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Sample records for human cervical squamous

  1. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman. Cervical squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdag, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B; Ozcan, Husiyen C

    2016-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in  non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient's complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  2. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  3. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to placenta.

    PubMed

    Can, Nhu Thuy T; Robertson, Patricia; Zaloudek, Charles J; Gill, Ryan M

    2013-09-01

    A pregnant 29-year-old gravida 4, para 3 woman with Stage IIB cervical cancer was admitted at 33 weeks and 4 days of gestation and delivered a healthy neonate. Her placenta was small but otherwise grossly unremarkable. Microscopic examination revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. An immunohistochemical stain for p16 was positive in the carcinoma cells, supporting metastasis from the cervical tumor. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to placenta is very rare. We report a case and discuss metastatic cancer during pregnancy with recommendations for infant follow-up. PMID:23896714

  4. Immunohistochemical Expression and Prognostic Significance of CD97 and its Ligand DAF in Human Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Wang, Wei; Xu, Lian; Li, Li; Liu, Juan; Feng, Min; Bu, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Accumulating evidences had demonstrated that the CD97, a member of the epidermal growth factor 7-transmembrane family, and its cellular ligand decay accelerating factor (DAF) both play important roles in tumor dedifferentiation, migration, invasiveness, and metastasis. However, the roles of CD97 and DAF in human cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to observe the expression profile of CD97 and DAF in CSCC and evaluate their clinical significance. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of CD97 and DAF proteins in 97 patients with CSCC and 53 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precursor lesion of CSCC. CD97 and DAF were absent or only weakly expressed in the normal epithelium of the cervix but were present in 83.5% (81/97) and 90.7% (88/97) of CSCC samples, respectively. Overexpression of CD97 was significantly associated with a high International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P=0.010) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.026). The majority of CSCCs, irrespective of staging/grading classification, displayed strong DAF immunostaining. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that overexpression of CD97 was associated with a worse prognosis. Multivariate analyses showed that the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P=0.000), lymph node metastasis (P=0.004), and CD97 expression (P=0.040) were independent risk factors for overall survival. The present study suggested that the expressions of CD97 and DAF were both upregulated in CSCC. The expression level of CD97 in CSCC was associated with the severity of the tumor. Furthermore, CD97 might be an independent poor prognostic factor for CSCC patients. PMID:26107567

  5. Human Papilloma Virus Persistence after Cone Excision in Women with Cervical High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pirtea, Laurențiu; Grigoraş, Dorin; Matusz, Petru; Pirtea, Marilena; Moleriu, Lavinia; Tudor, Anca; Ilina, Răzvan; Secoşan, Cristina; Mazilu, Octavian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary event in cervical cancer tumorigenesis. Our objectives were to estimate the rate of HPV infection persistence after large loop excision of the transformation zone (LEEP) in patients with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and to investigate if HPV persistence is type related. Methods. We conducted a prospective study on 89 patients with HSIL treated with LEEP. DNA HPV was performed before surgery and at 6, 12, and 18 months after LEEP. Results. Four patients were excluded from the study. The HPV persistence in the remaining 85 patients was 32.95% (6 months), 14.12% (12 months), and 10.59% (18 months). Type 16 had the highest persistence rate, 23.5% (6 months), 11.8% (12 months), and 8.2% (18 months). Coinfection was found to be 54.12% before LEEP and 18.8% (6 months), 4.7% (12 months), and 3.5% (18 months) after LEEP. The rate of coinfections including type 16 was 46.83% of all coinfections. Coinfection including type 16 was not correlated with higher persistence rate compared to infection with type 16 only. Conclusions. HPV infection is not completely eradicated by LEEP in patients with HSIL lesion on PAP smear. HPV persistence after LEEP is influenced by HPV type. HPV type 16 has the highest persistence rate. PMID:27366164

  6. DNA methylation in human papillomavirus-infected cervical cells is elevated in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Heon; So, Kyeong A; Hong, Sung Ran; Hwang, Chang-Sun; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kang, Chun; Hur, Soo Young; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective DNA methylation has been shown to be a potential biomarker for early cancer detection. The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA methylation profiles according to liquid-based Pap (LBP) test results and to assess their diagnostic value in a Korean population. Methods A total of 205 patients with various Papanicolaou test results were enrolled to this study (negative, 26; atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 39; low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 44; high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), 48; and cancer, 48). DNA methylation analysis of four genes, ADCYAP1, PAX1, MAL, and CADM1, was performed on residual cervical cells from LBP samples using a quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing method. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of the four methylated genes for cancer detection, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn. Sensitivities and specificities were also tested at cutoffs determined from the ROC curves. Results Cervical cancer cells showed dramatically increased methylation levels for the four genes analyzed. ADCYAP1 and PAX1 also trended toward elevated methylation levels in HSIL samples, although the levels were much lower than those in cancer cells. The sensitivities of methylated ADCYAP1, PAX1, MAL, and CADM1 for the detection of cancer were 79.2%, 75.0%, 70.8%, and 52.1%, and the specificities were 92.0%, 94.0%, 94.7%, and 94.0%, respectively. Methylated ADCYAP1 and PAX1 demonstrated relatively better discriminatory ability than did methylated MAL and CADM1 (area under the curves 0.911 and 0.916 vs. 0.854 and 0.756, respectively). Conclusion DNA methylation status, especially in the ADCYAP1 and PAX1 genes, showed relatively good specificity, ranging from 90% to 94%. The possible additive and complementary roles of DNA methylation testing with respect to conventional cervical cancer screening programs will need to be validated in prospective population-based studies. PMID:26768780

  7. Correlation of p16INK4a immunoexpression and human papillomavirus (HPV) detected by in-situ hybridization in cervical squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Koh, C C; Nazarina, A R; Teoh, K H; Looi, L M

    2016-04-01

    Persistence and eventual integration of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) into the cervical cell is crucial to the progression of cervical neoplasia and it would be beneficial to morphologically identify this transformation in routine surgical pathology practice. Increased p16(INK4a) (p16) expression is a downstream event following HPV E7 binding to pRB. A study was conducted to assess the correlation between hrHPV detection using a commercial in-situ hybridization assay (Ventana INFORM HPV ISH) and p16 immunoexpression (CINtec Histology Kit) in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and squamous carcinoma. 27 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 51 squamous carcinoma (SCC) were interrogated. hrHPV was significantly more frequent in HSIL (76.2%) and SCC (88.2%) compared to LSIL(37.0%). p16 expression was similarly more frequent in HSIL (95.2%) and SCC (90.2%) compared to LSIL(3.7%). That the rates of hrHPV when compared with p16 expression were almost equivalent in HSIL and SCC while p16 was expressed in only 1 of the 10 LSIL with hrHPV, are expected considering the likelihood that transformation has occurred in HSIL and SCC but does not occur in majority of LSIL. PMID:27126662

  8. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  9. Biventricular metastatic invasion from cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Karan; Evans, Matthew C; Shkullaku, Melsjan; Schillinger, Rachel; White, Charles S; Roque, Dana M

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the heart has been previously described with primary lung and breast carcinoma, lymphoma, leukaemia, mesothelioma and melanoma. However, left-ventricular cardiac metastasis from primary cervical squamous cell carcinoma is poorly described. This report describes the clinical presentation of a patient with cardiac metastatic invasion from cervical cancer. PMID:27371746

  10. The Association of High Risk Human Papillomaviruses in Patients With Cervical Cancer: An Evidence Based Study on Patients With Squamous Cell Dysplasia or Carcinoma for Evaluation of 23 Human Papilloma Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mostafavi Zadeh, Seyed Mostafa; Madani, Azita; Soleimani, Reza; Nedaeinia, Reza; Niakan, Mohammad; Avan, Amir; Manian, Mostafa; Moradi, Mohammad; Eftekhar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in females. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the major risk factor of cervical cancer. Objectives The aim of the current study was to explore the frequency and role of 23 different HPVs in patients with cervical cancer. Materials and Methods Overall, 117 formalin-fix and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from cervical cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or dysplasia were collected from Mirza-Kochakkhan-Jangali hospital, Tehran, Iran during year 2013, to investigate the presence of HPV- HPV- 67, 68, 6, 11, 13, 16, 17, 30, 69, 39, 40, 42, 64, 66 and 51 to 59 genotypes. Results The Pap smear report illustrated the presence of malignancy in 71 cases, while 11 cases had no evidence of malignancy. Among the patients, 26 cases had sexually transmitted disease with relative frequency of 0.58. Infection with papilloma virus was observed in 83.6% of SCC patients and 45% of the dysplasia group. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were 18 with 31.62% and 16 with 27.35% of cases. Moreover the relative frequencies of HPV-33, -6, -58, -52, -35 and -51, genotypes were 15.38, 7.69, 5.98, 5.12 and 3.41%, respectively. Among the different genotypes of HPV, 31 had the lowest and 16 had the highest relative frequency. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that HPV-16 and -18 have a higher prevalence in our population than 31 and 51. Further investigations are required to evaluate the role of these genotypes in a larger multicenter setting for establishing their values for early detection of patients, which is useful for screening and vaccination programs of cancerous and precancerous lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:27279992

  11. Revised terminology for cervical histopathology and its implications for management of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Alan G; Chelmow, David; Darragh, Teresa M; Lawson, Herschel; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In March 2012, the College of American Pathologists and American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, in collaboration with 35 stakeholder organizations, convened a consensus conference called the Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Project. The recommendations of this project include using a uniform, two-tiered terminology to describe the histology of human papillomavirus-associated squamous disease across all anogenital tract tissues: vulva, vagina, cervix, penis, perianus, and anus. The recommended terminology is "low-grade" or "high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL)." This terminology is familiar to clinicians, because it parallels the terminology of the Bethesda System cytologic reports. Biopsy results using SIL terminology may be further qualified using "intraepithelial neoplasia" (IN) terminology in parentheses. Laboratory p16 tissue immunostaining is recommended to better classify histopathology lesions that morphologically would earlier have been diagnosed as IN 2. p16 is also recommended for differentiating between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign mimics. The LAST Project recommendations potentially affect the application of current guidelines for managing cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. The authors offer interim guidance for managing cervical lesions diagnosed using this new terminology with special attention paid to managing young women with cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions on biopsy. Clinicians should be aware of the LAST Project recommendations, which include important changes from prior terminology. PMID:23168774

  12. Revised Terminology for Cervical Histopathology and Its Implications for Management of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, Alan G.; Chelmow, David; Darragh, Teresa M.; Lawson, Herschel; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2014-01-01

    In March 2012, the College of American Pathologists and American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, in collaboration with 35 stakeholder organizations, convened a consensus conference called the Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Project. The recommendations of this project include using a uniform, two-tiered terminology to describe the histology of human papillomavirus-associated squamous disease across all anogenital tract tissues: vulva, vagina, cervix, penis, perianus, and anus. The recommended terminology is “low-grade” or “high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL).” This terminology is familiar to clinicians, because it parallels the terminology of the Bethesda System cytologic reports. Biopsy results using SIL terminology may be further qualified using “intraepithelial neoplasia” (IN) terminology in parentheses. Laboratory p16 tissue immunostaining is recommended to better classify histopathology lesions that morphologically would earlier have been diagnosed as IN 2. p16 is also recommended for differentiating between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign mimics. The LAST Project recommendations potentially affect the application of current guidelines for managing cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. The authors offer interim guidance for managing cervical lesions diagnosed using this new terminology with special attention paid to managing young women with cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions on biopsy. Clinicians should be aware of the LAST Project recommendations, which include important changes from prior terminology. PMID:23168774

  13. Site and origin of squamous cervical cancer: a histomorphologic study.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, E; Ostör, A G

    1983-07-01

    Based on extensive histomorphologic study, a concept of cervical carcinogenesis is formulated. Intraepithelial neoplasia arises in well defined and predestined fields that are well demarcated from each other. Different forms of intraepithelial neoplasia coexist and have different topographic distribution. Extension and enlargement of atypical epithelial fields are not brought about by active spread, but by apposition of new fields. Two different pathways exist for the genesis of intraepithelial neoplasia affecting cell types involved in regeneration or transformation. In the majority of cases the precursor lesion is atypical squamous metaplasia in the transformation zone. Less commonly, malignant change occurs in original squamous epithelium, probably via atypical basal hyperplasia. The role of the "last gland" is seen as the anatomic landmark dividing these two areas. So-called minor forms of intraepithelial neoplasia cannot progress and change into carcinoma in situ, as they are differently located. PMID:6856213

  14. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, André LP; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria DB; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia EL

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  15. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, André Lp; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria Db; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia El

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  16. [Uterine cervical carcinoma and human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Sugase, M

    1992-06-01

    For many years it has been thought that a significant proportion of cervical cancer could be attributed to sexually transmitted agents, such as sperm, smegma, Treponema pallidum, Gonococcus and herpes simplexvirus type 2. Recent advances of molecular biology, however, have revealed that human papillomavirus (HPV) might be the most causative virus of the disease. Since HPV type 16 DNA was found in a patient with cervical cancer in 1983, many HPV types have been cloned from cervical cancers, also from premalignant lesions (intraepithelial neoplasias). In Japan, we have found 6 new types of HPV (HPV 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, 67) in the female genital tract so far. Especially, HPV 58, which was cloned from a patient with cervical squamous cell carcinoma and was already fully sequenced, is thought to be an important agent for the development of cervical cancer as well as HPV 16. Now we are investigating extensively to clarify the real relationship between genital HPV infection and cervical cancer. PMID:1327090

  17. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers. PMID:26700669

  18. A Fuzzy-C-Means-Clustering Approach: Quantifying Chromatin Pattern of Non-Neoplastic Cervical Squamous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing Rui; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi; Ch’ng, Ewe Seng

    2015-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of Pap-smear test in reducing the mortality rate due to cervical cancer, the criteria of the reporting standard of the Pap-smear test are mostly qualitative in nature. This study addresses the issue on how to define the criteria in a more quantitative and definite term. A negative Pap-smear test result, i.e. negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM), is qualitatively defined to have evenly distributed, finely granular chromatin in the nuclei of cervical squamous cells. To quantify this chromatin pattern, this study employed Fuzzy C-Means clustering as the segmentation technique, enabling different degrees of chromatin segmentation to be performed on sample images of non-neoplastic squamous cells. From the simulation results, a model representing the chromatin distribution of non-neoplastic cervical squamous cell is constructed with the following quantitative characteristics: at the best representative sensitivity level 4 based on statistical analysis and human experts’ feedbacks, a nucleus of non-neoplastic squamous cell has an average of 67 chromatins with a total area of 10.827μm2; the average distance between the nearest chromatin pair is 0.508μm and the average eccentricity of the chromatin is 0.47. PMID:26560331

  19. The landscape of alternative splicing in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Dan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Junjun; Ren, Tong; Zhu, Baoli; Xiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism in protein synthesis and proteome diversity. In this study, we identified alternative splicing events in four pairs of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) and adjacent nontumor tissues using RNA sequencing. Methods The transcripts of the four paired samples were thoroughly analyzed by RNA sequencing. SpliceMap software was used to detect the splicing junctions. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis was conducted to detect the alternative spliced genes-related signal pathways. The alternative spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results There were 35 common alternative spliced genes in the four CSCC samples; they were novel and CSCC specific. Sixteen pathways were significantly enriched (P<0.05). One novel 5′AS site in the KLHDC7B gene, encoding kelch domain-containing 7B, and an exon-skipping site in the SYCP2 gene, encoding synaptonemal complex 2, were validated by RT-PCR. The KLHDC7B gene with 5′AS was found in 67.5% (27/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with cellular differentiation and tumor size. The exon-skipping site of the SYCP2 gene was found in 35.0% (14/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with depth of cervical invasion. Conclusion The KLHDC7B and the SYCP2 genes with alternative spliced events might be involved in the development and progression of CSCC and could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of CSCC. PMID:25565867

  20. Effects of two genes coding squamous cell carcinoma antigen on the diagnosis and treatment of cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qi’nan; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Chenchen; Liu, Yanjuan; Chen, Zhuo; Lu, Fuer; Huang, Guangying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of expressions of SCCA1 and SCCA2 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma on its diagnosis, treatment evaluation and prognosis analysis. M ethod s : Seventy-six cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients enrolled in our hospital from October 2011 to April 2013 were selected, and another 76 healthy females (without cervical tissue lesions) were enrolled as the control. SCCA1 and SCCA2 expressions in the two groups were compared by RT-PCR. The serodiagnosis results before and after chemotherapy were compared to clarify the effects of SCCA2 expression. Results: The two groups had similar relative SCCA1 expression rates that were not significantly correlated with pathological factors. Before chemotherapy, the relative expression rates of SCCA2 were significantly higher in the patients with later stage (t=6.018, P=0.00082<0.05) and lymphatic metastasis (t=6.281, P=0.00192<0.05). After treatment, relative SCCA2 expression rate was decreased more significantly in the effective group than that in the ineffective group (t=10.27893, P=0.02815<0.05). Conclusion: The expression of SCCA1 failed to indicate the onset, diagnosis and prevention of cervical squamous cell carcinoma, whereas that of SCCA2 worked as one of the tumor markers. PMID:24772127

  1. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  2. Human Papilloma Virus and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anus

    PubMed Central

    Gami, Bhavna; Kubba, Faris; Ziprin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. In the UK, the incidence is estimated at approximately 1.5 per 100,000. Most of this increase is attributed to certain at-risk populations. Persons who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive and men who have sex with men (MSM), Organ transplant recipients, women with a history of cervical cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV), or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are known to have a greater risk for anal cancer. This paper will focus on HPV as a risk factor for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and discusses the etiology, anatomy, pathogenesis, management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus. PMID:25288893

  3. Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus among Women with Cervical Cytological Abnormalities or Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Incidence Area of Esophageal Carcinoma in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shaohong; Shen, Jinhui; Peng, Yanyan; Chen, Lechuan; Mai, Ruiqin; Zhang, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    Data of HPV genotype including 16 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and 4 low-risk HPV from 38,397 women with normal cytology, 1341 women with cervical cytology abnormalities, and 223 women with ISCC were retrospectively evaluated by a hospital-based study. The prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.51%, 41.83%, and 96.86% in women with normal cytology, cervical cytology abnormalities, and ISCC, respectively. The three most common HPV types were HPV-52 (1.76%), HPV-16 (1.28%), and HPV-58 (0.97%) in women with normal cytology, whereas the most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (16.85%), followed by HPV-52 (9.55%) and HPV-58 (7.83%) in women with cervical cytology abnormalities. Specifically, HPV-16 had the highest frequency in ASC-H (24.16%, 36/149) and HSIL (35.71%, 110/308), while HPV-52 was the most common type in ASC-US (8.28%, 53/640) and LSIL (16.80%, 41/244). HPV-16 (75.78%), HPV18 (10.31%), and HPV58 (9.87%) were the most common types in women with ISCC. These data might contribute to increasing the knowledge of HPV epidemiology and providing the guide for vaccine selection for women in Shantou. PMID:27610364

  4. Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus among Women with Cervical Cytological Abnormalities or Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Incidence Area of Esophageal Carcinoma in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shaohong; Shen, Jinhui; Peng, Yanyan; Chen, Lechuan; Mai, Ruiqin

    2016-01-01

    Data of HPV genotype including 16 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and 4 low-risk HPV from 38,397 women with normal cytology, 1341 women with cervical cytology abnormalities, and 223 women with ISCC were retrospectively evaluated by a hospital-based study. The prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.51%, 41.83%, and 96.86% in women with normal cytology, cervical cytology abnormalities, and ISCC, respectively. The three most common HPV types were HPV-52 (1.76%), HPV-16 (1.28%), and HPV-58 (0.97%) in women with normal cytology, whereas the most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (16.85%), followed by HPV-52 (9.55%) and HPV-58 (7.83%) in women with cervical cytology abnormalities. Specifically, HPV-16 had the highest frequency in ASC-H (24.16%, 36/149) and HSIL (35.71%, 110/308), while HPV-52 was the most common type in ASC-US (8.28%, 53/640) and LSIL (16.80%, 41/244). HPV-16 (75.78%), HPV18 (10.31%), and HPV58 (9.87%) were the most common types in women with ISCC. These data might contribute to increasing the knowledge of HPV epidemiology and providing the guide for vaccine selection for women in Shantou. PMID:27610364

  5. Human wings apart-like gene is specifically overexpressed in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    LU, XIAOQIN; CUI, JINQUAN; FU, MEIZHOU; WANG, WULIANG

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The human wings apart-like (hWAPL) gene, which is 30,793 bp long and located on 10q23.2., is a human homologue of the WAPL gene in Drosophila melanogaster. hWAPL has the characteristics of an oncogene in uterine cervical cancer. The present study investigated the expression of the hWAPL gene in tissues, including 9 common cancers, consisting of cervical, gastric and lung cancers, liver, bladder, esophageal, endometrial, renal and rectal carcinomas, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and benign squamous epithelia. The immunohistochemical analysis was conducted using paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from 413 patients, consisting of 27 benign squamous epithelial tissue samples, and 47 cervical cancer, 30 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)I, 33 CINII, 38 CINIII, 29 gastric cancer, 28 liver carcinoma, 26 bladder carcinoma, 35 esophageal carcinoma, 25 endometrial, 26 renal carcinoma, 36 rectal carcinoma and 33 lung cancer tissues. The expression of hWAPL mRNA was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 8 benign squamous epithelia and 11 cervical cancer tissues. Compared to benign squamous epithelia and the 8 other cancers, hWAPL protein was significantly increased in cervical cancer (P<0.001). The expression of the hWAPL protein in cervical cancer and CINIII tissues was markedly increased compared to the expression in CINI and CINII tissues (P<0.001). Despite the significant difference in the staining scores (P<0.001), no significant difference was observed in the percentage of tissues expressing hWAPL (P=0.102) between cervical cancer and CINIII. The hWAPL gene may therefore be specifically overexpressed in cervical cancer. The overexpression of hWAPL may play an important role in occurrence and development of cervical cancer. PMID:27347120

  6. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  7. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  8. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  9. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    DUHAIME, MICHAEL J.; PAGE, KHALIPH O.; VARELA, FAUSTO A.; MURRAY, ANDREW S.; SILVERMAN, MICHAEL E.; ZORATTI, GINA L.; LIST, KARIN

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:26297835

  10. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  11. Increased expression of sialic acid in cervical biopsies with squamous intraepithelial lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Altered sialylation has been observed during oncogenic transformation. Sialylated oligosaccharides of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been implicated in tumor progression and metastases. In the cervical cancer high levels of sialic acid have been reported in the patients serum, and an increased of total sialic acid concentration has been reported for the cervical neoplasia and cervical cancer. This study investigates the changes in expression and distribution of α2,3-linked sialic acid and α2,6- linked sialic acid in low and high squamous intraepithelial lesions and in normal tissue. Methods Lectin histochemistry was used to examine the expression and distribution of sialic acid in different grades of cervical neoplasia. We applied Maackia amurensis lectin, which interacts with α2,3-linked sialic acid and Sambucus nigra lectin specific for α2,6-linked sialic acid. Results The histochemical analysis showed that α2,3-linked sialic acid and α2,6- linked sialic acid increased in intensity and distribution in concordance with the grade of squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL). These results are in concordance with a previous study that reports increased RNAm levels of three sialyltransferases. Conclusions These results show that the change in sialylation occurs before cancer development and may play an important role in cellular transformation. These findings provide the basis for more detailed studies of the possible role of cell surface glycoconjugates bearing sialic acid in the cellular cervix transformation. PMID:21092209

  12. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  13. A study of the expression and localization of toll-like receptors 2 and 9 in different grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Ghosh, TapanKumar; Dalui, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subhas; Banerjee, Uma; Basu, Anupam

