developed for quantitation of phenazopyridine (PAP) in human plasma using internal standard (diazepam). PAP and IS are extracted from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed on a DB-5MS column with mass selective detector. Excellent linearity is found between 5-500 ng/mL (r = 0.9992, n = 7) for PAP in human plasma. The limit of detection is 0.3 ng/mL. Intra- and Inter-day precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation for the method are 1.37-6.69% and 1.24-6.01%, respectively. Extraction efficiency is more than 90%, and recoveries are in the range of 92.65-96.21%. This method is successfully applied for the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of 2 formulations of PAP in 18 healthy male volunteers who received a single 200 mg dose of each formulation. PMID:18796223

  9. Cannabinoid acids analysis.

    PubMed

    Lercker, G; Bocci, F; Frega, N; Bortolomeazzi, R

    1992-03-01

    The cannabinoid pattern of vegetable preparations from Cannabis sativa (hashish, marijuana) allows to recognize the phenotype of the plants, to be used as drug or for fiber. Cannabinoid determination by analytical point of view has represented some problems caused by the complex composition of the hexane extract. Capillary gas chromatography of the hexane extracts of vegetable samples, shows the presence of rather polar constituents that eluted, with noticeable interactions, only on polar phase. The compounds can be methylated by diazomethane and silanized (TMS) by silylating reagents. The methyl and methyl-TMS derivatives are analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification of the compounds shows their nature of cannabinoid acids, which the main by quantitative point of view results the cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). It is known that the cannabinoid acids are thermally unstable and are transformed in the corresponding cannabinoids by decarboxilation. This is of interest in forensic analysis with the aim to establish the total amount of THC in the Cannabis preparations, as the active component. PMID:1503600

  10. In vitro metabolism, disposition, preclinical pharmacokinetics and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of DNDI-VL-2098, a potential oral treatment for Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Mukkavilli, Rao; Pinjari, Jakir; Patel, Bhavesh; Sengottuvelan, Shankar; Mondal, Subodh; Gadekar, Ajit; Verma, Manas; Patel, Jignesh; Pothuri, Lavanya; Chandrashekar, Gopu; Koiram, Prabhakar; Harisudhan, Tanukrishnan; Moinuddin, Ansari; Launay, Delphine; Vachharajani, Nimish; Ramanathan, Vikram; Martin, Denis

    2014-12-18

    The in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) properties of DNDI-VL-2098, a potential oral agent for Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) were studied and used to predict its human pharmacokinetics. DNDI-VL-2098 showed a low solubility (10μM) and was highly permeable (>200nm/s) in the Caco-2 model. It was stable in vitro in liver microsomes and hepatocytes and no metabolite was detectable in circulating plasma from dosed animals suggesting very slow, if any, metabolism of the compound. DNDI-VL-2098 was moderate to highly bound to plasma proteins across the species tested (94-98%). DNDI-VL-2098 showed satisfactory PK properties in mouse, hamster, rat and dog with a low blood clearance (<15% of hepatic blood flow except hamster), a volume of distribution of about 3 times total body water, acceptable half-life (1-6h across the species) and good oral bioavailability (37-100%). Allometric scaling of the preclinical PK data to human gave a blood half-life of approximately 20h suggesting that the compound could be a once-a-day drug. Based on the above assumptions, the minimum efficacious dose predicted for a 50kg human was 150mg and 300mg, using efficacy results in the mouse and hamster, respectively. PMID:25261338

  11. Recombinant human pentraxin-2 therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: safety, pharmacokinetics and exploratory efficacy.

    PubMed

    van den Blink, Bernt; Dillingh, Marlous R; Ginns, Leo C; Morrison, Lake D; Moerland, Matthijs; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Trehu, Elizabeth G; Bartholmai, Brian J; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal fibrogenic repair response upon alveolar injury is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). PRM-151 (recombinant human pentraxin-2, also known as serum amyloid P), has been shown to reduce fibrosis in preclinical lung fibrosis models, and was well tolerated with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in an earlier single-dose phase I study.A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple ascending dose trial was performed to assess the tolerability and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of multiple doses of PRM-151 in IPF patients. Subjects in three successive cohorts (1, 5, or 10 mg·kg(-1) versus placebo) received intravenous study drug on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 15, and were followed-up to day 57.PRM-151 was well tolerated at all dose levels, with no serious adverse reactions. Administration of PRM-151 resulted in two- to eight-fold dose-dependent increases in circulating pentraxin-2 levels. Forced vital capacity and 6-min walk test showed trends towards improvement in the combined PRM-151 dose groups. On high-resolution computed tomography scans, stable or improved lung volume unoccupied by interstitial lung abnormality was noted in some PRM-151 subjects compared to placebo subjects on day 57.The efficacy of PRM-151 in IPF remains to be investigated in dedicated future trials. PMID:26869678

  12. A Qualitative Review on the Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics in Saliva: Implications on Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Humans.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Tony K L; Ensom, Mary H H

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a systematic search to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the utility of saliva for clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) of antibiotics. Although the majority of identified studies lacked sufficient pharmacokinetic data needed to assign an appropriate suitability classification, most aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillins/cephalosporins, and tetracyclines are likely not suitable for CPM in saliva. No clear pattern of correlation was observed between physiochemical properties that favor drug distribution into saliva and the likelihood of the antibiotic being classified as suitable for CPM in saliva (and vice versa). Insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiological conditions affected salivary distribution of antibiotics. Additional confirmatory data are required for drugs (especially in patients) that are deemed likely suitable for CPM in saliva because only a few studies were available and many focused only on healthy subjects. All studies identified had relatively small sample sizes and exhibited large variability. Very few studies reported salivary collection parameters (e.g., salivary flow, pH) that could potentially have some impact on drug distribution into saliva. The available data are heavily weighted on healthy subjects, and insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiology had effects on saliva drug distribution. Some studies also lacked assay sensitivity for detecting antibiotics in saliva. Overall, this review can be useful to clinicians who desire an overview on the suitability of saliva for conducting CPM of specific antibiotics, or for researchers who wish to fill the identified knowledge gaps to move the science of salivary CPM further. PMID:26346776

  13. Preclinical pharmacokinetics of TPN729MA, a novel PDE5 inhibitor, and prediction of its human pharmacokinetics using a PBPK model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-wei; Zhu, Yun-ting; Yu, Ming-ming; Zan, Bin; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yi-fan; Chen, Xiao-yan; Li, Xue-ning; Zhong, Da-fang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: TPN729MA is a novel selective PDE5 inhibitor currently under clinical development in China for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In this study we characterized its preclinical pharmacokinetics (PK) and predict its human PK using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Methods: The preclinical PK of TPN729MA was studied in rats and dogs. Human clearance (CL) values for TPN729MA were predicted from various allometric methods and from intrinsic CL determined in human liver microsomes. Human PK and plasma concentration versus time profiles of TPN729MA were predicted by using a PBPK model in GastroPlus. Considering the uncertainties in the prediction, a preliminary human study was conducted in 3 healthy male volunteers with an oral dose of 25 mg. Results: After a single intravenous administration of TPN729MA at a dose of 1 mg/kg in rats and 3 mg/kg in dogs, the plasma CL was 69.7 mL·min−1·kg−1 in rats and 26.3 mL·min−1·kg−1 in dogs, and the steady-state volumes of distribution (Vss) were 7.35 L/kg in rats and 6.48 L/kg in dogs. The oral bioavailability of TPN729MA was 10% in rats and above 34% in dogs. Profiles of predicted plasma concentration versus time were similar to those observed in humans at 25 mg, and the predicted Tmax, Cmax and AUC values were within 2-fold of the observed values. Conclusion: TPN729MA demonstrates good preclinical PK. This compound is a valuable candidate for further clinical development. This study shows the benefits of using a PBPK model to predict PK in humans. PMID:26592518

  14. Comparison of the pharmacology and signal transduction of the human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Felder, C C; Joyce, K E; Briley, E M; Mansouri, J; Mackie, K; Blond, O; Lai, Y; Ma, A L; Mitchell, R L

    1995-09-01

    The recently cloned CB2 cannabinoid receptor subtype was stably transfected into AtT-20 and Chinese hamster ovary cells to compare the binding and signal transduction properties of this receptor with those of the CB1 receptor subtype. The binding of [3H]CP 55,940 to both CB1 and CB2 was of similar high affinity (2.6 and 3.7 nM, respectively) and saturable. In competitive binding experiments, (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP 55,940 were equipotent at the CB1 and CB2 receptors, but WIN 55212-2 and cannabinol bound with higher affinity to the CB2 than the CB1 receptor. HU 210 had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. Anandamide, a recently identified endogenous cannabinoid agonist, was essentially equipotent at both receptor subtypes. The structurally related fatty acid ethanolamides dihomo-gamma-linolenylethanolamide and mead ethanolamide also bound with relatively equal affinity to both receptors, but adrenylethanolamide had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. The rank order of potency and efficacy for binding of the selected agonists to the CB1 and CB2 receptors was mimicked in functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments for all compounds tested. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors couple to the inhibition of cAMP accumulation that was pertussis toxin sensitive. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, was a poor antagonist at the CB2 receptor in both binding and functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments. When expressed in AtT-20 cells, the CB1 receptor mediated an inhibition of Q-type calcium channels and an activation of inward rectifying potassium channels. In contrast, the CB2 receptor did not modulate the activity of either channel under identical assay conditions. Similar to results obtained for CB1 receptor, the CB2 receptor did not couple to the activation of phospholipases A2, C, or D or to the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Except for its inability to couple to the modulation of Q-type calcium channels or inwardly rectifying

  15. HUMAN METHAMPHETAMINE PHARMACOKINETICS SIMULATED IN THE RAT: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF A 72- HOUR BINGE

    PubMed Central

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S.; Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly-defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using dynamic infusion, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [3H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35% and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and following a METH binge suggest that for humans under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles. PMID:19571794

  16. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  17. Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Evan C; Tsien, Richard W; Whalley, Benjamin J; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for centuries to treat seizures. Recent anecdotal reports, accumulating animal model data, and mechanistic insights have raised interest in cannabis-based antiepileptic therapies. In this study, we review current understanding of the endocannabinoid system, characterize the pro- and anticonvulsive effects of cannabinoids [e.g., Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (CBD)], and highlight scientific evidence from pre-clinical and clinical trials of cannabinoids in epilepsy. These studies suggest that CBD avoids the psychoactive effects of the endocannabinoid system to provide a well-tolerated, promising therapeutic for the treatment of seizures, while whole-plant cannabis can both contribute to and reduce seizures. Finally, we discuss results from a new multicenter, open-label study using CBD in a population with treatment-resistant epilepsy. In all, we seek to evaluate our current understanding of cannabinoids in epilepsy and guide future basic science and clinical studies. PMID:26282273

  18. Human biofluid concentrations of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in chimeric mice with humanized liver administered with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a reproductive toxicant in male rodents. The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP, a primary metabolite of DEHP) in humans by using data from oral administration of DEHP to chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. MEHP and its glucuronide were detected in plasma from control mice and chimeric mice after single oral doses of 250mg DEHP/kg body weight. Biphasic plasma concentration-time curves of MEHP and its glucuronide were seen only in control mice. MEHP and its glucuronide were extensively excreted in urine within 24h in mice with humanized liver. In contrast, fecal excretion levels of MEHP glucuronide were high in control mice compared with those with humanized liver. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated urine MEHP concentrations in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. This research illustrates how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of the primary or secondary metabolites of DEHP. PMID:25867688

  19. Medicinal Chemistry of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, A

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o-protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically. PMID:25801236

  20. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma. PMID:26895496

  1. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  2. Analysis of nabumetone in human plasma by HPLC. Application to single dose pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kobylińska, Kamila; Barlińska, Małgorzata; Kobylińska, Maria

    2003-06-01

    A simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of nabumetone in human plasma is described. The procedure involves liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and reversed-phase chromatography with fluorimetric detection (excitation 230 nm, emission 356 nm). The chromatographic conditions and the extraction procedure gave a clean chromatogram for the compound. The limit of quantitation was established as 0.313 ng/ml and the calibration curve was linear up to 20 ng/ml. The within-day and between-day relative standard deviations were less than 10% and the accuracy of the assay was in the range of 99-104%. The suitability of the method is shown for pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:12763542

  3. Effects of misoprostol on the pharmacokinetics of indomethacin in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rainsford, K D; James, C; Hunt, R H; Stetsko, P I; Rischke, J A; Karim, A; Nicholson, P A; Smith, M; Hantsbarger, G

    1992-04-01

    The effects of misoprostol (200 micrograms as a single dose or q.i.d. as a multiple dose) on the pharmacokinetics of indomethacin (100 mg single-dose administration or 50 mg t.i.d. multiple-dose administration) were studied in 16 healthy human volunteers under single-dose and steady-state conditions in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced three-period study design. The overall absorption as shown by the values for area under the concentration curve of indomethacin was unaffected by concurrent administration of misoprostol. However, misoprostol did significantly enhance the steady-state maximum concentration of indomethacin by 32%. Thus misoprostol does not interfere with the absorption of indomethacin despite the known inhibitory effects of this protaglandin analog on acid secretion. PMID:1563211

  4. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Toolkit for Environmental Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Patricia; Ray, Meredith; Fisher, Jeffrey; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be used to determine the internal dose and strengthen exposure assessment. Many PBPK models are available, but they are not easily accessible for field use. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has conducted translational research to develop a human PBPK model toolkit by recoding published PBPK models. This toolkit, when fully developed, will provide a platform that consists of a series of priority PBPK models of environmental pollutants. Presented here is work on recoded PBPK models for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals. Good agreement was generally obtained between the original and the recoded models. This toolkit will be available for ATSDR scientists and public health assessors to perform simulations of exposures from contaminated environmental media at sites of concern and to help interpret biomonitoring data. It can be used as screening tools that can provide useful information for the protection of the public. PMID:22174611

  5. Simulation of amoxicillin pharmacokinetics in humans for the prevention of streptococcal endocarditis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fluckiger, U; Moreillon, P; Blaser, J; Bickle, M; Glauser, M P; Francioli, P

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic determinants of successful antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis are not precisely known. Differences in half-lives of antibiotics between animals and humans preclude extrapolation of animal results to human situations. To overcome this limitation, we have mimicked in rats the amoxicillin kinetics in humans following a 3-g oral dose (as often used for prophylaxis of endocarditis) by delivering the drug through a computerized pump. Rats with catheter-induced vegetations were challenged with either of two strains of antibiotic-tolerant viridans group streptococci. Antibiotics were given either through the pump (to simulate the whole kinetic profile during prophylaxis in humans) or as an intravenous bolus which imitated only the peak level of amoxicillin (18 mg/liter) in human serum. Prophylaxis by intravenous bolus was inoculum dependent and afforded a limited protection only in rats challenged with the minimum inoculum size infecting > or = 90% of untreated controls. In contrast, simulation of kinetics in humans significantly protected animals challenged with 10 to 100 times the inoculum of either of the test organisms infecting > or = 90% of untreated controls. Thus, simulation of the profiles of amoxicillin prophylaxis in human serum was more efficacious than mere imitation of the transient peak level in rats. This confirms previous studies suggesting that the duration for which the serum amoxicillin level remained detectable (not only the magnitude of the peak) was an important parameter in successful prophylaxis of endocarditis. The results also suggest that single-dose prophylaxis with 3 g of amoxicillin in humans might be more effective than predicted by conventional animal models in which only peak levels of antibiotic in human serum were stimulated. PMID:7695272

  6. Enantioselective analysis of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide in human plasma with application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Francine Attié; Scatena, Gabriel dos Santos; Rocha, Otávio Pelegrino; Marques, Maria Paula; Cass, Quézia Bezerra; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is one of the most common immunosuppressive agents used in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. CY is a prodrug and is metabolized to active 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (HCY). Many authors have suggested an association between enantioselectivity in CY metabolism and treatment efficacy and/or complications. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method of HCY enantiomers in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) that can be applied to pharmacokinetic studies, filling this gap in the literature. HCY enantiomers previously derivatized with phenylhydrazine were extracted from 200-μL plasma aliquots spiked with antipyrine as internal standard and a mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (80:20, v/v) was used as the extraction solvent. The derivatized HCY enantiomers were resolved on a Chiracel(®) OD-R column using water:acetonitrile:formic acid (55:45:0.2, v/v) as the mobile phase. No matrix effect was observed and the analysis of HCY enantiomers was linear for plasma concentrations of 5-5000ng of each enantiomer/mL plasma. The coefficients of variation and inaccuracy calculated in precision and accuracy assessments were less than 15%. HCY was stable in human plasma after three successive freeze/thaw cycles, during 3h at room temperature, and in the autosampler at 4°C for 24h after processing, with deviation values less than 15%. The method was applied to evaluate the kinetic disposition of HCY in a patient with multiple sclerosis who was pretreated with intravenous racemic CY for stem cell transplantation. The clinical study showed enantioselectivity in the pharmacokinetics of HCY. PMID:26760223

  7. [18F]MK-9470, a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for in vivo human PET brain imaging of the cannabinoid-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Burns, H. Donald; Van Laere, Koen; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Hamill, Terence G.; Bormans, Guy; Eng, Wai-si; Gibson, Ray; Ryan, Christine; Connolly, Brett; Patel, Shil; Krause, Stephen; Vanko, Amy; Van Hecken, Anne; Dupont, Patrick; De Lepeleire, Inge; Rothenberg, Paul; Stoch, S. Aubrey; Cote, Josee; Hagmann, William K.; Jewell, James P.; Lin, Linus S.; Liu, Ping; Goulet, Mark T.; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wagner, John A.; de Hoon, Jan; Mortelmans, Luc; Fong, Tung M.; Hargreaves, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    [18F]MK-9470 is a selective, high-affinity, inverse agonist (human IC50, 0.7 nM) for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) that has been developed for use in human brain imaging. Autoradiographic studies in rhesus monkey brain showed that [18F]MK-9470 binding is aligned with the reported distribution of CB1 receptors with high specific binding in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies in rhesus monkeys showed high brain uptake and a distribution pattern generally consistent with that seen in the autoradiographic studies. Uptake was blocked by pretreatment with a potent CB1 inverse agonist, MK-0364. The ratio of total to nonspecific binding in putamen was 4–5:1, indicative of a strong specific signal that was confirmed to be reversible via displacement studies with MK-0364. Baseline PET imaging studies in human research subject demonstrated behavior of [18F]MK-9470 very similar to that seen in monkeys, with very good test–retest variability (7%). Proof of concept studies in healthy young male human subjects showed that MK-0364, given orally, produced a dose-related reduction in [18F]MK-9470 binding reflecting CB1R receptor occupancy by the drug. Thus, [18F]MK-9470 has the potential to be a valuable, noninvasive research tool for the in vivo study of CB1R biology and pharmacology in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. In addition, it allows demonstration of target engagement and noninvasive dose-occupancy studies to aid in dose selection for clinical trials of CB1R inverse agonists. PMID:17535893

  8. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  9. Stereoselective pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the enantiomers of cyclophosphamide. Preliminary results in humans and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Holm, K A; Kindberg, C G; Stobaugh, J F; Slavik, M; Riley, C M

    1990-04-15

    [R(+),S(-)]-Cyclophosphamide [(R,S)-CP] is an anticancer drug, containing a chiral phosphorous atom, which is prepared and used clinically as the racemic mixture. A new high-performance liquid chromatographic assay suitable for pharmacokinetic studies of CP enantiomers in plasma has been reported recently by this laboratory (Reid et al., Anal Chem 61: 441-446, 1989). Briefly, the assay involves ethyl acetate extraction of CP enantiomers from plasma followed by derivatization to diastereomers in a two-step process utilizing chloral and (+)-naproxen acid chloride. Chromatographic analysis was performed on a reversed phase (ODS) column with detection at 232 nm. In the present study, preliminary results on the applicability of this assay to pharmacokinetic studies are presented. Several rabbits were used to compare the influence of i.p., i.v., and oral routes of administration on the stereoselective disposition of (R,S)-CP. Following i.p. administration, S-CP was cleared faster than R-CP. Following oral administration, only R-CP was detectable in plasma, while i.v. administration resulted in minor or no stereoselective disposition. These results indicated that there was a marked stereoselective metabolism of the S-CP enantiomer, with the i.p. and oral routes producing the greatest differences due to first-pass metabolism. Incubation of rabbit-liver microsomes with (R,S)-CP demonstrated that the monooxygenase system can exhibit marked stereoselectivity in its metabolism of CP. The ratio of R-CP to S-CP in the incubation medium increased during the incubation period from 1:1 initially to 4.5:1 after 60 min. The results from the experiments with rabbits indicate that the first-pass metabolism of this drug is highly stereoselective; in contrast, cancer patients who had received (R,S)-CP as an i.v. infusion showed no stereoselectivity in the elimination of the enantiomers. Pharmacokinetic studies with cancer patients, receiving (R,S)-CP as an oral dose, are in progress in

  10. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  11. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test-retest reproducibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    The Radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test-retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test-retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9%; intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (P<0.0001). Cerebral uptake normalized by body weight and injected dose was higher in men by 17% (P<0.0001), but VT was significantly greater in women by 23% (P<0.0001). These findings show that [(11)C]OMAR binding can be reliably quantified by the 2T model or MA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [(11)C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25833345

  12. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test–retest reproducibility, and gender differences

    PubMed Central

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-01-01

    The Radiotracer [11C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test–retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test–retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9% intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (P<0.0001). Cerebral uptake normalized by body weight and injected dose was higher in men by 17% (P<0.0001), but VT was significantly greater in women by 23% (P<0.0001). These findings show that [11C]OMAR binding can be reliably quantified by the 2T model or MA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [11C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25833345

  13. The pharmacokinetics of phenylethyl alcohol (PEA): safety evaluation comparisons in rats, rabbits, and humans.

    PubMed

    Politano, Valerie T; Diener, Robert M; Christian, Mildred S; Hawkins, David R; Ritacco, Gretchen; Api, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    The present studies were conducted to compare the dermal absorption, plasma pharmacokinetics, and excretion of phenylethyl alcohol (PEA) by pregnant and nonpregnant rats, rabbits, and humans. The PEA is a natural fragrance material that is widely used in perfumes, soaps, and lotions and is a major ingredient of natural rose oil. Following dermal (430, 700, or 1400 mg/kg body weight [bw]), gavage (430 mg/kg bw), or dietary (430 mg/kg bw) administration of PEA to rats, plasma concentrations of PEA were found to be low regardless of the route of administration. The plasma concentrations of phenylacetic acid (PAA, the major metabolite of PEA) greatly exceeded the concentrations of PEA and were highest after gavage, followed by dermal then dietary administration. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion were compared following topical application of ¹⁴C-labeled PEA to rats, rabbits, and humans (specific activities of dosing solutions: 58-580, 164, and 50 µCi/mL, respectively). In rabbits, the plasma concentration-time profile for PAA was markedly prolonged compared to rats or humans. In humans, only 7.6% of the applied dose of PEA was absorbed, versus 77% in rats and 50% in rabbits. Based on a human dermal systemic exposure of 0.3 mg/kg per day from the use of multiple consumer personal care products containing PEA, a rat dermal no observed adverse effect level of 70 mg/kg per day, and the percentage of dose absorbed in humans, the margin of safety exceeds 2600 concluding that, under normal fragrance use conditions, PEA is not a developmental toxicity hazard for humans. PMID:23385160

  14. Mechanistic pharmacokinetic modeling for the prediction of transporter-mediated disposition in humans from sandwich culture human hepatocyte data.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hannah M; Barton, Hugh A; Lai, Yurong; Bi, Yi-An; Kimoto, Emi; Kempshall, Sarah; Tate, Sonya C; El-Kattan, Ayman; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra; Fenner, Katherine S

    2012-05-01

    With efforts to reduce cytochrome P450-mediated clearance (CL) during the early stages of drug discovery, transporter-mediated CL mechanisms are becoming more prevalent. However, the prediction of plasma concentration-time profiles for such compounds using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is far less established in comparison with that for compounds with passively mediated pharmacokinetics (PK). In this study, we have assessed the predictability of human PK for seven organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates (pravastatin, cerivastatin, bosentan, fluvastatin, rosuvastatin, valsartan, and repaglinide) for which clinical intravenous data were available. In vitro data generated from the sandwich culture human hepatocyte system were simultaneously fit to estimate parameters describing both uptake and biliary efflux. Use of scaled active uptake, passive distribution, and biliary efflux parameters as inputs into a PBPK model resulted in the overprediction of exposure for all seven drugs investigated, with the exception of pravastatin. Therefore, fitting of in vivo data for each individual drug in the dataset was performed to establish empirical scaling factors to accurately capture their plasma concentration-time profiles. Overall, active uptake and biliary efflux were under- and overpredicted, leading to average empirical scaling factors of 58 and 0.061, respectively; passive diffusion required no scaling factor. This study illustrates the mechanistic and model-driven application of in vitro uptake and efflux data for human PK prediction for OATP substrates. A particular advantage is the ability to capture the multiphasic plasma concentration-time profiles for such compounds using only preclinical data. A prediction strategy for novel OATP substrates is discussed. PMID:22344703

  15. Development of a Physiologically Based Model to Describe the Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate in Juvenile and Adult Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Ruark, Christopher D.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Young, John F.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  16. Development of a physiologically based model to describe the pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Ruark, Christopher D; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C; Doerge, Daniel R; Young, John F; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  17. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14–21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK–PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Results Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml−1 [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml−1 (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. Conclusions The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. PMID:23278647

  18. Effect of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, on the triggering of transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations in dogs and humans

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, H; Jensen, J; Carlsson, A; Ruth, M; Lehmann, A; Boeckxstaens, GE

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Transient lower oesophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) are the main mechanism underlying gastro-oesophageal reflux and are a potential pharmacological treatment target. We evaluated the effect of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) on TLESRs in dogs. Based on these findings, the effect of Δ9-THC was studied in healthy volunteers. Experimental approach In dogs, manometry was used to evaluate the effect of Δ9-THC in the presence and absence of the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A on TLESRs induced by gastric distension. Secondly, the effect of 10 and 20 mg Δ9-THC was studied in 18 healthy volunteers in a placebo-controlled study. Manometry was performed before and for 3 h after meal ingestion on three occasions. Key results In dogs, Δ9-THC dose-dependently inhibited TLESRs and reduced acid reflux rate. SR141716A significantly reversed the effects of Δ9-THC on TLESRs. Similarly, in healthy volunteers, Δ9-THC significantly reduced the number of TLESRs and caused a non-significant reduction of acid reflux episodes in the first postprandial hour. In addition, lower oesophageal sphincter pressure and swallowing were significantly reduced by Δ9-THC. After intake of 20 mg, half of the subjects experienced nausea and vomiting leading to premature termination of the study. Other side-effects were hypotension, tachycardia and central effects. Conclusions and implications Δ9-THC significantly inhibited the increase in meal-induced TLESRs and reduced spontaneous swallowing in both dogs and humans. In humans, Δ9-THC significantly reduced basal lower oesophageal sphincter pressure. These findings confirm previous observations in dogs and indicate that cannabinoid receptors are also involved in the triggering of TLESRs in humans. PMID:19068079

  19. Cannabinoids in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E M; Evans, F J

    2000-12-01

    Cannabis has a potential for clinical use often obscured by unreliable and purely anecdotal reports. The most important natural cannabinoid is the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC); others include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). Not all the observed effects can be ascribed to THC, and the other constituents may also modulate its action; for example CBD reduces anxiety induced by THC. A standardised extract of the herb may be therefore be more beneficial in practice and clinical trial protocols have been drawn up to assess this. The mechanism of action is still not fully understood, although cannabinoid receptors have been cloned and natural ligands identified. Cannabis is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for muscle spasm and pain, and in an experimental model of MS low doses of cannabinoids alleviated tremor. Most of the controlled studies have been carried out with THC rather than cannabis herb and so do not mimic the usual clincal situation. Small clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of THC as an analgesic; CBD and CBG also have analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, indicating that there is scope for developing drugs which do not have the psychoactive properties of THC. Patients taking the synthetic derivative nabilone for neurogenic pain actually preferred cannabis herb and reported that it relieved not only pain but the associated depression and anxiety. Cannabinoids are effective in chemotherapy-induced emesis and nabilone has been licensed for this use for several years. Currently, the synthetic cannabinoid HU211 is undergoing trials as a protective agent after brain trauma. Anecdotal reports of cannabis use include case studies in migraine and Tourette's syndrome, and as a treatment for asthma and glaucoma. Apart from the smoking aspect, the safety profile of cannabis is fairly good. However, adverse reactions include panic or anxiety attacks, which are worse in the elderly and in women, and less

  20. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  1. Behavioral methods in cannabinoid research.

    PubMed

    Fride, Ester; Perchuk, Alex; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2006-01-01

    In the absence of any specific behavioral assay for cannabinoids or endocannabinoids, a cannabinoid-induced profile in a series of four in vivo assays in mice is most commonly used to assess a specific cannabinoid activity at the behavioral level. Thus, when a given compound produces motor depression in an open field, catalepsy on an elevated ring, analgesia on a hot plate, as well as hypothermia, cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation is assumed, although exceptions are possible. The full cannabinoid profile, however, includes for example ataxia in dogs and discrimination learning in rats. In view of (1) the addictive/reward potential of cannabis and the cannabinoids and (2) the multiple roles of the endocannabinoid physiological control system (EPCS) in behavioral functions, including memory, emotionality, and feeding, a number of behavioral techniques have been used to assess the effects of cannabinoids in these functions. In this chapter we will describe the tetrad of cannabinoid-induced effects as well as a series of behavioral assays used in the behavioral pharmacology of marijuana-cannabinoid research. Since the EPCS plays an important role in the developing organism, methods used in the assessment of physical and behavioral development will also be discussed. The techniques include the tetrad, drug discrimination, self-stimulation and self-administration, conditioned place preference/aversion, the plus-maze, chronic mild stress (CMS), ultrasonic vocalizations, cognitive behaviors, and developmental assessment in mouse (and rat) pups. PMID:16506414

  2. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  3. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in the development of microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determination of the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model-aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been considered, robust design criteria and steps to build such systems have not yet been defined mathematically. In this paper, we first discuss strategies for incorporating body-on-a-chip technology into the current PBPK modeling-based drug discovery to provide a conceptual model. We propose two types of platforms that can be involved in the different stages of PBPK modeling and drug development; these are μOrgans-on-a-chip and μHuman-on-a-chip. Then we establish the design principles for both types of systems and develop parametric design equations that can be used to determine dimensions and operating conditions. In addition, we discuss the availability of the critical parameters required to satisfy the design criteria, consider possible limitations for estimating such parameter values and propose strategies to address such limitations. This paper is intended to be a useful guide to the researchers focused on the design of microphysiological platforms for PBPK/PD based drug discovery. PMID:25739725

  4. Use of a potential rabbit model for structure--behavioral activity studies of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Consroe, P; Martin, A R; Fish, B S

    1982-05-01

    Using the genetically unique tetrahydrocannabinol-seizure susceptible (THC-SS) rabbit, the behavioral effect of 14 cannabinoids or related structures were determined and compared to the effects of 11 previously tested cannabinoids. Relative potencies of the cannabinoid-induced convulsions in THC-SS rabbits were generally comparable to reported relative potencies of cannabinoid-produced psychoactivity in humans and other behavioral activity in monkeys or other species. These data suggest that the THC-SS rabbit may represent an experimentally convenient and reliable animal model for studies of structure--psychoactivity relationships of marijuana-like compounds. PMID:7086846

  5. Human pharmacokinetic prediction of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase substrates with an animal scale-up approach.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Kurihara, Atsushi; Igeta, Katsuhiro; Ikenaga, Hidenori; Fusegawa, Keiichi; Suzuki, Norio; Murata, Shinji; Hirouchi, Masakazu; Furuta, Yoshitake; Iwasaki, Masaru; Okazaki, Osamu; Izumi, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of allometric scaling methods for drugs metabolized by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), such as ketoprofen, imipramine, lorazepam, levofloxacin, zidovudine, diclofenac, furosemide, raloxifene, gemfibrozil, mycophenolic acid, indomethacin, and telmisartan. Human plasma clearance (CL) predictions were conducted from preclinical in vivo data by using multiple-species allometry with the rule of exponents and single-species allometric scaling (SSS) of mice, rats, monkeys, or dogs. Distribution volume at a steady state (V(ss)) was predicted by multiple-species allometry or SSS of V(ss). Oral plasma clearance (CL(po)) was calculated under the assumption that F(a) × F(g) was equivalent across species. Each of the results was compared with the observed parameter calculated from the clinical data after intravenous or oral administration. Multiple-species allometry and SSS of mice, rats, and dogs resulted in a similar accuracy of CL and CL(po) predictions. Monkeys tended to provide the most accurate predictions of human CL and CL(po). The ability to predict the half-life, which was determined from CL and V(ss) predictions, was more accurate in SSS of rats and monkeys. The in vivo fraction metabolized by glucuronidation (f(m,UGT)) in bile duct-cannulated monkeys was relatively similar to that of humans compared with other animal species, which likely contributed to the highest accuracy of SSS prediction of monkeys. On the basis of the current results, monkeys would be more reliable than other animal species in predicting human pharmacokinetics and f(m,UGT) for drugs metabolized by UGTs. PMID:21282406

  6. GC-FID determination and pharmacokinetic studies of oleanolic acid in human serum.

    PubMed

    Rada, Mirela; Castellano, José María; Perona, Javier S; Guinda, Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Analytical interest of OA determination in human serum has increased owing to the increasing interest in pharmaceutical research by pharmaceutical properties. A simple, specific, precise and accurate GC method with flame ionization detector (FID) developed and validated for the determination of oleanolic acid (OA) in human serum (HS). To an aliquot of HS, internal standard was added and a combination of liquid-liquid extraction with a mixture of diethyl ether-isopropyl alcohol, filtration and consecutive GC resulted in separation and quantification of OA. The organic phase was analyzed using a GC system equipped with a 30 × 0.25 mm i.d. Rtx-65TG capillary column and FID detection. Total chromatographic time was 10 min and no interfering peaks from endogenous components in blank serum were observed. The OA/internal standard peak area ratio was linearly fitted to the OA concentration (r = 0.992) over the range 10-1500 ng/mL. The mean serum extraction recovery of OA was 96.7 ± 1.0% and the lower limit of quantification based on 5 mL of serum was 10.7 ng/mL. The intra-day coefficient of variation ranged from 1.3 to 3.6% and inter-day varied from 1.4 to 4.5%. The developed method was used to study the pharmacokinetics of OA after oral administration in humans. The assay was simple, sensitive, precise and accurate for the use in the study of the mechanisms of absorption and distribution of OA in humans. PMID:25943913

  7. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  8. Quantitative Structure-Pharmacokinetic Relationships for the Prediction of Renal Clearance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Rutwij A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal clearance (CLR), a major route of elimination for many drugs and drug metabolites, represents the net result of glomerular filtration, active secretion and reabsorption, and passive reabsorption. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) to predict CLR of drugs or drug-like compounds in humans. Human CLR data for 382 compounds were obtained from the literature. Step-wise multiple linear regression was used to construct QSPKR models for training sets and their predictive performance was evaluated using internal validation (leave-one-out method). All qualified models were validated externally using test sets. QSPKR models were also constructed for compounds in accordance with their 1) net elimination pathways (net secretion, extensive net secretion, net reabsorption, and extensive net reabsorption), 2) net elimination clearances (net secretion clearance, CLSEC; or net reabsorption clearance, CLREAB), 3) ion status, and 4) substrate/inhibitor specificity for renal transporters. We were able to predict 1) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.77) of all compounds undergoing net reabsorption; 2) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.81) of all compounds undergoing extensive net reabsorption; and 3) CLR for substrates and/or inhibitors of OAT1/3 (Q2 = 0.81), OCT2 (Q2 = 0.85), MRP2/4 (Q2 = 0.78), P-gp (Q2 = 0.71), and MATE1/2K (Q2 = 0.81). Moreover, compounds undergoing net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption predominantly belonged to Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System classes 1 and 2. In conclusion, constructed parsimonious QSPKR models can be used to predict CLR of compounds that 1) undergo net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption and 2) are substrates and/or inhibitors of human renal transporters. PMID:25352657

  9. Simulation of Human Plasma Concentrations of Thalidomide and Primary 5-Hydroxylated Metabolites Explored with Pharmacokinetic Data in Humanized TK-NOG Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Sayako; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-16

    Plasma concentrations of thalidomide and primary 5-hydroxylated metabolites including 5,6-dihydroxythalidomide and glutathione (GSH) conjugate(s) were investigated in chimeric mice with highly "humanized" liver cells harboring cytochrome P450 3A5*1. Following oral administration of thalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of GSH conjugate(s) of 5-hydroxythalidomide were higher in humanized mice than in controls. Simulation of human plasma concentrations of thalidomide were achieved with a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in accordance with reported thalidomide concentrations. The results indicate that the pharmacokinetics in humans of GSH conjugate and/or catechol primary 5-hydroxylated thalidomide contributing in vivo activation can be estimated for the first time. PMID:26492539

  10. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Allarà, Marco; Bisogno, Tiziana; Petrosino, Stefania; Stott, Colin G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) interact with transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and enzymes of the endocannabinoid system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of 11 pure cannabinoids and botanical extracts [botanical drug substance (BDS)] from Cannabis varieties selected to contain a more abundant cannabinoid, on TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, TRPA1, human recombinant diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα), rat brain fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), COS cell monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), human recombinant N-acylethanolamine acid amide hydrolase (NAAA) and anandamide cellular uptake (ACU) by RBL-2H3 cells, were studied using fluorescence-based calcium assays in transfected cells and radiolabelled substrate-based enzymatic assays. Cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), the acids (CBDA, CBGA, THCA) and propyl homologues (CBDV, CBGV, THCV) of CBD, cannabigerol (CBG) and THC, and tetrahydrocannabivarin acid (THCVA) were also tested. KEY RESULTS CBD, CBG, CBGV and THCV stimulated and desensitized human TRPV1. CBC, CBD and CBN were potent rat TRPA1 agonists and desensitizers, but THCV-BDS was the most potent compound at this target. CBG-BDS and THCV-BDS were the most potent rat TRPM8 antagonists. All non-acid cannabinoids, except CBC and CBN, potently activated and desensitized rat TRPV2. CBDV and all the acids inhibited DAGLα. Some BDS, but not the pure compounds, inhibited MAGL. CBD was the only compound to inhibit FAAH, whereas the BDS of CBC > CBG > CBGV inhibited NAAA. CBC = CBG > CBD inhibited ACU, as did the BDS of THCVA, CBGV, CBDA and THCA, but the latter extracts were more potent inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results are relevant to the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids and Cannabis extracts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011

