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Sample records for human cell tissues

  1. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  2. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Human Nonmalignant and Malignant Cells and Tissues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Wenling Sha

    This thesis explores steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy from human malignant and non -malignant cells and tissues. The focus of these studies are the analysis of the excitation spectra, emission spectra, and decay time based on the contribution from several key intrinsic fluorophors: NAD(P)H, flavins, tryptophan, elastin and collagen that exist in different amounts in the human tissues and cells. The comparison between the spectra from malignant and non-malignant cells and tissues gives information on the changes that occur from non-malignancy to malignancy in the cells and tissues. The spectra of tissues and cells are also compared to help in understanding what fluorophors are responsible for fluorescence spectral differences between the malignant and non-malignant tissues and cells. The results in this thesis show that the spectral differences between the normal and cancerous tissues and cells exist in various wavelength ranges. The experimental data from GYN tissues have shown with over 95% of the sensitivity and specificity to separate malignant from non-malignant tissues using 300nm excitation. The 340nm band, which is mostly in response to intrinsic fluorophor (amino acid tryptophan), from malignant tissues were relatively higher then that from the non-malignant tissues. This might have been caused by the higher concentration of free tryptophan in the malignant tumor when compared to that of the normal tissue. This has been found in medical clinical study. The experimental data in this thesis also show that the fluorescence intensities around 450nm-460nm, which are mostly due to the intrinsic fluorophor coenzyme NADH, from both malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro are relatively higher than from non-malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro. These findings are reinforced by the faster decay time of the NADH fluorescence from normal cells in vitro than from neoplasm cells in vitro. Thus, the NADH in the mitochondria might be

  3. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  4. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  5. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    PubMed

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  6. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  7. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  12. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  13. Dynamic DNA methylation across diverse human cell lines and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Bowling, Kevin M.; Parker, Stephanie L.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Pauli-Behn, Florencia; Cross, Marie K.; Williams, Brian A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Absher, Devin M.; Wold, Barbara J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    As studies of DNA methylation increase in scope, it has become evident that methylation has a complex relationship with gene expression, plays an important role in defining cell types, and is disrupted in many diseases. We describe large-scale single-base resolution DNA methylation profiling on a diverse collection of 82 human cell lines and tissues using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). Analysis integrating RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data illuminates the functional role of this dynamic mark. Loci that are hypermethylated across cancer types are enriched for sites bound by NANOG in embryonic stem cells, which supports and expands the model of a stem/progenitor cell signature in cancer. CpGs that are hypomethylated across cancer types are concentrated in megabase-scale domains that occur near the telomeres and centromeres of chromosomes, are depleted of genes, and are enriched for cancer-specific EZH2 binding and H3K27me3 (repressive chromatin). In noncancer samples, there are cell-type specific methylation signatures preserved in primary cell lines and tissues as well as methylation differences induced by cell culture. The relationship between methylation and expression is context-dependent, and we find that CpG-rich enhancers bound by EP300 in the bodies of expressed genes are unmethylated despite the dense gene-body methylation surrounding them. Non-CpG cytosine methylation occurs in human somatic tissue, is particularly prevalent in brain tissue, and is reproducible across many individuals. This study provides an atlas of DNA methylation across diverse and well-characterized samples and enables new discoveries about DNA methylation and its role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:23325432

  14. Cervical tissue engineering using silk scaffolds and human cervical cells.

    PubMed

    House, Michael; Sanchez, Cristina C; Rice, William L; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L

    2010-06-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  15. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  16. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. PMID:19996631

  17. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  18. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-01-01

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease. PMID:23653480

  19. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  20. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from human subacromial bursa: potential for cell based tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Na; Armstrong, April D; Li, Feng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Niyibizi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common clinical problem either as a result of overuse or aging. Biological approaches to tendon repair that involve use of scaffolding materials or cell-based approaches are currently being investigated. The cell-based approaches are focused on applying multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) mostly harvested from bone marrow. In the present study, we focused on characterizing cells harvested from tissues associated with rotator cuff tendons based on an assumption that these cells would be more appropriate for tendon repair. We isolated MSCs from bursa tissue associated with rotator cuff tendons and characterized them for multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Human bursa was obtained from patients undergoing rotator cuff surgery and cells within were isolated using collagenase and dispase digestion. The cells isolated from the tissues were characterized for osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and tenogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the cells isolated from bursa tissue exhibited MSCs characteristics as evidenced by the expression of putative cell surface markers attributed to MSCs. The cells exhibited high proliferative capacity and differentiated toward cells of mesenchymal lineages with high efficiency. Bursa-derived cells expressed markers of tenocytes when treated with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) and assumed aligned morphology in culture. Bursa cells pretreated with BMP-12 and seeded in ceramic scaffolds formed extensive bone, as well as tendon-like tissue in vivo. Bone formation was demonstrated by histological analysis and immunofluorescence for DMP-1 in tissue sections made from the scaffolds seeded with the cells. Tendon-like tissue formed in vivo consisted of parallel collagen fibres typical of tendon tissues. Bursa-derived cells also formed a fibrocartilagenous tissue in the ceramic scaffolds. Taken together, the results demonstrate a new source of MSCs with a

  1. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Subacromial Bursa: Potential for Cell Based Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Song, Na; Armstrong, April D.; Li, Feng; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common clinical problem either as a result of overuse or aging. Biological approaches to tendon repair that involve use of scaffolding materials or cell-based approaches are currently being investigated. The cell-based approaches are focused on applying multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) mostly harvested from bone marrow. In the present study, we focused on characterizing cells harvested from tissues associated with rotator cuff tendons based on an assumption that these cells would be more appropriate for tendon repair. We isolated MSCs from bursa tissue associated with rotator cuff tendons and characterized them for multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Human bursa was obtained from patients undergoing rotator cuff surgery and cells within were isolated using collagenase and dispase digestion. The cells isolated from the tissues were characterized for osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and tenogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the cells isolated from bursa tissue exhibited MSCs characteristics as evidenced by the expression of putative cell surface markers attributed to MSCs. The cells exhibited high proliferative capacity and differentiated toward cells of mesenchymal lineages with high efficiency. Bursa-derived cells expressed markers of tenocytes when treated with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) and assumed aligned morphology in culture. Bursa cells pretreated with BMP-12 and seeded in ceramic scaffolds formed extensive bone, as well as tendon-like tissue in vivo. Bone formation was demonstrated by histological analysis and immunofluorescence for DMP-1 in tissue sections made from the scaffolds seeded with the cells. Tendon-like tissue formed in vivo consisted of parallel collagen fibres typical of tendon tissues. Bursa-derived cells also formed a fibrocartilagenous tissue in the ceramic scaffolds. Taken together, the results demonstrate a new source of MSCs with a

  2. Musculoskeletal tissue engineering with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Ott, Lindsey; Seshareddy, Kiran; Weiss, Mark L; Detamore, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold tremendous promise for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, yet with so many sources of MSCs, what are the primary criteria for selecting leading candidates? Ideally, the cells will be multipotent, inexpensive, lack donor site morbidity, donor materials should be readily available in large numbers, immunocompatible, politically benign and expandable in vitro for several passages. Bone marrow MSCs do not meet all of these criteria and neither do embryonic stem cells. However, a promising new cell source is emerging in tissue engineering that appears to meet these criteria: MSCs derived from Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord MSCs. Exposed to appropriate conditions, umbilical cord MSCs can differentiate in vitro along several cell lineages such as the chondrocyte, osteoblast, adipocyte, myocyte, neuronal, pancreatic or hepatocyte lineages. In animal models, umbilical cord MSCs have demonstrated in vivo differentiation ability and promising immunocompatibility with host organs/tissues, even in xenotransplantation. In this article, we address their cellular characteristics, multipotent differentiation ability and potential for tissue engineering with an emphasis on musculoskeletal tissue engineering. PMID:21175290

  3. Characteristics of Human Endometrial Stem Cells in Tissue and Isolated Cultured Cells: An Immunohistochemical Aspect

    PubMed Central

    Fayazi, Mehri; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ziaei, Saeideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the percentage of the stem cells population in human endometrial tissue sections and cultured cells at fourth passage. Methods: Human endometrial specimens were divided into two parts, one part for morphological studies and the other part for in vitro culture. Full thickness of human normal endometrial sections and cultured endometrial cells at fourth passage were analyzed via immunohistochemistry for CD146 and some stemness markers such as Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Klf4 and the expression of typical mesenchymal stem cell markers CD90, CD105. Results: 11.88±1.29% of human endometrial cells within tissue sections expressed CD146 marker vs. 28±2.3% of cultured cells, CD90 and CD105 were expressed by functionalis stroma (85±2.4 and 89±3.2%) than basalis stroma (16±1.4 and 17±1.9%), respectively (P<0.05). Oct4 and Nanog-expressing cells comprise 1.43±0.08 and 0.54±0.01% of endometrial stromal cells in endometrial sections vs. 12±3.1% and 8±2.9% of cultured cells, respectively. They reside near the glands in the basal layer of endometrium. Sox2 and Klf4 were not commonly expressed in tissue samples and cultured cells. CD9 and EpCAM were expressed by epithelial cells of the endometrium, rather than by stroma or perivascular cells. Conclusion: The human endometrial stem cells and pluripotency markers may be localized more in basalis layer of endometrium. The immunostaining observations of endometrial cells at fourth passage were correlated with the immunohistochemistry data. PMID:26568058

  4. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  5. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  6. Adult human adipose tissue contains several types of multipotent cells.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Realini, Claudio; Böhmler, Andreas; Kornfeld, Christopher; Vassalli, Giuseppe; Moccetti, Tiziano; Bardelli, Silvana; Soldati, Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells that can be easily isolated from various tissues and expanded in vitro. Many reports on their pluripotency and possible clinical applications have raised hopes and interest in MSCs. In an attempt to unify the terminology and the criteria to label a cell as MSC, in 2006 the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) proposed a standard set of rules to define the identity of these cells. However, MSCs are still extracted from different tissues, by diverse isolation protocols, are cultured and expanded in different media and conditions. All these variables may have profound effects on the selection of cell types and the composition of heterogeneous subpopulations, on the selective expansion of specific cell populations with totally different potentials and ergo, on the long-term fate of the cells upon in vitro culture. Therefore, specific molecular and cellular markers that identify MSCs subsets as well as standardization of expansion protocols for these cells are urgently needed. Here, we briefly discuss new useful markers and recent data supporting the rapidly emerging concept that many different types of progenitor cells are found in close association with blood vessels. This knowledge may promote the necessary technical improvements required to reduce variability and promote higher efficacy and safety when isolating and expanding these cells for therapeutic use. In the light of the discussed data, particularly the identification of new markers, and advances in the understanding of fundamental MSC biology, we also suggest a revision of the 2006 ISCT criteria. PMID:21327755

  7. Patents on Technologies of Human Tissue and Organ Regeneration from Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Xuejun H; Teng, Yang D; Moore, Dennis A; Snyder, Evan Y

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are genetically stable with unlimited expansion ability and unrestricted plasticity, proffering a pluripotent reservoir for in vitro derivation of a large supply of disease-targeted human somatic cells that are restricted to the lineage in need of repair. There is a large healthcare need to develop hESC-based therapeutic solutions to provide optimal regeneration and reconstruction treatment options for the damaged or lost tissue or organ that have been lacking. In spite of controversy surrounding the ownership of hESCs, the number of patent applications related to hESCs is growing rapidly. This review gives an overview of different patent applications on technologies of derivation, maintenance, differentiation, and manipulation of hESCs for therapies. Many of the published patent applications have been based on previously established methods in the animal systems and multi-lineage inclination of pluripotent cells through spontaneous germ-layer differentiation. Innovative human stem cell technologies that are safe and effective for human tissue and organ regeneration in the clinical setting remain to be developed. Our overall view on the current patent situation of hESC technologies suggests a trend towards hESC patent filings on novel therapeutic strategies of direct control and modulation of hESC pluripotent fate, particularly in a 3-dimensional context, when deriving clinically-relevant lineages for regenerative therapies. PMID:23355961

  8. Human Circulating and Tissue-Resident CD56bright Natural Killer Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Melsen, Janine E.; Lugthart, Gertjan; Lankester, Arjan C.; Schilham, Marco W.

    2016-01-01

    Two human natural killer (NK) cell subsets are usually distinguished, displaying the CD56dimCD16+ and the CD56brightCD16−/+ phenotype. This distinction is based on NK cells present in blood, where the CD56dim NK cells predominate. However, CD56bright NK cells outnumber CD56dim NK cells in the human body due to the fact that they are predominant in peripheral and lymphoid tissues. Interestingly, within the total CD56bright NK cell compartment, a major phenotypical and functional diversity is observed, as demonstrated by the discovery of tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells in the uterus, liver, and lymphoid tissues. Uterus-resident CD56bright NK cells express CD49a while the liver- and lymphoid tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells are characterized by co-expression of CD69 and CXCR6. Tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells have a low natural cytotoxicity and produce little interferon-γ upon monokine stimulation. Their distribution and specific phenotype suggest that the tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells exert tissue-specific functions. In this review, we examine the CD56bright NK cell diversity by discussing the distribution, phenotype, and function of circulating and tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells. In addition, we address the ongoing debate concerning the developmental relationship between circulating CD56bright and CD56dim NK cells and speculate on the position of tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells. We conclude that distinguishing tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells from circulating CD56bright NK cells is a prerequisite for the better understanding of the specific role of CD56bright NK cells in the complex process of human immune regulation. PMID:27446091

  9. Human corneal stromal stem cells support limbal epithelial cells cultured on RAFT tissue equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Kureshi, Alvena K; Dziasko, Marc; Funderburgh, James L; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    Human limbal epithelial cells (HLE) and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) reside in close proximity in vivo in the corneal limbal stem cell niche. However, HLE are typically cultured in vitro without supporting niche cells. Here, we re-create the cell-cell juxtaposition of the native environment in vitro, to provide a tool for investigation of epithelial-stromal cell interactions and to optimize HLE culture conditions for potential therapeutic application. RAFT (Real Architecture For 3D Tissue) tissue equivalents (TEs) were used as a 3-dimensional substrate for co-culturing HLE and CSSC. Our results demonstrate that a monolayer of HLE that maintained expression of p63α, ABCB5, CK8 and CK15 (HLE markers), formed on the surface of RAFT TEs within 13 days of culture. CSSC remained in close proximity to HLE and maintained expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers. This simple technique has a short preparation time of only 15 days with the onset of HLE layering and differentiation observed. Furthermore, co-cultivation of HLE with another niche cell type (CSSC) directly on RAFT TEs, eliminates the requirement for animal-derived feeder cells. RAFT TEs may be useful for future therapeutic delivery of multiple cell types to restore the limbal niche following ocular surface injury or disease. PMID:26531048

  10. Advanced Imaging and Tissue Engineering of the Human Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J.; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E.; Vernon, Amanda J.; Funderburgh, James L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein. PMID:25388395

  11. Optimizing cryopreservation of human spermatogonial stem cells: comparing the effectiveness of testicular tissue and single cell suspension cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Yango, Pamela; Altman, Eran; Smith, James F.; Klatsky, Peter C.; Tran, Nam D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether optimal human spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) cryopreservation is best achieved with testicular tissue or single cell suspension cryopreservation. This study compares the effectiveness between these two approaches by using testicular SSEA-4+ cells, a known population containing SSCs. Design In vitro human testicular tissues. Setting Academic research unit. Patients Adult testicular tissues (n = 4) collected from subjects with normal spermatogenesis and normal fetal testicular tissues (n = 3). Intervention(s) Testicular tissue vs. single cell suspension cryopreservation. Main Outcome Measures Cell viability, total cell recovery per milligram of tissue, as well as, viable and SSEA-4+ cell recovery. Results Single cell suspension cryopreservation yielded higher recovery of SSEA-4+ cells enriched in adult SSCs whereas fetal SSEA-4+ cell recovery was similar between testicular tissue and single cell suspension cryopreservation. Conclusions Adult and fetal human SSEA-4+ populations exhibited differential sensitivity to cryopreservation based on whether they were cryopreserved in situ as testicular tissues or as single cells. Thus, optimal preservation of human SSCs depends on the patient age, type of samples cryopreserved, and end points of therapeutic applications. PMID:25241367

  12. Tissue resident regulatory T cells: novel therapeutic targets for human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohui; Tang, Jiayou; Cao, Hao; Fan, Huimin; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the ability of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress multiple types of immune cells has received tremendous attention. Mounting evidence has revealed that tissue resident Tregs control non-immunological processes of their target tissues and contribute to a plethora of human diseases. The identification of novel tissue-specific Tregs has highlighted their heterogeneity and complexity. This review summarizes the recent findings for visceral adipose tissue CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (VAT Tregs), muscle Tregs, bone Tregs and skin memory Tregs, with a focus on their unique functions in local tissues. This interpretation of the roles of tissue-specific Tregs and of their involvement in disease progression provides new insight into the discovery of potential therapeutic targets of human diseases. PMID:25891216

  13. [The application progress of human urine derived stem cells in bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Jiang, Dapeng; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-04-01

    The research of bone tissue engineering bases on three basic directions of seed cells, scaffold materials and growth information. Stem cells have been widely studied as seed cells. Human urine-derived stem cell (hUSC) is extracted from urine and described to be adhesion growth, cloning, expression of the majority of mesenchymal stem cell markers and peripheral cell markers, multi-potential and no tumor but stable karyotype with passaging many times. Some researches proposed that hUSC might be a new source of seed cells in tissue engineering because of their invasive and convenient obtention, stable culture and multiple differentiation potential. PMID:27029208

  14. Isolation and Expansion of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived from Human Placenta Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Sardesai, Varda S.; Futrega, Kathryn; Lott, William B.; Kuhn, Michael; Doran, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are promising candidates for use in cell-based therapies. In most cases, therapeutic response appears to be cell-dose dependent. Human term placenta is rich in MSC and is a physically large tissue that is generally discarded following birth. Placenta is an ideal starting material for the large-scale manufacture of multiple cell doses of allogeneic MSC. The placenta is a fetomaternal organ from which either fetal or maternal tissue can be isolated. This article describes the placental anatomy and procedure to dissect apart the decidua (maternal), chorionic villi (fetal), and chorionic plate (fetal) tissue. The protocol then outlines how to isolate MSC from each dissected tissue region, and provides representative analysis of expanded MSC derived from the respective tissue types. These methods are intended for pre-clinical MSC isolation, but have also been adapted for clinical manufacture of placental MSC for human therapeutic use. PMID:27340821

  15. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  16. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  17. Human Lymphoid Tissues Harbor a Distinct CD69+CXCR6+ NK Cell Population.

    PubMed

    Lugthart, Gertjan; Melsen, Janine E; Vervat, Carly; van Ostaijen-Ten Dam, Monique M; Corver, Willem E; Roelen, Dave L; van Bergen, Jeroen; van Tol, Maarten J D; Lankester, Arjan C; Schilham, Marco W

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of human NK cells is based primarily on conventional CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from blood. However, most cellular immune interactions occur in lymphoid organs. Based on the coexpression of CD69 and CXCR6, we identified a third major NK cell subset in lymphoid tissues. This population represents 30-60% of NK cells in marrow, spleen, and lymph node but is absent from blood. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells have an intermediate expression of CD56 and high expression of NKp46 and ICAM-1. In contrast to circulating NK cells, they have a bimodal expression of the activating receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells do not express the early markers c-kit and IL-7Rα, nor killer cell Ig-like receptors or other late-differentiation markers. After cytokine stimulation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells produce IFN-γ at levels comparable to CD56(dim) NK cells. They constitutively express perforin but require preactivation to express granzyme B and exert cytotoxicity. After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CD69(+)CXCR6(+) lymphoid tissue NK cells do not exhibit the hyperexpansion observed for both conventional NK cell populations. CD69(+)CXCR6(+) NK cells constitute a separate NK cell population with a distinct phenotype and function. The identification of this NK cell population in lymphoid tissues provides tools to further evaluate the cellular interactions and role of NK cells in human immunity. PMID:27226093

  18. Expression of IL-10 in human normal and cancerous ovarian tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Alex; Medina, Liat; Piura, Benjamin; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    IL-10 is an 18-kd polypeptide that has been shown to be secreted by multiple cell types, including T and B cells, monocytes and some human tumors. However, which cell population is responsible for the elevated IL-10 levels in the serum and ascites of ovarian cancer patients, whether ovarian carcinoma cells produce IL-10, and how IL-10 influences the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma are issues that remain unclear. The aim of our study was to examine IL-10 production and secretion by ovarian carcinoma tissues and cells, and to determine its possible role in the cell and tumor micro-environment. The mean IL-10 protein levels expressed in normal ovarian tissue homogenates were significantly higher compared to cancerous ovarian tissue (p = 0.002). Yet, the IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.021). The IL-10 receptor mRNA expression levels of the cancerous ovarian tissue homogenates were slightly, but not significantly, higher than the normal tissues. IL-10 immunostaining revealed that in both normal and cancerous ovarian tissues, IL-10 expression could be detected mainly in epithelial cells. In normal ovarian tissues, similar levels of IL-10R were demonstrated in epithelial and stromal cells. However, in cancerous ovarian tissues, epithelial cells expressed higher levels of IL-10R than the stroma. Primary normal and cancerous ovarian cell cultures and SKOV-3 cells secreted similar amounts of IL-10 after 24 hours of incubation. Our results suggest that epithelial cells are the main source of IL-10 in the ovary. Nevertheless, the target cells for IL-10 are different in normal and cancerous ovarian cells. Thus, IL-10 and its receptor could be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:20430716

  19. Tissue-Engineered Vascular Rings from Human iPSC-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dash, Biraja C; Levi, Karen; Schwan, Jonas; Luo, Jiesi; Bartulos, Oscar; Wu, Hongwei; Qiu, Caihong; Yi, Ting; Ren, Yongming; Campbell, Stuart; Rolle, Marsha W; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-07-12

    There is an urgent need for an efficient approach to obtain a large-scale and renewable source of functional human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to establish robust, patient-specific tissue model systems for studying the pathogenesis of vascular disease, and for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we have derived a large quantity of highly enriched functional VSMCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-VSMCs). Furthermore, we have engineered 3D tissue rings from hiPSC-VSMCs using a facile one-step cellular self-assembly approach. The tissue rings are mechanically robust and can be used for vascular tissue engineering and disease modeling of supravalvular aortic stenosis syndrome. Our method may serve as a model system, extendable to study other vascular proliferative diseases for drug screening. Thus, this report describes an exciting platform technology with broad utility for manufacturing cell-based tissues and materials for various biomedical applications. PMID:27411102

  20. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  1. From cell lines to tissues: extrapolation of transcriptional effects to human tissues (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new suite of assays in the metabolically-competent, human hepatocyte-derived HepaRG cell line has been added to the ToxCast screening suite. For 1066 chemicals we have evaluated the chemical treatment-induced changes in expression for a diverse set of 93 genes representative of...

  2. [Penetration of polyene antibiotics into human embryonic kidney tissue cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, L S; Sokolov, V N; Vaĭnshteĭn, V A; Diment, A V; Tereshin, I M

    1977-12-01

    Penetration of 14C-amphotericin AM-2 into the cells of the tissue culture of the human embryon kidneys was studied by means of light autoradiography after incubation with the antibiotic. Microscopic examination of the autographs of the cell slices revealed the presence of the radioactive label in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of the cells. The revealed intracellular localization of the label was evident of the antibiotic penetration into the cells. PMID:596858

  3. Muse cells, newly found non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, reside in human mesenchymal tissues.