    2015-12-01

    TLRs are important molecules of innate immune response, those play central role in host pathogen interaction and recognition through pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Previous studies have indicated the role of TLRs in many human malignancy and cervical cancer in terms of viral recognition and inflammatory changes in-vivo. The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression and localization of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9 in preinvasive and invasive cervical cancer patients and to investigate its use as a probable diagnostic tool for better management cervical cancer. This single institution study includes individuals with normal, precancerous lesions, cervical intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix. Upon confirmation by histopathology, fluorescence based immunohistochemistry was performed in all patients for TLR2 and TLR9, followed by semi-quantitative estimation of the staining intensity and grade of expression. The expression pattern of TLR2 and TLR9 does not vary greatly from normal to precancerous lesions, but a significant variation was observed in advance stages, i.e. squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Additionally the expression increased marginally in higher grades. In spite of their low difference in expression along different stages of cervical cancer, both TLR2 and TLR9 could detect the disease at an advance stages as depicted by the receiver operator characteristics curve analysis. PMID:26569074

  14. Human papillomavirus testing in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Castle, Philip E; Cremer, Miriam

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is more reliable and sensitive but less specific than Papanicolaou (Pap) testing/cervical cytology for the detection of cervical precancer and cancer. HPV-negative women are at lower risk of cervical cancer than Pap-negative women. In high-resource settings, HPV testing can be used to make cervical cancer prevention programs more efficient by focusing clinical attention on women who have HPV. In lower-resource settings, where Pap testing has not been sustained or widespread, new, lower-cost HPV tests may make cervical cancer screening feasible. PMID:23732037

  15. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  16. Viral DNA load of high-risk human papilloma virus is closely associated with the grade of cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guqun; Cheng, Jingxin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the correlation between the viral load of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and the degree of cervical lesions, as well as the follow-up monitoring role of high-risk HPV measurements in the treatment of patients with cervical lesions. Hybrid capture-2 method was used to measure the amount of high-risk HPV load of 361 patients who were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, including 76 cases of cervical squamous carcinoma, 119 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 166 cases of cervicitis. The correlation between the viral load of high-risk HPV and the degree of cervical lesions was analyzed using correlation analysis. Patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous carcinoma were followed up until December 2013, with the follow-up time being 37-60 months. Statistically significant differences in the high-risk HPV load existed between cervicitis group, CIN group and cervical squamous carcinoma group (P = 0.000). In addition, the viral load was increased with the increase of the severity of cervical lesions, showing a positive correlation (r = 0.436, P = 0.000). During the follow-up, 6 cases of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, 3 cases of recurrence CIN and 1 case of vaginal squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were found, which were shown to relate with the continuing high-risk HPV infection in vagina. Viral load of high-risk HPV were positively correlated with the severity of cervical lesions, playing an important role in the monitoring of patients with cervical lesions after treatment. PMID:25664114

  17. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  18. Cervical metastases of squamous cell carcinoma of the maxilla: a retrospective study of 9 years

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Astrid LD; Grätz, Klaus W

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Metastases of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the mouth floor have been well studied. Concerning maxilla squamous cell carcinomas, however, only a few studies have been performed. The question is whether a prophylactic neck dissection should be performed in these tumors. Patients and Material In the Department of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital of Zurich, 30 patients who had been treated for squamous cell carcinonoma of the maxilla were examined retrospectively. Special attention was paid to direct and late metastasis, survival rate, and treatment. Results Of the 59 patients with upper jaw carcinomas over a 9-year period, only about half (30 patients) had a squamous cell carcinoma of the upper jaw. Of those patients, 27% had an upper lesion on the right side, 33% on the left. Of the 11 patients (36.7%) presenting positive lymph nodes, 4 patients had direct positive lymph nodes while 7 patients had later positive lymph nodes; and 71.4% of the late metastasis appeared during the first year. Conclusion Because of the 36.7% of patients presenting metastases in the cervical lymph nodes, elective neck treatment should be considered in cases even with a negative clinical examination. PMID:19619329

  19. Genetic susceptibility to cervical squamous cell carcinoma is associated with HLA-DPB1 polymorphisms in Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Chang, Tzu-Yang; Chen, Tze-Chien; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chang, Shih-Chuan; Lee, Yann-Jinn

    2015-09-01

    Cervical cancer is a multifactorial disease, and increasing evidence suggests that host immunogenetic background may contribute to its pathogenesis. Genetic variations in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes may alter the efficiency of immune response to human papillomavirus (HPV) antigens and have been implicated in the risk of cervical cancer. We investigated whether polymorphisms in the HLA-DPB1 gene were associated with cervical cancer risk in a Taiwanese population. HLA-DPB1 alleles and +550 G/A polymorphism were genotyped in a case-control study of 473 women with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) and 676 healthy controls. The presence and genotypes of HPV in CSCC were determined. We found that the DPB1*05:01 and +550 A alleles were associated with decreased and increased risk of CSCC, respectively [odds ratio (OR) = 0.72, Pc = 0.001; OR = 1.25, Pc = 0.03]. In subgroup analysis based on HPV type 16 positivity, significant associations were shown in the DPB1*05:01 and *13:01 alleles (OR = 0.65, Pc = 0.0007; OR = 1.83, Pc = 0.004). Furthermore, the DPB1*05:01-G and *13:01-G haplotypes conferred decreased and increased risk of both CSCC and HPV-16 positive CSCC women, respectively (OR = 0.72, Pc = 0.0009; OR = 0.63, Pc = 0.0004 for DPB1*05:01-G; OR = 1.55, Pc = 0.03; OR = 1.84, Pc = 0.004 for DPB1*13:01-G). A risk haplotype DPB1*02:01-A was also observed in the HPV-16 positive CSCC women (OR = 1.51, Pc = 0.05). These findings suggest that HLA-DPB1 gene is involved in the CSCC development. PMID:26031576

  20. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - The Enigma Unravelled.

    PubMed

    Khot, Komal P; Deshmane, Swati; Choudhari, Sheetal

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has long been regarded as a disease entity having a remarkable incidence worldwide and a fairly onerous prognosis; thus encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease outcome. Squamous cell carcinomas encompass at least 90% of all oral malignancies. Several factors like tobacco and tobacco-related products, alcohol, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are suspected as possible causative factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer also appears to be involved in the aetiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. HPVpositive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) seems to differ from HPV-negative SCC. Many questions about the natural history of oral HPV infection remain under investigation. The aim of this review is to highlight the current understanding of HPV-associated oral cancer with an emphasis on its prognosis, detection and management. PMID:26981603

  1. Cervical tissue engineering using silk scaffolds and human cervical cells.

    PubMed

    House, Michael; Sanchez, Cristina C; Rice, William L; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L

    2010-06-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  2. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  3. Tattoo-pigmented cervical lymph node that masqueraded as the sentinel lymph node in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Amith; Wieshmann, Hulya; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Shaw, Richard

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of a pigmented cervical lymph node mimicking the sentinel node during sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) on a patient with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The patient had extensive tattoos on his neck. This pigmented lymph node was not identified to be the sentinel lymph node using static and dynamic lymphoscintigraphy. Subsequent histological analysis revealed tattoo pigment within this lymph node. It is important during cervical SLNB to be aware that cutaneous tattoos can pigment lymph nodes. PMID:26188933

  4. Muscular invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma of the posterior mandibular alveolar ridge is associated with cervical lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between muscle invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma of the posterior mandibular alveolar ridge and cervical lymph node metastasis on the basis of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Twenty-six patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma of the posterior mandibular alveolar ridge were evaluated by MRI. The associations between cervical lymph node metastasis and independent factors evaluated by MRI were analyzed. Overall survival was also analyzed in this manner. Representative biopsy specimens were stained with anti-podoplanin and anti-CD34 antibodies. Results Mylohyoid muscle invasion was associated with cervical lymph node metastasis. A combinational factor of mylohyoid and/or buccinator muscle invasion was also associated with cervical lymph node metastasis. Cervical lymph node metastasis and masticator space invasion had a negative effect on overall survival. No lymphatic vessels were identified near the tumor invasion front within the mandible. In contrast, lymphatic vessels were identified near the front of tumor invasion in the muscles. Conclusion This study demonstrates an association between muscular invasion by oral squamous cell carcinoma of the posterior mandibular alveolar ridge and cervical lymph node metastasis.

  5. Prevalence of cervical neoplastic lesions and Human Papilloma Virus infection in Egypt: National Cervical Cancer Screening Project

    PubMed Central

    Abd El All, Howayda S; Refaat, Amany; Dandash, Khadiga

    2007-01-01

    Background Data from Egyptian studies provide widely varying estimates on the prevalence of pre-malignant and malignant cervical abnormalities and human papilloma virus (HPVs) infection. To define the prevalence and risk factors of pre-invasive and invasive cervical cancer (cacx), a community based full-scale cross sectional, household survey including 5453 women aged between 35 and 60 years was conducted. Methods The study period was between February 2000 and December 2002. Initially, conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears were evaluated using the Bethesda system (TBS), followed by colposcopic guided biopsy (CGB) for all epithelial abnormalities (EA). In a third step, HPV was tested on all EA by in-situ hybridization (ISH) using first the broad spectrum HPV probe recognizing HPVs 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 35, 45, 51 and 52 followed by subtyping with probes 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33. Lastly, unequivocal cases were immunostained for herpes simplex type-2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results EA representing 7.8% (424/5453), were categorized into atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASCUS) (34.4%), atypical glandular cell of undetermined significance (AGCUS) (15.3%), combined ASCUS and AGCUS (3.1%), low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) (41.0%), high grade SIL (5.2%) and invasive lesions (1%). CGB of EA (n = 281) showed non neoplastic lesions (12.8%), atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM) (19.2%), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN) (44.4%), CIN II (4.4%), CINIII (2.8%), endocervical lesions (5.2%), combined squamous and endocervical lesions (10.0%), invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (0.02%) and extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MZBCL) (0.02%). The overall predictive value of cytology was 87% while the predictive value for high grade lesions was 80%. On histological basis, HPVs were present in 94.3% of squamous lesions while it was difficult to be identified in endocervical ones. ISH

  6. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  7. Effect of human papillomavirus vaccination on cervical cancer screening in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong; Bell, Christopher; Sun, Maggie; Kliewer, Gordon; Xu, Linan; McInerney, Maria; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Yang, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Background: A school-based program with quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented in Alberta in 2008. We assessed the impact of this program on Pap test cytology results using databases of province-wide vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study involving a cohort of women in Alberta born between 1994 and 1997 who had at least 1 Pap test between 2012 and 2015. Women with negative cytology results were controls. Women with low-grade (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and high-grade (atypical squamous cells, cannot rule out a high-grade lesion; or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) cervical abnormalities were cases. Exposure status was assigned according to records of HPV vaccination. Odds ratios (ORs) for abnormal cytology results by vaccination status were adjusted for neighbourhood income, laboratory service, rural versus urban residency, and age. Results: The total study population was 10 204. Adjusting for age, vaccinated women had a higher screening rate than unvaccinated women (13.0% v. 11.4%, p < 0.001). Among women who received full vaccination (≥ 3 doses), the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63–0.82). For high-grade lesions, the adjusted OR was 0.50 (95% CI 0.30–0.85). With 2-dose HPV vaccination, the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 1.08 (95% CI 0.84–1.38). Interpretation: Quadrivalent HPV vaccination significantly reduced high-grade cervical abnormalities but required 3 doses. Vaccination against HPV was associated with screening uptake. Population-based vaccination and screening programs should work together to optimize cervical cancer prevention. PMID:27378467

  8. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  9. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen P; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Odle, Richard I; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of 'master regulators' for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  10. Age of Diagnosis of Squamous Cell Cervical Carcinoma and Early Sexual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Hughes, James P.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Galloway, Denise A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Given the established links between young age at first intercourse (AFI), number of sex partners, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC), we hypothesized that women diagnosed with SCC at younger ages would be more likely to report young AFI than women diagnosed later in life. Methods We performed a population-based investigation among invasive SCC cases who were diagnosed between 1986 and 2004, were 22 to 53 years old, and lived in the metropolitan Seattle-Puget Sound region (n=333). Using multivariate linear regression, we estimated coefficients and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between age at SCC diagnosis and AFI (<15, 15–18, ≥19) and number of sex partners before age 20 (0, 1, 2–4, 5–14, 15+), accounting for birth year and other factors. Interactions were assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Results The interval between AFI and SCC diagnosis ranged from 4 to 35 years. In a multivariate model, compared to SCC cases reporting AFI≥19, the mean age of diagnosis was 3.1 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI<15 (CI: −5.8, −0.5) and 2.6 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI 15–18 years (CI: −4.6, −0.6). Although number of sex partners before age 20 was associated with age at SCC diagnosis in a crude analysis, the association was not independent of AFI. However, in the AFI≥19 and AFI<15 groups, differences in effect were seen by number of sex partners before age 20 (p for interaction=0.08), with the association remaining strong and significant only in the AFI<15 group that had 2 or more partners before age 20 (coefficient: −4.2, CI: −6.3, −2.1). Conclusion Among younger and middle-aged women with SCC, early age of diagnosis was associated with early AFI, though the effect appeared to be modified by number of sex partners before age 20. PMID:19318437

  11. Screening of biomarkers in cervical squamous cell carcinomas via gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Li, Chundong; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Jiahui; Tong, Ying

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and invasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) were analyzed using bioinformatic tools to identify key genes and potential biomarkers. Analyses of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were performed for HSIL vs. normal control and invasive CSCC vs. normal control tissues using the Limma package in R. Pathway enrichment analysis was performed using KOBAS. A protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network for the DEGs in invasive CSCC was constructed using String. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for the DEGs in the PPI network using DAVID. Relevant small molecules were predicted using Cmap. A total of 633 and 881 DEGs were identified in HSIL and invasive CSCC, respectively, and the two groups had 305 DEGs in common. Genes associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway were enriched in the HSIL, while cell cycle-associated genes were over‑represented in invasive CSCC. The PPI network, containing 72 upregulated genes and 434 edges, was illustrated. Functional enrichment analysis showed that the cell cycle was the most significant gene ontology term. A total of six small molecules associated with the pathology of CSCC were identified, including the anti-cancer drug piperlongumine, which showed a negative correlation. The findings of the present study not only enhanced the current understanding of the pathogenesis of CSCC, but may also be a basis for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26398134

  12. Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in cervical squamous cell carcinoma--a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, I; Davidson, B; Lerner-Geva, L; Gotlieb, W H; Ben-Baruch, G; Novikov, I; Kopolovic, J

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the intracellular and peritumoral expression of matrix proteins in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix using immunohistochemistry. METHODS: 71 squamous cell carcinomas and 10 controls were stained for laminin, fibronectin, and collagen IV. Cytoplasmic staining in tumour cells and peritumoral deposition of matrix proteins were evaluated. The association between staining results and patient age, tumour stage, histological grade, and survival was studied. RESULTS: Positive cytoplasmic staining for laminin, fibronectin, and collagen IV was observed in 17 (23.9%), 27 (38%), and 10 (14.1%) cases, respectively. Staining for laminin was most pronounced in the invasive front of tumour islands, while for fibronectin and collagen IV it appeared to be diffuse. Peritumoral staining for laminin and collagen IV was detected in 12 cases (16.9%). Early stage (Ia1-Ia2) tumours were uniformly negative for all three proteins. Cytoplasmic staining for laminin correlated with positive staining for fibronectin and collagen IV, and with the presence of a peritumoral deposition of collagen IV and laminin. There was no correlation with any of the three markers between staining results and patient age, stage, grade, or survival. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of extracellular matrix proteins in some cervical squamous cell carcinomas might reflect the enhanced ability of these tumours to modify the peritumoral stroma. This ability seems to be absent in early stage tumours. The correlation between intracytoplasmic and peritumoral expression of matrix proteins supports the evidence of their synthesis by tumour cells. However, this property did not correlate with disease outcome in this study. Images PMID:10023343

  13. Expression and role of nestin in human cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuki; Ishiwata, Toshiyuki; Matsuda, Yoko; Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Asakura, Hirobumi; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Naito, Zenya

    2012-08-01

    Nestin expression reportedly correlates with aggressive growth, metastasis, poor prognosis and presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in various tumors. In this study, we determined the expression and role of nestin in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. We performed immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses of nestin in 26 cases for each stage of CIN and 55 cervical cancer tissue samples. To examine the role of nestin in cervical cancer cells, we stably transfected expression vectors containing nestin cDNA into ME-180 cells. We studied the effects of increased nestin expression on cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion as well as sphere and soft agar formation. Nestin was not localized in the squamous epithelium in normal cervical tissues, but it was weakly expressed in the basal squamous epithelium of CIN 1. In CIN 2, nestin was localized to the basal to lower 2/3 of the squamous epithelium, whereas in CIN 3, it was localized to the majority of the squamous epithelium. Nestin was detected in all cases of invasive cervical cancer. Nestin mRNA was expressed in both ME-180 and CaSki cells. Growth rate, cell motility and invasion ability of stably nestin-transfected ME-180 cells were not different from empty vector-transfected ME-180 (mock cells). However, the nestin-transfected ME-180 cells formed more colonies and spheres compared to the mock cells. These findings suggest that nestin plays important roles in carcinogenesis and tumor formation of cervical cancer cells. Nestin may closely correlate with regulation of CSCs. PMID:22580387

  14. Cervical metastases of oral maxillary squamous cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Bo; Peng, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Cervical treatment of oral maxillary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) remains controversial. We determined the metastases incidence and evaluated its predictive factors. Systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted of 23 Chinese and English-language articles retrieved from PubMed, Ovid, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Scientific and Technological Journal databases. Total cervical metastases and occult metastases rate was 32% and 21%, respectively. Positive lymph node detection was likeliest from levels I to III. The maxillary gingival metastases rate was higher than that of the hard palate. Advanced-stage tumors had higher metastatic risk than early-stage tumors. Well-differentiated tumors had a significantly higher metastases rate than medium and poor-differentiation tumors. N0 cases had survival benefit compared with N+ cases. Metastases rate of oral maxillary SCC correlates significantly with T classification and pathological stage. T and N classifications impact outcome significantly. Therefore, levels I to III selective neck dissection is recommended for patients with T3/4 cN0 disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2335-E2342, 2016. PMID:26890607

  15. Early determination of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma radioresponse identifies high- and low-response tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kiyoshi . E-mail: ki-ohara@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Oki, Akinori; Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Onishi, Kayoko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Satoh, Toyomi; Tsunoda, Hajime; Hata, Masaharu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether early-assessed radioresponse of tumors corresponds with late-assessed radioresponse, which is associated with local disease control in radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study included 12 patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated by RT with or without concurrent cisplatin. Tumor volume was estimated by scheduled magnetic resonance imaging before (preRT), 3 to 4 weeks after (early assessment), and 6 to 7 weeks after (late assessment) RT initiation. Radioresponse was assessed with tumor shrinkage curves based on these volumes. Radioresponse for each tumor was calculated as the slope (day{sup -1}) of the shrinkage curve by fitting to an exponential equation. Results: Early-assessed radioresponse ranged from 0.001 to 0.106 day{sup -1} (median, 0.021 day{sup -1}) and late-assessed radioresponse from 0.009 to 0.091 day{sup -1} (median, 0.021 day{sup -1}), with no significant difference between them (p = 0.1191). The early-assessed radioresponse correlated with the late-assessed radioresponse (R {sup 2} = 0.714, p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Correspondence between early- and late-assessed radioresponse in a series of tumors showing a wide range of radioresponse was not particularly close overall. However, early assessment of radioresponsiveness did seem to be useful for characterizing those tumors with high or low radioresponsiveness.

  16. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and molecular features, and better prognosis as compared to HPV-negative carcinomas. They also possess the potential for prevention by using vaccination. The present review describes in detail the salient features of HPV associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), its differences from HPV-negative OSCC, diagnostic features, and recent strategies in prevention and management. PMID:26483987

  17. Papillary urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation in association with human papilloma virus: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Guma, Sergei; Maglantay, Remegio; Lau, Ryan; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Melamed, Jonathan; Deng, Fang-Ming; Zhou, Ming; Makarov, Danil; Lee, Peng; Pincus, Matthew R; Pei, Zhi-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a carcinogen known for its strong association with cervical cancers and cervical lesions. It is also known to be associated with a variety of squamous cell carcinomas in other areas, such as the penis, vulva, anus and head and neck. However, the association with urothelial carcinoma remains controversial. Here, we report a case of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation associated with HPV-6/HPV-11. Case presentation: This is a case of a 70 year old man who presented with nocturia and pressure during urination. During the TURP procedure for what was clinically thought to be benign prostate hyperplasia with pathologic diagnosis as prostate carcinoma, a 2 cm papillary mass was found in the distal penile urethra. The papillary mass was found to be a high grade urothelial carcinoma positive for GATA 3 expression, with focal areas of squamous differentiation. The areas with squamous differentiation demonstrated koilocytic differentiation, which were positive for strong p16 expression. The tumor was found to harbor low risk HPV 6/11 by in situ hybridization. Conclusions: This study case demonstrates HPV infection with a low risk subtype (HPV 6/11) associated with an urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation and condylomatous features. PMID:27069958

  18. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. CEACAM1 in Cervical Cancer and Precursor Lesions: Association With Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Albarran-Somoza, Benibelks; Franco-Topete, Ramon; Delgado-Rizo, Vidal; Cerda-Camacho, Felipe; Acosta-Jimenez, Lourdes; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is an adhesion molecule expressed in a wide variety of tissues including epithelial cells, leukocytes, and tumors that may establish both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. The aim of this work was to study the protein expression pattern of CEACAM1 in cervical cancer and precursor lesions in the context of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We used immunohistochemistry to analyze CEACAM1 expression in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical tissues from 15 healthy women, 15 patients with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), 15 patients with high-grade SIL, and 15 patients with squamous carcinomas. HPV types were identified by PCR. CEACAM1 was either undetectable (13/15) or low (2/15) in normal cervical tissues. By contrast, CEACAM1 expression was increased in high-grade SIL (10 samples staining intermediate/high and 4 samples staining low) as compared with low-grade SIL with undetectable (n=3) or low (n= 12) expression. CEACAM1 expression was undetectable or low in cervical carcinoma. Our results suggest that CEACAM1 may be an interesting progression marker in SIL and cervical cancer, in particular due to reported immunoregulatory properties. PMID:16924126

  20. Human cervical mucus: research update.

    PubMed

    Katz, D F

    1991-12-01

    Evaluation of cervical mucus is a standard for determining the fertile period in natural family planning. Cervical mucus accepts, filters, prepares, and releases sperm for successful transport to the egg and fertilization. Recent scientific advances provide answers to how the mucus regulates fertility as its physical properties change during the menstrual cycle. Transmission electron microscopy reveals small interstices between mucus macromolecules relative to a sperm head. Thus advancing sperm must push aside or cut through the microstructure. The interstices are largest in the periovulatory phase of the cycle. Small magnetic spheres, comparable with the size of a sperm head, are now being used to study the physical properties of the mucus on the scale of individual sperm. PMID:1755453