  11. Global Fold of Human Cannabinoid Type 2 Receptor Probed by Solid-State 13C-, 15N-MAS NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Vukoti, Krishna; Lynch, Diane L.; Hurst, Dow P.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The global fold of human cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor in the agonist-bound active state in lipid bilayers was investigated by solid-state 13C- and 15N magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR, in combination with chemical-shift prediction from a structural model of the receptor obtained by microsecond-long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Uniformly 13C-, and 15N-labeled CB2 receptor was expressed in milligram quantities by bacterial fermentation, purified, and functionally reconstituted into liposomes. 13C MAS NMR spectra were recorded without sensitivity enhancement for direct comparison of Cα, Cβ, and C=O bands of superimposed resonances with predictions from protein structures generated by MD. The experimental NMR spectra matched the calculated spectra reasonably well indicating agreement of the global fold of the protein between experiment and simulations. In particular, the 13C chemical shift distribution of Cα resonances was shown to be very sensitive to both the primary amino acid sequence and the secondary structure of CB2. Thus the shape of the Cα band can be used as an indicator of CB2 global fold. The prediction from MD simulations indicated that upon receptor activation a rather limited number of amino acid residues, mainly located in the extracellular loop 2 and the second half of intracellular loop 3, change their chemical shifts significantly (≥1.5 ppm for carbons and ≥5.0 ppm for nitrogens). Simulated two-dimensional 13Cα(i)-13C=O(i) and 13C=O(i)-15NH(i+1) dipolar-interaction correlation spectra provide guidance for selective amino-acid labeling and signal assignment schemes to study the molecular mechanism of activation of CB2 by solid-state MAS NMR. PMID:23999926

  12. Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) and d-amphetamine on palatable food and food pellet intake in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Foltin, Richard W.; Haney, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist would selectively decrease consumption of highly palatable food in non-human primates. The CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant; 0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) and the stimulant anorectic drug d-amphetamine (0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) were administered to non-food deprived baboons for the purpose of measuring the effect of each drug on consumption of the normal diet, and a large single meal of a high-carbohydrate candy. Four male and four female baboons had access to food 24 hr each day, but they had to complete a two phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, where responding on another lever led to food delivery, i.e., a meal. Three days a week baboons received a jelly sugar-coated candy (Skittles®) during the first meal and then pellets were available in subsequent meals. All baboons ate as many individual candies in one meal as they did pellets throughout the entire day. Acute d-amphetamine and, to a lesser extent, SR141716 decreased both candy intake in a single meal and pellet intake in a single meal and over 24 hr. d-Amphetamine, but not SR141716 increased latency to the candy meal and the first pellet meal indicating that the two drugs differentially altered feeding topography. Although males ate more food pellets than females, few other sex differences were observed. Thus, although effective in decreasing food intake, there was no evidence of a specific effect of CB1 receptor antagonism on consumption of a large meal or a palatable food. PMID:17445873

  13. Chemical Polysialylation and In Vivo Tetramerization Improve Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase-Based Bioscavengers

    PubMed Central

    Terekhov, S. S.; Smirnov, I. V.; Shamborant, O. G.; Bobik, T. V.; Ilyushin, D. G.; Murashev, A. N.; Dyachenko, I. A.; Palikov, V. A.; Knorre, V. D.; Belogurov, A. A.; Ponomarenko, N. A.; Kuzina, E. S.; Genkin, D. D.; Masson, P.; Gabibov, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate toxins (OPs) are the most toxic low-molecular compounds. The extremely potent toxicity of OPs is determined by their specificity toward the nerve system. Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is a natural bioscavenger against a broad spectrum of OPs, which makes it a promising candidate for the development of DNA-encoded bioscavengers. The high values of the protective index observed for recombinant hBChE (rhBChE) make it appropriate for therapy against OP poisoning, especially in the case of highly toxic warfare nerve agents. Nevertheless, large-scale application of biopharmaceuticals based on hBChE is restricted due to its high cost and extremely rapid elimination from the bloodstream. In the present study, we examine two approaches for long-acting rhBChE production: I) chemical polysialylation and II) in-vivo tetramerization. We demonstrate that both approaches significantly improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rhBChE (more than 5 and 10 times, respectively), which makes it possible to use rhBChE conjugated with polysialic acids (rhBChE-CAO) and tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) in the treatment of OP poisonings. PMID:26798501

  14. Saturable human neopterin response to interferon-α assessed by a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we developed a pharmacokinetic (PK)- pharmacodynamic (PD) model of a new sustained release formulation of interferon-α-2a (SR-IFN-α) using the blood concentration of IFN-α and neopterin in order to quantify the magnitude and saturation of neopterin production over time in healthy volunteers. The SR-IFN-α in this study is a solid microparticular formulation manufactured by spray drying of a feeding solution containing IFN-α, a biocompatible polymer (polyethylene glycol) and sodium hyaluronate. Methods The full PK and PD (neopterin concentration) datasets from 24 healthy subjects obtained after single doses of 9, 18, 27 and 36 MIU of subcutaneous SR-IFN-α were used to build the mixed-effect model using NONMEM (version 7.2) with the GFORTRAN compiler. Results A one-compartment model with first-order elimination and a mixture of zero- and first-order absorption was chosen to describe the PK of SR-IFN-α. The time-concentration profile of neopterin, the PD marker, was described by a turnover model combined with a single transit compartment. The saturable pattern of the neopterin response blurring the dose–response relationship of SR-IFN-α was addressed by introducing the concept of the EC50 increasing over time. Conclusions The PK-PD model of SR-IFN-α developed in this study has presented a quantitative tool to assess the time-course of a saturable neopterin response in humans. PMID:24088361

  15. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A. PMID:26880225

  16. Brain regional pharmacokinetics of /sup 11/C-labeled diphenylhydantoin: positron emission tomography in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J.C.; Roeda, D.; Munari, C.; Crouzel, C.; Chodkiewicz, J.P.; Comar, D.

    1983-05-01

    We used positron emission tomography to study the regional cerebral pharmacokinetics of /sup 11/C-labeled diphenylhydantoin (/sup 11/C-DPH), which was given intravenously to 10 patients (8 intractable partial epileptics and 2 nonepileptics). In the nonaffected hemisphere, /sup 11/C-DPH concentration in gray matter reached equilibrium with blood within 20 minutes but was still rising at 60 minutes in white matter, where equilibrium was too slow to be detected owing to the fast physical decay of /sup 11/C. Brain-blood concentration ratios at 50 minutes were 1.37 and 1.06 in gray and white matter, respectively, similar but less variable than steady-state DPH ratios reported in human brain surgical samples. There was no indication that normal brain regions of medically resistant epileptics bind DPH less effectively than in nonepileptic patients. Brain and blood /sup 11/C-DPH concentrations were well correlated, confirming that the latter gives a reliable estimate of the former in unaffected brain regions.

  17. Novel LC- ESI-MS/MS method for desvenlafaxine estimation human plasma: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kancharla, Pushpa Kumari; Kondru, Venu Gopal Raju; Dannana, Gowri Sankar

    2016-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for the quantification of desvenlafaxine in human plasma using desvenlafaxine d6 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed using a Thermo-BDS hypersil C8 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with an isocratic mobile phase composed of 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer: methanol (20:80, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.80 mL/min. Desvenlafaxine and desvenlafaxine d6 were detected with proton adducts at m/z 264.2/58.1 and 270.2/ 64.1 in multiple reaction monitoring positive mode, respectively. Liquid-liquid extraction was used to extract the drug and the IS. The method was linear over the concentration range 1.001-400.352 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of ≥0.9994. This method demonstrated intra and inter-day precision within 0.7-5.5 and 1.9-6.8%, and accuracy within 95.3-107.4 and 93.4-99.5%. Desvenlafaxine was found to be stable throughout the freeze-thaw cycles, bench-top and long-term matrix stability studies. The developed and validated method can be successfully applied for the bioequivalence/pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine in pharmaceutical dosage forms. PMID:26095112

  18. Pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and mass balance of edoxaban, a selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in humans.

    PubMed

    Bathala, Mohinder S; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Oguma, Toshihiro; He, Ling; Lowrie, Chris; Mendell, Jeanne

    2012-12-01

    This study determined the mass balance and pharmacokinetics of edoxaban in humans after oral administration of [¹⁴C]edoxaban. After oral administration of 60 mg (as active moiety) of [¹⁴C]edoxaban to six healthy male subjects, serial blood/plasma and urinary and fecal samples were collected for up to 168 h postdose. All samples were analyzed for total radioactivity by liquid scintillation counting and for concentrations of edoxaban and four metabolites in plasma, urine, and fecal samples by either high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method using multiple reaction modes, or a liquid chromatography radiometric method. The mean recovery of radioactivity was >97% of the administered radioactive dose, with 62.2% eliminated in feces and 35.4% in urine. Unchanged edoxaban accounted for the majority of radioactivity, with 49.1 and 23.8% of the dose as parent observed in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged edoxaban was the most abundant species in plasma, with a mean area under the curve (AUC)(0-∞) of 1596 ng · h/ml. The next most abundant species was metabolite M4, with a mean AUC(0-∞) 147 ng · h/ml. The mass balance of edoxaban was well described, with unchanged edoxaban as the most abundant component of total radioactivity. Edoxaban is eliminated through multiple pathways, but each accounts for only a small amount of overall elimination. PMID:22936313

  19. HPLC Determination of Fexofenadine in Human Plasma For Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Pharmacokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Helmy, S A; El Bedaiwy, H M

    2016-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for fexofenadine determination in human plasma by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Satisfactory separation was achieved on a Hypersil® BDS C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5μm) using a mobile phase comprising 20 mm sodium dihydrogen phosphate-2 hydrate (pH adjusted to 3 with phosphoric acid)-acetonitrile at a ratio of 52:48, v/v. The elution was isocratic at ambient temperature with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV detector was set at 215 nm for the drug and 330 nm for the internal standared (tinidazole). The total time for a chromatographic separation was ~6.5 min. Linearity was demonstrated over the concentration range 0.01-4 μg/mL. The observed within- and between-day assay precision ranged from 0.346 to 13.6%; accuracy varied between 100.4 and 111.2%. This method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring in patients treated with clinical doses of fexofenadine and for pharmacokinetic studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26577375

  20. Chemical Polysialylation and In Vivo Tetramerization Improve Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase-Based Bioscavengers.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, S S; Smirnov, I V; Shamborant, O G; Bobik, T V; Ilyushin, D G; Murashev, A N; Dyachenko, I A; Palikov, V A; Knorre, V D; Belogurov, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Kuzina, E S; Genkin, D D; Masson, P; Gabibov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate toxins (OPs) are the most toxic low-molecular compounds. The extremely potent toxicity of OPs is determined by their specificity toward the nerve system. Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is a natural bioscavenger against a broad spectrum of OPs, which makes it a promising candidate for the development of DNA-encoded bioscavengers. The high values of the protective index observed for recombinant hBChE (rhBChE) make it appropriate for therapy against OP poisoning, especially in the case of highly toxic warfare nerve agents. Nevertheless, large-scale application of biopharmaceuticals based on hBChE is restricted due to its high cost and extremely rapid elimination from the bloodstream. In the present study, we examine two approaches for long-acting rhBChE production: I) chemical polysialylation and II) in-vivo tetramerization. We demonstrate that both approaches significantly improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rhBChE (more than 5 and 10 times, respectively), which makes it possible to use rhBChE conjugated with polysialic acids (rhBChE-CAO) and tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) in the treatment of OP poisonings. PMID:26798501

  1. Biodistribution and translational pharmacokinetic modeling of a human recombinant alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Peters, Esther; Stevens, Jasper; Arend, Jacques; Guan, Zheng; Raaben, Willem; Laverman, Peter; van Elsas, Andrea; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Pickkers, Peter

    2015-11-10

    Clinical trials showed renal protective effects of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (AP) in patients with sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). Subsequently, a human recombinant chimeric AP (recAP) was developed as a pharmaceutically acceptable alternative. Here, we investigated the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of recAP and developed a translational population PK model. Biodistribution was studied during LPS-induced AKI in rats. Iodine-125-labeled recAP was primarily taken up by liver, spleen, adrenals, heart, lungs and kidneys followed by the gastro-intestinal tract and thyroid. Tissue distribution was not critically affected by endotoxemia. PK parameters were determined in rats and minipigs during IV bolus injections of recAP, administered once, or once daily during seven consecutive days. Plasma concentrations of recAP increased with increasing dose and disappeared in a biphasic manner. Exposure to recAP, estimated by AUC and Cmax, was similar on days 1 and 7. Subsequently, population approach nonlinear mixed effects modeling was performed with recAP rat and minipig and biAP phase I PK data. Concentration versus time data was accurately described in all species by a two-compartmental model with allometric scaling based on body weight. This model provides a solid foundation for determining the optimal dose and duration of first-in-man recAP studies. PMID:26325308

  2. Recent progresses in the experimental methods and evaluation strategies of transporter functions for the prediction of the pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Satoshi; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2008-06-01

    Establishing the methods for the effective screening of compounds with optimal pharmacokinetic properties is of great importance to many scientists working in new drug discovery and development. This review deals with the methods by which in vivo pharmacokinetics in humans can be predicted from in vitro studies and from in vivo animal experiments. Direct extrapolation from animal studies to human pharmacokinetics is generally difficult because of species differences in the function of molecules involved in drug metabolism and transport. To overcome this problem, a "scaling factor," which relates in vivo animal studies with in vitro experiments, is often used for the accurate prediction. Several experimental systems for the functional analyses of membrane transporters have been developed and many reports have revealed that various transporters clearly govern the tissue dispositions of drugs in humans. This review covers the impact of membrane transporters on the pharmacokinetics, control of elimination pathways, and toxicity. Indeed, by utilizing transporter-deficient animals, some studies have clarified the importance of transporters in various types of tissue-specific toxicity. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions are one of the most important issues in clinical situation because some reports suggested that severe clinical incidents are caused by the inhibition of transporter-mediated uptake and efflux in clearance organs (liver and kidney) and at several barriers. The review also focuses on the clinical significance of genetic polymorphisms of transporters, as these can influence the plasma and tissue concentrations of some drugs. Finally, integrated information is presented based on multiple in vitro studies, including those on transporters. This should enable the prediction of the outcomes of drug exposure in cells, tissues, and individual organisms. PMID:18536908

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Le Cotonnec, J Y; Galazka, A; Abdul-Ahad, A; Darragh, A

    1996-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta 1a) were assessed following administration to 12 healthy male volunteers. Each subject received, in a double-blind, balanced, random-order, crossover sequence, single doses of 6 MIU of rHuIFN-beta 1a (Rebif) i.v., i.m., and s.c. or matching placebo on four occasions separated by washout periods of 1 week. Blood samples were collected at preset times for the measurement of serum IFN-beta levels and of intracellular 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase levels. Blood pressure, sitting heart rate, respiratory rate, oral body temperature, and tolerance were monitored regularly. All administrations of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well tolerated, although about half of the subjects had a flu-like syndrome, as expected. After i.v. bolus injection, the pharmacokinetics of rHuIFN-beta 1a were well described by a classic two-compartment model. Mean total clearance of rHuIFN-beta 1a was about 100 L.h-1. The distribution half-life was 5 min, and the terminal half-life was approximately 5 h. After i.m. or s.c. injection, serum IFN-beta profiles were rather flat, and about one sixth of the administered dose was available systemically. Extent and duration of clinical and biologic effects were independent of the route of administration and of the IFN-beta serum levels. Biologic pharmacodynamic effects persisted even when IFN-beta serum levels had returned to baseline and were still significantly elevated 3 days after a single dose. Because of the independence of the extent and duration of clinical and biologic pharmacodynamic effects from the route of administration and from the IFN-beta serum levels, the s.c route of administration is preferred in indications in which primarily an immunomodulatory action is sought. Predominantly antiviral and antiproliferative activity is enhanced by the i.v. route to provide adequate drug levels at the site of pathology, although its application is limited on practical

  4. PET measurement of C-11-methylphenidate pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP), a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT), is the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medication for children in the USA yet little is known about its pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain. PET was used to measure the pharmacokinetics of d,l-threo-[{sup 11}C]methylphenidate (MP*) the labelled form of the prescribed drug (ritalin) in eight normal male subjects (age range 20-74 years). Four subjects had 2 repeated scans to assess test/retest reproducibility and 4 had one wan as baseline and the second 10 minutes after administration of 0.5 mg/kg MP to assess specific to nonspecific binding. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of MP*(5-10 mCi) for 90 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the distribution volume (DV) in basal ganglia (BG), cerebellum (CB) and global (GL) regions using graphical analysis. Binding of MP* was highest in the BG (0.008% dose/cc) uptake in CB corresponded to (0.006) and in GL to (0.005). Kinetic analysis revealed fast uptake of MP* with peak uptake in BG occurring 5-20 min PI, and in CB and GL at 5-13 min PI. Half time clearance for MP* occurred 90 min PI for BG and 60 min for CB and GL. Test/retest variability was <10% (range -0.5 to +7.0% for the DV ratio (BG/CB)). Pretreatment with MP selectively reduced uptake in BG wherein it did not affect uptake in CB or GL. The ratio of the DV in BG to that in CB changed from 2.12{plus_minus}0.1 to 1.35{plus_minus}0.04. The lack of an effect of MP in CB an area with a high density of norepinephrine (NE) transporters suggests that MP* is not binding to the NE transporter.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  6. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  7. Prediction of Pharmacokinetics and Penetration of Moxifloxacin in Human with Intra-Abdominal Infection Based on Extrapolated PBPK Model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, JianWei; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, YongMing; Zhang, JianLei; Zhao, YuanYuan; Dong, WeiLin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model in intra-abdominal infected rats, and extrapolate it to human to predict moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics profiles in various tissues in intra-abdominal infected human. 12 male rats with intra-abdominal infections, induced by Escherichia coli, received a single dose of 40 mg/kg body weight of moxifloxacin. Blood plasma was collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480, 1440 min after drug injection. A PBPK model was developed in rats and extrapolated to human using GastroPlus software. The predictions were assessed by comparing predictions and observations. In the plasma concentration versus time profile of moxifloxcinin rats, Cmax was 11.151 µg/mL at 5 min after the intravenous injection and t1/2 was 2.936 h. Plasma concentration and kinetics in human were predicted and compared with observed datas. Moxifloxacin penetrated and accumulated with high concentrations in redmarrow, lung, skin, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, muscle tissues in human with intra-abdominal infection. The predicted tissue to plasma concentration ratios in abdominal viscera were between 1.1 and 2.2. When rat plasma concentrations were known, extrapolation of a PBPK model was a method to predict drug pharmacokinetics and penetration in human. Moxifloxacin has a good penetration into liver, kidney, spleen, as well as other tissues in intra-abdominal infected human. Close monitoring are necessary when using moxifloxacin due to its high concentration distribution. This pathological model extrapolation may provide reference to the PK/PD study of antibacterial agents. PMID:25729270

  8. Endogenous cannabinoids revisited: a biochemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, B M; Costa, M A; Almada, M; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N A

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used illegal drug, particularly in Western societies. The discovery of an endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) highlighted new molecules in various physiological processes. The ECS consists of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors that can be activated by small lipid mediators, termed endocannabinoids (eCBs) and cannabis-derived drugs, plus the associated biochemical machinery (precursors, synthesis and degradative enzymes, and transporters). Several biochemical, pharmacological and physiological studies have shown that endocannabinoid system elements are widely distributed throughout the body, with regional variations and organ-specific actions. This review portrays the endocannabinoid "family" on new studies concerning eCB storage, release and functional roles and on the growing importance of its bioactive metabolites. Those findings reinforce and confirm the importance of ECS. Strategies for manipulating the system for the treatment of human disease will require a thorough understanding of the roles of the different eCBs and their sources. PMID:23474290

  9. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  10. Metabolite Profiling and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Hydrocortisone in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M.; Hughes, David J.; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Dyer, Rachel L.; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte–Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase–ultra high-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time of flight–mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8–10% of the loss, and 45–52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour−1, 6.6 × 10−5 l⋅hour−1, and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  11. Effects of Idazoxan on Alcohol Pharmacokinetics and Intoxication: A Preliminary Human Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Leggio, Lorenzo; Davidson, Dena; Swift, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preliminary basic and human studies suggest that the α2-adrenergic antagonist idazoxan may represent a novel medication for alcohol dependence (AD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the co-administration of idazoxan with alcohol and explore whether pharmacokinetics (PK) and biobehavioral (Pharmacodynamics, PD) mechanisms of idazoxan may alter alcohol's effects. Methods This was a preliminary double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled, cross-over, randomized human laboratory study. Ten social drinkers were dosed, in two different alcohol challenge sessions (ACS), with a single oral dose of idazoxan (40-mg) or placebo, followed by a fixed alcohol dose 60 minutes later. Participants returned after a one-week wash-out and they were crossed over to the opposite medication condition. Results There were no significant differences in adverse events (AEs) between idazoxan and placebo. Moreover, during the ACS paradigm, 40-mg idazoxan was well tolerated with no significant autonomic effects compared to placebo; idazoxan reduced the peak blood alcohol level (Cmax) (p<.01) and time to peak (tmax) (p<.05) compared to placebo. A PK/PD model aligned the biobehavioral effects, demonstrating that the co-administration of 40-mg idazoxan with alcohol, decreased alcohol-related stimulation (p<.05) and increased alcohol-related sedation (p<.05). Conclusions This study supports the safety and tolerability of 40-mg idazoxan when co-administered with alcohol. Additionally, this study suggests that idazoxan may alter the biphasic effects of alcohol by decreasing stimulation and increasing sedation. These findings have implications for further investigation of using idazoxan as a probe to develop potential novel medications to treat alcoholic patients. PMID:25833022

  12. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of bisoprolol-/sup 14/C in three animal species and in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Buehring, K.U.S.; Sailer, H.; Faro, H.P.; Leopold, G.; Pabst, J.; Garbe, A.

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of bisoprolol-/sup 14/C were studied in Wistar rats, beagle dogs, and Cynomolgus monkeys. Bisoprolol is well absorbed in these species; independent of the route of administration (i.v. or p.o.), 70-90% of the /sup 14/C-dose was recovered in urine. Faecal excretion was approximately 20% in rats and less than 10% in dogs and monkeys. Rats excreted approximately 10% of the dose in bile after i.v. as well as after oral administration. The plasma half-life of the unchanged drug was approximately 1 h in rats, 3 h in monkeys, and 5 h in dogs. The bioavailability was 40-50% in monkeys, approximately 80% in dogs, and 10% in rats. Studies in rats have shown that the drug is rapidly taken up by the tissues. After i.v. administration, high levels of radioactivity were found in lung, kidneys, liver, adrenals, spleen, pancreas, and salivary glands. After oral administration, the highest concentration occurred in the liver and kidneys. With the exception of plasma and liver, unchanged bisoprolol was the major radioactive constituent in all tissues studied. Both the blood-brain and placental barriers were penetrated, but only to a small degree. No accumulation of radioactivity in tissues was observed after repeated dosing (1 mg/kg/day). The metabolism of bisoprolol was studied in the same three animal species and in humans. The major metabolites are the products of O-dealkylation and subsequent oxidation to the corresponding carboxylic acids. The amount of bisoprolol excreted unchanged in the urine is 50-60% of the dose in humans, 30-40% in dogs, and approximately 10% in rats and monkeys.

  13. Prediction of the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of levofloxacin in humans based on an extrapolated PBPK model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liqin; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Jianwei; Wang, Yongming; Zhang, Jianlei; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Dong, Weilin

    2016-08-01

    This study developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model in intraabdominally infected rats and extrapolated it to humans to predict the levofloxacin pharmacokinetics and penetration into tissues. Twelve male rats with intraabdominal infections induced by Escherichia coli received a single dose of 50 mg/kg body weight of levofloxacin. Blood plasma was collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 and 1440 min after injection, respectively. A PBPK model was developed in rats and extrapolated to humans using GastroPlus software. The predictions were assessed by comparing predictions and observations. In the plasma concentration-versus-time profile of levofloxacin in rats, C max was 23.570 μg/ml at 5 min after intravenous injection, and t1/2 was 2.38 h. The plasma concentration and kinetics in humans were predicted and validated by the observed data. Levofloxacin penetrated and accumulated with high concentrations in the heart, liver, kidney, spleen, muscle and skin tissues in humans. The predicted tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios in abdominal viscera were between 1.9 and 2.3. When rat plasma concentrations were known, extrapolation of a PBPK model was a method to predict the drug pharmacokinetics and penetration in humans. Levofloxacin had good penetration into the liver, kidney and spleen as well as other tissues in humans. This pathological model extrapolation may provide a reference for the study of antiinfective PK/PD. In our study, levofloxacin penetrated well into abdominal organs. Also ADR monitoring should be implemented when using levofloxacin. PMID:25753830

  14. Determination of Acyclovir in Human Plasma Samples by HPLC Method with UV Detection: Application to Single-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Zendelovska, Dragica; Simeska, Suzana; Atanasovska, Emilija; Georgievska, Kalina; Kikerkov, Igor; Labachevski, Nikola; Jakovski, Krume; Balkanov, Trajan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters: Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ with the two-way analysis of variance, single observation (ANOVA) for two preparations containing acyclovir. OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir, method for quantitative determination of acyclovir in human plasma should be simple, rapid and reproducible. Therefore, the method is developed, validated and applied for analysis of acyclovir in plasma samples obtained from healthy volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with UV-detection for the determination of acyclovir in human plasma is presented. This method involves protein precipitation with 20 % (V/V) perchloric acid. The chromatographic separation was accomplished on a reversed phase C8 column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1 % (V/V) triethylamine in water (pH 2.5). No internal standard is required. UV detection was set at 255 nm. The method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic profiles of acyclovir tablets in 24 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: The validation results shows that proposed method is rugged, precise (RSDs for intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.02 to 8.37 %) and accurate (relative errors are less than 6.66 %). The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 0.1-2.0 µg/ml and the limit of quantification was 0.1 µg/ml. The Cmax, tmax and AUCs for the two products were not statistically different (p>0.05), suggesting that the plasma profiles generated by Zovirax were comparable to those produced by acyclovir manufactured by Jaka 80 company. CONCLUSION: Good precision, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity and shorter time of analysis of the method makes it particularly useful for processing of multiple samples in a limited period of time for pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir. PMID:27275193

  15. A pharmacokinetic model of inhaled methanol in humans and comparison to methanol disposition in mice and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, R A; Ward, K W; Pollack, G M

    1995-01-01

    We estimated kinetic parameters associated with methanol disposition in humans from data reported in the literature. Michaelis-Menten elimination parameters (Vmax = 115 mg/L/hr; Km = 460 mg/L) were selected for input into a semi-physiologic pharmacokinetic model. We used reported literature values for blood or urine methanol concentrations in humans and nonhuman primates after methanol inhalation as input to an inhalation disposition model that evaluated the absorption of methanol, expressed as the fraction of inhaled methanol concentration that was absorbed (phi). Values of phi for nonexercising subjects typically varied between 0.64 and 0.75; 0.80 was observed to be a reasonable upper boundary for fractional absorption. Absorption efficiency in exercising subjects was lower than that in resting individuals. Incorporation of the kinetic parameters and phi into a pharmacokinetic model of human exposure to methanol, compared to a similar analysis in rodents, indicated that following an 8-hr exposure to 5000 ppm of methanol vapor, blood methanol concentrations in the mouse would be 13- to 18-fold higher than in humans exposed to the same methanol vapor concentration; blood methanol concentrations in the rat under similar conditions would be 5-fold higher than in humans. These results demonstrate the importance in the risk assessment for methanol of basing extrapolations from rodents to humans on actual blood concentrations rather than on methanol vapor exposure concentrations. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C PMID:7588485

  16. In vivo toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer activity of Genistein linked to recombinant human epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Uckun, F M; Narla, R K; Zeren, T; Yanishevski, Y; Myers, D E; Waurzyniak, B; Ek, O; Schneider, E; Messinger, Y; Chelstrom, L M; Gunther, R; Evans, W

    1998-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-associated protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) complexes have vital anti-apoptotic functions in human breast cancer cells. We have shown previously that targeting the naturally occurring PTK inhibitor genistein to the EGFR-associated PTK complexes using the EGF-Genistein (Gen) conjugate triggers rapid apoptotic cell death in human breast cancer cells and abrogates their in vitro clonogenic growth. In the present study, we examined the in vivo toxicity profile, pharmacokinetics, and anticancer activity of EGF-Gen. No toxicities were observed in mice treated with EGF-Gen at dose levels as high as 40 mg/kg administered i.p. as a single dose or 140 mg/kg administered i.p. over 28 consecutive days. EGF-Gen significantly improved tumor-free survival in a severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer, when it was administered 24 h after inoculation of tumor cells. At 100 microg/kg/day x 10 days (1 mg/kg total dose), which is >100-fold less than the highest tested and nontoxic cumulative dose (ie., 140 mg/kg) in mice, EGF-Gen was more effective than cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg/day x 2 days), Adriamycin (2.5 mg/kg x 1 day), or methotrexate (0.5 mg/kg x 1 day), the most widely used standard chemotherapeutic drugs for breast cancer, and resulted in 60% long-term tumor-free survival. Furthermore, treating SCID mice with established s.c. human breast cancer xenografts of 0.5-cm diameter with EGF-Gen at this dose level resulted in disappearance of the tumors in two of five mice and >50% shrinkage in three of five mice within 10 days, whereas all of the control tumors in five PBS-treated mice as well as five mice treated with unconjugated Gen (1 mg/kg/day x 10 days) showed >200% increase in diameter during the same observation period. EGF-Gen treatment reduced the growth rate of breast cancer xenografts of 1.0-cm diameter, but unlike with tumors of 0.5-cm diameter, it failed to cause shrinkage or

  17. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

    2009-04-20

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  18. Simultaneous pharmacokinetics evaluation of human cytochrome P450 probes, caffeine, warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam, in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Utoh, Masahiro; Toda, Akiko; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes (caffeine, racemic warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam) composite, after single intravenous and oral administrations at doses of 0.20 and 1.0 mg kg(-1), respectively, to four male common marmosets were investigated. 2. The plasma concentrations of caffeine and warfarin decreased slowly in a monophasic manner but those of omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam decreased extensively after intravenous and oral administrations, in a manner that approximated those as reported for pharmacokinetics in humans. 3. Bioavailabilities were ∼100% for caffeine and warfarin, but <25% for omeprazole and metoprolol. Bioavailability of midazolam was 4% in marmosets, presumably because of contribution of marmoset P450 3A4 expressed in small intestine and liver, with a high catalytic efficiency for midazolam 1'-hydroxylation as evident in the recombinant system. 4. These results suggest that common marmosets, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 probe substrates, could be an experimental model for humans and that marmoset P450s have functional characteristics that differ from those of human and/or cynomolgus monkey P450s in some aspects, indicating their importance in modeling in P450-dependent drug metabolism studies in marmosets and of further studies. PMID:26114209

  19. Determination of phenazopyridine in human plasma via LC-MS and subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Erxin; Xiang, Bingren; Liu, Guangyu; Xie, Shaofei; Wei, Wenyan; Lu, Jun

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a new LC-MS method for the determination of phenazopyridine and the subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model for phenazopyridine in vivo. Phenazopyridine hydrochloride is a strong analgesic used in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Although it has been used as a clinical treatment for a very long time, pharmacokinetic data and suitable methods for its determination in plasma are currently lacking. The study described in this paper used high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, HPLC-MS, to determine the plasma concentrations of phenazopyridine in human subjects after oral administration. After liquid-liquid extraction, the phenazopyridine in the plasma was analyzed on a C18 column under SIM mode. A double-peak phenomenon was observed in most of the concentration-time profiles of the subjects. Although some drugs are known to cause this phenomenon, phenazopyridine has not been reported to do so. Several possible causes were analyzed in order to obtain an explanation. We proposed a two-site absorption compartment model to fit the concentration data in vivo, which has one more absorption site than the classical one-compartment model. The model describes the concentration profiles in different dose groups well and could provide an explanation for the double-peak phenomenon. The three dose groups exhibited similar model parameters and a linear pharmacokinetic process over the dose range used. PMID:15900475

  20. Normal aging in rats and pathological aging in human Alzheimer's disease decrease FAAH activity: modulation by cannabinoid agonists.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A C; Martín-Moreno, A M; Giusto, N M; de Ceballos, M L; Pasquaré, S J

    2014-12-01

    Anandamide is an endocannabinoid involved in several physiological functions including neuroprotection. Anandamide is synthesized on demand and its endogenous level is regulated through its degradation, where fatty acid amide hydrolase plays a major role. The aim of this study was to characterize anandamide breakdown in physiological and pathological aging and its regulation by CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists. Fatty acid amide hydrolase activity was analyzed in an independent cohort of human cortical membrane samples from control and Alzheimer's disease patients, and in membrane and synaptosomes from adult and aged rat cerebral cortex. Our results demonstrate that fatty acid amide hydrolase activity decreases in the frontal cortex from human patients with Alzheimer's disease and this effect is mimicked by Aβ(1-40) peptide. This activity increases and decreases in aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes, respectively. Also, while the presence of JWH-133, a CB2 selective agonist, slightly increases anandamide hydrolysis in human controls, it decreases this activity in adults and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. In the presence of WIN55,212-2, a mixed CB1/CB2 agonist, anandamide hydrolysis increases in Alzheimer's disease patients but decreases in human controls as well as in adult and aged rat cerebrocortical membranes and synaptosomes. Although a similar profile is observed in fatty acid amide hydrolase activity between aged rat synaptic endings and human Alzheimer's disease brains, it is differently modulated by CB1/CB2 agonists. This modulation leads to a reduced availability of anandamide in Alzheimer's disease and to an increased availability of this endocannabinoid in aging. PMID:25456842

  1. Naringin does not alter caffeine pharmacokinetics, energy expenditure, or cardiovascular haemodynamics in humans following caffeine consumption.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Tasha L P; Halaweish, Fathi T; Stevermer, Cheryl L; Agrawal, Puja; Vukovich, Matthew D

    2006-04-01

    1. Naringin, a grapefruit constituent interacts with many medications including caffeine, a popular weight loss supplement. The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in caffeine pharmacokinetics, resting energy expenditure (REE), oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) after an acute dosage of caffeine and naringin. 2. Using a double-blinded, counterbalanced design, REE, VO(2), and RER were measured before and systematically for 8 h after a single dosage of caffeine (CAF, 200 mg) with and without naringin (100 mg (CN100) or 200 mg (CN200)) in 10 apparently healthy individuals. A standardized meal was provided following 240-minute measurements (400 kcals; 35 g carbohydrate; 27 g protein; 7 g fat). 3. Caffeine, CN100, CN200 did not alter VO(2) or VO(2) area under the curve (137 301 +/- 8318, 139 729 +/- 9300, 134 297 +/- 8318, mL/480 min). Resting energy expenditure (k/cals) was 10.0 +/- 1.4% higher with CAF versus CN200 (6.0 +/- 1.4%) and CN100 (6 +/- 1.5%) at 240 min (P = 0.07) which was then negated following a standardized meal. Percent change in RER from pre to 240 min and pre to 480 min was not different between the CAF, CN100, or CN200 (-0.2 +/- 1.7%, 1.7 +/- 1.7%, -2.8 +/- 1.9%). 4. Although caffeine alone suggests a trend of increased REE, the results of the present study indicate that concurrent consumption of caffeine with naringin in acute dosages does not affect RER, VO(2), and prevents the increase of REE in adult humans. The results suggest that the interaction of grapefruit juice and caffeine may be due to constituents of grapefruit juice other than naringin or in addition to naringin. PMID:16620293

  2. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human erythropoietin in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Brockmöller, J; Köchling, J; Weber, W; Looby, M; Roots, I; Neumayer, H H

    1992-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of and therapeutic response to recombinant human erythropoietin (rcEPO) were studied in 12 patients under chronic haemodialysis on a thrice weekly intravenous rcEPO treatment scheme. The kinetics of rcEPO were also assessed after a subcutaneous injection during the initial period and during maintenance treatment. RcEPO was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay. 2. After the first i.v. dose plasma erythropoietin concentrations were best described by a monoexponential disposition function with a mean (+/- s.d.) elimination half-life of 5.4 +/- 1.7 h. The volume of distribution was 70 +/- 5.2 ml kg-1 and the clearance was 10.1 +/- 3.5 ml h-1 kg-1 (n = 12). 3. After 3 months of continuous therapy, the plasma half-life of rcEPO decreased by 15% (P < 0.05, mean half-life during steady state: 4.6 +/- 2.8 h), while mean clearance and volume of distribution remained constant. 4. After the first s.c. injection the mean (+/- s.d.) absorption time was 22 +/- 11 h and systemic availability was 44 +/- 7%. 5. Changes in haemoglobin concentrations were described by a linear additive dose-response model, defined by an efficacy constant (Keff) and the mean erythrocyte lifetime (MRTHb). The sample mean (+/- s.d.) Keff was 0.043 +/- 0.017 g dl-1 Hb per 1000 units rcEPO and MRTHb was 10.02 +/- 1.75 weeks. The net effect of rcEPO treatment was described by the area under the unit-dose-response curve (AUEC) with a mean (+/- s.d.) value of 0.45 +/- 0.23 g dl-1 weeks. 6. RcEPO clearance showed a significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.41) with the effectiveness of rcEPO therapy, as measured by the parameters Keff or AUEC. PMID:1493082

  3. The pharmacokinetic profile of crocetin in healthy adult human volunteers after a single oral administration.

    PubMed

    Umigai, N; Murakami, K; Ulit, M V; Antonio, L S; Shirotori, M; Morikawa, H; Nakano, T