    PubMed

    Wakao, Shohei; Akashi, Hideo; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been presumed to include a subpopulation of pluripotent-like cells as they differentiate not only into the same mesodermal-lineage cells but also into ectodermal- and endodermal-lineage cells and exert tissue regenerative effects in a wide variety of tissues. A novel type of pluripotent stem cell, Multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells, was recently discovered in mesenchymal tissues such as the bone marrow, adipose tissue, dermis and connective tissue of organs, as well as in cultured fibroblasts and bone marrow-MSCs. Muse cells are able to differentiate into all three germ layers from a single cell and to self-renew, and yet exhibit non-tumorigenic and low telomerase activities. They can migrate to and target damaged sites in vivo, spontaneously differentiate into cells compatible with the targeted tissue, and contribute to tissue repair. Thus, Muse cells may account for the wide variety of differentiation abilities and tissue repair effects that have been observed in MSCs. Muse cells are unique in that they are pluripotent stem cells that belong in the living body, and are thus assumed to play an important role in 'regenerative homeostasis' in vivo. PMID:24471964

  4. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Human Insulin Gene and PCR Assay for Monitoring Beta Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Husseiny, Mohamed I.; Kaye, Alexander; Zebadua, Emily; Kandeel, Fouad; Ferreri, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy. PMID:24722187

  5. Human progenitor cells derived from cardiac adipose tissue ameliorate myocardial infarction in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Farré, Jordi; Sepúlveda, Pilar; Raya, Angel; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Montero, José Anastasio; Büscher, Dirk; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2010-11-01

    Myocardial infarction caused by vascular occlusion results in the formation of nonfunctional fibrous tissue. Cumulative evidence indicates that cell therapy modestly improves cardiac function; thus, novel cell sources with the potential to repair injured tissue are actively sought. Here, we identify and characterize a cell population of cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (ATDPCs) from biopsies of human adult cardiac adipose tissue. Cardiac ATDPCs express a mesenchymal stem cell-like marker profile (strongly positive for CD105, CD44, CD166, CD29 and CD90) and have immunosuppressive capacity. Moreover, cardiac ATDPCs have an inherent cardiac-like phenotype and were able to express de novo myocardial and endothelial markers in vitro but not to differentiate into adipocytes. In addition, when cardiac ATDPCs were transplanted into injured myocardium in mouse and rat models of myocardial infarction, the engrafted cells expressed cardiac (troponin I, sarcomeric α-actinin) and endothelial (CD31) markers, vascularization increased, and infarct size was reduced in mice and rats. Moreover, significant differences between control and cell-treated groups were found in fractional shortening and ejection fraction, and the anterior wall remained significantly thicker 30days after cardiac delivery of ATDPCs. Finally, cardiac ATDPCs secreted proangiogenic factors under in vitro hypoxic conditions, suggesting a paracrine effect to promote local vascularization. Our results indicate that the population of progenitor cells isolated from human cardiac adipose tissue (cardiac ATDPCs) may be valid candidates for future use in cell therapy to regenerate injured myocardium. PMID:20713059

  6. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  7. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  8. Species-specific metastasis of human tumor cells in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse engrafted with human tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, E; Namikawa, R

    1995-01-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to gamma-irradiation or to interleukin 1 alpha. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753860

  9. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  10. Isolation and characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Shalini; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; George, Elizabeth; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of placenta tissue as a reliable and efficient source for generating mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). METHODS: MSC were generated from human placenta tissue by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation. The placenta MSC (PLC-MSC) were characterized for expression of cell surface markers, embryonic stem cell (ECS) gene expression and their differentiation ability into adipocytes and osteocytes. The immunosuppressive properties of PLC-MSC on resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated allogenic T cells were assessed by means of cell proliferation via incorporation of tritium thymidine (3H-TdR). RESULTS: The generated PLC-MSC appeared as spindle-shaped cells, expressed common MSC surface markers and ESC transcriptional factors. They also differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages when induced. However, continuous cultivation up to passage 15 caused changes in morphological appearance and cellular senescence, although the stem cell nature of their protein expression was unchanged. In terms of their immunosuppressive properties, PLC-MSC were unable to stimulate resting T cell proliferation; they inhibited the PHA stimulated T cells in a dose dependent manner through cell to cell contact. In our study, MSC generated from human placenta exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers; MSC-like gene expression pattern and MSC-like differentiation potential were comparable to other sources of MSC. CONCLUSION: We suggest that placenta tissues can serve as an alternative source of MSC for future experimental and clinical studies. PMID:22993662

  11. Effect of Initial Seeding Density on Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Fibrocartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Limin; Seshareddy, Kiran; Weiss, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Cells derived from Wharton's jelly from human umbilical cords (called umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells herein) are a novel cell source for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the effects of different seeding densities on seeding efficiency, cell proliferation, biosynthesis, mechanical integrity, and chondrogenic differentiation. Cells were seeded on non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA) meshes in an orbital shaker at densities of 5, 25, or 50 million cells/mL and then statically cultured for 4 weeks in chondrogenic medium. At week 0, initial seeding density did not affect seeding efficiency. Throughout the 4-week culture period, absolute cell numbers of the 25 and 50 million-cells/mL (higher density) groups were significantly larger than in the 5 million-cells/mL (lower density) group. The presence of collagen types I and II and aggrecan was confirmed using immunohistochemical staining. Glycosaminoglycan and collagen contents per construct in the higher-density groups were significantly greater than in the lower-density group. Constructs in the high-density groups maintained their mechanical integrity, which was confirmed using unconfined compression testing. In conclusion, human umbilical cord cells demonstrated the potential for chondrogenic differentiation in three-dimensional tissue engineering, and higher seeding densities better promoted biosynthesis and mechanical integrity, and thus a seeding density of at least 25 million cells/mL is recommended for fibrocartilage tissue engineering with umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells. PMID:18759671

  12. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  13. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction. PMID:24486314

  14. Gene Expression of Purified β-Cell Tissue Obtained from Human Pancreas with Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marselli, Lorella; Thorne, Jeffrey; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Omer, Abdulkadir; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Libermann, Towia; Otu, Hasan H.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Human β-cell gene profiling is a powerful tool for understanding β-cell biology in normal and pathological conditions. Assessment is complicated when isolated islets are studied because of contamination by non-β-cells and the trauma of the isolation procedure. Objective: The objective was to use laser capture microdissection (LCM) of human β-cells from pancreases of cadaver donors and compare their gene expression with that of handpicked isolated islets. Design: Endogenous autofluorescence of β-cells facilitated procurement of purified β-cell tissue from frozen pancreatic sections with LCM. Gene expression profiles of three microdissected β-cell samples and three isolated islet preparations were obtained. The array data were normalized using DNA-Chip Analyzer software (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA), and the lower confidence bound evaluated differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR was performed on selected acinar genes and on the duct cell markers, carbonic anhydrase II and keratin 19. Results: Endogenous autofluorescence facilitates the microdissection of β-cell rich tissue in human pancreas. When compared with array profiles of purified β-cell tissue, with lower confidence bound set at 1.2, there were 4560 genes up-regulated and 1226 genes down-regulated in the isolated islets. Among the genes up-regulated in isolated islets were pancreatic acinar and duct genes, chemokine genes, and genes associated with hypoxia, apoptosis, and stress. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of acinar gene transcripts and the duct marker carbonic anhydrase II in isolated islets. Conclusion: LCM makes it possible to obtain β-cell enriched tissue from human pancreas sections without the trauma and ischemia of islet isolation. PMID:18073315

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation from human umbilical cord tissue: understanding and minimizing variability in cell yield for process optimization.

    PubMed

    Iftimia-Mander, Andreea; Hourd, Paul; Dainty, Roger; Thomas, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Human tissue banks are a potential source of cellular material for the nascent cell-based therapy industry; umbilical cord (UC) tissue is increasingly privately banked in such facilities as a source of mesenchymal stem cells for future therapeutic use. However, early handling of UC tissue is relatively uncontrolled due to the clinical demands of the birth environment and subsequent transport logistics. It is therefore necessary to develop extraction methods that are robust to real-world operating conditions, rather than idealized operation. Cell yield, growth, and differentiation potential of UC tissue extracted cells was analyzed from tissue processed by explant and enzymatic digestion. Variability of cell yield extracted with the digestion method was significantly greater than with the explant method. This was primarily due to location within the cord tissue (higher yield from placental end) and time delay before tissue processing (substantially reduced yield with time). In contrast, extraction of cells by explant culture was more robust to these processing variables. All cells isolated showed comparable proliferative and differentiation functionality. In conclusion, given the challenge of tightly controlled operating conditions associated with isolation and shipping of UC tissue to banking facilities, explant extraction of cells offers a more robust and lower-variability extraction method than enzymatic digestion. PMID:24835260

  16. Adipogenic potential in human mesenchymal stem cells strictly depends on adult or foetal tissue harvest.

    PubMed

    Ragni, Enrico; Viganò, Mariele; Parazzi, Valentina; Montemurro, Tiziana; Montelatici, Elisa; Lavazza, Cristiana; Budelli, Silvia; Vecchini, Alba; Rebulla, Paolo; Giordano, Rosaria; Lazzari, Lorenza

    2013-11-01

    Cell-based therapies promise important developments for regenerative medicine purposes. Adipose tissue and the adipogenic process has become central to an increasing number of translational efforts in addition to plastic and reconstructive surgical applications. In recent experimental clinical trials, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proven to be well tolerated because of their low immunoreactivity. MSC are multipotent cells found among mature cells in different tissues and organs with the potentiality to differentiate in many cell types, including osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes, thus being a suitable cell source for tissue engineering strategies. We compared the adipogenic potential of MSC originated from two adult sources as fat pads and bone marrow, and from four foetal sources as umbilical cord blood, Wharton's jelly, amniotic fluid and preterm umbilical cord perivascular cells. Surprisingly, adult MSC displayed higher differentiation capacities confirmed by gene expression analysis on a selected panel of adipogenesis-related genes. Further, an in-depth molecular analysis highlighted the early and vigorous activation of the PPARγ transcription factor-cascade in adipose-derived MSC that resulted to be both delayed and reduced in foetal MSC accounting for their lack of adipogenic potential. Thus, MSC show a different degree of phenotypic plasticity depending on the source tissue, that should be taken into consideration for the selection of the most appropriate MSC type for specific tissue regeneration purposes. PMID:23942228

  17. Human periodontal ligament cell sheets can regenerate periodontal ligament tissue in an athymic rat model.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masateru; Yamato, Masayuki; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2005-01-01

    Conventional periodontal regeneration methods remain insufficient to attain complete and reliable clinical regeneration of periodontal tissues. We have developed a new method of cell transplantation using cell sheet engineering and have applied it to this problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of human periodontal ligament (HPDL) cell sheets retrieved from culture on unique temperature-responsive culture dishes, and to examine whether these cell sheets can regenerate periodontal tissues. The HPDL cell sheets were examined histologically and biochemically, and also were transplanted into a mesial dehiscence model in athymic rats. HPDL cells were harvested from culture dishes as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix and retained intact integrins that are susceptible to trypsin-EDTA treatment. In the animal study, periodontal ligament-like tissues that include an acellular cementum-like layer and fibrils anchoring into this layer were identified in all the athymic rats transplanted with HPDL cell sheets. This fibril anchoring highly resembles native periodontal ligament fibers; such regeneration was not observed in nontransplanted controls. These results suggest that this technique, based on the concept of cell sheet engineering, can be useful for periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:15869425

  18. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body. PMID:27521270

  19. Development of human connective tissue mast cells from purified blood monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Czarnetzki, B M; Figdor, C G; Kolde, G; Vroom, T; Aalberse, R; de Vries, J E

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified subfractions of human peripheral blood monocytes, when cultured in the presence of 30% L cell supernatant and 30% horse serum, assumed all the characteristics that define human connective tissue mast cells. After three weeks of culture, 75% of the cells developed metachromasia and granular chloroacetate esterase staining, and their intracellular histamine levels increased from 0.0 to 50.5 ng/10(6) cells. On electron microscopy, the cells developed intracytoplasmic granules with all the features typical for mature and immature mast cells. Cultured cells bound 55 pg 125I-IgE/10(6) cells, while labelling was negligible with cells prior to culture and with heat-denatured 125I-IgE. Fluorescent staining with anti-IgE increased slightly as well, while staining with monoclonal anti-monocyte and anti-HLA-Dr markers decreased. Purified lymphocytes did not assume mast cell characteristics, and lymphokines did not induce or enhance in vitro mast cell development or IgE binding. The data therefore further support the concept that connective tissue mast cells arise from the monocytoid lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:6698581

  20. Characterization and Differentiation of Stem Cells Isolated from Human Newborn Foreskin Tissue.

    PubMed

    Somuncu, Özge Sezin; Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Şişli, Hatice Burcu; Somuncu, Salih; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-11-01

    Circumcision is described as a cultural, medical, and religious process which states surgical removal of the foreskin either partly or fully. Cells isolated from the circumcised tissues are referred as foreskin cells. They have been thought as feeder cell lines for embryonic stem cells. Their fibroblastic properties were also utilized for several experiments. The waste tissues that remain after the circumcision thought to have stem cell properties. Therefore, there have been very few attempts to expose their stem cell properties without turning them into induced pluripotent stem cells. Although stem cell isolation from prepuce and their mesenchymal multilineage differentiation potential have been presented many times in the literature, the current study explored hematopoietical phenotype of newborn foreskin stem cells for the first time. According to the results, human newborn foreskin stem cells (hnFSSCs) were identified by their capability to turn into all three germ layer cell types under in vitro conditions. In addition, these cells have exhibited a stable phenotype and have remained as a monolayer in vitro. hnFSSCs suggested to carry different treatment potentials for bone damages, cartilage problems, nerve damages, lesion formations, and other diseases that are derive from mesodermal, endodermal, and ectodermal origins. Owing to the location of the tissue in the body and differentiation capabilities of hnFSSCs, these cells can be considered as easily obtainable and utilizable even better than the other stem cell sources. In addition, hnFSSCs offers a great potential for tissue engineering approaches due to exhibiting embryonic stem cell-like characteristics, not having any ethical issues, and teratoma induction as in embryonic stem cell applications. PMID:26304127

  1. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  2. Isolation of endothelial cells from human placental microvessels: effect of different proteolytic enzymes on releasing endothelial cells from villous tissue.

    PubMed

    Ugele, B; Lange, F

    2001-01-01

    Approaches for the isolation of human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) using proteolytic enzymes have been described recently. However, the isolation procedure and enzyme composition most suitable for optimal disaggregation of placental tissue and isolation of HPMEC has not yet been established. We tested different proteolytic enzymes and enzyme mixtures for their capabilities of releasing endothelial cells from human term placental villous tissue. Best results were obtained with a mixture of collagenase/dispase/deoxyribonuclease I (0.28%/0.25%/0.01%). By adding a discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation step to the enzymatic dispersion, about 1 x 10(6) cells/g tissue with more than 30% von Willebrand factor (vWf)-positive cells were obtained. However, the total cell number and number of vWf-positive cells were highly dependent on the lot of collagenase used. A perfusion step prior to mincing of villous tissue did not increase the amount of vWf-positive cells. We conclude that the methods described in this study are suitable to isolate high yields of HPMEC and that the composition of the collagenase preparation is crucial to the successful release of endothelial cells from placental tissue. To obtain pure HPMEC, further separation steps, e.g., cell sorting with antibodies against endothelial specific cell surface antigens are necessary. PMID:11573814

  3. Novel strong tissue specific promoter for gene expression in human germ cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tissue specific promoters may be utilized for a variety of applications, including programmed gene expression in cell types, tissues and organs of interest, for developing different cell culture models or for use in gene therapy. We report a novel, tissue-specific promoter that was identified and engineered from the native upstream regulatory region of the human gene NDUFV1 containing an endogenous retroviral sequence. Results Among seven established human cell lines and five primary cultures, this modified NDUFV1 upstream sequence (mNUS) was active only in human undifferentiated germ-derived cells (lines Tera-1 and EP2102), where it demonstrated high promoter activity (~twice greater than that of the SV40 early promoter, and comparable to the routinely used cytomegaloviral promoter). To investigate the potential applicability of the mNUS promoter for biotechnological needs, a construct carrying a recombinant cytosine deaminase (RCD) suicide gene under the control of mNUS was tested in cell lines of different tissue origin. High cytotoxic effect of RCD with a cell-death rate ~60% was observed only in germ-derived cells (Tera-1), whereas no effect was seen in a somatic, kidney-derived control cell line (HEK293). In further experiments, we tested mNUS-driven expression of a hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase (SB100X). The mNUS-SB100X construct mediated stable transgene insertions exclusively in germ-derived cells, thereby providing further evidence of tissue-specificity of the mNUS promoter. Conclusions We conclude that mNUS may be used as an efficient promoter for tissue-specific gene expression in human germ-derived cells in many applications. Our data also suggest that the 91 bp-long sequence located exactly upstream NDUFV1 transcriptional start site plays a crucial role in the activity of this gene promoter in vitro in the majority of tested cell types (10/12), and an important role - in the rest two cell lines. PMID:20716342

  4. Synchrotron FTIR Imaging For The Identification Of Cell Types Within Human Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Michael J.; Pounder, F. Nell; Nasse, Michael J.; Macias, Virgilia; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hirschmugl, Carol; Bhargava, Rohit

    2010-02-03

    The use of synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been shown to be a very promising tool for biomedical research. S-FTIR spectroscopy allows for the fast acquisition of infrared (IR) spectra at a spatial resolution approaching the IR diffraction limit. The development of the Infrared Environmental Imaging (IRENI) beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has allowed for diffraction limited imaging measurements of cells in human prostate and breast tissues. This has allowed for the identification of cell types within tissues that would otherwise not have been resolvable using conventional FTIR sources.

  5. Generation of Neural Stem Cells from Discarded Human Fetal Cortical Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jie; Delli-Bovi, Laurent C.; Hecht, Jonathan; Folkerth, Rebecca; Sheen, Volney L.

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside along the ventricular zone neuroepithelium during the development of the cortical plate. These early progenitors ultimately give rise to intermediate progenitors and later, the various neuronal and glial cell subtypes that form the cerebral cortex. The capacity to generate and expand human NSCs (so called neurospheres) from discarded normal fetal tissue provides a means with which to directly study the functional aspects of normal human NSC development 1-5. This approach can also be directed toward the generation of NSCs from known neurological disorders, thereby affording the opportunity to identify disease processes that alter progenitor proliferation, migration and differentiation 6-9. We have focused on identifying pathological mechanisms in human Down syndrome NSCs that might contribute to the accelerated Alzheimer's disease phenotype 10,11. Neither in vivo nor in vitro mouse models can replicate the identical repertoire of genes located on human chromosome 21. Here we use a simple and reliable method to isolate Down syndrome NSCs from aborted human fetal cortices and grow them in culture. The methodology provides specific aspects of harvesting the tissue, dissection with limited anatomical landmarks, cell sorting, plating and passaging of human NSCs. We also provide some basic protocols for inducing differentiation of human NSCs into more selective cell subtypes. PMID:21654623

  6. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling. PMID:26955856

  7. Hypoxia Created Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheet for Prevascularized 3D Tissue Construction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijun; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Tahtinen, Mitchell; Zhang, Zhaoqiang; Shearier, Emily; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2016-02-01

    3D tissue based on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) sheets offers many interesting opportunities for regenerating multiple types of connective tissues. Prevascularizing hMSC sheets with endothelial cells (ECs) will improve 3D tissue performance by supporting cell survival and accelerating integration with host tissue. It is hypothesized that hypoxia cultured hMSC sheets can promote microvessel network formation and preserve stemness of hMSCs. This study investigates the vascularization of hMSC sheets under different oxygen tensions. It is found that the HN condition, in which hMSC sheets formed under physiological hypoxia (2% O2 ) and then cocultured with ECs under normoxia (20% O2 ), enables longer and more branched microvessel network formation. The observation is corroborated by higher levels of angiogenic factors in coculture medium. Additionally, the hypoxic hMSC sheet is more uniform and less defective, which facilitates fabrication of 3D prevascularized tissue construct by layering the prevascularized hMSC sheets and maturing in rotating wall vessel bioreactor. The hMSCs in the 3D construct still maintain multilineage differentiation ability, which indicates the possible application of the 3D construct for various connective tissues regeneration. These results demonstrate that hypoxia created hMSC sheets benefit the microvessel growth and it is feasible to construct 3D prevascularized tissue construct using the prevascularized hMSC sheets. PMID:26663707

  8. Protein analysis through Western blot of cells excised individually from human brain and muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Koob, A.O.; Bruns, L.; Prassler, C.; Masliah, E.; Klopstock, T.; Bender, A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparing protein levels from single cells in tissue has not been achieved through Western blot. Laser capture microdissection allows for the ability to excise single cells from sectioned tissue and compile an aggregate of cells in lysis buffer. In this study we analyzed proteins from cells excised individually from brain and muscle tissue through Western blot. After we excised individual neurons from the substantia nigra of the brain, the accumulated surface area of the individual cells was 120,000, 24,000, 360,000, 480,000, 600,000 μm2. We used an optimized Western blot protocol to probe for tyrosine hydroxylase in this cell pool. We also took 360,000 μm2 of astrocytes (1700 cells) and analyzed the specificity of the method. In muscle we were able to analyze the proteins of the five complexes of the electron transport chain through Western blot from 200 human cells. With this method, we demonstrate the ability to compare cell-specific protein levels in the brain and muscle and describe for the first time how to visualize proteins through Western blot from cells captured individually. PMID:22402104

  9. Human adipose tissue as a source of cells with angiogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Szöke, Krisztina; Beckstrøm, Karen Johanne; Brinchmann, Jan E

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved in the process of angiogenesis, the outgrowth of new vessels from preexisting blood vessels. If available in sufficiently large numbers, ECs could be used therapeutically to establish blood flow through in vitro engineered tissues and tissues suffering from severe ischemia. Adipose tissue (AT) is an easily available source of large number of autologous ECs. Here we describe the isolation, in vitro expansion, and characterization of human AT derived ECs (AT-ECs). AT-ECs proliferated rapidly through 15-20 population doublings. The cultured cells showed cobblestone morphology and expressed EC markers including CD31, CD144, eNOS, CD309, CD105, von Willebrand factor, CD146, CD54, and CD102. They bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin and took up DiI-Ac-LDL. The AT-ECs formed capillary-like tubes in Matrigel in vitro and formed functional blood vessels in Matrigel following subcutaneous injection into immunodeficient mice. In conclusion, AT-ECs reach clinically significant cell numbers after few population doublings and are easily accessible from autologous AT, which also contains mesenchymal stem cells/pericytes. Thus, AT yields two cell populations that may be used together in the treatment of tissue ischemia and in clinical applications of tissue engineering. PMID:21669039

  10. Discovery of Human sORF-Encoded Polypeptides (SEPs) in Cell Lines and Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of nonannotated protein-coding human short open reading frames (sORFs) has been revealed through the direct detection of their sORF-encoded polypeptide (SEP) products. The discovery of novel SEPs increases the size of the genome and the proteome and provides insights into the molecular biology of mammalian cells, such as the prevalent usage of non-AUG start codons. Through modifications of the existing SEP-discovery workflow, we discover an additional 195 SEPs in K562 cells and extend this methodology to identify novel human SEPs in additional cell lines and human tissue for a final tally of 237 new SEPs. These results continue to expand the human genome and proteome and demonstrate that SEPs are a ubiquitous class of nonannotated polypeptides that require further investigation. PMID:24490786

  11. Tissue specific characteristics of cells isolated from human and rat tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, N; Rolf, CG; Scutt, A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tendon and ligament injuries are common and costly in terms of surgery and rehabilitation. This might be improved by using tissue engineered constructs to accelerate the repair process; a method used successfully for skin wound healing and cartilage repair. Progress in this field has however been limited; possibly due to an over-simplistic choice of donor cell. For tissue engineering purposes it is often assumed that all tendon and ligament cells are similar despite their differing roles and biomechanics. To clarify this, we have characterised cells from various tendons and ligaments of human and rat origin in terms of proliferation, response to dexamethasone and cell surface marker expression. Methods Cells isolated from tendons by collagenase digestion were plated out in DMEM containing 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin/streptomycin and ultraglutamine. Cell number and collagen accumulation were by determined methylene blue and Sirius red staining respectively. Expression of cell surface markers was established by flow cytometry. Results In the CFU-f assay, human PT-derived cells produced more and bigger colonies suggesting the presence of more progenitor cells with a higher proliferative capacity. Dexamethasone had no effect on colony number in ACL or PT cells but 10 nM dexamethasone increased colony size in ACL cultures whereas higher concentrations decreased colony size in both ACL and PT cultures. In secondary subcultures, dexamethasone had no significant effect on PT cultures whereas a stimulation was seen at low concentrations in the ACL cultures and an inhibition at higher concentrations. Collagen accumulation was inhibited with increasing doses in both ACL and PT cultures. This differential response was also seen in rat-derived cells with similar differences being seen between Achilles, Patellar and tail tendon cells. Cell surface marker expression was also source dependent; CD90 was expressed at higher levels by PT cells and in both humans and

  12. The multiplicity of human formins: Expression patterns in cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Elisabeth C; Ouderkirk, Jessica L; Miller, Eric W; Miller, Matthew R; Mersich, Akos T; Blystone, Scott D

    2013-08-01

    Formins are actin-binding proteins conserved across species from plants to humans. The formin family is defined by their common formin homology (FH2) domains. The 15 distinct human formins are involved in a broad range of cellular functions, including cell adhesion, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Their commonality is actin polymerization activity inherent to FH2 domains. Although still requiring much study, biochemical activity of formins has been carefully described. In contrast, much less is known of their activities in complex living systems. With the diversity of the formin family and the actin structures that they affect, an extensive future of study beckons. In this study, we report the expression level of all 15 formins in 22 different human cell and tissue types using quantitative real-time PCR. Identification of major themes in formin expression and documentation of expression profiles should facilitate the cellular study of formins. PMID:23629878

  13. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  14. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Gutman, Jonathan A; Kohrt, Wendy M; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L; Miller, Heidi L; Sullivan, Timothy M; Erickson, Paul F; Helm, Karen M; Acosta, Alistaire S; Childs, Christine R; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M; Klemm, Dwight J

    2016-03-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans. PMID:26581599

  15. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    King, William J; Kouris, Nicholas A; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M; Murphy, William L

    2012-03-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique that could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency was significantly influenced by N/P ratio, polyplex dose, cell density and cell passage number. hMSC culture conditions that inhibited cell division also decreased transfection efficiency, suggesting that strategies to promote hMSC proliferation may be useful to enhance transfection efficiency in future tissue engineering studies. Non-viral transfection treatments influenced hMSC phenotype, including the expression level of the hMSC marker CD105 and the ability of hMSCs to differentiate down the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The parameters found here to promote hMSC transfection efficiency, minimize toxicity and influence hMSC phenotype may be instructive in future non-viral transfection studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22277991

  16. Environmental parameters influence non-viral transfection of human mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    King, William J.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Choi, Siyoung; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Non-viral transfection is a promising technique which could be used to increase the therapeutic potential of stem cells. The purpose of this study was to explore practical culture parameters of relevance in potential human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) clinical and tissue engineering applications, including type of polycationic transfection reagent, N/P ratio and dose of polycation/pDNA polyplexes, cell passage number, cell density, and cell proliferation. The non-viral transfection efficiency was significantly influenced by N/P ratio, polyplex dose, cell density, and cell passage number. hMSC culture conditions that inhibited cell division also decreased transfection efficiency, suggesting that strategies to promote hMSC proliferation may be useful to enhance transfection efficiency in future tissue engineering studies. Non-viral transfection treatments influenced hMSC phenotype, including the expression level of the hMSC marker CD105, and the ability of hMSCs to differentiate down the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The parameters found here to promote hMSC transfection efficiency, minimize toxicity, and influence hMSC phenotype may be instructive in future non-viral transfection studies and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22277991

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells from human perinatal tissues: From biology to cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bieback, Karen; Brinkmann, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Cell-based regenerative medicine is of growing interest in biomedical research. The role of stem cells in this context is under intense scrutiny and may help to define principles of organ regeneration and develop innovative therapeutics for organ failure. Utilizing stem and progenitor cells for organ replacement has been conducted for many years when performing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Since the first successful transplantation of umbilical cord blood to treat hematological malignancies, non-hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations have recently been identified within umbilical cord blood and other perinatal and fetal tissues. A cell population entitled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) emerged as one of the most intensely studied as it subsumes a variety of capacities: MSCs can differentiate into various subtypes of the mesodermal lineage, they secrete a large array of trophic factors suitable of recruiting endogenous repair processes and they are immunomodulatory. Focusing on perinatal tissues to isolate MSCs, we will discuss some of the challenges associated with these cell types concentrating on concepts of isolation and expansion, the comparison with cells derived from other tissue sources, regarding phenotype and differentiation capacity and finally their therapeutic potential. PMID:21607124

  18. Human Adipose Tissue Is a Source of Multipotent Stem CellsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Patricia A.; Zhu, Min; Ashjian, Peter; De Ugarte, Daniel A.; Huang, Jerry I.; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Alfonso, Zeni C.; Fraser, John K.; Benhaim, Prosper; Hedrick, Marc H.