  1. HK2 is a radiation resistant and independent negative prognostic factor for patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xinqiong; Liu, Miaomiao; Sun, Hong; Wang, Fengjun; Xie, Xiaoxue; Chen, Xiang; Su, Juan; He, Yuxiang; Dai, Youyi; Wu, Haijun; Shen, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which overexpression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) indicates locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (LACSCC) with radio-resistance is still unknown despite being an independent biomarker of poor prognosis. Here, we retrospectively analyzed 132 female patients receiving radiotherapy for cervical squamous cell carcinoma including 85 radiation-sensitive cases and 47 radiation-resistant cases. The expression of HK2 was examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage of high HK2 expression in the radiation-resistant group differed from the radiation-sensitive group with statistical significance (P < 0.001) even if divided into three subgroups including a lower 5-year progression free survival group (PFS) for comparison (P < 0.001). The Kaplan Meier curve analysis showed that there were differences between the two groups (P < 0.001). Therefore, this study proves a close relationship between HK2 expression and radio-resistance. Multivariate Cox regression analysis implied that HK2 was an independent prognostic indicator of cervical squamous carcinoma (HR (95% CI), 2.940 (1.609, 1.609); P = 0.002). PMID:26097593

  2. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  3. Increased RIPK4 expression is associated with progression and poor prognosis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Qing; Li, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Xue, Wen-Qiong; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Yuan-Bin; Liao, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Hu, Ye-Zhu; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of receptor interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4), a crucial regulatory protein of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, has recently been reported to be involved in several cancers. Here, we report the potential clinical implication and biological functions of RIPK4 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). One hundred and ninety-eight CSCC cases, 109 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 141 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 63 chronic cervicitis were collected. The expression of RIPK4 was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and its clinical value and oncogenic functions were further assessed. RIPK4 expression increased significantly with disease progression from 3.2% in chronic cervicitis, 19.3% in LSILs and 85.1% in HSILs to 94.4% in CSCCs (P < 0.001). Moreover, RIPK4 may serve as a useful biomarker to distinguish HSIL from chronic cervicitis/LSIL, which are two different clinical types for therapeutic procedures, with a high sensitivity and specificity (85.1% and 86.6%, respectively) and the performance improved when combined with p16INK4a. Further, RIPK4 overexpression was associated with overall (HR = 2.085, P = 0.038) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.742, P = 0.037). Knockdown of RIPK4 reduced cell migration and invasion via inhibition of Vimentin, MMP2 and Fibronectin expression in cervical cancer cells. RIPK4 might act as a potential diagnostic and independent prognostic biomarker for CSCC patients. PMID:26148476

  4. Induction of Human Squamous Cell-Type Carcinomas by Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Becker-Santos, Daiana D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a potent human carcinogen. Around one hundred million people worldwide have potentially been exposed to this metalloid at concentrations considered unsafe. Exposure occurs generally through drinking water from natural geological sources, making it difficult to control this contamination. Arsenic biotransformation is suspected to have a role in arsenic-related health effects ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies associated with chronic exposure. It has been demonstrated that arsenic exhibits preference for induction of squamous cell carcinomas in the human, especially skin and lung cancer. Interestingly, keratins emerge as a relevant factor in this arsenic-related squamous cell-type preference. Additionally, both genomic and epigenomic alterations have been associated with arsenic-driven neoplastic process. Some of these aberrations, as well as changes in other factors such as keratins, could explain the association between arsenic and squamous cell carcinomas in humans. PMID:22175027

  5. Anatomic Invasive Depth Predicts Delayed Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sohei; Tomioka, Toshifumi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ugumori, Toru; Hato, Naohito; Fujii, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Delayed cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) is the most negative prognostic factor of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study analyzed the relationship between clinicopathologic factors, including anatomic invasive depth (AID), and CLNM. A total of 212 patients with clinically node-negative (cN0) tongue SCC who had undergone partial glossectomy through the mouth were eligible for this retrospective study. The deepest portions where tongue SCC cells invaded as determined by microscopic analyses were classified into 5 categories, including epithelial and submucosal tissue, lateral extrinsic tongue muscle (ETM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM according to AID. We examined the relationship between clinicopathologic factors including AID and delayed CLNM. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that AID was an independent predictive factor for delayed CLNM (P=0.0022; odds ratio=7.1). Deeper invasion than ITM, including ITM, paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM, had high sensitivity and negative predictive value for delayed CLNM (94.4% and 95.7%, respectively). Precise elucidation of AID may be useful for the preoperative decision for performing elective neck dissection. None of 11 patients in whom the deepest portion where tumor invaded to lateral ETM (according to AID) showed delayed CLNM, although tongue SCC T4a tumor is defined by the presence of invasion of cancer cells to ETM. Tumors with invasion to lateral ETM might have to be excluded from the pathologic T4a category. PMID:27186852

  6. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  7. FDG and FMISO PET Hypoxia Evaluation in Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  8. Human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA prevalence and association with cervical cytological abnormalities in the Irish HIV population.

    PubMed

    Loy, Aisling; McInerney, Jamie; Pilkington, Loretto; Keegan, Helen; Delamere, Sandra; Martin, Cara M; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    The complex interplay between HIV and human papillomavirus and its link to cervical dysplasia is poorly understood. This is the first study to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus mRNA in HIV-positive women, its relationship to HIV and its potential use in the triage of cervical cancer screening in HIV-positive women. In this cross-sectional study, we included 321 HIV-positive women. In all, 28.7% had abnormal cervical cytology, 51.1% were human papillomavirus DNA-positive and 21.8% tested positive for human papillomavirus mRNA. Women with a CD4 count of <200 × 10(6)/L were more likely to test positive for human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA. Virally suppressed women were less likely to be human papillomavirus DNA-positive; however, the same did not hold true for human papillomavirus mRNA. We found the human papillomavirus mRNA screening to be more specific when screening for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion than human papillomavirus DNA at 84.53% compared to 57.36%. However, the sensitivity was less at 51.59% versus 91.07% for human papillomavirus DNA. It may be possible in the future to use human papillomavirus mRNA/DNA testing within a triage algorithm for the screening and management of cervical cancer in the HIV-positive patient. PMID:25258395

  9. Human papillomavirus infection in couples with female low-grade intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe; Roumeguere, Thierry; Christophe Noël, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are frequently found during cervical cancer screening. Usually they are associated with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Does the high-transmission rate of HPV infection to the male partner represent a clinical risk for him? Are preventive measures to be taken to prevent the occurrence of male diseases? More than 80% of all LSIL are associated with HPV infections. The prevalence of HPV infection in males can range up to 40%, with 60% of the male partners of LSIL female patients presenting with penile flat lesions. The spontaneous cure rate for male infections is very high (90% at 5 years) but negative consequences in females (cervical high-grade lesion and cervical cancer) are frequent. Their male counterparts are far rarer but in some patients can require deleterious treatment. Transmission prevention by the use of condoms and circumcision is discussed. The effectiveness of HPV vaccination in this situation has not been validated. PMID:20646823

  10. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0–91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7–83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9–73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9–71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9–15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3–21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7–19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  11. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0-91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7-83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9-73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9-71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9-15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3-21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7-19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  12. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  13. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-01

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (p<0.014) and failure (p<0.0001) mechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects. PMID:23415075

  14. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions among HIV-infected women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enju; McCree, Renicha; Mtisi, Expeditho; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Aris, Eric; Lema, Irene A; Hertzmark, Ellen; Chalamilla, Guerino; Li, Nan; Vermund, Sten H; Spiegelman, Donna

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence and predictors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) among HIV-infected women in Tanzania, a cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-infected women at HIV care and treatment clinics. A Papanicolaou (Pap) smear was used as a screening tool for detection of cervical SIL. From December 2006 to August 2009, 1365 HIV-infected women received cervical screening. The median age was 35 (interquartile range [IQR]: 30-42) years, and the median CD4 + cell count was 164 (IQR: 80-257) cells/mm(3). The prevalence of cervical SIL was 8.7% (119/1365). In multivariate analysis, older age (≥50 versus 30-<40 years: prevalence ratio [PR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-3.84, p for trend = 0.001), lower CD4 + cell counts (<100 versus ≥200 cells/mm(3): PR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.01-2.36, p for trend = 0.03) and cervical inflammation (PR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.16-2.60, p = 0.008) were associated with an increased risk of cervical SIL. Women with advanced WHO HIV disease stage (IV versus I/II: PR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.35-8.85, p for trend = 0.01) had an increased risk for high-grade SIL. In resource-limited settings where it is not feasible to provide cervical cancer prevention services to all HIV-infected women, greater efforts should focus on scaling-up services among those who are older than 50 years, with lower CD4 cell counts and advanced HIV disease stage. PMID:25957324

  16. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. Role of CD24 Protein in Predicting Metastatic Potential of Uterine Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ghee Young; Ha, Hongil; Ahn, Geunghwan; Park, Seon Young; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The protein CD24 is a cell surface protein that appears to function as an adhesion molecule; its expression has been shown to correlate with prognosis in a variety of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoreactivity of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma to CD24 and determine whether CD24 is associated with clinical and pathologic parameters, including prognosis. Methods and Materials: The expression of CD24 protein was immunohistochemically studied in 73 cases of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone or with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Two pathologists independently analyzed the immunostaining; they did not have knowledge of the patient outcomes and evaluated any changes according to the percentage of tumor cells stained as follows: negative, <5% reactive; and positive, >5% reactive. Results: Positive staining was found in 43 cases (58.9%). The immunoreactivity did not correlate with age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, lymph node metastasis, or tumor size. For patients who were CD24 negative, the total failure and distant metastasis rates were decreased about 20% compared with the rates for patients who were CD24 positive. On univariate analysis, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate of CD24-negative patients was significantly greater than that of the CD24-positive patients (84.7% vs. 66.7%, respectively, p = 0.0497). The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and CD24 expression were significantly associated with distant metastasis-free survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: CD24 expression was a significant independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival in patients with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In the future, prospective determination of CD24 expression might aid clinical practice in the selection of the appropriate therapy for individual patients.

  18. mTOR as a Molecular Target in HPV-Associated Oral and Cervical Squamous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Marsh, Christina; Dinali, Mohamed El; Gangane, Nitin; Jennison, Kaitlin; Hewitt, Stephen; Patel, Vyomesh; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) associated with papillomavirus (HPV) infection has increased over the past decades in the US. We aimed at examining the global impact of HPV-associated HNSCC, and whether the established key role of mTOR activation in HNSCC is also observed in HPV+ HNSCC lesions, thereby providing novel treatment options for HPV-associated HNSCC patients. Experimental Design An international HNSCC tissue microarray (TMA) was used to analyze the expression of p16INK4A, a surrogate for HPV infection, and Akt-mTOR pathway activation. Results were confirmed in a large collection of HPV− and HPV+ HNSCC cases and in a cervical cancer (CCSCC) TMA. Observations were validated in HNSCC and CCSCC-derived cell lines, which were xenografted into immunodeficient mice for tumorigenesis assays. Results Approximately 20% of all HNSCC lesions could be classified as HPV+, irrespective of their country of origin. mTOR pathway activation was observed in most HPV+ HNSCC and CCSCC lesions and cell lines. The pre-clinical efficacy of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin and RAD001 was explored in HPV+ HNSCC and CCSCC tumor xenografts. Both mTOR inhibitors effectively decreased mTOR activity in vivo, and caused a remarkable decrease in tumor burden. These results emphasize the emerging global impact of HPV-related HNSCCs, and indicate that the activation of the mTOR pathway is a widespread event in both HPV− and HPV-associated HNSCC and CCSCC lesions. Conclusions The emerging results may provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of mTOR inhibitors as a molecular targeted approach for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:22409888

  19. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Hypoxia in Squamous Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldbo, Christina S.; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Malinen, Eirik; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an adverse factor in cervical cancer, and hypoxia-related gene expression could be a powerful biomarker for identifying the aggressive hypoxic tumors. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is a valuable method for gene expression studies, but suitable reference genes for data normalization that are independent of hypoxia status and clinical parameters of cervical tumors are lacking. In the present work, we aimed to identify reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of hypoxia in squamous cervical cancer. From 422 candidate reference genes selected from the literature, we used Illumina array-based expression profiles to identify 182 genes not affected by hypoxia in cervical cancer, i.e. genes regulated by hypoxia in eight cervical cancer cell lines or correlating with the hypoxia-associated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameter ABrix in 42 patients, were excluded. Among the 182 genes, nine candidates (CHCHD1, GNB2L1, IPO8, LASP1, RPL27A, RPS12, SOD1, SRSF9, TMBIM6) that were not associated with tumor volume, stage, lymph node involvement or disease progression in array data of 150 patients, were selected for further testing by RT-qPCR. geNorm and NormFinder analyses of RT-qPCR data of 74 patients identified CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 as the optimal set of reference genes, with stable expression both overall and across patient subgroups with different hypoxia status (ABrix) and clinical parameters. The suitability of the three reference genes were validated in studies of the hypoxia-induced genes DDIT3, ERO1A, and STC2. After normalization, the RT-qPCR data of these genes showed a significant correlation with Illumina expression (P<0.001, n = 74) and ABrix (P<0.05, n = 32), and the STC2 data were associated with clinical outcome, in accordance with the Illumina data. Thus, CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 seem to be suitable reference genes for studying hypoxia-related gene expression in squamous cervical cancer samples by RT

  20. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Hypoxia in Squamous Cervical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, Christina S; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Malinen, Eirik; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an adverse factor in cervical cancer, and hypoxia-related gene expression could be a powerful biomarker for identifying the aggressive hypoxic tumors. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is a valuable method for gene expression studies, but suitable reference genes for data normalization that are independent of hypoxia status and clinical parameters of cervical tumors are lacking. In the present work, we aimed to identify reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of hypoxia in squamous cervical cancer. From 422 candidate reference genes selected from the literature, we used Illumina array-based expression profiles to identify 182 genes not affected by hypoxia in cervical cancer, i.e. genes regulated by hypoxia in eight cervical cancer cell lines or correlating with the hypoxia-associated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameter ABrix in 42 patients, were excluded. Among the 182 genes, nine candidates (CHCHD1, GNB2L1, IPO8, LASP1, RPL27A, RPS12, SOD1, SRSF9, TMBIM6) that were not associated with tumor volume, stage, lymph node involvement or disease progression in array data of 150 patients, were selected for further testing by RT-qPCR. geNorm and NormFinder analyses of RT-qPCR data of 74 patients identified CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 as the optimal set of reference genes, with stable expression both overall and across patient subgroups with different hypoxia status (ABrix) and clinical parameters. The suitability of the three reference genes were validated in studies of the hypoxia-induced genes DDIT3, ERO1A, and STC2. After normalization, the RT-qPCR data of these genes showed a significant correlation with Illumina expression (P<0.001, n = 74) and ABrix (P<0.05, n = 32), and the STC2 data were associated with clinical outcome, in accordance with the Illumina data. Thus, CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 seem to be suitable reference genes for studying hypoxia-related gene expression in squamous cervical cancer samples by RT

  1. Human papillomaviruses and cervical cancer in Bangkok. III. The role of husbands and commercial sex workers.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Kuypers, J; Kiviat, N; Koetsawang, A; Ashley, R L; Qin, Q; Koetsawang, S

    2001-04-15

    Between September 1991 and September 1993, husbands of women with and without cervical neoplasia and commercial sex workers in one brothel and one massage parlor in Bangkok, Thailand, were interviewed; serologic tests for sexually transmitted infections were performed; and cervical and penile scrapings were tested for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA. The risks of cervical carcinoma in monogamous women and of oncogenic HPV in their husbands were associated with the men's having unprotected intercourse with prostitutes. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV was higher in commercial sex workers than in women attending gynecologic and family planning clinics. Oncogenic HPV prevalence declined with age in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, but not in healthy HIV-positive, commercial sex workers and was weakly associated with hepatitis B antigenemia, suggesting that persistence of HPV infection is due to subtle changes in immunity. Associations of HPV with recent pregnancy and oral contraceptive use suggest that hormonal factors may increase the risk of cervical neoplasia by enhancing persistence of HPV infection. The prevalence of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions was strongly related to oncogenic HPV types and weakly to HIV infection only in their presence. Commercial sex workers in Bangkok are reservoirs of oncogenic HPV, and cervical cancer in monogamous Thai women develops in part as a result of transmission of these viruses to them by their husbands from prostitutes. PMID:11296145

  2. Gene Expression Changes in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Initiation of Chemoradiation and Correlation With Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Jhingran, Anuja Ramdas, Latha; Story, Michael D.; Broadus, Russell R.; Lu, Karen H.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate early gene expression changes after chemoradiation in a human solid tumor, allowing identification of chemoradiation-induced gene expression changes in the tumor as well as the tumor microenvironment. In addition we aimed to identify a gene expression profile that was associated with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Microarray experiments were performed on cervical cancer specimens obtained before and 48 h after chemoradiation from 12 patients with Stage IB2 to IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated between April 2001 and August 2002. Results: A total of 262 genes were identified that were significantly changed after chemoradiation. Genes involved in DNA repair were identified including DDB2, ERCC4, GADD45A, and XPC. In addition, significantly regulated cell-to-cell signaling pathways included insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), interferon, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. At a median follow-up of 41 months, 5 of 12 patients had experienced either local or distant failure. Supervised clustering analysis identified a 58-gene set from the pretreatment samples that were differentially expressed between patients with and without recurrence. Genes involved in integrin signaling and apoptosis pathways were identified in this gene set. Immortalization-upregulated protein (IMUP), IGF-2, and ARHD had particularly marked differences in expression between patients with and without recurrence. Conclusions: Genetic profiling identified genes regulated by chemoradiation including DNA damage and cell-to-cell signaling pathways. Genes associated with recurrence were identified that will require validation in an independent patient data set to determine whether the 58-gene set associated with clinical outcome could be useful as a prognostic assay.

  3. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Women With High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meizhu; Xu, Qiuxiang; Li, Hongyan; Gao, Huiqiao; Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) genotypes among Han women with high-grade cervical lesions in Beijing, China.Cervical cell specimens from patients with histopathologically confirmed cervical lesions at 7 hospitals in Beijing were examined with a validated HPV kit for 13 hr-HPV genotypes during the study period. The patients were divided into a low-grade cervical lesions group (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, CIN1) and a high-grade cervical lesions group (CIN2+, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2, CIN2; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, CIN3; squamous cervical cancer, SCC; and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, ACC) based on the histopathology results.A total of 2817 eligible patients were enrolled, including 610 cases identified as CIN1 and 2207 as CIN2+. The hr-HPV positive rates in the CIN1 and CIN2+ groups were 78.2% (477/610) and 93.3% (2060/2207), respectively. The most frequently detected genotypes were HPV16, 58, 52 and18 in the CIN1 group and HPV16, 58, 33, and 52 in the CIN2+ group, in descending order of prevalence. In addition, the prevalence of HPV18 among the patients with ACC was 28.6% (14/49), significantly >7.2% (54/752) prevalence among the SCC patients (P < 0.001). Additionally, significantly more women in the CIN2+ group had multiple infections compared with those in the CIN1 group (38.1% and 24.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). However, as the cervical lesion grade increased, the prevalence of multiple hr-HPV infections gradually deceased to 44.2% in the CIN2 patients, 36.7% in the CIN3 patients, and 35.3% in the cervical cancer (CC) patients, which included SCC and ACC patients. In cases of multiple hr-HPV infections in the CIN2+ group, double infections accounted for ∼76.6%, and HPV16+58, HPV16+52, and HPV16+18 were the most common combinations, in descending order. The most frequent combination for triple infections was HPV16+58+31, with

  4. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  5. Metastatic Collision Tumour (Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma) in Cervical Lymph Nodes: An Immunohistochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Alhanafy, Alshimaa Mahmoud; Al-Sharaky, Dalia; Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Abdallah, Rania Abdallah

    2016-02-01

    Collision tumours are a rare entity, in this report, we describe a case of 73-year-old woman presented with a rapid enlargement of left upper cervical lymph node (LN) associated with right thyroid nodular goiter. The histopathological examination of the excised LN showed definite areas of papillary thyroid carcinoma admixed with moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Thyroglobulin immunostaining was positive in papillary carcinomatous areas confirming thyroid gland as a source of metastasis. Then the patient underwent total thyroidectomy and neck dissection, which revealed multicentric classic papillary thyroid carcinoma with an absence of squamous differentiation on extensive sampling. The patient received adjuvant radioactive iodine, but the neck swelling was rapidly progressing, ulcerated and infected. Computed tomography (CT) revealed left large cervical amalgamated LN and two metastatic lung nodules, the patient received 2 cycles of chemotherapy and was planned for external beam radiotherapy but she died within 7 months of first presentation. Collision tumours pose a diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenge and carry a rapidly progressive course and a fatal outcome. SCC is considered as a dedifferentiation of papillary thyroid carcinoma, which may appear in metastatic site rather than the primary site. PMID:27042475

  6. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  7. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the United States Across Time

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV– cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990–1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000–present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States. PMID:24641254

  8. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in the United States across time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Saha, Sandeep; Yu, Menggang; Kimple, Randall J; Lambert, Paul F

    2014-04-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV- cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990-1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000-present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States. PMID:24641254

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Biomechanical response of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Kemper, Andrew R; Porta, David J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical response of human cervical spine segments in dynamic axial compression. This was accomplished by performing dynamic axial compression tests on human cervical spine segments, C4-T1 and C6-T1, dissected from fresh frozen human male cadavers. The proximal and distal vertebral bodies were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot and subjected to dynamic compressive loading rates using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System at a rate of 50 mm/s. The average force and moment at time of structural failure were found to be 3022 +/- 45 N and 46.1 +/-8.1 Nm, respectively, for C4-T1 segments and 6117 +/- 6639 N and 69.5 +/-6.8 Nm, respectively for C6-T1segments. The most severe injury as a result of this testing was compression fractures of the vertebral body. In addition, injuries to the intervertebral discs were only observed in specimens that sustained severe vertebral body fractures. This is consistent with the findings of previous researchers who have reported that intervertebral disc failures do not occur due to single acute loading events without associated severe boney fractures. PMID:19141905

  12. Expression of E-, P- and N-Cadherin and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Precancerous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Fenfen; Hong, Die; Lv, Weiguo; Xie, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of classical cadherins has been observed in tumor invasion and metastasis, but its involvement in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not clear. We investigated E-, P- and N-cadherin expression and its significance in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). This retrospective study enrolled 508 patients admitted to Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University with cervical lesions between January 2006 and December 2010. Immunochemical staining was performed in 98 samples of normal cervical epithelium (NC), 283 of CIN, and 127 of early-stage SCC. The association of cadherin staining with clinical characteristics and survival of the patients was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. We found gradients of decreasing E-cadherin expression and increasing P-cadherin expression from NC through CIN to SCC. Aberrant E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression were significantly associated with clinical parameters indicating poor prognosis and shorter patient survival. Interestingly, we found very low levels of positive N-cadherin expression in CIN and SCC tissues that were not related to CIN or cancer. Pearson chi-square tests showed that E-cadherin expression in SCC was inversely correlated with P-cadherin expression (E-P switch), and was not correlated with N-cadherin expression. More important, patients with tissues exhibiting an E-P switch in expression had highly aggressive phenotypes and poorer prognosis than those without E-P switch expression. Our findings suggest that E-cadherin and P-cadherin, but not N-cadherin staining, might be useful in diagnosing CIN and for predicting prognosis in patients with early-stage SCC. PMID:27223886

  13. Study on CXCR4/SDF-1alpha axis in lymph node metastasis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-P; Lu, W-G; Ye, F; Chen, H-Z; Zhou, C-Y; Xie, X