    2011-05-15

    Crocetin, a unique carotenoid with a short carbon chain length, is an active compound of saffron and Gardenia jasminoides Ellis used as traditional herbal medicine. The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of crocetin in healthy adult subjects. The study was conducted as an open-label, single dose escalation with 10 Filipino volunteers (5 men and 5 women). The subjects received a single dose of crocetin at three doses (7.5, 15 and 22.5 mg) in one week interval. Blood samples were collected from the brachial vein before and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h after administration. Plasma concentrations of crocetin were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crocetin was rapidly absorbed and detected within an hour of administration with a mean time to reach maximum concentration (T(max)) of crocetin ranging from 4.0 to 4.8 h. The mean values of C(max) and AUC(0-24h) ranged from 100.9 to 279.7 ng/ml and 556.5 to 1720.8 ng. h/ml respectively. C(max) and AUC values increased with dose proportional manner. Crocetin was eliminated from human plasma with a mean elimination half life (T(½) of 6.1 to 7.5 h. In summary, there were no serious adverse events up to 22.5 mg dose of crocetin while crocetin was found to be absorbed more quickly than the other carotenoids such as β-carotene, lutein and lycopene. PMID:21112749

  4. Pharmacokinetics of naproxen, its metabolite O-desmethylnaproxen, and their acyl glucuronides in humans.

    PubMed

    Vree, T B; van den Biggelaar-Martea, M; Verwey-van Wissen, C P; Vree, J B; Guelen, P J

    1993-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the pharmacokinetics of naproxen in 10 human subjects after an oral dose of 500 mg using a direct HPLC analysis of the acyl glucuronide conjugates of naproxen and its metabolite O-desmethylnaproxen. The mean t1/2 of naproxen in 9 subjects was 24.7 +/- 6.4 h (range 16 to 36 h). The t1/2 of 7.4 as found in subject number 10 must, therefore, be regarded as an extraordinary case (p < 0.0153). Naproxen acyl glucuronide accounts for 50.8 +/- 7.32 per cent of the dose, its isomerized conjugate isoglucuronide for 6.5 +/- 2.0 per cent, O-desmethylnaproxen acyl glucuronide for 14.3 +/- 3.4 per cent, and its isoglucuronide for 5.5 +/- 1.3 per cent (n = 10; 100 h collection period). Naproxen and O-desmethylnaproxen are excreted in negligible amounts (< 1 per cent). Even though urine pH of the subjects was kept acid (range pH 5.0-5.5) in order to stabilize the acyl glucuronides, isomerization takes place in blood when the acyl glucuronide is released from the liver for excretion by the kidney. Binding to plasma proteins was measured as 98 per cent and 100 per cent, respectively for the unconjugated compounds naproxen and O-desmethylnaproxen. Binding of the acyl glucuronides was less, being 92 per cent; for naproxen acyl glucuronide, 66 per cent for naproxen isoglucuronide, 72 per cent for O-desmethylnaproxen acyl glucuronide and 42 per cent for O-desmethylnaproxen isoglucuronide. PMID:8218967

  5. A Sensitive and Robust HPLC Assay with Fluorescence Detection for the Quantification of Pomalidomide in Human Plasma for Pharmacokinetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Roth, Jeffrey; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Aleman, Karen; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Yarchoan, Robert; Figg, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Pomalidomide is a second generation IMiD (immunomodulatory agent) that has recently been granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma after prior treatment with two antimyeloma agents, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. A simple and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for pomalidomide over the range of 1–500 ng/mL has been developed for application to pharmacokinetic studies in ongoing clinical trials in various other malignancies. A liquid-liquid extraction from human plasma alone or pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl was performed, using propyl paraben as the internal standard. From plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not, the assay was shown to be selective, sensitive, accurate, precise, and have minimal matrix effects (<20%). Pomalidomide was stable in plasma through 4 freeze-thaw cycles (<12% change), in plasma at room temperature for up to 2 hr for samples not pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl and up to 8 hr in samples pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl, 24 hr post-preparation at 4 °C (<2% change), and showed excellent extraction recovery (~90%). This is the first reported description of the freeze/thaw and plasma stability of pomalidomide in plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not. The information presented in this manuscript is important when performing pharmacokinetic analyses. The method was used to analyze clinical pharmacokinetics samples obtained after a 5 mg oral dose of pomalidomide. This relatively simple HPLC-FL assay allows a broader range of laboratories to measure pomalidomide for application to clinical pharmacokinetics. PMID:24486861

  6. A sensitive and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for the quantification of pomalidomide in human plasma for pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J; Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Roth, Jeffrey; Wyvill, Kathleen M; Aleman, Karen; Zeldis, Jerome B; Yarchoan, Robert; Figg, William D

    2014-04-01

    Pomalidomide is a second generation IMiD (immunomodulatory agent) that has recently been granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma after prior treatment with two antimyeloma agents, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. A simple and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for pomalidomide over the range of 1-500ng/mL has been developed for application to pharmacokinetic studies in ongoing clinical trials in various other malignancies. A liquid-liquid extraction from human plasma alone or pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl was performed, using propyl paraben as the internal standard. From plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not, the assay was shown to be selective, sensitive, accurate, precise, and have minimal matrix effects (<20%). Pomalidomide was stable in plasma through 4 freeze-thaw cycles (<12% change), in plasma at room temperature for up to 2h for samples not pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl and up to 8h in samples pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl, 24h post-preparation at 4°C (<2% change), and showed excellent extraction recovery (∼90%). This is the first reported description of the freeze/thaw and plasma stability of pomalidomide in plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not. The information presented in this manuscript is important when performing pharmacokinetic analyses. The method was used to analyze clinical pharmacokinetics samples obtained after a 5mg oral dose of pomalidomide. This relatively simple HPLC-FL assay allows a broader range of laboratories to measure pomalidomide for application to clinical pharmacokinetics. PMID:24486861

  7. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Epidemiology, Pharmacodynamics, and Clinical Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Gorelick, David A.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Hartman, Rebecca L.; Pirard, Sandrine; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are a heterogeneous group of compounds developed to probe the endogenous cannabinoid system or as potential therapeutics. Clandestine laboratories subsequently utilized published data to develop SC variations marketed as abuseable “designer drugs.” In the early 2000’s, SC became popular as “legal highs” under brand names such as “Spice” and “K2,” in part due to their ability to escape detection by standard cannabinoid screening tests. The majority of SC detected in herbal products have greater binding affinity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor than does Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, and greater affinity at the CB1 than the CB2 receptor. In-vitro and animal in-vivo studies show SC pharmacological effects 2-100 times more potent than THC, including analgesic, anti-seizure, weight-loss, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer growth effects. SC produce physiological and psychoactive effects similar to THC, but with greater intensity, resulting in medical and psychiatric emergencies. Human adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath or depressed breathing, hypertension, tachycardia, chest pain, muscle twitches, acute renal failure, anxiety, agitation, psychosis, suicidal ideation, and cognitive impairment. Long-term or residual effects are unknown. Due to these public health consequences, many SC are classified as controlled substances. However, frequent structural modification by clandestine laboratories results in a stream of novel SC that may not be legally controlled or detectable by routine laboratory tests. Methods We present here a comprehensive review, based on a systematic electronic literature search, of SC epidemiology and pharmacology and their clinical implications. PMID:25220897

  8. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  9. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  10. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  11. Cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid after controlled cannabis smoking in frequent and occasional smokers.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly popular alternative matrix for drug testing, with cannabinoids being the most commonly identified illicit drug. Quantification of multiple OF cannabinoids and understanding differences in OF cannabinoid pharmacokinetics between frequent and occasional smokers improve test interpretation. The new Oral-Eze® OF collection device has an elution buffer that stabilizes analytes and improves drug recovery from the collection pad; however, its performance has not been independently evaluated. After controlled smoking of a 6.8% Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabis cigarette by frequent and occasional smokers, OF was collected with the Oral-Eze device for up to 30 h. Samples were analyzed for multiple cannabinoids by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Frequent smokers had significantly greater OF THCCOOH concentrations than occasional smokers at all times, and showed positive results for a significantly longer time. We evaluated multiple cannabinoid cut-offs; the shortest last detection times were observed when THC ≥ 1 μg/L was combined with CBD or CBN ≥ 1 μg/L. With these cut-offs, last detection times(1-13.5 h) were not significantly different between groups, demonstrating suitability for short-term cannabinoid detection independent of smoking history. Cut-offs utilizing THC alone or combined with THCCOOH showed significantly different last detection times between groups. The widest detection windows were observed with THC ≥ 1 or 2 μg/L or THCCOOH ≥ 20 ng/L. Our data illustrate the effectiveness of the Oral-Eze® device for OF collection, the impact of self-administered smoked cannabis history on OF cannabinoid results, and the ability to improve interpretation and tailor OF cannabinoid cut-offs to fulfill the detection window needs of a given program. PMID:24652685

  12. Cannabinoid Disposition in Oral Fluid after Controlled Cannabis Smoking in Frequent and Occasional Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly popular alternative matrix for drug testing, with cannabinoids being the most commonly identified illicit drug. Quantification of multiple OF cannabinoids and understanding differences in OF cannabinoid pharmacokinetics between frequent and occasional smokers improves test interpretation. The new Oral-Eze® OF collection device has an elution buffer that stabilizes analytes and improves drug recovery from the collection pad; however, its performance has not been independently evaluated. After controlled smoking of a 6.8% Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabis cigarette by frequent and occasional smokers, OF was collected with the Oral-Eze device for up to 30h. Samples were analyzed for multiple cannabinoids by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Frequent smokers had significantly greater OF THCCOOH concentrations than occasional smokers at all times, and showed positive results for a significantly longer time. We evaluated multiple cannabinoid cutoffs; the shortest last detection times were observed when THC ≥1μg/L, and CBD or CBN ≥1μg/L. With these cutoffs, last detection times, about 1–13.5h, were not significantly different between groups, demonstrating suitability for short-term cannabinoid detection independent of smoking history. Cutoffs utilizing THC alone or combined with THCCOOH showed significantly different last detection times between groups. The widest detection windows were observed with THC ≥1 or 2μg/L or THCCOOH ≥20ng/L. Our data illustrate the effectiveness of the Oral-Eze device for OF collection, the impact of self-administered smoked cannabis history on OF cannabinoid results, and the ability to improve interpretation and tailor OF cannabinoid cutoffs to fulfill the detection window needs of a given program. PMID:24652685

  13. Pharmacokinetic study of isocorynoxeine metabolites mediated by cytochrome P450 enzymes in rat and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lizhu; Zang, Bin; Qi, Wen; Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Haibo; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Isocorynoxeine (ICN) is one of the major bioactive tetracyclic oxindole alkaloids found in Uncaria rhynchophylla (Miq.) Jacks. that is widely used for the treatment of hypertension, vascular dementia, and stroke. The present study was undertaken to assess the plasma pharmacokinetic characteristics of major ICN metabolites, and the role of simulated gastric and intestinal fluid (SGF and SIF), human and rat liver microsomes (HLMs and RLMs), and seven recombinant human CYP enzymes in the major metabolic pathway of ICN. A rapid, sensitive and accurate UHPLC/Q-TOF MS method was validated for the simultaneous determination of ICN and its seven metabolites in rat plasma after oral administration of ICN at 40mg/kg. It was found that 18.19-dehydrocorynoxinic acid (DCA) and 5-oxoisocorynoxeinic acid (5-O-ICA) were both key and predominant metabolites, rather than ICN itself, due to the rapid and extensive metabolism of ICN in vivo. The further study indicated that ICN was mainly metabolized in human or rat liver, and CYPs 2C19, 3A4 and 2D6 were the major enzymes responsible for the biotransformation of ICN to DCA and 5-O-ICA in human. These findings are of significance in understanding of the pharmacokinetic nature of tetracyclic oxindole alkaloids, and provide helpful information for the clinical co-administration of the herbal preparations containing U. rhynchophylla with antihypertensive drugs that are mainly metabolized by CYP3A4 and CYP2C19. PMID:27094112

  14. Species differences in the pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil as determined in wildtype and humanized PepT1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E

    2016-05-01

    PepT1 (SLC15A1) is a high-capacity low-affinity transporter that is important in the absorption of digested di/tripeptides from dietary protein in the small intestine. PepT1 is also crucial for the intestinal uptake and absorption of therapeutic agents such as the β-lactam aminocephalosporins and antiviral prodrugs. Species differences, however, have been observed in PepT1-mediated intestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics, thereby, making it more difficult to predict systemic drug exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the in situ intestinal permeability of the PepT1 substrate cefadroxil in wildtype and humanized PepT1 (huPepT1) mice, and the in vivo absorption and disposition of drug after escalating oral doses. The in situ perfusions indicated that cefadroxil had a twofold higher affinity (i.e., twofold lower Km) for jejunal PepT1 in huPepT1 mice, lower but substantial permeability in all regions of the small intestine, and low but measureable permeability in the colon as compared to wildtype animals. The in vivo experiments indicated almost superimposable pharmacokinetic profiles between the two genotypes after intravenous bolus dosing of cefadroxil. In contrast, after oral dose escalation, the systemic exposure of cefadroxil was reduced in huPepT1 mice as compared to wildtype animals. Moreover, the AUC and Cmax versus dose relationships were nonlinear for huPepT1 but not wildtype mice, and similar to that observed from human subjects. In conclusion, our findings indicate that huPepT1 mice may provide a valuable tool in the drug discovery process by better predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of PepT1 substrates in humans. PMID:26979860

  15. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of use of the synthetic cannabinoid agonists UR-144 and XLR-11 in human urine.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Ofsa, Bill; Keil, Alyssa Marie; Simon, John R; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2014-09-01

    Ongoing changes in the synthetic cannabinoid drug market create the need for relevant targeted immunoassays for rapid screening of biological samples. We describe the validation and performance characteristics of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay designed to detect use of one of the most prevalent synthetic cannabinoids in urine, UR-144, by targeting its pentanoic acid metabolite. Fluorinated UR-144 (XLR-11) has been demonstrated to metabolize to this common product. The assay has significant cross-reactivity with UR-144-5-OH, UR-144-4-OH and XLR-11-4-OH metabolites, but <10% cross-reactivity with the parent compounds, and no measurable cross-reactivity with other synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites at concentrations of <1,000 ng/mL. The assay's cutoff is 5 ng/mL relative to the pentanoic acid metabolite of UR-144, which is used as the calibrator. The method was validated with 90 positive and negative control urine samples for UR-144, XLR-11 and its metabolites tested versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined to be 100% for the assay at the specified cutoff. PMID:24908262

  16. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  17. Assessment of juvenile pigs to serve as human pediatric surrogates for preclinical formulation pharmacokinetic testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by the various biological, clinical, and formulation challenges associated with age-based populations. A primary cause for this lack of development is the inability to accurately predict ontogenic changes that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in children using trad...

  18. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke. PMID:26238742

  19. Late-Postnatal Cannabinoid Exposure Persistently Increases FoxP2 Expression within Zebra Finch Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Soderstrom, Ken; Luo, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Prior work has shown that cannabinoid exposure of zebra finches during sensorimotor stages of vocal development alters song patterns produced in adulthood. We are currently working to identify physiological substrates for this altered song learning. FoxP2 is a transcription factor associated with altered vocal development in both zebra finches and humans. This protein shows a distinct pattern of expression within Area X of striatum that coincides with peak expression of CB1 cannabinoid receptors during sensorimotor learning. Coincident expression in a brain region essential for song learning led us to test for a potential signaling interaction. We have found that cannabinoid agonists acutely increase expression of FoxP2 throughout striatum. When administered during sensorimotor song learning, cannabinoids increase basal levels of striatal FoxP2 expression in adulthood. Thus, song-altering cannabinoid treatments are associated with persistent increases in basal expression of FoxP2 in zebra finch striatum. PMID:20017118

  20. Improved RP-HPLC method to determine biapenem in human plasma/urine and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Libo; Liu, Yi; Kou, Zhibin; Bayasi, Aidijie; Cai, Huan; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Qian; Li, Yuzhen; Fang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Existing methods to determine biapenem (CAS 120410-24-4), a carbapenem, either lacked sensitivity/reproducibility or had no internal standard as a control. Here an improved reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method was established in human plasma and urine. After adding p-aminobenzoic acid as the internal standard to plasma or urine, plasma samples were ultra-filtrated and urine samples were diluted directly. Chromatographic separations were carried out on a 4.6 mm x 150 mm column with acetonitrile-0.1 mol/l sodium acetate (2:98, v:v; pH 4.38 or 4.00) as mobile phase and UV detection at 300 nm. The extraction recovery was 91.51% for biapenem at the concentration level of 5 microg /ml in human plasma. The linear quantification range of the method was 0.1 to approximately 50 microg /ml for plasma and urine, with linear correlation coefficients greater than 0.998. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for biapenem at low, middle and high levels in human samples were less than 12.51% for plasma and less than 7.05% for urine. The RP-HPLC method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies, in which healthy subjects received multiple doses of biapenem (300 mg, i.v., b.i.d., for 5 continuous days). The pharmacokinetic results are presented. PMID:21528646

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Concentration-Effect Relationship of Oral LSD in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Schmid, Yasmin; Haschke, Manuel; Rentsch, Katharina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pharmacokinetics of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are unknown despite its common recreational use and renewed interest in its use in psychiatric research and practice. Methods: We characterized the pharmacokinetic profile, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, and urine recovery of lysergic acid diethylamide and its main metabolite after administration of a single oral dose of lysergic acid diethylamide (200 μg) in 8 male and 8 female healthy subjects. Results: Plasma lysergic acid diethylamide concentrations were quantifiable (>0.1ng/mL) in all the subjects up to 12 hours after administration. Maximal concentrations of lysergic acid diethylamide (mean±SD: 4.5±1.4ng/mL) were reached (median, range) 1.5 (0.5–4) hours after administration. Concentrations then decreased following first-order kinetics with a half-life of 3.6±0.9 hours up to 12 hours and slower elimination thereafter with a terminal half-life of 8.9±5.9 hours. One percent of the orally administered lysergic acid diethylamide was eliminated in urine as lysergic acid diethylamide, and 13% was eliminated as 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-lysergic acid diethylamide within 24 hours. No sex differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic profiles of lysergic acid diethylamide. The acute subjective and sympathomimetic responses to lysergic acid diethylamide lasted up to 12 hours and were closely associated with the concentrations in plasma over time and exhibited no acute tolerance. Conclusions: These first data on the pharmacokinetics and concentration-effect relationship of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are relevant for further clinical studies and serve as a reference for the assessment of intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide. PMID:26108222

  2. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation. PMID:27422645

  3. Pharmacokinetics of flavanone glycosides after ingestion of single doses of fresh-squeezed orange juice versus commercially processed orange juice in healthy humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange juice is a rich source of flavonoids known to be beneficial to cardiovascular health in humans. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of the main flavanone glycosides, hesperidin and narirutin, in humans after the consumption of two types of orange juice, fresh squee...

  4. Pharmacokinetic characterization of BMS-936561, an anti-CD70 antibody-drug conjugate, in preclinical animal species and prediction of its pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiqing; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Sung, Mei-Chen; Passmore, David; Kempe, Thomas; Wang, Xiaoli; Thevanayagam, Lourdes; Pan, Chin; Rao, Chetana; Srinivasan, Mohan; Zhang, Qian; Gangwar, Sanjeev; Deshpande, Shrikant; Cardarelli, Pina; Marathe, Punit; Yang, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    CD70 is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like type II integral membrane protein that is transiently expressed on activated T- and B-lymphocytes. Aberrant expression of CD70 was identified in both solid tumors and haematologic malignancies. BMS-936561 (αCD70_MED-A) is an antibody-drug conjugate composed of a fully human anti-CD70 monoclonal antibody (αCD70) conjugated with a duocarmycin derivative, MED-A, through a maleimide-containing citrulline-valine dipeptide linker. MED-A is a carbamate prodrug that is activated by carboxylesterase to its active form, MED-B, to exert its DNA alkylation activity. In vitro serum stability studies suggested the efficiencies of hydrolyzing the carbamate-protecting group in αCD70_MED-A followed a rank order of mouse > rat > > monkey > dog ~ human. Pharmacokinetics of αCD70_MED-A was evaluated in mice, monkeys, and dogs after single intravenous doses. In mice, αCD70_MED-A was cleared rapidly, with no detectable exposures after 15 min following dosing. In contrast, αCD70_MED-A was much more stable in monkeys and dogs. The clearance of αCD70_MED-A in monkeys was 58 mL/d/kg, ~2-fold faster than that in dogs (31 mL/d/kg). The human PK profiles of the total αCD70 and αCD70_MED-A were predicted using allometrically scaled monkeys PK parameters of αCD70 and the carbamate hydrolysis rate constant estimated in dogs. Comparing the predicted and observed human PK from the phase I study, the dose-normalized concentration-time profiles of αCD70_MED-A and the total αCD70 were largely within the 5(th) -95(th) percentile of the predicted profiles. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25869904

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Saquinavir plus Low-Dose Ritonavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Pregnant Women†

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Edward P.; Bardeguez, Arlene; Zorrilla, Carmen D.; Van Dyke, Russell; Hughes, Michael D.; Huang, Sharon; Pompeo, Lisa; Stek, Alice M.; Pitt, Jane; Watts, D. Heather; Smith, Elizabeth; Jiménez, Eleanor; Mofenson, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    The physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy make it difficult to predict antiretroviral pharmacokinetics (PKs), but few data exist on the PKs of protease inhibitors in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women. The objective of the present study was to determine the PKs of ritonavir (RTV)-enhanced saquinavir (SQV) in HIV-infected pregnant women by an area under the curve (AUC)-targeted approach. A phase I, formal PK evaluation was conducted with HIV-infected pregnant woman during gestation, during labor and delivery, and at 6 weeks postpartum. The SQV-RTV regimen was 800/100 mg twice a day (b.i.d.), and nucleoside analogs were administered concomitantly. The SQV exposure targeted was an AUC at 24 h of 10,000 ng · h/ml. Participants were evaluated for 12-h steady-state PKs at each time period. Thirteen subjects completed the PK evaluations during gestation, 7 completed the PK evaluations at labor and delivery, and 12 completed the PK evaluations postpartum. The mean baseline weight was 67.4 kg, and the median length of gestation was 23.3 weeks. All subjects achieved SQV exposures in excess of the target AUC. The SQV AUCs at 12 h (AUC12s) during gestation (29,373 ± 17,524 ng · h/ml [mean ± standard deviation]), during labor and delivery (26,189 ± 22,138 ng · h/ml), and during the postpartum period (35,376 ± 26,379 ng · h/ml) were not significantly different. The mean values of the PK parameters for RTV were lower during gestation than during the postpartum period: for AUC12, 7,811 and 13,127 ng · h/ml, respectively; for trough concentrations, 376 and 632 ng/ml, respectively; and for maximum concentrations, 1,256 and 2,252 ng/ml, respectively (P ≤ 0.05 for all comparisons). This is the first formal PK evaluation of a dual protease inhibitor regimen with HIV-infected pregnant women. The level of SQV exposure was sufficient at each time of evaluation. These data demonstrate large variability in SQV and RTV

  6. Single-dose pharmacokinetics of delavirdine mesylate and didanosine in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, G D; Fischl, M A; Shelton, M J; Cox, S R; Driver, M; DeRemer, M; Freimuth, W W

    1997-01-01

    Delavirdine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that is currently being evaluated in combination regimens with various nucleoside analogs, including didanosine. Due to the pH-dependent solubility of delavirdine, the buffering agents in didanosine formulations may reduce delavirdine absorption. To evaluate the potential interaction between these agents, 12 HIV-infected patients (mean [+/- standard deviation] CD4+ cell count, 304 +/- 213/mm3) were enrolled in a three-way crossover single-dose study. Didanosine (125 to 200 mg given as buffered tablets) and delavirdine mesylate (400 mg) pharmacokinetics were evaluated when each drug was given alone (treatments A and B, respectively), when the two drugs were given concurrently (treatment C), and when didanosine was given 1 h after delavirdine (treatment D). Delavirdine exposure was reduced by concurrent administration of didanosine. The maximum drug concentration in serum (Cmax) was reduced from 7.22 +/- 4.0 to 3.51 +/- 1.9 microM, and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC0-->infinity) was reduced from 22.5 +/- 14 to 14 +/- 5.7 microM.h. The extent of N-dealkylation, as indicated by the ratio of the N-dealkylated delavirdine AUC0-->infinity to the delavirdine AUC0-->infinity, was unchanged across study treatments (P = 0.708). Reductions in didanosine exposure were observed during concurrent administration with delavirdine with a Cmax reduction from 4.65 +/- 2.0 to 3.22 +/- 0.59 microM and an AUC0-->infinity reduction from 7.93 +/- 3.9 to 6.54 +/- 2.3 microM.h. Thus, concurrent administration of delavirdine and didanosine may reduce the AUC0-->infinity of both drugs, although the clinical significance of this reduction is unknown. Administration of delavirdine 1 h before didanosine avoided the interaction. Due to the single-dose nature of this study, these findings require further evaluation at steady

  7. [Palliative pain therapy, cannabinoids].

    PubMed

    Radbruch, L; Elsner, F

    2005-10-01

    Cancer pain treatment should follow the recommendations of the World Health Organisation. Treatment should be with oral application, regular application times and following the analgesic step-ladder. Non-opioids such as dipyrone or non-steroids are used for slight to moderate pain, step-2 opioids such as tramadol or tilidine/naloxone for moderate pain and step-3 opioids such as morphine, oxycodone or hydromorphone for severe pain. Transdermal application of fentanyl or buprenorphine offer a non-invasive parenteral alternative for patients with stable pain syndromes. Cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol offer a valuable add-on option for cancer patients with refractory pain, spasticity, nausea or appetite loss. PMID:15965665

  8. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shusen; Zimmermann, Anthony E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to describe cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), which is thought to be induced by long-term cannabis use, and provide clinical pharmacists with information to manage the hyperemetic phase of CHS. Method: Published literature was searched and reviewed using PubMed. Results: CHS is characterized by intractable nausea and vomiting without an obvious organic cause and associated learned compulsive hot water bathing behavior. Patients often seek care in the emergency department (ED) for symptomatic relief. Conclusion: CHS is potentially underrecognized and underdiagnosed in the ED, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in long-term cannabis use patients with CHS symptoms to avoid unnecessary extensive diagnostic workup including invasive radiologic imaging. Pharmacists have an important role in CHS recognition, education, and symptom management. PMID:24421535

  9. Mucosal tissue pharmacokinetics of the integrase inhibitor raltegravir in a humanized mouse model: Implications for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Yang, Kuo-Hsiung; Sykes, Craig; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Kashuba, Angela D M; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Orally administered anti-retroviral drugs show considerable promise for HIV/AIDS pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). For the success of these strategies, pharmacokinetic (PK) data defining the optimal concentration of the drug needed for protection in relevant mucosal exposure sites is essential. Here we employed a humanized mouse model to derive comprehensive PK data on the HIV integrase inhibitor raltegravir (RAL), a leading PrEP drug candidate. Under steady state conditions following oral dosing, plasma and multiple mucosal tissues were sampled simultaneously. RAL exhibited higher drug exposure in mucosal tissues relative to that in plasma with one log higher exposure in vaginal and rectal tissue and two logs higher exposure in intestinal mucosa reflecting the trends seen in the human studies. These data demonstrate the suitability of RAL for HIV PrEP and validate the utility of humanized mouse models for deriving important preclinical PK-PD data. PMID:26771889

  10. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  11. Ebola Virus Infection: Review of the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties of Drugs Considered for Testing in Human Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Madelain, Vincent; Nguyen, Thi Huyen Tram; Olivo, Anaelle; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Guedj, Jérémie; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Mentré, France

    2016-08-01

    The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease is the largest epidemic to date in terms of the number of cases, deaths, and affected areas. In October 2015, no antiviral agents had proven antiviral efficacy in patients. However, in September 2014, the World Health Organization inventoried and has since regularly updated a list of potential drug candidates with demonstrated antiviral efficacy in in vitro or animal models. This includes agents belonging to various therapeutic classes, namely direct antiviral agents (favipiravir and BCX4430), a combination of antibodies (ZMapp), type I interferons, RNA interference-based drugs (TKM-Ebola and AVI-7537), and anticoagulant drugs (rNAPc2). Here, we review the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information presently available for these drugs, using data obtained in healthy volunteers for pharmacokinetics and data obtained in human clinical trials or animal models for pharmacodynamics. Future studies evaluating these drugs in clinical trials are critical to confirm their efficacy in humans, propose appropriate doses, and evaluate the possibility of treatment combinations. PMID:26798032

  12. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, tolerability, and pharmacodynamics of metuzumab, a novel CD147 human-mouse chimeric and glycoengineered antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Qian; Feng, Fei; Huhe, Muren; Mi, Li; Chen, Zhinan

    2015-01-01

    Metuzumab is an affinity-optimized and nonfucosylated anti-CD147 human-mouse chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody with enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics, safety, and antitumor activities of metuzumab in mouse, rat, and monkey. The ADCC activity was assessed by a lactate dehydrogenase release assay. The pharmacokinetics of metuzumab were determined in Sprague-Dawley rats and in cynomolgus monkeys. Single- and repeat-dose toxicology studies of the i.v. administration of high-dose metuzumab were conducted in cynomolgus monkeys. Mice bearing human tumor xenografts were used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of metuzumab. The ADCC potency of metuzumab was enhanced compared with the nonglycoengineered parental antibody. Metuzumab also effectively inhibited tumor growth in A549 and NCI-H520 xenograft models. In the monkey model, the total clearance of metuzumab decreased with increasing dose. The nonspecific clearance in monkeys was estimated to be 0.53 to 0.92 mL/h/kg. In single- and repeat-dose toxicology studies in cynomolgus monkeys, metuzumab did not induce any distinct or novel adverse findings and was well tolerated at all tested doses. These preclinical safety data facilitated the initiation of an ongoing clinical trial of metuzumab for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. PMID:25376611

  13. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses. PMID:25683773

  14. UPLC-MS-MS Method for the Determination of Vilazodone in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    El-Bagary, Ramzia; Hashem, Hanaa; Fouad, Marwa; Tarek, Sally

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive, rapid and simple liquid chromatographic-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the quantitative determination of vilazodone in human plasma and for the study of the pharmacokinetic behavior of vilazodone in healthy Egyptian volunteers. With escitalopram as internal standard (IS), liquid-liquid extraction was used for the purification and preconcentration of analytes from human plasma matrix using diethyl ether. The separation was performed on an Acquity UPLC BEH shield RP C18 column (1.7 µm, 2.1 × 150 mm). Isocratic elution was applied using methanol-0.2% formic acid (90:10, v/v). Detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer with multiple reaction monitoring mode via an electrospray ionization source at m/z 442.21 → 155.23 for vilazodone and m/z 325.14 → 109.2 for escitalopram. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 1-200 ng/mL with the lower limit of quantification at 1 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision showed relative standard deviation ≤3.3%. The total run time was 1.5 min. This method was successfully applied for clinical pharmacokinetic investigation, and a preliminary metabolic study was also carried out. PMID:27209054

  15. Safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of atevirdine mesylate (U-87201E) in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Been-Tiktak, A M; Vrehen, H M; Schneider, M M; van der Feltz, M; Branger, T; Ward, P; Cox, S R; Harry, J D; Borleffs, J C

    1995-01-01

    Atevirdine mesylate (U-87201E) is a new nonnucleoside (bisheteroarylpiperazine) inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase. In a double-blind, escalating single-dose study the safety, tolerance, and pharmacokinetics of atevirdine mesylate were investigated in 24 asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive male patients. Each patient received one single oral dose of atevirdine mesylate and placebo separated by an interval of 1 to 3 weeks. For each dose level (400, 800, 1,200, and 1,600 mg) six patients received drug and placebo on separate occasions. Blood samples were collected before dosing and at intervals afterward for safety evaluation and estimation of atevirdine and metabolite levels. The concentrations of atevirdine and its principal metabolite (U-89255) in serum were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results of the study showed that atevirdine mesylate is well tolerated at all dose levels. No clinically significant effects on vital signs, electrocardiograms, or laboratory tests were observed. Occasional headache and nausea were reported both in the drug group and in the placebo group. The times to peak values were relatively short (0.5 to 1.0 h), suggesting a rapid absorption. The maximum concentrations of drug in serum were 1.4 microM (400 mg), 4.2 microM (800 mg), 7.3 microM (1,200 mg), and 5.8 microM (1,600 mg). The values of the pharmacokinetic parameters for atevirdine were found to have relatively large intersubject variabilities, and consequently, the study had little power to detect dose-dependent changes in the values of the pharmacokinetic parameters. The oral clearance of atevirdine tended to increase by 90% as the atevirdine mesylate doses increased from 400 to 1,600 mg, but this change in oral clearance was not statistically significant. The values of the pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the study were similar to those found in a previous single-dose study in healthy

  16. Pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and tolerability of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors: impact of human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tenor, Hermann; Hatzelmann, Armin; Beume, Rolf; Lahu, Gezim; Zech, Karl; Bethke, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Since more than two decades anti-inflammatory effects of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-4 have been described in numerous cellular and animal studies and were finally confirmed in clinical trials. The path from an early, pioneering study with Ro20-1724 showing reduction of psoriatric plaque size in 1979 to modern PDE4 inhibitors such as oral apremilast in development for psoriasis, the inhaled PDE4 inhibitor GSK256066 in development for asthma and COPD and finally roflumilast, the first PDE4 inhibitor approved and currently marketed as an oral, once-daily remedy for severe COPD was marked by large progress in chemical optimization based on improved understanding of PDE4 biology and drug-like properties determining the appropriate pharmacokinetic profile. In this chapter aspects of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of PDE4 inhibitors, which have been in clinical development over the years are summarized with specific emphasis on their clinical pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:21695636

  17. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems §...

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Levofloxacin against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in Human Skin Blister Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Trampuz, Andrej; Wenk, Markus; Rajacic, Zarko; Zimmerli, Werner

    2000-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in serum and in skin blister fluid (SBF) was determined for 20 volunteers after a single 500-mg oral dose of levofloxacin. In addition, ex vivo bactericidal activity of SBF against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was studied. SBF containing levofloxacin and granulocytes killed 5.2 log of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria and 2.0 log of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria during a 6-h incubation. PMID:10770776

  1. Stable isotope methodology in the pharmacokinetic studies of androgenic steroids in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S. )

    1990-04-01

    The use of stable isotopically labeled steroids combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has found a broad application in pharmacologic studies. Initially, stable isotopically labeled steroids served as the ideal analytic internal standard for GC/MS analysis; however, their in vivo use has expanded and has proven to be a powerful pharmacokinetic tool. We have successfully used stable isotope methodology to study the pharmacokinetic/bioavailability of androgens. The primary advantage of the technique is that endogenous and exogenous steroids with the same basic structure can be differentiated by using stable isotopically labeled analogs. The method was used to examine the pharmacokinetics of testosterone and testosterone propionate, and to clarify the influence of endogenous testosterone. Another advantage of the isotope methods is that steroidal drugs can be administered concomitantly in two formulations (e.g., solution and solid dosage). A single set of blood samples serves to describe the time course of the formulations being compared. This stable isotope coadministration technique was used to estimate the relative bioavailability of 17 alpha-methyltestosterone. 35 references.