    2002-01-01

    Much of the work conducted on adult stem cells has focused on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found within the bone marrow stroma. Adipose tissue, like bone marrow, is derived from the embryonic mesenchyme and contains a stroma that is easily isolated. Preliminary studies have recently identified a putative stem cell population within the adipose stromal compartment. This cell population, termed processed lipoaspirate (PLA) cells, can be isolated from human lipoaspirates and, like MSCs, differentiate toward the osteogenic, adipogenic, myogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. To confirm whether adipose tissue contains stem cells, the PLA population and multiple clonal isolates were analyzed using several molecular and biochemical approaches. PLA cells expressed multiple CD marker antigens similar to those observed on MSCs. Mesodermal lineage induction of PLA cells and clones resulted in the expression of multiple lineage-specific genes and proteins. Furthermore, biochemical analysis also confirmed lineage-specific activity. In addition to mesodermal capacity, PLA cells and clones differentiated into putative neurogenic cells, exhibiting a neuronal-like morphology and expressing several proteins consistent with the neuronal phenotype. Finally, PLA cells exhibited unique characteristics distinct from those seen in MSCs, including differences in CD marker profile and gene expression. PMID:12475952

  19. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Vinicius; Dubey, Nileshkumar; Islam, Intekhab; Min, Kyung-San; Nör, Jacques E

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates). The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies. PMID:27313627

  20. Pluripotency of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Vinicius; Dubey, Nileshkumar; Islam, Intekhab; Min, Kyung-San; Nör, Jacques E.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) are highly proliferative pluripotent cells that can be retrieved from primary teeth. Although SHED are isolated from the dental pulp, their differentiation potential is not limited to odontoblasts only. In fact, SHED can differentiate into several cell types including neurons, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. The high plasticity makes SHED an interesting stem cell model for research in several biomedical areas. This review will discuss key findings about the characterization and differentiation of SHED into odontoblasts, neurons, and hormone secreting cells (e.g., hepatocytes and islet-like cell aggregates). The outcomes of the studies presented here support the multipotency of SHED and their potential to be used for tissue engineering-based therapies. PMID:27313627

  1. Computerized image analysis of cell-cell interactions in human renal tissue by using multi-channel immunoflourescent confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Liarski, Vladimir M.; Kaverina, Natalya; Clark, Marcus R.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of interactions between B and T cells in tubulointerstitial inflammation is important for understanding human lupus nephritis. We developed a computer technique to perform this analysis, and compared it with manual analysis. Multi-channel immunoflourescent-microscopy images were acquired from 207 regions of interest in 40 renal tissue sections of 19 patients diagnosed with lupus nephritis. Fresh-frozen renal tissue sections were stained with combinations of immunoflourescent antibodies to membrane proteins and counter-stained with a cell nuclear marker. Manual delineation of the antibodies was considered as the reference standard. We first segmented cell nuclei and cell membrane markers, and then determined corresponding cell types based on the distances between cell nuclei and specific cell-membrane marker combinations. Subsequently, the distribution of the shortest distance from T cell nuclei to B cell nuclei was obtained and used as a surrogate indicator of cell-cell interactions. The computer and manual analyses results were concordant. The average absolute difference was 1.1+/-1.2% between the computer and manual analysis results in the number of cell-cell distances of 3 μm or less as a percentage of the total number of cell-cell distances. Our computerized analysis of cell-cell distances could be used as a surrogate for quantifying cell-cell interactions as either an automated and quantitative analysis or for independent confirmation of manual analysis.

  2. Tissue-Specific Cultured Human Pericytes: Perivascular Cells from Smooth Muscle Tissue Have Restricted Mesodermal Differentiation Ability.

    PubMed

    Pierantozzi, Enrico; Vezzani, Bianca; Badin, Margherita; Curina, Carlo; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Petraglia, Felice; Randazzo, Davide; Rossi, Daniela; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    Microvascular pericytes (PCs) are considered the adult counterpart of the embryonic mesoangioblasts, which represent a multipotent cell population that resides in the dorsal aorta of the developing embryo. Although PCs have been isolated from several adult organs and tissues, it is still controversial whether PCs from different tissues exhibit distinct differentiation potentials. To address this point, we investigated the differentiation potentials of isogenic human cultured PCs isolated from skeletal (sk-hPCs) and smooth muscle tissues (sm-hPCs). We found that both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs expressed known pericytic markers and did not express endothelial, hematopoietic, and myogenic markers. Both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were able to differentiate into smooth muscle cells. In contrast, sk-hPCs, but not sm-hPCs, differentiated in skeletal muscle cells and osteocytes. Given the reported ability of the Notch pathway to regulate skeletal muscle and osteogenic differentiation, sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were treated with N-[N-(3,5- difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), a known inhibitor of Notch signaling. DAPT treatment, as assessed by histological and molecular analysis, enhanced myogenic differentiation and abolished osteogenic potential of sk-hPCs. In contrast, DAPT treatment did not affect either myogenic or osteogenic differentiation of sm-hPCs. In summary, these results indicate that, despite being isolated from the same anatomical niche, cultured PCs from skeletal muscle and smooth muscle tissues display distinct differentiation abilities. PMID:26956507

  3. Involvement of glutathione and glutathione metabolizing enzymes in human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Areum Daseul; Zhang, Rui; Han, Xia; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Maeng, Young Hee; Chang, Weon Young; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-09-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an abundant tripeptide present in the majority of cell types. GSH is highly reactive and is often conjugated to other molecules, via its sulfhydryl moiety. GSH is synthesized from glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine via two sequential ATP‑consuming steps, which are catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) and GSH synthetase (GSS). However, the role of GSH in cancer remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine the levels of GSH and GSH synthetic enzymes in human colorectal cancer. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GSH, the catalytic subunit of GCL (GCLC) and GSS were significantly higher in the following five colon cancer cell lines: Caco‑2, SNU‑407, SNU‑1033, HCT‑116, and HT‑29, as compared with the normal colon cell line, FHC. Similarly, in 9 out of 15 patients with colon cancer, GSH expression levels were higher in tumor tissue, as compared with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the protein expression levels of GCLC and GSS were higher in the tumor tissue of 8 out of 15, and 10 out of 15 patients with colon cancer respectively, as compared with adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that GCLC and GSS were expressed at higher levels in colon cancer tissue, as compared with normal mucosa. Since GSH and GSH metabolizing enzymes are present at elevated levels in colonic tumors, they may serve as clinically useful biomarkers of colon cancer, and/or targets for anti-colon cancer drugs. PMID:26059756

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of cells and tissues from the upper and lower human female reproductive tract.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, A L; Edkins, R D; Rier, S E; Yeaman, G R; Stern, J E; Fanger, M W; Wira, C R

    1997-01-01

    Viable tissue sections and isolated cell cultures from the human fallopian tube, uterus, cervix, and vaginal mucosa were examined for susceptibility to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We examined infectivity by using the monocytotropic strain HIV-1(JR-FL) and several primary isolates of HIV-1 obtained from infected neonates. HIV-1 infection was measured by p24 production in short-term culture and by immunofluorescence detection of HIV-1 Nef and p24 proteins by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Three-color immunofluorescence was used to phenotype HIV-infected cells within tissue sections from each site. Our findings indicate that epithelial, stromal, and dendritic cells and cells with CD14+ CD4+, CD14-CD4-, and CD4+ CD14- phenotypes from the female reproductive tract are infectable with HIV-1. Of importance is the finding that tissues from the upper reproductive tract are susceptible to infection with HIV-1. Moreover, tissue samples from women in all stages of the menstrual cycle, including postmenopausal women (inactive), could be infected with HIV-1. Female reproductive tract cells required a minimum of 60 min of exposure to HIV-1 in order for infection to occur, in contrast to peripheral blood lymphocytes, which became infected after being exposed to HIV-1 for only 1 min. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 can infect cells and tissues from different sites within the female reproductive tract and suggest that multiple cell types, including epithelial cells, may be targets for the initial infection by HIV-1. PMID:9094621

  5. Comparative Investigation of Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Application in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jiawen; Dai, Jiewen; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Sha; Gu, Jing; Shi, Jun; Shen, Steve G. F.; Guo, Lihe

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests amniotic epithelial cells (AECs) as a promising source of progenitor cells in regenerative medicine and bone tissue engineering. However, investigations comparing the regenerative properties of AECs with other sources of stem cells are particularly needed before the feasibility of AECs in bone tissue engineering can be determined. This study aimed to compare human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs), human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs), and human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) in terms of their morphology, proliferation, immunophenotype profile, and osteogenic capacity in vitro and in vivo. Not only greatly distinguished by cell morphology and proliferation, hAECs, hAFMSCs, and hBMSCs exhibited remarkably different signature regarding immunophenotypical profile. Microarray analysis revealed a different expression profile of genes involved in ossification along the three cell sources, highlighting the impact of different anatomical origin and molecular response to osteogenic induction on the final tissue-forming potential. Furthermore, our data indicated a potential role of FOXC2 in early osteogenic commitment. PMID:25834575

  6. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-05-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 - 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery.

  7. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 – 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery. PMID:25961911

  8. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application. PMID:25609254

  9. Tissue-resident and memory properties of human T-cell and NK-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Enrico; Hudspeth, Kelly; Roberto, Alessandra; Mavilio, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Efficient immune responses to invading pathogens are the result of the complex but coordinated synergy between a variety of cell types from both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. While adaptive and innate immune responses are highly complementary, some cells types within these two systems perform similar functions, underscoring the need for redundancy and increased flexibility. In this review, we will discuss the striking shared features of immunological memory and tissue residency recently discovered between T cells, a component of the adaptive immune system, and natural killer (NK) cells, members generally assigned to the innate compartment. Specifically, we will focus on the T-cell and NK-cell diversity at the single-cell level, on the discrete function of specific subsets, and on their anatomical location. Finally, we will discuss the implication of such diversity in the generation of long-term memory. PMID:27431095

  10. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  11. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  12. Tissue distribution of human gamma delta T cells: no evidence for general epithelial tropism.

    PubMed Central

    Vroom, T M; Scholte, G; Ossendorp, F; Borst, J

    1991-01-01

    In man and mice only a small proportion of T cells in the peripheral lymphoid compartment express the gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR). In mice, however, gamma delta T cells comprise the predominant population at particular epithelial sites--in epidermis and epithelia of intestine, reproductive organs, and tongue. The distribution of gamma delta T cells in normal human tissues was investigated, paying particular attention to epithelial layers. In all lymphatic organs and in epithelia of a wide variety of non-lymphatic organs, including the respiratory tract, male and female reproductive organs and tongue, gamma delta T cells constituted less than 5% of total T cells, with the remainder expressing TCR alpha beta. The only exception was the intestine, where gamma delta T cells were preferentially situated in the columnar epithelium of the crypts, rather than in the lamina propria. It is concluded, therefore, that human gamma delta T cells do not display a general epithelial tropism and are, in terms of relative numbers, no more able than alpha beta T cells to carry out continuous surveillance of the immune system against infection or transformation in epithelia. gamma delta T cells may, however, have a specialised function in the epithelium of the intestinal tract. Images PMID:1838746

  13. Reduced cilia frequencies in human renal cell carcinomas versus neighboring parenchymal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cilia are essential organelles in multiple organ systems, including the kidney where they serve as important regulators of renal homeostasis. Renal nephron cilia emanate from the apical membrane of epithelia, extending into the lumen where they function in flow-sensing and ligand-dependent signaling cascades. Ciliary dysfunction underlies renal cyst formation that is in part caused by deregulation of planar cell polarity and canonical Wnt signaling. Renal cancer pathologies occur sporadically or in heritable syndromes caused by germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes including VHL. Importantly, Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) patients frequently develop complex renal cysts that can be considered a premalignant stage. One of the well-characterized molecular functions of VHL is its requirement for the maintenance of cilia. In this study, tissue from 110 renal cancer patients who underwent nephrectomy was analyzed to determine if lower ciliary frequency is a common hallmark of renal tumorigenesis by comparing cilia frequencies in both tumor and adjacent parenchymal tissue biopsies from the same kidney. Methods We stained sections of human renal material using markers for cilia. Preliminary staining was performed using an immunofluorescent approach and a combination of acetylated-α-tubulin and pericentrin antibodies and DAPI. After validation of an alternative, higher throughput approach using acetylated-α-tubulin immunohistochemistry, we continued to manually quantify cilia in all tissues. Nuclei were separately counted in an automated fashion in order to determine ciliary frequencies. Similar staining and scoring for Ki67 positive cells was performed to exclude that proliferation obscures cilia formation potential. Results Samples from renal cell carcinoma patients deposited in our hospital tissue bank were previously used to compose a tissue microarray containing three cores of both tumor and parenchymal tissue per patient. Cilia frequencies in a total of

  14. Human norovirus infection of caco-2 cells grown as a three-dimensional tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Straub, Timothy M; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Valdez, Catherine O; Valentine, Nancy B; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J; Call, Douglas R

    2011-06-01

    Human norovirus (hNoV) infectivity was studied using a three-dimensional model of large intestinal epithelium. Large intestine Caco-2 cells were grown in rotating wall vessel bioreactors for 18-21 days at 37 degrees C and then transferred to 24-well tissue culture plates where they were infected with GI.1 and GII.4 human noroviruses collected from human challenge trials and various outbreak settings, respectively. Compared with uninfected cells, transmission micrographs of norovirus-infected cells displayed evidence of shortening or total loss of apical microvilli, and vacuolization. Quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated an approximate 2-3 log10 increase in viral RNA copies for the infected cells. A passage experiment examined both the ability for continued viral RNA and viral antigen detection. In the passaged samples 1.01x10(6) copies ml(-1) were detected by qRT-PCR. Immune electron microscopy using primary antibody to hNoV GI.1 capsids in conjunction with 6 nm gold-labelled secondary antibodies was performed on crude cellular lysates. Localization of antibody was observed in infected but not for uninfected cells. Our present findings, coupled with earlier work with the three-dimensional small intestinal INT407 model, demonstrate the utility of 3-D cell culture methods to develop infectivity assays for enteric viruses that do not readily infect mammalian cell cultures. PMID:21942189

  15. Pluripotent muse cells derived from human adipose tissue: a new perspective on regenerative medicine and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Simerman, Ariel A; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells were introduced to the scientific community, offering potential resolution to the issue of teratoma formation that plagues both embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells. Isolated from human bone marrow, dermal fibroblasts, adipose tissue and commercially available adipose stem cells (ASCs) under severe cellular stress conditions, Muse cells self-renew in a controlled manner and do not form teratomas when injected into immune-deficient mice. Furthermore, Muse cells express classic pluripotency markers and differentiate into cells from the three embryonic germ layers both spontaneously and under media-specific induction. When transplanted in vivo, Muse cells contribute to tissue generation and repair. This review delves into the aspects of Muse cells that set them apart from ES, iPS, and various reported adult pluripotent stem cell lines, with specific emphasis on Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT), and their potential to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy. PMID:24940477

  16. Pluripotent muse cells derived from human adipose tissue: a new perspective on regenerative medicine and cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells were introduced to the scientific community, offering potential resolution to the issue of teratoma formation that plagues both embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells. Isolated from human bone marrow, dermal fibroblasts, adipose tissue and commercially available adipose stem cells (ASCs) under severe cellular stress conditions, Muse cells self-renew in a controlled manner and do not form teratomas when injected into immune-deficient mice. Furthermore, Muse cells express classic pluripotency markers and differentiate into cells from the three embryonic germ layers both spontaneously and under media-specific induction. When transplanted in vivo, Muse cells contribute to tissue generation and repair. This review delves into the aspects of Muse cells that set them apart from ES, iPS, and various reported adult pluripotent stem cell lines, with specific emphasis on Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT), and their potential to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy. PMID:24940477

  17. Good preservation of stromal cells and no apoptosis in human ovarian tissue after vitrification.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Raffaella; Vicenti, Rossella; Macciocca, Maria; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Paradisi, Roberto; Battaglia, Cesare; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Venturoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a vitrification procedure for human ovarian tissue cryopreservation in order to better preserve the ovarian tissue. Large size samples of ovarian tissue retrieved from 15 female-to-male transgender subjects (18-38 years) were vitrified using two solutions (containing propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, and sucrose at different concentrations) in an open system. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and TUNEL assay were applied to evaluate the efficiency of the vitrification protocol. After vitrification/warming, light microscopy showed oocyte nucleus with slightly thickened chromatin and irregular shape, while granulosa and stromal cells appeared well preserved. Transmission electron microscopy showed oocytes with slightly irregular nuclear shape and finely dispersed chromatin. Clear vacuoles and alterations in cellular organelles were seen in the oocyte cytoplasm. Stromal cells had a moderately dispersed chromatin and homogeneous cytoplasm with slight vacuolization. TUNEL assay revealed the lack of apoptosis induction by vitrification in all ovarian cell types. In conclusion after vitrification/warming the stromal compartment maintained morphological and ultrastructural features similar to fresh tissue, while the oocyte cytoplasm was slightly damaged. Although these data are encouraging, further studies are necessary and essential to optimize vitrification procedure. PMID:24804230

  18. Good Preservation of Stromal Cells and No Apoptosis in Human Ovarian Tissue after Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Vicenti, Rossella; Battaglia, Cesare; Venturoli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a vitrification procedure for human ovarian tissue cryopreservation in order to better preserve the ovarian tissue. Large size samples of ovarian tissue retrieved from 15 female-to-male transgender subjects (18–38 years) were vitrified using two solutions (containing propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, and sucrose at different concentrations) in an open system. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and TUNEL assay were applied to evaluate the efficiency of the vitrification protocol. After vitrification/warming, light microscopy showed oocyte nucleus with slightly thickened chromatin and irregular shape, while granulosa and stromal cells appeared well preserved. Transmission electron microscopy showed oocytes with slightly irregular nuclear shape and finely dispersed chromatin. Clear vacuoles and alterations in cellular organelles were seen in the oocyte cytoplasm. Stromal cells had a moderately dispersed chromatin and homogeneous cytoplasm with slight vacuolization. TUNEL assay revealed the lack of apoptosis induction by vitrification in all ovarian cell types. In conclusion after vitrification/warming the stromal compartment maintained morphological and ultrastructural features similar to fresh tissue, while the oocyte cytoplasm was slightly damaged. Although these data are encouraging, further studies are necessary and essential to optimize vitrification procedure. PMID:24804230

  19. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo. PMID:25085858

  20. Unveiling the Differences of Secretome of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells, and Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells: A Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ana O; Mendes-Pinheiro, Barbara; Teixeira, Fábio G; Anjo, Sandra I; Ribeiro-Samy, Silvina; Gomes, Eduardo D; Serra, Sofia C; Silva, Nuno A; Manadas, Bruno; Sousa, Nuno; Salgado, Antonio J

    2016-07-15

    The use of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has emerged as a possible therapeutic strategy for CNS-related conditions. Research in the last decade strongly suggests that MSC-mediated benefits are closely related with their secretome. Studies published in recent years have shown that the secretome of hMSCs isolated from different tissue sources may present significant variation. With this in mind, the present work performed a comparative proteomic-based analysis through mass spectrometry on the secretome of hMSCs derived from bone marrow (BMSCs), adipose tissue (ASCs), and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs). The results revealed that BMSCs, ASCs, and HUCPVCs differed in their secretion of neurotrophic, neurogenic, axon guidance, axon growth, and neurodifferentiative proteins, as well as proteins with neuroprotective actions against oxidative stress, apoptosis, and excitotoxicity, which have been shown to be involved in several CNS disorder/injury processes. Although important changes were observed within the secretome of the cell populations that were analyzed, all cell populations shared the capability of secreting important neuroregulatory molecules. The difference in their secretion pattern may indicate that their secretome is specific to a condition of the CNS. Nevertheless, the confirmation that the secretome of MSCs isolated from different tissue sources is rich in neuroregulatory molecules represents an important asset not only for the development of future neuroregenerative strategies but also for their use as a therapeutic option for human clinical trials. PMID:27226274

  1. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-01-01

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host–parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling. PMID:25792515

  2. Human placental cell and tissue uptake of doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Suvi K; Repo, Jenni K; Karttunen, Vesa; Auriola, Seppo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H; Ruponen, Marika

    2015-12-01

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are in clinical use, doxorubicin also during pregnancy. However, little is known about how doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are taken up by placental cells and whether they can cross human placenta. We therefore investigated quantitative cellular uptake and toxicity of doxorubicin and its two liposomal formulations, pH-sensitive liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX) and commercially available pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PL-DOX), in human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. PL-DOX showed significantly lower cellular uptake and toxicity compared with doxorubicin and L-DOX. In preliminary studies with human placental perfusion, PL-DOX did not cross the placenta at all in 4h, whereas doxorubicin and L-DOX crossed the placenta at low levels (max 12% of the dose). Furthermore, PL-DOX did not accumulate in placental tissue while doxorubicin did (up to 70% of the dose). Surface pegylation probably explains the low placental cell and tissue uptake of PL-DOX. Formulation of doxorubicin thus seems to enable a decrease of fetal exposure. PMID:26383631

  3. Differentiation of immature DCs into endothelial-like cells in human esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Bai, Ruihua; Qin, Zhenzhu; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Yanan; Yang, Hongyan; Huang, Youtian; Li, Gang; Zhao, Mingyao; Dong, Ziming

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported endothelial-like differentiation (ELD) of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in the microenvironment derived from EC9706 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma conditioned medium (CM). However, the CM is far different from the esophageal carcinoma tissue of patients. In addition, the potential role of peri-esophageal carcinoma in the ELD of iDCs is also unknown. In the present study, we showed that the tumor microenvironment derived from esophageal carcinoma homogenate promoted iDCs to differentiate from the DC pathway toward endothelial cells, while the peri-esophageal carcinoma homogenate did not have this function. During the course of ELD, ERK signaling pathway and CREB were activated. Blocking MEK, both the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB, and the ELD of iDCs were inhibited. These data suggest that esophageal carcinoma tissue, not peri-esophageal carcinoma tissue, can drive iDCs to differentiate into endothelial-like cells, instead of differentiation into mature DCs, thereby losing the ability of antigen presentation. PMID:23708958

  4. Quantitative 3D Tracing of Gene-delivery Viral Vectors in Human Cells and Animal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Li, Chengwen; Neumann, Aaron; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking through a variety of cellular structures and organelles is essential for the interaction between gene-delivery vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus (AAV) and liposomes) and host cells/tissues. Here, we present a method of computer-assisted quantitative 3D biodistribution microscopy that samples the whole population of fluorescently-labeled vectors and document their trafficking routes. Using AAV as a working model, we first experimentally defined numerical parameters for the singularity of Cy5-labeled particles by combining confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We then developed a robust approach that integrates single-particle fluorescence imaging with 3D deconvolution and isosurface rendering to quantitate viral distribution and trafficking in human cells as well as animal tissues at the single-particle level. Using this quantitative method, we uncovered an as yet uncharacterized rate-limiting step during viral cell entry, while delineating nuclear accumulation of virions during the first 8 hours postinfection. Further, our studies revealed for the first time that following intramuscular injection, AAV spread progressively across muscle tissues through endomysium between myofibers instead of traversing through target cells. Such 3D resolution and quantitative dissection of vector–host interactions at the subcellular level should significantly improve our ability to resolve trafficking mechanisms of gene-delivery particles and facilitate the development of enhanced viral vectors. PMID:22108857