    2007-01-01

    CXCR4/stromal-cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) is involved in many cancer metastatic mechanisms. Cervical squamous cell cancer (SCC) tissues (n=35), normal cervical tissues (n=10), metastatic (n=10) and nonmetastatic lymph nodes (n=50), and Hela cells were stained immunohistochemically with CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Meanwhile, lymph nodes were stained immunohistochemically with rabbit anti-SDF-1alpha. In vitro invasion of Hela cells was evaluated using Transwell Permeable Supports (Corning, NY), in which Hela cells with/without CXCR4 mAb preincubation were seeded in the upper chambers and medium containing 0-100 ng/mL SDF-1alpha was added to the lower compartments. For evaluating the effect of CXCR4/SDF-1alpha on proliferation of cervical cancer cells, Hela cells were cultured for 72 h exposed to SDF-1alpha with and without CXCR4 mAb. We found that CXCR4 was expressed on SCC cells in all cervical cancer, metastatic lymph node, and Hela cells but not in normal cervix. SDF-1alpha was expressed on lymph cells in all lymph nodes. SDF-1alpha induced the directed migration of Hela cells with a concentration-dependent model, which was inhibited by CXCR4 mAb (P<0.05). SDF-1alpha also stimulated the proliferation of Hela cells mediated by CXCR4 (P<0.05). CXCR4/SDF-1alpha axis probably participates in the metastasis toward lymph nodes in cervical cancer. PMID:17362322

  14. Human papillomaviruses and cervical cancer in Bangkok. I. Risk factors for invasive cervical carcinomas with human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 DNA.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Koetsawang, A; Kiviat, N; Kuypers, J; Qin, Q; Ashley, R L; Koetsawang, S

    2001-04-15

    Personal interviews, tests for antibodies to herpes simplex virus type 2, Treponema pallidum, and hepatitis B, tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and polymerase chain reaction-based assays for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical scrapings were obtained from 190 women with squamous cell and 42 women with adenomatous cervical carcinoma and from 291 hospitalized controls diagnosed in Bangkok, Thailand, between September 1991 and September 1993. Risk was strongly associated with oncogenic HPV types, with types 16 and 18 predominating in squamous and adenomatous lesions, respectively. The 126 cases with HPV-16 and the 42 cases with HPV-18 were compared with 250 controls with no evidence of any HPV. The risk of both viral tumor types increased with decreasing age at first intercourse in this predominantly monogamous population, which may be explained by more visits to prostitutes by the husbands of cases with early than late age at first intercourse. HPV-16 tumors were weakly associated with HBsAg carrier state and smoking. The risk of tumors of both viral types increased with parity and use of oral contraceptives but not with injectable progestogens. Factors that may predispose to persistent, oncogenic HPV-16 or -18 infection may include estrogens or progestins in the presence of estrogens, immunosuppression, and smoking, but other factors related to low socioeconomic status are also involved. PMID:11296143

  15. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. Purpose To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Study Design Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Methods Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). Results The atlantoaxial (C1–2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4–C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Conclusion Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be

  16. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Iranian Women According to the Severity of the Cervical Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Hashemi, Firoozeh Sadat; Haeri, Hayedeh; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Keyvani, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as a major cause of cervical cancer. Distribution of HPV genotypes may differ according to the geographic region and the severity of the cervical lesion. Determining HPV genotypes’ specific distribution is useful for HPV surveillance and control programs. However, little is known about the distribution of HPV genotypes in Iranian women. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of HPV genotypes in Iranian women with different grades of cervical lesions. Patients and Methods From 2011 to 2013, a total of 436 Iranian women with convenience sampling strategy were included in this cross-sectional study. In detail, 287 women negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, 32 with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 50 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), 44 with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), and 23 with cervical cancer were evaluated in this investigation. HPV genotypes were determined by INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay. Results In total, HPV infection was detected in 45.4% of the cases. The most common high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) genotype was HPV-16 (32.8%), followed by HPV-53 (9.1%). Within low-risk (LR-HPV) genotypes HPV-6 (22.2%) and HPV-44 (6.1%) were the most prevalent. HPV-16 was the predominant genotype in cases with cervical cancer (56.5%), ASCUS (34.4%), and HSIL (34.1%). HPV-6 was the most common genotype in normal cases (9.1%) and LSIL patients (18%). The prevalence of HPV positivity was significantly higher in cases with high-grade lesions (≥ HSIL) (64.2%) than in normal/LSIL (37.3%) (P = 0.033). The rate of HR-HPV infection was significantly higher in ≥ HSIL cases (61.2%) than normal/LSIL (27.9%) (P = 0.003). Conclusions This study describes robust information on the distribution of HPV genotypes among Iranian women with and without cervical lesions. The present data

  19. Management of Squamous Cancer Metastatic to Cervical Nodes With an Unknown Primary Site.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Thomas J; Ridge, John A

    2015-10-10

    Squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (SCCUP) of the head and neck is a rare disease. As a diagnosis of exclusion, the manner in which it is assigned merits consideration. Despite the development and refinement of several techniques designed to locate an occult tumor, including cross-sectional anatomic imaging, functional imaging, and transoral surgical techniques, delineating SCCUP remains an active clinical problem. Its relative rarity has prevented prospective study of the entity. Hence, investigators must rely on retrospective analyses to understand the disease and its appropriate treatment. The current understanding of SCCUP differs substantially from when it was initially described decades ago. The most common site of a small primary tumor initially thought to represent SCCUP is the tonsil or base of the tongue, and an increasing percentage are associated with human papilloma virus. Modern treatment of SCCUP by neck dissection alone, neck dissection followed by radiation with or without concurrent chemotherapy, or primary chemoradiation according to initial nodal disease burden produces extraordinarily low recurrence rates. Whether the potential mucosal primary site and/or the contralateral neck should be electively treated is controversial. Efficacy data seem to be similar; therefore, an evaluation of the toxicity of both treatment paradigms is warranted. PMID:26351351

  20. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds. PMID:6746858

  1. Has cervical smooth muscle any physiological role in the human?

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1985-01-01

    Strips of human cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy and contractile activity was registered isometrically in a tissue chamber perfused by Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer. The most frequently encountered pattern of contractile activity was high frequency-short duration. Prostaglandin (PG)E2, PGI2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha had an inhibitory effect on the muscular activity. Cervical muscle from pregnant women was more sensitive to PGE2 than specimens from non-pregnant women. PGF2 alpha had no apparent effect on cervical contractility in non-pregnant and early pregnant patients. In late pregnancy, however, PGF2 alpha inhibited muscle contractions. The present results point to a physiological role of the cervical muscles for the control of cervical competence during pregnancy. The inhibitory effect of PGs on the muscle activity may promote cervical dilatation and retraction. PMID:3893038

  2. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  3. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  4. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  6. Comparison of absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Zelinska, N. V.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  7. The Number of Positive Pelvic Lymph Nodes and Multiple Groups of Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis Influence Prognosis in Stage IA–IIB Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Li-Jun; Li, Ming-Zhu; Li, Ming-Xia; Wang, Jian-Liu; Wei, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pelvic lymph node metastasis (LNM) is an important prognostic factor in cervical cancer. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 75–80% of all cervical cancers. Analyses of the effects of the number of positive lymph nodes (LNs), unilateral versus bilateral pelvic LNM and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM on survival and recurrence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma are still lacking. The study aimed to analyze the effects of the number of positive pelvic LNs and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM on survival and recurrence. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 296 patients diagnosed with Stage IA–IIB cervical squamous cell carcinoma who received extensive/sub-extensive hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy/pelvic LN sampling at Peking University People's Hospital from November 2004 to July 2013. Ten clinicopathological variables were evaluated as risk factors for pelvic LNM: Age at diagnosis, gravidity, clinical stage, histological grade, tumor diameter, lymph-vascular space involvement (LVSI), depth of cervical stromal invasion, uterine invasion, parametrial invasion, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: The incidence of pelvic LNM was 20.27% (60/296 cases). Pelvic LNM (P = 0.00) was significantly correlated with recurrence. Pelvic LNM (P = 0.00), the number of positive pelvic LNs (P = 0.04) and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM (P = 0.03) had a significant influence on survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that LVSI (P = 0.00), depth of cervical stromal invasion (P = 0.00) and parametrial invasion (P = 0.03) were independently associated with pelvic LNM. Conclusions: Patients with pelvic LNM had a higher recurrence rate and poor survival outcomes. Furthermore, more than 2 positive pelvic LNs and multiple groups of pelvic LNM appeared to identify patients with worse survival outcomes in node-positive IA-IIB cervical squamous cell carcinoma. LVSI

  8. High-risk human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women: Distribution and association with pathohistological findings.

    PubMed

    Stamenković, Miodrag; Knežević, Aleksandra; Knežević, Ivana; Kuzmanović, Igor; Karalić, Danijela; Milenković, Sanja; Jovanović, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    A significant role of high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma is well known. HR HPV 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. The incidence of cervical cancer in Serbia, is one of the highest in Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of HR HPV types in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women, as well as association between the HPV types and pathohistological findings. The study included 80 archival cervical cancer tissues from the same number of patients. The presence of HPV DNA was determined using MY09/MY11 primers for L1 gene and GP1/GP2 primers for E1 gene. HPV was detected in 78.75% tissues. HR HPV genotypes found in the decreasing order of frequency were: HPV16 (80.39%), HPV33 (7.84%), HPV58 (5.88%), HPV18 (1.96%), HPV45 (1.96%) and HPV53 (1.96%). The examined tissues were 91.25% squamous cell carcinomas and 8.75% adenocarcinoma. The high frequency of HPV 16 was observed in both types of carcinoma (80.8% and 75%, respectively) while the prevalence of HPV18 was low. These results may contribute to the implementation of cervical carcinoma prevention program in Serbia, including the selection of the most appropriate vaccine and immunization program. PMID:27461126

  9. Venereal factors in human cervical cancer: evidence from marital clusters.

    PubMed

    Kessler, I I

    1977-04-01

    All Caucasian women in a large Eastern city who developed pathologically confirmed cervical cancer between 1950 and 1969 are being prospectively followed in an epidemiological test of the venereal hypothesis of cervical carcinogenesis. We are attempting to identify all men who were married to these probands at any time prior to the date of their cancer diagnosis. The ultimate objective is the identification of all the other wives of the proband husbands in order that their risk of cervical cancer be assessed. A random sample of control wives similar to the other wives in age, race, date and place of marriage as well as prior marital status is also being followed. To date, a total of 1,087 other wives and 659 control wives has been fully traced. Cervical cancer or carcinoma in situ was detected in 29 (2.7%) of the other wives and in seven (1.1%) of the control wives. A total of 14.0% of the other wives had either cervical cancer or a cervical cytological specimen which was other than normal. The corresponding statistic for the control wives was 8.0%. These differences in the prevalence of cervical cancer and of non-normal cervical cytology are statistically significant. In the course of this investigation so far, we have identified 29 "marital clusters" of cervical cancer in which two women married to the same man have all developed cervical neoplasms. The observed number of 29 clusters may be compared with an expected number of 11.6. This investigation, as yet incomplete, offers confirmatory evidence of the possible role of venereal factors in the pathogenesis of human cervical neoplasia. While the genital herpesvirus is the likeliest candidate, other venereal elements might also be involved. PMID:192439

  10. Prognosis of Cervical Cancer in the Era of Concurrent Chemoradiation from National Database in Korea: A Comparison between Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Boram; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Jae-Weon; Won, Young-Joo

    2015-01-01

    In 1999, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical advisory strongly touting the advantage of cisplatin-based chemoradiation (CCRT) for cervical cancer patients requiring radiation for their treatment. This study aimed to compare survival outcomes of cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma before and after the advent of CCRT. Data were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database for patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancers between 1993 and 2012. We compared survival according to histologic subtypes in cervical cancer patients diagnosed before (1993–1997), during (1998–2002), and after (2003–2012) the introduction of CCRT. A total of 80,766 patients were identified, including 64,531 (79.9%) women with squamous cell carcinomas and 7,265 (9.0%) with adenocarcinoma. With the introduction of CCRT, survival trends gradually increased in patients of both histologic subtypes with regional tumors. However, survival was significantly higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma patients regardless of treatment modalities (surgery alone, P < 0.001; surgery followed by CCRT, P < 0.001; or primary CCRT, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that adenocarcinoma was an independent negative prognostic factor for survival regardless of the time period (before CCRT, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.37–1.62; after introduction of CCRT, HR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.30–1.50). Although the survival of adenocarcinoma has improved after the introduction of CCRT, adenocarcinoma is still associated with worse overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinoma in the era of CCRT. PMID:26660311

  11. Human papillomavirus profile of women in Belize City, Belize: correlation with cervical cytopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Cathro, Helen P; Loya, Theresa; Dominguez, Frederick; Howe, Susan L; Howell, Renee; Orndorff, Kyle; Moreno, Jessica; Mendez, Elena; Fung, Po Chu; Beer, Natalie L; Allen, Peter; Sosa, Alba M; Gurka, Kelly K; Stoler, Mark H; Frierson, Henry F

    2009-07-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common cancer among Belizean women; however, data regarding the frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and their association with cervical cancer are nonexistent. We therefore included HPV genotyping as part of a week-long cervical cancer screening campaign conducted in Belize City in 2007. Conventional Papanicolaou smears with Hybrid Capture (HC) 2 HPV testing were performed on 463 women. All HC2-positive samples were genotyped using a developmental GP5+/GP6+ polymerase chain reaction-coupled Luminex assay for 2 low-risk and 18 high-risk HPV types. The prevalence of high-risk HPV was 15.6% in the total population, 10.1% in those with normal cytologic findings, and 93.3% in women with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Of patients with HPV infections, 35% had multiple types (5.4% of the total group). Of all women and of women with normal cytologic findings, 5.2% and 2.8%, respectively, had HPV16 or 18. For all women, HPV16, 18, 56, and 52 were present in decreasing order of frequency. HPV11 was present in only one patient, and none had HPV6. HPV16 was found in 47% of high-grade squamous epithelial lesions; however, no case of HSIL had HPV18 or 45. HPV35 and HPV58 were the next most common types in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, each occurring in 20% of cases of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, followed by HPV31 in 13.3%. Although women younger than 25 years old were underrepresented, these data suggest that the HPV profile of this cohort of Belizean women differs somewhat from that in the region. In addition, these data are of importance with regard to the development of HPV vaccines that will be used in less developed countries, where care should be taken not to implement vaccination at the cost of basic screening and diagnostic services. PMID:19299000

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection & cervical abnormalities in HIV-positive women in eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Chourasia, Ankita; Thakur, Minaxi; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Agrawal, Nisha Rani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: India has the third highest burden of HIV and highest number of cervical cancer in the world. A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the factors associated with HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in HIV-positive women attending the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Centre in a tertiary care hospital in eastern India. Methods: We screened 216 HIV- positive women with Papanicolau smear cytology and HPV testing. HPV DNA was detected by using consensus primers followed by sequencing. Results: Of the 216 HIV-positive women screened, 58 (26.85%) were HPV-positive; 56 (25.9%) were of high-risk (HR) HPV type. The most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (7.9%); non 16 and 18 HPV types were present in 17.6 per cent patients. Age ≤ 35 yr [(OR), 2.56 (1.26-5.19)], illiteracy [OR, 2.30 (1.19-4.46)], rural residence [OR, 3.99 (1.27-12.56)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.46 (1.26-4.83)] were associated with increased risk of acquisition of HPV. One hundred thirty nine (74.33%) patients had normal/ negative for intraepithelial lesions (NILM) cytology, three (1.60%) had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 32 (17.11%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 10 (5.35%) had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and three (1.60%) had carcinoma cervix. WHO clinical Stage III and IV [OR, 2.83 (1.07-7.49)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.84 (1.30-6.20)] were risk factors for abnormal cytology. Interpretation &conclusions: Our study showed 26.85 per cent HPV positivity in HIV infected women in this region, with HPV-16 as the commonest genotype. Abnormal cervical cytology was seen in about 25 per cent women. Regular Pap smear screening as recommended by the National AIDS Control Organization will help in early detection of cervical abnormalities in HIV- positive women. PMID:26997018

  13. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy. PMID:25817474

  14. The absence of human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in East China

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Haohua; Li, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuping; Wu, Jie; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most common types of tumors worldwide, particularly in China, and human papillomavirus (HPV) is thought to be a potential risk factor for this cancer. To determine whether this is true, we collected 177 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded ESCC samples from two hospitals. We screened for 23 different HPV genotypes using a human papillomavirus genotyping kit, which allowed us to amplify the L1 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and test for 23 HPV subtypes by reverse dot blot (RDB) on a single membrane. We also used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect the P16INK4a protein, the expression of which is linked to HPV E7 activity and which is used to diagnose cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The genotyping results showed that only six samples were weakly positive for HPV: two for HPV16, two for HPV11 and two for HPV35, with no samples showing strong positive signals. The IHC results showed only five samples with diffuse positive staining, with the other samples being completely negative or having only focal positive signals, which were considered as negative. This study demonstrates that the HPV infection rate in ESCC samples is very low, suggesting that HPV is not the etiological cause of ESCC. PMID:25120798

  15. Human papillomavirus tumor infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ludmir, Ethan B.; Stephens, Sarah J.; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been recognized for over three decades. Recently, multiple meta-analyses have drawn upon existing literature to assess the strength of the HPV-ESCC linkage. Here, we review these analyses and attempt to provide a clinically-relevant overview of HPV infection in ESCC. HPV-ESCC detection rates are highly variable across studies. Geographic location likely accounts for a majority of the variation in HPV prevalence, with high-incidence regions including Asia reporting significantly higher HPV-ESCC infection rates compared with low-incidence regions such as Europe, North America, and Oceania. Based on our examination of existing data, the current literature does not support the notion that HPV is a prominent carcinogen in ESCC. We conclude that there is no basis to change the current clinical approach to ESCC patients with respect to tumor HPV status. PMID:26029456

  16. Molecular Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Motamedi, Hossein; Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Bahrami Shehni, Mahjabin; Kargar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is one of the important reasons of mortality among females. Prevention, early diagnosis and immediate treatment can affect the rate of mortality in this cancer and several epidemiological studies have shown a strong relationship between human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer. Objectives: The present study was conducted to survey HPV infections in a women population with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia/metaplasia in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: 72 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies which had been previously archived from women with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterward, the detected HPV strains were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR amplicons. Results: 60 out of 72 samples had necessary requirements and HPV DNA was detected in 43.3% of these samples. Most HPV positive samples belonged to women aged from 48 to 63 years. On the other hand, HPV infection among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 48.78% and in women with dysplasia/metaplasia was 26.66%. The most prevalent type of the human papilloma virus was HPV16 (100%). Conclusions: Knowing the most prevalent type of the human papilloma viruses circulating in the population (HPV16) can be applied in the future screening and managing programs of this major disease and also in vaccination against the prevalent types of the virus. Meanwhile, it seems that more studies should be performed to determine the role of different risk factors involved in development of the disease, especially those related with social behaviors and traditions with respect to different areas. PMID:27366309

  17. Synchronous metastatic squamous cell carcinoma to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ito, Homare; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Tsukui, Hidenori; Naoi, Daishi; Tahara, Makiko; Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Horie, Hisanaga; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Sata, Naohiro

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from an unknown primary site to the colon has not been reported previously. A 75-year-old woman presented with a mass in the left submandibular region. Biopsy revealed a Class V lesion, but the histologic type was undetermined. Surgical resection of the left submandibular gland with cervical lymph node dissection was performed. However, SCC was seen in the lymph nodes only, with no tumor in the submandibular gland. Three months after surgery, computed tomography revealed that the preoperatively diagnosed lesion in the transverse colon had grown considerably. A laparoscopic right hemicolectomy was performed. Histological examination showed features of SCC, similar to the findings in the cervical lymph nodes. We report a rare case of synchronous metastatic SCC to the colon and cervical lymph nodes from a carcinoma of unknown primary site. PMID:27173884

  18. Expression of HIF-2α and VEGF in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Its Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lixia; Chen, Qiang; Hu, Jing; Chen, Yue; Liu, Chenglong; Xu, Changshui

    2016-01-01

    CSCC is a systemic disease involving polygenic alteration and multiple steps, and HIF and VEGF are closely associated with tumorigenesis. Specimens surgically resected from 64 cases of CSCC and 22 cases of normal cervical tissue were selected randomly to detect the expression of HIF-2α and VEGF in CSCC for exploring their clinical significance; information regarding the age, lymph node metastasis, and FIGO staging were collected as well; expression of HIF-2α and VEGF was detected by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. We found that the expression of HIF-2α and VEGF mRNA in CSCC was significantly higher than that of normal cervical tissues and showed a positive correlation between them. The positive rates of HIF-2α and VEGF protein expression in CSCC and normal cervical tissues were 93.8% and 18.2%, respectively, with correlation between them. The expression of both HIF-2α and VEGF mRNA did not relate closely to age but the FIGO staging and lymph node metastasis. Compared with the counterpart control group, CSCC tissues with high FIGO staging and lymph node metastasis had a higher level of HIF-2α and VEGF mRNA expression. So, HIF-2α and VEGF were overexpressed in CSCC, which has a great clinical significance for its diagnosis. PMID:27413748

  19. Genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with cervical lesions in Bioko, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Nieto-Bona, Ma Paz; Rueda, Sonsoles; Silva-Sánchez, Luís Fernando; Piernas-Morales, Ma Concepción; Carro-Campos, Patricia; Cortés-Lambea, Luís; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Background The HVP vaccine is a useful tool for preventing cervical cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine the most frequent HPV genotypes in Equatorial Guinea in order to develop future vaccination strategies to apply in this country. Methods A campaign against cervical cancer was carried out in the area on a total of 1,680 women. 26 of the women, following cytological screening, were treated surgically with a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Cases were studied histologically and were genotyped from paraffin blocks by applying a commercial kit that recognized 35 HPV types. Results Cytological diagnoses included 17 HSIL, 1 LSIL, 5 ASC-H and 3 AGUS. Histological diagnosis resulted in 3 cases of microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma stage IA of FIGO, 9 CIN-3, 8 CIN-2, 2 CIN-1, 3 flat condylomas and mild dysplasia of the endocervical epithelium. Fifteen of twenty-five cases genotyped were positive for HPV (60%). HPV 16 and 33 were identified in four cases each, HPV 58 in two other cases, and HPV 18, 31, 52, and 82 in one case, with one HPV 16 and 58 coinfection. Conclusion The frequency of HPV types in the African area varies in comparison to other regions, particularly in Europe and USA. Vaccination against the five most common HPV types (16, 33, 58, 18, and 31) should be considered in the geographic region of West Africa and specifically in Equatorial Guinea. PMID:19740435

  20. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen in Follow-Up of Cervical Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, Franca; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella Morganti, Alessio G.; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Giardina, Bruno; Scambia, Giovanni

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen is still considered the most accurate serologic tumor marker in cervical carcinoma. We assessed the contribution of the SCC assay to the detection of recurrences in patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The pattern of recurrence and follow-up data were prospectively recorded for 135 patients. Of the 135 patients, 103 (76.3%) had primary cervical carcinoma and 32 (23.7%) had already experienced disease recurrence that had been successfully treated with surgery (n = 2), surgery plus radiotherapy (n = 2), radiotherapy (n = 5), or concomitant chemoradiotherapy (n = 23). The follow-up evaluations (chest X-ray, abdominopelvic magnetic resonance imaging, gynecologic examination with colposcopy, Papanicolaou smear, and SCC assay) were performed at 6-month intervals; the evaluation was done earlier if recurrent disease was suspected. The median follow-up time was 29 months (range, 6-131). The SCC serum levels were assayed, and a cost analysis was done. Results: A total of 481 SCC determinations were performed. Of the 135 patients, 43 (31.8%) experienced disease recurrence. The SCC levels were higher in those with recurrent disease than in the disease-free patients. Elevation of SCC was documented in 34 (79.1% sensitivity) of 43 recurrences before symptoms appeared. Of the 38 patients with serum SCC elevation, 34 developed a recurrence (positive predictive value, 89.5%). Of the 97 patients with negative SCC serum levels, 88 had negative findings at the clinicoradiologic evaluation (negative predictive value, 90.7%). A simplified approach (SCC plus gynecologic examination) was evaluated. Compared with the complete follow-up program, the rate of missed recurrence was 2.2%. The total projected cost per patient for 5 years of follow-up for the simplified procedure was approximately 12.2-fold lower than the standard approach. Conclusions: Our results have shown that a simplified diagnostic approach, including

  1. Effect of Low CD4 Cell Count on Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions among HIV-Positive Women in Enugu, Southeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Enebe, Joseph Tochukwu; Nnakenyi, Emeka Francis; Ezegwui, Hyginus Uzochukwu; Ozumba, Benjamin Chukwuma

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive women are more likely to develop cervical neoplasm. HIV-positive women with low CD4 T-lymphocyte cell count may be more predisposed to cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs). This study aimed to determine the association between low cellular immunity of HIV positive women, and the prevalence and grade of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. Materials and Methods Pap smear was carried out on two cohorts of Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) experienced HIV-positive women (178 per group) at the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria-Centre for Disease Control Adult Anti-Retroviral clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria from June to November, 2012. The study group had CD4 cell count of < 200 cells/μl while the control group had CD4 cell count of ≥200 cells/μl. Results The mean CD4 cell counts of participants in the study (low CD4) group was 127.9 ± 47.49 cells/ml while that of the control (high CD4) group was 489.2 ± 186.36 cells/ml (p < 0.001). The prevalence of SIL was 10.2% (18/176) for the low CD4 group, and 5.7% (10/176) for the high CD4 group [OR = 1.9 (95% CI: 0.85, 4.22)]. The commonest category of SILs identified was Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion (LSIL), thus 11 (6.3%) in the study versus 7 (4.0%) in the control group (p = 0.703). Conclusion Prevalence of cervical SILs among HIV positive women on HAART in Enugu, Nigeria is low and has no significant relationship with their CD4 cell count. PMID:26674006

  2. Correlation Among Six Biologic Factors (p53, p21{sup WAF1}, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2) and Clinical Outcomes After Curative Chemoradiation Therapy in Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Murakami, Naoya; Asari, Takao; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The expressions of six cell-cycle-associated proteins were analyzed in cervical squamous cell carcinomas in correlation in a search for prognostic correlations in tumors treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT). Methods and Materials: The expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, molecular immunology borstel-1 (MIB-1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Bcl-2 were studied using an immunohistochemical method in 57 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with cCRT. Patients received cCRT between 1998 and 2005. The mean patient age was 61 years (range, 27-82 years). The number of patients with Stage II, III, and IVA disease was 18, 29, and 10, respectively. Results: The number of patients with tumors positive for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2 was 26, 24, 49, 26, 13, and 11, respectively; no significant correlation was noted. The 5-year overall survival rates of HER2-positive and -negative patients was 76% vs. 44%, which was of borderline significance (p = 0.0675). No significant correlation was noted between overall survival and expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2. No correlation was observed between local control and expression of any of the proteins. Conclusion: Expression of HER2 protein had a weak impact of borderline significance on overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with cCRT. However, no clinical associations could be established for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2 protein expressions.