  2. Use of biological markers and pharmacokinetics in human health risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Hattis, D

    1991-01-01

    There are two reasons to connect discussions of biological markers and pharmacokinetics. First, both tend to open up the black box between exposure and effect. Doing this promises more complete scientific understanding than simple input-output analysis, the possibility of better mechanism-based projection of risk beyond the range of possible direct observations, and the possibility of greater sensitivity of analysis, in some cases going from the organism to the cell as the unit of analysis. Second, pharmacokinetic (or similar pharmacodynamic) analysis will often be essential for appropriate interpretation of biological marker information. One needs some sort of dynamic model of the generation and loss of the marker in relation to exposure in order to use a biological marker, either to form a better measure of dosage (either accumulated past dose, or biologically relevant dose), or to make an improved prediction of effect. (For example, the use of a blood cadmium level alone to predict kidney effects might be inferior to predictions based on aggregate past accumulation of cadmium in the kidney, based on the past history of cadmium blood levels x time). Several examples will be discussed of the use of biomarkers and pharmacokinetics in risk assessments for both carcinogenesis and other effects. PMID:2050066

  3. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters. Methods: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps of model rate constants k1, k3 and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake. Results: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k1 (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer uptake (mean spearman R = 0.88) 5 min post injection (pi). Moreover, positive relationships were found between late tracer uptake (90 min pi) and both k3 and the net influx rate constant, Ki (mean spearman R = 0.56 and R = 0.86; respectively). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility to extract relevant parameters from voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis to be used for preclinical validation of 64Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia-specific PET tracer. PMID:26854145

  4. Human pharmacokinetic study of tutin in honey; a plant-derived neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fields, Barry A; Reeve, John; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Mueller, Utz

    2014-10-01

    Over the last 150 years a number of people in New Zealand have been incapacitated, hospitalised, or died from eating honey contaminated with tutin, a plant-derived neurotoxin. A feature of the most recent poisoning incident in 2008 was the large variability in the onset time of clinical signs and symptoms of toxicity (0.5-17 h). To investigate the basis of this variability a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in which 6 healthy males received a single oral dose of tutin-containing honey giving a tutin dose of 1.8 μg/kg body weight. The serum concentration-time curve for all volunteers exhibited two discrete peaks with the second and higher level occurring at approximately 15 h post-dose. Two subjects reported mild, transient headache at a time post-dose corresponding to maximum tutin concentrations. There were no other signs or symptoms typical of tutin intoxication such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness or seizures. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a two-site absorption model resulted in a good fit to the observed concentration data. A novel analytical method subsequently revealed the presence of glycoside conjugates of tutin in addition to unconjugated tutin in honey. These pharmacokinetic data will be important to better define a safe maximum tutin concentration in honey. PMID:25084484

  5. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of UK-49,858, a metabolically stable triazole antifungal drug, in animals and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, M J; Jevons, S; Tarbit, M H

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of UK-49,858 (fluconazole), a novel triazole antifungal agent which is being developed for oral and intravenous use, was determined in mice, rats, dogs, and humans. Comparative data following oral and intravenous administration showed that bioavailability was essentially complete in all four species. Peak concentrations in plasma of drug normalized to a 1-mg/kg dose level following oral administration, were relatively high: 0.7, 0.6, 1.1, and 1.4 micrograms/ml in mice, rats, dogs, and humans, respectively. The volumes of distribution ranged between 1.1 liter/kg in mice and 0.7 liter/kg in humans, which are approximate to the values for total body water. Whole body autoradiography studies in mice following intravenous administration of [14C]UK-49,858 demonstrated that the drug was evenly distributed throughout the tissues, including the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Plasma protein binding was low (11 to 12%) in all species. Marked species differences were observed in elimination half-lives, with mean values of 4.8, 4.0, 14, and 22 h in mice, rats, dogs, and humans, respectively. The major route of elimination of the drug was renal clearance, with about 70% of the dose being excreted unchanged in the urine in each species. Studies with [14C]UK-49,858 on metabolism and excretion (intravenous and oral) in mice and dogs showed that about 90% of the dose was recovered as unchanged drug in urine and feces, confirming the metabolic stability of the drug. This pharmacokinetic profile is markedly different from that of imidazole antifungal drugs and undoubtedly contributes to the excellent efficacy of UK-49,858 in vivo. Images PMID:3004323

  6. It's All in the Rhythm: The Role of Cannabinoids in Neural Oscillations and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Hajós, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated over the past several decades suggesting that both exocannabinoids and endocannabinoids play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The current article presents evidence suggesting that one of the mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce psychosis is through the alteration in synchronized neural oscillations. Neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) ranges, are disrupted in schizophrenia and are involved in various areas of perceptual and cognitive function. Regarding cannabinoids, preclinical evidence from slice and local field potential recordings has shown that central cannabinoid receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) agonists decrease the power of neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma and theta bands. Further, the administration of cannabinoids during critical stages of neural development has been shown to disrupt the brain's ability to generate synchronized neural oscillations in adulthood. In humans, studies examining the effects of chronic cannabis use (utilizing electroencephalography) have shown abnormalities in neural oscillations in a pattern similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Finally, recent studies in humans have also shown disruptions in neural oscillations after the acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis. Taken together, these data suggest that both acute and chronic cannabinoids can disrupt the ability of the brain to generate synchronized oscillations at functionally relevant frequencies. Hence, this may represent one of the primary mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce disruptions in attention, working memory, sensory-motor integration, and many other psychosis-related behavioral effects. PMID:26850792

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  8. Human plasma-derived FVIII/VWD concentrate (Biostate): a review of experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Paul; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Curtin, Julie; Barnes, Chris; Dunkley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex concentrates are used to control bleeding in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or haemophilia A (HA). The properties of these haemostatic factor concentrates vary widely, which can have significant clinical implications. This review provides an extensive overview of the molecular properties, in addition to pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data, and case studies of clinical experience of one such concentrate, Biostate. These data are discussed in the context of various therapeutic applications and compared with other factor concentrate products. Data are presented from data on file from the manufacturer; product information and published experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy study data; and example case studies of clinical experience. The data discussed herein demonstrate that Biostate has well-established efficacy profiles in the treatment of patients with VWD or HA, with the control of bleeding rated as ‘excellent’, ‘good’ or ‘moderate’ in >90% of patients. In an immune-tolerance induction setting, 73% of patients achieved a complete response following treatment with Biostate. Biostate was generally well tolerated in patients with HA or VWD, with infrequent minor adverse events reported and no reported cases of clinically relevant thrombosis. PMID:27114741

  9. A pilot, first-in-human, pharmacokinetic study of 9cUAB30 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Jill M; Hoel, Ryan; Pomplun, Marcia; Havighurst, Tom; Stublaski, Jeanne; Wollmer, Barbara; Krontiras, Helen; Brouillette, Wayne; Muccio, Donald; Kim, Kyungmann; Grubbs, Clinton J; Bailey, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    9cUAB30 is a synthetic analog of 9-cis-retinoic acid with chemopreventive activity in cell lines and in animal models. The purpose of this first-in-human evaluation of 9cUAB30 was to evaluate the single-dose pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity of the compound in healthy volunteers at 3 dose levels. This study enrolled 14 patients to receive a single dose of 5, 10, or 20 mg of 9cUAB30. Plasma and urine samples were collected to assess 9cUAB30 concentrations by a validated LC/MS MS method. 9cUAB30 was well tolerated, with 1 patient experiencing grade 2 toxicity and no grade 3 or 4 toxicities reported. T(max) occurred approximately 3 hours after dose administration with the plasma half-life ranging from 2.79 to 7.21 hours. AUC increased linearly across the examined dose range of 5 to 20 mg; C(max) was proportional to the log of the dose. The plasma clearance ranged from 25 to 39 L/h compared to the renal clearance which ranged from 0.018 to 0.103 L/h. 9cUAB30 has a favorable toxicity and pharmacokinetic profile, with oral availability and primarily hepatic metabolism. Further dose ranging studies with once a day dosing are underway. PMID:21149332

  10. Effect of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum) supplementation on digoxin pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Bill J; Swain, Ashley; Barone, Gary W; Williams, D Keith; Breen, Philip; Yates, C Ryan; Stuart, Leslie B; Hubbard, Martha A; Tong, Yudong; Cheboyina, Sreekhar

    2007-02-01

    Phytochemical-mediated modulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug transporters may give rise to many herb-drug interactions. Serial plasma concentration-time profiles of the P-gp substrate, digoxin, were used to determine whether supplementation with goldenseal or kava kava modified P-gp activity in vivo. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a standardized goldenseal (3210 mg daily) or kava kava (1227 mg daily) supplement for 14 days, followed by a 30-day washout period. Subjects were also randomized to receive rifampin (600 mg daily, 7 days) and clarithromycin (1000 mg daily, 7 days) as positive controls for P-gp induction and inhibition, respectively. Digoxin (Lanoxin, 0.5 mg) was administered p.o. before and at the end of each supplementation and control period. Serial digoxin plasma concentrations were obtained over 24 h and analyzed by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Comparisons of area under the curve (AUC)((0-3)), AUC((0-24)), C(max,) CL/F, and elimination half-life were used to assess the effects of goldenseal, kava kava, rifampin, and clarithromycin on digoxin pharmacokinetics. Rifampin produced significant reductions (p < 0.01) in AUC((0-3)), AUC((0-24)), CL/F, t(1/2), and C(max), whereas clarithromycin increased these parameters significantly (p < 0.01). With the exception of goldenseal's effect on C(max) (14% increase), no statistically significant effects on digoxin pharmacokinetics were observed following supplementation with either goldenseal or kava kava. When compared with rifampin and clarithromycin, supplementation with these specific formulations of goldenseal or kava kava did not appear to affect digoxin pharmacokinetics, suggesting that these supplements are not potent modulators of P-gp in vivo. PMID:17079360

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  12. USE OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELS TO QUANTIFY THE IMPACT OF HUMAN AGE AND INTERINDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY PERTINENT TO RISK (FINAL REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final R...

  13. Cannabinoid pharmacology: the first 66 years

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2006-01-01

    Research into the pharmacology of individual cannabinoids that began in the 1940s, several decades after the presence of a cannabinoid was first detected in cannabis, is concisely reviewed. Also described is how this pharmacological research led to the discovery of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and of endogenous ligands for these receptors, to the development of CB1- and CB2-selective agonists and antagonists and to the realization that the endogenous cannabinoid system has significant roles in both health and disease, and that drugs which mimic, augment or block the actions of endogenously released cannabinoids must have important therapeutic applications. Some goals for future research are identified. PMID:16402100

  14. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  15. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. PMID:26092091

  16. Development of an LC-tandem mass spectrometry method for the separation of montelukast and its application to a pharmacokinetic study in humans.

    PubMed

    Ezzeldin, E; Tammam, M H; AboTalib, N F

    2014-11-01

    Accurate, precise, and sensitive LC-MS/MS assay method for the determination of montelukast (MO) in human plasma samples using gliclazide (GL) as internal standard was developed and applied in pharmacokinetics study.MO extracted by protein precipitation using acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was carried out using a Agilant Triple quadrupoles mass spectrometer with API source with an Agilant SB- C18 (50×4.6 mm), 1.8 µm particle size column. A mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: 0.1% formic acid (84:16) was delivered. Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of (10.00-800.00) ng/ml. The bioanalytical method for determination of MO was successfully applied to assess pharmacokinetics of montelukast. The LLOQ was sensitive enough for detecting terminal phase concentrations of the drug. This study showed that developed method is suitable for MO pharmacokinetic study. PMID:24500731

  17. Cannabinoid Modulation of Neuroinflammatory Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Viviane M; Rezende, Rafael M; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has been dedicated to the study of the endocannabinoid system. The isolation of Cannabis sativa main psychotropic compound, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has led to the discovery of an atypical neurotransmission system that modulates the release of other neurotransmitters and participates in many biological processes, including the cascade of inflammatory responses. In this context, cannabinoids have been studied for their possible therapeutic properties in neuroinflammatory diseases. In this review, historic and biochemical aspects of cannabinoids are discussed, as well as their function as modulators of inflammatory processes and therapeutic perspectives for neurodegenerative disorders, particularly, multiple sclerosis. PMID:23204985

  18. Cannabinoid modulation of neuroinflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Saito, Viviane M; Rezende, Rafael M; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has been dedicated to the study of the endocannabinoid system. The isolation of Cannabis sativa main psychotropic compound, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has led to the discovery of an atypical neurotransmission system that modulates the release of other neurotransmitters and participates in many biological processes, including the cascade of inflammatory responses. In this context, cannabinoids have been studied for their possible therapeutic properties in neuroinflammatory diseases. In this review, historic and biochemical aspects of cannabinoids are discussed, as well as their function as modulators of inflammatory processes and therapeutic perspectives for neurodegenerative disorders, particularly, multiple sclerosis. PMID:23204985

  19. Determination of photocyanine in human serum by HPLC and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Li, Su; Jian, Feng-Bi; Zhan, Jing; Zou, Ben-Yan; Liao, Hai

    2014-09-01

    Photocyanine, a novel amphoteric phthalocyanine drug, showed favorable anticancer activity in vivo. Pharmacokinetic study in cancer patients is an important component in dose administration choice. In this study, a rapid, sensitive analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection was developed and validated for the determination of four isomers of photocyanine (FD1-4) in cancer patients. Sample preparation involved liquid-liquid extraction with a combination of ultrasound and N,N-dimethyl formamide. Calibration curves (1/x(2)) offered satisfactory linearity for the four isomers of photocyanine. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) for FD1-3 isomers was 30 ng/mL, and LLOQ for FD-4 was 5 ng/mL. Inter- and intra-day accuracies for four isomers ranged from 96.6 to 105.5%, and 95.0 to 103.6%, respectively. Inter- and intra-day precision ranged from 4.8 to 8.9%, and 3.6 to 12.2%, respectively. Stability studies showed that photocyanine was stable. This method was successfully used to quantify photocyanine in a pharmacokinetic study in which a single-dose of photocyanine (0.1 mg/kg) was intravenously administered to patients with cancer. On the basis of the discovery that photocyanine has a half-life of 57.5 h in vivo, we suggest that avoiding light for a longer period is essential for patients undergoing photocyanine therapy. PMID:23888003

  20. High-dose short-term administration of naringin did not alter talinolol pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M A; Staubach, P; Tamai, I; Langguth, P

    2015-02-20

    Naringin is considered the major causative ingredient of the inhibition of intestinal drug uptake by grapefruit juice. Moreover, it is contained in highly dosed nutraceuticals available on the market. A controlled, open, randomized, crossover study was performed in 10 healthy volunteers to investigate the effect of high-dose naringin on the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of intestinal organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)-mediated uptake. Following 6-day supplementation with 3 capsules of 350 mg naringin daily, 100mg talinolol were administered orally with 3 capsules of the same dietary supplement (1050 mg naringin) on the seventh day. This test treatment was compared to 100mg talinolol only (control). The results showed that short-term high-dose naringin supplementation did not significantly affect talinolol pharmacokinetics. Geometric mean ratios of test versus control ranged between 0.90 and 0.98 for talinolol c(max), AUC(0-48 h), AUC(0-∞), t(1/2) and A(e(0-48 h)). The high dose may provoke inhibition of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which counteracts the uptake inhibition. As disintegration and dissolution processes are required for the solid dosage form, dissolved naringin may arrive at the site of interaction after talinolol is already absorbed. In conclusion, the effect of nutraceuticals on drug pharmacokinetics can deviate from that observed when administered as food component due to the different dose and dosage form. PMID:25486333

  1. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  2. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  3. Simultaneous Quantification of 20 Synthetic Cannabinoids and 21 Metabolites, and Semi-quantification of 12 Alkyl Hydroxy Metabolites in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Clandestine laboratories constantly produce new synthetic cannabinoids to circumvent legislative efforts, complicating toxicological analysis. No extensive synthetic cannabinoid quantitative urinary methods are reported in the literature. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneously quantifying JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, JWH-398, RCS-4, AM-2201, MAM-2201, UR-144, CP 47,497-C7, CP 47,497-C8 and their metabolites, and JWH-203, AM-694, RCS-8, XLR-11 and HU-210 parent compounds in urine. Non-chromatographically resolved alkyl hydroxy metabolite isomers were considered semi-quantitative. β-glucuronidase hydrolyzed urine was extracted with 1 ml Biotage SLE+ columns. Specimens were reconstituted in 150 µL mobile phase consisting of 50% A (0.01% formic acid in water) and 50% B (0.01% formic acid in 50:50 methanol:acetonitrile). 4 and 25 µL injections were performed to acquire data in positive and negative ionization modes, respectively. The LC-MS/MS instrument consisted of a Shimadzu UFLCxr system and an ABSciex 5500 Qtrap mass spectrometer with an electrospray source. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved utilizing a Restek Ultra Biphenyl column with a 0.5 ml/min flow rate and an overall run time of 19.5 and 11.4 min for positive and negative mode methods, respectively. Quantification was by multiple reaction monitoring with CP 47,497 compounds and HU-210 ionized via negative polarity; all other analytes were acquired in positive mode. Lower and upper limits of linearity were 0.1–1.0 and 50–100 µg/l (r2 > 0.994). Validation parameters were evaluated at three concentrations spanning linear dynamic ranges. Inter-day analytical recovery (bias) and imprecision (N=20) were 88.3–112.2% and 4.3–13.5% coefficient of variation, respectively. Extraction efficiencies and matrix effect (N=10) were 44–110 and −73 to 52%, respectively. We present

  4. HPLC method for measuring meropenem and biapenem concentrations in human peritoneal fluid and bile: application to comparative pharmacokinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Keiko; Ikawa, Kazuro; Ikeda, Kayo; Morikawa, Norifumi; Nakashima, Akira; Ohge, Hiroki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using ultrafiltration to pretreat peritoneal fluid and bile samples is developed to measure meropenem and biapenem concentrations in human peritoneal fluid and bile. Meropenem or biapenem in peritoneal fluid or bile samples is stabilized by mixing with 1 mol/L 3-morpholinopropanesulfonic acid buffer (pH 7.0) (1:1). The mixture is transferred to a Nanosep 10K centrifugal filter device; after centrifugation, the filtrate is subjected to reversed-phase HPLC, and the eluate is monitored at 300 nm. No interference from endogenous substances is observed. The lower limits of quantification are 0.05 microg/mL for peritoneal fluid and 0.1 microg/mL for bile. The new method has been applied to comparative site-specific-pharmacokinetic investigations in surgery patients. PMID:20515537

  5. HPLC fluorescence method for the determination of nizatidine in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Çakar, Mahmut B; Ulu, Sevgi T

    2014-06-01

    A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of nizatidine in human plasma. Nizatidine was derivatized by 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD-F). Chromatographic separation was performed on a Inertsil C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using isocratic elution by a mobile phase consisting of methanol/water (55:45) at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min. Amlodipine was used as the internal standard (IS). Fluorescence detector was used operated at 461 nm (excitation) and 517 nm (emission), respectively. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 50-2000 ng/mL. This method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of a dose (150 mg) of nizatidine. PMID:23836529

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabis in Cancer Cachexia-Anorexia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Stephanie E; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-07-01

    Anorexia can affect up to 90 % of people with advanced cancer. It is a complex symptom associated with changes in taste, lack of hunger at mealtimes and lack of food enjoyment. Associated weight loss is part of the physical decline that occurs as cancer worsens. Weight loss can also occur from cachexia, the increased metabolism of energy due to raised inflammatory cytokines, liver metastases and other factors seen in several advanced cancers. Independent of anorexia, although frequently associated (where it is referred to as the cachexia-anorexia syndrome), it accounts for a significant amount of morbidity and deaths in people with cancer. In particular, quality of life for the patient and the family is significantly affected with this syndrome as it causes anxiety and distress. Therefore, it is important that research into therapies is undertaken, particularly focusing on an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of compounds in this cachexic population. Cannabinoids are one such group of therapies that have received a large amount of media focus recently. However, there appears to be a lack on rigorous pharmacokinetic data of these complex and varied compounds in the cachexic population. Similarly, there is a lack of pharmacokinetic data in any population group for the non- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) cannabinoids (often due to the lack of analytical standards for quantification). This review will thus examine the pharmacokinetics of major cannabinoids i.e. THC and CBD in a cancer population. Overall, based on the current literature, evidence for the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome remains equivocal. A high-quality, rigorous, phase I/II study to elicit pharmacokinetic dose-concentration and concentration-response data, with a clinically acceptable mode of delivery to reduce intrapatient variability and enable more consistent bioavailability is needed in this population. PMID

  7. Safety, pharmacokinetics and neutralization of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01 in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, J E; Coates, E E; Yamshchikov, G; Saunders, J G; Holman, L; Enama, M E; DeZure, A; Lynch, R M; Gordon, I; Plummer, S; Hendel, C S; Pegu, A; Conan-Cibotti, M; Sitar, S; Bailer, R T; Narpala, S; McDermott, A; Louder, M; O'Dell, S; Mohan, S; Pandey, J P; Schwartz, R M; Hu, Z; Koup, R A; Capparelli, E; Mascola, J R; Graham, B S

    2015-12-01

    VRC-HIVMAB060-00-AB (VRC01) is a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolated from the B cells of an HIV-infected patient. It is directed against the HIV-1 CD4 binding site and is capable of potently neutralizing the majority of diverse HIV-1 strains. This Phase I dose-escalation study in healthy adults was conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD, USA). Primary objectives were the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VRC01 intravenous (i.v.) infusion at 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, given either once (20 mg/kg) or twice 28 days apart (all doses), and of subcutaneous (s.c.) delivery at 5 mg/kg compared to s.c. placebo given twice, 28 days apart. Cumulatively, 28 subjects received 43 VRC01 and nine received placebo administrations. There were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities. Mean 28-day serum trough concentrations after the first infusion were 35 and 57 μg/ml for groups infused with 20 mg/kg (n = 8) and 40 mg/kg (n = 5) doses, respectively. Mean 28-day trough concentrations after the second infusion were 56 and 89 μg/ml for the same two doses. Over the 5-40 mg/kg i.v. dose range (n = 18), the clearance was 0.016 l/h and terminal half-life was 15 days. After infusion VRC01 retained expected neutralizing activity in serum, and anti-VRC01 antibody responses were not detected. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) VRC01 was well tolerated when delivered i.v. or s.c. The mAb demonstrated expected half-life and pharmacokinetics for a human immunoglobulin G. The safety and PK results support and inform VRC01 dosing schedules for planning HIV-1 prevention efficacy studies. PMID:26332605

  8. Effect of Carum carvi, a herbal bioenhancer on pharmacokinetics of antitubercular drugs: A study in healthy human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Naiyma; Khajuria, Vijay; Gillani, Zahid H.; Tandon, Vishal R.; Arora, Ekta

    2014-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: The present study was undertaken in 20 healthy human volunteers to evaluate the effect of a herbal bioenhancer, Carum carvi on pharmacokinetics of rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide in fixed dose combination (FDC). Materials and Methods: It was a prospective, two-period, open-label, cross-over experiment on 20 healthy human male volunteers. The volunteers were administered a single dose of FDC containing rifampicin (450 mg), isoniazid (300 mg), and pyrazinamide (1000 mg) and after 10 days washout period the same FDC along with C. carvi extract (100 mg) was administered. Blood samples were collected at different time-points and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detailed pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated, which included Cmax, area under curve (AUC), time to reach maximum plasma concentration (Tmax), clearance (Cl), volume of distribution (Vd), and half-life (t½). Results: Additions of C. carvi extract lead to increase in plasma levels of rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide. The bioavailability indices Cmax of rifampicin increased from 4.57 ± 0.19 to 5.95 ± 0.19 (P = 0.000) and AUC increased from 40.11 ± 1.69 to 53.01 ± 1.88 (P = 0.000). Similarly, Cmax of isoniazid increased from 2.66 ± 0.16 to 3.62 ± 0.16 (P = 0.000) and AUC from 17.72 ± 0.78 to 22.87 ± 0.94 (P = 0.000). The bioavailability indices of pyrazinamide also revealed an increase in Cmax from 18.81 ± 0.79 to 25.06 ± 1.14 (P = 0.000) and AUC from 107.65 ± 4.42 to 137.71 ± 5.92 (P = 0.000), respectively. Conclusion: C. carvi acts as a bioenhancer and modifies the kinetics of antitubercular treatment (ATT) favorably. PMID:24741485

  9. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [(14)C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing.

    PubMed

    Madeen, Erin; Corley, Richard A; Crowell, Susan; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Mike; McQuistan, Tammie J; Garrard, Mary; Sudakin, Dan; Williams, David E

    2015-01-20

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [(14)C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL(-1) with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h(-1), followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h(-1). In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms. PMID:25418912

  10. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [14C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [14C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL–1 with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h–1, followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h–1. In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms. PMID:25418912

  11. Pharmacokinetic interaction of megestrol acetate with zidovudine in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Van Harken, D R; Pei, J C; Wagner, J; Pike, I M

    1997-01-01

    This nonrandomized, two-period crossover study was performed to assess whether concomitant administration of megestrol acetate influences the steady-state pharmacokinetics of zidovudine and its inactive 5'-O-glucuronide metabolite. Twelve HIV-positive, asymptomatic male volunteers received a 100-mg oral capsule dose of zidovudine at least 30 min before meals five times a day at 0700, 1100, 1500, 1900, and 2300 h on study days 1 to 3 and a single 100-mg dose at 0700 h on day 4. On days 5 to 17, 800 mg of megestrol acetate, as a 40-mg/ml aqueous suspension, was administered orally immediately before the 0700 h dose of zidovudine. On days 5 to 16, zidovudine was also administered at 1100, 1500, 1900, and 2300 h. Serial blood samples were collected for 12 h after the single 100-mg dose of zidovudine on days 4 and 17; trough samples were also obtained just before the 0700 h dose on days 2 to 4 and 15 to 17. Levels of zidovudine and its glucuronide in plasma were assayed by a validated radioimmunoassay. Statistical analysis of trough plasma level data indicated that steady-state levels of zidovudine and its glucuronide in plasma had been attained when pharmacokinetic assessments were made on days 4 and 17. When megestrol acetate and zidovudine were coadministered for 13 days, differences of -14, -6.5, and -4.6% in mean zidovudine peak concentration and areas under the curve at 0 to 4 and 0 to 12 h, respectively, +22.5% in mean trough concentration, +2.6% in mean plasma half-life, and no change in median time to peak were observed compared to conditions when zidovudine was administered alone; for zidovudine 5'-O-glucuronide the respective differences were -9, -7.3, -4.4, +2.3, and +10% and no change. None of the differences were statistically significant (P > 0.05). Concomitant therapy with megestrol acetate, at the dose employed to treat anorexia, cachexia, or an unexplained, significant weight loss in AIDS patients, did not alter the steady-state pharmacokinetics of

  12. Pharmacokinetic comparison of cefroxadin (CGP 9000) and cephalexin by simultaneous administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Lecaillon, J B; Hirtz, J L; Schoeller, J P; Humbert, G; Vischer, W

    1980-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of cefroxadin and cephalexin were compared after simultaneous oral administration of the two cephalosporins to 21 subjects. The influence of the dose, the formulation, and food intake on these parameters was investigated. Both drugs were equally well absorbed from all of the tested formulations; identical percentages of the dose were recovered in the urine in all cases. The elimination half-life of cefroxadin and, consequently, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve were about 10% less than those of cephalexin. Plasma concentrations and cumulative excretion curves of the two drugs were almost superimposable. Food intake had the same effect on both drugs; absorption was slowed, but the amounts absorbed were almost the same as those in fasted subjects. PMID:7447423

  13. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of hydrogen cyanide levels in human breath.

    PubMed

    Stamyr, Kristin; Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a potent and fast-acting toxin increasingly recognized as an important cause of death in fire victims. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of cyanide poisoning are essential to avoid fatalities. Unfortunately, there are at present few rapid diagnostic methods. A noninvasive methodology would be to use HCN in exhaled air as a marker for systemic exposure. To explore this possibility, we developed a preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The model suggests that breath HCN levels following inhalation exposure at near-lethal and lethal conditions are 0.1-1 ppm, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude higher than the background breath level of about 0.01 ppm in unexposed subjects. Hence, our results imply that breath analysis may be used as a rapid diagnostic method for cyanide poisoning. PMID:25069802

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Dapsone Administered Daily and Weekly in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Mirochnick, Mark; Cooper, Ellen; McIntosh, Ken; Xu, Jing; Lindsey, Jane; Jacobus, David; Mofenson, Lynne; Sullivan, John L.; Dankner, Wayne; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Nachman, Sharon; Wara, Diane W.; Johnson, Daniel; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Rathore, Mobeen H.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; McNamara, James

    1999-01-01

    Although dapsone is a commonly used alternative agent for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in children intolerant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there are few data that describe dapsone pharmacokinetics in children. We studied dapsone pharmacokinetics in 30 children (median age, 2.8 years; age range, 0.3 to 12 years) receiving a new proprietary liquid preparation by three dosing regimens (1 mg/kg of body weight daily, 2 mg/kg daily, or 4 mg/kg weekly). Dosing of children with 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly resulted in peak concentrations equivalent to those reached in adults receiving 100-mg tablets daily. For the entire population, the median half-life was 22.2 h (range, 7.1 to 40.3 h), the median oral clearance was 0.0365 liter/kg/h (range, 0.0104 to 0.1021 liter/kg/h), and the median oral apparent volume of distribution was 1.13 liters/kg (range, 0.50 to 2.32 liters/kg). The median dapsone oral clearance was significantly increased in those infants less than 2 years of age compared to the oral clearance in those over 2 years of age (0.0484 versus 0.0278 liter/kg/h; P = 0.011). These data suggest that absorption of this liquid preparation is adequate and that the concentrations in the sera of children receiving 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly are equivalent to those seen in adults receiving standard dapsone dosing. Dapsone oral clearance appears to be increased in children under 2 years of age. PMID:10543733

  15. Effect of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of almotriptan, an antimigraine agent in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fleishaker, Joseph C; Ryan, Kristi K; Jansat, Josep M; Carel, Barabara J; Bell, David J A; Burke, Moira T; Azie, Nkechi E

    2001-01-01

    Aims To assess the effect of a reversible MAO-A inhibitor, moclobemide, on the single-dose pharmacokinetics of almotriptan and assess the clinical consequences of any interaction. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers received the following treatments in a randomized, open-label, two-way crossover design (with a 1 week washout between treatments): (A) one 150 mg moclobemide tablet every 12 h for 8 days and one 12.5 mg almotriptan tablet on the morning of day 8; and (B) one 12.5 mg almotriptan tablet on day 8. Plasma almotriptan was quantified by h.p.l.c.-MS-MS, while urinary concentrations were measured by h.p.l.c.-u.v. Vital signs, ECGs, and adverse events were evaluated after almotriptan administration. Treatment effects on pharmacokinetics and vital signs were assessed by analysis of variance. Results Mean almotriptan AUC was higher (483 ± 99.9 vs 352 ± 75.4 ng ml−1 h, P = 0.0001) and oral clearance was lower (26.6 ± 4.00 vs 36.6 ± 5.89 l h−1, P = 0.0001) when almotriptan was administered with moclobemide. Mean half-life was longer (4.22 ± 0.78 vs 3.41 ± 0.45 h, P = 0.0002) after coadministration with moclobemide. Renal clearance of almotriptan was unaffected by moclobemide. No serious adverse events occurred and no clinically significant vital sign changes were observed. Conclusions Moclobemide increased plasma concentrations of almotriptan on average by 37%, but the combined administration of these two compounds was well tolerated. The degree of interaction was much less than that seen previously for sumatriptan or zolmitriptan given with moclobemide. PMID:11422001

  16. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Abacavir Alone and in Combination with Zidovudine in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, James A.; Lou, Yu; Symonds, William S.; Stein, Daniel S.

    2000-01-01

    Abacavir (1592U89) is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with potent activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) when used alone or in combination with other antiretroviral agents. The present study was conducted to determine the multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of abacavir in HIV-1-infected subjects following oral administration of daily doses that ranged from 600 to 1,800 mg, with and without zidovudine. Seventy-nine subjects received abacavir monotherapy for 4 weeks (200, 400, or 600 mg every 8 hours [TID] and 300 mg every 12 h [BID]) and thereafter received either zidovudine (200 mg TID or 300 mg BID) or matching placebo with abacavir for 8 additional weeks. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated for abacavir after administration of the first dose and at week 4 and for abacavir, zidovudine, and its glucuronide metabolite at week 12. The concentrations of abacavir in cerebrospinal fluid were determined in a subset of subjects. Steady-state plasma abacavir concentrations were achieved by week 4 of monotherapy and persisted to week 12. At steady state, abacavir pharmacokinetic parameters (area under the plasma concentration-time curve for a dosing interval [AUCtau] and peak concentration [Cmax]) were generally proportional to dose over the range of a 600- to 1,200-mg total daily dose. Coadministration of zidovudine with abacavir produced a small and inconsistent effect on abacavir pharmacokinetic parameters across the different doses. At the clinical abacavir dose (300 mg BID) zidovudine coadministration had no effect on the abacavir AUCtau, which is most closely associated with efficacy. Zidovudine pharmacokinetics appeared to be unaffected by abacavir. Statistically significant but weak relationships were found for the change in the log10 HIV-1 RNA load from the baseline to week 4 versus total daily AUCtau and Ctau (P < 0.05). The incidence of nausea was significantly associated with total daily AUCtau and Cmax

  17. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of subcutaneous immune globulin (human), 10% caprylate/chromatography purified in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, R L; Irani, A-M; Tracy, J; Tsoukas, C; Stark, D; Levy, R; Chen, J; Sorrells, S; Roberts, R; Gupta, S

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of intravenous immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an additional level of patient convenience and more options for patients with poor venous access or a history of intravenous IgG reactions. An open-label, pharmacokinetic trial (n = 32) determined the non-inferiority of the subcutaneous versus intravenous route of 10% caprylate/chromatography purified human immune globulin intravenous (IGIV-C; Gamunex®) administration by comparing the steady-state area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) of total plasma IgG in patients with primary immunodeficiency disease. Patients on stable IGIV-C received two intravenous infusions (administered 3 or 4 weeks apart). Seven to 10 days after the second intravenous infusion, all patients switched to a weekly infusion of subcutaneous IGIV-C, with the dose equal to 137% of the previous weekly equivalent intravenous dose, for up to 24 weeks. Samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were collected during steady state for intravenous and subcutaneous IGIV-C treatments. The AUC0-τ geometric least-squares mean ratio was 0·89 (90% confidence interval, 0·86–0·92) and met the criteria for non-inferiority. The overall mean steady-state trough concentration of plasma total IgG with subcutaneous IGIV-C was 11·4 mg/ml, 18·8% higher than intravenous IGIV-C (9·6 mg/ml). Subcutaneous IGIV-C was safe and well tolerated. Subcutaneous IGIV-C infusion-site reactions were generally mild/moderate and the incidence decreased over time. No serious bacterial infections were reported. Weekly subcutaneous IGIV-C infusion using 137% of the weekly equivalent intravenous immunoglobulin dose provides an AUC comparable to intravenous administration, thus allowing patients to maintain the same IgG preparation/formulation if switching between intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. PMID:20550549

  19. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Charles W; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced 2 hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hours following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 µg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative-stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  20. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  1. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of febuxostat in human plasma and its pharmacokinetic application.

    PubMed

    Vaka, Venkata Rami Reddy; Inamadugu, Jaswanth Kumar; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Ramesh, Mullangi; Katreddi, Hussain Reddy

    2013-11-01

    An improved, simple and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for quantification of febuxostat with 100 μL human plasma using febuxostat-d7 as an internal standard (IS) according to regulatory guidelines. The analyte and IS were extracted from human plasma via liquid-liquid extraction using diethyl ether. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax C18 column using a mixture of acetonitrile and 5 mm ammonium formate (60:40, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The total run time was 5.0 min and the elution of febuxostat and IS occurred at 1.0 and 1.5 min, respectively. A linear response function was established for the range of concentrations 1-6000 ng/mL (r > 0.99). The precursor to product ion transitions monitored for febuxostat and IS were m/z 317.1 → 261.1 and 324.2 → 262.1, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions (%RSD) were within 1.29-9.19 and 2.85-7.69%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies in humans. PMID:23733262

  2. Simultaneous determination of acetaminophen and dihydrocodeine in human plasma by UPLC-MS/MS: Its pharmacokinetic application.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiangjun; Lou, Dan; Su, Ding; Liu, Zebin; Gao, Pengtao; Zhang, Nan-sheng

    2015-06-15

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated to determine acetaminophen (AAP) and dihydrocodeine (DHC) in human plasma simultaneously. Plasma samples were prepared using protein precipitation with acetonitrile, the two analytes and the internal standard midazolam were separated on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column and mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a QTrap5500 mass spectrometer coupled with an electro-spray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The MRM transitions of m/z 151.2→110.0 and m/z 302.3→199.2 were used to quantify for AAP and DHC, respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 50-10000ng/mL for AAP, and 1-100ng/mL for DHC in human plasma, respectively. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 50ng/mL and 1ng/mL for AAP and DHC in human plasma, respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD) of intra and inter precision were less than 10% for both AAP and DHC. The analysis time of per sample was 1.0min. The developed and validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of AAP (500mg) with DHC (20mg) capsule in Chinese healthy volunteers (N=20). PMID:25965875

  3. Using Simcyp to project human oral pharmacokinetic variability in early drug research to mitigate mechanism-based adverse events.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher L; Scialis, Renato J; Rong, Haojing; Obach, R Scott

    2012-03-01

    Positive allosteric modulators ('potentiators') of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) have been shown to display a mechanism-based exposure-response continuum in preclinical species with procognitive electrophysiological and behavioral effects ('efficacy') at low exposures and motor coordination disruptions at progressively higher exposures. Due to the dose-capping nature of such motor coordination deficits, an exposure threshold-mediated adverse event (C(AE) ), the adequacy of separation between the maximal total plasma compound concentration (C(max) ) at a predicted clinically efficacious oral dose and this adverse event (AE) was explored in early drug research with three AMPAR potentiators considered potential candidates for clinical trials. In vitro metabolism studies in human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes demonstrated the metabolic clearance for each compound was predominately due to cytochromes P450 (CYP). Thus, for each compound's anticipated clinically efficacious dose, human C(max) variability following oral administration was assessed using Simcyp software, which combines its virtual human populations database using extensive demographic, physiological and genomic information with routinely collected compound-specific in vitro biochemical data to simulate and predict drug disposition. Using a combination of experimentally determined recombinant human CYP intrinsic clearances for CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, human binding factors, expected fraction absorbed and estimated steady-state volume of distribution, Simcyp simulations demonstrated that two of the three potentiators had acceptable projected C(max) variability (i.e. the 95th percentile C(max) did not breach C(AE) ). This evaluation aided in the selection of compounds for preclinical progression, and represents a novel application of pharmacologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) software approaches to predict interpatient

  4. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties. PMID:27261847

  5. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use....

  6. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use....

  7. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use....

  8. An update on PPAR activation by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Some cannabinoids activate the different isoforms of PPARs (α, β and γ), as shown through the use of reporter gene assays, binding studies, selective antagonists and knockout studies. Activation of all isoforms, but primarily PPARα and γ, mediates some (but not all) of the analgesic, neuroprotective, neuronal function modulation, anti-inflammatory, metabolic, anti-tumour, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of some cannabinoids, often in conjunction with activation of the more traditional target sites of action such as the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and the TRPV1 ion channel. PPARs also mediate some of the effects of inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation or transport. Cannabinoids may be chaperoned to the PPARs by fatty acid binding proteins. The aims of this review are to update the evidence supporting PPAR activation by cannabinoids and to review the physiological responses to cannabinoids that are mediated, and not mediated, by PPAR activation. PMID:27077495

  9. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl--cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21525939

  10. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  11. Cannabinoids as Pharmacotherapies for Neuropathic Pain: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Elizabeth J.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multiple sclerosis (MS), and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB1/CB2 agonists, CB2-selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e. inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Δ9-THC analogs (e.g. Marinol®, Cesamet®) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Δ9-THC and cannabidiol (e.g. Sativex®, Cannador®) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e. rating scales) and objective (i.e. stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  12. Development and pharmacokinetic characterization of pulmonal and intravenous delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans.