  5. Generation and Applications of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induced into Neural Lineages and Neural Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Y.; Dubois-Dauphin, M.; Krause, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a new and exciting field in modern medicine, now the focus of many researchers and media outlets. The hype is well-earned because of the potential of stem cells to contribute to disease modeling, drug screening, and even therapeutic approaches. In this review, we focus first on neural differentiation of these cells. In a second part we compare the various cell types available and their advantages for in vitro modeling. Then we provide a “state-of-the-art” report about two major biomedical applications: (1) the drug and toxicity screening and (2) the neural tissue replacement. Finally, we made an overview about current biomedical research using differentiated hPSCs. PMID:22457650

  6. Expression and functional study of estrogen receptor-related receptors in human prostatic cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Cheung, C P; Yu, Shan; Wong, K B; Chan, L W; Lai, Fernand M M; Wang, Xianghong; Suetsugi, Masatomo; Chen, Shiuan; Chan, Franky L

    2005-03-01

    Estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs; alpha, beta, gamma) are orphan nuclear receptors and constitutively active without binding to estrogen. Like estrogen receptors (ERs), ERRs bind to estrogen receptor elements and estrogen receptor element-related repeats. Growing evidence suggests that ERRs can cross-talk with ERs in different cell types via competition for DNA sites and coactivators. We hypothesize that ERRs might play regulatory roles in normal and neoplastic prostatic cells by sharing similar ER-mediated pathways or acting independently. In this study, we investigated mRNA and protein expression patterns of three ERR members in normal human prostate epithelial cells, established cell lines, cancer xenografts, and prostatic tissues. Additionally, effects of transient transfection of ERRs on prostatic cell proliferation and ER expression were also examined. RT-PCR showed that ERRalpha and ERRgamma transcripts were detected in most cell lines and xenografts, whereas ERRbeta was detected in normal epithelial cells and few immortalized cell lines but not in most cancer lines. Similar results were demonstrated in clinical prostatic specimens. Western blottings and immunohistochemistry confirmed similar expression patterns that ERR proteins were detected as nuclear proteins in epithelial cells, whereas their expressions became reduced or undetected in neoplastic prostatic cells. Transient transfection confirmed that ERRs were expressed in prostatic cells as nuclear proteins and transcriptionally active in the absence of estradiol. Transfection results showed that overexpression of ERRs inhibited cell proliferation and repressed ERalpha transcription in PC-3 cells. Our study shows that ERRs, which are coexpressed with ERs in prostatic cells, could regulate cell growth and modulate ER-mediated pathways via interference on ERalpha transcription in prostatic cells. PMID:15598686

  7. MERAV: a tool for comparing gene expression across human tissues and cell types.

    PubMed

    Shaul, Yoav D; Yuan, Bingbing; Thiru, Prathapan; Nutter-Upham, Andy; McCallum, Scott; Lanzkron, Carolyn; Bell, George W; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic transformation of normal cells into malignant, rapidly proliferating cells requires major alterations in cell physiology. For example, the transformed cells remodel their metabolic processes to supply the additional demand for cellular building blocks. We have recently demonstrated essential metabolic processes in tumor progression through the development of a methodological analysis of gene expression. Here, we present the Metabolic gEne RApid Visualizer (MERAV, http://merav.wi.mit.edu), a web-based tool that can query a database comprising ∼4300 microarrays, representing human gene expression in normal tissues, cancer cell lines and primary tumors. MERAV has been designed as a powerful tool for whole genome analysis which offers multiple advantages: one can search many genes in parallel; compare gene expression among different tissue types as well as between normal and cancer cells; download raw data; and generate heatmaps; and finally, use its internal statistical tool. Most importantly, MERAV has been designed as a unique tool for analyzing metabolic processes as it includes matrixes specifically focused on metabolic genes and is linked to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway search. PMID:26626150

  8. Human bone marrow and adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Mosna, Federico; Sensebé, Luc; Krampera, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that hold great promise in the field of regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from almost any tissue of the body and display, after expansion, very similar properties and minor differences, probably due to their microenvironment of origin. Expansion in vitro can be obtained in cytokine-free, serum-enriched media, as well as in serum-free, basic fibroblast growth factor-enriched media. A detailed immunophenotypic analysis is required to test the purity of the preparation, but no unique distinguishing marker has been described as yet. Functional assays, that is, differentiation studies in vitro, are needed to prove multilineage differentiation of expanded cells, and demonstration of pluripotency is necessary to identify most immature precursors. MSCs show powerful immunomodulative properties toward most of the cells of the immune system: this strengthens the theoretical rationale for their use also in an allogeneic setting across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) immunological barriers. Systemic intravenous injection and local use have been tried: after systemic injection, MSCs show a high degree of chemotaxis based on pro-inflammatory cytokines, and localize at inflamed and neoplastic tissues; local regeneration has been improved using synthetic, as well as organic scaffolds. On the other hand, inadequate heterotopic in vivo differentiation and neoplastic transformation are potential risks of this form of cell therapy, even if evidence of this sort has been collected only from studies in mice, and generally after prolonged in vitro expansion. This review tries to provide a detailed technical overview of the methods used for human bone-marrow (BM)-derived and adipose-tissue (AT)-derived MSC isolation, in vitro expansion, and characterization for tissue repair. We chose to use BM-MSCs as a model to describe techniques that have been used for MSC isolation and expansion from very different sources, and

  9. Early-life compartmentalization of human T cell differentiation and regulatory function in mucosal and lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Thome, Joseph J C; Bickham, Kara L; Ohmura, Yoshiaki; Kubota, Masaru; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Gordon, Claire; Granot, Tomer; Griesemer, Adam; Lerner, Harvey; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how the immune response in early life becomes appropriately stimulated to provide protection while also avoiding excessive activation as a result of diverse new antigens. T cells are integral to adaptive immunity; mouse studies indicate that tissue localization of T cell subsets is important for both protective immunity and immunoregulation. In humans, however, the early development and function of T cells in tissues remain unexplored. We present here an analysis of lymphoid and mucosal tissue T cells derived from pediatric organ donors in the first two years of life, as compared to adult organ donors, revealing early compartmentalization of T cell differentiation and regulation. Whereas adult tissues contain a predominance of memory T cells, in pediatric blood and tissues the main subset consists of naive recent thymic emigrants, with effector memory T cells (T(EM)) found only in the lungs and small intestine. Additionally, regulatory T (T(reg)) cells comprise a high proportion (30-40%) of CD4(+) T cells in pediatric tissues but are present at much lower frequencies (1-10%) in adult tissues. Pediatric tissue T(reg) cells suppress endogenous T cell activation, and early T cell functionality is confined to the mucosal sites that have the lowest T(reg):T(EM) cell ratios, which suggests control in situ of immune responses in early life. PMID:26657141

  10. Connective tissue growth factor hammerhead ribozyme attenuates human hepatic stellate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Run-Ping; Brigstock, David R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of hammerhead ribozyme targeting connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) on human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function. METHODS: CCN2 hammerhead ribozyme cDNA plus two self-cleaving sequences were inserted into pTriEx2 to produce pTriCCN2-Rz. Each vector was individually transfected into cultured LX-2 human HSCs, which were then stimulated by addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 to the culture medium. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels for CCN2 or collagen I, while protein levels of each molecule in cell lysates and conditioned medium were measured by ELISA. Cell-cycle progression of the transfected cells was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In pTriEx2-transfected LX-2 cells, TGF-β1 treatment caused an increase in the mRNA level for CCN2 or collagen I, and an increase in produced and secreted CCN2 or extracellular collagen I protein levels. pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells showed decreased basal CCN2 or collagen mRNA levels, as well as produced and secreted CCN2 or collagen I protein. Furthermore, the TGF-β1-induced increase in mRNA or protein for CCN2 or collagen I was inhibited partially in pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells. Inhibition of CCN2 using hammerhead ribozyme cDNA resulted in fewer of the cells transitioning into S phase. CONCLUSION: Endogenous CCN2 is a mediator of basal or TGF-β1-induced collagen I production in human HSCs and regulates entry of the cells into S phase. PMID:19673024

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  12. Natural Scaffolds for Renal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Kidney Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Martinez, Michele L.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enthusiasm for bioengineering of functional renal tissues for transplantation, many obstacles remain before the potential of this technology can be realized in a clinical setting. Viable tissue engineering strategies for the kidney require identification of the necessary cell populations, efficient scaffolds, and the 3D culture conditions to develop and support the unique architecture and physiological function of this vital organ. Our studies have previously demonstrated that decellularized sections of rhesus monkey kidneys of all age groups provide a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with sufficient structural properties with spatial and organizational influences on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) migration and differentiation. To further explore the use of decellularized natural kidney scaffolds for renal tissue engineering, pluripotent hESC were seeded in whole- or on sections of kidney ECM and cell migration and phenotype compared with the established differentiation assays for hESC. Results of qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated upregulation of renal lineage markers when hESC were cultured in decellularized scaffolds without cytokine or growth factor stimulation, suggesting a role for the ECM in directing renal lineage differentiation. hESC were also differentiated with growth factors and compared when seeded on renal ECM or a new biologically inert polysaccharide scaffold for further maturation. Renal lineage markers were progressively upregulated over time on both scaffolds and hESC were shown to express signature genes of renal progenitor, proximal tubule, endothelial, and collecting duct populations. These findings suggest that natural scaffolds enhance expression of renal lineage markers particularly when compared to embryoid body culture. The results of these studies show the capabilities of a novel polysaccharide scaffold to aid in defining a protocol for renal progenitor differentiation from hESC, and advance the promise

  13. VEGF-Mediated Proliferation of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Li, Min; Zhou, Qing; Zhang, Chen; Huang, Jun; Qiu, Yu; Wen, Xiangyi; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yushan; Yang, Shuzhang; Lu, Lixia; Zhang, Jieping; Yuan, Qionglan; Lu, Jianwei; Xu, Guotong; Xue, Yunyun; Jin, Zibing; Jiang, Cizhong; Ying, Ming; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are an attractive multipotent stem cell source with therapeutic applicability across diverse fields for the repair and regeneration of acute and chronically damaged tissues. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in ADSC for tissue engineering applications. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of ADSC proliferation are not fully understood. Here we show that 47 transcripts are up-regulated while 23 are down-regulated in ADSC compared to terminally differentiated cells based on global mRNA profiling and microRNA profiling. Among the up-regulated genes, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is fine-tuned by miR-199a-5p. Further investigation indicates that VEGF accelerates ADSC proliferation whereas the multipotency of ADSC remains stable in terms of adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic potentials after VEGF treatment, suggesting that VEGF may serve as an excellent supplement for accelerating ADSC proliferation during in vitro expansion. PMID:24098328

  14. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  15. Human Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Is a Tissue and Urinary Tumor Marker of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Won K.; Alinani, Anwar; Wu, Chin-Lee; Michaelson, Dror; Loda, Massimo; McGovern, Francis J.; Thadhani, Ravi; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2005-01-01

    Human kidney injury molecule-1 (hKIM-1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is not detectable in normal kidney tissue but is expressed at high levels in human and rodent kidneys with dedifferentiated proximal tubule epithelial cells after ischemic or toxic injury. Therefore, it was hypothesized that renal tumors express hKIM-1 and release this protein into the urine. Forty renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and 484 nonrenal tumors were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of hKIM-1 (group 1). Urine samples before nephrectomy and nephrectomy tissue samples were collected from an additional 42 patients with renal tumors, from 30 normal control subjects, and also from 10 patients with prostate carcinoma (group 2). In five additional patients with RCC, urine was collected before and after nephrectomy (group 3). Tissue was examined for expression of hKIM-1, and cell-free urine supernatants were analyzed for hKIM-1 by ELISA. Urinary hKIM-1 was normalized to the urinary creatinine concentration (UCr). Expression of hKIM-1 was present in 32 tissue sections (91%) of 35 clear cell RCC (group 1). In group 2, the normalized urinary hKIM-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with clear cell RCC (0.39 ± 0.08 ng/mg UCr; n = 21), compared with levels in patients with prostate carcinoma (0.12 ± 0.03 ng/mg UCr; P < 0.02; n = 10), or normal control subjects (0.05 ± 0.01 ng/mg UCr; P < 0.005; n = 30). Tissue sections from 28 (82%) of 34 primary RCC stained positively for the expression of hKIM-1. In all patients with a detectable prenephrectomy urinary hKIM-1 level, there was either complete disappearance or marked reduction after nephrectomy (group 3). In conclusion, the cleaved ectodomain of hKIM-1 can be detected in the urine of patients with RCC and may serve as a new biomarker for early detection of RCC. PMID:15744000

  16. Genome-scale RNAi profiling of cell division in human tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Kittler, Ralf; Pelletier, Laurence; Heninger, Anne-Kristine; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Theis, Mirko; Miroslaw, Lukasz; Poser, Ina; Lawo, Steffen; Grabner, Hannes; Kozak, Karol; Wagner, Jan; Surendranath, Vineeth; Richter, Constance; Bowen, Wayne; Jackson, Aimee L; Habermann, Bianca; Hyman, Anthony A; Buchholz, Frank

    2007-12-01

    Cell division is fundamental for all organisms. Here we report a genome-scale RNA-mediated interference screen in HeLa cells designed to identify human genes that are important for cell division. We have used a library of endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNAs for gene silencing and have used DNA content analysis to identify genes that induced cell cycle arrest or altered ploidy on silencing. Validation and secondary assays were performed to generate a nine-parameter loss-of-function phenoprint for each of the genes. These phenotypic signatures allowed the assignment of genes to specific functional classes by combining hierarchical clustering, cross-species analysis and proteomic data mining. We highlight the richness of our dataset by ascribing novel functions to genes in mitosis and cytokinesis. In particular, we identify two evolutionarily conserved transcriptional regulatory networks that govern cytokinesis. Our work provides an experimental framework from which the systematic analysis of novel genes necessary for cell division in human cells can begin. PMID:17994010

  17. Trade in human tissue products.

    PubMed

    Tonti-Filippini, Nicholas; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2011-03-01

    Trade in human tissue in Australia is prohibited by state law, and in ethical guidelines by the National Health and Medical Research Council: National statement on ethical conduct in human research; Organ and tissue donation by living donors: guidelines for ethical practice for health professionals. However, trade in human tissue products is a common practice especially for: reconstructive orthopaedic or plastic surgery; novel human tissue products such as a replacement trachea created by using human mesenchymal stem cells; biomedical research using cell lines, DNA and protein provided through biobanks. Cost pressures on these have forced consideration of commercial models to sustain their operations. Both the existing and novel activities require a robust framework to enable commercial uses of human tissue products while maintaining community acceptability of such practices, but to date no such framework exists. In this article, we propose a model ethical framework for ethical governance which identifies specific ethical issues such as: privacy; unique value of a person's tissue; commodification of the body; equity and benefit to the community; perverse incentives; and "attenuation" as a potentially useful concept to help deal with the broad range of subjective views relevant to whether it is acceptable to commercialise certain human tissue products. PMID:21382003

  18. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  19. Intermittent high oxygen influences the formation of neural retinal tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lixiong; Chen, Xi; Zeng, Yuxiao; Li, Qiyou; Zou, Ting; Chen, Siyu; Wu, Qian; Fu, Caiyun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is a highly multilayered nervous tissue with a large diversity of cellular components. With the development of stem cell technologies, human retinas can be generated in three-dimensional (3-D) culture in vitro. However, understanding the factors modulating key productive processes and the way that they influence development are far from clear. Oxygen, as the most essential element participating in metabolism, is a critical factor regulating organic development. In this study, using 3-D culture of human stem cells, we examined the effect of intermittent high oxygen treatment (40% O2) on the formation and cellular behavior of neural retinas (NR) in the embryonic body (EB). The volume of EB and number of proliferating cells increased significantly under 40% O2 on day 38, 50, and 62. Additionally, the ratio of PAX6+ cells within NR was significantly increased. The neural rosettes could only develop with correct apical-basal polarity under 40% O2. In addition, the generation, migration and maturation of retinal ganglion cells were enhanced under 40% O2. All of these results illustrated that 40% O2 strengthened the formation of NR in EB with characteristics similar to the in vivo state, suggesting that the hyperoxic state facilitated the retinal development in vitro. PMID:27435522

  20. Human umbilical cord stem cell encapsulation in novel macroporous and injectable fibrin for muscle tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Hockin H K; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D; Chen, Qianming; Trotman, Carroll Ann

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the seeding of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were: (i) to seed hUCMSCs in a fibrin hydrogel containing fast-degradable microbeads (dMBs) to create macropores to enhance cell viability; and (ii) to investigate the encapsulated cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation for muscle tissue engineering. Mass fractions of 0-80% of dMBs were tested, and 35% of dMBs in fibrin was shown to avoid fibrin shrinkage while creating macropores and promoting cell viability. This construct was referred to as "dMB35". Fibrin without dMBs was termed "dMB0". Microbead degradation created macropores in fibrin and improved cell viability. The percentage of live cells in dMB35 reached 91% at 16 days, higher than the 81% in dMB0 (p<0.05). Live cell density in dMB35 was 1.6-fold that of dMB0 (p<0.05). The encapsulated hUCMSCs proliferated, increasing the cell density by 2.6 times in dMB35 from 1 to 16 days. MTT activity for dMB35 was substantially higher than that for dMB0 at 16 days (p<0.05). hUCMSCs in dMB35 had high gene expressions of myotube markers of myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and alpha-actinin 3 (ACTN3). Elongated, multinucleated cells were formed with positive staining of myogenic specific proteins including myogenin, MYH, ACTN and actin alpha 1. Moreover, a significant increase in cell fusion was detected with myogenic induction. In conclusion, hUCMSCs were encapsulated in fibrin with degradable microbeads for the first time, achieving greatly enhanced cell viability and successful myogenic differentiation with formation of multinucleated myotubes. The injectable and macroporous fibrin-dMB-hUCMSC construct may be promising for muscle tissue engineering applications. PMID:22902812

  1. “The state of the heart”: Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing and regenerative medicine. PMID:26069271

  2. Expression of Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 in Tissue and Cultured Cells from Human Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Jesper J.; Höög, Jan-Olov; Nilsson, Jan A.; Xi, Zheng; Elfwing, Åsa; Grafström, Roland C.

    2000-01-01

    Because formaldehyde exposure has been shown to induce pathological changes in human oral mucosa, eg, micronuclei, the potential enzymatic defense by alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3)/glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase was characterized in oral tissue specimens and cell lines using RNA hybridization and immunological methods as well as enzyme activity measurements. ADH3 mRNA was expressed in basal and parabasal cell layers of oral epithelium, whereas the protein was detected throughout the cell layers. ADH3 mRNA and protein were further detected in homogenates of oral tissue and various oral cell cultures, including, normal, SV40T antigen-immortalized, and tumor keratinocyte lines. Inhibition of the growth of normal keratinocytes by maintenance at confluency significantly decreased the amount of ADH3 mRNA, a transcript with a determined half-life of 7 hours. In contrast, decay of ADH3 protein was not observed throughout a 4-day period in normal keratinocytes. In samples from both tissue and cells, the ADH3 protein content correlated to oxidizing activity for the ADH3-specific substrate S-hydroxymethylglutathione. The composite analyses associates ADH3 mRNA primarily to proliferative keratinocytes where it exhibits a comparatively short half-life. In contrast, the ADH3 protein is extremely stable, and consequently is retained during the keratinocyte life span in oral mucosa. Finally, substantial capacity for formaldehyde detoxification is shown from quantitative assessments of alcohol- and aldehyde-oxidizing activities including Km determinations, indicating that ADH3 is the major enzyme involved in formaldehyde oxidation in oral mucosa. PMID:11073833

  3. Tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase production by human dental pulp stromal cells is enhanced by high density cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Matthew J; Dennis, Caitriona; Yang, Xuebin B; Kirkham, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    The cell surface hydrolase tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) (also known as MSCA-1) is used to identify a sub-population of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) with high mineralising potential and is found on subsets of cells within the dental pulp. We aim to determine whether TNAP is co-expressed by human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) alongside a range of BMSC markers, whether this is an active form of the enzyme and the effects of culture duration and cell density on its expression. Cells from primary dental pulp and culture expanded hDPSCs expressed TNAP. Subsequent analyses revealed persistent TNAP expression and co-expression with BMSC markers such as CD73 and CD90. Flow cytometry and biochemical assays showed that increased culture durations and cell densities enhanced TNAP expression by hDPSCs. Arresting the hDPSC cell cycle also increased TNAP expression. These data confirm that TNAP is co-expressed by hDPSCs together with other BMSC markers and show that cell density affects TNAP expression levels. We conclude that TNAP is a potentially useful marker for hDPSC selection especially for uses in mineralised tissue regenerative therapies. PMID:25636587

  4. Resident Tissue-Specific Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Fibrogenesis in Human Lung Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft–derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme–associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. PMID:21641374

  5. Methods for Culturing Human Femur Tissue Explants to Study Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Metastatic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zachary S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis. Although it is widely accepted that the microenvironment influences cancer cell behavior, little is known about breast cancer cell properties and behaviors within the native microenvironment of human bone tissue.We have developed approaches to track, quantify and modulate human breast cancer cells within the microenvironment of cultured human bone tissue fragments isolated from discarded femoral heads following total hip replacement surgeries. Using breast cancer cells engineered for luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, we are able to reproducibly quantitate migration and proliferation patterns using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), track cell interactions within the bone fragments using fluorescence microscopy, and evaluate breast cells after colonization with flow cytometry. The key advantages of this model include: 1) a native, architecturally intact tissue microenvironment that includes relevant human cell types, and 2) direct access to the microenvironment, which facilitates rapid quantitative and qualitative monitoring and perturbation of breast and bone cell properties, behaviors and interactions. A primary limitation, at present, is the finite viability of the tissue fragments, which confines the window of study to short-term culture. Applications of the model system include studying the basic biology of breast cancer and other bone-seeking malignancies within the metastatic niche, and developing therapeutic strategies to effectively target breast cancer cells in bone tissues. PMID:25867136

  6. HDAC inhibition radiosensitizes human normal tissue cells and reduces DNA Double-Strand Break repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Purrucker, Jan C; Fricke, Andreas; Ong, Mei Fang; Rübe, Christian; Rübe, Claudia E; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are gaining increasing attention in the treatment of cancer, particularly in view of their therapeutic effectiveness and assumed mild toxicity profile. While numerous studies have investigated the role of HDACi in tumor cells, little is known about their effects on normal tissue cells. We studied the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), MS275, sodium-butyrate and valproic acid in healthy human fibroblasts and found HDACi-treatment to go along with increased radiosensitivity and reduced DSB repair capacity. In view of the potential genotoxic effects of HDACi-treatment, particularly when being administered long-term for chronic disease or when given to children, to women of childbearing age or their partners or in combination with radiotherapy, an extensive education of patients and prescribing physicians as well as a stringent definition of clinical indications is urgently required. PMID:19956891

  7. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum. PMID:27115725

  8. IL-13 Augments Compressive Stress-Induced Tissue Factor Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchel, Jennifer A; Antoniak, Silvio; Lee, Joo-Hyeon; Kim, Sae-Hoon; McGill, Maureen; Kasahara, David I; Randell, Scott H; Israel, Elliot; Shore, Stephanie A; Mackman, Nigel; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is best known as a cellular initiator of coagulation, but it is also a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in multiple pathophysiologic conditions, including asthma. In the lung, airway epithelial cells express TF, but it is unknown how TF expression is regulated by asthma-associated mediators. We investigated the role of IL-13, a type 2 cytokine, alone and in combination with compressive stress, which mimics asthmatic bronchoconstriction, on TF expression and release of TF-positive extracellular vesicles from primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were treated with IL-13 and compressive stress, alone and in combination. TF mRNA, protein and activity were measured in the cells and conditioned media. TF was also measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of allergen-challenged mice and patients with asthma. IL-13 and compressive stress increased TF expression, but only compressive stress induced TF-positive extracellular vesicle release. Pretreatment with IL-13 augmented compressive stress-induced TF expression and release. TF protein and activity in BAL fluid were increased in allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice. TF was elevated in the BAL fluid of patients with mild asthma after an allergen challenge. Our in vitro and in vivo data indicate close cooperation between mechanical and inflammatory stimuli on TF expression and release of TF-positive extracellular vesicles in the lungs, which may contribute to pathophysiology of asthma. PMID:26407210

  9. Scaffold-free, Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tissue Engineered Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngmee; Ji, HaYeun; Chen, Zaozao; Fai Chan, Hon; Atchison, Leigh; Klitzman, Bruce; Truskey, George; Leong, Kam W.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBV) can serve as vascular grafts and may also play an important role in the development of organs-on-a-chip. Most TEBV construction involves scaffolding with biomaterials such as collagen gel or electrospun fibrous mesh. Hypothesizing that a scaffold-free TEBV may be advantageous, we constructed a tubular structure (1 mm i.d.) from aligned human mesenchymal cell sheets (hMSC) as the wall and human endothelial progenitor cell (hEPC) coating as the lumen. The burst pressure of the scaffold-free TEBV was above 200 mmHg after three weeks of sequential culture in a rotating wall bioreactor and perfusion at 6.8 dynes/cm2. The interwoven organization of the cell layers and extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) formation of the hMSC-based TEBV resembled that of native blood vessels. The TEBV exhibited flow-mediated vasodilation, vasoconstriction after exposure to 1 μM phenylephrine and released nitric oxide in a manner similar to that of porcine femoral vein. HL-60 cells attached to the TEBV lumen after TNF-α activation to suggest a functional endothelium. This study demonstrates the potential of a hEPC endothelialized hMSC-based TEBV for drug screening. PMID:26456074

  10. Comparative study of the cytoplasmic organelles of epithelial cell lines derived from human carcinomas and nonmalignant tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E.L.