  3. The Zinc Finger Protein ZNF268 Is Overexpressed in Human Cervical Cancer and Contributes to Tumorigenesis via Enhancing NF-κB Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Mingxiong; Hu, Li; Cai, Jinyang; Zeng, Yan; Luo, Jun; Shu, Zhiqiang; Li, Wenxin; Huang, Zan

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common tumors affecting women's health worldwide. Although human papillomavirus can be detected in nearly all cases, the mechanism of cervical carcinogenesis remains to be further addressed. Here, we demonstrated that ZNF268, a Krüppel-associated box-containing zinc finger protein, might contribute to the development of cervical cancer. We found that ZNF268b2, an isoform of ZNF268, was overexpressed in human squamous cervical cancer specimens. Knockdown of ZNF268 in cervical cancer cells caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, reduced colony formation, and increased sensitivity to TNFα-induced apoptosis. In addition, HeLa cell growth in xenograft nude mice was suppressed by ZNF268 knockdown, with increased apoptosis. Furthermore, ZNF268b2 was shown to increase NF-κB signaling in vitro and in vivo. Reconstitution of NF-κB activity restored proliferation in ZNF268 knockdown HeLa cells. Of note, we observed a high frequency of NF-κB activation in ZNF268-overexpressing cervical cancer tissues, suggesting a pathological coincidence of ZNF268b2 overexpression and NF-κB activation. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role of ZNF268b2 that contributes to cervical carcinogenesis in part through enhancing NF-κB signaling. PMID:23091055

  4. Is there any role of mast cell density and microvessel density in cervical squamous cell carcinoma? A histologic study with special reference to CD-34 immunomarker staining

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Santosh Kumar; Dasgupta, Senjuti; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Chatterjee, Shankha; Chakraborty, Debdutta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mast cells are involved in induction of angiogenesis in the early-stages of tumor development and in modulating blood vessel growth in the later stages of tumor progression. Aims and Objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate the association between mast cell density (MCD) and microvessel density (MVD) in carcinoma in situ (CIS), microinvasive carcinoma (CA) and invasive squamous cell CA of cervix. Materials and Methods: Six cases of CIS, four cases of microinvasive CA and 38 cases of invasive CA were studied over a period of 2 years from August, 2011 to June, 2013. Ten control samples were included in the study. Routine histologic examination was done. Toluidine blue stain was used for MCD determination. Immunohistochemical analysis with CD-34 was done for assessing MVD. Student's t-test was used to calculate the statistical significance of MCD and MVD. Results: Both MCD and MVD increased from normal samples through CIS to invasive cervical CA. In the four cases of microinvasive CA, the MCD and MVD were more than that of the control samples, but less than that of the six cases of CIS. Conclusion: There is a correlation between mast cell accumulation and angiogenesis in CIS, microinvasive CA and invasive cervical squamous cell CA. MCD and MVD in invasive CA exceed those in CIS and microinvasive CA. It gives us an opportunity to postulate that therapeutic strategies against mast cell mediators and angiogenesis may be of benefit in patients of early-stage cervical CA. PMID:25197180

  5. Prevalence characteristics of high-risk human papillomaviruses in women living in Shanghai with cervical precancerous lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Ma, Chenyun; Zou, Jue; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Rong; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-26

    A complete understanding of the natural history of infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in cervical cancer requires data from regional and ethnic studies. The prevalence of high-risk HPVs was evaluated retrospectively in 2040 patients with cervicitis, 239 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 242 with CIN2/3, and 42 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) based on data from patients who visited our hospital between May 2013 and May 2015. The rates of high-risk HPV infection in patients with cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and invasive SCC were 40.8%, 74.9%, 70.2%, and 83.3%, respectively. The three most dominant HPV genotypes were HPV16, 58, and 52. HPV16 and HPV58 positivity in cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and SCC patients were 20.9% and 16.4%, 19.0% and 20.1%, 44.1% and 23.5%, and 60.0% and 31.4%, respectively. Compared to cervicitis, the odds ratios (ORs) for CIN2/3 in HPV16- and HPV58-positive patients were 2.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.32-4.33) and 1.56 (1.11-3.21), respectively; for SCC, the corresponding values were 5.68 (2.31-7.893) and 2.33 (1.41-3.87). Further identifying of carcinogenic HPVs and a fully aware of regional differences in HPV genotype distribution are tasks of top priority for cervical cancer control and prevention. PMID:27013587

  6. Patient-tailored conservative surgical treatment of invasive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Menczer, J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to review currently available data regarding the results of a more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early invasive uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A PubMed search of investigations in the English language published from January 2000 to September 2012 containing the terms conservative surgery, conservative treatment, trachelectomy, parametrectomy, lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and fertility sparing surgery in combination with SCC was made. Conization only is optimal for women with stage Ia1 disease mainly in tumors without lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI). In stage Ib1 patients interested to maintain reproductive capacity, vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy are the procedures of choice. Patients with small tumors (<2 cm), no deep invasion, no LVSI, and negative pelvic nodes are at very low risk of parametrial involvement and parametrectomy may be omitted in them. Such patients may benefit from less radical surgery and may be candidates for simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, or conization with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is apparently a good predictor of node metastases and allows the performance of lymphadenectomy only in SLN positive cases. Thus lymphadenectomy may also be omitted in some patients. In young women with locally advanced tumors, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery may also be a feasible treatment. A more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early SCC is possible resulting in lower morbidity and preservation of fertility without compromising the outcome. PMID:24051940

  7. Constitutive expression of human keratin 14 gene in mouse lung induces premalignant lesions and squamous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dakir, E L Habib; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Linnoila, R Ilona

    2008-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 20% of all human lung cancers and is strongly linked to cigarette smoking. It develops through premalignant changes that are characterized by high levels of keratin 14 (K14) expression in the airway epithelium and evolve through basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia and dysplasia to carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma. In order to explore the impact of K14 in the pulmonary epithelium that normally lacks both squamous differentiation and K14 expression, human keratin 14 gene hK14 was constitutively expressed in mouse airway progenitor cells using a mouse Clara cell specific 10 kDa protein (CC10) promoter. While the lungs of CC10-hK14 transgenic mice developed normally, we detected increased expression of K14 and the molecular markers of squamous differentiation program such as involucrin, loricrin, small proline-rich protein 1A, transglutaminase 1 and cholesterol sulfotransferase 2B1. In contrast, wild-type lungs were negative. Aging CC10-hK14 mice revealed multifocal airway cell hyperplasia, occasional squamous metaplasia and their lung tumors displayed evidence for multidirectional differentiation. We conclude that constitutive expression of hK14 initiates squamous differentiation program in the mouse lung, but fails to promote squamous maturation. Our study provides a novel model for assessing the mechanisms of premalignant lesions in vivo by modifying differentiation and proliferation of airway progenitor cells. PMID:18701433

  8. Recombinant vaccines for the prevention of human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Kenneth E; Jenson, A Bennett; Kouokam, J Calvin; Lasnik, Amanda B; Ghim, Shin-je

    2009-06-01

    Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that cause cervical cancer preferentially infect basal, metaplastic squamous cells of the transformation zone. If infection persists, and a vegetative infection ensues, a premalignant lesion may develop with the potential to progress into an invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Papillomavirus prophylactic vaccines target the systemic immune system for induction of neutralizing antibodies that protect the basal cells against infection. Because the carcinogenic HPVs are susceptible to neutralization by antibodies for 9-48 h after reaching the basal cells, both low and high titered HPV type-specific antibodies induced by HPV L1 and L2-based vaccines are highly efficacious. The greatest burden of HPV-associated cancers occurs in poor areas of the world where women do not have access to routine gynecological care. The burden of HIV/AIDS in these same regions of the world has added to the burden of HPV-associated disease. There is an urgent need for a cost-effective, broad-spectrum HPV prophylactic vaccine in developing countries, which necessitates substantial cost subsidization of the virus-like particle (VLP) based vaccines licensed in industrialized countries or an alternative approach with second-generation vaccines that are specifically designed for delivery to women in resource-poor communities. PMID:19454268

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in the cervical epithelium of Mexican women: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical epithelium has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of Cervical Cancer (CC), which has recently become a public health problem in Mexico. This finding has allowed for the development of vaccines that help prevent this infection. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence and HPV type-distribution in Mexican women with CC, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), and Normal cytology (N) to estimate the impact of the HPV vaccines. Methods The PubMed database was used to identify and review all articles that reported data on HPV prevalence in CC, precursor lesions, and normal cytology of Mexican women. Results A total of 8,706 samples of the tissues of Mexican women were stratified according to diagnosis as follows: 499 for CC; 364 for HSIL; 1,425 for LSIL, and 6,418 for N. According to the results, the most prevalent genotypes are the following: HPV16 (63.1%), -18 (8.6%), -58, and −31 (5%) for CC; HPV-16 (28.3%), 58 (12.6%), 18 (7.4%), and 33 (6.5%) for HSIL; HPV-16 (13.1%), 33 (7.4%), 18 (4.2%), and 58 (2.6%) for LSIL, and HPV-16 (3.4%), 33 (2.1%), 18, and 58 (1.2%) for N. Conclusions Taken together, genotypes 58 and 31 (10%) are more common than type 18 (8.6%) in CC. Therefore, the inclusion of these two genotypes in a second-generation vaccine would provide optimal prevention of CC in Mexico. PMID:23199368

  10. Cervical Carcinomas With Neuroendocrine Differentiation: A Report of 28 Cases With Immunohistochemical Analysis and Molecular Genetic Evidence of Common Clonal Origin With Coexisting Squamous and Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Robert E; Michael, Helen; Wang, Mingsheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Roth, Lawrence M; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Cervical neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare, aggressive tumors and their immunohistochemical features and clonal relationship to coexisting tumors are incompletely described. Twenty-eight cases were identified (17 small cell, 9 large cell, and 2 mixed), 10 of which had an invasive squamous or adenocarcinoma component. Staining for synaptophysin, chromogranin A, TTF1, c-kit, CD44, and p16 was performed. Analyses for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 5 polymorphic microsatellite markers (D3S1300, D9S171, D11S914, D13S319, and TP53) and X-chromosome inactivation were performed. Of 17 cases with available blocks, 13 (76%) were synaptophysin+, 8 (47%) were chromogranin A+, 8 (47%) were TTF1+, 7 (41%) were c-kit+, and 6 (35%) were CD44+. Strong patchy or strong diffuse p16 staining was seen in all cases. LOH and X-chromosome inactivation analysis were performed for 17 cases, 8 of which had a coexisting squamous or adenocarcinoma component. Five of the 8 (63%) cases with 2 components showed allelic loss in both components. All 5 of these cases demonstrated identical LOH between the neuroendocrine and squamous or adenocarcinoma components. Nonrandom X-chromosome inactivation was seen in the neuroendocrine and other components in 4 of the 8 cases. In all 4 cases the pattern of inactivation was identical between the 2 components. Cervical neuroendocrine carcinomas have features similar to other extrapulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas, including expression of TTF1, c-kit, and CD44. Consistent staining for p16 is also seen. Concordant genetic alterations support common clonal origin for neuroendocrine carcinomas with a coexisting squamous or adenocarcinoma component. PMID:26630233

  11. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  12. Immunohistochemical Expression of VEGF and Podoplanin in Uterine Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Belfort-Mattos, Patrícia Napoli; Focchi, Gustavo Rubino de Azevedo; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas; Megale De Lima, Tatiana; Nogueira Carvalho, Carmen Regina; Kesselring Tso, Fernanda; De Góis Speck, Neila Maria

    2016-01-01

    VEGF and podoplanin (PDPN) have been identified as angiogenesis and/or lymphangiogenesis regulators and might be essential to restrict tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In the present study, we evaluate the association between the expression of these markers and CIN grade. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 234 uterine cervical samples using conventional histologic sections or TMA with the monoclonal antibodies to VEGF (C-1 clone) and podoplanin (D2-40 clone). Positive-staining rates of VEGF in 191 CIN specimens were significantly associated with histological grade (P < 0.001). Negative and/or focal immunostaining for PDPN were more frequent in CIN 3 (P = 0.016). We found that patients with CIN 3 more frequently had strong and more diffuse staining for VEGF and diminished staining for PDPN (P = 0.018). Strong and more diffuse VEGF immunoexpressions in CIN 2 and CIN 3 were detected when compared to CIN 1. Negative and/or focal PDPN immunoexpression appear to be more frequent in CIN 3. Moderate to strong VEGF expression may be a tendency among patients with high-grade lesions and diminished PDPN expression. PMID:27313335

  13. Association of human papilloma virus with pterygia and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, N

    2012-02-01

    There are more microorganisms that colonize the human body than resident cells; some are commensal whereas others are pathogenic. Pathogenic microorganisms are sensed by the innate or adaptive immune system, an immune response is initiated, and the infection is often cleared. Some microorganisms have developed strategies to evade immune defenses, ensuring their long-term survival with potentially devastating consequences for the host. Approximately 18% of all cancers can be attributed to infective agents; the most common being Helicobacter pylori, Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Hepatitis B and C virus in causing stomach, cervical and liver carcinoma, respectively. This review focuses on whether HPV infection is necessary for initiating pterygia, a common benign condition and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), a rare disease with metastatic potential. The search engine PubMed was used to identify articles from the literature related to HPV and pterygium or conjunctival neoplasia. From 34 investigations that studied HPV in pterygia and OSSN, a prevalence rate of 18.6% (136/731) and 33.8% (144/426), respectively, was recorded. The variation in HPV prevalence (0-100%) for both disease groups may have arisen from study-design faults and the techniques used to identify the virus. Overall, the data suggest that HPV is not necessary for initiating either condition but may be a co-factor in susceptible hosts. Currently, over 60 million people worldwide have been immunized with HPV vaccines, but any effect on pterygium and OSSN development may not be known for some time as these lesions can evolve over decades or occur in older individuals. PMID:22134594

  14. Effect of human papillomavirus 16 oncoproteins on oncostatin M upregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chotiyano, Apinya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Promthet, Supannee; Swangphon, Piyawut; Wongjampa, Weerayut; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection modulates several host cytokines contributing to cancer development. Oncostatin M (OSM), an IL-6 family cytokine, acts to promote cell senescence and inhibit growth. Its dysregulation promotes cell survival, cell proliferation and metastasis in various malignancies. The effect of HPV on OSM dysregulation has not been investigated. To elucidate this, immunohistochemistry was used on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues: HPV-positive (50) and HPV-negative (50) cases. Immortalized human cervical keratinocytes expressing HPV16E6 (HCK1T, Tet-On system) were used to demonstrate the role of HPV16E6 in OSM expression. In addition, a vector containing HPV16E6/E7 was transiently transfected into oral cancer cell lines. Cell viability, cell-cycle progression and cell migration were evaluated using flow cytometry and a wound healing assay, respectively. The results showed various intensities of OSM expression in OSCC. Interestingly, the median percentages of strongly stained cells were significantly higher in HPV-positive OSCCs than in HPV-negative OSCCs. To explore the role of HPV oncoproteins on OSM expression, the expression of HPV16E6 in the HCK1T Tet-On condition was induced by doxycycline and HPV16E6 was found to significantly upregulate levels of OSM mRNA and protein, with concomitant upregulation of c-Myc. In addition, the levels of OSM mRNA and protein in E6/E7 transiently transfected oral cancer cells also gradually increased in a time-dependent manner and these transfected cells showed greater viability and higher migration rates and cell-cycle progression than controls. This result demonstrates that HPV16 oncoproteins upregulate OSM and play an important role to promote OSCC development. PMID:27349249

  15. Dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2007-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients, including coupling coefficients, throughout the human cervical spine using rear impacts. A biofidelic whole cervical spine model (n=6) with muscle force replication and surrogate head was rear impacted at 5 g peak horizontal accelerations of the T1 vertebra within a bench-top mini-sled. The dynamic main and coupling sagittal flexibility coefficients were calculated at each spinal level, head/C1 to C7/T1. The average flexibility coefficients were statistically compared (p<0.05) throughout the cervical spine. To validate the coefficients, the average computed displacement peaks, obtained using the average flexibility matrices and the measured load vectors, were statistically compared to the measured displacement peaks. The computed and measured displacement peaks showed good overall agreement, thus validating the computed flexibility coefficients. These peaks could not be statistically differentiated, with the exception of extension rotation at head/C1 and posterior shear translation at C7/T1. Head/C1 was significantly more flexible than all other spinal levels. The cervical spine was generally more flexible in posterior shear, as compared to axial compression. The coupling coefficients indicated that extension moment caused coupled posterior shear translation while posterior shear force caused coupled extension rotation. The present results may be used towards the designs of anthropometric test dummies and mathematical models that better simulate the cervical spine response during dynamic loading. PMID:17140545

  16. Isolation of a novel human papillomavirus (type 51) from a cervical condyloma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J.; Crum, C.P.; Levine, R.U.; Silverstein, S.J. ); De Villiers, E.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors cloned the DNA from a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) present in a cervical condyloma. When DNA from this isolate was hybridized at high stringency with HPV types 1 through 50 (HPV-1 through HPV-50), it showed weak homology with HPV-6 and -16 and stronger homology with HPV-26. A detailed restriction endonuclease map was prepared which showed marked differences from the maps for other HPVs that have been isolated from the female genital tract. Reassociation kinetic analysis revealed that HPV-26 and this new isolate were less than 10% homologous; hence, the new isolate is a noel strain of HPV. The approximate positions of the open reading frames of the new strain were surmised by hybridization with probes derived from individual open reading frames of HPV-16. In an analysis of 175 genital biopsies from patients with abnormal Papanicolaou smears, sequences hybridizing under highly stringent conditions to probes from this novel HPV type were found in 4.2, 6.1, and 2.4% of biopsies containing normal squamous epithelium, condylomata, and intraepithelial neoplasia, respectively. In addition, sequences homologous to probes from this novel isolate were detected in one of five cervical carcinomas examined.

  17. Human papillomavirus types 16 E1 mRNA is transcribed from P14 early promoter in cervical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Maria; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Pavlova, Larissa; Komel'kov, Andrei; Korolenkova, Ljubov; Kisseljov, Fjodor; Kisseljova, Natalia

    2016-01-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) persistent infection is responsible for the development of the majority of cervical cancers. The therapy against HPV-associated cancer requires knowledge of the viral gene expression mechanisms. In this study, the polyadenylated polycistronic transcripts containing full-size E1ORF and produced from the early P14 promoter were detected for the first time in cervical tumors with episomal forms of the HPV16 genome. P14-initiated mRNAs were revealed also in precancerous lesions. The amount of P14-initiated transcripts was significantly less compared to transcripts initiated from the major P97 HPV16 promoter in cervical intraepithelial neoplasms and squamous cell carcinomas. The ratios of P97/P14-transcripts determined by qRT-PCR were unique for each clinical sample and varied in quite wide ranges independent of disease progression stages or tumor grade. These data suggest that the levels of P14- and P97-transcripts are regulated independently from each other in cervical neoplasms. PMID:26655237

  18. Rapid induction of senescence in human cervical carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Edward C.; Yang, Eva; Lee, Chan-Jae; Lee, Han-Woong; Dimaio, Daniel; Hwang, Eun-Seong

    2000-09-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 regulatory protein in human cervical carcinoma cell lines repressed expression of the resident human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes and within a few days caused essentially all of the cells to synchronously display numerous phenotypic markers characteristic of cells undergoing replicative senescence. This process was accompanied by marked but in some cases transient alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and by decreased telomerase activity. We propose that the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins actively prevent senescence from occurring in cervical carcinoma cells, and that once viral oncogene expression is extinguished, the senescence program is rapidly executed. Activation of endogenous senescence pathways in cancer cells may represent an alternative approach to treat human cancers.