    PubMed

    Naef, Myrtha; Russmann, Stefan; Petersen-Felix, Steen; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a physiologically compatible inhalation solution of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and to compare the pharmacokinetic and analgesic properties of pulmonal THC versus pulmonal placebo and intravenous (iv) THC, respectively. Eight healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover study. The aqueous THC formulations were prepared by using a solubilization technique. iv THC (0.053 mg/kg body weight), pulmonal THC (0.053 mg/kg), or a placebo inhalation solution was administered as single dose. At defined time points, blood samples were collected, and somatic and psychotropic side effects as well as vital functions monitored. An ice water immersion test was performed to measure analgesia. Using a pressure-driven nebulizer, the pulmonal administration of the THC liquid aerosol resulted in high THC peak plasma levels within minutes. The bioavailability of the pulmonal THC was 28.7 +/- 8.2% (mean +/- SEM). The side effects observed after pulmonal THC were coughing and slight irritation of the upper respiratory tract, very mild psychotropic symptoms, and headache. The side effects after iv THC were much more prominent. Neither pulmonal nor iv THC significantly reduced experimentally induced pain. PMID:15067694

  13. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (99m)Tc labeled human elastase inhibitor, elafin, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaschwich, Mark; Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Tjiong, Angelina; Marx, Marlies; Haenisch, Sierk; Wiedow, Oliver; Preuss, Stefanie; Culman, Juraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-04-01

    Elafin is a potent reversible inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory proteases leukocyte elastase and protease 3. It is currently in clinical development for the use in postoperative inflammatory diseases. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of (99m)Tc-labeled elafin ((99m)Tc-Elafin) in blood and individual organs in rat after bolus intravenous injection using the single photon emission tomography (SPECT). (99m)Tc-Elafin predominantly accumulated in the kidney reaching a maximum of 8.5% ± 0.1% of the injected dose per gram (ID/g) at 5 min post injection (p.i) and decreased only slowly during 24 h. In contrast, the initially high radio activity recorded in the other organs rapidly decreased parallel to the radioactivity detected in blood. The blood kinetics fits to a two compartment kinetics model. The radio activity in the dissected kidney was 4.98 ± 1.24%ID/g 24 h p.i, while in other organs, including the brain, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-Elafin was detected. At this time point 30% of the detected radioactivity in the kidney was identified to be not metabolized (99m)Tc-Elafin. In conclusion, the blood and organ-specific kinetic data provide a basis for planning of adequate dosing regimens and the high accumulation of intact elafin in the kidney favors clinical developments targeting inflammatory kidney diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy after kidney transplantation. PMID:26948953

  14. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  15. Ocular pharmacokinetics of latamoxef and cefaclor in humans. Penetration into aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, T; Tsukiai, S; Arai, S; Miyake, K; Kimura, M; Fukuchi, H

    1989-01-01

    Penetrations of latamoxef (LMOX) and cefaclor (CCL) into the aqueous humor after intravenous or oral administration were investigated in patients admitted with cataract. Concentrations of antibiotics in plasma and aqueous humor were determined periodically by microbiological assay. LMOX disappeared from plasma in a monoexponential manner with a half-life of 2.7 h after intravenous administration at a dose of 1000 mg. The maximum concentration of LMOX in aqueous humor (4.7 micrograms/ml) was observed 2 h after administration. When CCL was administered orally at a dose of 500 mg, the maximum concentration of CCL in aqueous humor was 0.53 microgram/ml 2 h after administration, whereas the maximum plasma concentration of 8.4 micrograms/ml was observed at 1 h. Pharmacokinetic analysis (simultaneous simulation) of plasma and aqueous humor concentration-time courses was done by using the best-fitting compartment model examined (modified two-compartment model). Prediction of the concentration of antibiotics in aqueous humor from the plasma concentration profile was also examined using the same compartment model in a separate experiment. The predicted concentration in aqueous humor was proved to fit reasonably with the measured concentration. PMID:2724050

  16. Intranasal absorption of rizatriptan--in vivo pharmacokinetics and bioavailability study in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Jiang, X G; Jiang, W M; Gao, X L; Mei, N

    2005-01-01

    Rizatriptan nasal spray was developed to achieve fast a high effectiveness and to overcome limitations associated with oral formulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of a rizatriptan nasal spray compared with an oral formulation in a two treatments, two periods, randomized crossover design. At each phase, each subject received 5 mg rizatriptan as a nasal spray or an oral tablet. Plasma concentrations of rizatriptan were determined by HPLC. Rizatriptan was absorbed more rapidly following nasal spray with detectable plasma concentrations 5 min after dosing. There was no statistically significant difference for AUC or Cmax values between the nasal spray and the oral tablet. The relative bioavailability of nasal formulation to oral formulation was 96%+/-16%. All the formulations were well tolerated and adverse events were generally of short duration and of mild intensity. Thus, rizatriptan nasal spray offers more rapidly absorption compared to the oral route, which may be particularly beneficial to those patients who have gastrointestinal disturbances during their migraine attack or who have difficulty in swallowing a tablet. PMID:15702515

  17. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  18. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  19. Microbiological transformations of nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, R A; Fukuda, D S; Kossoy, A D; Abbott, B J

    1979-01-01

    A screening program was conducted to find microorganisms that modify the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone. After purification, the products from three cultures were analyzed by spectral methods to determine their chemical structures. An optically active 9S-hydroxy-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid was isolated from a culture of an unidentified soil bacterium designated A24007. From Bacillus cereus cultures were isolated a 9S,6'-dihydroxy-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid, a 9S-hydroxy-6'-keto-6aR,10aR-trans cannabinoid, a 9-keto-6'-hydroxy-6aS,10aS-trans cannabinoid, and a 6',9-diketo-6aS,10aS-trans cannabinoid. All of these products were optically active, as was a 9S-hydroxy-6aS,10AS-trans cannabinoid also isolated from B. cereus cultures. A series of acidic products were isolated from cultures of Nocardia salmonicolor. All of these products contained a carboxylic acid group at the terminal end of three-position alkyl side chains having varying numbers of carbon atoms. Two of the acidic products contained a 9-keto group, whereas all other carboxylic acid products were 9-hydroxy cannabinoids. The array of products obtained from incubation of nabilone indicates the usefulness of microbial transformations in the preparation of new cannabinoids. PMID:114111

  20. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  1. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for eltrombopag in 50μL of human plasma: a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Maddela, Rambabu; Gajula, Ramakrishna; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Siddiraju, Sridhar; Maddela, Srinubabu; Makula, Ajitha

    2014-09-01

    Eltrombopag is a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, used in the treatment of thrombocytopenia. This paper describes a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay method for the determination of eltrombopag in human plasma samples using eltrombopag 13C4 as internal standard (IS). Analyte and the IS were extracted from 50μL of human plasma using protein precipitation technique with no drying, evaporation and reconstitution steps. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 column by using a mixture of 10mM ammonium formate (pH3) and acetonitrile (10:90, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The linearity of the method was established in the concentration range 50.0-10007ng/mL with r(2)≥0.99. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results in four validation batches across five concentration levels were well within the acceptance limits. The proposed method was found to be applicable to pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:24887483

  2. Determination of pinocembrin in human plasma by solid-phase extraction and LC/MS/MS: application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bei; Cao, Guoying; Sun, Taohua; Zhao, Xi; Hu, Xin; Yan, Jiling; Peng, Yueying; Shi, Aixin; Li, Yang; Xue, Wei; Li, Min; Li, Kexin; Liu, Yingfa

    2014-12-01

    A sensitive, fast and specific method for the quantitation of pinocembrin in human plasma based on high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) was developed and validated. Clonazepam was used as the internal standard (IS). After solid-phase extraction of 500 μL plasma, pinocembrin and the IS were separated on a Luna C8 column using the mobile phase composed of acetonitrile-0.3 mm ammonium acetate solution (65:35, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min in isocratic mode. The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer by multiple reaction monitoring via an electrospray ionization source in negative mode by AB SCIEX Qtrap 5500. The assay was linear from 1 to 400 ng/mL, with within- and between-run accuracy (relative error) from -1.82 to 0.54%, and within- and between-run precision (CV) below 5.25%. The recovery was above 88% for the analyte at 1, 50 and 300 ng/mL. This analytical method was successful for the determination of pinocembrin in human plasma and applied to a pharmacokinetic study of pinocembrin injection in healthy volunteers after intravenous drip administration. PMID:24733513

  3. Simultaneous determination of roflumilast and its metabolite in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application for a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinge; Huang, Jie; Zheng, Xin; Jiang, Ji; Kuang, Yun; Hu, Pei

    2016-09-01

    Roflumilast had shown good efficacy and safety in Caucasian COPD patients after oral administration of 0.5mg. The main active metabolite of it is roflumilast N-oxide. A reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) quantitation method was developed for the simultaneous determination of them in human plasma with rather low limits of quantitation for roflumilast (0.02ng/mL) and roflumilast N-oxide (0.04ng/mL). Human plasma samples were prepared by solid phase extraction (SPE), which ensured high recovery and slight matrix effect for the both analytes. This method showed good linearity, accuracy, precision and stability in the range of 0.02-10ng/mL and 0.04-50ng/mL for roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide respectively. The developed method was successfully applied for the pharmacokinetic research in Chinese healthy volunteers after oral administration of 0.25mg, 0.375mg and 0.5mg of roflumilast tablet. PMID:27423044

  4. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric determination of rupatadine in human plasma and its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Jingjing; Lin, Hui; Liang, Jiabi; Zhang, Zunjian; Chen, Yun

    2008-08-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantification of rupatadine in human plasma using estazolam as internal standard (IS). Following liquid-liquid extraction, the analytes were separated using a mobile phase of methanol-ammonium acetate (pH 2.2; 5mM) (50:50, v/v) on a reverse phase C18 column and analyzed by a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer in the positive ion and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, m/z 416-->309 for rupatadine and m/z 295-->267 for the IS. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.1-100 ng/ml for rupatadine in human plasma. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.1 ng/ml with a relative standard deviation of less than 20%. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. The validated LC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of rupatadine in healthy volunteers. PMID:18472381

  5. Method development and validation of almotriptan in human plasma by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Konda; Chandu, Babu Rao; Challa, Balasekhara Reddy; Chandrasekhar, Kottapalli B

    2012-06-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective method has been developed for quantification of Almotriptan (AL) in human plasma using Almotriptan-d(6) (ALD6) as an internal standard. Almotriptan and Almotriptan-d(6) were detected with proton adducts at m/z 336.1→201.1 and 342.2→207.2 in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) positive mode, respectively. The method was linear over a concentration range of 0.5-150.0 ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for Almotriptan were 0.2 pg/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Liquid-liquid extraction was used followed by MS/MS (ion spray). The method was shown to be precise with an average within-run and between-run variation of 0.68 to 2.78% and 0.57 to 0.86%, respectively. The average within-run and between-run accuracy of the method throughout its linear range was 98.94 to 102.64% and 99.43 to 101.44%, respectively. The mean recovery of drug and internal standard from human plasma was 92.12 ± 4.32% and 89.62 ± 6.32%. It can be applied for clinical and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:22896823

  6. Method Development and Validation of Almotriptan in Human Plasma by HPLC Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Application to Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Konda; Chandu, Babu Rao; Challa, Balasekhara Reddy; Chandrasekhar, Kottapalli B.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective method has been developed for quantification of Almotriptan (AL) in human plasma using Almotriptan-d6 (ALD6) as an internal standard. Almotriptan and Almotriptan-d6 were detected with proton adducts at m/z 336.1→201.1 and 342.2→207.2 in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) positive mode, respectively. The method was linear over a concentration range of 0.5–150.0 ng/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for Almotriptan were 0.2 pg/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Liquid-liquid extraction was used followed by MS/MS (ion spray). The method was shown to be precise with an average within-run and between-run variation of 0.68 to 2.78% and 0.57 to 0.86%, respectively. The average within-run and between-run accuracy of the method throughout its linear range was 98.94 to 102.64% and 99.43 to 101.44%, respectively. The mean recovery of drug and internal standard from human plasma was 92.12 ± 4.32% and 89.62 ± 6.32%. It can be applied for clinical and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:22896823

  7. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. PMID:27179908

  8. Behavioral, Metabolic, and Immune Consequences of Chronic Alcohol or Cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV Model.

    PubMed

    Molina, Patricia E; Amedee, Angela M; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-06-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. Drug Alcohol Depend 112:178-193, 2010; Phillips et al. J Gen Int Med 16:165, 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  9. Behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of chronic alcohol or cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV model

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. 2010; Phillips et al. 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  10. Pharmacokinetics of silybin nanoparticles in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenocraft

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin-Lei; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Hou, Rui-Jie; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Quan-Le; Yin, Shan-Lan; Wang, Shi-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The particle fabrication technique was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly (lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the silybin. Response surface methodology (RSM) using the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) model was used to optimize formulations of silybin nanoparticles. Further the optimized nanoparticles are characterized for particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro drug release, silybin availability for tumor, plasma, lung, spleen, liver were determined. The significant findings were the optimal formulation of PLGA concentration 10 mg, PVA concentration 2000 and PET width of 6 gave rise to the EE of 88%, mean diameter of 223 nm and zeta potential of 25-mV. Release studies were investigated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8. It was studied that lower the pH, faster the release of sylibin. The nanoparticles had~15-fold higher plasma exposure as measured by AUC contrasted to pure silybin. The nanoparticles had a 60% increase altogether tumor silybin presentation contrasted with pure silybin. Nanoparticles had higher silybin presentation in the spleen and liver contrasted with pure silybin suspension as expected for a nanoparticle formulation. The lung silybin presentation for the nanoparticle was additionally 2-fold higher than that of the pure silybin suspension. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters and oral bioavailability data exhibited that drug-nanoparticle complex could enhance the oral absorption of silybin and as well as the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:26770331

  11. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  12. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system. PMID:12660312

  13. Human pharmacokinetics of xanthohumol, an anti-hyperglycemic flavonoid from hops

    PubMed Central

    Legette, LeeCole; Karnpracha, Chanida; Reed, Ralph L.; Choi, Jaewoo; Bobe, Gerd; Christensen, J. Mark; Rodriguez-Proteau, Rosita; Purnell, Jonathan; Stevens, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Xanthohumol (XN) is a bioactive prenylflavonoid from hops. A single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study was conducted in men (n=24) and women (n=24) to determine dose-concentration relationships. Methods and results Subjects received a single oral dose of 20, 60, or 180 mg XN. Blood was collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Plasma levels of XN and its metabolites, isoxanthohumol (IX), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6PN) were measured by LC-MS/MS. Xanthohumol and IX conjugates were dominant circulating flavonoids among all subjects. Levels of 8PN and 6PN were undetectable in most subjects. The XN PK profile showed peak concentrations around 1h and between 4-5h after ingestion. The maximum XN concentrations (Cmax) were 45±7 μg/L, 67±11 μg/L, and 133±23 μg/L for the 20, 60, and180 mg dose, respectively. Using non-compartmental modeling, the area under the curves (AUC0→∞) for XN were 92±68 h×μg/L, 323±160 h×μg/L, and 863±388 h×μg/L for the 20, 60, and 180 mg dose, respectively. The mean half-life of XN was 20 h for the 60 and 18 h for the 180 mg dose. Conclusion Xanthohumol has a distinct biphasic absorption pattern with XN and IX conjugates being the major circulating metabolites. PMID:24038952

  14. Hydrastine pharmacokinetics and metabolism after a single oral dose of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) to humans.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prem K; Barone, Gary; Gurley, Bill J; Fifer, E Kim; Hendrickson, Howard P

    2015-04-01

    The disposition and metabolism of hydrastine was investigated in 11 healthy subjects following an oral dose of 2.7 g of goldenseal supplement containing 78 mg of hydrastine. Serial blood samples were collected for 48 hours, and urine was collected for 24 hours. Hydrastine serum and urine concentrations were determined by Liquid Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Pharmacokinetic parameters for hydrastine were calculated using noncompartmental methods. The maximal serum concentration (Cmax) was 225 ± 100 ng/ml, Tmax was 1.5 ± 0.3 hours, and area under the curve was 6.4 ± 4.1 ng ⋅ h/ml ⋅ kg. The elimination half-life was 4.8 ± 1.4 hours. Metabolites of hydrastine were identified in serum and urine by using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Hydrastine metabolites were identified by various mass spectrometric techniques, such as accurate mass measurement, neutral loss scanning, and product ion scanning using Quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) and triple quadrupole instruments. The identity of phase II metabolites was further confirmed by hydrolysis of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates using bovine β-glucuronidase and a Helix pomatia sulfatase/glucuronidase enzyme preparation. Hydrastine was found to undergo rapid and extensive phase I and phase II metabolism. Reduction, O-demethylation, N-demethylation, hydroxylation, aromatization, lactone hydrolysis, and dehydrogenation of the alcohol group formed by lactone hydrolysis to the ketone group were observed during phase I biotransformation of hydrastine. Phase II metabolites were primarily glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. Hydrastine undergoes extensive biotransformation, and some metabolites may have pharmacological activity. Further study is needed in this area. PMID:25609220

  15. Diagnosing and treating cannabinoid hyperemesis.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Olivia; Lutton, Stuart; Doherty, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis is a newly emerging syndrome that manifests as intractable nausea and vomiting in people who regularly smoke cannabis. The signs and symptoms are relieved by bathing in hot water and by stopping smoking cannabis but are unresponsive to antiemetics. This article briefly examines the possible causes and clinical presentation of the condition and uses a case study to describe the management of patients. PMID:26638755

  16. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR PROPYLENE GLYCOL MONOMETHYL ETHER AND ITS ACETATE IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Gies, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Weitz, Karl K.

    2005-03-05

    Propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PM), along with its acetate, is the most widely used of the propylene glycol ether family of solvents. The most common toxic effects of PM observed in animal studies include sedation, very slight alpha2u globulin-mediated nephropathy (male rats only) and hepatomegally at high exposures (typically >1000 ppm). Sedation in animal studies usually resolves within a few exposures to 3000 ppm (the highest concentration used in subchronic and chronic inhalation studies) due to the induction of metabolizing enzymes. Data from a variety of pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies have been incorporated into a PBPK model for PM and its acetate in rats and mice. Published controlled exposure and workplace biomonitoring studies have also been included for comparisons of the internal dosimetry of PM and its acetate between laboratory animals and humans. PM acetate is rapidly hydrolyzed to PM, which is further metabolized to either glucuronide or sulphate conjugates (minor pathways) or propylene glycol (major pathway). In vitro half-lives for PM acetate range from 14-36 min depending upon the tissue and species. In vivo half-lives are considerably faster, reflecting the total contributions of esterases in the blood and tissues of the body, and are on the order of just a few minutes. Thus, very little PM acetate is found in vivo and, other than potential portal of entry irritation, the toxicity of PM acetate is related to PM. Regardless of the source for PM (either PM or its acetate), rats were predicted to have a higher Cmax and AUC for PM in blood than humans, especially at concentrations greater than the current ACGIH TLV of 100 ppm. This would indicate that the major systemic effects of PM would be expected to be less severe in humans than rats at comparable inhalation exposures.

  18. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester exhibiting distinctive binding interaction with human serum albumin implies the pharmacokinetic basis of propolis bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2016-04-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), as one of the major bioactive components present in propolis, exhibits versatile bioactivities, especially for its potent cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell models. To understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CAPE, the binding interaction between CAPE and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated in vitro using multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. The results reveal that CAPE exhibits a distinctive binding interaction with HSA comparing with other propolis components. The association constant K(A) (L mol(-1)) of the binding reaches 10(6) order of magnitude, which is significantly stronger than the other components of propolis. Based on the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the binding distance was calculated as 5.7 nm, which is longer than that of the other components of propolis. The thermodynamic results indicate that the binding is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. The docking and drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen) competitive results show that CAPE is located in the subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I, FA7) of HSA, and Gln196 and Lys199 contribute to the hydrogen bonds. Circular dichroism spectra suggest an alteration of the secondary structure of HSA due to its partial unfolding in the presence of CAPE. PMID:26829518

  19. UPLC-MS/MS determination of voriconazole in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Huang, Cheng-ke; Sun, Wei; Xiao, Cui; Wang, Zeng-shou

    2015-02-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to determine voriconazole in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple one-step protein precipitation with methanol. Chromatographic separation was carried out on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using an isocratic mobile phase system composed of acetonitrile and water containing 1% formic acid (45:55, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.50 mL/min. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a QTrap5500 mass spectrometer coupled with an electrospray ionization source in the positive ion mode. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions of m/z 351.0 → 281.5 and m/z 237.1 → 194.2 were used to quantify voriconazole and carbamazepine (internal standard), respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 2.0-1000 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 2.0 ng/mL. Only 1.0 min was needed for an analytical run. This fully validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of 200 mg voriconazole to 20 Chinese healthy male volunteers. PMID:24925071

  20. Simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: validation and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Aidong; Hang, Taijun; Chen, Suning; Wang, Zhirui; Ding, Likun; Tian, Yun; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Xinxin

    2008-11-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma using clenbuterol as internal standard (IS). The plasma samples were subjected to a simple protein precipitation with methanol. Separation was achieved on a Lichrospher C(18) column (150 mm x 4.6mm ID, dp 5 microm) using methanol (containing 0.2% of formic acid) and water (containing 0.2% of formic acid) as a mobile phase by gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode by monitoring the ion transitions from m/z 365.9-->348.9 (amoxicillin), m/z 378.9-->263.6 (ambroxol) and m/z 277.0-->203.0 (IS). Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 5-20,000 ng/mL for amoxicillin, and 1-200 ng/mL for ambroxol, with the intra- and inter-run precisions of <9% and the accuracies of 100+/-7%. The method has been validated and applied to pharmacokinetic studies of compound amoxicillin and ambroxol hydrochloride tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:18603398

  1. A pilot human pharmacokinetic study and influence of formulation factors on orodispersible tablet incorporating meloxicam solid dispersion using factorial design.

    PubMed

    Aboelwafa, Ahmed A; Fahmy, Rania H

    2012-01-01

    Meloxicam (MLX) suffers from poor aqueous solubility leading to slow absorption following oral administration; hence, immediate release MLX tablet is unsuitable in the treatment of acute pain. This study aims to overcome such a drawback by increasing MLX solubility and dissolution using PEG solid dispersion (SD), then, to investigate the feasibility of incorporating the SD into orodispersible tablets (ODTs). A 2(3) full factorial design was employed to investigate the influence of three formulation variables on MLX ODTs. The selected factors: camphor (X(1)) as pore-forming material, and croscarmellose sodium (X(2)) as superdisintegrant, showed significant positive influence, while PEG content (X(3)) was proved to negatively affect both disintegration and wetting times. In addition, isomalt increased disintegration and wetting times when compared to mannitol as diluents. The pharmacokinetic assessment of the optimum ODT formulation in healthy human subjects proved that the faster MLX dissolution by using PEG solid dispersion at pH 6.8 resulted in more rapid absorption of MLX. The rate of absorption of MLX from ODT was significantly faster (p = 0.030) with a significantly higher peak plasma concentration (P = 0.037) when compared to the marketed immediate release MLX tablet with a mean oral disintegration time of 17 ± 3 s. PMID:20550483

  2. Application of a sensitive liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method to pharmacokinetic study of nalmefene in humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Chen, Xiaoyan; Dai, Xiaojian; Wen, Aidong; Zhang, Yifan; Zhong, Dafang

    2007-06-01

    A sensitive, specific and rapid liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of nalmefene in human plasma. An aliquot of 200 microL plasma sample was simply precipitated by 400 microL methanol. Separation of nalmefene and the internal standard hydromorphone from the interferences was achieved on a C(18) column followed by MS/MS detection. The analytes were monitored in the positive ionization mode with a TurboIonspray source. The method had a total chromatographic run time of 4.5 min and linear calibration curves over the concentration range of 10-5000 pg/mL. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 10 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision was less than 10.1% determined from QC samples at concentrations of 30, 300 and 4500 pg/mL, and the accuracy was within +/-3.4%. As the method was more sensitive (10 times higher) than those reported previously, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of nalmefene in healthy volunteers after a single intravenous injection of low dose (30 microg) of nalmefene hydrochloride for the first time. PMID:17329173

  3. Determination of rizatriptan in human plasma by liquid chromatographic-eletrospray tandem mass spectrometry: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-fen; Zhang, Ai-jun; Zhao, Ling; Sun, Xiao-hong; Zhao, Yi-min; Gao, Hong-zhi; Liu, Ze-yuan; Qiao, Shan-yi

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of rizatriptan in human plasma. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by liquid-liquid extraction, separated on a Zorbax XDB C8 column (150 x 4.6 mm i.d.) and detected by tandem mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization interface. Zomitriptan was used as the internal standard. The method had a lower limit of quantitation of 50 pg/mL for rizatriptan, which showed more sensitivity and speed of analysis compared with reported methods. The within- and between-day precision was measured to be below 11.71% and accuracy between -5.87 and 0.86% for all quality control samples. This quantitation method was successfully applied to the evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profiles of rizatriptan after single oral administration of 5, 10 and 15 mg rizatriptan tablets to 10 healthy volunteers (five males and five females). PMID:15954161

  4. In vitro enantioselective human liver microsomal metabolism and prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of tetrabenazine by DLLME-CE.

    PubMed

    Bocato, Mariana Zuccherato; de Lima Moreira, Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2016-09-01

    A new capillary electrophoresis method for the enantioselective analysis of cis- and trans- dihydrotetrabenazine (diHTBZ) after in vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLMs) was developed. The chiral electrophoretic separations were performed by using tris-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 1% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD as background electrolyte with an applied voltage of +15kV and capillary temperature kept at 15°C. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was employed to extract the analytes from HLMs. Dichloromethane was used as extraction solvent (75μL) and acetone as disperser solvent (150μL). The method was validated according to official guidelines and showed to be linear over the concentration range of 0.29-19.57μmolL(-1) (r=0.9955) for each metabolite enantiomer. Within- and between-day precision and accuracy evaluated by relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 15% for all enantiomers. The stability assay showed that the analytes kept stable under handling, storage and in metabolism conditions. After method validation, an enantioselective in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic prediction was carried out. This study showed a stereoselective metabolism and the observed kinetic profile indicated a substrate inhibition behavior. DiHTBZ enantiomers were catalyzed mainly by CYP2C19 and the predicted clearance suggests that liver metabolism is the main route for TBZ elimination which supports the literature data. PMID:27381871

  5. Pharmacokinetics in rats of a long-acting human parathyroid hormone-collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) peptide construct

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Robert; Vu, Christopher; Sakon, Joshua; Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Gensure, Robert; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a hybrid peptide consisting of the N-terminal biologically active region of human parathyroid hormone (PTH) linked to a collagen binding domain (CBD) were evaluated in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The peptide, PTH-CBD, consists of the first 33 amino acids of PTH linked as an extension of the amino acid chain to the CBD peptide derived from ColH collagenase of Clostridium histolyticum. Serum concentrations arising from single dose administration by the subcutaneous and intravenous routes were compared to those measured following route specific mole equivalent doses of PTH(1-34). Population-based modeling demonstrated similar systemic absorption kinetics and bioavailability for both peptides. Exposure to PTH-CBD was 6-fold higher due to a systemic clearance of approximately 20% relative to PTH(1-34); however, these kinetics were consistent with >95% of a dose being eliminated from serum within 24 hours. Results obtained support continued investigation of PTH-CBD as a bone targeted anabolic agent for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24399637

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of a 13-mer LNA-inhibitor-miR-221 in Mice and Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    Gallo Cantafio, Maria Eugenia; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Mignogna, Chiara; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Botta, Cirino; Frandsen, Niels M; Rolfo, Christian; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Di Martino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides have been successfully used to efficiently inhibit endogenous small noncoding RNAs in vitro and in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the direct miR-221 inhibition by the novel 13-mer LNA-i-miR-221 induces significant antimyeloma activity and upregulates canonical miR-221 targets in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate the LNA-i-miR-221 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel assays for oligonucleotides quantification in NOD.SCID mice and Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) plasma, urine and tissues were developed. To this aim, a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method, after solid-phase extraction, was used for the detection of LNA-i-miR-221 in plasma and urine, while a specific in situ hybridization assay for tissue uptake analysis was designed. Our analysis revealed short half-life, optimal tissue biovailability and minimal urine excretion of LNA-i-miR-221 in mice and monkeys. Up to 3 weeks, LNA-i-miR-221 was still detectable in mice vital organs and in xenografted tumors, together with p27 target upregulation. Importantly, no toxicity in the pilot monkey study was observed. Overall, our findings indicate the suitability of LNA-i-miR-221 for clinical use and we provide here pilot data for safety analysis and further development of LNA-miRNA-based therapeutics for human cancer. PMID:27327137

  7. Determination of Sertraline in Human Plasma by UPLC-MS/MS and its Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Zhen; Tian, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Zhu, Kang; Ye, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method was developed to determine sertraline in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was carried out on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using a gradient mobile phase system composed of acetonitrile and 1% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.40 mL/min. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a XEVO TQD mass spectrometer coupled with an electrospray ionization source in the positive ion mode. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions of m/z 306.3 → 275.2 and 326.2 → 291.1 were used to quantify for sertraline and midazolam (internal standard), respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 1.0-100.0 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL. Only 2.0 min was needed for an analytical run. This fully validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study after an oral administration of 100 mg sertraline to 20 Chinese healthy male volunteers. PMID:26324195

  8. LC-MS/MS method development for quantification of busulfan in human plasma and its application in pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nadella, Taraka Ramarao; Suryadevara, Vidyadhara; Lankapalli, Sasidhar Reddyvallam; Mandava, Venkata Basaveswara Rao; Bandarupalli, Deepti

    2016-02-20

    A simple, rapid, specific and precise liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrophotometric (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of busulfan, in human plasma. busulfan d8 was used as internal standard, added to plasma sample prior to extraction using acetonitrile as a precipitating agent. Chromatographic separation was achieved on phenomenex kinetex C18 column (50mm×2.1mm, 2.6μm) with acteonitrile: 10mM ammonium formate buffer (80:20v/v) as an isocratic mobile phase with a flow rate of 0.5mLmin(-1). Quantitation was performed by transition of 264.1→151.1 (m/z) for busulfan and 272.1→159.1 (m/z) for busulfan d8. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.2ngmL(-1) with a 100μL plasma sample. The concentrations of nine working standards showed linearity between 0.2 and 100ngmL(-1) (r(2)≥0.9986). Chromatographic separation was achieved within 2.0min. The average extraction recoveries of 3quality control concentrations were 92.52% for busulfan and 90.75% for busulfan d8. The coefficient of variation was ≤15% for intra- and inter-batch assays. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of Busulfan pharmacokinetics after oral administration. PMID:26736033

  9. Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Adverse Effects of Synthetic Cannabinoid Drugs.

    PubMed

    Gurney, S M R; Scott, K S; Kacinko, S L; Presley, B C; Logan, B K

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid drugs have become an established part of the recreational drug landscape in the United States and internationally. These drugs are manufactured in clandestine laboratories internationally and distributed in the United States in smoking mixtures, use of which produces effects very similar to use of marijuana. The adverse-effect profile of the drugs has not been studied in humans and infrequently in animal models, so much of the information about their toxicity comes from emergency department and treatment reports and forensic case studies. This review considers the discovery and characterization of the endocannabinoid system, approaches to receptor-binding studies of various synthetic cannabinoids from the first wave of naphthoylindoles (e.g., JWH-018) to the emerging adamantoylindole drugs (e.g., AKB-48), and their analogs, to evaluate the potential activity of drugs in this class. Currently employed approaches to assessing functional activity of the drugs using in vitro and in vivo models is also described, and comparisons made to the effects of THC. The physiological effects of activation of the endocannabinoid system in humans are reviewed, and the physiological effects of cannabinoid use are described. Case reports of adverse events including emergency department admissions, mental health admissions, and clinical and forensic case reports are presented in detail and discussed to summarize the current state of knowledge of adverse effects, both clinical and forensic in humans, including effects on driving ability, and tissue injury and death. The greatest weight is accorded to those reports that include toxicological confirmation of use. Finally, we discuss the current status of attempts to schedule and control the distribution of synthetic cannabinoids and the relevance of receptor binding and functional activity in this context. There is growing toxicological and pharmacological evidence of impairment, psychosis, tissue injury, and

  10. Synthetic cannabinoids: the dangers of spicing it up.

    PubMed

    Salani, Deborah A; Zdanowicz, Martin M

    2015-05-01

    Cannabinoids are the most commonly used illegal substances in the world. Spice and K2 are synthetic cannabinoid (SC) products that contain a mixture of herbs and plant matter combined with synthetic compounds similar to tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis. Because the effects of Spice and K2 are similar to cannabis, many users are smoking these products as legal substitutes despite package labeling that they are not designed for human consumption. These SC products appeal to users because they are easily accessible and not readily detected in standard urine drug screens. The active components in SC products are highly potent and poorly characterized. Use of these agents has been associated with serious psychological and physiological side effects. Because abuse of SC products has become a national public health issue, nurses should be aware of the effects of SC compounds and must take a lead role in educating patients about the dangers of their use. PMID:25974923

  11. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay B; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J; O'Hara, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r(2) = 0.83, r = 0.91, p < 0.01) better than NHP (r(2) = 0.67, r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for this dataset. Applying simple allometric scaling using an empirically derived best-fit exponent of 0.93 enabled the prediction of human CL from the Tg32 homozygous mouse within 2-fold error for 100% of mAbs tested. Implementing the Tg32 homozygous mouse model in discovery and preclinical drug development to predict human CL may result in an overall decreased usage of monkeys for PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic. PMID:27232760

  12. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child’s hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  13. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  14. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopic method for the determination of zerumbone in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Eid, Eltayeb E M; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Rasedee, A; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Sukari, Mohd A; Fatah, Safa A

    2011-08-01

    A rapid, sensitive, specific and selective LC-MS/MS method for the determination of zerumbone (ZER) in human plasma using 2,4-diamino-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine (DMTZ) as an internal standard (IS) has been developed and validated. ZER was chromatographed on C8 column using a mobile phase of acetonitrile/water (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.25 ml min(-1) . Quantitation was achieved using ESI+ interface, employing multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode at m/z 219 > 81 and 218 > 134 for ZER and IS, respectively. The calibration standards were linear over a range of 5-3000 ng ml(-1) (r(2)=0.9994) with an LLOQ of 5 ng ml(-1) (RSD %; 11.4% and bias%; 9.5%). Intra- and inter-day precision of ZER assay ranged from 0.18 to 3.56% with accuracy (bias) that varied between -5.09 and 4.3%, demonstrating good precision and accuracy. Recoveries of ZER and the IS from human plasma were above 85%. The developed method was validated for the determination of ZER in rat plasma. Linearity, stability of ZER and the ME on rat plasma were discussed. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated by measuring ZER in rat plasma samples following intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of ZER prepared in hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), respectively, in 20 mg kg(-1) and this study indicated a clear significant difference (p<0.05) in pharmacokinetic parameters of ZER in ZER/HPβCD complex compared with ZER in CMC preparation. PMID:21834015

  15. Nicotine Delivery to Rats via Lung Alveolar Region-Targeted Aerosol Technology Produces Blood Pharmacokinetics Resembling Human Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine is a heavily used addictive drug acquired through smoking tobacco. Nicotine in cigarette smoke is deposited and absorbed in the lungs, which results in a rapidly peaked slowly declining arterial concentration. This pattern plays an important role in initiation of nicotine addiction. Methods: A method and device were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents with lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology. The dose of delivery can be controlled by the nicotine aerosol concentration and duration of exposure. Results: Our data showed that, in the breathing zone of the nose-only exposure chamber, the aerosol droplet size distribution was within the respirable diameter range. Rats were exposed to nicotine aerosol for 2min. The arterial blood nicotine concentration reached 43.2±15.7ng/ml (mean ± SD) within 1–4min and declined over the next 20min, closely resembling the magnitude and early pharmacokinetics of a human smoking a cigarette. The acute inhalation toxicity of nicotine: LC50 = 2.3mg/L was determined; it was affected by pH, suggesting that acidification decreases nicotine absorption and/or bioavailability. Conclusions: A noninvasive method and toolkit were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents that enable rapid delivery of a controllable amount of nicotine into the systemic circulation and brain-inducing dose-dependent pharmacological effects, even a lethal dose. Aerosol inhalation can produce nicotine kinetics in both arterial and venous blood resembling human smoking. This method can be applied to studies of the effects of chronic intermittent nicotine exposure, nicotine addiction, toxicology, tobacco-related diseases, teratogenicity, and for discovery of pharmacological therapeutics. PMID:23239844

  16. Determination of levocetirizine in human plasma by LC-MS-MS: validation and application in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; Jithavech, Ponsiree; Sanphanya, Kingkan; Vicheantawatchai, Petploy; Rojsitthisak, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    A fast and simple sample cleanup approach for levocetirizine in human was developed using protein precipitation coupled with LC-MS-MS. Samples were treated with 6% trichloroacetic acid in water prior to LC-MS-MS analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reverse phase column with an isocratic mobile phase of acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.5 (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The run time was 3.5 min. Mass parameters were optimized to monitor transitions at m/z [M+H](+) 389.0→201.0 for levocetirizine and m/z [M+H](+) 375.3→201.0 for hydroxyzine as internal standard. The lower limit of quantification and the dynamic range were 1.00 and 1.00-500 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity was good for intraday and interday validations (r(2) ≥ 0.995). The mean recoveries were 59 and 69% for levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, respectively. Matrix effect was acceptable with %CV < 15. Hemolytic effect was negligible. Levocetirizine was stable in human plasma for 27 h at room temperature (25°C), for 16 weeks frozen at -70°C, 4 weeks frozen at -20°C, for 24 h in an autosampler at 15°C and for three freeze/thaw cycles. The validated method was applied in a pharmacokinetic study to determine the concentration of levocetirizine in plasma samples. The study provides a fast and simple bioanalytical method for routine analysis and may be particularly useful for bioequivalence studies. PMID:26084706

  17. Pharmacokinetics of celecoxib after oral administration in dogs and humans: effect of food and site of absorption.

    PubMed

    Paulson, S K; Vaughn, M B; Jessen, S M; Lawal, Y; Gresk, C J; Yan, B; Maziasz, T J; Cook, C S; Karim, A

    2001-05-01

    Celecoxib pharmacokinetics was evaluated after single and multiple oral dosing; after dosing in a solution and as a solid; with and without food; and after administration into different sites of the GI tract using dog. After oral dosing in a solution, celecoxib was rapidly absorbed and reached maximum concentrations by 1 h; absorption was delayed another 1 to 2 h when administered as a solid. The absolute bioavailability of celecoxib was higher when given as a solution (64--88%) compared with capsule (22--40%). The absorption of celecoxib given in a capsule was delayed by food, although systemic exposure increased by 3- to 5-fold. The systemic availability of celecoxib given intragastrically in solution was similar to that obtained following direct instillation into the duodenum, jejunum, or colon through a chronic intestinal access port. Collectively, these data suggest that celecoxib is a highly permeable drug that can be absorbed throughout the GI tract and that dissolution may be a rate-limiting factor for absorption from solid dosage forms. Unlike dogs, celecoxib given to humans with a high fat meal exhibits only a slight increase in AUC(0--infinity) (11%) that is not clinically significant with regard to safety or efficacy. In humans, a lower dose and a longer GI residence time may promote the opportunity for absorption of a poorly soluble drug such as celecoxib that can be absorbed throughout the GI tract. This would minimize the effect of food on absorption; as such, patients with arthritis can be given celecoxib with or without food. PMID:11303053

  18. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  19. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  20. Safety and Toxicology of Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Jane; McGlade, Erin; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    There is extensive research on the safety, toxicology, potency, and therapeutic potential of cannabis. However, uncertainty remains facilitating continued debate on medical and recreational cannabis policies at the state and federal levels. This review will include a brief description of cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system; a summary of the acute and long-term effects of cannabis; and a discussion of the therapeutic potential of cannabis. The conclusions about safety and efficacy will then be compared with the current social and political climate to suggest future policy directions and general guidelines. PMID:26269228

  1. Ochratoxin A: comparative pharmacokinetics and toxicological implications (experimental and domestic animals and humans).