    1980-03-01

    The cytoplasmic organelles of 16 human epithelial cell lines have been characterized by electron microscopy. The cell lines were derived from normal, nonmalignant tissues of cancerous organs and from primary and metastatic carcinomas. Mitochondrial pleomorphism was expressed slightly by normal, to variable degrees by lines derived from nonmalignant tissues of cancerous organs, and to a much greater extent by all lines derived from malignant tissues. Hypertrophied mitochondria and longitudinal cristal arrangement were found in almost all the malignant lines, but not in any lines derived from nonmalignant tissues of cancerous organs or from normal tissues. All the lines appeared differentiate and showed slightly to moderately developed Golgi and smooth and rough endoplasmic reticula. There were no significant ultrastructural differences in cells at different passage levels or subconfluent and confluent tumor cells; however, more tight junctions were observed in confluent than in subconfluent normal cells.

  11. Implantable tissue-engineered blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Liqiong; Dash, Biraja C; Luo, Jiesi; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhao, Liping; Yamamoto, Kota; Hashimoto, Takuya; Wu, Hongwei; Dardik, Alan; Tellides, George; Niklason, Laura E; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-09-01

    Derivation of functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to generate tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) holds great potential in treating patients with vascular diseases. Herein, hiPSCs were differentiated into alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and calponin-positive VSMCs, which were seeded onto polymer scaffolds in bioreactors for vascular tissue growth. A functional TEBV with abundant collagenous matrix and sound mechanics resulted, which contained cells largely positive for α-SMA and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Moreover, when hiPSC-derived TEBV segments were implanted into nude rats as abdominal aorta interposition grafts, they remained unruptured and patent with active vascular remodeling, and showed no evidence of teratoma formation during a 2-week proof-of-principle study. Our studies represent the development of the first implantable TEBVs based on hiPSCs, and pave the way for developing autologous or allogeneic grafts for clinical use in patients with vascular disease. PMID:27336184

  12. In Vitro Behavior of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Poly(ε-caprolactone) Film for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Cecilia; Zonefrati, Roberto; Galli, Gianna; Puppi, Dario; Pirosa, Alessandro; Chiellini, Federica; Martelli, Francesco Saverio; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an emerging field, representing one of the most exciting challenges for scientists and clinicians. The possibility of combining mesenchymal stem cells and scaffolds to create engineered tissues has brought attention to a large variety of biomaterials in combination with osteoprogenitor cells able to promote and regenerate bone tissue. Human adipose tissue is officially recognized as an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs), a significant factor for use in tissue regenerative medicine. In this study, we analyze the behavior of a clonal finite cell line derived from human adipose tissue seeded on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) film, prepared by solvent casting. PCL polymer is chosen for its good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties. We observe that AMSCs are able to adhere to the biomaterial and remain viable for the entire experimental period. Moreover, we show that the proliferation process and osteogenic activity of AMSCs are maintained on the biofilm, demonstrating that the selected biomaterial ensures cell colonization and the development of an extracellular mineralized matrix. The results of this study highlight that AMSCs and PCL film can be used as a suitable model to support regeneration of new bone for future tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26558266

  13. In Vitro Behavior of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Poly(ε-caprolactone) Film for Bone Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Cecilia; Zonefrati, Roberto; Galli, Gianna; Puppi, Dario; Pirosa, Alessandro; Chiellini, Federica; Martelli, Francesco Saverio; Tanini, Annalisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an emerging field, representing one of the most exciting challenges for scientists and clinicians. The possibility of combining mesenchymal stem cells and scaffolds to create engineered tissues has brought attention to a large variety of biomaterials in combination with osteoprogenitor cells able to promote and regenerate bone tissue. Human adipose tissue is officially recognized as an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs), a significant factor for use in tissue regenerative medicine. In this study, we analyze the behavior of a clonal finite cell line derived from human adipose tissue seeded on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) film, prepared by solvent casting. PCL polymer is chosen for its good biocompatibility, biodegradability, and mechanical properties. We observe that AMSCs are able to adhere to the biomaterial and remain viable for the entire experimental period. Moreover, we show that the proliferation process and osteogenic activity of AMSCs are maintained on the biofilm, demonstrating that the selected biomaterial ensures cell colonization and the development of an extracellular mineralized matrix. The results of this study highlight that AMSCs and PCL film can be used as a suitable model to support regeneration of new bone for future tissue engineering strategies. PMID:26558266

  14. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  15. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  16. From Single Cells to Tissues: Interactions between the Matrix and Human Breast Cells in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Montevil, Mael; Saetzler, Kurt; Bode-Animashaun, Gbemisola; McKerr, George; Georgakoudi, Irene; Downes, C. Stephen; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Howard, C. Vyvyan; Soto, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mammary gland morphogenesis involves ductal elongation, branching, and budding. All of these processes are mediated by stroma - epithelium interactions. Biomechanical factors, such as matrix stiffness, have been established as important factors in these interactions. For example, epithelial cells fail to form normal acinar structures in vitro in 3D gels that exceed the stiffness of a normal mammary gland. Additionally, heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of acini and ducts within individual collagen gels suggests that local organization of the matrix may guide morphogenesis. Here, we quantified the effects of both bulk material stiffness and local collagen fiber arrangement on epithelial morphogenesis. Results The formation of ducts and acini from single cells and the reorganization of the collagen fiber network were quantified using time-lapse confocal microscopy. MCF10A cells organized the surrounding collagen fibers during the first twelve hours after seeding. Collagen fiber density and alignment relative to the epithelial surface significantly increased within the first twelve hours and were a major influence in the shaping of the mammary epithelium. The addition of Matrigel to the collagen fiber network impaired cell-mediated reorganization of the matrix and increased the probability of spheroidal acini rather than branching ducts. The mechanical anisotropy created by regions of highly aligned collagen fibers facilitated elongation and branching, which was significantly correlated with fiber organization. In contrast, changes in bulk stiffness were not a strong predictor of this epithelial morphology. Conclusions Localized regions of collagen fiber alignment are required for ductal elongation and branching suggesting the importance of local mechanical anisotropy in mammary epithelial morphogenesis. Similar principles may govern the morphology of branching and budding in other tissues and organs. PMID:24691468

  17. Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    Direct-write printing of stem cells within biomaterials presents an opportunity to engineer tissue for in vitro modeling and regenerative medicine. Here, a first example of constructing neural tissue by printing human neural stem cells that are differentiated in situ to functional neurons and supporting neuroglia is reported. The supporting biomaterial incorporates a novel clinically relevant polysaccharide-based bioink comprising alginate, carboxymethyl-chitosan, and agarose. The printed bioink rapidly gels by stable cross-linking to form a porous 3D scaffold encapsulating stem cells for in situ expansion and differentiation. Differentiated neurons form synaptic contacts, establish networks, are spontaneously active, show a bicuculline-induced increased calcium response, and are predominantly gamma-aminobutyric acid expressing. The 3D tissues will facilitate investigation of human neural development, function, and disease, and may be adaptable for engineering other 3D tissues from different stem cell types. PMID:27028356

  18. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  19. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T.; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  20. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Consortium, The Fantom; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  1. In vitro evaluation of textile chitosan scaffolds for tissue engineering using human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Christiane; Heinemann, Sascha; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Worch, Hartmut; Hanke, Thomas

    2009-05-11

    Textile chitosan fiber scaffolds were developed and tested in terms of biocompatibility for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). A part of the scaffolds was further modified by coating with fibrillar collagen type I in order to biologize the surface. hBMSCs of two donors were used for cell culture experiments in vitro. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed fast attachment and morphological adaptation of the cells on both the raw chitosan fibers and the collagen-coated scaffolds. Cells were osteogenically induced after 3 days and cultivated for up to 28 days on the scaffolds. Activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was analyzed to evaluate proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation. We found a 3.5-6-fold increase in the cell number, whereas the collagen coating did not noticeably influence these factors. Osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the course of ALP activity and immunostaining of osteocalcin. The feature of the collagen-coated as well as the raw chitosan fiber scaffolds to support attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of hBMSCs suggests a potential application of chitosan fibers and textile chitosan scaffolds for the tissue engineering of bone. PMID:19344120

  2. Expression analysis of ATAD3 isoforms in rodent and human cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuijie; Lamarche, Fredéric; Charton, Romain; Delphin, Christian; Gires, Olivier; Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Schlattner, Uwe; Rousseau, Denis

    2014-02-01

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA-Domain containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial inner membrane ATPase with unknown but vital functions. Initial researches have focused essentially on the major p66-ATAD3 isoform, but other proteins and mRNAs are described in the data banks. Using a set of anti-peptide antibodies and by the use of rodent and human cell lines and organs, we tried to detail ATAD3 gene expression profiles and to verify the existence of the various ATAD3 isoforms. In rodent, the single ATAD3 gene is expressed as a major isoform of 67 kDa, (ATAD3l; long), in all cells and organs studied. A second isoform, p57-ATAD3s (small), is expressed specifically throughout brain development and in adult, and overexpressed around the peri-natal period. p57-ATAD3s is also expressed in neuronal and glial rodent cell lines, and during in vitro differentiation of primary cultured rat oligodendrocytes. Other smaller isoforms were also detected in a tissue-specific manner. In human and primates, ATAD3 paralogues are encoded by three genes (ATAD3A, 3B and 3C), each of them presenting several putative variants. Analyzing the expression of ATAD3A and ATAD3B with four specific anti-peptide antibodies, and comparing their expressions with in vitro expressed ATAD3 cDNAs, we were able to observe and define five isoforms. In particular, the previously described p72-ATAD3B is confirmed to be in certain cases a phosphorylated form of ATAD3As. Moreover, we observed that the ATAD3As phosphorylation level is regulated by insulin and serum. Finally, exploring ATAD3 mRNA expression, we confirmed the existence of an alternative splicing in rodent and of several mRNA isoforms in human. Considering these observations, we propose the development of a uniform denomination for ATAD3 isoforms in rodent and human. PMID:24239551

  3. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Grafts Enhance Normal and Impaired Wound Healing by Recruiting Existing Endogenous Tissue Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as a clinical therapy to promote tissue repair. However, the disappearance of grafted cells soon after engraftment suggests a possible role as initiators of repair rather than effectors. We evaluated the relative contribution of grafted human MSCs and host stem/progenitor cells in promoting wound healing by using a novel asymmetric wound model in normal and impaired healing diabetic (db/db) mice to discriminate between the effect of direct engraftment and the subsequent systemic response. Experimental animals received paired wounds, with one wound receiving human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and the other wound receiving vehicle to assess local and systemic effects, respectively. Control animals received vehicle in both wounds. Grafted hMSCs significantly improved healing in both normal and impaired healing animals; produced significant elevation of signals such as Wnt3a, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α; and increased the number of pre-existing host MSCs recruited to the wound bed. Improvement was also seen in both the grafted and nongrafted sides, suggesting a systemic response to hMSC engraftment. Healing was enhanced despite the rapid loss of hMSCs, suggesting that mobilizing the host response is the major outcome of grafting MSCs to tissue repair. We validate that hMSCs evoke a host response that is clinically relevant, and we suggest that therapeutic efforts should focus on maximizing the mobilization of host MSCs. PMID:23283490

  4. Paracrine Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Adipose Tissue in Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Linero, Itali; Chaparro, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has proved to be a promising strategy in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Although their mechanism of action is not completely clear, it has been suggested that their therapeutic activity may be mediated by a paracrine effect. The main goal of this study was to evaluate by radiographic, morphometric and histological analysis the ability of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue (Ad-MSC) and their conditioned medium (CM), to repair surgical bone lesions using an in vivo model (rabbit mandibles). The results demonstrated that both, Ad-MSC and CM, induce bone regeneration in surgically created lesions in rabbit's jaws, suggesting that Ad-MSC improve the process of bone regeneration mainly by releasing paracrine factors. The evidence of the paracrine effect of MSC on bone regeneration has a major impact on regenerative medicine, and the use of their CM can address some issues and difficulties related to cell transplants. In particular, CM can be easily stored and transported, and is easier to handle by medical personnel during clinical procedures. PMID:25198551

  5. Oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial function differ between human prostate tissue and cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Schöpf, Bernd; Schäfer, Georg; Weber, Anja; Talasz, Heribert; Eder, Iris E; Klocker, Helmut; Gnaiger, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Altered mitochondrial metabolism plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer. Cell lines are frequently used as models to study mitochondrial (dys)function, but little is known about their mitochondrial respiration and metabolic properties in comparison to the primary tissue of origin. We have developed a method for assessment of oxidative phosphorylation in prostate tissue samples of only 2 mg wet weight using high-resolution respirometry. Reliable protocols were established to investigate the respiratory activity of different segments of the mitochondrial electron transfer system (ETS) in mechanically permeabilized tissue biopsies. Additionally, the widely used immortalized prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell lines, RWPE1 and NAF, representing the major cell types in prostate tissue, were analyzed and compared to the tissue of origin. Our results show that mechanical treatment without chemical permeabilization agents or sample processing constitutes a reliable preparation method for OXPHOS analysis in small amounts of prostatic tissue typically obtained by prostate biopsy. The cell lines represented the bioenergetic properties of fresh tissue to a limited extent only. Particularly, tissue showed a higher oxidative capacity with succinate and glutamate, whereas pyruvate was a substrate supporting significantly higher respiratory activities in cell lines. Several fold higher zinc levels measured in tissue compared to cells confirmed the role of aconitase for prostate-specific metabolism in agreement with observed respiratory properties. In conclusion, combining the flexibility of cell culture models and tissue samples for respirometric analysis are powerful tools for investigation of mitochondrial function and tissue-specific metabolism. PMID:27060259

  6. Derivation of Multiple Cranial Tissues and Isolation of Lens Epithelium-Like Cells From Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a powerful tool to investigate early events occurring during human embryonic development. In the present study, we induced differentiation of hESCs in conditions that allowed formation of neural and non-neural ectoderm and to a lesser extent mesoderm. These tissues are required for correct specification of the neural plate border, an early embryonic transient structure from which neural crest cells (NCs) and cranial placodes (CPs) originate. Although isolation of CP derivatives from hESCs has not been previously reported, isolation of hESC-derived NC-like cells has been already described. We performed a more detailed analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified cell populations using the surface antigens previously used to select hESC-derived NC-like cells, p75 and HNK-1, and uncovered their heterogeneous nature. In addition to the NC component, we identified a neural component within these populations using known surface markers, such as CD15 and FORSE1. We have further exploited this information to facilitate the isolation and purification by FACS of a CP derivative, the lens, from differentiating hESCs. Two surface markers expressed on lens cells, c-Met/HGFR and CD44, were used for positive selection of multiple populations with a simultaneous subtraction of the neural/NC component mediated by p75, HNK-1, and CD15. In particular, the c-Met/HGFR allowed early isolation of proliferative lens epithelium-like cells capable of forming lentoid bodies. Isolation of hESC-derived lens cells represents an important step toward the understanding of human lens development and regeneration and the devising of future therapeutic applications. PMID:23341438

  7. Derivation of multiple cranial tissues and isolation of lens epithelium-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mengarelli, Isabella; Barberi, Tiziano

    2013-02-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provide a powerful tool to investigate early events occurring during human embryonic development. In the present study, we induced differentiation of hESCs in conditions that allowed formation of neural and non-neural ectoderm and to a lesser extent mesoderm. These tissues are required for correct specification of the neural plate border, an early embryonic transient structure from which neural crest cells (NCs) and cranial placodes (CPs) originate. Although isolation of CP derivatives from hESCs has not been previously reported, isolation of hESC-derived NC-like cells has been already described. We performed a more detailed analysis of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified cell populations using the surface antigens previously used to select hESC-derived NC-like cells, p75 and HNK-1, and uncovered their heterogeneous nature. In addition to the NC component, we identified a neural component within these populations using known surface markers, such as CD15 and FORSE1. We have further exploited this information to facilitate the isolation and purification by FACS of a CP derivative, the lens, from differentiating hESCs. Two surface markers expressed on lens cells, c-Met/HGFR and CD44, were used for positive selection of multiple populations with a simultaneous subtraction of the neural/NC component mediated by p75, HNK-1, and CD15. In particular, the c-Met/HGFR allowed early isolation of proliferative lens epithelium-like cells capable of forming lentoid bodies. Isolation of hESC-derived lens cells represents an important step toward the understanding of human lens development and regeneration and the devising of future therapeutic applications. PMID:23341438

  8. Islet-Like Cell Aggregates Generated from Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Experimental Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Vikash; G, Swetha; Muthyala, Sudhakar; Jaiswal, Amit K.; Bellare, Jayesh R.; Nair, Prabha D.; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is caused by auto immune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Currently available treatments include transplantation of isolated islets from donor pancreas to the patient. However, this method is limited by inadequate means of immuno-suppression to prevent islet rejection and importantly, limited supply of islets for transplantation. Autologous adult stem cells are now considered for cell replacement therapy in diabetes as it has the potential to generate neo-islets which are genetically part of the treated individual. Adopting methods of islet encapsulation in immuno-isolatory devices would eliminate the need for immuno-suppressants. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we explore the potential of human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells (h-ASCs) to differentiate into functional islet like cell aggregates (ICAs). Our stage specific differentiation protocol permit the conversion of mesodermic h-ASCs to definitive endoderm (Hnf3β, TCF2 and Sox17) and to PDX1, Ngn3, NeuroD, Pax4 positive pancreatic endoderm which further matures in vitro to secrete insulin. These ICAs are shown to produce human C-peptide in a glucose dependent manner exhibiting in-vitro functionality. Transplantation of mature ICAs, packed in immuno-isolatory biocompatible capsules to STZ induced diabetic mice restored near normoglycemia within 3–4 weeks. The detection of human C-peptide, 1155±165 pM in blood serum of experimental mice demonstrate the efficacy of our differentiation approach. Conclusions h-ASC is an ideal population of personal stem cells for cell replacement therapy, given that they are abundant, easily available and autologous in origin. Our findings present evidence that h-ASCs could be induced to differentiate into physiologically competent functional islet like cell aggregates, which may provide as a source of alternative islets for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:21687731

  9. Access to bacteriophage therapy: discouraging experiences from the human cell and tissue legal framework.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, G; Huys, I; De Vos, D; De Coninck, A; Roseeuw, D; Kets, E; Vanderkelen, A; Draye, J P; Rose, T; Jennes, S; Ceulemans, C; Pirnay, J P

    2016-02-01

    Cultures of human epithelial cells (keratinocytes) are used as an additional surgical tool to treat critically burnt patients. Initially, the production environment of keratinocyte grafts was regulated exclusively by national regulations. In 2004, the European Tissues and Cells Directive 2004/23/EC (transposed into Belgian Law) imposed requirements that resulted in increased production costs and no significant increase in quality and/or safety. In 2007, Europe published Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 on Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products. Overnight, cultured keratinocytes became (arguably) 'Advanced' Therapy Medicinal Products to be produced as human medicinal products. The practical impact of these amendments was (and still is) considerable. A similar development appears imminent in bacteriophage therapy. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that can be used for tackling the problem of bacterial resistance development to antibiotics. Therapeutic natural bacteriophages have been in clinical use for almost 100 years. Regulators today are framing the (re-)introduction of (natural) bacteriophage therapy into 'modern western' medicine as biological medicinal products, also subject to stringent regulatory medicinal products requirements. In this paper, we look back on a century of bacteriophage therapy to make the case that therapeutic natural bacteriophages should not be classified under the medicinal product regulatory frames as they exist today. It is our call to authorities to not repeat the mistake of the past. PMID:26678555

  10. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Kartolo, Wiwi Andralia; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA. PMID:26881220

  11. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Kartolo, Wiwi Andralia; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA. PMID:26881220

  12. Altered features and increased chemosensitivity of human breast cancer cells mediated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent heterogeneous cell population suitable for cell therapies in regenerative medicine. MSCs can also substantially affect tumor biology due to their ability to be recruited to the tumor stroma and interact with malignant cells via direct contacts and paracrine signaling. The aim of our study was to characterize molecular changes dictated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) and the effects on drug responses in human breast cancer cells SKBR3. Methods The tumor cells were either directly cocultured with AT-MSCs or exposed to MSCs-conditioned medium (MSC-CM). Changes in cell biology were evaluated by kinetic live cell imaging, fluorescent microscopy, scratch wound assay, expression analysis, cytokine secretion profiling, ATP-based viability and apoptosis assays. The efficiency of cytotoxic treatment in the presence of AT-MSCs or MSCs-CM was analyzed. Results The AT-MSCs altered tumor cell morphology, induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, increased mammosphere formation, cell confluence and migration of SKBR3. These features were attributed to molecular changes induced by MSCs-secreted cytokines and chemokines in breast cancer cells. AT-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in direct cocultures which was shown to be dependent on the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling axis. MSC-CM-exposed SKBR3 or SKBR3 in direct coculture with AT-MSCs exhibited increased chemosensitivity and induction of apoptosis in response to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions Our work further highlights the multi-level nature of tumor-stromal cell interplay and demonstrates the capability of AT-MSCs and MSC-secreted factors to alter the anti-tumor drug responses. PMID:24209831

  13. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  14. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in the human tissues from 41 Japanese autopsy cases using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Higaki-Mori, Hiromi; Yashima, Shoji; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Horie, Yasushi; Kitamura, Yukisato; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been shown that approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas harbor a novel polyomavirus named Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). MCPyV has been detected in human tissue samples. However, detailed distribution of MCPyV in non-neoplastic Japanese human tissues remains unclear. To address this, we used single or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for 41 autopsy cases. PCR revealed MCPyV-DNA in non-neoplastic samples: total, 29/41 (71%); adult, 29/39 (74%); fetus or infant, 0/2; men, 24/28 (86%); women, 5/13 (38%); total human tissues, 66/572 (12%); skin, 8/15 (53%); adrenal gland, 9/33 (27%), and other 16 organs (4-25%). This study first reported the presence of MCPyV-DNA in non-neoplastic tissues of thyroid gland, adrenal gland, spleen, bone marrow, stomach, gallbladder, pancreas, heart, and aorta. PCR revealed that viral load ranged from 0.00026 to 0.22 in all MCPyV-positive tissues compared with Merkel cell carcinoma samples. These detailed PCR data showed higher prevalence of MCPyV infection in Japanese men than women (p = 0.004) and broad distribution of MCPyV with low viral load in more non-neoplastic human tissues than in the previous reports. These data provide valuable insights for further studies of MCPyV infection and MCPyV-related diseases. PMID:22986833

  15. Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma is an easily available, convenient, and promising source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. Cryogenic storage of umbilical cord tissue provides more possibilities for further isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for autologous transplantation or scientific purposes. Here we developed a protocol for preparation of the whole umbilical cord tissue for cryogenic storage that in combination with the previously described modified method of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells allowed us to isolate cells with high proliferative potential, typical phenotype, and preserved differentiation potencies. PMID:26902359

  16. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ratnesh K; Mallela, Ramya K; Cornuet, Pamela K; Reifler, Aaron N; Chervenak, Andrew P; West, Michael D; Wong, Kwoon Y; Nasonkin, Igor O

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue

  17. Gastroenterology-urology devices; classification of tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2001-05-16

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to this device is a guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: issue Culture Media for Human Ex Vivo Tissue and Cell Culture Processing Applications; Final Guidance for Industry and FDA Reviewers." The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying these devices into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of the devices. PMID:11721690

  18. Evidence for tissue-resident mesenchymal stem cells in human adult lung from studies of transplanted allografts.

    PubMed

    Lama, Vibha N; Smith, Lisa; Badri, Linda; Flint, Andrew; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Murray, Susan; Wang, Zhuo; Liao, Hui; Toews, Galen B; Krebsbach, Paul H; Peters-Golden, Marc; Pinsky, David J; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2007-04-01

    The origin and turnover of connective tissue cells in adult human organs, including the lung, are not well understood. Here, studies of cells derived from human lung allografts demonstrate the presence of a multipotent mesenchymal cell population, which is locally resident in the human adult lung and has extended life span in vivo. Examination of plastic-adherent cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from 76 human lung transplant recipients revealed clonal proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in 62% (106 of 172) of samples. Immunophenotyping of these isolated cells demonstrated expression of vimentin and prolyl-4-hydroxylase, indicating a mesenchymal phenotype. Multiparametric flow cytometric analyses revealed expression of cell-surface proteins, CD73, CD90, and CD105, commonly found on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Hematopoietic lineage markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 were absent. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Cytogenetic analysis of cells from 7 sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients harvested up to 11 years after transplant revealed that 97.2% +/- 2.1% expressed the sex genotype of the donor. The presence of MSCs of donor sex identity in lung allografts even years after transplantation provides what we believe to be the first evidence for connective tissue cell progenitors that reside locally within a postnatal, nonhematopoietic organ. PMID:17347686

  19. Characterisation of inorganic microparticles in pigment cells of human gut associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Ainley, C C; Harvey, R S; Mason, I M; Kendall, M D; Sankey, E A; Dhillon, A P; Thompson, R P