  19. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  20. Detection of rare and possibly carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes as single infections in invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Daan; Alemany, Laia; Guimera, Nuria; de Sanjose, Silvia; de Koning, Maurits; Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Bosch, Xavier; Quint, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the burden of cervical cancer has been well established. However, the role and contribution of phylogenetically related HPV genotypes and rare variants remains uncertain. In a recent global study of 8977 HPV-positive invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs), the genotype remained unidentified in 3.7% by the HPV SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 (version 1) algorithm. The 331 ICC specimens with unknown genotype were analysed by a novel sequence methodology, using multiple selected short regions in L1. This demonstrated HPV genotypes that have infrequently or never been detected in ICC, ie HPV26, 30, 61, 67, 68, 69, 73 and 82, and rare variants of HPV16, 18, 26, 30, 34, 39, 56, 67, 68, 69, 82 and 91. These are not identified individually by LiPA25 and only to some extent by other HPV genotyping assays. Most identified genotypes have a close phylogenetic relationship with established carcinogenic HPVs and have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by IARC. Except for HPV85, all genotypes in α-species 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 were encountered as single infections in ICCs. These species of established and possibly carcinogenic HPV types form an evolutionary clade. We have shown that the possibly carcinogenic types were detected only in squamous cell carcinomas, which were often keratinizing and diagnosed at a relatively higher mean age (55.3 years) than those associated with established carcinogenic types (50.9 years). The individual frequency of the possibly carcinogenic types in ICCs is low, but together they are associated with 2.25% of the 8338 included ICCs with a single HPV type. This fraction is greater than seven of the established carcinogenic types individually. This study provides evidence that possibly carcinogenic HPV types occur as single infections in invasive cervical cancer, strengthening the circumstantial evidence of a carcinogenic role. PMID:22711526

  1. Associations between sexually transmitted infections, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and abnormal cervical Pap smear results in OB/GYN outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the meaning and usefulness of sexually transmitted infection (STI) test when caring for patients who have abnormal cervical cytology and/or positive high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test results. Methods Among patients who underwent liquid-based cervical cytology and HPV DNA tests at the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic, 800 patients who showed abnormal cervical cytology were compared with 200 patients in the control group. Both groups were simultaneously tested via multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for seven types of STI-causative microorganisms. Results The positive rate of high-risk HPV infection in total STIs positive group was 1.47 times higher than that of total STIs negative group. The probability of a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) was significantly higher in patients testing positive for total STIs (1.46 times), Chlamydia trachomatis (3.21 times), or Mycoplasma genitalicum (3.58 times) than in those testing negative. The total STIs positive rate was significantly higher for those having a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) when high-risk HPV test result was negative. Conclusion Correlations were present not only between STIs and high-risk HPV infection but also between abnormal cervical cytology and STIs. Therefore, additional evaluation of STIs will be helpful to appropriately diagnose and treat patients with abnormal cervical cytology, positive results on high-risk HPV DNA test, or a cytological diagnosis of ASC-US despite negative high-risk HPV DNA test result. PMID:27329197

  2. Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

  3. Human Papillomavirus in Oral Leukoplakia, Verrucous Carcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Normal Mucous Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saghravanian, Nasrollah; Ghazi, Narges; Meshkat, Zahra; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common oral malignancy, and verrucous carcinoma (VC) is a less invasive type of SCC. Leukoplakia (LP) is the most frequent premalignant lesion in the oral cavity. The human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recognized as one of the etiologic factors of these conditions. The association of anogenital and cervical cancers with HPV particularly its high-risk subtypes (HPV HR) has been demonstrated. The purpose of our study was to investigate the hypothetical association between HPV and the mentioned oral cavity lesions. Methods One hundred and seventy-three samples (114 SCCs, 21 VCs, 20 LPs) and 18 normal mucosa samples (as a control group) were retrieved from the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology of Mashhad Dental School, Iran. The association of HPV genotypes in LP, VC, and SCC was compared to normal oral mucosa using the polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed the absence of HPV in normal mucosa and LP lesions. In three samples of VC (14.3%), we observed the presence of HPV HR (types 16 and 18). All VCs were present in the mandibular ridge of females aged over 65 years old. No statistically significant correlation between HPV and VC was observed (p=0.230). Additionally, 15 (13.1%) SCCs showed HPV positivity, but this was not significant (p=0.830). The prevalence of SCC was higher on the tongue with the dominant presence of less carcinogenic species of HPV (types 6 and 11). A statistically significant association was not observed between HPV and SCC or VC in the oral cavity. Conclusion More studies are necessary to better understand the relationship between HPV and malignant/premalignant oral cavity lesions. PMID:26674929

  4. Factors involved in the inflammatory events of cervical ripening in humans

    PubMed Central

    Stjernholm-Vladic, Ylva; Stygar, Denis; Mansson, Christopher; Masironi, Britt; Akerberg, Sonja; Wang, Hong; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor; Sahlin, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Background Cervical ripening is an inflammatory reaction. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediates glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory reactions, whereas nuclear factor (NF)kappaB is a key pro-inflammatory transcription factor. Prostaglandins as well as platelet activating factor (PAF) are inflammatory mediators. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) regulates the level of nitric oxide (NO) in response to various inflammatory stimuli. We hypothesize that a changed biological response to glucocorticoids could be a mechanism regulating the inflammatory events resulting in cervical ripening. Methods We monitored GR and NFkappaB, prostaglandin synthases cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2, iNOS, as well as the PAF-receptor (PAF-R) in the uterine cervix from term pregnant women (with unripe cervices) before the onset of labor (TP), immediately after parturition (PP), as compared to non-pregnant (NP), using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results The GR protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in the nuclei of stroma and squamous epithelium (SQ). Stromal GR staining was increased in TP as compared to the NP group and decreased again after parturition. GR staining in SQ was decreased after parturition as compared to term. NFkappaB was present in SQ and glandular epithelium (GE), stroma and vascular endothelium. Increased nuclear NFkappaB staining was observed postpartum as compared to term pregnancy in stroma and GE. Stromal immunostaining for COX-1 as well as COX-2 was increased in the TP and PP groups as compared to the NP, and GE displayed an intensely increased COX-2 immunostaining at term and postpartum. Stromal PAF-R immunostaining was highest at term, while it was greatly increased in GE postpartum. No difference in the immunostaining for iNOS was found between the groups. RT-PCR showed a predominance of GRalpha to GRbeta mRNA in cervical tissue. The COX-2 mRNA level was increased in the PP group as compared to the TP group. Conclusions There is a decrease in GR

  5. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  6. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  7. Depressed type 1 cytokine synthesis by superantigen-activated CD4+ T cells of women with human papillomavirus-related high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bang-Ning; Follen, Michele; Shen, De-Yu; Malpica, Anais; Adler-Storthz, Karen; Shearer, William T; Reuben, James M

    2004-03-01

    Carcinoma of the cervix is causally related to infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), and T cells play a pivotal role in the immune response of the host to rid itself of HPV infection. Therefore, we assessed the T-cell function of women with HPV-related cervical neoplasia against a superantigen, Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB). Each woman provided a cervical brush specimen for HPV DNA testing and Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for the staging of cervical lesions. They also provided a blood specimen for determination of the ability of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells to synthesize Th1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2], gamma interferon [IFN-gamma], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) and Th2 (IL-10) cytokines in response to activation with SEB. Compared with control subjects with self-attested negative Pap smears, women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) had significantly lower percentages of activated CD4(+) T cells that produced IL-2 (P = 0.045), IFN-gamma (P = 0.040), and TNF-alpha (P = 0.015) and a significantly lower percentage of activated CD8(+) T cells that produced IL-2 (P < 0.01). These data indicate that women with HPV-related cervical HSIL show a decrease in Th1 cytokine production by activated CD4(+) T cells and suggested that compromised T-helper functions may negatively impact the function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. PMID:15013969

  8. The role of human cervical cancer oncogene in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Yu; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR) was identified by differential display RT-PCR by screened abnormally expressed genes in cervical human cancers. The overexpressed gene is not only identified in cervical tissues, but also in various human cancers as leukemia/lymphoma, breast, stomach, colon, liver, kidney and ovarian cancer. For its special sensitivities and specificities in human breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, it is expected to be a new biomarker to replace or combine with the existing biomarkers in the diagnose. The HCCR manifests as a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, and its expression is regulated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, modulated by TCF/β-catenin, it also participates in induction of the c-kit proto-oncogene, in activation of PKC and telomerase activities, but the accurate biochemical mechanisms of how HCCR contributes to the malignancies is still unknown. The aim of this review is to summarize the roles of HCCR in cancer progression and the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:26309489

  9. Nonlinear optical microscopy and ultrasound imaging of human cervical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Lisa M.; Feltovich, Helen; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Gunnsteinn; Campagnola, Paul J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    The cervix softens and shortens as its collagen microstructure rearranges in preparation for birth, but premature change may lead to premature birth. The global preterm birth rate has not decreased despite decades of research, likely because cervical microstructure is poorly understood. Our group has developed a multilevel approach to evaluating the human cervix. We are developing quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques for noninvasive interrogation of cervical microstructure and corroborating those results with high-resolution images of microstructure from second harmonic generation imaging (SHG) microscopy. We obtain ultrasound measurements from hysterectomy specimens, prepare the tissue for SHG, and stitch together several hundred images to create a comprehensive view of large areas of cervix. The images are analyzed for collagen orientation and alignment with curvelet transform, and registered with QUS data, facilitating multiscale analysis in which the micron-scale SHG images and millimeter-scale ultrasound data interpretation inform each other. This novel combination of modalities allows comprehensive characterization of cervical microstructure in high resolution. Through a detailed comparative study, we demonstrate that SHG imaging both corroborates the quantitative ultrasound measurements and provides further insight. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of specific microstructural cervical change in pregnancy should lead to novel approaches to the prevention of preterm birth.

  10. Enhanced expression of PD L1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Mezache, Louisa; Paniccia, Bernard; Nyinawabera, Angelique; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    Programmed death ligand 1 (PD L1) expression can reduce the immune response in both infectious diseases and cancers. We thus examined PD L1 expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) and cancers since they each reflect infection by human papillomavirus (HPV). PD L1 protein was not evident by immunohistochemistry in histologically normal cervical epithelia (0/55) even when adjacent to CIN or cancer. PD L1 expression was much increased in CINs (20/21=95%) and cervical squamous cell cancer (56/70=80%) and localized to the dysplastic/neoplastic squamous cells and mononuclear cells, respectively. There was also a significant increase (each P<0.001) in PD L1 detection in mononuclear cells when comparing cervical squamous cell cancers to endometrial (22/115=19%) and ovarian adenocarcinomas (5/40=13%). Co-expression analyses showed that the primary inflammatory cell that contained PD L1 was the CD8+ lymphocyte that strongly concentrated around the dysplastic CIN cells and nests of invasive squamous cancer cells. These data show that PD L1 is a solid biomarker of productive HPV infection of the cervix and that it is significantly upregulated in both the carcinoma and surrounding inflammatory cells in cervical cancer when compared with other gynecologic malignancies. This suggests that anti-PD L1 therapy may have a role in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26403783

  11. Neurovascular Invasion and Histological Grade Serve as the Risk Factors of Cervical Lymph Node Metastases in Early Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kailiu; Yang, Xi; Li, Liwen; Ruan, Min; Liu, Wei; Lu, Wei; Zhang, Chenping; Li, Siyi

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze the regional characteristics of the cervical lymph node metastasis and to investigate the factors associated with the risk of lymph node involvement. One hundred seventy-one patients suffering from early primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (cT1-2N0) were enrolled. Gender, age, growth site, T stage, histological grade, and neurovascular invasion were statistically analyzed by K-M survival analysis and Cox multivariate analysis to evaluate the relationship between the factors and the neck lymph node metastasis. Of the 171 cases divided into the neck dissection group and observation group, 40 ended up with lymph node metastasis, of which 17 were metastasized to level I, 27 to level II, 10 to level III, 2 to level IV, and 1 to level V. Histological grade and neurovascular invasion were significantly associated with lymph node involvement in univariate and multivariate analyses. Age distribution was found to be significantly associated with the lymph node metastasis in multivariate analysis. The metastasis of early tongue SCC has a certain regularity at different sites. Age was not a critical risk factor for cervical lymph node metastasis after surgery. Tumor size was suspected to exert a negative effect on metastasis by influencing tumor invasion. Histological grade and neurovascular invasion were significantly associated with the risk of cervical lymph node metastasis of early tongue SCC. PMID:25911199

  12. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  13. Potential impact of a nine-valent vaccine in human papillomavirus related cervical disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution is necessary to evaluate the potential impact of current and future HPV vaccines. We estimated the relative contribution (RC) to invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and precancerous cervical lesions of the nine HPV types (HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) included in an HPV vaccine currently under development. Methods Estimations on ICC were based on an international study of 8,977 HPV positive cases and estimations on precancerous cervical lesions were extracted from a published meta-analysis including 115,789 HPV positive women. Globocan 2008 and 2010 World Population Prospects were used to estimate current and future projections of new ICC cases. Results RC of the 9 HPV types in ICC was 89.4%, with 18.5% of cases positive for HPV 31/33/45/52/58. Regional variations were observed. RCs varied by histology, ranging between 89.1% in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 95.5% in adenocarcinomas (ADC). HPV 16/18/45 were detected in 94.2% of ADC. RC of the 9 types altogether decreased with age (trend test p < 0.0001), driven by the decrease in older ages of HPV 16/18/45. In contrast, the RC of HPV 31/33/52/58 increased with age. Due to population growth alone, projected estimates of ICC cases attributable to the 9 types are expected to rise from 493,770 new cases in 2012 to 560,887 new cases in 2025. The RCs of individual high risk HPV types varied by cytological and histological grades of HPV-positive precancerous cervical lesions, and there was an under representation of HPV 18 and 45 compared to ICC. Conclusions The addition of HPV 31/33/45/52/58 to HPV types included in current vaccines could prevent almost 90% of ICC cases worldwide. If the nine-valent vaccine achieves the same degree of efficacy than previous vaccines, world incidence rates could be substantially reduced. PMID:23273245

  14. Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, John A.

    1983-01-01

    Invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix is preceded by a series of premalignant changes described as mild, moderate, or severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These premalignant states are identified by cervical cytology, diagnosed by colposcopy and if effectively treated, can prevent invasive squamous carcinoma of the cervix. Because of the apparent biological variation of the premalignant states, even the most aggressive cervical screening program cannot be expected to eliminate all invasive squamous cancer of the cervix. Optimal results of a cervical screening program will be achieved when all women under 35 years of age and sexually active have an annual cytological smear; the cytology is screened by a laboratory with high quality control; the patient's positive cytology is accurately assessed by an experienced colposcopist, and the premalignant lesion is effectively treated. PMID:21283455

  15. Specificity of L1 peptides versus virus-like particles for detection of human papillomavirus-positive cervical lesions in females attending Engativa Hospital, Bogota, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Sánchez, Ricardo; Amaya, Jairo; León, Sandra; Acosta, Jenny; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Camargo, Milena; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2008-11-01

    A serological test for the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in females at risk of developing cervical cancer could be based on conserved L1 peptides with low levels of antigenicity specifically recognized by antibodies from patients with cervical lesions infected with high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types. The aim was to assess the ability of L1 peptides 18283, 18294, and 18301 compared with the ability of virus-like particles (VLPs) to identify these infections in females. A total of 391 HPV-infected female volunteers were interviewed, and peripheral blood and cervical cells were obtained for detection of anti-HPV antibodies and HPV DNA; all of the patients had a Pap smear test; 287 patients were referred for colposcopy or biopsy, according to gynecological criteria. The level of agreement, as determined by the use of the Lin coefficient (rho value), showed that 75 to 83% of females with HR-HPV DNA-positive cervical lesions had antibodies that recognized VLPs and peptide 18283, 18294, or 18301, while 15 to 23% of the HPV DNA-negative females with a normal cytology had antibodies that recognized these three peptides and 45% had antibodies that recognized VLPs. The rate of agreement between peptides and VLPs for antibody detection was higher for patients with HPV DNA-positive cervical lesions. Peptides 18283, 18294, and 18301 showed similar sensitivities for the detection of HR-HPV DNA-positive cervical lesions and were more specific than VLPs. Peptide 18301 might be detecting protective antibodies in HPV DNA-negative females with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. These peptides could be useful for the design of a serology test for the detection of HR-HPV infection in females with cervical lesions and at risk of cervical cancer. PMID:18799706

  16. Concurrent Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in a Married Couple

    PubMed Central

    García, Joaquín J.; Price, Katharine A.; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for development of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been increasingly associated with this group of cancers. We describe the case of a married couple who presented with HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma within two months of each other. Methods. Tumor biopsies were positive for p16 and high-risk HPV in both patients. Sanger sequencing showed a nearly identical HPV16 strain in both patients. Both patients received chemoradiation, and one patient also underwent transoral robotic tongue base resection with bilateral neck dissection. Results. Both patients showed no evidence of recurrent disease on follow-up PET imaging. Conclusions. New head and neck symptoms should be promptly evaluated in the partner of a patient with known HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. This case expands the limited current literature on concurrent presentation of HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma in couples. PMID:27418994

  17. Purification of a protein associated with human bronchogenic squamous-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kelly, B S; Levy, J G

    1979-03-01

    A heteroantiserum raised in rabbits to extracts of human squamous-cell carcinoma of the lung which exhibited marked tumour specificity was used to monitor the fractionation and isolation of a tumour-associated component of the extract. KC1 extracts of pools of both normal lung and bronchogenic squamous-cell carcinoma were subjected to a series of purification steps involving acid precipitation, salting out, DEAE chromatography and preparative polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. At each stage, fractions were tested for their ability to react in the complement-fixation assay with the antiserum. A protein was ultimately isolated which did not appear to be present at detectable levels in an equivalent fraction of normal lung extract, reacted with the heteroantiserum, and appeared to be present in all extracts of squamous-cell carcinoma. PMID:465295

  18. Human Papillomavirus in Brazilian women with and without cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) high-risk (HR) types are the causal factor for cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Data on frequency of HPV types provide a basis to design and evaluate HPV prevention programs. Taking into account the heterogeneity of HPV types across and within populations this study aims to access the HPV frequency in Brazilian women. Results We identified 24 different types of HPV, including a Betapapillomavirus and a likely new type, previously reported, from 132 women positive for the virus analysed by Hybrid Capture II assay. These women were infected by a single or multiple HPV types and 142 HPV strains were identified. HR types were found in 75% of women and HPV types 16, 18, 45, 58, and 66 had the highest frequency. Significant differences in frequency of HR HPV types were found for presence of cervical lesions, and for different HPV species and women age. Conclusions Compared with previous studies in Brazil, our data indicated differences in frequency and HPV type diversity, a significant association of other HR-types but HPV16 and 18 and cervical lesions, and a trend for distinct distribution of HPV types by age. PMID:21208414

  19. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  20. Predictive Value of Cytokeratin 7 Immunohistochemistry in Cervical Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion as a Marker for Risk of Progression to a High-grade Lesion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Cherie; Mills, Anne M; Stoler, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    The squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) cell population of the uterine cervix is a discrete epithelial area and the putative source of the majority of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). The SCJ cells can be identified by immunohistochemical (IHC) stains including cytokeratin 7 (CK7). Others have theorized that an SCJ marker-positive low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) has a higher risk for future HSIL compared with an SCJ marker-negative LSIL. This study has 2 aims: first, to refine the definition of a positive CK7 immunostaining pattern in cervical lesions, and, second, to test the hypothesis that CK7 positivity in LSIL indicates higher risk for future HSIL, with both questions addressed using a data set with consensus diagnoses. One hundred cases each of LSIL, moderate HSIL (CIN2), and severe HSIL (CIN3) were stained for CK7, with positivity defined as a diffuse cytoplasmic staining pattern (>5 to 6 contiguous cells); all others were considered negative. Using this model, 34% of CIN1, 45% of CIN2, and 60% of CIN3 were CK7 positive. With follow-up, CK7-positive LSILs were more likely to progress to HSIL compared with CK7-negative LSIL (32% vs. 11%, P=0.05), in concordance with the results of other researchers. This study simplifies cervical CK7 IHC grading into a reproducible system and supports the thesis that CK7 positivity in LSIL is associated with increased risk for future HSIL. Larger cohorts using consensus-diagnosed LSIL are needed to confirm these results before CK7 may be considered for clinical validation. PMID:26551618

  1. Direct measurement of the permeability of human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Yoshida, Kyoko; Wapner, Ronald; Myers, Kristin M

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical integrity of the uterine cervix is critical for a pregnancy to successfully reach full term. It must be strong to retain the fetus throughout gestation and then undergo a remodeling and softening process before labor for delivery of the fetus. It is believed that cervical insufficiency (CI), a condition in pregnancy resulting in preterm birth (PTB), is related to a cervix with compromised mechanical strength which cannot resist deformation caused by external forces generated by the growing fetus. Such PTBs are responsible for infant developmental problems and in severe cases infant mortality. To understand the etiologies of CI, our overall research goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of the cervix. Permeability is a mechanical property of hydrated collagenous tissues that dictates the time-dependent response of the tissue to mechanical loading. The goal of this study was to design a novel soft tissue permeability testing device and to present direct hydraulic permeability measurements of excised nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant (PG) human cervical tissue from women with different obstetric histories. Results of hydraulic permeability testing indicate repeatability for specimens from single patients, with an order of magnitude separating the NP and PG group means (2.1 ± 1.4×10(-14) and 3.2 ± 4.8×10(-13)m(4)/N[middle dot]s, respectively), and large variability within the NP and PG sample groups. Differences were found between samples with similar obstetric histories, supporting the view that medical history may not be a good predictor of permeability (and therefore mechanical behavior) and highlighting the need for patient-specific measurements of cervical mechanical properties. The permeability measurements from this study will be used in future work to model the constitutive material behavior of cervical tissue and to develop in vivo diagnostic tools to stage the progression of labor. PMID:23445069

  2. Assessment of cervical lymph node metastasis for therapeutic decision-making in squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa: a prospective clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical metastasis has a tremendous impact on the prognosis in patients with carcinomas of the head and neck and the frequency of such spread is greater than 20% for most squamous cell carcinomas. With emerging evidence, focus is shifting to conservative neck procedures aimed at achieving good shoulder function without compromising oncologic safety. The purpose of this study was to analyze the pattern of nodal metastasis in patients presenting with squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa. Materials and methods This was a prospective clinical analysis of patients who were histologically diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal cavity and clinically N1 and had not received treatment anywhere else. Patients were analyzed for age and sex distribution, tumor staging, location, and metastasis. Results The incidence of metastatic lymph node in T4 (n=44) was the highest, that is, level I was 100% (44/44), level II was 43.18% (19/44), level III was 15.90% (7/44), and level IV was 4.5% (2/44). Level V was free of metastasis. Among T3 (n=10) lesions, incidence of metastasis in level I was 100% (10/10), level II was 20% (2/10), and level III, IV, and V were free of metastasis. Among T2 (n=6) lesions, incidence of lymph node metastasis in level I was 100% (6/6) and all other levels of lymph nodes were found free of metastasis. Conclusion Lymphatic spread from carcinoma of the buccal mucosa is low. Involvement of level IV is seen in only 3% of patients. A more conservative approach to the neck in patients with carcinoma of the buccal mucosa is recommended. PMID:23173732

  3. Distribution and location of Daxx in cervical epithelial cells with high risk human papillomavirus positive

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims To provide the basis for further exploring the effect and its mechanism of Death domain associated protein (Daxx) on the progress of cervical carcinoma induced by human papillomavirus (HPV), the distribution and location of Daxx in cervical carcinoma with high risk HPV(HR-HPV) positive was analyzed. Methods The samples of normal cervical epithelial cells, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I (CINI), CINII CINIII and cervical cancers were collected. Immunohistochemistry assay was used to analyze the distributions and locations of Daxx in the cervical tissue. Indirect immunoinfluorescence test was utilized to observe the locations of Daxx in Caski cells with HPV16 positive. Results Under the light microscopy, the brown signals of Daxx distributed in the nuclei of normal cervical epithelial cells; Daxx mainly distributed in nuclear membrane and there were a small amount of Daxx in the nuclei in CINI. Daxx intensively distributed in the cytoplasm and cell membrane in CINII, CINIII and cervical cancer. Under fluorescent microscopy, the distribution and location of Daxx in Caski cells was similarly to that in cervical cells of CINII, CINIII and cervical cancer. Conclusion In the progress of the cervical cancer, Daxx gradually translocates from nucleus into nuclear membrane, cytoplasm and cell membrane. Daxx locates in the cytoplasm and cell membrane in CINII, CINIII and cervical cancer. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4671548951113870. PMID:24398161