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Daniel R; Heussner, Alexandra H; O'Brien, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    The causal factors for the species- and sex-differences associated with ochratoxin-mediated toxicity remain unclear. Variations in kinetic parameters may play a major role in explaining these differences, however, discrepancies and inaccuracies in the toxicokinetics reported in the literature for various species, make comparison and hence the extrapolation to the human situation impossible. The one- and two-compartment open models currently proposed may be insufficient to enable an accurate representation of the actual situation in vivo. It is likely that at least three if not four compartments must be assumed to account for the reported effects. The application of such models to existing raw data would most likely provide for a more accurate base set of toxicokinetic data and contribute to a more accurate human risk assessment. Possible explanations for the reported inconsistencies and their impact on the proposed mechanism(s) of action of OTA and risk assessment are discussed. PMID:16332621

  2. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  3. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  4. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered. PMID:20219697

  5. Safety pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetic assessment of human Gc globulin (vitamin D binding protein).

    PubMed

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Jørgensen, Charlotte Svaerke; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Leifsson, Páll Skúli; Hansen, Erik Wind; Laursen, Inga; Houen, Gunnar

    2010-11-01

    Gc globulin is an important protein of the plasma actin-scavenger system. As such, it has been shown to bind free actin and prevent hypercoagulation and shock in patients with massive actin release resulting from severe tissue injuries. Treatment of such patients with Gc globulin could therefore potentially be life-saving. This article presents pre-clinical toxicology experiments conducted on purified plasma-derived human Gc globulin. The Gc globulin formulation was shown to be stable for at least 4 years with full retention of actin-binding capacity. In vitro studies did not reveal activation of the kallikrein system or the complement system and cellular studies showed no toxic effects on a variety of human cell lines. In vivo studies showed no acute toxic effects in mice, rats or guinea pigs upon intravenous infusion. A 14-day local tolerance study in rabbits showed no adverse effects, and 14-day toxicity studies in rats and horses did not show any unwanted reactions. In a 14-day toxicology study in beagle dogs, formation of antibodies was seen and in the end of the study period, three out of four dogs showed clinical immunological reactions, which could be ascribed to the formation of antibodies. The half-life, T, for human Gc globulin was 12 hr in rats, 16 hr in horses and 30 hr in dogs. The safety profile of plasma-derived Gc globulin is concluded to be consistent to that required for use in man. PMID:20560927

  6. MicroSPECT/CT imaging and pharmacokinetics of 188Re-(DXR)-liposome in human colorectal adenocarcinoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Ya-Jen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Yu, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yu-Hsien; Lee, Wan-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Lin, Feng-Huei; Lee, Te-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi; Ting, Gann

    2010-01-01

    Nanoliposome can be designed as a drug delivery carrier to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of drug administration. (188)Re-labeled nanoliposomes are useful for diagnostic imaging as well as for targeted radionuclide therapy. In this study, the in vivo nuclear imaging, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of administered nanoliposomes were investigated as drug and radionuclide carriers for targeting solid tumor via intravenous (i.v.) administration. The radiotherapeutics ((188)Re-liposome) and radiochemotherapeutics ((188)Re-DXR-liposome) were i.v. administered to nude mice bearing human HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposomes show similar biodistribution profile; both have higher tumor uptake, higher blood retention time, and lower excretion rate than (188)Re-N,N-bis(2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylenediamine (BMEDA). In contrast to tumor uptake, the area under the curve (AUC) value of tumor for (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome was 16.5- and 11.5-fold higher than that of free (188)Re-BMEDA, respectively. Additionally, (188)Re-liposome and (188)Re-DXR-liposome had a higher tumor-to-muscle ratio at 24 h (14.4+/-2 .7 and 17.14+/-4.1, respectively) than (188)Re-BMEDA (1.6+/-0.1). The tumor targeting and distribution of (188)Re-(DXR)-liposome (representing (188)Re-DXR-liposome and (188)Re-liposome) can also be acquired by signal photon-emission computed tomography/computed tomography images as well as whole body autoradiograph. These results suggest that (188)Re-(DXR)-liposomes are potentially promising agents for passive targeting treatment of malignant disease. PMID:20150618

  7. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic modeling of the temperature-dependent dermal absorption of chloroform by humans following bath water exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A. ); Gordon, Syd M.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2000-01-14

    The kinetics of chloroform in the exhaled breath of human volunteers exposed skin-only via bath water (concentrations < 100 ppb) were analyzed using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Significant increases in exhaled chloroform (and thus bioavailability) were observed as exposure temperatures were increased from 30 to 40?C. The blood flows to the skin and effective skin permeability coefficients (Kp) were both varied to reflect the temperature-dependent changes in physiology and exhalation kinetics. At 40?C, no differences were observed between males and females. Therefore, Kp?s were determined ({approx}0.06 cm/hr) at a skin blood flow rate of 18% of the cardiac output. At 30 and 35?C, males exhaled more chloroform than females resulting in lower effective Kp?s calculated for females. At these lower temperatures, the blood flow to the skin was also reduced. Total amounts of chloroform absorbed averaged 41.9 and 43.6 mg for males and 11.5 and 39.9 mg for females exposed at 35 and 40?C, respectively. At 30?C, only 2/5 males and 1/5 females had detectable concentrations of chloroform in their exhaled breath. For perspective, the total intake of chloroform would have ranged from 79 - 194 mg if the volunteers had consumed 2 L of water orally at the concentrations used in this study. Thus, the relative contribution of dermal uptake of chloroform to the total body burdens associated with bathing for 30 min and drinking 2 L of water (ignoring contributions from inhalation exposures) was predicted to range from 1-28% depending on the temperature of the bath.

  8. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-21

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26818100

  9. Investigation of omeprazole and phenacetin first-pass metabolism in humans using a microscale bioreactor and pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Bricks, Thibault; Hamon, Jérémy; Fleury, Marie José; Jellali, Rachid; Merlier, Franck; Herpe, Yves Edouard; Seyer, Alexandre; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Bois, Frédéric; Leclerc, Eric

    2015-07-01

    A new in vitro microfluidic platform (integrated insert dynamic microfluidic platform, IIDMP) allowing the co-culture of intestinal Caco-2 TC7 cells and of human primary hepatocytes was used to test the absorption and first-pass metabolism of two drugs: phenacetin and omeprazole. The metabolism of these drugs by CYP1A2, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 was evaluated by the calculation of bioavailabilities and of intrinsic clearances using a pharmacokinetic (PK) model. To demonstrate the usefulness of the device and of the PK model, predictions were compared with in vitro and in vivo results from the literature. Based on the IIDMP experiments, hepatic in vivo clearances of phenacetin and omeprazole in the IIDMP were predicted to be 3.10 ± 0.36 and 1.46 ± 0.25 ml/min/kg body weight, respectively. This appeared lower than the in vivo observed data with values ranging between 11.9-19.6 and 5.8-7.5 ml/min/kg body weight, respectively. Then the calculated hepatic and intestinal clearances led to predicting an oral bioavailability of 0.85 and 0.77 for phenacetin and omeprazole versus 0.92 and 0.78 using separate data from the simple monoculture of Caco-2 TC7 cells and hepatocytes in Petri dishes. When compared with the in vivo data, the results of oral bioavailability were overestimated (0.37 and 0.71, respectively). The feasibility of co-culture in a device allowing the integration of intestinal absorption, intestinal metabolism and hepatic metabolism in a single model was demonstrated. Nevertheless, further experiments with other drugs are needed to extend knowledge of the device to predict oral bioavailability and intestinal first-pass metabolism. PMID:25678106

  10. Influence of Urinary pH on the Pharmacokinetics of Cinoxacin in Humans and on Antibacterial Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, Rashmi H.; Gerber, Andreas U.; Craig, William A.; Welling, Peter G.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of acidification and alkalinization of the urine on the pharmacokinetics of cinoxacin was examined after single 500-mg oral doses were administered to nine healthy male volunteers. Acidic and alkaline conditions were achieved by repeated oral doses of ammonium chloride or sodium bicarbonate, respectively. Plasma cinoxacin levels in all subjects were adequately described in terms of one-compartment-model kinetics with first-order absorption and elimination. Acidification and alkalinization treatment had no effect on cinoxacin absorption or distribution. The mean elimination half-life of cinoxacin in plasma was 1.1, 2.0, and 0.6 h in control subjects and with acidification and alkalinization of urine, respectively. Recovery of intact cinoxacin in samples of urine collected 0 to 36 h after cinoxacin administration represented 65% of the dose in control subjects and urine acidification and 80% of the dose with alkalinization of urine. The mean renal clearance of cinoxacin was 76, 118, and 278 ml/min with acidification, control, and alkalinization, respectively, and renal clearance was highly correlated with urinary pH. Urine concentrations of cinoxacin were significantly higher with alkalinization compared with control values during the first 4 h after drug administration. Urine cinoxacin concentrations were reduced somewhat by acidification, but these tended not to be significantly different from control values. Changes in cinoxacin elimination owing to urine pH are less pronounced in humans than in dogs. The antibacterial activity of cinoxacin against some common urinary tract pathogens was pH dependent. A four- to eightfold reduction in cinoxacin activity was generally observed at pH 8 compared with lower pH values. However, in view of the high levels of cinoxacin which are obtained in both acidic and basic urine, the impact of urine pH on cinoxacin antibacterial efficacy would be of minor clinical importance. PMID:7103450

  11. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiling of a P2X7 receptor allosteric modulator GSK1482160 in healthy human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Zahid; Laurijssens, Bart; Ostenfeld, Thor; McHugh, Simon; Stylianou, Anastasia; Scott-Stevens, Paul; Hosking, Louise; Dewit, Odile; Richardson, Jill C; Chen, Chao

    2013-01-01

    AIMS This paper describes findings from the first-in-human study for GSK1482160, an orally available allosteric P2X7 receptor modulator. The study aimed to assess the pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), safety and tolerability of the compound in healthy subjects. METHODS Escalating single doses of up to 1 g were administered to healthy subjects in a single-blind and placebo-controlled fashion. Safety, tolerability, blood drug concentrations and ex vivo Il-1β production in blood were evaluated. RESULTS Drug concentration peaked within 3.5 h of dosing under fasting conditions and declined thereafter with a relatively short half-life of less than 4.5 h. Exposure was proportional to dose with between subject variability of less than 60%. A PK/PD model quantified Il-1β as a function of drug exposure. The model allowed simulation of in vivo pharmacology for various untested dose levels and regimens. Furthermore, the mechanistic model supported the hypothesis that the compound reduces the efficacy of ATP at the P2X7 receptor without affecting its affinity. No major safety or tolerability concerns were identified in this small study (n = 29), except for one case of asymptomatic accelerated idioventricular rhythm at the top dose. CONCLUSION The model-based approach maximized analysis power by integrating all biomarker data and revealed mechanistic insight into the pharmacology of P2X7 modulation by GSK1482160. Simulations by this model ultimately led to the discontinuation of the development of this compound. The therapeutic relevance of the P2X7 receptor remains to be tested in patients. The mechanistic-model-based approach can be applied widely to drug development. PMID:22568863

  12. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  13. Simultaneous determination of carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in polarity switch mode: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Vudagandla; Ramesh, Mullangi; Kumar, Inamadugu Jaswanth; Babu, Ravi Vasu; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Krishnaiah, Abburi

    2013-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid LC-MS/MS-ESI method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma. Carisoprodol was detected in positive ion mode, whereas aspirin was detected in negative ion mode. Carbamazepine and furosemide were used as internal standards (IS) for quantification of carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The extraction procedure involves a liquid-liquid extraction method with ter-butyl methyl ether. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax XDB-Phenyl (4.6 × 75 mm, 3.5 µm) column using an isocratic mobile phase (5 mm ammonium acetate:methanol, 20:80, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min with a total run time of 2.2 min. A detailed method validation was performed as per the FDA guidelines. The standard curves found to be linear in the range of 25.5-4900 and 15.3-3000 ng/mL for carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The results met the acceptance criteria. Carisoprodol and aspirin were found to be stable in various stability studies. The validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study following co-administration of carisoprodol (250 mg) and aspirin (75 mg) tablets by oral route to human volunteers. PMID:22674769

  14. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22706678

  15. Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Orr; Karsak, Meliha; Leclerc, Nathalie; Fogel, Meirav; Frenkel, Baruch; Wright, Karen; Tam, Joseph; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kram, Vardit; Shohami, Esther; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Bab, Itai

    2006-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids bind to and activate two G protein-coupled receptors, the predominantly central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Whereas CB1 mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic, analgesic, and orectic effects, CB2 has been implicated recently in the regulation of liver fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Here we show that CB2-deficient mice have a markedly accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and cortical expansion, although cortical thickness remains unaltered. These changes are reminiscent of human osteoporosis and may result from differential regulation of trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. The CB2–/– phenotype is also characterized by increased activity of trabecular osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), increased osteoclast (the bone-resorbing cell) number, and a markedly decreased number of diaphyseal osteoblast precursors. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. A CB2-specific agonist that does not have any psychotropic effects enhances endocortical osteoblast number and activity and restrains trabecular osteoclastogenesis, apparently by inhibiting proliferation of osteoclast precursors and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in bone marrow-derived osteoblasts/stromal cells. The same agonist attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss and markedly stimulates cortical thickness through the respective suppression of osteoclast number and stimulation of endocortical bone formation. These results demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is essential for the maintenance of normal bone mass by osteoblastic and osteoclastic CB2 signaling. Hence, CB2 offers a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, the most prevalent degenerative disease in developed countries. PMID:16407142

  16. In vitro studies are sometimes better than conventional human pharmacokinetic in vivo studies in assessing bioequivalence of immediate-release solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Polli, James E

    2008-06-01

    Human pharmacokinetic in vivo studies are often presumed to serve as the "gold standard" to assess product bioequivalence (BE) of immediate-release (IR) solid oral dosage forms. However, when this general assumption is re-visited, it appears that in vitro studies are sometimes better than in vivo studies in assessing BE of IR solid oral dosage forms. Reasons for in vitro studies to sometimes serve as the better method are that in vitro studies: (a) reduce costs, (b) more directly assess product performance, and (c) offer benefits in terms of ethical considerations. Reduced costs are achieved through avoiding in vivo studies where BE is self-evident, where biopharmaceutic data anticipates BE, and where in vivo BE study type II error is high. In vitro studies more directly assess product performance than do conventional human pharmacokinetic BE studies, since in vitro studies focus on comparative drug absorption from the two products, while in vivo BE testing can suffer from complications due to its indirect approach. Regarding ethical considerations, in vitro studies better embrace the principle "No unnecessary human testing should be performed" and can result in faster development. Situations when in vitro test should be viewed as preferred include Class I drugs with rapid dissolution, Class III drugs with very rapid dissolution, and highly variable drugs with rapid dissolution and that are not bio(equivalence)problem drugs. Sponsors of potential in vivo human pharmacokinetic BE testing should be required to justify why in vitro data is insufficient, similar to proposed animal testing requires justification to not employ an in vitro approach. PMID:18500564

  17. In vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of topical ketoconazole and miconazole in human stratum corneum.

    PubMed Central

    Pershing, L K; Corlett, J; Jorgensen, C

    1994-01-01

    A direct study evaluating whether differential drug uptake of topical 2% miconazole and 2% ketoconazole from cream formulations into human stratum corneum correlated with differential pharmacological activity against Candida albicans was investigated in healthy human subjects. A single 24-h topical dose of 2% ketoconazole cream or 2% miconazole cream was applied unoccluded, at the same dose (2.6 mg of formulation per cm2 of surface area), at four skin sites on both ventral forearms of six human subjects. At the end of the treatment, residual drug was removed with a tissue from all sites and the treated site was tape stripped 11 times, either 1, 4, 8, or 24 h later. The first tape disc was discarded. The remaining tape discs, 2 through 11, were combined and extracted for drug quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography and bioactivity against C. albicans growth in vitro. Topical 2% ketoconazole produced 14-, 10-, and 7-fold greater drug concentrations in stratum corneum than 2% miconazole at 1, 4, and 8 h after a single topical dose. Ketoconazole and miconazole concentrations in the stratum corneum were similar 24 h after drug removal. Tape disc extracts from 2% ketoconazole-treated skin sites demonstrated significantly greater bioactivity in the bioassay than 2% miconazole. The increased efficacy of 2% ketoconazole compared with that of 2% miconazole in vitro reflects their differential uptake into the stratum corneum and inherent pharmacological activity. Tape stripping the drug-treated site in conjunction with a bioassay is therefore a useful approach in the determination of bioavailability of topical antifungal agents. PMID:8141586

  18. Role of the endogenous cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction: novel insights.

    PubMed

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M; Gueye, Aliou B; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine's effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  19. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  20. [Cephalexin pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V G; Vasil'ev, V K; Danilova, V I; Firsov, A A

    1981-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cephalexin monohydrate after its oral administration in a single dose was studied on rats and dogs. The analysis of the pharmacokinetic data obtained with the one-compartmental model showed that the rate of the antibiotic absorption in the rats was higher than that in the dogs. The periods of the cephalexin half-absorption and maximum concentration were 0.2 and 1.1 hour in the rats and 0.64 and 1.9 hours in the dogs respectively. The period of the antibiotic half-life was almost the same in both animal species. Selective localization of cephalexin in the kidney and liver tissues was noted. The antibiotic was mainly excreted by the kidneys (98.8 per cent for 24 hours). PMID:7235651

  1. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  2. What We Know and Don’t Know About the Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2)

    PubMed Central

    Malfitano, Anna Maria; Basu, Sreemanti; Maresz, Katarzyna; Bifulco, Maurizio; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2015-01-01

    It well appreciated that the endocannabinoid system can regulate immune responses via the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), which is primarily expressed by cells of the hematopoietic system. The endocannabinoid system is composed of receptors, ligands and enzymes controlling the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids. Along with endocannabinoids, both plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids have been shown to bind to and signal through CB2 via G proteins leading to both inhibitory and stimulatory signals depending on the biological process. Because no cannabinoid ligand has been identified that only binds to CB2, the generation of mice deficient in CB2 has greatly expanded our knowledge of how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. In regards to humans, genetic studies have associated CB2 with a variety of human diseases. Here, we review the endocannabinoid system with an emphasis on CB2 and its role in the immune system. PMID:24877594

  3. A novel expression cassette delivers efficient production of exclusively tetrameric human butyrylcholinesterase with improved pharmacokinetics for protection against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Stanislav; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatiana; Shamborant, Olga; Zenkova, Marina; Chernolovskaya, Elena; Gladkikh, Danil; Murashev, Arkadii; Dyachenko, Igor; Palikov, Viktor; Palikova, Yulia; Knorre, Vera; Belogurov, Alexey; Ponomarenko, Natalie; Blackburn, G Michael; Masson, Patrick; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a stoichiometric bioscavenger against poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The low level of expression and extremely rapid clearance of monomeric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE) from bloodstream (t½≈2 min) limits its pharmaceutical application. Recently (Ilyushin at al., PNAS, 2013) we described a long-acting polysialylated recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE-CAO), stable in the bloodstream, that protects mice against 4.2 LD50 of VR. Here we report a set of modifications of the initial rhBChE expression vector to improve stability of the enzyme in the bloodstream and increase its production in CHO cells by introducing in the expression cassette: (i) the sequence of the natural human PRAD-peptide in frame with rhBChE gene via "self-processing" viral F2A peptide under control of an hEF/HTLV promoter, and (ii) previously predicted in silico MAR 1-68 and MAR X-29 sequences. This provides fully tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) at 70 mg/l, that displays improved pharmacokinetics (t½ = 32 ± 1.2 h, MRT = 43 ± 2 h). 3D Fluorescent visualization and distribution of (125)I-labeled enzyme reveals similar low level 4rhBChE and rhBChE-CAO accumulation in muscle, fat, and brain. Administered 4rhBChE was mainly catabolized in the liver and breakdown products were excreted in kidney. Injection of 1.2 LD50 and 1.1 LD50 of paraoxon to BALB/c and knockout BChE-/- mice pre-treated with 4rhBChE (50 mg/kg) resulted in 100% and 78% survival, respectively, without perturbation of long-term behavior. In contrast, 100% mortality of non-pre-treated mice was observed. The high expression level of 4rhBChE in CHO cells permits consideration of this new expression system for manufacturing BChE as a biopharmaceutical. PMID:26239905

  4. High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Rivastigmine in Human Plasma for Application in Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Hossein; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2010-01-01

    A simple and reproducible HPLC method with spectrophotometric detection was developed for determination of rivastigmine in human plasma. Liquid-liquid extraction of rivastigmine and donepezil (as internal standard) from plasma samples was performed with 1-butanol/n-hexane (2:98 v/v) in alkaline condition followed by back-extraction into diluted acetic acid. Chromatography was carried out using a Silica column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) under isocratic elution with acetonitrile-50 mM aqueous sodium dihydrogen phosphate (17: 83 v/v, pH 3.1. Analyses were run at a flow-rate of 1.3 mL/min at of 50°C. The recovery was 90.8% and 95.7% for rivastigmine and the internal standard donepezil, respectively. The precision of the method was 2.6% to 9.1% over the concentration range of 0.5-16 ng/mL for rivastigmine in plasma with a linearity greater than 0.999. The method was specific and sensitive, with a quantification limit of 0.5 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL in plasma. The method was used for a bioequivalence study in healthy subjects. PMID:24363716

  5. Liquid chromatographic assay for metronidazole and tinidazole: pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ursing, B; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1981-01-01

    We developed methods for measuring metronidazole, its two major metabolites, and tinidazole in serum and urine. After treatment of each sample with an equal volume of 5% perchloric acid, the drugs were separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (retention times, 6 to 18 min). Quantitation was based on spectrometry at 320 nm. These assays were sensitive, rapid, and specific, and recoveries from biological samples were quantitative. Metronidazole and tinidazole were given as rapid intravenous infusions to four healthy human volunteers. The biological half-lives of these two compounds were 5.4 and 11.1 h, respectively. The hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole appeared quickly in serum and was eliminated at a slow rate. The acetic acid metabolite of metronidazole was detected in serum at very low levels and only for a limited time. No metabolic products of tinidazole were found in serum samples. In urine, 43.7% of the administered dose of metronidazole was recovered over a period of 24 h (24.1% of the dose as the hydroxy metabolite, 12.0% as the acetic acid metabolite, and 7.6% as unchanged drug). Only 18.4% of the infused dose of tinidazole was eliminated in urine over a period of 72 h, and no metabolic products were detected. PMID:7294765

  6. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  7. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  8. Determination of Cefalothin and Cefazolin in Human Plasma, Urine and Peritoneal Dialysate by UHPLC-MS/MS: application to a pilot pharmacokinetic study in humans.

    PubMed

    Parker, Suzanne L; Guerra Valero, Yarmarly C; Roberts, Darren M; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A; Wallis, Steven C

    2016-06-01

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of cefazolin and cefalothin in human plasma (total and unbound), urine and peritoneal dialysate has been developed and validated. Total plasma concentrations are measured following protein precipitation and are suitable for the concentration range of 1-500 µg/mL. Unbound concentrations are measured from ultra-filtered plasma acquired using Centrifree(®) devices and are suitable for the concentration range of 0.1-500 µg/mL for cefazolin and 1-500 µg/mL for cefalothin. The urine method is suitable for a concentration range of 0.1-20 mg/mL for cefazolin and 0.2-20 mg/mL for cefalothin. Peritoneal dialysate concentrations are measured using direct injection, and are suitable for the concentration range of 0.2-100 µg/mL for both cefazolin and cefalothin. The cefazolin and cefalothin plasma (total and unbound), urine and peritoneal dialysate results are reported for recovery, inter-assay precision and accuracy, and the lower limit of quantification, linearity, stability and matrix effects, with all results meeting acceptance criteria. The method was used successfully in a pilot pharmacokinetic study with patients with peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis, receiving either intraperitoneal cefazolin or cefalothin. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26394804

  9. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma after controlled oral administration of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Gustafson, Richard A; Barnes, Allan; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-08-01

    A clinical study to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral tetrahydrocannabinol was performed. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, inpatient study compared the effects of THC-containing hemp oils in liquid and capsule form to dronabinol (synthetic THC) in doses used for appetite stimulation. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and each participant provided informed consent. Detection times and concentrations of THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [limits of quantification (LOQ)=0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively] after oral THC administration. Six volunteers ingested liquid hemp oil (0.39 and 14.8 mg THC/d), hemp oil in capsules (0.47 mg THC/d), dronabinol capsules (7.5 mg THC/d), and placebo. Plasma specimens were collected during and after each dosing condition. THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were low and never exceeded 6.1 ng/mL. Analytes were detectable 1.5 hour after initiating dosing with the 7.5 mg THC/d regimen and 4.5 hour after starting the 14.8 mg THC/d sessions. THCCOOH was detected 1.5 hour after the first dose, except for the 0.47 mg THC/d session, which required 4.5 hour for concentrations to reach the LOQ. THCCOOH concentrations peaked at 3.1 ng/mL during dosing with the low-dose hemp oils. Plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were negative for all participants at all doses within 15.5 hours after the last THC dose. Plasma THCCOOH persisted for at least 39.5 hours after the end of dosing and at much higher concentrations (up to 43.0 ng/mL). This study demonstrated that subjects who used high THC content hemp oil (347 mug/mL) as a dietary supplement had THC and metabolites in plasma in quantities comparable to those of patients using dronabinol for appetite stimulation. There was a significant

  10. Alcohol Versus Cannabinoids: A Review of Their Opposite Neuro-Immunomodulatory Effects and Future Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan P.; Figueroa, Gloria; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Agudelo, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    Due to the legalization of marijuana and the increased demand for cannabis and alcohol consumption, research efforts highlighting the biomedical consequences of the use of alcohol and cannabinoids are not only relevant to the substance abuse scientific field, but are also of public health interest. Moreover, an overview of the recent literature about alcohol and cannabinoids neuro-immunomodulatory effects highlighting their future therapeutic potentials will provide a significant contribution to science and medicine. Therefore, in the current review, we will first discuss briefly the prevalence of alcohol and marijuana abuse, followed by a discussion on the individual effects of alcohol and cannabinoids on the immune system; then, we will focus on the role of endocannabinoids on the alcohol-induced inflammatory effects. In addition, the review also incorporates cytokine array data obtained from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, providing a different perspective on the alcohol and cannabinoid abuse divergent effects on cytokine production. The final section will highlight the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptors and the novel strategies to treat alcohol dependence as determined by in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. PMID:26478902

  11. Cannabinoid modulation of fear extinction brain circuits: a novel target to advance anxiety treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Phan, K Luan

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress (PTSD), panic, and phobic disorders, can be conceptualized as a failure to inhibit inappropriate fear responses. A common, effective treatment strategy involves repeated presentations to the feared cue without any danger (extinction). However, extinction learning has a number of important limitations, and enhancing its effects, generalizability and durability via cognitive enhancers may improve its therapeutic impact. In this review we focus specifically on the role of the cannabinoid system in fear extinction learning and its retention. We address the following questions: What are the neural circuits mediating fear extinction?; Can we make fear extinction more effective?; Can cannabinoids facilitate fear extinction in humans?; How might the cannabinoid system effect fear extinction? Collectively, translational evidence suggest that enhancing cannabinoid transmission may facilitate extinction learning and its recall, and that the cannabinoid system is a potential pharmacological target for improving the active learning that occurs during exposure-based behavioral treatments prompting future research in terms of mechanisms research, novel treatment approaches ('cognitive enhancers'), and pharmacotherapeutic drug discovery. PMID:23829364

  12. Synthetic cannabinoid use: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Daniel; Thornton, Gabriel

    2012-03-01

    In the past few years, synthetic cannabinoid products have been increasingly used by adolescents and young adults. These products are marketed as herbal or aromatic incense and potpourri, but their psychoactive properties appear to be due to the addition of synthetic cannabinoids. When smoked, they can produce significant psychoactive and physical effects similar to cannabis. Changes in cognition, behavioral disturbances, alterations in mood, and perceptual changes have been reported. An emerging body of literature indicates that use of these products is associated with anxiety and other negative mood changes not typical of cannabis intoxication. Use of synthetic cannabinoid products has been associated with new onset psychosis or exacerbation of pre-existing psychosis, although current evidence cannot establish a definitive link between synthetic cannabinoids and psychosis. Clinicians should suspect synthetic cannabinoid product use if a patient: 1) presents with signs and symptoms consistent with cannabis use, 2) has negative routine urine toxicology screens, 3) is in a situation in which his or her urine is being routinely monitored for illicit substance use, and/or 4) presents with otherwise unexplained sudden onset psychosis. To make the diagnosis, clinicians should become familiar with the effects of synthetic cannabinoid use and have a high index of suspicion. PMID:22418399

  13. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) after intravenous dosing of antiseptic XueBiJing injection in human subjects and rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen; Lin, Jia-zhen; Li, Li; Yang, Jun-ling; Jia, Wei-wei; Huang, Yu-hong; Du, Fei-fei; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Mei-juan; Li, Yan-fen; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Na-ting; Olaleye, Olajide E.; Sun, Yan; Li, Jian; Sun, Chang-hai; Zhang, Gui-ping; Li, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) are believed to be pharmacologically important for the antiseptic herbal injection XueBiJing. This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides. Methods: Systemic exposure to Chishao monoterpene glycosides was assessed in human subjects receiving an intravenous infusion and multiple infusions of XueBiJing injection, followed by assessment of the pharmacokinetics of the major circulating compounds. Supportive rat studies were also performed. Membrane permeability and plasma-protein binding were assessed in vitro. Results: A total of 18 monoterpene glycosides were detected in XueBiJing injection (content levels, 0.001–2.47 mmol/L), and paeoniflorin accounted for 85.5% of the total dose of monoterpene glycosides detected. In human subjects, unchanged paeoniflorin exhibited considerable levels of systemic exposure with elimination half-lives of 1.2–1.3 h; no significant metabolite was detected. Oxypaeoniflorin and albiflorin exhibited low exposure levels, and the remaining minor monoterpene glycosides were negligible or undetected. Glomerular-filtration-based renal excretion was the major elimination pathway of paeoniflorin, which was poorly bound to plasma protein. In rats, the systemic exposure level of paeoniflorin increased proportionally as the dose was increased. Rat lung, heart, and liver exposure levels of paeoniflorin were lower than the plasma level, with the exception of the kidney level, which was 4.3-fold greater than the plasma level; brain penetration was limited by the poor membrane permeability. Conclusion: Due to its significant systemic exposure and appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, as well as previously reported antiseptic properties, paeoniflorin is a promising XueBiJing constituent of therapeutic importance. PMID:26838074

  14. Cannabinoids: novel medicines for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; Valdeolivas, Sara; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has experienced a notable increase in the last 3 decades which is allowing the development of novel cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of different human pathologies, for example, Cesamet® (nabilone) or Marinol® (synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol for oral administration) that were approved in 80s for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients and in 90s for anorexiacachexia associated with AIDS therapy. Recently, the british company GW Pharmaceuticals plc has developed an oromucosal spray called Sativex®, which is constituted by an equimolecular combination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol- and cannabidiol- enriched botanical extracts. Sativex® has been approved for the treatment of specific symptoms (i.e. spasticity and pain) of multiple sclerosis patients in various countries (i.e. Canada, UK, Spain, New Zealand). However, this cannabis- based medicine has been also proposed to be useful in other neurological disorders given the analgesic, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties of their components demonstrated in preclinical models. Numerous clinical trials are presently being conducted to confirm this potential in patients. We are particularly interested in the case of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder caused by an excess of CAG repeats in the genomic allele resulting in a polyQ expansion in the encoded protein called huntingtin, and that affects primarily striatal and cortical neurons thus producing motor abnormalities (i.e. chorea) and dementia. Cannabinoids have been studied for alleviation of hyperkinetic symptoms, given their inhibitory effects on movement, and, in particular, as disease-modifying agents due to their anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. This potential has been corroborated in different experimental models of HD and using different types of cannabinoid agonists

  15. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S.; Perez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled “Not for human use.” Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, “K2” and “Spice.” Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  16. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S; Perez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled "Not for human use." Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, "K2" and "Spice." Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  17. Determination of the novel antiarrhythmic drug sulcardine sulfate in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and its application in a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingying; Liu, Gangyi; Zhang, Mengqi; Lu, Youli; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Yun; Zheng, Hongcao; Wang, Wei; Gui, Yuzhou; Yu, Chen; Li, Shuijun; Wang, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    Sulcardine sulfate (Sul), a novel antiarrhythmic agent, is currently in phase I and phase II clinical trials. To elucidate its clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics, a rapid and accurate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been developed and validated for the quantification of Sul in human plasma. Plasma samples were precipitated by acetonitrile and isotope-labeled sulcardine was added as internal standard. The analysis was carried out on a Capcell Pak C18 MG III column (100 × 2.0 mm, 5 μm) with 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile solution and water (17:83, v/v) as mobile phase. The linear range was 5.0-1000 ng/mL for Sul, with a lower limit of quantification of 5.0 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-batch CVs were within ±11.0% and the accuracies were 4.9-107.3%. Our method, for the first time, allows the rapid (only 3.0 min) and accurate quantification of Sul in human plasma. The method has been successfully applied in the pharmacokinetic study of Sul in a clinical trial following oral administration of Sul to healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26715470

  18. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4].

  19. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analyticalmore » methods employed and is related to [4].« less

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids in Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Leweke, F Markus; Mueller, Juliane K; Lange, Bettina; Rohleder, Cathrin

    2016-04-01

    Over recent years, the interest in the endocannabinoid system (ECS) as a new target for the treatment of schizophrenia has evolved. The ECS represents one of the most relevant neurotransmitter systems in the brain and mainly fulfills a homeostatic role in terms of neurotransmission but also with respect to inflammatory processes. Two main approaches to the modulation of endocannabinoid functioning have been chosen so far. First, the selective blockade or inverse agonism of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor has been tested for the improvement of acute psychotic symptoms, as well as for the improvement of cognitive functions in schizophrenia. This was not effective in either case. Second, the modulation of endocannabinoid levels by use of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors has been proposed, and the antipsychotic properties of cannabidiol are currently being investigated in humans. Unfortunately, for most of these trials that have focused on psychopathological and cognitive effects of cannabidiol, no published data are available. However, there is first evidence that cannabidiol may ameliorate psychotic symptoms with a superior side-effect profile compared with established antipsychotics. In conclusion, several clinical trials targeting the ECS in acute schizophrenia have either been completed or are underway. Although publicly available results are currently limited, preliminary data indicate that selected compounds modulating the ECS may be effective in acute schizophrenia. Nevertheless, so far, sample sizes of patients investigated are not sufficient to come to a final judgment, and no maintenance studies are available to ensure long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26852073

  1. Monte Carlo Simulations of a Human Phantom Radio-Pharmacokinetic Response on a Small Field of View Scintigraphic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgio, N.; Ciavola, C.; Santagata, A.; Iurlaro, G.; Montani, L.; Scafè, R.

    2006-04-01

    The limiting factors for the scintigraphic clinical application are related to i) biosource characteristics (pharmacokinetic of the drug distribution between organs), Detection chain (photons transport, scintillation, analog to digital signal conversion, etc.) Imaging (Signal to Noise ratio, Spatial and Energy Resolution, Linearity etc) In this work, by using Monte Carlo time resolved transport simulations on a mathematical phantom and on a small field of view scintigraphic device, the trade off between the aforementioned factors was preliminary investigated.