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages at the base of human gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), become loaded early in life with dark granular pigment that is rich in aluminium, silicon, and titanium. The molecular characteristics, intracellular distribution, and source of this pigment is described. Laser scanning and electron microscopy showed that pigmented macrophages were often closely related to collagen fibres and plasma cells in GALT of both small and large intestine and contained numerous phagolysosomes, previously described as granules, that are rich in electron dense submicron sized particles. Morphological assessment, x ray microanalysis, and image electron energy loss spectroscopy showed three distinct types of microparticle: type I - spheres of titanium dioxide, 100-200 nm diameter, characterised as the synthetic food-additive polymorph anatase; type II - aluminosilicates, < 100-400 nm in length, generally of flaky appearance, often with adsorbed surface iron, and mostly characteristic of the natural clay mineral kaolinite; and type III - mixed environmental silicates without aluminium, 100-700 nm in length and of variable morphology. Thus, this cellular pigment that is partly derived from food additives and partly from the environment is composed of inert inorganic microparticles and loaded into phagolysosomes of macrophages within the GALT of all human subjects. These observations suggest that the pathogenicity of this pigment should be further investigated since, in susceptible individuals, the same intracellular distribution of these three types of submicron particle causes chronic latent granulomatous inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8675092

  20. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5′ distal regions were often enriched in 3′ distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. PMID:25505144

  1. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  2. FORMATION OF SLOW-REACTING SUBSTANCE OF ANAPHYLAXIS IN HUMAN LUNG TISSUE AND CELLS BEFORE RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert A.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Goetzl, Edward J.; Austen, K. Frank

    1974-01-01

    The capacity to extract slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) from human lung tissue or cells after immunologic activation, together with the measurement of SRS-A in both the extract and the surrounding fluid, permits study of total SRS-A generation. That the material extracted is SRS-A was established by both differential bioassay and purification. SRS-A accumulation was entirely intracellular after limited IgE-dependent direct or reversed anaphylactic activation. Intracellular accumulation also generally preceded release, with generation of SRS-A continuing well beyond a plateau in the cellular SRS-A level and the release of preformed mediators. The quantity of SRS-A generated after immunologic activation was modulated by the introduction of exogenous cyclic nucleotides, revealing a site of cyclic nucleotide action distinct from that on mediator release. The capacity to determine not only the release of preformed mediators but also the generation of a newly formed mediator, the sum of SRS-A in cells and supernate, adds an additional dimension to the analysis of the cellular events of immediate hypersensitivity. PMID:4378429

  3. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation. PMID:24789705

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of LLC1 in human tissues and its limited expression in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vishal; Choi, Yong-Bock; Hwang, Hai-Li; Lee, Jeong-Hwa; Park, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Hyun-Kyoung; Poojan, Shiv; Koh, Jae-Soo; Kim, Han-Seong; Hong, Kyeong-Man

    2015-09-01

    We have shown both LLC1 expression in the lung epithelium by in situ hybridization and its inactivation in lung cancer by epigenetic modification. However, LLC1 protein's cellular localization or its role in normal lung or cancer tissues has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against recombinant LLC1 was produced, and immunohistochemical staining was performed on arrays including various human tissues, normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues for LLC1 localization. The immunohistochemical results showed LLC1 expression in the cilia of normal-airway epithelial cells and in the cytoplasm of type II pneumocytes in bronchiectatic patients, but no expression in most of the NSCLC tissues, which is consistent with our previous report positing LLC1 as a tumor suppressor. However, LLC1 over-expression in NSCLC cell lines NCI-H1299 and NCI-H23 did not show any change in proliferation or migration, which does not indicate any LLC1 tumor-suppressor role. As for the other human tissues, LLC1 was localized in renal tubular cells, pancreatic acinar cells, and epithelial cells of the stomach, duodenum, and gallbladder. In summary, our findings suggest that LLC1 is not a tumor suppressor, and that it is localized in the cilia of the normal lung epithelium but is absent in most NSCLC cases, probably due to the loss of cilia during lung carcinogenesis. PMID:25786037

  5. Cultivation of Human Bone-Like Tissue from Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Osteogenic Progenitors in Perfusion Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems—bioreactors—has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries. PMID:24281874

  6. Characterization of human skin cells for tissue engineering applications by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudlas, Marieke; Koch, Steffen; Bolwien, Carsten; Walles, Heike

    2010-02-01

    In the field of cell culture and tissue engineering is an increasing need for non-invasive methods to analyze living cells in vitro. One important application is the cell characterization in tissue engineering products. Raman spectroscopy is a method which analyzes cells without lysis, fixation or the use of any chemicals and do not affect cell vitality adversely if suitable laser powers and wavelength are used. This purely optical technique is based on inelastic scattering of laser photons by molecular vibrations of biopolymers. Basically Raman spectra of cells contain typical fingerprint regions and information about cellular properties. Characteristic peaks in Raman spectra could be assigned to biochemical molecules like proteins, nucleic acid or lipids. The distinction of cell types by a multivariate analysis of Raman spectra is possible due to their biochemical differences. As this method allows a characterization of cells without any cell damage it is a promising technology for the quality control of cells in tissue engineering or cell culture applications.

  7. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field. PMID:25122057

  8. Ex vivo generation of glucose sensitive insulin secreting mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Shruti D.; Vanikar, Aruna V.; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diabetics are incapable of producing insulin/have autoimmune mechanisms making it ineffective to control glucose secretion. We present a prospective study of glucose-sensitive insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem cells (IS-MSC) generated from human adipose tissue (h-AD) sans xenogenic material. Materials and Methods: Ten grams h-AD from donor anterior abdominal wall was collected in proliferation medium composed of α-Minimum Essential Media (α-MEM), albumin, fibroblast-growth factor and antibiotics, minced, incubated in collagenase-I at 37°C with shaker and centrifuged. Supernatant and pellets were separately cultured in proliferation medium on cell+ plates at 37°C with 5% CO2 for 10 days. Cells were harvested by trypsinization, checked for viability, sterility, counts, flow-cytometry (CD45-/90+/73+), and differentiated into insulin-expressing cells using medium composed of DMEM, gene expressing up-regulators and antibiotics for 3 days. They were studied for transcriptional factors Pax-6, Isl-1, pdx-1 (immunofluorescence). C-peptide and insulin were measured by chemiluminescence. In vitro glucose sensitivity assay was carried out by measuring levels of insulin and C-peptide secretion in absence of glucose followed by 2 hours incubation after glucose addition. Results: Mean IS-AD-MSC quantum was 3.21 ml, cell count, 1.5 ×103 cells/μl), CD45-/90+/73+ cells were 44.37% /25.52%. All of them showed presence of pax-6, pdx-1, and Isl-1. Mean C-Peptide and insulin levels were 0.36 ng/ml and 234 μU/ml, respectively, pre-glucose and 0.87 ng/ml and 618.3 μU/ml post-glucose additions. The mean rise in secretion levels was 2.42 and 2.65 fold, respectively. Conclusion: Insulin-secreting h-AD-MSC can be generated safely and effectively showing in vitro glucose responsive alteration in insulin and C-peptide secretion levels. PMID:22701849

  9. Neurotrophic Features of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Wanda; Geloso, Maria Concetta; Saulnier, Nathalie; Giannetti, Stefano; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Corvino, Valentina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Michetti, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Due to its abundance, easy retrieval, and plasticity characteristics, adipose-tissue-derived stromal cells (ATSCs) present unquestionable advantages over other adult-tissue-derived stem cells. Based on the in silico analysis of our previous data reporting the ATSC-specific expression profiles, the present study attempted to clarify and validate at the functional level the expression of the neurospecific genes expressed by ATSC both in vitro and in vivo. This allowed evidencing that ATSCs express neuro-specific trophins, metabolic genes, and neuroprotective molecules. They were in fact able to induce neurite outgrowth in vitro, along with tissue-specific commitment along the neural lineage and the expression of the TRKA neurotrophin receptor in vivo. Our observation adds useful information to recent evidence proposing these cells as a suitable tool for cell-based applications in neuroregenerative medicine. PMID:22219658

  10. Human tissue mast cells are an inducible reservoir of persistent HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J Bruce; Ellis, Jane E; Hair, Gregory A; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S; Metcalfe, Dean D; Yi, Hong; Cardona, Adriana C; Lindsay, Michael K; Ansari, Aftab A

    2007-06-15

    We have proposed that, unlike other HIV-vulnerable cell lineages, progenitor mast cells (prMCs), cultured in vitro from undifferentiated bone marrow-derived CD34(+) pluripotent progenitors (PPPs), are susceptible to infection during a limited period of their ontogeny. As infected prMCs mature in culture, they lose expression of viral chemokine coreceptors necessary for viral entry and develop into long-lived, latently infected mature tissue mast cells (MCs), resistant to new infection. In vivo recruitment of prMCs to different tissue compartments occurs in response to tissue injury, growth, and remodeling or allergic inflammation, allowing populations of circulating and potentially HIV-susceptible prMCs to spread persistent infection to diverse tissue compartments. In this report, we provide in vivo evidence to confirm this model by demonstrating that HIV-infected women have both circulating prMCs and placental tissue MCs (PLMCs) that harbor inducible infectious HIV even after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Furthermore, infectious virus, capable of infecting alloactivated fetal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), could be induced in isolated latently infected PLMCs after weeks in culture in vitro. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that tissue MCs, developed from infected circulating prMCs, comprise a long-lived inducible reservoir of persistent HIV in infected persons during HAART. PMID:17351109

  11. Human tissue mast cells are an inducible reservoir of persistent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Jane E.; Hair, Gregory A.; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Yi, Hong; Cardona, Adriana C.; Lindsay, Michael K.; Ansari, Aftab A.

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that, unlike other HIV-vulnerable cell lineages, progenitor mast cells (prMCs), cultured in vitro from undifferentiated bone marrow–derived CD34+ pluripotent progenitors (PPPs), are susceptible to infection during a limited period of their ontogeny. As infected prMCs mature in culture, they lose expression of viral chemokine coreceptors necessary for viral entry and develop into long-lived, latently infected mature tissue mast cells (MCs), resistant to new infection. In vivo recruitment of prMCs to different tissue compartments occurs in response to tissue injury, growth, and remodeling or allergic inflammation, allowing populations of circulating and potentially HIV-susceptible prMCs to spread persistent infection to diverse tissue compartments. In this report, we provide in vivo evidence to confirm this model by demonstrating that HIV-infected women have both circulating prMCs and placental tissue MCs (PLMCs) that harbor inducible infectious HIV even after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Furthermore, infectious virus, capable of infecting alloactivated fetal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs), could be induced in isolated latently infected PLMCs after weeks in culture in vitro. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that tissue MCs, developed from infected circulating prMCs, comprise a long-lived inducible reservoir of persistent HIV in infected persons during HAART. PMID:17351109

  12. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  13. Human T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression reflect ERα/ERβ ratios in rat and human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Evers, N M; van de Klundert, T M C; van Aesch, Y M; Wang, S; de Roos, W K; Romano, A; de Haan, L H J; Murk, A J; Ederveen, A G H; Rietjens, I M C M; Groten, J P

    2013-09-01

    T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression and constant ERα expression can be used to investigate effects of varying ERα/ERβ ratios on estrogen-induced cellular responses. This study defines conditions at which ERα/ERβ ratios in T47D-ERβ cells best mimic ERα/ERβ ratios in breast and other estrogen-sensitive tissues in vivo in rat as well as in human. Protein and mRNA levels of ERα and ERβ were analyzed in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to a range of tetracycline concentrations and compared to ERα and ERβ levels found in breast, prostate, and uterus from rat and human origin. The ERα/ERβ ratio in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to >150ng/ml tetracycline is comparable to the ratio found in rat mammary gland and in human breast tissue. The ERα/ERβ ratio of other estrogen-sensitive rat and human tissues can also be mimicked in T47D-ERβ cells. The ERα/ERβ ratio found in MCF-7 and native T47D breast cancer cell lines did not reflect ratios in analyzed rat and human tissues, which further supports the use of T47D-ERβ cells as model for estrogen-responsive tissues. Using 17β-estradiol and the T47D-ERβ cells under the conditions defined to mimic various tissues it could be demonstrated how these different tissues vary in their proliferative response. PMID:23680332

  14. Behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells on chemically synthesized HA-PCL scaffolds for hard tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Guarino, Vincenzo; Martina, Stefano; Valletta, Rosa; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Our goal was to characterize the response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a novel composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone (HA-PCL) composite scaffolds were prepared by a sol-gel method at room temperature and the scaffold morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to validate the synthesis process. The response of two different lines of hMSCs, bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in terms of cell proliferation and differentiation into the osteoblastic phenotype, was evaluated using Alamar blue assay, SEM, histology and alkaline phosphatase activity. Our results indicate that tissue engineering by means of composite HA-PCL scaffolds may represent a new therapeutic strategy to repair craniofacial bone defects. PMID:23723157

  15. Visualisation of doxorubicin in human and animal tissues and in cell cultures by immunogold-silver staining.

    PubMed Central

    Henneberry, H. P.; Aherne, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    In previous pharmacologic studies, the native fluorescent properties of doxorubicin (DOX) have been utilised to visualise tissue and cellular drug distribution. Such distribution studies provide valuable additional information to that obtained by measuring tissue drug concentration alone. An alternative immunocytochemical method of drug localisation using a rabbit immunoadsorbed antiserum to DOX and silver-enhanced gold-labelled second antibodies has been used to achieve visualisation of DOX in normal and malignant tissues from drug-treated animals and patients, and in human tumour cell lines treated in vitro. Non-specific staining in untreated tissues or in controls stained without primary antibody was minimal. Widespread dark brown to black specific immunostaining was observed in the normal tissues of drug-treated animals and in rat sarcoma and in the mouse EMT6 mammary tumour. In human breast tumour biopsy samples obtained at surgery 1 h following a 25 mg intravenous dose of DOX, considerable variation in drug distribution was observed which appeared to be related to drug concentration. Both nuclear and membrane staining was apparent; the latter was especially noticeable in human tumour cells grown in the presence of DOX at concentrations greater than 0.92 microM. Immunolocalisation using silver enhanced gold-labelled reagents provides an additional technique to study cell and organ specific differences in drug uptake and distribution. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1733446

  16. The in vivo assessment of a novel scaffold containing heparan sulfate for tissue engineering with human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luong-Van, Emma; Grøndahl, Lisbeth; Song, Shujun; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon

    2007-10-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are an attractive tissue engineering avenue for the repair and regeneration of bone. In this study we detail the in vivo performance of a novel electrospun polycaprolactone scaffold incorporating the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS) as a carrier for hMSC. HS is a multifunctional regulator of many key growth factors expressed endogenously during bone wound repair, and we have found it to be a potent stimulator of proliferation in hMSCs. To assess the potential of the scaffolds to support hMSC function in vivo, hMSCs pre-committed to the osteogenic lineage (human osteoprogenitor cells) were seeded onto the scaffolds and implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of nude rats. After 6 weeks the scaffolds were retrieved and examined by histological methods. Implanted human cells were identified using a human nuclei-specific antibody. The host response to the implants was characterized by ED1 and ED2 antibody staining for monocytes/macrophages and mature tissue macrophages, respectively. It was found that the survival of the implanted human cells was affected by the host response to the implant regardless of the presence of HS, highlighting the importance of controlling the host response to tissue engineering devices. PMID:17694276

  17. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs

    PubMed Central

    Dikina, Anna D.; Strobel, Hannah A.; Lai, Bradley P.; Rolle, Marsha W.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted in a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. PMID:25818451

  18. Regulation of LPS-induced tissue factor expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells by curcumin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane receptor, which initiates thrombotic episodes associated with various diseases. In addition to membrane-bound TF, we have discovered an alternatively spliced form of human TF mRNA. It was later confirmed that this form of TF mRNA expresses a soluble protein circ...

  19. Polarimetry based partial least square classification of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma human skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Manzoor; Khan, Karim; Ikram, Masroor

    2016-06-01

    Optical polarimetry was employed for assessment of ex vivo healthy and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissue samples from human skin. Polarimetric analyses revealed that depolarization and retardance for healthy tissue group were significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to BCC tissue group. Histopathology indicated that these differences partially arise from BCC-related characteristic changes in tissue morphology. Wilks lambda statistics demonstrated the potential of all investigated polarimetric properties for computer assisted classification of the two tissue groups. Based on differences in polarimetric properties, partial least square (PLS) regression classified the samples with 100% accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. These findings indicate that optical polarimetry together with PLS statistics hold promise for automated pathology classification. PMID:27083851

  20. Genetically engineering self-organization of human pluripotent stem cells into a liver bud-like tissue using Gata6

    PubMed Central

    Guye, Patrick; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Kipniss, Nathan; Velazquez, Jeremy J.; Schoenfeld, Eldi; Kiani, Samira; Griffith, Linda G.; Weiss, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have potential for personalized and regenerative medicine. While most of the methods using these cells have focused on deriving homogenous populations of specialized cells, there has been modest success in producing hiPSC-derived organotypic tissues or organoids. Here we present a novel approach for generating and then co-differentiating hiPSC-derived progenitors. With a genetically engineered pulse of GATA-binding protein 6 (GATA6) expression, we initiate rapid emergence of all three germ layers as a complex function of GATA6 expression levels and tissue context. Within 2 weeks we obtain a complex tissue that recapitulates early developmental processes and exhibits a liver bud-like phenotype, including haematopoietic and stromal cells as well as a neuronal niche. Collectively, our approach demonstrates derivation of complex tissues from hiPSCs using a single autologous hiPSCs as source and generates a range of stromal cells that co-develop with parenchymal cells to form tissues. PMID:26732624

  1. Genetically engineering self-organization of human pluripotent stem cells into a liver bud-like tissue using Gata6.

    PubMed

    Guye, Patrick; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Kipniss, Nathan; Velazquez, Jeremy J; Schoenfeld, Eldi; Kiani, Samira; Griffith, Linda G; Weiss, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have potential for personalized and regenerative medicine. While most of the methods using these cells have focused on deriving homogenous populations of specialized cells, there has been modest success in producing hiPSC-derived organotypic tissues or organoids. Here we present a novel approach for generating and then co-differentiating hiPSC-derived progenitors. With a genetically engineered pulse of GATA-binding protein 6 (GATA6) expression, we initiate rapid emergence of all three germ layers as a complex function of GATA6 expression levels and tissue context. Within 2 weeks we obtain a complex tissue that recapitulates early developmental processes and exhibits a liver bud-like phenotype, including haematopoietic and stromal cells as well as a neuronal niche. Collectively, our approach demonstrates derivation of complex tissues from hiPSCs using a single autologous hiPSCs as source and generates a range of stromal cells that co-develop with parenchymal cells to form tissues. PMID:26732624

  2. Acellular human glans extracellular matrix as a scaffold for tissue engineering: in vitro cell support and biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Egydio, Fernanda M.; Freitas, Luiz G.; Sayeg, Kleber; Laks, Marcus; Oliveira, Andréia S.; Almeida, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Diseases of the genitourinary tract can lead to significant damage. Current reconstructive techniques are limited by tissue availability and compatibility. This study aims to assess if the decellularized human glans can be used as a biomaterial for penile reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Samples of the glans matrices were descellularized. We evaluate the presence of collagen type I and III, and elastic fibers. Biocompatibility assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic interactions between the acellular matrix and 3T3 cells. The matrices were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells and were assessed for viability and integration of these cells. Biomechanical tests in native tissue, descellularized matrix and seeded matrix were performed to characterize their biomechanical properties. Results: The tissue architecture of the decellularized matrix of human glans was preserved as well as the maintenance of the biomechanical and biological properties. The analyzes of glans seeded with mesenchymal stem cells revealed the integration of these cells to the matrices, and its viability during two weeks “in vitro”. Conclusion: The decellularization process did not alter the biological and biomechanical characteristics of the human glans. When these matrices were seeded they were able to maintain the cells integrity and vitality. PMID:26689526

  3. Human Mesenchymal Cells from Adipose Tissue Deposit Laminin and Promote Regeneration of Injured Spinal Cord in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Karla; Nascimento, Marcos Assis; Gonçalves, Juliana Pena; Cruz, Aline Silva; Lopes, Daiana Vieira; Curzio, Bianca; Bonamino, Martin; de Menezes, João Ricardo Lacerda; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel Doria; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising strategy to pursue the unmet need for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although several studies have shown that adult mesenchymal cells contribute to improve the outcomes of SCI, a descripton of the pro-regenerative events triggered by these cells is still lacking. Here we investigated the regenerative properties of human adipose tissue derived stromal cells (hADSCs) in a rat model of spinal cord compression. Cells were delivered directly into the spinal parenchyma immediately after injury. Human ADSCs promoted functional recovery, tissue preservation, and axonal regeneration. Analysis of the cord tissue showed an abundant deposition of laminin of human origin at the lesion site and spinal midline; the appearance of cell clusters composed of neural precursors in the areas of laminin deposition, and the appearance of blood vessels with separated basement membranes along the spinal axis. These effects were also observed after injection of hADSCs into non-injured spinal cord. Considering that laminin is a well-known inducer of axonal growth, as well a component of the extracellular matrix associated to neural progenitors, we propose that it can be the paracrine factor mediating the pro-regenerative effects of hADSCs in spinal cord injury. PMID:24830794

  4. Expression of the Peptide Antibiotic Human β-Defensin 1 in Cultured Gingival Epithelial Cells and Gingival Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krisanaprakornkit, Suttichai; Weinberg, Aaron; Perez, Christopher N.; Dale, Beverly A.

    1998-01-01

    Human β-defensin-1 (hBD-1) is a member of the family of small cationic antimicrobial peptides that have been identified in several mucosal epithelia. Because human gingival epithelium is a site that is constantly challenged by oral microorganisms, we examined the expression of hBD-1 in human gingival epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures and tissue samples. Cell cultures were challenged with cell wall extracts of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum, Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or phorbol myristate acetate. hBD-1 mRNA was detected in unstimulated and stimulated cultures by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR using several primer sets specific for hBD-1. Gingival epithelial cells, but not gingival fibroblasts, expressed a product of the predicted size for hBD-1 mRNA. The sequence of the PCR product was identical to that of hBD-1. hBD-1 mRNA expression was not significantly modulated by any of the stimulants tested. Human gingival tissues from noninflamed and inflamed sites were also analyzed by RT-PCR. hBD-1 mRNA was expressed in all tissue samples. The relative expression of hBD-1 mRNA was similar in noninflamed and inflamed tissues obtained from each of four patients undergoing treatment for periodontitis. However, the relative expression of hBD-1 mRNA varied in gingival biopsies obtained from 15 different normal individuals, and the relative hBD-1 expression was unrelated to interleukin-8 expression. Our findings show the constitutive expression of hBD-1 mRNA in cultured epithelial cells and gingival tissues but not gingival fibroblasts. These findings suggest that expression of hBD-1 may play a role as part of the innate host defenses in maintaining normal gingival health. PMID:9712771

  5. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in normal and neoplastic human neuroendocrine tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Hemperly, J. J.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) is a group of cell surface glycoproteins involved in direct cell--cell adhesion. N-CAM expression in normal and neoplastic tissues was examined with specific antibodies and oligonucleotide probes by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Most neuroendocrine cells and tumors with secretory granules expressed N-CAM protein and mRNA. Parathyroid adenomas (4) were somewhat unusual, because N-CAM mRNA, but not protein, was detected in some of these benign neoplasms. Most non-neuroendocrine cells and tumors did not express N-CAM, although uterine smooth muscle and an adrenal cortical carcinoma were both positive. Western blots disclosed proteins of 180, 140, and 120 kd in normal adult brain, whereas two pheochromocytomas, a null cell adenoma, and a gastrinoma had proteins of approximately 180 and 140 kd. These results indicate that N-CAM protein and mRNA are widely expressed in neuroendocrine cells and neoplasms. N-CAM oligonucleotide probes as well as antibodies against N-CAM can be used as broad-spectrum neuroendocrine markers. In addition, these molecular probes can be used to examine the role of N-CAM in the development and regulation of neuroendocrine tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2012179

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Subpopulations: Comparison of Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Busser, Hélène; Najar, Mehdi; Raicevic, Gordana; Pieters, Karlien; Velez Pombo, Rafael; Philippart, Pierre; Meuleman, Nathalie; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2015-09-15

    Preparations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are generally obtained from unfractionated tissue cells, resulting in heterogeneous cell mixtures. Several markers were proposed to enrich these cells, but the majority of these markers are defined for bone marrow (BM). Moreover, the surface markers of freshly isolated MSCs also differ from those of cultured MSCs in addition to a phenotypic variation depending on the MSC source. For tissue engineering applications, it is crucial to start with a well-defined cell population. In this study, we performed immunomagnetic selections with five single surface markers to isolate MSC subpopulations from BM and adipose tissue (AT): CD271, SUSD2, MSCA-1, CD44, and CD34. We determined the phenotype, the clonogenicity, the proliferation, the differentiation capacity, and the immunoregulatory profile of the subpopulations obtained in comparison with unselected cells. We showed that native BM-MSCs can be enriched from the positive fractions of MSCA-1, SUSD2, and CD271 selections. In contrast, we observed that SUSD2 and MSCA-1 were unable to identify MSCs from AT, meaning they are not expressed in situ. Only the CD34(+) selection successfully isolated MSCs from AT. Interestingly, we observed that CD271 selection can define AT cell subsets with particular abilities, but only in lipoaspiration samples and not in abdominoplasty samples. Importantly, we found a population of clear CD34(+) fresh BM-MSCs displaying different properties. A single marker-based selection for MSC enrichment should be more advantageous for cell therapy and would enable the standardization of efficient and safe therapeutic intervention through the use of a well-identified and homogeneous cell population. PMID:26086188

  7. Transcriptomic variation of pharmacogenes in multiple human tissues and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Aparna; French, Courtney E.; Yee, Sook Wah; Gamazon, Eric R.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Qin, Xiang; Webb, Amy; Papp, Audrey C.; Wang, Ann; Simmons, Christine Q.; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Chaudhry, Amarjit S.; Mitchel, Katrina; Stryke, Doug; Ferrin, Thomas E.; Weiss, Scott T.; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; George, Alfred L.; Schuetz, Erin G.; Medina, Marisa W.; Cox, Nancy J.; Scherer, Steven E.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Brenner, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the expression level and activity of genes involved in drug disposition and action (“pharmacogenes”) can affect drug response and toxicity, especially when in tissues of pharmacological importance. Previous studies have relied primarily on microarrays to understand gene expression differences, or have focused on a single tissue or small number of samples. The goal of this study was to use RNA-seq to determine the expression levels and alternative splicing of 389 PGRN pharmacogenes across four tissues (liver, kidney, heart and adipose) and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), which are used widely in pharmacogenomics studies. Analysis of RNA-seq data from 139 different individuals across the 5 tissues (20–45 individuals per tissue type) revealed substantial variation in both expression levels and splicing across samples and tissue types. This in-depth exploration also revealed 183 splicing events in pharmacogenes that were previously not annotated. Overall, this study serves as a rich resource for the research community to inform biomarker and drug discovery and use. PMID:26856248

  8. Human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based products; establishment registration and listing. Interim final rule; opportunity for public comment.