  4. Immunohistochemical detection of Ca antigen in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic squamous epithelia of the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J M; O'Dowd, T; Driver, M; Tee, D E

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining was performed on biopsies and cytological samples from normal, dysplastic and neoplastic squamous epithelia using the monoclonal Ca 1 antibody. The results of staining 92 biopsies and 20 cytological samples are described and it is reported that positive staining with Ca 1 antibody was detected in normal, dysplastic and neoplastic epithelia. The role of the Ca 1 antibody in the study of cervical cancer is discussed. Images PMID:6368596

  5. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  6. Genital Tract HIV RNA Levels and Their Associations with Human Papillomavirus Infection and Risk of Cervical Pre-Cancer

    PubMed Central

    GHARTEY, Jeny; KOVACS, Andrea; BURK, Robert D.; MASSAD, L. Stewart; MINKOFF, Howard; XIE, Xianhong; D’SOUZA, Gypsyamber; XUE, Xiaonan; WATTS, D. Heather; LEVINE, Alexandra M.; EINSTEIN, Mark H.; COLIE, Christine; ANASTOS, Kathryn; ELTOUM, Isam-Eldin; HEROLD, Betsy C.; PALEFSKY, Joel M.; STRICKLER, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Plasma HIV RNA levels have been associated with risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive women. However, little is known regarding local genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with cervical HPV and neoplasia. Design/Methods In an HIV-seropositive women’s cohort with semi-annual follow-up, we conducted a nested case-control study of genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with incident high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions sub-classified as severe (severe HSIL), as provided for under the Bethesda 2001 classification system. Specifically, 66 incident severe HSIL were matched to 130 controls by age, CD4+ count, HAART use, and other factors. We also studied HPV prevalence, incident detection, and persistence in a random sample of 250 subjects. Results Risk of severe HSIL was associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels (odds ratio comparing HIV RNA ≥ the median among women with detectable levels versus undetectable [ORVL] 2.96; 95% CI: 0.99–8.84; Ptrend=0.03). However, this association became non-significant (Ptrend=0.51) following adjustment for plasma HIV RNA levels. There was also no association between genital tract HIV RNA levels and the prevalence of any HPV or oncogenic HPV. However, the incident detection of any HPV (Ptrend=0.02) and persistence of oncogenic HPV (Ptrend=0.04) were associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels, after controlling plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusion These prospective data suggest that genital tract HIV RNA levels are not a significant independent risk factor for cervical pre-cancer in HIV-seropositive women, but leave open the possibility that they may modestly influence HPV infection, an early stage of cervical tumoriogenesis. PMID:24694931

  7. Increased cycling cell numbers and stem cell associated proteins as potential biomarkers for high grade human papillomavirus+ve pre-neoplastic cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Canham, Maurice; Charsou, Chara; Stewart, June; Moncur, Sharon; Hoodless, Laura; Bhatia, Ramya; Cong, Duanduan; Cubie, Heather; Busby-Earle, Camille; Williams, Alistair; McLoughlin, Victoria; Campbell, John D M; Cuschieri, Kate; Howie, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    High risk (oncogenic) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer. Infections are common but most clear naturally. Persistent infection can progress to cancer. Pre-neoplastic disease (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia/CIN) is classified by histology (CIN1-3) according to severity. Cervical abnormalities are screened for by cytology and/or detection of high risk HPV but both methods are imperfect for prediction of which women need treatment. There is a need to understand the host virus interactions that lead to different disease outcomes and to develop biomarker tests for accurate triage of infected women. As cancer is increasingly presumed to develop from proliferative, tumour initiating, cancer stem cells (CSCs), and as other oncogenic viruses induce stem cell associated gene expression, we evaluated whether presence of mRNA (detected by qRT-PCR) or proteins (detected by flow cytometry and antibody based proteomic microarray) from stem cell associated genes and/or increased cell proliferation (detected by flow cytometry) could be detected in well-characterised, routinely collected cervical samples from high risk HPV+ve women. Both cytology and histology results were available for most samples with moderate to high grade abnormality. We found that stem cell associated proteins including human chorionic gonadotropin, the oncogene TP63 and the transcription factor SOX2 were upregulated in samples from women with CIN3 and that the stem cell related, cell surface, protein podocalyxin was detectable on cells in samples from a subset of women with CIN3. SOX2, TP63 and human gonadotrophin mRNAs were upregulated in high grade disease. Immunohistochemistry showed that SOX2 and TP63 proteins clearly delineated tumour cells in invasive squamous cervical cancer. Samples from women with CIN3 showed increased proliferating cells. We believe that these markers may be of use to develop triage tests for women with high grade cervical abnormality to distinguish

  8. Cervical Microbiota Associated with Higher Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women Infected with High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Kumar, Ranjit; Macaluso, Maurizio; Alvarez, Ronald D; Morrow, Casey D

    2016-05-01

    It is increasingly recognized that microbes that reside in and on human body sites play major roles in modifying the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. However, specific microbes or microbial communities that can be mechanistically linked to cervical carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between cervical microbiota and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+) in women infected with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses (HPV) and to assess whether the cervical microbiota are associated with oxidative DNA damage as indicated by the presence of cervical cells positive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. The study included 340 women diagnosed with CIN 2+ (cases) and 90 diagnosed with CIN 1 (non-cases). Microbiota composition was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from DNA extracted from cervical mucus samples. Measures of alpha/beta-diversity were not associated with either CIN severity or oxidative DNA damage. However, a cervical mucosal community type (CT) dominated by L. iners and unclassified Lactobacillus spp was associated with CIN 2+ (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.27-9.55). Sequence reads mapping to Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillus, L. reuteri, and several sub-genus level Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units were also associated with CIN 2+ when examined independently (effect size >2.0; P < 0.05). Our 16S rRNA sequencing results need confirmation in independent studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing and that would allow sharpening the suggested associations at finer taxonomic levels. Our results provide little evidence that DNA oxidative damage mediates the effect of the microbiome on the natural history of HPV infection and CIN severity. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 357-66. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26935422

  9. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  10. Clinical response to glycyrrhizinic acid in genital infection due to human papillomavirus and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Marcelino Hernández; Pacheco, Adia Carrillo; Quijano, Tomás Hernández; Girón, Antonio Vargas; López, Carlos Vargas

    2011-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can infect any of the mucosal areas of the body and cause cervical cancer. Until recently, no specific treatments were available for this condition; therefore, any damaged tissue had to be removed or destroyed, which may have presented obstetrical repercussions for some women. Recently, new drugs have been developed that have shown to be effective for the cure of HPV infection. Glycyrrhizinic acid (GA) has shown fewer side effects and its systemic use makes it possible to reach difficult-to-treat lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of GA to eliminate the epithelial lesion and HPV. We carried out a longitudinal, descriptive study that included women of reproductive age who were diagnosed with HPV associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Subjects began treatment based on GA using two routes of administration - systemic (oral) and topical (spray) - with assessments every month to determine the clinical changes of the lesions through colposcopy and Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Simple statistics were used along with two-tailed Student's t-test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant before and after treatment. There were 70 eligible patients, of whom 62 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Age of subjects was 27.8±9.5 years. At the time of the study, 100% of the patients had HPV infection, 40% were associated with LSIL, and only 16% used a barrier contraceptive (condom) method. Resolution was achieved in all patients from 4 weeks of treatment initiation and improvement was achieved in the majority of patients at 12 weeks (74%) (P<0.001). However, there was persistence of LSIL in 27.7% of patients and only one patient progressed to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II. The use of GA proved to be effective in resolving clinical HPV lesions. For cervical lesions with epithelial changes (LSIL), treatment may be required for a longer period as with other drugs used for this

  11. Clinical response to glycyrrhizinic acid in genital infection due to human papillomavirus and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Marcelino Hernández; Pacheco, Adia Carrillo; Quijano, Tomás Hernández; Girón, Antonio Vargas; López, Carlos Vargas

    2011-09-28

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can infect any of the mucosal areas of the body and cause cervical cancer. Until recently, no specific treatments were available for this condition; therefore, any damaged tissue had to be removed or destroyed, which may have presented obstetrical repercussions for some women. Recently, new drugs have been developed that have shown to be effective for the cure of HPV infection. Glycyrrhizinic acid (GA) has shown fewer side effects and its systemic use makes it possible to reach difficult-to-treat lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of GA to eliminate the epithelial lesion and HPV. We carried out a longitudinal, descriptive study that included women of reproductive age who were diagnosed with HPV associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Subjects began treatment based on GA using two routes of administration - systemic (oral) and topical (spray) - with assessments every month to determine the clinical changes of the lesions through colposcopy and Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Simple statistics were used along with two-tailed Student's t-test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant before and after treatment. There were 70 eligible patients, of whom 62 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Age of subjects was 27.8±9.5 years. At the time of the study, 100% of the patients had HPV infection, 40% were associated with LSIL, and only 16% used a barrier contraceptive (condom) method. Resolution was achieved in all patients from 4 weeks of treatment initiation and improvement was achieved in the majority of patients at 12 weeks (74%) (P<0.001). However, there was persistence of LSIL in 27.7% of patients and only one patient progressed to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II. The use of GA proved to be effective in resolving clinical HPV lesions. For cervical lesions with epithelial changes (LSIL), treatment may be required for a longer period as with other drugs used for this

  12. Ten human carcinoma cell lines derived from squamous carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. M.; Easty, G. C.; Carter, R. L.; Monaghan, P.; Butler, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ten cell lines of human squamous carcinomas of the tongue and larynx have been established from surgical specimens removed from 36 unselected patients, in order to provide systems for investigating the invasive and tissue-destructive capacity of squamous carcinomas of the head and neck. The morphology, ultrastructure and growth characteristics of the 10 lines are described. Detailed cytogenetic analysis of the first 4 lines indicates that each is karyotypically unique, with no evidence of cross-contamination. Nine of the 10 cell lines secrete immunoreactive beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) in the culture medium. No correlation was demonstrated between the ability of the cell lines to secrete plasminogen activator and their capacity to grow in soft agar or as xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:7195729

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Intact Human Cervical Spine Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Ivancic, Paul C.; Coe, Marcus P.; Ndu, Anthony B.; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Carlson, Erik J.; Rubin, Wolfgang; (FH), Dipl-Ing; Panjabi, Manohar M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Most previous studies have investigated ligaments mechanical properties at slow elongation rates of less than 25 mm/s. PURPOSE To determine the tensile mechanical properties, at a fast elongation rate, of intact human cervical anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING In vitro biomechanical study. METHODS A total of 97 intact bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1) were prepared from six cervical spines (average age: 80.6 years, range, 71 to 92 years) and were elongated to complete rupture at an average (SD) peak rate of 723 (106) mm/s using a custom-built apparatus. Non-linear force vs. elongation curves were plotted and peak force, peak elongation, peak energy, and stiffness were statistically compared (P<0.05) among ligament. A mathematical model was developed to determine the quasi-static physiological ligament elongation. RESULTS Highest average peak force, up to 244.4 and 220.0 N in the ligamentum flavum and capsular ligament, respectively, were significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament and middle-third disc. Highest peak elongation reached 5.9 mm in the intraspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the middle-third disc. Highest peak energy of 0.57 J was attained in the capsular ligament, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament and middle-third disc. Average stiffness was generally greatest in the ligamentum flavum and least in the intraspinous and supraspinous ligaments. For all ligaments, peak elongation was greater than average physiological elongation computed using the mathematical model. CONCLUSIONS Comparison of the present results with previously reported data indicated that high speed elongation may cause cervical ligaments to fail at a higher peak force and smaller peak elongation and may be stiffer and absorb less energy, as compared to a

  14. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. [Cervical infection epidemiology of human papillomavirus in Ushuaia, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sijvarger, C C; González, J V; Prieto, A; Messmer, A G; Mallimaci, M C; Alonio, V L; Teyssié, A R; Picconi, M A

    2006-01-01

    Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is decisive in the causation of cervical cancer. In order to evaluate the epidemiology of HPV infection in Ushuaia, Province of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 132 endocervical cytobrushes from preneoplastic and neoplastic cases and controls were studied. Detection and typing of the viral genome was performed by polymerase chain reaction, combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay or hybridization. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 41% in the population examined, with a frequency of 26% in the controls and 71% in the cases under study. The 14-24 age group showed the highest HPV prevalence. The most common viral types in the infected population were HPV 16 (23%), HPV 18 (11%), HPV 33 (8%) and HPV 35 (8%), while high risk viral types were detected in 30% of the samples, 16% of the controls and 60% of the cases. This study provides the first data on the predominant viral types in Ushuaia. Our results show lower levels of infection than in regions with a high incidence of cervical cancer, HPV 16 being the most prevalent viral type. This research may be useful for selecting a specific vaccine targeting the population examined. PMID:16784128

  16. Human papillomavirus research on the prevention, diagnosis, and prognosis of cervical cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chao, Angel; Huang, Huei-Jean; Lai, Chyong-Huey

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is third in incidence and fourth in mortality among cancers of women worldwide. Epidemiological studies have shown that human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, if not sufficient, to cause nearly 100% of cervical cancers. HPV testing is useful in primary screening for cervical neoplasms. The value of HPV detection or genotyping is potentially useful in triage of borderline or low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, assessment of prognosis and treatment planning for invasive cervical cancer. Studies from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital have defined the genotype distribution of cervical cancer in Taiwan and confirmed the independent prognostic value of the HPV genotype in cervical cancer. The cost-effectiveness of using HPV testing in prevention and management of cervical neoplasms depends on the medical and public health infrastructure of the individual country. The population-based HPV prevalence and genotype distribution as well as longitudinal follow-up studies have established strong support for incorporating HPV testing with cervical cytology and for future comparisons of HPV epidemiology before and after implementation of HPV prophylactic vaccines in Taiwan. Future directions in HPV research are discussed. PMID:22913856

  17. Wild-type p53 reactivation by small-molecule Minnelide™ in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo-Granados, Emiro; Lin, Rui; Clements-Green, Caitlin; Yueh, Bevan; Sangwan, Veena; Saluja, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) continues to increase, particularly oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) cases. The inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene promotes a chain of molecular events, including cell cycle progression and apoptosis resistance. Reactivation of wild-type p53 function is an intriguing therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a novel compound derived from diterpene triepoxide (Minnelide™) can reactivate wild-type p53 function in HPV-positive HNSCC. Materials and Methods For all of our in vitro experiments, we used 2 HPV-positive HNSCC cell lines, University of Michigan squamous cell carcinoma (UM-SCC) 47 and 93-VU-147, and 2 HPV-positive human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and CaSki. Cells were treated with different concentrations of triptolide and analyzed for p53 activation. Mice bearing UM-SCC 47 subcutaneous xenografts and HPV-positive patient-derived tumor xenografts were treated with Minnelide and evaluated for tumor growth and p53 activation. Results In HPV-positive HNSCC, Minnelide reactivated p53 by suppressing E6 oncoprotein. Activation of apoptosis followed, both in vitro and in vivo. In 2 preclinical HNSCC animal models (a subcutaneous xenograft model and a patient-derived tumor xenograft model), Minnelide reactivated p53 function and significantly decreased tumor progression and tumor volume. Conclusion Triptolide and Minnelide caused cell death in vitro and in vivo in HPV-positive HNSCC by reactivating wild-type p53 and thus inducing apoptosis. In addition, in 2 HPV-positive HNSCC animal models, Minnelide decreased tumor progression and induced apoptosis. PMID:25311433

  18. Viral load, E2 gene disruption status, and lineage of human papillomavirus type 16 infection in cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jo L K; Lo, Keith W K; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Tang, Julian W; Chan, Paul K S

    2006-12-15

    The clinical utility of human papillomavirus (HPV) load and integration status remains unclear. We applied refined methods to delineate the viral load, integration status, and lineage of 104 women with HPV-16 monotype infection, including 19 with normal cervices, 9 with histologically proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, 24 with CIN 2, 27 with CIN 3, and 25 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Higher crude viral load, as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the E7 gene, was observed for SCC but became insignificant after normalization for cell content. Integration was located and quantified by real-time PCRs targeting, respectively, the carboxyl, amino, and hinge domains of the E2 gene. Pure episomal, integrated, and mixed forms were observed in all disease groups. Most E2 gene disruptions involved the amino-terminal, but sparing the hinge region that has been frequently used as a surrogate marker of integration. Large-fragment disruption involving all 3 E2 regions was observed only in the CIN 3 and SCC groups. Altogether, 33.3% of the CIN 3 group and 28.0% of the SCC group harbored pure episomal genomes. The Asian lineage was associated with a higher risk for CIN 3/SCC than the European lineage, and 6 of the 7 large-fragment E2 disruptions were from Asian lineage. The link between viral lineage, integration pattern, and oncogenesis deserves further study. PMID:17109343

  19. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical dysplasia is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a common virus that is spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV. Some types lead to cervical dysplasia or cancer. ...

  20. Comparison of the outcome between cervical adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients with adjuvant radiotherapy following radical surgery: SGSG/TGCU Intergroup Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    SHIMADA, MUNEAKI; NISHIMURA, RYUICHIRO; NOGAWA, TAKAMITSU; HATAE, MASAYUKI; TAKEHARA, KAZUHIRO; YAMADA, HIDEKAZU; KURACHI, HIROHISA; YOKOYAMA, YOSHIHITO; SUGIYAMA, TORU; KIGAWA, JUNZO

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for adenocarcinoma (AC) is controversial, although patients with AC of the uterine cervix are treated in a similar manner to those with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant RT for patients with AC compared to those with SCC following radical hysterectomy. A total of 820 patients with stage IB-IIB cervical cancer, who underwent type III radical hysterectomy between 1997 and 2003, were retrospectively examined; the sample included 280 patients with AC and 540 with SCC. A total of 139 patients with AC and 327 with SCC underwent adjuvant treatment. The histological type did not affect the outcome for patients with stage I disease; however, stage II patients with AC exhibited a significantly worse 5-year overall survival (OS) rate compared to those with SCC. Patients with SCC exhibited significantly higher lymph node involvement compared to those with AC in stage IB1; however, there were no differences between stages IB2 and II. Among patients with lymph node involvement, patients with AC exhibited a significantly worse 5-year survival rate compared to those with SCC (46.4 vs. 72.3%, respectively; P=0.0005). Among patients receiving adjuvant RT, those with AC recurred more frequently compared to those with SCC, particularly in the pelvic cavity, including the vaginal stump and/or pelvis (24.6 vs. 10.5%, respectively; P= 0.0022). By contrast, the histological type did not affect the incidence of recurrence in paraaortic lymph nodes and/or distant recurrence. In conclusion, RT may not suffice as an adjuvant treatment for patients with cervical AC following radical hysterectomy. PMID:24649246

  1. Human papillomavirus-related squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal with papillary features

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Marino E; Shamekh, Rania; Coppola, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the anal canal is a well-known carcinoma associated with high-risk types of HPV. HPV-related SCC with papillary morphology (papillary SCC) has been described in the oropharynx. We describe, for the first time, a case of anal HPV-related squamous carcinoma with papillary morphology. The tumor arose from the anal mucosa. The biopsies revealed a superficially invasive SCC with prominent papillary features and associated in situ carcinoma. The tumor cells were positive for p16 and were also positive for high-risk types of HPV using chromogenic in situ hybridization. The findings are consistent with a HPV-related SCC of the anal canal with papillary features. This tumor shows histologic features similar to a papillary HPV-related SCC of the oropharynx. Additional studies are needed to characterize these lesions. PMID:25717259

  2. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Sambur, Ian M; de Almeida, John R; Posner, Marshall; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas arising in other subsites of the head and neck. The human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has played an increasing role in these epidemiological changes and as the etiology for a significant fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, OPSCC in particular. Most importantly, many retrospective studies have shown that the prognosis differs significantly between patients with HPV-associated tumors and non-HPV associated tumors. Thus, questions arise on the choices of treatment for patients based on HPV status and the consequences of therapy. Given the recognized relevance of HPV status in OPSCC, many new questions concerning the biology, treatment, and prevention of HPV infection arise. This review is intended to highlight some of the major issues and frequently asked questions relevant for the clinician dealing with patients with OPSCC. PMID:22752642

  3. Measuring the compressive viscoelastic mechanical properties of human cervical tissue using indentation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J; Ananth, Cande V; Oyen, Michelle L; Myers, Kristin M

    2014-06-01

    The human cervix is an important mechanical barrier in pregnancy which must withstand the compressive and tensile forces generated from the growing fetus. Premature cervical shortening resulting from premature cervical remodeling and alterations of cervical material properties are known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth (PTB). To understand the mechanical role of the cervix during pregnancy and to potentially develop indentation techniques for in vivo diagnostics to identify women who are at risk for premature cervical remodeling and thus preterm birth, we developed a spherical indentation technique to measure the time-dependent material properties of human cervical tissue taken from patients undergoing hysterectomy. In this study we present an inverse finite element analysis (IFEA) that optimizes material parameters of a viscoelastic material model to fit the stress-relaxation response of excised tissue slices to spherical indentation. Here we detail our IFEA methodology, report compressive viscoelastic material parameters for cervical tissue slices from nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant (PG) hysterectomy patients, and report slice-by-slice data for whole cervical tissue specimens. The material parameters reported here for human cervical tissue can be used to model the compressive time-dependent behavior of the tissue within a small strain regime of 25%. PMID:24548950

  4. Human papillomavirus prevalence and predictors for cervical cancer among high-risk women from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, C R N; Rosa, M L G; Vasconcelos, G A L B M; Faria, P C P; Cavalcanti, S M B; Oliveira, L H S

    2007-01-01

    We assess the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cofactors for cervical severe disease, as contribution for vaccine strategies at the right moment in which Brazilian health authorities have approved an anti-HPV vaccine. A case-control study was undertaken with 201 women who attended a public health service with previous abnormal cytology. The HPV status was ascertained by consensus primers My09/11 and typed by 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, and 58 specific primers. Patients diagnosed with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and cervical cancer were referred as cases (n = 84). Patients with normal/inflammatory cervix or carrying benign cervical lesions were included in controls (n = 117). The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 75.6%, with 91.7% among cases. In spite of HPV 16 being the most frequent type (53.3%), 27.6% of infections were attributed to nonvaccine types. High-risk HPV were strongly associated to older women (OR = 6.7). Otherwise, age at the first intercourse (OR = 7.10), three or more parities (OR = 3.05), abortion episodes (OR = 4.80), and smoking (OR = 3.83) conferred a heavy effect in younger women. Among mediators affecting the progress from HSIL to cancer, age played the main role in easing the progression (OR = 1.09, P = 0.002) followed by education level (OR = 4.20, P = 0.066). White ethnia showed to be a protective factor (OR = 0.32, P = 0.055). Predictors from HPV exposure to malignant disease include demographic and behavioral factors. Public policies such as improvement of education and continued prevention campaigns might contribute to reduce this picture. This work also gives background, in identifying a target population, for implementing future vaccine strategies. PMID:17504378

  5. Prognostic Value of Neutrophil-Related Factors in Locally Advanced Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Cisplatin-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Yang; Bai, Zhou-Lan; He, Jian-Li; Yang, Yan; Zhao, Ren; Hai, Ping; Zhe, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between neutrophil-related factors, including neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the responses of neutrophil to granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (RNG), and the prognosis of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (LACSCC) undergoing cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCCRT). A total of sixty LACSCC patients were enrolled in this study. We analyzed the association of NLR or RNG with clinicopathologic characteristics of these patients. The prognostic factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate survival analysis. The optimal cut-off value of the NLR was determined to be 2.0 for the overall survival (OS). A higher level of the NLR was associated with younger age (P = 0.017) and higher baseline platelet count (P = 0.040). NLR was identified to be the only independent prognostic factor for OS by multivariate analysis (P = 0.037). The median RNG was 3.01, with a range of 1.19–16.84. RNG level was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis of these patients (P = 0.023). And higher RNG was identified as being a closely independent poor prognostic factor for OS (P = 0.055). This study showed that NLR and RNG may be used as potential biomarkers for survival prediction in patients with LACSCC receiving CCCRT. PMID:27087737

  6. Control of growth and squamous differentiation in normal human bronchial epithelial cells by chemical and biological modifiers and transferred genes

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, A.M.; Lechner, J.F.; Masui, T.; Reddel, R.R.; Mark, G.E.; Harris, C.C.