  2. Posiphen as a candidate drug to lower CSF amyloid precursor protein, amyloid-β peptide and τ levels: target engagement, tolerability and pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Maccecchini, Maria L; Chang, Mee Young; Pan, Catherine; John, Varghese; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Aim A first in human study to evaluate tolerability and pharmacokinetics followed by an early proof of mechanism (POM) study to determine whether the small orally, available molecule, Posiphen tartrate (Posiphen), lowers secreted (s) amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) α and -β, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), tau (τ) and inflammatory markers in CSF of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Study design Posiphen single and multiple ascending dose phase 1 randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled safety, tolerance, pharmacokinetic studies were undertaken in a total of 120 healthy volunteers to define a dose that was then used in a small non-randomised study of five MCI subjects, used as their own controls, to define target engagement. Main outcome measures Pharmacodynamic: sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42, τ (total (t) and phosphorylated (p)) and inflammatory marker levels were time-dependently measured over 12 h and compared prior to and following 10 days of oral Posiphen treatment in four MCI subjects who completed the study. Pharmacokinetic: plasma and CSF drug and primary metabolite concentrations with estimated brain levels extrapolated from steady-state drug administration in rats. Results Posiphen proved well tolerated and significantly lowered CSF levels of sAPPα, sAPPβ, t-τ, p-τ and specific inflammatory markers, and demonstrated a trend to lower CSF Aβ42. Conclusions These results confirm preclinical POM studies, demonstrate that pharmacologically relevant drug/metabolite levels reach brain and support the continued clinical optimisation and evaluation of Posiphen for MCI and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22791904

  3. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of human mouse chimeric anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD22-positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su; Zhang, Dongsheng; Sun, Jian; Li, Zhinming; Deng, Liting; Zou, Benyan; Zhan, Jing

    2012-01-01

    The safety and pharmacokinetics assessment of antibodies targeting CD22 (e.g., epratuzumab) have been established in western Caucasian populations, but there are no reports of the effects in Chinese populations. This dose-escalation study examines the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of multiple doses of anti-CD22 human-murine chimeric monoclonal antibody SM03 in 21 Chinese patients with CD22-positive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Most of drug-related adverse events (AEs) were mild and reversible. Two patients experienced serious AEs (hemorrhage); one patient had grade 4 neutropenia; one patient had asymptomatic grade III prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Major AEs included fever (71%), prolongation of APTT (42.8%), leukocytopenia (44.4%), alanine transaminase elevation (28.6%), elevated serum creatinine (23.8%) and injection site skin redness (14.3%). Circulating B cells transiently decreased without significant effects on T cells or immunoglobulin levels. Pharmacokinetic data revealed that mean maximum observed SM03 concentration and mean AUC from time zero to infinity increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 360 mg/m2 SM03. Mean clearance was similar at doses ≤360 mg/m2 and decreased significantly at dose 480 mg/m2, supporting saturation of B-cell binding at 360 mg/m2. Across all dose levels and histologies, one patient achieved partial response at 480 mg/m2 dose; 14 patients had stable disease as best response and four patients progressed. Overall, SM03 was tolerated at doses ranging from 60–480 mg/m2 and had potential efficacy in Chinese patients with follicular lymphoma. PMID:22453099

  4. Didanosine Population Pharmacokinetics in West African Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children Administered Once-Daily Tablets in Relation to Efficacy after One Year of Treatment▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Déborah; Bardin, Christophe; Diagbouga, Serge; Nacro, Boubacar; Hien, Hervé; Zoure, Emmanuelle; Rouet, François; Ouiminga, Adama; Urien, Saik; Foulongne, Vincent; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Msellati, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to study didanosine pharmacokinetics in children after the administration of tablets, the only formulation available in Burkina Faso for which data are missing, and to establish relationships between doses, plasma drug concentrations, and treatment effects (efficacy/toxicity). Didanosine concentrations were measured for 40 children after 2 weeks and for 9 children after 2 to 5 months of treatment with a didanosine-lamivudine-efavirenz combination. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM. The link between the maximal concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), and the decrease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 RNA levels after 12 months of treatment was evaluated. The threshold AUC that improved efficacy was determined by the use of a Wilcoxon test for HIV RNA, and an optimized dosing schedule was simulated. Didanosine pharmacokinetics was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The apparent clearance and volume of distribution were higher for tablets, probably due to a lower bioavailability with tablets than with pediatric powder. The decrease in the viral load after 12 months of treatment was significantly correlated with the didanosine AUC and Cmax (P ≤ 0.02) during the first weeks of treatment. An AUC of >0.60 mg/liter·h was significantly linked to a greater decrease in the viral load (a decrease of 3 log10 versus 2.4 log10 copies/ml; P = 0.03) than that with a lower AUC. A didanosine dose of 360 mg/m2 administered as tablets should be a more appropriate dose than 240 mg/m2 to improve efficacy for these children. However, data on adverse events with this dosage are missing. PMID:19581461

  5. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells. PMID:24976505

  6. Control of spasticity in a multiple sclerosis model using central nervous system-excluded CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Visintin, Cristina; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Al-Izki, Sarah; De Faveri, Lia E; Nuamah, Rosamond A; Mein, Charles A; Montpetit, Alexandre; Hardcastle, Alison J; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Amor, Sandra; Thomas, Sarah A; Ledent, Catherine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Thompson, Alan J; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the generation of central nervous system (CNS)-excluded cannabinoid receptor agonists to test the hypothesis that inhibition of spasticity, due to CNS autoimmunity, could be controlled by affecting neurotransmission within the periphery. Procedures included identification of chemicals and modeling to predict the mode of exclusion; induction and control of spasticity in the ABH mouse model of multiple sclerosis; conditional deletion of CB1 receptor in peripheral nerves; side-effect profiling to demonstrate the mechanism of CNS-exclusion via drug pumps; genome-wide association study in N2(129×ABH) backcross to map polymorphic cannabinoid drug pump; and sequencing and detection of cannabinoid drug-pump activity in human brain endothelial cell lines. Three drugs (CT3, SAB378 and SAD448) were identified that control spasticity via action on the peripheral nerve CB1 receptor. These were peripherally restricted via drug pumps that limit the CNS side effects (hypothermia) of cannabinoids to increase the therapeutic window. A cannabinoid drug pump is polymorphic and functionally lacking in many laboratory (C57BL/6, 129, CD-1) mice used for transgenesis, pharmacology, and toxicology studies. This phenotype was mapped and controlled by 1-3 genetic loci. ABCC1 within a cluster showing linkage is a cannabinoid CNS-drug pump. Global and conditional CB1 receptor-knockout mice were used as controls. In summary, CNS-excluded CB1 receptor agonists are a novel class of therapeutic agent for spasticity. PMID:24121462

  7. The Role of Cannabinoids in Neuroanatomic Alterations in Cannabis Users.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Valentina; Solowij, Nadia; Yücel, Murat

    2016-04-01

    The past few decades have seen a marked change in the composition of commonly smoked cannabis. These changes primarily involve an increase of the psychoactive compound ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a decrease of the potentially therapeutic compound cannabidiol (CBD). This altered composition of cannabis may be linked to persistent neuroanatomic alterations typically seen in regular cannabis users. In this review, we summarize recent findings from human structural neuroimaging investigations. We examine whether neuroanatomic alterations are 1) consistently observed in samples of regular cannabis users, particularly in cannabinoid receptor-high areas, which are vulnerable to the effects of high circulating levels of THC, and 2) associated either with greater levels of cannabis use (e.g., higher dosage, longer duration, and earlier age of onset) or with distinct cannabinoid compounds (i.e., THC and CBD). Across the 31 studies selected for inclusion in this review, neuroanatomic alterations emerged across regions that are high in cannabinoid receptors (i.e., hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, cerebellum). Greater dose and earlier age of onset were associated with these alterations. Preliminary evidence shows that THC exacerbates, whereas CBD protects from, such harmful effects. Methodologic differences in the quantification of levels of cannabis use prevent accurate assessment of cannabis exposure and direct comparison of findings across studies. Consequently, the field lacks large "consortium-style" data sets that can be used to develop reliable neurobiological models of cannabis-related harm, recovery, and protection. To move the field forward, we encourage a coordinated approach and suggest the urgent development of consensus-based guidelines to accurately and comprehensively quantify cannabis use and exposure in human studies. PMID:26858212

  8. Membrane associated antitumor effects of crocine-, ginsenoside- and cannabinoid derivates.

    PubMed

    Molnár, J; Szabó, D; Pusztai, R; Mucsi, I; Berek, L; Ocsovszki, I; Kawata, E; Shoyama, Y

    2000-01-01

    In the present work a systematic study was initiated with crocine, ginsenoside and cannabinoid derivatives on multidrug resistant mouse lymphoma cells, viral tumor antigen expression and some human leukocyte functions. Among saffron derivatives, crocin and picrocrocin, triglucosyl and diglucosyl crocetin were ineffective on the reversal of multidrug resistance of lymphoma cells. Ginsenoside increased drug accumulation and tumor antigen expression at 2.0-20.0 micrograms/mL. Some cannabinoid derivatives such as cannabinol, cannabispirol and cannabidiol increased drug accumulation, while cannabidiolic acid, delta-9-THC and tetrahydro-cannabidiolic acid reduced drug accumulation of the human mdr1-gene transfected mouse lymphoma cells. The reversal of multidrug resistance is the result of the inhibition of the efflux pump function in the tumor cells. Crocetin esters were less potent than crocin itself in the inhibition of EBV early antigen expression. However crocin and diglucosylcrocetin inhibited early tumor antigen expression of adenovirus infected cells, but triglucosylcrocetin was less effective at 0.01-1.0 microgram/mL. The crocin had no antiviral effect [on HSV-2 infected vero cells] up to 25 micrograms/mL concentration. Ginsenosides had a moderate inhibitory effect except ginsenoside Rb1 (was the less effective) on the drug efflux pump. Among the cannabinoid derivatives the cannabinol and cannabispirol increased drug accumulation, while cannabidiolic acid and delta-8-THC, delta-9-THC and tetrahydro-cannabinol reduced drug accumulation in multidrug resistant mouse lymphoma cells. It is interesting that ginsenosides had a chemical structure-dependent immunomodulating effect by enhancing the activity of NK-cells and ADCC activities. PMID:10810367

  9. Rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of megestrol acetate in human plasma: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hyung; Park, Ji-Sun; Jo, Min-Ho; Park, Mi-Sun; Ryu, Ju-Hee; Cho, Young-Wuk; Shim, Wang-Sup; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-04-01

    A rapid, simple and fully validated LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of megestrol acetate in human plasma using tolbutamide as an internal standard (IS) after one-step liquid-liquid extraction with methyl-tert-butyl-ether. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring mode by monitoring the transitions m/z 385.5 → 267.1 for megestrol acetate and m/z 271.4 → 155.1 for IS. Chromatographic separation was performed on a YMC Hydrosphere C18 column with an isocratic mobile phase, which consisted of 10 mm ammonium formate buffer (adjusted to pH 5.0 with formic acid)-methanol (60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The achieved lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 1 ng/mL (signal-to-noise ratio > 10) and the standard calibration curve for megestrol acetate was linear (r > 0.99) over the studied concentration range (1-2000 ng/mL). The proposed method was fully validated by determining its specificity, linearity, LLOQ, intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, recovery, matrix effect and stability. The validated LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters of megestrol acetate after oral administration of a single dose 800 mg of megestrol acetate (Megace™) to five healthy Korean male volunteers under fed conditions. PMID:22961730

  10. Determination of afloqualone in human plasma using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: Application to pharmacokinetic studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Lee, Seo-Pan; Jeong, Hae Hum; Yoon, Young-Ran; Sohn, Soo Jung; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2007-10-15

    Two methods for determining the central-acting muscle relaxant afloqualone in human plasma were developed and compared using API2000 and API4000 liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) systems. In the API2000 LC/MS/MS system, afloqualone and the internal standard methaqualone were extracted from plasma using a methyl-tertiary ether. After drying the organic layer, the residue was reconstituted in a mobile phase (0.1% formic acid-acetonitrile:0.1% formic acid buffer, 80:20 v/v) and injected onto a reversed-phase C(18) column. The isocratic mobile phase was eluted at 0.2ml/min. The ion transitions monitored in multiple reaction-monitoring mode were m/z 284-->146 and 251-->117 for afloqualone and methaqualone, respectively. Sample preparation for the API4000LC/MS/MS system involved simple protein precipitation with an organic mixture (methanol:10% ZnSO(4)=8:2). The ion transitions monitored in multiple reaction-monitoring mode were m/z 284-->146 and 251-->131 for afloqualone and methaqualone, respectively. In both assays, the coefficient of variation of the precision was less than 11.8%, the accuracy exceeded 91.5%, the limit of quantification was 0.5ng/ml, and the limit of detection was 0.1ng/ml for afloqualone. Two methods were used to measure the plasma afloqualone concentration in healthy subjects after a single oral 20-mg dose of afloqualone. During subsequent application of the methods, we observed that high-concentration plasma samples (>7ng/ml) prepared using the protein precipitation method resulted in about 20% higher afloqualone concentrations than with plasma samples prepared using the liquid-liquid extraction method. We believe that this phenomenon was related to the cleanness of the sample and its chemical nature. PMID:19073082

  11. Pharmacokinetics of cannabidiol in dogs.

    PubMed

    Samara, E; Bialer, M; Mechoulam, R

    1988-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the major nonpsychoactive cannabinoids produced by Cannabis sativa L. Recent studies have shown that CBD has a high protective index, comparable to that of phenobarbital and phenytoin. Because CBD has been reported to possess both anticonvulsant and antiepileptic activity, its pharmacokinetics were studied in dogs after the administration of two iv doses (45 and 90 mg) and one oral dose (180 mg) to dogs. After iv administration, CBD was rapidly distributed, followed by a prolonged elimination. It has a terminal half-life of 9 hr. CBD plasma levels declined in a triphasic fashion. The total body clearance of CBD was 17 liters/hr (after the 45-mg dose) and 16 liters/hr (after the 90-mg dose). This clearance value, after its normalization to blood clearance using mathematical equations, approaches the value of the hepatic blood flow; the extraction ratio in the liver is 0.74. CBD was observed to have a large volume of distribution, approximately 100 liters. In the dose range of 45 to 90 mg, the increase in the AUC was proportional to the dose, a fact that indicates that the pharmacokinetic profile of CBD in this dose range was not dose dependent. In three of the six dogs studied, CBD could not be detected in the plasma after oral administration. In the other three, the oral bioavailability ranged from 13 to 19%. The results of this study show that CBD is barely absorbed after oral administration to dogs. This low bioavailability may be due to a first pass effect. PMID:2900742

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  13. Physiologically based predictions of the impact of inhibition of intestinal and hepatic metabolism on human pharmacokinetics of CYP3A substrates.

    PubMed

    Fenneteau, Frederique; Poulin, Patrick; Nekka, Fahima

    2010-01-01

    The first objective of the present study was to predict the pharmacokinetics of selected CYP3A substrates administered at a single oral dose to human. The second objective was to predict pharmacokinetics of the selected drugs in presence of inhibitors of the intestinal and/or hepatic CYP3A activity. We developed a whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetics (WB-PBPK) model accounting for presystemic elimination of midazolam (MDZ), alprazolam (APZ), triazolam (TRZ), and simvastatin (SMV). The model also accounted for concomitant administration of the above-mentioned drugs with CYP3A inhibitors, namely ketoconazole (KTZ), itraconazole (ITZ), diltiazem (DTZ), saquinavir (SQV), and a furanocoumarin contained in grape-fruit juice (GFJ), namely 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB). Model predictions were compared to published clinical data. An uncertainty analysis was performed to account for the variability and uncertainty of model parameters when predicting the model outcomes. We also briefly report on the results of our efforts to develop a global sensitivity analysis and its application to the current WB-PBPK model. Considering the current criterion for a successful prediction, judged satisfied once the clinical data are captured within the 5th and 95th percentiles of the predicted concentration-time profiles, a successful prediction has been obtained for a single oral administration of MDZ and SMV. For APZ and TRZ, however, a slight deviation toward the 95th percentile was observed especially for C(max) but, overall, the in vivo profiles were well captured by the PBPK model. Moreover, the impact of DHB-mediated inhibition on the extent of intestinal pre-systemic elimination of MDZ and SMV has been accurately predicted by the proposed PBPK model. For concomitant administrations of MDZ and ITZ, APZ and KTZ, as well as SMV and DTZ, the in vivo concentration-time profiles were accurately captured by the model. A slight deviation was observed for SMV when

  14. [What sense in cannabinoid use as regulated by Italian DM 18/04/07? Pharmacological and legal considerations].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Grossi, S; Bonsignore, A; Martelli, A

    2008-06-01

    The present article relates to the Italian Ministerial Decree (DM) 18/04/2007 referring to what was established by the Financial Law 2007 on the matter of the use of drugs for the so called ''off-label'' uses. This law introduces three cannabinoid substances, with the common name of Delta 9 and Trans-delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol and Nabilone, within the possible therapies for the treatment of ''severe pain''. The authors underline the absence of a sufficient pharmacokinetical and pharmacodynamical knowledge supporting the use of cannabinoid substances in the ''severe pain'' therapy. Further more the professional prescriber could go against judicial consequences if the drugs causes as verified the onset of collateral effects even severe that, for the scientific knowledge in possess at the present state, the authors know could take place. PMID:18497729

  15. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers. PMID:26764235

  16. A potential role for cannabinoid receptors in the therapeutic action of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Priestley, Richard S; Nickolls, Sarah A; Alexander, Stephen P H; Kendall, David A

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoids are reported to have actions through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which led us to investigate PPAR agonists for activity at the cannabinoid receptors. Radio-ligand binding and functional assays were conducted using human recombinant cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors, as well as the guinea pig isolated ileum, using the full agonist CP55940 as a positive control. The PPAR-α agonist fenofibrate exhibited submicromolar affinity for both receptors (pKi CB1, 6.3 ± 0.1; CB2, 7.7 ± 0.1). Functionally, fenofibrate acted as an agonist at the CB2 receptor (pEC50, 7.7 ± 0.1) and a partial agonist at the CB1 receptor, although with a decrease in functional response at higher concentrations, producing bell-shaped concentration-response curves. High concentrations of fenofibrate were able to increase the dissociation rate constant for [(3)H]-CP55940 at the CB1 receptor, (kfast without: 1.2 ± 0.2/min; with: 3.8 ± 0.1 × 10(-2)/min) and decrease the maximal response to CP55940 (Rmax, 86 ± 2%), which is consistent with a negative allosteric modulator. Fenofibrate also reduced electrically induced contractions in isolated guinea pig ileum via CB1 receptors (pEC50, 6.0 ± 0.4). Fenofibrate is thus identified as an example of a new class of cannabinoid receptor ligand and allosteric modulator, with the potential to interact therapeutically with cannabinoid receptors in addition to its primary PPAR target. PMID:25550466

  17. Potentiation of the antitumor activity of adriamycin against osteosarcoma by cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    NIU, FENG; ZHAO, SONG; XU, CHANG-YAN; SHA, HUI; BI, GUI-BIN; CHEN, LIN; YE, LONG; GONG, PING; NIE, TIAN-HONG

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in children and adolescents. The present study aimed to identify novel therapeutic strategies for osteosarcoma, by assessing the antitumor activity of the cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 and its combined effect with adriamycin (ADM) against the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line. To evaluate the antiproliferative action of these molecules, a Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used. The ability of cannabinoid to inhibit the migration, invasion and angiogenic activity of MG-63 cells were assessed by scratch, Transwell® chamber and angiogenesis assays, respectively, in vitro. To examine the alterations in expression of targeted genes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used. The administration of cannabinoid combined with ADM was demonstrated to inhibit the growth of MG-63 cells, resulting in a cell viability of 32.12±3.13%, which was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with the cell viability following treatment with cannabinoid (70.86±7.55%) and ADM (62.87±5.98%) alone. Greater antimetastasis and antiangiogenic activities were also observed following the coadministration of the two agents compared with individual treatments and controls. In addition, the expression levels of Notch-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in MG-63 cells were downregulated following the treatments with cannabinoid alone or in combination with ADM. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrated that cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 may significantly potentiate the antiproliferative, antimetastasis and antiangiogenic effects of ADM against MG-63 cells via the downregulation of Notch-1, MMP-2 and VEGF. These findings may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26622862

  18. Modelling of the concentration--effect relationship of THC on central nervous system parameters and heart rate -- insight into its mechanisms of action and a tool for clinical research and development of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Strougo, A; Zuurman, L; Roy, C; Pinquier, J L; van Gerven, J M A; Cohen, A F; Schoemaker, R C

    2008-09-01

    Pharmacokinetics after pulmonary administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its major metabolites 11-OH-THC and 11-nor-9-COOH-THC was quantified. Additionally, the relationship between THC and its effects on heart rate, body sway and several visual analogue scales was investigated using pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modelling. This provided insights useful for the research and development of novel cannabinoids and the physiology and pharmacology of cannabinoid systems. First, the PK-PD model gave information reflecting various aspects of cannabinoid systems. The delay between THC concentration and effect was quantified in equilibration half-lives of 7.68 min for heart rate and from 39.2 to 84.8 min for the CNS responses. This suggests that the effect of THC on the different responses could be due to different sites of action or different physiological mechanisms. Differences in the shape of the concentration-effect relationship could indicate various underlying mechanisms. Second, the PK-PD model can be used for prediction of THC concentration and effect profiles. It is illustrated how this can be used to optimise studies with entirely different trial designs. Third, many new cannabinoid agonists and antagonists are in development. PK-PD models for THC can be used as a reference for new agonists or as tools to quantitate the pharmacological properties of cannabinoid antagonists. PMID:18583433

  19. The human and rat recombinant receptors for advanced glycation end products have a high degree of homology but different pharmacokinetic properties in rats.

    PubMed

    Renard, C; Chappey, O; Wautier, M P; Nagashima, M; Morser, J; Scherrmann, J M; Wautier, J L

    1999-09-01

    The accelerated formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is implicated in diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications. The binding of AGEs to their cellular surface receptor (RAGE) induces vascular dysfunction and in particular an increase in vascular permeability. We previously demonstrated that rat recombinant RAGE (rR-RAGE) produced in insect cells corrected the hyperpermeability due to RAGE-AGE interaction and that pharmacokinetic properties of rR-RAGE after i.v. administration in rats were compatible with a potential therapeutic use. In the present study, we showed that recombinant human RAGE (rH-RAGE) had a similar efficacy in inhibiting AGE-induced endothelial alteration and in reducing the hyperpermeability observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. (125)I-rH-RAGE elimination half-life after i.v. administration was similar in diabetic and normal rats (53.7 +/- 7.6 and 45.3 +/- 4.0 h, respectively). The presence of AGEs is responsible for a higher distribution volume in diabetic rats compared with normal rats (15.3 +/- 2.7 and 7.7 +/- 0. 7 l/kg, respectively). Immunoreactive (125)I-rH-RAGE decreased more rapidly than did immunoreactive (125)I-rR-RAGE. The differences between (125)I-rH-RAGE and (125)I-rR-RAGE pharmacokinetics in rat may be related to differences in potential O-glycosylation and protease cleavage sites between the two RAGE molecules. PMID:10454525

  20. Determination of dexmedetomidine in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometric detection: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Zunjian; Wu, Lili; Tian, Yuan; Feng, Shudan; Chen, Yun

    2009-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive and selective high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the determination and pharmacokinetic investigation of dexmedetomidine (DMED) in human plasma. Dexmedetomidine and the internal standard (ondansetron) were extracted in a single step with diethyl-ether from 1.0 mL of alkalinized plasma. The mobile phase was a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.5% formic acid solution (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.2 mL min(-1). The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode using the respective [M+H]+ ions m/z 201.0-->95.1 for DMED and m/z 294.1-->170.1 for the IS. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 5-5000 pg mL(-1) with the correlation coefficient above 0.9995. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 5 pg mL(-1) with a relative standard deviation of less than 15%. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. The validated HPLC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of three level doses of DMED in Chinese healthy volunteers. PMID:19577876

  1. Molecular pharmacokinetics of catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Levêque, Dominique; Jehl, François

    2007-05-01

    This review focuses on the published data regarding the molecular determinants (enzymes, transporters, orphan nuclear receptors) of Catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition, drug-drug interactions) is also discussed. PMID:17442684

  2. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Kyle; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. PMID:27473014

  3. Pharmacokinetic Interpretation of Blood Levels and Urinary Excretion Data for Cefazolin and Cephalothin After Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rattie, Elisabeth S.; Ravin, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    Blood levels of cefazolin and cephalothin were determined in two separate crossover studies in 20 healthy male adults, each after intravenous and intramuscular administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the intravenous data based upon a two-compartment open model. The rate constants controlling the distribution between the central and peripheral compartments, the overall elimination rate constants, the apparent volumes of distribution, and the fraction of the dose in the central and peripheral compartments were determined. The bioavailability was calculated to be 100% for cefazolin and cephalothin. PMID:1147591

  4. The use of cannabinoids in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Timothy David; Osborn, Hannah Louise

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year-old man who developed chronic pain following the excision of a facial cancer that was poorly controlled despite multiple analgesic medications. Following the starting of nabilone (a synthetic cannabinoid) his pain control was greatly improved and this had a huge impact on his quality of life. We also managed to significantly reduce his doses of opioid analgesia and ketamine. We review the current literature regarding the medicinal use of cannabinoids, with an emphasis on chronic pain, in an attempt to clarify their role and how to select patients who may benefit from this treatment. PMID:23893276

  5. Safety, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics of VGX-1027-A novel oral anti-inflammatory drug in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica C; Menacherry, Stanley; Diehl, Malissa C; Giffear, Mary D; White, C Jo; Juba, Rob; Bagarazzi, Mark L; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Boyer, Jean; Agarwal, Vipin; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bart, Stephen; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2016-03-01

    VGX-1027, a novel oral immune modulator, is under development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single (1-800 mg) and multiple (40-400 mg) oral doses were evaluated in 2 clinical studies. The doses were well tolerated up to 800 mg in a single dose and 200 mg twice daily in multiple doses. Adverse events were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose-related pattern. There were no clinically significant physical or laboratory findings. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that increases in Cmax and AUC0-inf were dose-proportional, and AUC0- τ was approximately dose-proportional. For the single-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 4.9 to 8.7 hours. For the multiple-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 7.05 to 10.05 hours. No accumulation of the drug was observed after day 1, indicating that steady-state concentrations were attained with single and multiple dosing for 5 days. Approximately 90% of the administered dose was excreted in urine as unchanged drug. PMID:27138022

  6. Hollow fiber-based liquid phase microextraction with factorial design optimization and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for determination of cannabinoids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Emídio, Elissandro Soares; de Menezes Prata, Vanessa; de Santana, Fernando José Malagueño; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira

    2010-08-15

    A new method, based on hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSMS), was developed for determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in samples of human hair. Since hair is a solid matrix, the samples were subjected to alkaline digestion using NaOH. The aqueous solutions obtained were extracted using a 6cm polypropylene fiber (600microm i.d., 200microm wall thickness, 0.2microm pore size) for each extraction. A 2(5-1) fractional factorial design for screening, and a central composite design for optimization of significant variables, was applied during development of the extraction method. The variables evaluated were the type of extraction solvent, pH, stirring speed, extraction time, and acceptor phase volume. The optimized conditions for the proposed extraction procedure were 10mg of hair sample; 20microL of butyl acetate; aqueous (pH 14) donor phase containing 6.8% NaCl; 600rpm stirring speed; 20min extraction time. A linear response was obtained in the ranges 1-500pgmg(-1) (CBD and CBN) and 20-500pgmg(-1) (THC), with regression coefficients >0.99. Precision, determined as the relative standard deviation, was 3.3-8.9% (intra-day) and 4.4-13.7% (inter-day). Absolute recoveries varied in the ranges 4.4-4.8% (CBD), 7.6-8.9% (THC) and 7.7-8.2% (CBN). Limits of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 0.5-15pgmg(-1) and 1-20pgmg(-1), respectively. The method was successfully used to determine CBD, THC and CBN in hair samples from patients in a drug dependency rehabilitation center. Concentrations varied in the ranges 1-18pgmg(-1) (CBD), 20-232pgmg(-1) (THC) and 9-107pgmg(-1) (CBN), confirming the suitability of the method for monitoring studies. PMID:20655815

  7. Cannabinoids mediate analgesia largely via peripheral type 1 cannabinoid receptors in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Nitin; Pacher, Pal; Tegeder, Irmgard; Amaya, Fumimasa; Constantin, Cristina E; Brenner, Gary J; Rubino, Tiziana; Michalski, Christoph W; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Mackie, Ken; Marian, Claudiu; Batkai, Sandor; Parolaro, Daniela; Fischer, Michael J; Reeh, Peter; Kunos, George; Kress, Michaela; Lutz, Beat; Woolf, Clifford J; Kuner, Rohini

    2008-01-01

    Although endocannabinoids constitute one of the first lines of defense against pain, the anatomical locus and the precise receptor mechanisms underlying cannabinergic modulation of pain are uncertain. Clinical exploitation of the system is severely hindered by the cognitive deficits, memory impairment, motor disturbances and psychotropic effects resulting from the central actions of cannabinoids. We deleted the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) specifically in nociceptive neurons localized in the peripheral nervous system of mice, preserving its expression in the CNS, and analyzed these genetically modified mice in preclinical models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The nociceptor-specific loss of CB1 substantially reduced the analgesia produced by local and systemic, but not intrathecal, delivery of cannabinoids. We conclude that the contribution of CB1-type receptors expressed on the peripheral terminals of nociceptors to cannabinoid-induced analgesia is paramount, which should enable the development of peripherally acting CB1 analgesic agonists without any central side effects. PMID:17558404

  8. Simultaneous bioanalysis of rasagiline and its major metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yang, Leting; Hua, Jing; Xie, Huiru; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-06-01

    Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type-B (MAO-B) and has been used both as a monotherapy and in addition to levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rasagiline is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, and the following three major metabolites with potential neuroprotective activity have been identified: 1-aminoindan (AI), 3-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1-aminoindan (3-OH-PAI) and 3-hydroxy-1-aminoindan (3-OH-AI). In this study, a novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of rasagiline and its major metabolites in human plasma. This method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, matrix effect and stability. The validated method was then applied to a clinical pharmacokinetic study after the oral administration of 1mg rasagiline mesylate tablets to six healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:27060436

  9. Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-10-01

    There is substantial evidence from studies in humans and animal models for a role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states. Several studies have shown an association between exposure to trauma and substance use. Specifically, it has been shown that there is increased prevalence of cannabis use in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and vice versa. Clinical studies suggest that PTSD patients may cope with their symptoms by using cannabis. This treatment-seeking strategy may explain the high prevalence of cannabis use among individuals with PTSD. Preliminary studies in humans also suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease PTSD symptoms including sleep quality, frequency of nightmares, and hyperarousal. However, there are no large-scale, randomized, controlled studies investigating this specifically. Studies in animal models have shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of stress on emotional function and memory processes, facilitate fear extinction, and have an anti-anxiety-like effect in a variety of tasks. Moreover, cannabinoids administered shortly after exposure to a traumatic event were found to prevent the development of PTSD-like phenotype. In this article, we review the existing literature on the use of cannabinoids for treating and preventing PTSD in humans and animal models. There is a need for large-scale clinical trials examining the potential decrease in PTSD symptomatology with the use of cannabis. In animal models, there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of cannabis. Nevertheless, the end result of the current clinical and preclinical data is that cannabinoid agents may offer therapeutic benefits for PTSD. PMID:27551883

  10. Prediction of clinical pharmacokinetics of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 monoclonal antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Köck, Kathleen; Wisler, John A; Rees, William A; Prince, Peter J; Reynhardt, Kai O; Hsu, Hailing; Yu, Zhigang; Borie, Dominic C; Salinger, David H; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict a safe starting dose of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases, based on cynomolgus monkey pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data. A two-compartment model with parallel linear and target-mediated drug disposition for AMG 181 PK in cynomolgus monkey was developed. The estimated parameters were allometrically scaled to predict human PK. An Emax PD model was used to relate AMG 181 concentration and free α4β7 receptor data in cynomolgus monkey. AMG 181 clinical doses were selected based on observed exposures at the no adverse effect level of 80 mg·kg−1 in monkeys, the predicted human exposures, and AMG 181 concentration expected to produce greater than 50% α4β7 receptor occupancy in humans. The predicted human AMG 181 clearance and central volume of distribution were 144 mL·day−1 and 2900 mL, respectively. The estimated EC50 for free α4β7 receptor was 14 ng·mL−1. At the 0.7 mg starting dose in humans, the predicted exposure margins were greater than 490,000 and AMG 181 concentrations were predicted to only briefly cover the free α4β7 receptor EC10. Predictions for both Cmax and AUC matched with those observed in the first-in-human study within the 7 mg subcutaneous to 420 mg intravenous dose range. The developed model aided in selection of a safe starting dose and a pharmacological relevant dose escalation strategy for testing of AMG 181 in humans. The clinically observed human AMG 181 PK data validated the modeling approach based on cynomolgus monkey data alone. PMID:25692016

  11. Quantitative determination of mithramycin in human plasma by a novel, sensitive ultra-HPLC-MS/MS method for clinical pharmacokinetic application.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jeffrey; Peer, Cody J; Widemann, Brigitte; Cole, Diane E; Ershler, Rachel; Helman, Lee; Schrump, David; Figg, William D

    2014-11-01

    Mithramycin is a neoplastic antibiotic synthesized by various Streptomyces bacteria. It is under investigation as a chemotherapeutic treatment for a wide variety of cancers. Ongoing and forthcoming clinical trials will require pharmacokinetic analysis of mithramycin in humans, both to see if target concentrations are achieved and to optimize dosing and correlate outcomes (response/toxicity) with pharmacokinetics. Two published methods for mithramycin quantitation exist, but both are immunoassays that lack current bioanalytical standards of selectivity and sensitivity. To provide an upgraded and more widely applicable assay, a UPLC-MS/MS method for quantitation of mithramycin in human plasma was developed. Solid-phase extraction allowed for excellent recoveries (>90%) necessary for high throughput analyses on sensitive instrumentation. However, a ∼55% reduction in analyte signal was observed as a result of plasma matrix effects. Mithramycin and the internal standard chromomycin were separated on a Waters Acquity BEH C18 column (2.1×50 mm, 1.7 μm) and detected using electrospray ionization operated in the negative mode at mass transitions m/z 1083.5→268.9 and 1181.5→269.0, respectively, on an AB Sciex QTrap 5500. The assay range was 0.5-500 ng/mL and proved to be linear (r(2)>0.996), accurate (≤10% deviation), and precise (CV<15%). Mithramycin was stable in plasma at room temperature for 24 h, as well as through three freeze-thaw cycles. This method was subsequently used to quantitate mithramycin plasma concentrations from patients enrolled on two clinical trials at the NCI. PMID:25247492

  12. Effect of Short-Term Drinking Water Exposure to Dichloroacetate on its Pharmacokinetics and Oral Bioavailability in Human Volunteers: A Stable Isotope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R.; Shangraw, Robert E.

    2006-06-21

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) is a by-product of drinking water disinfection, a known rodent hepatocarcinogen and is also used therapeutically to treat a variety of metabolic disorders in humans. We measured DCAA bioavailability in 16 human volunteers (8 male, 8 female) after simultaneous administration of oral and iv DCAA doses. Volunteers consumed DCAA-free bottled water for 2 weeks to wash out background effects of DCAA. Subsequently, each subject drank 12C-DCAA (2 mg/kg) in 500 ml water over three minutes. Five minutes after the start of the 12C-DCAA consumption, 13C-labeled DCAA (0.3 mg/kg) was administered iv over 20 seconds, and plasma 12C/13C-DCAA concentrations measured at predetermined time points over 4 h. Volunteers subsequently consumed DCAA 0.02 mg/kg/day in 500 ml water for 14 consecutive days to simulate a low-level chronic DCAA intake. Afterwards, the 12C/13C-DCAA administrations was repeated. Study endpoints were calculation of AUC0??, apparent volume of distribution (Vss), total body clearance (Clb), plasma elimination half-life (t?,?), oral absorption rate (Ka), and oral bioavailability. Oral bioavailability was estimated from dose-adjusted AUC ratios, and by using a compartmental pharmacokinetic model after simultaneous fitting of oral and iv DCAA concentration-time profiles. DCAA bioavailability had large inter-individual variation, ranging from 28 ? 100 %. In the absence of prior DCAA intake, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in any pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female volunteers, although there was a trend that women absorbed DCAA was more rapidly (increased Ka), and cleared DCAA more slowly (decreased Clb), than men. Only women were affected by previous 14 d DCAA exposure, which increased the AUC0?? for both oral and i.v. DCAA doses (P<0.04; 0.014 respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the Clb.