    PubMed

    2004-01-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an interim final rule to except human dura mater and human heart valve allografts, currently subject to application or notification requirements under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), from the scope of the definition of "human cells, tissues, or cellular or tissue-based products (HCT/P's)" subject to the registration and listing requirements contained in 21 CFR part 1271. That definition became effective on January 21, 2004. FDA is taking this action to assure that these products, which are currently subject to the act and therefore regulated under the current good manufacturing practice regulations set out in the quality system regulations in 21 CFR part 820 are not released from the scope of those regulations before a more comprehensive regulatory framework applicable to HCT/P's, including donor suitability requirements, good tissue practice regulations, and appropriate enforcement provisions, is fully in place. When that comprehensive framework is in place, FDA intends that human dura mater and human heart valves will be subject to it. FDA intends to revoke this interim final rule at that time. PMID:14968801

  9. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells isolated from subcutaneous, omental, and intrathoracic adipose tissue depots for regenerative applications.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valerio; Yu, Claire; Belliveau, Paul; Hamilton, Andrew; Flynn, Lauren E

    2014-02-01

    Adipose tissue is an abundant source of multipotent progenitor cells that have shown promise in regenerative medicine. In humans, fat is primarily distributed in the subcutaneous and visceral depots, which have varying biochemical and functional properties. In most studies to date, subcutaneous adipose tissue has been investigated as the adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) source. In this study, we sought to develop a broader understanding of the influence of specific adipose tissue depots on the isolated ASC populations through a systematic comparison of donor-matched abdominal subcutaneous fat and omentum, and donor-matched pericardial adipose tissue and thymic remnant samples. We found depot-dependent and donor-dependent variability in the yield, viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic potential, doubling time, and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacities of the ASC populations. More specifically, ASCs isolated from both intrathoracic depots had a longer average doubling time and a significantly higher proportion of CD34(+) cells at passage 2, as compared with cells isolated from subcutaneous fat or the omentum. Furthermore, ASCs from subcutaneous and pericardial adipose tissue demonstrated enhanced adipogenic differentiation capacity, whereas ASCs isolated from the omentum displayed the highest levels of osteogenic markers in culture. Through cell culture analysis under hypoxic (5% O(2)) conditions, oxygen tension was shown to be a key mediator of colony-forming unit-fibroblast number and osteogenesis for all depots. Overall, our results suggest that depot selection is an important factor to consider when applying ASCs in tissue-specific cell-based regenerative therapies, and also highlight pericardial adipose tissue as a potential new ASC source. PMID:24361924

  10. Comparisons of Differentiation Potential in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton's Jelly, Bone Marrow, and Pancreatic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Shih-Yi; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Lin, Chi-Hung; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chen, Tien-Hua; Weng, Zen-Chung; Tsai, Pei-Jiun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Insulin-producing cells (IPCs) differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in human tissues decrease blood glucose levels and improve survival in diabetic rats. We compared the differential ability and the curative effect of IPCs from three types of human tissue to determine the ideal source of cell therapy for diabetes. Methods. We induced MSCs from Wharton's jelly (WJ), bone marrow (BM), and surgically resected pancreatic tissue to differentiate into IPCs. The in vitro differential function of these IPCs was compared by insulin-to-DNA ratios and C-peptide levels after glucose challenge. In vivo curative effects of IPCs transplanted into diabetic rats were monitored by weekly blood glucose measurement. Results. WJ-MSCs showed better proliferation and differentiation potential than pancreatic MSCs and BM-MSCs. In vivo, WJ-IPCs significantly reduced blood glucose levels at first week after transplantation and maintained significant decrease till week 8. BM-IPCs reduced blood glucose levels at first week but gradually increased since week 3. In resected pancreas-IPCs group, blood glucose levels were significantly reduced till two weeks after transplantation and gradually increased since week 4. Conclusion. WJ-MSCs are the most promising stem cell source for β-cell regeneration in diabetes treatment. PMID:26294917

  11. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  12. Influence of Culture Conditions and Extracellular Matrix Alignment on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Invasion into Decellularized Engineered Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Weidenhamer, Nathan K.; Moore, Dusty L.; Lobo, Fluvio L.; Klair, Nathaniel T.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    The variables that influence the in vitro recellularization potential of decellularized engineered tissues, such as cell culture conditions and scaffold alignment, have yet to be explored. The goal of this work was to explore the influence of insulin and ascorbic acid and extracellular matrix alignment on the recellularization of decellularized engineered tissue by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Aligned and non-aligned tissues were created by specifying the geometry and associated mechanical constraints to fibroblast-mediated fibrin gel contraction and remodeling using circular and C-shaped molds. Decellularized tissues (matrices) of the same alignment were created by decellularization with detergents. Ascorbic acid promoted the invasion of hMSCs into the matrices due to a stimulated increase in motility and proliferation. Invasion correlated with hyaluronic acid secretion, α-smooth muscle actin expression, and decreased matrix thickness. Furthermore, hMSC invasion into aligned and non-aligned matrices was not different, although there was a difference in cell orientation. Finally, we show that hMSCs on the matrix surface appear to be differentiating toward a smooth muscle cell or myofibroblast phenotype with ascorbic acid treatment. These results inform the strategy of recellularizing decellularized engineered tissue with hMSCs. PMID:25556358

  13. Bio-electrospraying of human mesenchymal stem cells: An alternative for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Braghirolli, D I; Zamboni, F; Chagastelles, P C; Moura, D J; Saffi, J; Henriques, J A P; Pilger, D A; Pranke, P

    2013-01-01

    Bio-electrospraying (BES) is a technique used for the processing of cells and can be applied to tissue engineering. The association of BES with scaffold production techniques has been shown to be an interesting strategy for the production of biomaterials with cells homogeneously distributed in the entire structure. Various studies have evaluated the effects of BES on different cell types. However, until the present moment, no studies have evaluated the impact of BES time on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to standardise the different parameters of BES (voltage, flow rate, and distance of the needle from the collecting plate) in relation to cell viability and then to evaluate the impact of BES time in relation to viability, proliferation, DNA damage, maintenance of plasticity and the immunophenotypic profile of MSC. Using 15 kV voltage, 0.46 ml/h flow rate and 4 cm distance, it was possible to form a stable and continuous jet of BES without causing a significant reduction in cell viability. Time periods between 15 and 60 min of BES did not cause alterations of viability, proliferation, plasticity, and immunophenotypic profile of the MSC. Time periods above 30 min of BES resulted in DNA damage; however, the DNA was able to repair itself within five hours. These results indicate that bio-electrospraying is an adequate technique for processing MSC which can be safely applied to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24404063

  14. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Timothy J; Josowitz, Rebecca; Johnson, Bryce V; Gelb, Bruce D; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  15. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bryce V.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  16. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  17. Generation of functional hippocampal neurons from self-organizing human embryonic stem cell-derived dorsomedial telencephalic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Hideya; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Soen, Mika; Narii, Nobuhiro; Ishida, Yoshihito; Ohgushi, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Jun; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    The developing dorsomedial telencephalon includes the medial pallium, which goes on to form the hippocampus. Generating a reliable source of human hippocampal tissue is an important step for cell-based research into hippocampus-related diseases. Here we show the generation of functional hippocampal granule- and pyramidal-like neurons from self-organizing dorsomedial telencephalic tissue using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). First, we develop a hESC culture method that utilizes bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signalling to induce choroid plexus, the most dorsomedial portion of the telencephalon. Then, we find that titrating BMP and Wnt exposure allowed the self-organization of medial pallium tissues. Following long-term dissociation culture, these dorsomedial telencephalic tissues give rise to Zbtb20+/Prox1+ granule neurons and Zbtb20+/KA1+ pyramidal neurons, both of which were electrically functional with network formation. Thus, we have developed an in vitro model that recapitulates human hippocampus development, allowing the generation of functional hippocampal granule- and pyramidal-like neurons. PMID:26573335

  18. Influence of scaffold morphology on co-cultures of human endothelial and adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Arnal-Pastor, M; Martínez-Ramos, C; Vallés-Lluch, A; Pradas, M Monleón

    2016-06-01

    The interior of tissue engineering scaffolds must be vascularizable and allow adequate nutrients perfusion in order to ensure the viability of the cells colonizing them. The promotion of rapid vascularization of scaffolds is critical for thick artificial constructs. In the present study co-cultures of human endothelial and adipose tissue-derived stem cells have been performed in poly(ethyl acrylate) scaffolds with two different pore structures: grid-like (PEA-o) or sponge-like (PEA-s), in combination with a self-assembling peptide gel filling the pores, which aims to mimic the physiological niche. After 2 and 7 culture days, cell adhesion, proliferation and migration, the expression of cell surface markers like CD31 and CD90 and the release of VEGF were assessed by means of immunocytochemistry, scanning electronic microscopy, flow cytometry and ELISA analyses. The study demonstrated that PEA-s scaffolds promoted greater cell organization into tubular-like structures than PEA-o scaffolds, and this was enhanced by the presence of the peptide gel. Paracrine signaling from adipose cells significantly improved endothelial cell viability, proving the advantageous combination of this system for obtaining easily vascularizable tissue engineered grafts. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1523-1533, 2016. PMID:26860551

  19. Immunochemistry of the Streptococcus mutans BHT cell membrane: detection of determinants cross-reactive with human heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Ayakawa, G Y; Siegel, J L; Crowley, P J; Bleiweis, A S

    1985-01-01

    Cell membranes of Streptococcus mutans BHT serotype b were prepared after glass bead disruption or mutanolysin digestion of whole cells. Immunoblot analyses of BHT membrane extracts revealed major polypeptides of 42,000, 46,000, 62,000, and 82,000 daltons, as well as several minor bands, to be reactive with rabbit anti-human heart immunoglobulins. Heart cross-reactive antigens have been reported in the cell walls and culture fluids of several S. mutans serotypes. This represents the first report of cell membrane-localized heart cross-reactive antigens in this oral pathogen. Positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot reactions were also obtained with heart tissue antigen and anti-BHT sera, indicating mutual cross-reactivity. The major cross-reactive component detected by immunoblotting of human heart extracts was a 69,000-dalton polypeptide. Images PMID:3886543

  20. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  1. Partitioning and levels of neutral organochlorine compounds in human serum, blood cells, and adipose and liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H

    1991-04-15

    Concentrations of neutral organochlorine compounds (OCs) in blood compartments and adipose tissue were determined in three groups of subjects. In 12 healthy volunteers a positive correlation was found between DDT residue levels in paired serum/adipose tissue samples when the concentrations were calculated on a fat-weight basis (r = 0.74, p less than 0.05); positive correlations were also found for PCB and HCB when the calculations were based on a wet-weight basis (r = 0.68, p less than 0.01; r = 0.69, p less than 0.01). For lindane the correlation coefficient for paired serum/adipose tissue samples was -0.94 (p less than 0.01). The association between adipose tissue and blood cells was weaker than that obtained for serum. These readily obtainable samples are adequate for estimating, or monitoring, the total burden of neutral organochlorines in adipose tissue, especially in cases of low chronic exposure, such as those found in epidemiological studies. In paired liver-adipose tissue samples from 23 autopsy cases, no correlation was found either on a wet- or fat-weight basis. In 131 adults resident in southern and eastern Finland the concentration medians for serum were 1.8, 2.0 and 0.3 ng g-1 wet wt for DDT compounds. PCB and HCB, respectively. This study indicates that monitoring of fat/serum ratios may provide, with tissue concentrations, more information about human exposure to OCs. PMID:1909054

  2. Role of cyclic AMP in promoting the thromboresistance of human endothelial cells by enhancing thrombomodulin and decreasing tissue factor activities.

    PubMed Central

    Archipoff, G.; Beretz, A.; Bartha, K.; Brisson, C.; de la Salle, C.; Froget-Léon, C.; Klein-Soyer, C.; Cazenave, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of forskolin, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP), dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db cyclic GMP) and 3-isobutyl-l-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were investigated on the expression of tissue factor and thrombomodulin activities on the surface of human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) in culture. 2. Forskolin (10(-6) to 10(-4) M), PGE1 (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and db cyclic AMP (10(-4) to 10(-3) M) caused a concentration-dependent decrease of cytokine-induced tissue factor activity. 3. Similar concentrations of forskolin, PGE1 and db cyclic AMP enhanced significantly constitutive thrombomodulin activity and reversed the decrease of this activity caused by interleukin-1 (IL-1). 4. IBMX (10(-4) M) decreased tissue factor activity and enhanced the effect of forskolin on tissue factor and thrombomodulin activities. 5. Forskolin (10(-4) M) decreased the IL-1-induced tissue factor mRNA and increased the thrombomodulin mRNA level. IL-1 did not change the thrombomodulin mRNA level after 2 h of incubation with HSVEC in culture. 6. Dibutyryl cyclic GMP (10(-4) M to 10(-3) M) did not influence tissue factor or thrombomodulin activity. 7. Our data suggest that elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP levels may participate in the regulation of tissue factor and thrombomodulin expression, thus contributing to promote or restore antithrombotic properties of the endothelium. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7684300

  3. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  4. Mammosphere formation assay from human breast cancer tissues and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Ylenia; de Giorgio, Alexander; Coombes, Charles R; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Similar to healthy tissues, many blood and solid malignancies are now thought to be organised hierarchically, with a subset of stem-like cancer cells that self-renew while giving rise to more differentiated progeny. Understanding and targeting these cancer stem cells in breast cancer, which may possess enhanced chemo- and radio-resistance compared to the non-stem tumor bulk, has become an important research area. Markers including CD44, CD24, and ALDH activity can be assessed using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to prospectively isolate cells that display enhanced tumorigenicity when implanted into immunocompromised mice: the mammosphere assay has also become widely used for its ability to retrospectively identify sphere-forming cells that develop from single stem cell-like clones. Here we outline approaches for the appropriate culturing of mammospheres from cell lines or primary patient samples, their passaging, and calculations to estimate sphere forming efficiency (SFE). First we discuss key considerations and pitfalls in the appropriate planning and interpretation of mammosphere experiments. PMID:25867607

  5. T cell engraftment in lymphoid tissues of human peripheral blood lymphocyte reconstituted SCID mice with or without prior activation of cells.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Falk, M C

    1998-12-01

    The reconstitution of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with human PBL (Hu-PBL-SCID) was assessed using fresh unstimulated PBL and anti-CD3-stimulated PBL. Mice were reconstituted with PBL by intraperitoneal injection of 1-2.5 x 107 PBL in PBS; controls received PBS. Successful engraftment of human PBL in SCID mice was determined by measurement of human IgG in mouse sera, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of human-specific HLA-DRbeta DNA in SCID periphery, and immunohistochemical staining of mouse tissues (spleen, lymph nodes, thymus, liver and lung) with antibodies specific for human CD45 and CD3. Human IgG was detected 1 week after reconstitution in sera of all animals that received at least 1 x 107 PBL and continued to increase for 8 weeks. Human-specific HLA-DRbeta DNA was detected in the majority of mice 3 weeks after reconstitution but not in controls. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of Hu-PBL-SCID mouse tissues revealed the presence of human CD45+ cells in all tissues examined. CD3+ T cell engraftment was observed in lymphoid tissues irrespective of whether PBL had been activated prior to transfer or not. PMID:9893029

  6. TFH cells accumulate in mucosal tissues of humanized-DRAG mice and are highly permissive to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Allam, Atef; Majji, Sai; Peachman, Kristina; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jiae; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Merbah, Melanie; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Casares, Sofia; Rao, Mangala

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+) T follicular helper cells (TFH) in germinal centers are required for maturation of B-cells. While the role of TFH-cells has been studied in blood and lymph nodes of HIV-1 infected individuals, its role in the mucosal tissues has not been investigated. We show that the gut and female reproductive tract (FRT) of humanized DRAG mice have a high level of human lymphocytes and a high frequency of TFH (CXCR5(+)PD-1(++)) and precursor-TFH (CXCR5(+)PD-1(+)) cells. The majority of TFH-cells expressed CCR5 and CXCR3 and are the most permissive to HIV-1 infection. A single low-dose intravaginal HIV-1 challenge of humanized DRAG mice results in 100% infectivity with accumulation of TFH-cells mainly in the Peyer's patches and FRT. The novel finding of TFH-cells in the FRT may contribute to the high susceptibility of DRAG mice to HIV-1 infection. This mouse model thus provides new opportunities to study TFH-cells and to evaluate HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:26034905

  7. TFH cells accumulate in mucosal tissues of humanized-DRAG mice and are highly permissive to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Atef; Majji, Sai; Peachman, Kristina; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jiae; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Merbah, Melanie; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Alving, Carl R.; Casares, Sofia; Rao, Mangala

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH) in germinal centers are required for maturation of B-cells. While the role of TFH-cells has been studied in blood and lymph nodes of HIV-1 infected individuals, its role in the mucosal tissues has not been investigated. We show that the gut and female reproductive tract (FRT) of humanized DRAG mice have a high level of human lymphocytes and a high frequency of TFH (CXCR5+PD-1++) and precursor-TFH (CXCR5+PD-1+) cells. The majority of TFH-cells expressed CCR5 and CXCR3 and are the most permissive to HIV-1 infection. A single low-dose intravaginal HIV-1 challenge of humanized DRAG mice results in 100% infectivity with accumulation of TFH-cells mainly in the Peyer’s patches and FRT. The novel finding of TFH-cells in the FRT may contribute to the high susceptibility of DRAG mice to HIV-1 infection. This mouse model thus provides new opportunities to study TFH-cells and to evaluate HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:26034905

  8. Induction of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in human endothelial cells by lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and platelets.

    PubMed

    Muehlich, Susanne; Schneider, Nadine; Hinkmann, Fabian; Garlichs, Christoph D; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2004-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by multiple interactions between endothelial cells and components of the blood. This study focussed on the induction of the pro-atherogenic connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in endothelial cells by bioactive lipids and platelets. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) led to a time- and concentration-dependent increase in CTGF mRNA and protein expression in the human endothelial cell line EAHY 926 and in primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). As both cell types expressed various receptors for LPA and S1P, signaling pathways were further characterized by pharmacological means: induction of CTGF was pertussis toxin-insensitive and inhibition of activation of p42/44 MAP kinases only partially reduced CTGF expression. On the contrary, interference with the RhoA signaling pathway by simvastatin, an inhibitor of geranylgeranyltransferases, or the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 prevented induction of CTGF. Co-incubation of endothelial cells with freshly isolated human platelets significantly increased the expression of CTGF mRNA in endothelial cells, which was also sensitive to simvastatin. Up-regulation of CTGF in endothelial cells, induced by LPA, S1P, or platelets, may contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Interference of simvastatin with the synthesis of this pro-atherogenic factor further supports the anti-atherogenic role of statins. PMID:15262182

  9. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  10. Meniscus Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Combination of Electrospun Scaffolds and Human Meniscus Cells Embedded within an Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jihye; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2015-01-01

    Meniscus injury and degeneration have been linked to the development of secondary osteoarthritis (OA). Therapies that successfully repair or replace the meniscus are therefore likely to prevent or delay OA progression. We investigated the novel approach of building layers of aligned polylactic acid (PLA) electrospun (ES) scaffolds with human meniscus cells embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel to lead to formation of neotissues that resemble meniscus-like tissue. PLA ES scaffolds with randomly oriented or aligned fibers were seeded with human meniscus cells derived from vascular or avascular regions. Cell viability, cell morphology, and gene expression profiles were monitored via confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and real-time PCR, respectively. Seeded scaffolds were used to produce multilayered constructs and were examined via histology and immunohistochemistry. Morphology and mechanical properties of PLA scaffolds (with and without cells) were influenced by fiber direction of the scaffolds. Both PLA scaffolds supported meniscus tissue formation with increased COL1A1, SOX9, COMP, yet no difference in gene expression was found between random and aligned PLA scaffolds. Overall, ES materials, which possess mechanical strength of meniscus and can support neotissue formation, show potential for use in cell-based meniscus regeneration strategies. PMID:25640671

  11. In vivo gene expression profiling of human intestinal epithelial cells: analysis by laser microdissection of formalin fixed tissues

    PubMed Central

    George, Michael D; Wehkamp, Jan; Kays, Robert J; Leutenegger, Christian M; Sabir, Sadiah; Grishina, Irina; Dandekar, Satya; Bevins, Charles L

    2008-01-01

    Background The small intestinal epithelium mediates vital functions of nutrient absorption and host defense. The spatial organization of the epithelial cells along the crypt-villus axis segregates them into regions of specialized function. However, the differences in transcriptional programming and the molecular machinery that governs the migration, adhesion, and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cell lineages in humans remain under-explored. To increase our understanding of these mechanisms, we have evaluated gene expression patterns of ileal epithelial cells isolated by laser capture microdissection from either the villus epithelial or crypt cell regions of healthy human small intestinal mucosa. Expression profiles in villus and crypt epithelium were determined by DNA microarray, quantitative real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry based methods. The expression levels of selected epithelial biomarkers were also compared between gastrointestinal tissues. Results Previously established biomarkers as well as a novel and distinct set of genes believed to be linked to epithelial cell motility, adhesion, and differentiation were found to be enriched in each of the two corresponding cell populations (GEO accession: GSE10629). Additionally, high baseline expression levels of innate antimicrobials, alpha defensin 5 (HD5) and regenerating islet-derived 3 alpha (Reg3A), were detected exclusively within the small bowel crypt, most notably in the ileum in comparison to other sites along the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion The elucidation of differential gene expression patterns between crypt and villus epithelial cell lineages in human ileal tissue provides novel insights into the molecular machinery that mediates their functions and spatial organization. Moreover, our findings establish an important framework of knowledge for future investigations of human gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:18457593

  12. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Extraembryonic Tissues of Fetuses Affected by Monogenic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa V; Botta, Annalisa; Murdocca, Michela; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Orlandi, Augusto; Giardina, Emiliano; Santoro, Massimo; Brancati, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from an autologous extraembryonic fetal source is an innovative personalized regenerative technology that can transform own-self cells into embryonic stem-like ones. These cells are regarded as a promising candidate for cell-based therapy, as well as an ideal target for disease modeling and drug discovery. Thus, hiPSCs enable researchers to undertake studies for treating diseases or for future applications of in utero therapy. We used a polycistronic lentiviral vector (hSTEMCCA-loxP) encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC genes and containing loxP sites, excisible by Cre recombinase, to reprogram patient-specific fetal cells derived from prenatal diagnosis for several genetic disorders, such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), β-thalassemia (β-Thal), lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as from wild-type (WT) fetal cells. Because cell types tested to create hiPSCs influence both the reprogramming process efficiency and the kinetics, we used chorionic villus (CV) and amniotic fluid (AF) cells, demonstrating how they represent an ideal cell resource for a more efficient generation of hiPSCs. The successful reprogramming of both CV and AF cells into hiPSCs was confirmed by specific morphological, molecular, and immunocytochemical markers and also by their teratogenic potential when inoculated in vivo. We further demonstrated the stability of reprogrammed cells over 10 and more passages and their capability to differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers, as well as into neural cells. These data suggest that hiPSCs-CV/AF can be considered a valid cellular model to accomplish pathogenesis studies and therapeutic applications. PMID:26474030

  13. Measuring cell-type specific differential methylation in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Montaño, Carolina M; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kaufmann, Walter E; Talbot, Konrad; Gur, Raquel E; Feinberg, Andrew P; Taub, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of epigenetic mechanisms in the brain is obscured by tissue heterogeneity and disease-related histological changes. Not accounting for these confounders leads to biased results. We develop a statistical methodology that estimates and adjusts for celltype composition by decomposing neuronal and non-neuronal differential signal. This method provides a conceptual framework for deconvolving heterogeneous epigenetic data from postmortem brain studies. We apply it to find cell-specific differentially methylated regions between prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. We demonstrate the utility of the method on both Infinium 450k and CHARM data. PMID:24000956

  14. Ectopic Osteogenesis of Macroscopic Tissue Constructs Assembled from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Microcarriers through In Vitro Perfusion Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Maiqin; Zhou, Min; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-01-01

    We had previously demonstrated the feasibility of preparing a centimeter-sized bone tissue construct by following a modular approach. In the present study, the objectives were to evaluate osteogenesis and tissue formation of human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-laden CultiSpher S microcarriers during in vitro perfusion culture and after subcutaneous implantation. Microtissues were prepared in dynamic culture using spinner flasks in 28 days. In comparison with 1-week perfusion culture, microtissues became more obviously fused, demonstrating significantly higher cellularity, metabolic activity, ALP activity and calcium content while maintaining cell viability after 2-week perfusion. After subcutaneous implantation in nude mice for 6 and 12 weeks, all explants showed tight contexture, suggesting profound tissue remodeling in vivo. In addition, 12-week implantation resulted in slightly better tissue properties. However, in vitro perfusion culture time exerted great influence on the properties of corresponding explants. Degradation of microcarriers was more pronounced in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues compared to those of 1-week perfusion and directly implanted microtissues. Moreover, more blood vessel infiltration and bone matrix deposition with homogeneous spatial distribution were found in the explants of 2-week perfused macrotissues. Taken together, in vitro perfusion culture time is critical in engineering bone tissue replacements using such a modular approach, which holds great promise for bone regeneration. PMID:25275528

  15. Nuclear localisation of endogenous SUMO-1-modified PDGF-C in human thyroid tissue and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Reigstad, Laila J.; Martinez, Aurora; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Lillehaug, Johan R. . E-mail: johan.lillehaug@mbi.uib.no

    2006-04-01

    We investigated post-translational modification and subcellular localisation of endogenous platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) in human thyroid papillary carcinomas (PTC), non-neoplastic thyroid tissues, and a selection of cultured cell lines. PDGF-C expressed nuclear localisation in 95% of all tested cell types in culture and in 10% of the thyrocytes from both PTC and non-neoplastic tissue. The cell lines expressed two forms of full-length PDGF-C, {approx}39 and {approx}55 kDa, in cell membrane and cytosol, while the {approx}55 kDa form dominated in the nucleus where it was partly chromatin-associated. The {approx}55 kDa form was post-translationally modified by SUMO-1. The putative PDGF-C SUMOylation site is the surface exposed {sup 314}lysine part of a positively charged loop ({sup 312}RPKTGVRGLHK{sup 322}) with characteristics of a nuclear localisation signal. The tissue thyrocytes expressed a non-SUMOylated {approx}43 kDa and the 55 kDa PDGF-C. The SUMO-1 modified {approx}55 kDa PDGF-C expression was low in PTC where the {approx}43 kDa PDGF-C dominated. This is in contrast to non-neoplastic tissue and cultured cells where the SUMOylated {approx}55 kDa PDGF-C was strongly expressed. Our data provide novel evidence for nuclear localisation of PDGF-C, post-translational modification by SUMOylation and the expression of a novel form of PDGF-C in human papillary thyroid carcinomas.