  13. Analysis of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to clinical pharmacokinetics in hypertensive pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Filgueira, Osmany Alberto Silva; Carvalho, Daniela Miarelli; Marques, Maria Paula; Moisés, Elaine Christine Dantas; Duarte, Geraldo; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Nifedipine is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of hypertension in pregnant women. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid. Separation of nifedipine and nitrendipine (IS) was performed using a LiChroCART(®) RP-Select B column and a mixture of water:acetonitrile:glacial acetic acid (30:70:0.5 v/v) as the mobile phase. Aliquots of 500μL of biological samples were extracted at pH 13 using dichloromethane:n-pentane (3:7 v/v). The validated method was applied to a study of the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid samples collected up to 12h after administration of the last slow-release nifedipine (20mg/12h) dose to 12 hypertensive pregnant women. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters of nifedipine showed a mean AUC(0-12) of 250.2ngh/mL, ClT/F of 89.2L/h, Vd/F of 600.0L and t1/2 5.1h. The mean amniotic fluid/plasma concentration ratio was 0.05. The methods proved to be highly sensitive by showing a lower quantification limit of 0.1ng/mL for both matrices. And this study reports for the first time the complete development and validation of the method to quantify nifedipine in amniotic fluid using LC-MS-MS. PMID:25984962

  14. Quantitative Determination of Mithramycin in Human Plasma by a Novel, Sensitive ultra-HPLC-MS/MS Method for Clinical Pharmacokinetic Application

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Jeffrey; Peer, Cody J.; Widemann, Brigitte; Cole, Diane E.; Ershler, Rachel; Helman, Lee; Schrump, David; Figg, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Mithramycin is a neoplastic antibiotic synthesized by various Streptomyces bacteria. It is under investigation as a chemotherapeutic treatment for a wide variety of cancers. Ongoing and forthcoming clinical trials will require pharmacokinetic analysis of mithramycin in humans, both to see if target concentrations are achieved and to optimize dosing and correlate outcomes (response/toxicity) with pharmacokinetics. Two published methods for mithramycin quantitation exist, but both are immunoassays that lack current bioanalytical standards of selectivity and sensitivity. To provide an upgraded and more widely applicable assay, a UPLC-MS/MS method for quantitation of mithramycin in human plasma was developed. Solid phase extraction allowed for excellent recoveries (>90%) necessary for high throughput analyses on sensitive instrumentation. However, a ~55% reduction in analyte signal was observed as a result of plasma matrix effects. Mithramycin and the internal standard chromomycin were separated on a Waters Acquity BEH C18 column (2.1x50mm, 1.7um) and detected using electrospray ionization operated in the negative mode at mass transitions m/z 1083.5→268.9 and 1181.5→269.0, respectively, on an AB Sciex QTrap 5500. The assay range was 0.5–500 ng/mL and proved to be linear (r2>0.996), accurate (≤10% deviation), and precise (CV<15%). Mithramycin was stable in plasma at room temperature for 24 hours, as well as through three freeze-thaw cycles. This method was subsequently used to quantitate mithramycin plasma concentrations from patients enrolled on two clinical trials at the NCI. PMID:25247492

  15. Simultaneous determination of nimesulide and its four possible metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application in a study of pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Xue, Kai-Lu; Jiao, Xin-Yue; Chen, Qian; Xu, Li; Zheng, Heng; Ding, Yu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, it was the first time that we simultaneously quantified nimesulide and its possible metabolites M1, M2, M3 and M4 by employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Nimesulide-d5 was used as internal standard (IS) for validation. Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Prepared plasma samples were analyzed under the same LC-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was realized by using an Ultimate C18 column, with run time being 5min for each sample. Our results showed that various analytes within their concentration ranges could be quantified accurately by using the method. Mean intra- and inter-day accuracies ranged from -4.8% to 4.8% (RE), and intra- and inter-assay precision ≤6.2% (RSD). The following parameters were validated: specificity, recovery, matrix effects, dilution integrity, carry-over, sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw and post-preparative) and stock solution stability. Pharmacokinetics of nimesulide and its metabolites were calculated based on the analysis of samples collected from twelve Chinese healthy volunteers after single oral dose of 100mg nimesulide tablets. By applying the pharmacokinetic determination into human samples, we preliminarily detected a new metabolite of nimesulide (M4*), and the concentration of M4* was relatively higher in plasma. Furthermore, we predicted part of conceivable metabolism pathway in plasma of after oral administration of 100mg nimesulide tablets. This research provided an experimental basis for further studies on metabolic activation and biotransformation of nimesulide, and for more comprehensive conjecture of its metabolic pathways. PMID:27284972

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ling; Chen, Zhi-hang; Liu, Dong; Cheng, Yuan-guo; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2), and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC) after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞)7th/AUC(0–∞)1st) of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞)6th/AUC(0–∞)1st of Jintrolong ® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was slower than that of sc rhGH. No progressive serum accumulation of Jintrolong® was found. The changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by rhGH and Jintrolong® were comparable, indicating similar pharmacodynamics. Our results demonstrate that Jintrolong® is suitable for long-term growth hormone treatment in children with growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26719670

  17. Single-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Abacavir (1592U89), Zidovudine, and Lamivudine Administered Alone and in Combination in Adults with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Laurene H.; Chittick, Gregory E.; McDowell, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Abacavir (1592U89), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), has been evaluated for efficacy and safety in combination regimens with other nucleoside analogs, including zidovudine (ZDV) and lamivudine (3TC). To evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic interactions between these agents, 15 HIV-1-infected adults with a median CD4+ cell count of 347 cells/mm3 (range, 238 to 570 cells/mm3) were enrolled in a randomized, seven-period crossover study. The pharmacokinetics and safety of single doses of abacavir (600 mg), ZDV (300 mg), and 3TC (150 mg) were evaluated when each drug was given alone or when any two or three drugs were given concurrently. The concentrations of all drugs in plasma and the concentrations of ZDV and its 5′-glucuronide metabolite, GZDV, in urine were measured for up to 24 h postdosing, and pharmacokinetic parameter values were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The maximum drug concentration (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞), time to Cmax (Tmax), and apparent elimination half-life (t1/2) of abacavir in plasma were unaffected by coadministration with ZDV and/or 3TC. Coadministration of abacavir with ZDV (with or without 3TC) decreased the mean Cmax of ZDV by approximately 20% (from 1.5 to 1.2 μg/ml), delayed the median Tmax for ZDV by 0.5 h, increased the mean AUC0–∞ for GZDV by up to 40% (from 11.8 to 16.5 μg · h/ml), and delayed the median Tmax for GZDV by approximately 0.5 h. Coadministration of abacavir with 3TC (with or without ZDV) decreased the mean AUC0–∞ for 3TC by approximately 15% (from 5.1 to 4.3 μg · h/ml), decreased the mean Cmax by approximately 35% (from 1.4 to 0.9 μg/ml), and delayed the median Tmax by approximately 1 h. While these changes were statistically significant, they are similar to the effect of food intake (for ZDV) or affect an inactive metabolite (for GZDV) or are

  18. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  19. Incorporation of Therapeutic Interventions in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Human Clinical Case Reports of Accidental or Intentional Overdosing with Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; McMartin, K. E.

    2005-05-16

    Ethylene glycol is a high production volume chemical used in the manufacture of resins and fibers, antifreeze, deicing fluids, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids. Although occupational uses of ethylene glycol have not been associated with adverse effects, there are case reports where humans have either intentionally or accidentally ingested large quantities of ethylene glycol, primarily from antifreeze. The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol in humans and animals and can proceed through three stages, each associated with a different metabolite: central nervous system depression (ethylene glycol), cardiopulmonary effects associated with metabolic acidosis (glycolic acid) and ultimately renal toxicity (oxalic acid), depending upon the total amounts consumed and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed in a companion paper (Corley et al., 2004) was refined in this study to include clinically relevant treatment regimens for ethylene glycol poisoning such as hemodialysis or metabolic inhibition with either ethanol or fomepizole. Such modifications enabled the model to describe several human case reports which included analysis of ethylene glycol and/or glycolic acid. Such data and model simulations provide important confirmation that the PBPK model developed previously can adequately describe the pharmacokinetics of ethylene glycol in humans following low, occupational or environmentally relevant inhalation exposures, as well as massive oral doses even under conditions where treatments have been employed that markedly affect the disposition of ethylene glycol and glycolic acid. By integrating the case report data sets with controlled studies in this PBPK model, it was demonstrated that fomepizole, if administered early enough in a clinical situation, can be more effective than ethanol or hemodialysis in preventing the metabolism of ethylene glycol to more toxic metabolites. Hemodialysis remains an

  20. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome. PMID:16969427

  1. A survey study to characterize use of Spice products (synthetic cannabinoids)

    PubMed Central

    Vandrey, Ryan; Dunn, Kelly E.; Fry, Jeannie A.; Girling, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids are a rapidly emerging class of abused drugs. Synthetic cannabinoids are typically sold as “herbal blends” or “incense,” commonly referred to as Spice products. No controlled human experiments have been conducted on the effects of Spice products or the synthetic cannabinoids they often contain. Methods An internet-based survey study was conducted with adults reporting at least one lifetime use of a Spice product. Results Respondents were primarily male, Caucasian and ≥12 yrs of education. Use of other psychoactive drugs was common, though 21% identified Spice products as their preferred drug. Spice products were most frequently obtained from retail vendors and smoked, though other forms of ingestion were endorsed. Mean age of first use was 26 and mean frequency of use in the past year was 67 days (range 0–365). Primary reasons for use were curiosity, positive drug effect, relaxation, and to get high without having a positive drug test. Acute subjective effects were similar to known effects of cannabis, and a subset of users met DSM criteria for abuse and dependence on Spice products. Conclusions Participants exhibited a diverse profile of use patterns as is typical for other drugs of abuse. There was evidence that users continued to seek and use these drugs after being banned by local authorities. This study should be interpreted with caution due to methodological limitations. Controlled laboratory research is needed to further examine the behavioral pharmacology of individual synthetic cannabinoids found in Spice products. PMID:21835562

  2. Stimulation of the midkine/ALK axis renders glioma cells resistant to cannabinoid antitumoral action.

    PubMed

    Lorente, M; Torres, S; Salazar, M; Carracedo, A; Hernández-Tiedra, S; Rodríguez-Fornés, F; García-Taboada, E; Meléndez, B; Mollejo, M; Campos-Martín, Y; Lakatosh, S A; Barcia, J; Guzmán, M; Velasco, G

    2011-06-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of gliomas to anticancer treatments is an issue of great therapeutic interest. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, by analyzing the gene expression profile of a large series of human glioma cells with different sensitivity to cannabinoid action, we have identified a subset of genes specifically associated to THC resistance. One of these genes, namely that encoding the growth factor midkine (Mdk), is directly involved in the resistance of glioma cells to cannabinoid treatment. We also show that Mdk mediates its protective effect via the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor and that Mdk signaling through ALK interferes with cannabinoid-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, in vivo Mdk silencing or ALK pharmacological inhibition sensitizes cannabinod-resistant tumors to THC antitumoral action. Altogether, our findings identify Mdk as a pivotal factor involved in the resistance of glioma cells to THC pro-autophagic and antitumoral action, and suggest that selective targeting of the Mdk/ALK axis could help to improve the efficacy of antitumoral therapies for gliomas. PMID:21233844

  3. Evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibiting effects of six major cannabinoids isolated from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Ruhaak, Lucia Renee; Felth, Jenny; Karlsson, Pernilla Christina; Rafter, Joseph James; Verpoorte, Robert; Bohlin, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyse the production of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Prostaglandins are important mediators in the inflammatory process and their production can be reduced by COX-inhibitors. Endocannabinoids, endogenous analogues of the plant derived cannabinoids, occur normally in the human body. The Endocannabinoids are structurally similar to arachidonic acid and have been suggested to interfere with the inflammatory process. They have also been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Anti-inflammatory effects of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids have been observed, however the mode of action is not yet clarified. Anti-inflammatory activity (i.e., inhibition of COX-2) is proposed to play an important role in the development of colon cancer, which makes this subject interesting to study further. In the present work, the six cannabinoids tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC), tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (Δ⁹-THC-A), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), cannabigerol (CBG) and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), isolated from Cannabis sativa, were evaluated for their effects on prostaglandin production. For this purpose an in vitro enzyme based COX-1/COX-2 inhibition assay and a cell based prostaglandin production radioimmunoassay were used. Cannabinoids inhibited cyclooxygenase enzyme activity with IC₅₀ values ranging from 1.7·10⁻³ to 2.0·10⁻⁴ M. PMID:21532172

  4. Cannabinoid-related agents in the treatment of anxiety disorders: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tambaro, Simone; Bortolato, Marco

    2012-04-01

    Rich evidence has shown that cannabis products exert a broad gamut of effects on emotional regulation. The main psychoactive ingredient of hemp, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and its synthetic cannabinoid analogs have been reported to either attenuate or exacerbate anxiety and fear-related behaviors in humans and experimental animals. The heterogeneity of cannabis-induced psychological outcomes reflects a complex network of molecular interactions between the key neurobiological substrates of anxiety and fear and the endogenous cannabinoid system, mainly consisting of the arachidonic acid derivatives anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and two receptors, respectively termed CB1 and CB2. The high degree of interindividual variability in the responses to cannabis is contributed by a wide spectrum of factors, including genetic and environmental determinants, as well as differences in the relative concentrations of THC and other alkaloids (such as cannabidiol) within the plant itself. The present article reviews the currently available knowledge on the herbal, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids with respect to the modulation of anxiety responses, and highlights the challenges that should be overcome to harness the therapeutic potential of some of these compounds, all the while limiting the side effects associated with cannabis consumption. In addition the article presents some promising patents on cannabinoid-related agents. PMID:22280339

  5. Cannabinoid receptor signaling in progenitor/stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Bari, Monica; Guzmán, Manuel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of cannabis (Cannabis sativa) extracts, have attracted the attention of human civilizations for centuries, much earlier than the discovery and characterization of their substrate of action, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The latter is an ensemble of endogenous lipids, their receptors [in particular type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors] and metabolic enzymes. Cannabinoid signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, with different outcomes depending on the molecular targets and cellular context involved. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed and functional from the very early developmental stages, when they regulate embryonic and trophoblast stem cell survival and differentiation, and thus may affect the formation of manifold adult specialized tissues derived from the three different germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm). In the ectoderm-derived nervous system, both CB1 and CB2 receptors are present in neural progenitor/stem cells and control their self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. CB1 and CB2 show opposite patterns of expression, the former increasing and the latter decreasing along neuronal differentiation. Recently, endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling has also been shown to regulate proliferation and differentiation of mesoderm-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, with a key role in determining the formation of several cell types in peripheral tissues, including blood cells, adipocytes, osteoblasts/osteoclasts and epithelial cells. Here, we will review these new findings, which unveil the involvement of eCB signaling in the regulation of progenitor/stem cell fate in the nervous system and in the periphery. The developmental regulation of cannabinoid receptor expression and cellular/subcellular localization, together with their role in progenitor/stem cell biology, may have important implications in human health and disease. PMID:24076098

  6. Evaluation of the Safety and Pharmacokinetic Profile of a New, Pasteurized, Human Tetanus Immunoglobulin Administered as Sham, Postexposure Prophylaxis of Tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Forrat, Rémi; Dumas, Rafaele; Seiberling, Michael; Merz, Michael; Lutsch, Charles; Lang, Jean

    1998-01-01

    In a monocentric, double-blind, randomized trial, we examined the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of a new, pasteurized, human tetanus immunoglobulin (P-HTIG). As part of the purification process, P-HTIG has undergone a heat treatment step (10 h at 60°C) and the removal of Merthiolate. Forty-eight adults with a history of tetanus vaccination were randomized into four groups (n = 12 per group) to receive one of two different batches of this P-HTIG simultaneously with either tetanus-diphtheria (Td) vaccine (sham, postexposure prophylaxis of tetanus) or placebo. Local reactions at the injection site were followed for the first 3 days after injection, and systemic reactions were followed during the entire study period, i.e., up to 42 days posttreatment. Blood samples for tetanus antibody titer determination (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method) were drawn prior to treatment on day 0 and on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42. A normalization of tetanus antibody titers (subtraction of the day 0 value for each subject at each time period) was performed to assess the additive effect of P-HTIG on tetanus antibody titers. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by both a compartmental analysis (modelization) and a noncompartmental analysis. No severe adverse reactions were reported. The rate of local reactions at the P-HTIG injection site was 27%. All local reactions were mild and resolved within 2 days. In contrast, local reactions at the vaccine injection site were seen in 79% of the subjects. The rate of systemic reactions was similar in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group (33%) and in the P-HTIG plus placebo group (21%), and all these reactions were mild. In the P-HTIG plus placebo group, tetanus antibody titers rose to a maximum of 0.313 ± 2.49 IU/ml after 4.4 days; in the P-HTIG plus Td vaccine group, a maximum concentration of 15.2 ± 2.42 IU/ml was reached 19 days postinjection. In both groups, 100% of the patients had seroprotective levels of

  7. Pharmacokinetic study of HS061, a new human insulin, in non-diabetic rat using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jingjing; Wu, Jie; Cao, Rongyue; Li, Taiming

    2014-09-15

    HS061, a new structure analogue of human insulin, was investigated for the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we developed a simple and accurate UPLC-MS/MS method for the pharmacokinetic studies of HS061 in non-diabetic rats followed by a full method validation. Following a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile, the analyte and internal standard (Levemir, IS) were separated on a Waters XBridge™ BEH300 C4 column (100 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 3.5 μm) with a gradient elution using acetonitrile and 0.2% aqueous formic acid. The method was operated under pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring (pseudo-MRM) in the positive electrospray ionization mode. The monitored transitions were set at m/z 1563.4→1563.4 for HS061 by pseudo-MRM and m/z 1184.7→454.5 for IS by MRM. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the concentration ranges of 10-1000 ng/mL and no interfering peaks were detected at the retention time of HS061 and IS in blank rat plasma. The mean extraction recoveries of HS061 at three concentrations of 20, 100, 800 ng/mL were greater than 95.17%. Stability was assessed under different conditions and no significant degradations were found. The validated method was then successfully applied in measuring HS061 following subcutaneous (0.5, 1.0, 3.0 U/kg) and intravenous (1.0 U/kg) injection in rat plasma to support the pre-clinical pharmacokinetic study. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) for the subcutaneous doses of HS061 was approximately dose proportional while other pharmacokinetic parameters showed no significant differences among the three doses (p>0.05). The absolute bioavailability of HS061 after subcutaneous administration at 1.0 U/kg was estimated to be 70.40%. PMID:25073106

  8. Cannabinoids for Symptom Management and Cancer Therapy: The Evidence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoids bind not only to classical receptors (CB1 and CB2) but also to certain orphan receptors (GPR55 and GPR119), ion channels (transient receptor potential vanilloid), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Cannabinoids are known to modulate a multitude of monoamine receptors. Structurally, there are 3 groups of cannabinoids. Multiple studies, most of which are of moderate to low quality, demonstrate that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and oromucosal cannabinoid combinations of THC and cannabidiol (CBD) modestly reduce cancer pain. Dronabinol and nabilone are better antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than certain neuroleptics, but are not better than serotonin receptor antagonists in reducing delayed emesis, and cannabinoids have largely been superseded by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists and olanzapine; both cannabinoids have been recommended for breakthrough nausea and vomiting among other antiemetics. Dronabinol is ineffective in ameliorating cancer anorexia but does improve associated cancer-related dysgeusia. Multiple cancers express cannabinoid receptors directly related to the degree of anaplasia and grade of tumor. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that cannabinoids may have anticancer activity. Paradoxically, cannabinoid receptor antagonists also have antitumor activity. There are few randomized smoked or vaporized cannabis trials in cancer on which to judge the benefits of these forms of cannabinoids on symptoms and the clinical course of cancer. Smoked cannabis has been found to contain Aspergillosis. Immunosuppressed patients should be advised of the risks of using "medical marijuana" in this regard. PMID:27407130

  9. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  10. Phenol-Explorer 2.0: a major update of the Phenol-Explorer database integrating data on polyphenol metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans and experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Joseph A.; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Boto-Ordoñez, Maria; Knox, Craig; Llorach, Rafael; Eisner, Roman; Cruz, Joseph; Neveu, Vanessa; Wishart, David; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Scalbert, Augustin

    2012-01-01

    Phenol-Explorer, launched in 2009, is the only comprehensive web-based database on the content in foods of polyphenols, a major class of food bioactives that receive considerable attention due to their role in the prevention of diseases. Polyphenols are rarely absorbed and excreted in their ingested forms, but extensively metabolized in the body, and until now, no database has allowed the recall of identities and concentrations of polyphenol metabolites in biofluids after the consumption of polyphenol-rich sources. Knowledge of these metabolites is essential in the planning of experiments whose aim is to elucidate the effects of polyphenols on health. Release 2.0 is the first major update of the database, allowing the rapid retrieval of data on the biotransformations and pharmacokinetics of dietary polyphenols. Data on 375 polyphenol metabolites identified in urine and plasma were collected from 236 peer-reviewed publications on polyphenol metabolism in humans and experimental animals and added to the database by means of an extended relational design. Pharmacokinetic parameters have been collected and can be retrieved in both tabular and graphical form. The web interface has been enhanced and now allows the filtering of information according to various criteria. Phenol-Explorer 2.0, which will be periodically updated, should prove to be an even more useful and capable resource for polyphenol scientists because bioactivities and health effects of polyphenols are dependent on the nature and concentrations of metabolites reaching the target tissues. The Phenol-Explorer database is publicly available and can be found online at http://www.phenol-explorer.eu. Database URL: http://www.phenol-explorer.eu PMID:22879444

  11. Determination of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Qin, WeiWei; Wang, Bin; Lu, XiaoPei; Liu, HaiMing; Wang, Li; Qi, WeiLin

    2016-03-20

    An assay based on protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate (STS) in human plasma. After the addition of dehydroepiandrosterone-D5-3-sulfate sodium salt (DHEAS-D5) as internal standard (IS) and formic acid, plasma samples were prepared by one-step protein precipitation with a mixture of acetonitrile and methanol. Isocratic mobile phase consisted of 0.4 mmol/L ammonium formate buffer (16 ppm formic acid)/acetonitrile (40/60, v/v) on a XSELECT™ HSS T3 column. Detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing an electrospray ionization (ESI) interface operating in positive ion and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with the precursor to product ion transitions m/z 373.3→357.1 for STS and m/z 373.0→97.8 for the IS. Calibration curves of STS in human plasma were linear (r=0.9957-0.9998) over the concentration range of 2-1000 ng/mL with acceptable accuracy and precision. The lower limit of quantification in human plasma was 2 ng/mL. The validated LC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of STS in Chinese healthy male volunteers. PMID:26812478

  12. Concurrent determination of olanzapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Siva Selva Kumar, M; Ramanathan, M

    2016-02-01

    A simple and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous estimation of olanzapine (OLZ), risperidone (RIS) and 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OHRIS) in human plasma in vitro. The sample preparation was performed by simple liquid-liquid extraction technique. The analytes were chromatographed on a Waters Acquity H class UPLC system using isocratic mobile phase conditions at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and Acquity UPLC BEH shield RP18 column maintained at 40°C. Quantification was performed on a photodiode array detector set at 277 nm and clozapine was used as internal standard (IS). OLZ, RIS, 9-OHRIS and IS retention times were found to be 0.9, 1.4, .1.8 and 3.1 min, respectively, and the total run time was 4 min. The method was validated for selectivity, specificity, recovery, linearity, accuracy, precision and sample stability. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 1-100 ng/mL for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS. Intra- and inter-day precisions for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS were found to be good with the coefficient of variation <6.96%, and the accuracy ranging from 97.55 to 105.41%, in human plasma. The validated UPLC method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of RIS and 9-OHRIS in human plasma. PMID:26129833

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC AND MECHANISTIC RESEARCH TO IMPROVE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR PRIORITY DISINFECTION BYPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A primary goal of this project is the development of physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) models for bromodichloromethane (BDCM) including a refined human pharmacokinetic model of the uptake and metabolism of BDCM administered by different routes of exposure. These effo...

  14. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections. PMID:26059175

  15. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy: Protective or death role?

    PubMed

    Costa, Lia; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Fonseca, Bruno M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, the "self-digestion" mechanism of the cells, is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process that targets portions of cytoplasm, damaged organelles and proteins for lysosomal degradation, which plays a crucial role in development and disease. Cannabinoids are active compounds of Cannabis sativa and the most prevalent psychoactive substance is Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoid compounds can be divided in three types: the plant-derived natural products (phytocannabinoids), the cannabinoids produced endogenously (endocannabinoids) and the synthesized compounds (synthetic cannabinoids). Various studies reported a cannabinoid-induced autophagy mechanism in cancer and non-cancer cells. In this review we focus on the recent advances in the cannabinoid-induced autophagy and highlight the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26732541

  16. Cannabinoids in Disguise: Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Effects of Tetramethylcyclopropyl Ketone Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Lefever, Timothy W.; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic indole-derived cannabinoids have become commonly used recreational drugs and continue to be abused despite their adverse consequences. As compounds that were identified early in the epidemic (e.g., naphthoylindoles) have become legally banned, new compounds have appeared on the drug market. Two tetramethylcyclopropyl ketone indoles, UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] and XLR-11 [(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone], recently have been identified in confiscated products. These compounds are structurally related to a series of CB2-selective compounds explored by Abbott Labs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which UR-144 and XLR-11 shared cannabinoid effects with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Indices of in vitro and in vivo activity at cannabinoid receptors were assessed. Similar to other psychoactive cannabinoid agonists, XLR-11 and UR-144 showed low nanomolar (< 30) affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors, activated these receptors as full agonists, and produced dose-dependent effects that were blocked by rimonabant in mice, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotor activity. The potency of both compounds was several-fold greater than Δ9-THC. XLR-11 and UR-144 also substituted for Δ9-THC in a Δ9-THC discrimination procedure in mice, effects that were attenuated by rimonabant. Analysis of urine from mice treated with the compounds revealed that both were extensively metabolized, with predominant urinary excretion as glucuronide conjugates. Together, these results demonstrate that UR-144 and XLR-11 share a pharmacological profile of in vitro and in vivo effects with Δ9-THC and other abused indole-derived cannabinoids and would be predicted to produce Δ9-THC-like subjective effects in humans. PMID:23916483

  17. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa. PMID:18778758

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of resveratrol derivatives in humans after oral administration of melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) seed extract powder.

    PubMed

    Tani, Hiroko; Hikami, Susumu; Iizuna, Sanae; Yoshimatsu, Maiko; Asama, Takashi; Ota, Hidetaka; Kimura, Yuka; Tatefuji, Tomoki; Hashimoto, Ken; Higaki, Kazutaka

    2014-02-26

    Fruits and seeds of melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L.) are resveratrol derivative-rich materials. Pharmacokinetics of resveratrol derivatives in healthy volunteers after oral administration of 1000 mg of melinjo seed extract (MSE) powder were assessed and compared with those after oral dosing of trans-resveratrol (tRV) powder containing 4.8 mg of tRV only, equivalent to the content in 1000 mg MSE powder. Plasma tRV concentrations with enzymatic hydrolysis were maintained over 24 h, with a tmax of 12 h and a mean residence time (MRT) of 14 h, 5 and 2 times higher than those for tRV powder intake, respectively. Gnetin C, a resveratrol dimer, with hydrolysis was maintained in plasma for >96 h with a 36 h MRT. With repeated doses once daily for 28 days, plasma tRV and gnetin C concentrations with hydrolysis were in good agreement with the theoretical curves. MSE powder was well tolerated up to the oral dosing of 5000 mg with no serious adverse events. PMID:24495149

  19. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the novel γ-secretase modulator, E2212, in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Logovinsky, Veronika; Schuck, Edgar; Kaplow, June; Chang, Min-Kun; Miyagawa, Takehiko; Wong, Nancy; Ferry, Jim

    2014-05-01

    E2212, a novel γ-secretase modulator, is under development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single ascending oral doses (10-250 mg, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized) of E2212 were evaluated. In this phase I clinical trial, E2212 was found to be well tolerated in single doses. Maximum tolerated dose was not achieved up to 250 mg. Most AEs were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose related pattern. There were no clinically significant findings on physical and ophthalmologic examinations as well as vital signs, laboratory, ECG and C-SSRS assessments. E2212 was rapidly absorbed, with median tmax values ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. E2212 exhibited biphasic disposition with the terminal t1/2 of 12.5-19.0 h. Renal excretion was the minor pathway for E2212 elimination. Increased PD response (reduction in plasma concentrations of Aβ(x-42)) was observed with increasing doses. The maximum PD response was observed in the highest dose 250 mg cohort, with ΔAUAC(0-24 h) of 44.1% and Amax of 53.6%. These results support further clinical development of E2212. PMID:24343761

  20. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method to quantify methylergonovine in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhui; Sun, Qichao; Liu, Dongming; Ma, Bowen; Zhao, Hengli; Fang, Zengjun; Wang, Haisheng; Lou, Hongxiang

    2016-02-01

    Methylergonovine (ME) is a semisynthetic ergot alkaloid that is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of postpartum hemorrhage. In recent years, methylergonovine has been effective in the control of refractory headaches and is likely to be employed as chemosensitizers for cancer. However, this alkaloid sometimes causes elevated blood pressure. Therefore, a sensitive and accurate method for the quantification of this drug in biological matrices is necessary. In this study, ME was extracted from 500μL plasma samples by a liquid-liquid extraction under alkaline conditions and detected using positive multi-reaction-monitoring mode (+MRM) mass spectrometry. The method was validated according to US FDA guidelines and covered a working range from 0.025 to 10ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 0.025ng/mL. In conclusion, a rapid, sensitive, selective and accurate quantification by an LC-MS/MS method was developed and successfully applied to a clinical pharmacokinetics study in female volunteers after a single intramuscular injection or oral administration of a 0.2mg dose of ME maleate. It is suitable for both preclinical and clinical studies on ME. PMID:26760224

  1. Phase I Safety and Pharmacokinetics Study of Micronized Atovaquone in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Walter; Dorenbaum, Alejandro; Yogev, Ram; Beauchamp, Belinda; Xu, Jing; McNamara, James; Moye, John; Purdue, Lynette; van Dyke, Russell; Rogers, Michael; Sadler, Brian; Group, The Pediatric Aids Clinical Trials

    1998-01-01

    A phase I dose-escalating safety and pharmacokinetic study evaluated an oral suspension of micronized atovaquone (m-atovaquone) in infants and children stratified into age groups from 1 month to 12 years of age. Dosages of 10, 30, and 45 mg/kg of body weight/day were evaluated as single daily doses over a period of 12 days. Steady-state concentrations in plasma were determined on day 12, and single postdose concentrations were measured on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 18, 21, and 24. Prior studies with adults suggest that the average plasma atovaquone concentration of 15 μg/ml is associated with therapeutic success in more than 95% of patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis. The results showed m-atovaquone to be safe and well tolerated. Dosages of 30 mg/kg/day were adequate to achieve an average steady-state concentration of greater than 15 μg/ml in children ages 1 to 3 months and 2 to 12 years, but a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day was needed to reach this concentration in infants 3 to 24 months of age. The oral suspension of atovaquone is safe and well tolerated in children. A single daily dose of 30 mg/kg provides bioavailability considered adequate for therapy of P. carinii pneumonia, but infants between 3 and 24 months of age may require a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day. PMID:9624466

  2. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic correlation from mouse to human with pazopanib, a multikinase angiogenesis inhibitor with potent antitumor and antiangiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Knick, Victoria B; Rudolph, Sharon K; Johnson, Jennifer H; Crosby, Renae M; Crouthamel, Ming-Chih; Hopper, Teresa M; Miller, Charles G; Harrington, Laura E; Onori, James A; Mullin, Robert J; Gilmer, Tona M; Truesdale, Anne T; Epperly, Andrea H; Boloor, Amogh; Stafford, Jeffrey A; Luttrell, Deirdre K; Cheung, Mui

    2007-07-01

    With the development of targeted therapeutics, especially for small-molecule inhibitors, it is important to understand whether the observed in vivo efficacy correlates with the modulation of desired/intended target in vivo. We have developed a small-molecule inhibitor of all three vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit tyrosine kinases, pazopanib (GW786034), which selectively inhibits VEGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation. It has good oral exposure and inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in mice. Because bolus administration of the compound results in large differences in C(max) and C(trough), we investigated the effect of continuous infusion of a VEGFR inhibitor on tumor growth and angiogenesis. GW771806, which has similar enzyme and cellular profiles to GW786034, was used for these studies due to higher solubility requirements for infusion studies. Comparing the pharmacokinetics by two different routes of administration (bolus p.o. dosing and continuous infusion), we showed that the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of VEGFR inhibitors is dependent on steady-state concentration of the compound above a threshold. The steady-state concentration required for these effects is consistent with the concentration required for the inhibition of VEGF-induced VEGFR2 phosphorylation in mouse lungs. Furthermore, the steady-state concentration of pazopanib determined from preclinical activity showed a strong correlation with the pharmacodynamic effects and antitumor activity in the phase I clinical trial. PMID:17620431

  3. Oral fluid cannabinoids in chronic frequent cannabis smokers during ad libitum cannabis smoking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Vandrey, Ryan; Mendu, Damodara R; Murray, Jeannie A; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Oral fluid (OF) offers a simple, non-invasive, directly observable sample collection for clinical and forensic drug testing. Given that chronic cannabis smokers often engage in drug administration multiple times daily, evaluating OF cannabinoid pharmacokinetics during ad libitum smoking is important for practical development of analytical methods and informed interpretation of test results. Eleven cannabis smokers resided in a closed research unit for 51 days, and underwent four, 5-day oral delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) treatments. Each medication period was separated by 9 days of ad libitum cannabis smoking from 12:00 to 23:00 h daily. Ten OF samples were collected from 9:00-22:00 h on each of the last ad libitum smoking days (Study Days 4, 18, 32, and 46). As the number of cannabis cigarettes smoked increased over the study days, OF THC, cannabinol (CBN), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) also increased with a significant effect of time since last smoking (Δtime; range, 0.0-17.4 h) and ≥88% detection rates; concentrations on Day 4 were significantly lower than those on Days 32 and 46 but not Day 18. Within 30 min of smoking, median THC, CBN, and THCCOOH concentrations were 689 µg/L, 116 µg/L, and 147 ng/L, respectively, decreasing to 19.4 µg/L, 2.4 µg/L, and 87.6 ng/L after 10 h. Cannabidiol and 11-hydroxy-THC showed overall lower detection rates of 29 and 8.6%, respectively. Cannabinoid disposition in OF was highly influenced by Δtime and composition of smoked cannabis. Furthermore, cannabinoid OF concentrations increased over ad libitum smoking days, in parallel with increased cannabis self-administration, possibly reflecting development of increased cannabis tolerance. PMID:25220020

  4. Cannabinoids: A New Group of Agonists of PPARs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Bennett, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been used medicinally and recreationally for thousands of years and their effects were proposed to occur mainly via activation of the G-protein-coupled receptor CB1/CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 1/2). Discovery of potent synthetic analogs of the natural cannabinoids as clinically useful drugs is the sustained aim of cannabinoid research. This demands that these new compounds be free of the psychotropic effects that connected with the recreational use of cannabinoids. In preclinical studies cannabinoids displayed many of the characteristics of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and it seems to be free of unwanted side effects. An increasing number of therapeutic actions of cannabinoid are being reported that do not appear to be mediated by either CB1 or CB2, and recently nuclear receptor superfamily PPARs (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors) have been suggested as the target of certain cannabinoids. This review summarizes the evidence for cannabinoid activation on PPARs and possible associated remedial potentials. PMID:18288264

  5. Determination of the antifungal agent voriconazole in human plasma using a simple column-switching high-performance liquid chromatography and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Saori; Suzuki, Riho; Yamazaki, Reiko; Kusuhara, Yoko; Mitsumoto, Shoko; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Shimoeda, Sadahiko; Ohta, Shin; Yamato, Susumu

    2008-03-01

    A simple column-switching high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method that does not require any complicated pretreatment has been developed to determine voriconazole in human plasma samples. An internal standard (IS) and borate buffer (pH 9.0) were added to plasma samples, which were then injected directly into the column-switching HPLC system using MAYI-ODS as a pre-column. The calibration curve for voriconazole showed good linearity in the range of 0.2-10 mug/ml in human plasma. The mean RSD (%) value of intra-day (n=6) and inter-day (n=5) precision were less than 5.4% and 8.2%, respectively. This system could make more than three hundred successive, accurate measurements when a washing step with ammonium acetate solution was added. This method was successfully applied to measure the therapeutic voriconazole level in patients' plasma, and was used in a study of voriconazole pharmacokinetics after oral administration. PMID:18310944

  6. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Loizou, George D; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  7. A novel LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of tenofovir and lamivudine in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Matta, Murali Krishna; Burugula, Laxminarayana; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Inamadugu, Jaswanth Kumar; J V L N, Seshagiri Rao

    2012-10-01

    A new, rapid, sensitive and specific LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of tenofovir and lamivudine in human plasma using abacavir as an internal standard. An API-4000 LC-MS/MS with electrospray ionization was operated in multiple-reaction monitoring mode for the analysis. The analytes were extracted from plasma by solid-phase extraction technique using an Oasis HLB cartridge. The reconstituted samples were chromatographed on a Chromolith ROD speed C(18) column using a mixture of 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile (90:10 v/v) at a flow-rate of 1 mL/min. The method was validated as per the FDA guidelines. The calibration curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-600 ng/mL for tenofovir and 25- 4000 ng/mL for lamivudine. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits. A run time of 2.8 min consumed for each sample made it possible to analyze more samples per day. The proposed assay method was found to be applicable to a pharmacokinetic study in human male volunteers. PMID:22222724

  8. Development and validation of an RP-HPLC method for the quantitation of odanacatib in rat and human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Police, Anitha; Gurav, Sandip; Dhiman, Vinay; Zainuddin, Mohd; Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Rajagopal, Sriram; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    A simple, specific, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay method has been developed and validated for the estimation of odanacatib in rat and human plasma. The bioanalytical procedure involves extraction of odanacatib and itraconazole (internal standard, IS) from a 200 μL plasma aliquot with simple liquid-liquid extraction process. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Symmetry Shield RP18 using an isocratic mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. The UV detection wave length was 268 nm. Odanacatib and IS eluted at 5.5 and 8.6 min, respectively with a total run time of 10 min. Method validation was performed as per US Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the results met the acceptance criteria. The calibration curve was linear over a concentration range of 50.9-2037 ng/mL (r(2) = 0.994). The intra- and inter-day precisions were in the range of 2.06-5.11 and 5.84-13.1%, respectively, in rat plasma and 2.38-7.90 and 6.39-10.2%, respectively, in human plasma. The validated HPLC method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:25914381

  9. Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Troutman, John A; Rick, David L; Stuard, Sharon B; Fisher, Jeffrey; Bartels, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species. To reduce uncertainty associated with interspecies extrapolations and to evaluate the margin of exposure (MOE) for use of PhE in cosmetics and baby products, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PhE and its metabolite 2-phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) was developed. The PBPK model incorporated key kinetic processes describing the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of PhE and PhAA following oral and dermal exposures. Simulations of repeat dose rat studies facilitated the selection of systemic AUC as the appropriate dose metric for evaluating internal exposures to PhE and PhAA in rats and humans. Use of the PBPK model resulted in refinement of the total default UF for extrapolation of the animal data to humans from 100 to 25. Based on very conservative assumptions for product composition and aggregate product use, model-predicted exposures to PhE and PhAA resulting from adult and infant exposures to cosmetic products are significantly below the internal dose of PhE observed at the NOAEL dose in rats. Calculated MOEs for all exposure scenarios were above the PBPK-refined UF of 25. PMID:26188115

  10. Sensitive and Rapid HPLC Method for Determination of Memantine in Human Plasma Using OPA Derivatization and Fluorescence Detection: Application to Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Shafaati, Alireza; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Khoddam, Arash; Madadian, Babak

    2010-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of memantine in human plasma after derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and fluorescence detection. Amantadine was used as internal standard. The derivatized memantine and amantadine were eluted in less than 10 min with no interference from endogenous plasma peaks. The analysis was carried out on a monolithic silica column (Chromolith Performance RP-18e, 100×4.6 mm). The mobile phase was composed of a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.025 M phosphate buffer (50:50, v/v, pH=4.6) with a flow rate of 2.5 mLmin−1. The excitation and emission wavelengths were set at 335 nm and 440 nm respectively. The assay enables the measurement of memantine for therapeutic drug monitoring with a lower quantification limit of 2 ngmL−1. The method involves simple extraction procedure and analytical recovery was 82.8± 0.9%. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 2–80 ngmL−1. The coefficients of variation for inter-day and intra-day assay were found to be less than 8%. The method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies in humans. PMID:21179320

  11. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Ba