  16. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Elsholz, Floriana A; Kersten, Astrid; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schumacher, Udo; Schempp, Christoph M

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting. PMID:26950109

  17. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  18. Ambient ionization mass spectrometric analysis of human surgical specimens to distinguish renal cell carcinoma from healthy renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Clint M; Jarmusch, Alan K; Pirro, Valentina; Kerian, Kevin S; Masterson, Timothy A; Cheng, Liang; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-08-01

    Touch spray-mass spectrometry (TS-MS) is an ambient ionization technique (ionization of unprocessed samples in the open air) that may find intraoperative applications in quickly identifying the disease state of cancerous tissues and in defining surgical margins. In this study, TS-MS was performed on fresh kidney tissue (∼1-5 cm(3)), within 1 h of resection, from 21 human subjects afflicted by renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The preliminary diagnostic value of TS-MS data taken from freshly resected tissue was evaluated. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the negative ion mode (m/z 700-1000) data provided the separation between RCC (16 samples) and healthy renal tissue (13 samples). Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on the PCA-compressed data estimated sensitivity (true positive rate) and specificity (true negative rate) of 98 and 95 %, respectively, based on histopathological evaluation. The results indicate that TS-MS might provide rapid diagnostic information in spite of the complexity of unprocessed kidney tissue and the presence of interferences such as urine and blood. Desorption electrospray ionization-MS imaging (DESI-MSI) in the negative ionization mode was performed on the tissue specimens after TS-MS analysis as a reference method. The DESI imaging experiments provided phospholipid profiles (m/z 700-1000) that also separated RCC and healthy tissue in the PCA space, with PCA-LDA sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 89 %, respectively. The TS and DESI loading plots indicated that different ions contributed most to the separation of RCC from healthy renal tissue (m/z 794 [PC 34:1 + Cl](-) and 844 [PC 38:4 + Cl](-) for TS vs. m/z 788 [PS 36:1 - H](-) and 810 [PS 38:4 - H](-) for DESI), while m/z 885 ([PI 38:4 - H](-)) was important in both TS and DESI. The prospect, remaining hurdles, and future work required for translating TS-MS into a method of intraoperative tissue diagnosis are discussed. Graphical abstract Touch spray-mass spectrometry used for

  19. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells Promote Migration and Early Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Brian G.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Sheng, Mei; Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Jones, Ryan K.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Asher, Majdouline; Lacayo, Eduardo A.; Friedlander, Paul L.; Kutner, Robert; Chiu, Ernest S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat grafting is used to restore breast defects after surgical resection of breast tumors. Supplementing fat grafts with adipose tissue-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) is proposed to improve the regenerative/restorative ability of the graft and retention. However, long term safety for ASC grafting in proximity of residual breast cancer cells is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of three donors, on a human breast cancer model that exhibits early metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells represents “triple negative” breast cancer that exhibits early micrometastasis to multiple mouse organs [1]. Human ASCs were derived from abdominal adipose tissue from three healthy female donors. Indirect co-culture of MDA-MB-231 cells with ASCs, as well as direct co-culture demonstrated that ASCs had no effect on MDA-MB-231 growth. Indirect co-culture, and ASC conditioned medium (CM) stimulated migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. ASC/RFP cells from two donors co-injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells exhibited a donor effect for stimulation of primary tumor xenografts. Both ASC donors stimulated metastasis. ASC/RFP cells were viable, and integrated with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells in the tumor. Tumors from the co-injection group of one ASC donor exhibited elevated vimentin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), IL-8, VEGF and microvessel density. The co-injection group exhibited visible metastases to the lung/liver and enlarged spleen not evident in mice injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP alone. Quantitation of the total area of GFP fluorescence and human chromosome 17 DNA in mouse organs, H&E stained paraffin sections and fluorescent microscopy confirmed multi-focal metastases to lung/liver/spleen in the co-injection group without evidence of ASC/RFP cells. Conclusions Human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of two donors stimulated metastasis of MDA-MB-231

  20. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs. PMID:25894066

  1. Functionally graded beta-TCP/PCL nanocomposite scaffolds: in vitro evaluation with human fetal osteoblast cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Seher; Kalyon, Dilhan M; Yu, Xiaojun

    2010-03-01

    The engineering of biomimetic tissue relies on the ability to develop biodegradable scaffolds with functionally graded physical and chemical properties. In this study, a twin-screw-extrusion/spiral winding (TSESW) process was developed to enable the radial grading of porous scaffolds (discrete and continuous gradations) that were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL), beta-tricalciumphosphate (beta-TCP) nanoparticles, and salt porogens. Scaffolds with interconnected porosity, exhibiting myriad radial porosity, pore-size distributions, and beta-TCP nanoparticle concentration could be obtained. The results of the characterization of their compressive properties and in vitro cell proliferation studies using human fetal osteoblast cells suggest the promising nature of such scaffolds. The significant degree of freedom offered by the TSESW process should be an additional enabler in the quest toward the mimicry of the complex elegance of the native tissues. PMID:19296543

  2. Efficacy of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Neonatal Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Amini, Naser; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Mousavi, Neda; Safakheil, Hosein; Jafari, Leila; Sarveazad, Arash; Yari, Abazar; Ramezani, Sara; Faghihi, Faezeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-05-01

    Kernicterus is a neurological syndrome associated with indirect bilirubin accumulation and damages to the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brain stem nuclei particularly the cochlear nucleus. To mimic haemolysis in a rat model such that it was similar to what is observed in a preterm human, we injected phenylhydrazine in 7-day-old rats to induce haemolysis and then infused sulfisoxazole into the same rats at day 9 to block bilirubin binding sites in the albumin. We have investigated the effectiveness of human adiposity-derived stem cells as a therapeutic paradigm for perinatal neuronal repair in a kernicterus animal model. The level of total bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, brain bilirubin and brain iron was significantly increased in the modelling group. There was a significant decreased in all severity levels of the auditory brainstem response test in the two modelling group. Akinesia, bradykinesia and slip were significantly declined in the experience group. Apoptosis in basal ganglia and cerebellum were significantly decreased in the stem cell-treated group in comparison to the vehicle group. All severity levels of the auditory brainstem response tests were significantly decreased in 2-month-old rats. Transplantation results in the substantial alleviation of walking impairment, apoptosis and auditory dysfunction. This study provides important information for the development of therapeutic strategies using human adiposity-derived stem cells in prenatal brain damage to reduce potential sensori motor deficit. PMID:26818600

  3. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M.; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C.; Roberts, Gareth W.; Donovan, Kieron L.; Colmont, Chantal S.; Toleman, Mark A.; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2+ γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. PMID:27527598

  4. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    PubMed

    Woon, Heng Giap; Braun, Asolina; Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G; Khanna, Rajiv; Elliot, Michael; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D; Tangye, Stuart G; Rickinson, Alan B; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J; Palendira, Umaimainthan

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections. PMID:27540722

  5. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G.; Khanna, Rajiv; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D.; Tangye, Stuart G.; Rickinson, Alan B.; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103—, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections. PMID:27540722

  6. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  7. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi infection regulates CD1 expression in human cells and tissues via IL1-β

    PubMed Central

    Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Roura-Mir, Carme; Magalhaes, Kelly Grace; De Jong, Annemieke; Kasmar, Anne G.; Granter, Scott R.; Budd, Ralph; Steere, Allen; Pena-Cruz, Victor; Kirschning, Carsten; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Moody, D. Branch

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of newly translated group 1 CD1 proteins (CD1a, CD1b, CD1c) on maturing myeloid DC to effective lipid antigen presenting cells. Here we show that Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, triggers appearance of group 1 CD1 proteins at high density on the surface of human myeloid DC during infection. Within human skin, CD1b and CD1c expression was low or absent prior to infection, but increased significantly after experimental infections and in erythema migrans lesions from Lyme Disease patients. The induction of CD1 was initiated by borrelial lipids acting through TLR-2 within minutes, but required 3 days for maximum effect. The delay in CD1 protein appearance involved a multi-step process whereby TLR-2 stimulated cells release soluble factors, which are sufficient to transfer the CD1-inducing effect in trans to other cells. Analysis of these soluble factors identified IL-1β as a previously unknown pathway leading to group 1 CD1 protein function. These studies establish that upregulation of group 1 CD1 proteins is an early event in B. burgdorferi infection and suggest a stepwise mechanism whereby bacterial cell walls, TLR activation and cytokine release cause DC precursors to express group 1 CD1 proteins. PMID:21246541

  9. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  10. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM) in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), along with hyaluronic acid (HA) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM), and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees. PMID:27588219

  11. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM) in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), along with hyaluronic acid (HA) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM), and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees. PMID:27588219

  12. Osteogenic potential of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on 3D-printed porous structured titanium.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Jones, Dakota L; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Paradise, Christopher R; Kremers, Hilal M; Abdel, Matthew P; Kakar, Sanjeev; Dietz, Allan B; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-05-01

    Integration of porous metal prosthetics, which restore form and function of irreversibly damaged joints, into remaining healthy bone is critical for implant success. We investigated the biological properties of adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) and addressed their potential to alter the in vitro microenvironment of implants. We employed human AMSCs as a practical source for musculoskeletal applications because these cells can be obtained in large quantities, are multipotent, and have trophic paracrine functions. AMSCs were cultured on surgical-grade porous titanium disks as a model for orthopedic implants. We monitored cell/substrate attachment, cell proliferation, multipotency, and differentiation phenotypes of AMSCs upon osteogenic induction. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy and histology revealed that AMSCs adhere to the porous metallic surface. Compared to standard tissue culture plastic, AMSCs grown in the porous titanium microenvironment showed differences in temporal expression for genes involved in cell cycle progression (CCNB2, HIST2H4), extracellular matrix production (COL1A1, COL3A1), mesenchymal lineage identity (ACTA2, CD248, CD44), osteoblastic transcription factors (DLX3, DLX5, ID3), and epigenetic regulators (EZH1, EZH2). We conclude that metal orthopedic implants can be effectively seeded with clinical-grade stem/stromal cells to create a pre-conditioned implant. PMID:26774799

  13. Murine and Human Tissue-Engineered Esophagus Form from Sufficient Stem/Progenitor Cells and Do Not Require Microdesigned Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L.; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Materials and Methods: Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. Results: TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. Conclusions: TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies. PMID:25298083

  14. Acquisition of innate-like microbial reactivity in mucosal tissues during human fetal MAIT-cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeansyah, Edwin; Loh, Liyen; Nixon, Douglas F.; Sandberg, Johan K.

    2014-01-01

    Innate-like, evolutionarily conserved MR1-restricted mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent a large antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. Here, we investigate the development of these cells in second trimester human fetal tissues. MAIT cells are rare and immature in the fetal thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. In contrast, mature IL-18Rα+ CD8αα MAIT cells are enriched in the fetal small intestine, liver and lung. Independently of localization, MAIT cells express CD127 and Ki67 in vivo and readily proliferate in response to Escherichia coli in vitro. Maturation is accompanied by the gradual post-thymic acquisition of the PLZF transcription factor and the ability to produce IFNγ and IL-22 in response to bacteria in mucosa. Thus, MAIT cells acquire innate-like antimicrobial responsiveness in mucosa before exposure to environmental microbes and the commensal microflora. Establishment of this arm of immunity before birth may help protect the newborn from a range of pathogenic microbes.

  15. Stem Cell Bioprinting: Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    PubMed

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    On page 1429 G. G. Wallace, J. M. Crook, and co-workers report the first example of fabricating neural tissue by 3D bioprinting human neural stem cells. A novel polysaccharide based bioink preserves stem cell viability and function within the printed construct, enabling self-renewal and differentiation to neurons and supporting neuroglia. Neurons are predominantly GABAergic, establish networks, are spontaneously active, and show a bicuculline induced increased calcium response. PMID:27333401

  16. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  17. Hypoxia enhances proliferation and tissue formation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, Warren L.; Zhao, Feng; Bunnell, Bruce; Ma, Teng . E-mail: teng@eng.fsu.edu

    2007-07-06

    Changes in oxygen concentrations affect many of the innate characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were maintained under hypoxic atmospheres (2% O{sub 2}) for up to seven in vitro passages. This resulted in approximately 30-fold higher hMSC expansion over 6 weeks without loss of multi-lineage differentiation capabilities. Under hypoxia, hMSCs maintained their growth-rates even after reaching confluence, resulting in the formation of multiple cell layers. Hypoxic hMSCs also displayed differences in the cell and nuclear morphologies as well as enhanced ECM formation and organization. These changes in cellular characteristics were accompanied by higher mRNA levels of Oct-4 and HIF-2{alpha}, as well as increased expression levels of connexin-43, a protein used in gap junction formation. The results from this study demonstrated that oxygen concentrations affected many aspects of stem-cell physiology, including growth and in vitro development, and may be a critical parameter during expansion and differentiation.

  18. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:26918856

  19. Bioactive nanoparticles stimulate bone tissue formation in bioprinted three-dimensional scaffold and human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guifang; Schilling, Arndt F; Yonezawa, Tomo; Wang, Jiang; Dai, Guohao; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Bioprinting based on thermal inkjet printing is a promising but unexplored approach in bone tissue engineering. Appropriate cell types and suitable biomaterial scaffolds are two critical factors to generate successful bioprinted tissue. This study was undertaken in order to evaluate bioactive ceramic nanoparticles in stimulating osteogenesis of printed bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in poly(ethylene glycol)dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) scaffold. hMSCs suspended in PEGDMA were co-printed with nanoparticles of bioactive glass (BG) and hydroxyapatite (HA) under simultaneous polymerization so the printed substrates were delivered with highly accurate placement in three-dimensional (3D) locations. hMSCs interacted with HA showed the highest cell viability (86.62 ± 6.02%) and increased compressive modulus (358.91 ± 48.05 kPa) after 21 days in culture among all groups. Biochemical analysis showed the most collagen production and highest alkaline phosphatase activity in PEG-HA group, which is consistent with gene expression determined by quantitative PCR. Masson's trichrome staining also showed the most collagen deposition in PEG-HA scaffold. Therefore, HA is more effective comparing to BG for hMSCs osteogenesis in bioprinted bone constructs. Combining with our previous experience in vasculature, cartilage, and muscle bioprinting, this technology demonstrates the capacity for both soft and hard tissue engineering with biomimetic structures. PMID:25130390

  20. Electrophoretic separation and analysis of living cells from solid tissues by several methods - Human embryonic kidney cell cultures as a model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Plank, Lindsay D.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of free-fluid electrophoresis methods to separate tissue cells having a specific function is discussed. It is shown that cells suspended by trypsinization from cultures of human embryonic kidney are electrophoretically heterogeneous and tolerate a wide range of electrophoresis buffers and conditions without significant attenuation of function. Moreover, these cells do not separate electrophoretically on the basis of size or cell position alone and can be separated according to their ability to give rise to progeny that produce specific plasminogen activators.

  1. Altered response of fibroblasts from human tympanosclerotic membrane to interacting mast cells: implication for tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pawelczyk, Tadeusz; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Wesserling, Martyna; Grden, Marzena; Kuczkowski, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a tympanosclerotic (TMS) lesion often develops secondary to acute and chronic otitis media. Histological findings indicate that fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, including mast cells, play a key role in the tympanosclerotic plaque formation. However, details on the functional characteristics of tympanosclerotic fibroblasts (Fs(TMS)) are scanty. Therefore the aim of our study was to examine the activity of human fibroblasts from tympanosclerotic lesions and to evaluate the influence of stimulated by crosslinking of IgE receptor mast cells (HMC-1(FcɛRI)) on fibroblast functional behavior. We observed that fibroblasts from normal tympanic membrane (Fs(TM)) released less TNF-α, TGF-β1 and IL-6 compared to Fs(TMS). Fs(TMS) but not Fs(TM) upon interaction with HMC-1(FcɛRI) released increased quantities of TNF-α and TGF-β1. Exposing the fibroblast to HMC-1(FcɛRI) cells resulted in an increased synthesis of proteins including collagen. We noted that the COL2A1 transcript level increased ∼5- and ∼12-fold in Fs(TM) and Fs(TMS) co-cultured with HMC-1(FcɛRI), respectively. Both Fs(TM) and Fs(TMS) upon maintenance in the primary culture released significant quantities of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). However, Fs(TMS) released ∼5-fold more MMP-9 activity compared to the Fs(TM) cultures. The mast cell-induced release of TNF-α, TGF-β1 and MMP-9 sustained for a longer time in Fs(TMS) cultures compared to Fs(TM). Concluding, our data strongly indicate that increased fibroblast sensitivity to mast cell stimulation greatly contributes to the excessive fibrosis and pathological remodeling of the tympanic membrane. We postulate that the persistency of the Fs(TMS) activated state could be an important factor in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:25310903

  2. Tissue specific transcription of the human epsilon-globin gene following transfection into the embryonic erythroid cell line K562.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, M; Montague, P; Grindlay, G J; Sibbet, G; Donovan-Peluso, M; Bank, A; Paul, J

    1985-01-01

    We have introduced a plasmid containing the human epsilon-globin gene either stably or transiently into a number of erythroid or non-erythroid cell lines, and analysed the accuracy and efficiency of transcription. In non-erythroid cells (or in mouse erythroleukaemia (MEL) cells in which adult but not embryonic globin genes are expressed) transcription of the epsilon-globin gene occurs mainly from a site 200 bp upstream of the major cap site (the -200 cap site). In the human K562 cell line, in which the endogenous epsilon-globin gene is transcribed at high levels, transcription initiation from the introduced gene occurs mainly from the major cap site. Transcriptional activity of the epsilon-globin gene introduced into K562 cell is quantitatively similar to that of the endogenous gene. This suggests the presence (or absence) in K562 cells of factor(s) which activate (or repress) the epsilon-globin gene in a tissue specific manner. Images PMID:2995916

  3. Gene Expression Profiles of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Modified by Cell Culture Density

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Keon Hee; Lee, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, In Keun; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Seung Jo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies conducted cell expansion ex vivo using low initial plating densities for optimal expansion and subsequent differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, MSC populations are heterogeneous and culture conditions can affect the characteristics of MSCs. In this study, differences in gene expression profiles of adipose tissue (AT)-derived MSCs were examined after harvesting cells cultured at different densities. AT-MSCs from three different donors were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm2. After 7 days in culture, detailed gene expression profiles were investigated using a DNA chip microarray, and subsequently validated using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Gene expression profiles were influenced primarily by the level of cell confluence at harvest. In MSCs harvested at ∼90% confluence, 177 genes were up-regulated and 102 genes down-regulated relative to cells harvested at ∼50% confluence (P<0.05, FC>2). Proliferation-related genes were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at low density, while genes that were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at high density (∼90% confluent) were linked to immunity and defense, cell communication, signal transduction and cell motility. Several cytokine, chemokine and growth factor genes involved in immunosuppression, migration, and reconstitution of damaged tissues were up-regulated in MSCs harvested at high density compared with MSCs harvested at low density. These results imply that cell density at harvest is a critical factor for modulating the specific gene-expression patterns of heterogeneous MSCs. PMID:24400072

  4. α-Klotho Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kenneth; Groen, Arnoud; Molostvov, Guerman; Lu, Tzongshi; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Snead, David; James, Sean; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Ting, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: α-Klotho has emerged as a powerful regulator of the aging process. To date, the expression profile of α-Klotho in human tissues is unknown, and its existence in some human tissue types is subject to much controversy. Objective: This is the first study to characterize systemwide tissue expression of transmembrane α-Klotho in humans. We have employed next-generation targeted proteomic analysis using parallel reaction monitoring in parallel with conventional antibody-based methods to determine the expression and spatial distribution of human α-Klotho expression in health. Results: The distribution of α-Klotho in human tissues from various organ systems, including arterial, epithelial, endocrine, reproductive, and neuronal tissues, was first identified by immunohistochemistry. Kidney tissues showed strong α-Klotho expression, whereas liver did not reveal a detectable signal. These results were next confirmed by Western blotting of both whole tissues and primary cells. To validate our antibody-based results, α-Klotho-expressing tissues were subjected to parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (data deposited at ProteomeXchange, PXD002775) identifying peptides specific for the full-length, transmembrane α-Klotho isoform. Conclusions: The data presented confirm α-Klotho expression in the kidney tubule and in the artery and provide evidence of α-Klotho expression across organ systems and cell types that has not previously been described in humans. PMID:26280509

  5. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K; Keller, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  6. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J.; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  7. Use of human tissue explants to study human infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The study of human cell–cell and cell–pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture is critical for deciphering the mechanisms of many normal and pathogenic processes. This protocol describes methods for culturing and infecting explants of human tissues to study the pathogenesis of human infectious agents and their local interactions. The protocol relies on the use of fresh human tissues dissected into small blocks or biopsies that are cultured at the liquid–air interface on collagen rafts. These tissue blocks retain their cytoarchitecture and support productive infection of various pathogens without exogenous stimulation. Experimental details for setting up cultures of human tonsils, lymph nodes and cervicovaginal and rectosigmoid tissues, including protocols for their infection with HIV-1 and other pathogens, are described here. Using this protocol, culture and infections can be set up in 3–6 h and be maintained for 2–3 weeks, depending on the tissue used. PMID:19197269

  8. Predicting Virulence of Aeromonas Isolates Based-on Changes in Transcription of c-jun and c-fos in Human Tissue Culture Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess virulence of Aeromonas isolates based on the change in regulation of c-jun and c-fos in the human intestinal tissue culture cell line Caco-2. Methods and Results: Aeromonas cells were added to Caco-2 cells at approximately a one to one ratio. After 1, 2 and 3 ...

  9. 17β-Estradiol modulates huntingtin levels in rat tissues and in human neuroblastoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Maria Teresa; Fiocchetti, Marco; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Ascenzi, Paolo; Marino, Maria

    2016-02-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions in the brain. Here, E2-induced increased levels of huntingtin (HTT), a protein involved in several crucial neuronal functions is reported. E2 physiological concentrations up-regulate HTT in hippocampus and striatum of rats as well as in human neuroblastoma cells. This effect requires both nuclear and extra-nuclear estrogen receptor (ER)α activities. Intriguingly, HTT silencing completely prevents E2 protective effects against oxidative stress injury. In conclusion, these data indicate for the first time that HTT is an E2-inducible protein involved in the first steps of E2-induced signaling pathways committed to neuronal protection against oxidative stress. PMID:26264729

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived fiber-shaped cardiac tissue on a chip.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Mori, S; Sakai, F; Takeuchi, S

    2016-06-21

    We propose a method for the production of a fiber-shaped three-dimensional (3D) cellular construct of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) for the quantification of the contractile force. By culturing the cardiomyocytes in a patterned hydrogel structure with fixed edges, we succeeded in fabricating hiPS-CM fibers with aligned cardiomyocytes. The fiber generated contractile force along the fiber direction due to the hiPS-CM alignment, and we were able to measure its contractile force accurately. Furthermore, to demonstrate the drug reactivity of hiPS-CM fibers, the changes in the contractile frequency and force following treatment with isoproterenol and propranolol were observed. We believe that hiPS-CM fibers will be a useful tool for pharmacokinetic analyses during drug development. PMID:27217209