    1989-03-01

    The majority of human lung cancers arise from bronchial epithelial cells. The normal pseudostratified bronchial epithelium is composed of basal, mucous, and ciliated cells. This multi-differentiated epithelium usually responds to xenobiotics and physical injury by undergoing basal cell hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia, and squamous metaplasia. One step of the multistage process of carcinogenesis is thought to involve aberrations in control of the squamous metaplastic processes. Decreased responsiveness to regulators of terminal squamous differentiation may confer a selective clonal expansion advantage to an initiated cell. We studied the effects of endogenous (e.g., transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and serum) and exogenous (e.g., 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-phorbol-acetate (TPA), tobacco smoke condensate, and aldehydes) modifiers of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell in a serum-free culture system. NHBE cells are growth inhibited by all of these compounds and induced to undergo squamous differentiation by TGF-beta 1 or TPA. In contrast, lung carcinoma cell lines are relatively resistant to inducers of terminal squamous differentiation which may provide them with a selective growth advantage. Chemical agents and activated protooncogenes (ras,raf,myc) altered the response to endogenous and exogenous inducers of squamous differentiation and caused extended cellular lifespan, aneuploidy, and/or tumorigenicity. The data suggest a close relationship between dysregulation of terminal differentiation pathways and neoplastic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

  7. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. Methods A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). Conclusion As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited. PMID:23167826

  8. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, distribution of viral types and risk factors in cervical samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive women attending three human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immune deficiency syndrome reference centres in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barboza, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Maruza, Magda; Tenório, Terezinha; Ximenes, Ricardo AA

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have a greater prevalence of coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is of high oncogenic risk. Indeed, the presence of the virus favours intraepithelial squamous cell lesion progression and may induce cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection, distribution of HPV types and risk factors among HIV-positive patients. Cervical samples from 450 HIV-positive patients were analysed with regard to oncotic cytology, colposcopy and HPV presence and type by means of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The results were analysed by comparing demographic data and data relating to HPV and HIV infection. The prevalence of HPV was 47.5%. Among the HPV-positive samples, 59% included viral types of high oncogenic risk. Multivariate analysis showed an association between HPV infection and the presence of cytological alterations (p = 0.003), age greater than or equal to 35 years (p = 0.002), number of partners greater than three (p = 0.002), CD4+ lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 (p = 0.041) and alcohol abuse (p = 0.004). Although high-risk HPV was present in the majority of the lesions studied, the low frequency of HPV 16 (3.3%), low occurrence of cervical lesions and preserved immunological state in most of the HIV-positive patients were factors that may explain the low occurrence of precancerous cervical lesions in this population. PMID:25317701

  9. Human papillomavirus types in 115,789 HPV-positive women: a meta-analysis from cervical infection to cancer.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peng; Howell-Jones, Rebecca; Li, Ni; Bruni, Laia; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M

    2012-11-15

    Genotyping may improve risk stratification of high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive women in cervical screening programs; however, prospective data comparing the natural history and carcinogenic potential of individual HR types remain limited. A meta-analysis of cross-sectional HR HPV-type distribution in 115,789 HPV-positive women was performed, including 33,154 normal cytology, 6,810 atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 13,480 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 6,616 high-grade SIL (HSIL) diagnosed cytologically, 8,106 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 4,068 CIN2 and 10,753 CIN3 diagnosed histologically and 36,374 invasive cervical cancers (ICCs) from 423 PCR-based studies worldwide. No strong differences in HPV-type distribution were apparent between normal cytology, ASCUS, LSIL or CIN1. However, HPV16 positivity increased steeply from normal/ASCUS/LSIL/CIN1 (20-28%), through CIN2/HSIL (40/47%) to CIN3/ICC (58/63%). HPV16, 18 and 45 accounted for a greater or equal proportion of HPV infections in ICC compared to normal cytology (ICC:normal ratios = 3.07, 1.87 and 1.10, respectively) and to CIN3 (ICC:CIN3 ratios = 1.08, 2.11 and 1.47, respectively). Other HR types accounted for important proportions of HPV-positive CIN2 and CIN3, but their contribution dropped in ICC, with ICC:normal ratios ranging from 0.94 for HPV33 down to 0.16 for HPV51. ICC:normal ratios were particularly high for HPV45 in Africa (1.85) and South/Central America (1.79) and for HPV58 in Eastern Asia (1.36). ASCUS and LSIL appear proxies of HPV infection rather than cancer precursors, and even CIN3 is not entirely representative of the types causing ICC. HPV16 in particular, but also HPV18 and 45, warrant special attention in HPV-based screening programs. PMID:22323075

  10. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  11. Identification of Distinct Layers Within the Stratified Squamous Epithelium of the Adult Human True Vocal Fold

    PubMed Central

    Dowdall, Jayme R.; Sadow, Peter M.; Hartnick, Christopher; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Song, Phillip C.; Franco, Ramon A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2016-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis A precise molecular schema for classifying the different cell types of the normal human vocal fold epithelium is lacking. We hypothesize that the true vocal fold epithelium has a cellular architecture and organization similar to that of other stratified squamous epithelia including the skin, cornea, oral mucosa, and esophagus. In analogy to disorders of the skin and gastrointestinal tract, a molecular definition of the normal cell types within the human vocal fold epithelium and a description of their geometric relationships should serve as a foundation for characterizing cellular changes associated with metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Study Design Qualitative study with adult human larynges. Methods Histologic sections of normal human laryngeal tissue were analyzed for morphology (hematoxylin and eosin) and immunohistochemical protein expression profile, including cytokeratins (CK13 and CK14), cornified envelope proteins (involucrin), basal cells (NGFR/p75), and proliferation markers (Ki67). Results We demonstrated that three distinct cell strata with unique marker profiles are present within the stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. We used these definitions to establish that cell proliferation is restricted to certain cell types and layers within the epithelium. These distinct cell types are reproducible across five normal adult larynges. Conclusion We have established that three layers of cells are present within the normal adult stratified squamous epithelium of the true vocal fold. Furthermore, replicating cell populations are largely restricted to the parabasal strata within the epithelium. This delineation of distinct cell populations will facilitate future studies of vocal fold regeneration and cancer. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25988619

  12. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  13. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed

    Chung, Soo-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  16. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells. PMID:27120594

  17. Piperlongumine Suppresses Proliferation of Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis and Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Yuan; Liu, Geng-Hung; Chao, Wen-Ying; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Lim, Yun-Ping; Lu, Chieh-Hsiang; Lai, Peng-Yeh; Chen, Hau-Ren; Lee, Ying-Ray

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), an aggressive cancer originating in the oral cavity, is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in males worldwide. This study investigated the antitumor activity and mechanisms of piperlongumine (PL), a natural compound isolated from Piper longum L., in human OSCC cells. The effects of PL on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in human OSCC cells were investigated. PL effectively inhibited cell growth, caused cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis and senescence in OSCC cells. Moreover, PL-mediated anti-human OSCC behavior was inhibited by an ROS scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) treatment, suggesting that regulation of ROS was involved in the mechanism of the anticancer activity of PL. These findings suggest that PL suppresses tumor growth by regulating the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis and senescence and is a potential chemotherapy agent for human OSCC cells. PMID:27120594

  18. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells containing human papillomavirus type 16 episomes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Lei, Yanjun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Qin, Weihua; Chen, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that infect the anogenital tract are strongly associated with the development of cervical carcinoma, which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Therapeutic drugs specifically targeting HPV are not available. Polyphenolic compounds have gained considerable attention because of their cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancers and certain viruses. In this study, we examined the effects of several polyphenols on cellular proliferation and death of the human cervical cancer cells and human cervical epithelial cells containing stable HPV type 16 episomes (HPVep). Our results show that three polyphenols inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, one of the examined polyphenols, gallic acid (GA), also inhibited the proliferation of HPVep cells and exhibited significant specificity towards HPV-positive cells. The anti-proliferative effect of GA on HPVep and HeLa cells was associated with apoptosis and upregulation of p53. These results suggest that GA can be a potential candidate for the development of anti-HPV agents. PMID:26059022

  19. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain), to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B) specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US), 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL). Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p < 0.001). Strikingly, in N/B diagnoses, genotypes from A5 species were found as coinfecting in all cases. Genotypes from A7 or A9 species appeared in co-infections in 56.5% and 54% respectively whereas genotypes from A6 species appeared in 25.1% of cases. Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization. PMID:19664248

  20. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine increase the radiosensitivity of human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Yuan; Han, Lihui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase is a type of reverse transcriptase that is overexpressed in almost all human tumor cells, but not in normal tissues, which provides an opportunity for radiosensitization targeting telomerase. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine are reverse transcriptase inhibitors that have been applied in clinical practice for several years. We sought to explore the radiosensitization effect of these three drugs on human esophageal cancer cell lines. Eca109 and Eca9706 cells were treated with zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine for 48 h before irradiation was administered. Samples were collected 1 h after irradiation. Clonal efficiency assay was used to evaluate the effect of the combination of these drugs with radiation doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. Telomerase activity (TA) and relative telomere length (TL) were detected and evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis rates were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that all the drugs tested sensitized the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines to radiation through an increase in radiation-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis, deregulation of TA and decreasing the shortened TL caused by radiation. Each of the drugs investigated (zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine) could be used for sensitizing human esophageal cancer cell lines to radiation. Consequently, the present study supports the potential of these three drugs as therapeutic agents for the radiosensitization of esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:27220342

  1. Interstitial laser and chemotherapy combined for treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, Romaine E.; Graeber, Ines P.; Suh, Michael J.; Paek, Woo H.; Paiva, Marcos B.; Castro, Dan J.

    1997-05-01

    We have tested a combined treatment for squamous cell carcinoma based on laser activation of anti-cancer drugs in human solid tumors. Cisplatinum and the new anthrapyrazole CI- 941 are reported to interact with photothermal energy. Combined intratumor drug and interstitial laser therapy were tested in nude mice bearing human squamous cell carcinomas grown as subcutaneous tumors. Cisplatinum injection (1.2 mg/500 mg tumor) 4 hours before KTP laser fiberoptic treatment (532 nm, 0.8 W, 10 sec/site, 300 J) resulted in complete tumor regression in 6/8 animals, while intratumor drug alone led to partial regression and tumor regrowth in 10/10 mice during 12 weeks followup. Laser treatment alone resulted in ablation followed by recurrence in 7/8 cases. Similar laser treatment 4 hours after injection of the light sensitive anthrapyrazole CI-941 led to complete tumor regression in 15/22 cases. CI-941 alone at drug levels up to 1.2 mg/gm tumor in 30 mice induced stasis followed by progression in all cases. Finally, tumor retention of 14C-CI-941 in mice 4 hrs after intralesional injection was 200-fold higher than via the systemic route and by 24 hrs remained 40-fold higher, but drug levels in normal tissues were reduced 10 - 100 fold. The data suggest laser chemotherapy may be a useful new treatment for human cancer.

  2. Detection of squamous cell carcinoma antigen with two systems in the follow-up of patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Maria T; Salvatici, Michela; Mauro, Cristian; Radice, Davide; Lentati, Paola; Massaro, Maria A; Boveri, Sara; Zorzino, Laura; Landoni, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Since squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) testing became commercially available on the Architect platform, the previously established method on the Abbott IMx platform has been progressively replaced. Aim of this work was to compare SCC-Ag values obtained with the 2 methods. Clinical and laboratory data of 188 patients for whom SCC-Ag determination was requested, were reviewed. IMx was used to determine the levels of SCC-Ag from June 2007 to May 2009, while the Architect system was used from June 2009 to April 2011. Only patients consistently diagnosed with no evidence of disease, for whom at least 2 determinations with each analyzer were available were used. Comparison of the results obtained with the 2 systems was then performed. Mean values for SCC-Ag were 0.56 ng/mL (Standard Error (SE): 0.08) with the IMx method, and 1.08 ng/mL (SE 0.10) with Architect (p<0.0001). False positive results were found in 4.8% of patients with the IMx method and in 9.5% of patients with Architect (p=0.049). The values of SCC-Ag determined on the Architect platform are higher than those obtained on the IMx, with a higher percentage of false positive results. PMID:23722302

  3. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. A Functional Polymorphism in the Promoter of MiR-143/145 Is Associated With the Risk of Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yundan; Sun, Ruifen; Li, Lijuan; Yuan, Fang; Liang, Weibo; Wang, Li; Nie, Xinwen; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Linbo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract MiR-143/145 is down-regulated in cervical cancer, which may serve as a tumor suppressor by targeting KRAS and Ras-responsive element-binding protein (RREB1). Activated KRAS leads to down-regulation of miR-143/145 transcription in a RREB1-dependent manner, establishing a miR-143/145-KRAS-RREB1 feedback loop. A polymorphism rs4705343C/T in the promoter of miR-143/145 might influence the binding of TATA-binding protein. We hypothesized that the miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712 may be related to the occurrence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). In this study, we genotyped the 2 polymorphisms in 415 patients with CSCC and 504 controls using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. The promoter activities were measured by the Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay System. We found that the rs4705343TC genotype was associated with an increased risk of CSCC (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.80). The significantly increased association was also observed in a dominant genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.01–1.72). Combined analysis showed that individuals carrying the genotypes of rs4705343 TC/CC and rs712GT/TT had a 1.47-fold increased risk of CSCC (adjusted OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.01–2.15). By using multifactor dimensionality reduction software method, we identified a significant interaction between the miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712. Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay showed that the luciferase activity was significantly lower in cells transfected with the rs4705343C allele than that of the rs4705343T allele. These findings indicate that miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712 may contribute to the etiology of CSCC in Chinese women. PMID:26252302

  5. Primary Screening for Cervical Cancer Based on High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection and HPV 16 and HPV 18 Genotyping, in Comparison to Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Constantinidis, Theocharis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study is to assess the performance of a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) DNA test with individual HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping as a method for primary cervical cancer screening compared with liquid-based cytology (LBC) in a population of Greek women taking part in routine cervical cancer screening. Methods The study, conducted by the “HEllenic Real life Multicentric cErvical Screening” (HERMES) study group, involved the recruitment of 4,009 women, aged 25–55, who took part in routine cervical screening at nine Gynecology Departments in Greece. At first visit cervical specimens were collected for LBC and HPV testing using the Roche Cobas 4800 system. Women found positive for either cytology or HPV were referred for colposcopy, whereas women negative for both tests will be retested after three years. The study is ongoing and the results of the first screening round are reported herein. Results Valid results for cytology and HPV testing were obtained for 3,993 women. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV was 12.7%, of HPV-16 2.7% and of HPV-18 1.4%. Of those referred for colposcopy, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) was detected in 41 women (1.07%). At the threshold of CIN2+, cytology [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or worse] and HPV testing showed a sensitivity of 53.7% and 100% respectively, without change between age groups. Cytology and HPV testing showed specificity of 96.8% and 90.3% respectively, which was increased in older women (≥30) in comparison to younger ones (25–29). Genotyping for HPV16/18 had similar accuracy to cytology for the detection of CIN2+ (sensitivity: 58.5%; specificity 97.5%) as well as for triage to colposcopy (sensitivity: 58.5% vs 53.7% for cytology). Conclusion HPV testing has much better sensitivity than cytology to identify high-grade cervical lesions with slightly lower specificity. HPV testing with individual HPV-16/HPV-18

  6. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus types in Mexican women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    López-Revilla, Rubén; Martínez-Contreras, Luz A; Sánchez-Garza, Mireya

    2008-01-01

    Background Prevalence of high risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) types in the states of San Luis Potosí (SLP) and Guanajuato (Gto), Mexico, was determined by restriction fragment length-polymorphism (RFLP) analysis on the E6 ~250 bp (E6-250) HR-HPV products amplified from cervical scrapings of 442 women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma (280 from SLP and 192 from Gto). Fresh cervical scrapings for HPV detection and typing were obtained from all of them and cytological and/or histological diagnoses were performed on 383. Results Low grade intraepithelial squamous lesions (LSIL) were diagnosed in 280 cases (73.1%), high grade intraepithelial squamous lesions (HSIL) in 64 cases (16.7%) and invasive carcinoma in 39 cases (10.2%). In the 437 cervical scrapings containing amplifiable DNA, only four (0.9%) were not infected by HPV, whereas 402 (92.0%) were infected HR-HPV and 31 (7.1%) by low-risk HPV. RFLP analysis of the amplifiable samples identified infections by one HR-HPV type in 71.4%, by two types in 25.9% and by three types in 2.7%. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV types was, in descending order: 16 (53.4%) > 31 (15.6%) > 18 (8.9%) > 35 (5.6) > 52 (5.4%) > 33 (1.2%) > 58 (0.7%) = unidentified types (0.7%); in double infections (type 58 absent in Gto) it was 16 (88.5%) > 31 (57.7%) > 35 (19.2%) > 18 (16.3%) = 52 (16.3%) > 33 (2.8%) = 58 (2.8%) > unidentified types (1.0%); in triple infections (types 33 and 58 absent in both states) it was 16 (100.0%) > 35 (54.5%) > 31 (45.5%) = 52 (45.5%) > 18 (27.3%). Overall frequency of cervical lesions was LSIL (73.1%) > HSIL (16.7%) > invasive cancer (10.2%). The ratio of single to multiple infections was inversely proportional to the severity of the lesions: 2.46 for LSIL, 2.37 for HSIL and 2.15 for invasive cancer. The frequency of HR-HPV types in HSIL and invasive cancer lesions was 16 (55.0%) > 31 (18.6%) > 35 (7.9%) > 52 (7.1%) > 18 (4.3%) > unidentified types (3.6%) > 33 (2.9%) > 58 (0

  7. Radiation and taxol effects on synchronized human cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geard, C.R.; Jones, J.M. )

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the plant derived chemotherapeutic agent taxol alone and in combination with ionizing radiation on synchronous and asynchronous human cervical carcinoma cells and to define the mechanistic basis for this cytotoxic response. Asynchronous and synchronous cells (obtained by modified mitotic shake-off) derived from carcinomas of the human uterine cervix were treated with a range of concentrations of taxol (0, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 nM) for either 8, 24, or 48 h. Synchronized cell cycling was evaluated by counting mitotic indices and by uptake of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd). Cells were irradiated ([sup 137]Cs [gamma] rays at 1.12 Gy/min) alone and after taxol treatment and plating efficiencies and radiosensitivity determined. Taxol treatment resulted in a dose time dependent loss of colony forming ability with 10 nM for 24 h producing about 10% cell survival. Irradiating taxol treated cells resulted in a strictly additive response in contrast to previous supra-additive results with astrocytoma and melanoma cells. Mitotically synchronized cells rapidly moved into G[sub 1] phase with a second mitotic peak at 28 h (total cycle time). Taxol treatment resulted in a continued accumulation of mitoses, and a failure and/or delay of entry of a fraction of cells into S phase after a G[sub 1] phase of at least 10 h. That is, taxol effects cell cycling at a stage other than G[sub 2]/M. Irradiating (3 Gy) synchronized cells showed a 10-fold variation in sensitivity, with mitosis as the most sensitive phase with taxol alone resulting in some cytotoxicity and combined effects additive or less than additive. This may explain the failure to obtain taxol radiosensitization with these cells and it may indicate that taxol has a multiplicity of actions with differences in effectiveness likely between cells of different origins. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Resistance to telomerase inhibition by human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2011-04-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the ends of chromosomes that are composed of a repetitive G rich sequence and telomeric binding proteins. Telomeres prevent the degradation of chromosomal ends and protect against inappropriate recombination. Telomere attrition involves a tumor suppressor pathway that limits the replication of premalignant cells. The loss of telomeric DNA with each round of replication leads to growth arrest accompanied by senescence or apoptosis. Many tumor cells activate the telomerase gene to bypass senescence. Telomerase is a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein that uses an RNA template to catalyze the addition of telomeric DNA to chromosomal ends. Overexpression of the TERT subunit leads to telomere lengthening and extension of the replicative lifespan. Dominant-negative telomerase has been shown to inhibit telomerase activity in many tumor cell lines, and this is associated with telomere shortening and apoptosis. Additionally, pharmacological telomerase inhibitors have been developed which lead to progressive telomere shortening and programmed cell death. In this study, we report a series of human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines that have high telomerase activity and short telomeres. Dominant-negative telomerase expression and pharmacological telomerase inhibition failed to completely inhibit enzymatic activity which was accompanied by the lack of telomere shortening. These cells continued to proliferate and demonstrated fewer responsive genes when treated with a pharmacological telomerase inhibitor. We concluded that some human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines are resistant to telomerase inhibition. PMID:21305252

  9. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  10. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus positive/negative cervical cancer patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    HERD, OLIVIA; FRANCIES, FLAVIA; KOTZEN, JEFFREY; SMITH, TRUDY; NXUMALO, ZWIDE; MULLER, XANTHENE; SLABBERT, JACOBUS; VRAL, ANNE; BAEYENS, ANS

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer amongst South African women and is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in this region. Several international studies on radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes of cervical cancer patients have remained inconclusive. Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer in South Africa, and the extensive use of radiotherapy to treat it, the chromosomal radiosensitivity of South African cervical cancer patients has not been studied to date. Since a high number of these patients are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, the effect of HIV infection on chromosomal radiosensitivity was also investigated. Blood samples from 35 cervical cancer patients (20 HIV-negative and 15 HIV-positive) and 20 healthy controls were exposed to X-rays at doses of 6 MV of 2 and 4 Gy in vitro. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed using the micronucleus (MN) assay. MN scores were obtained using the Metafer 4 platform, an automated microscopic system. Three scoring methods of the MNScore module of Metafer were applied and compared. Cervical cancer patients had higher MN values than healthy controls, with HIV-positive patients having the highest MN values. Differences between groups were significant when using a scoring method that corrects for false positive and false negative MN. The present study suggested increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in HIV-positive South African cervical cancer patients. PMID:26549042

  11. Overexpression of Dishevelled-2 contributes to proliferation and migration of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoren; Ye, Jinjun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Zhi; Feng, Jifeng

    2016-06-01

    Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) was associated with tumor cell proliferation and migration. We aimed to examine the mechanism of Dvl2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Dvl2 was overexpressed in human ESCC tissues and cell lines ECA109 and TE1 cells. CCK-8 and colony formation assay was performed to evaluate the proliferation in ECA109 cells transfected with Dvl2-shRNA. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to examine the activities of migration and invasion in Dvl2-silenced ESCC cells. Knockdown of Dvl2 significantly reduced ECA109 cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, we demonstrated that the proliferation and migration ability of Dvl2 might through the activation of Wnt pathway by targeting the Cyclin D1 and MMP-9. We came to the conclusion that the proliferation and migration effects of Dvl2 might contribute to malignant development of human ESCC. PMID:27083564

  12. Landscape of genomic alterations in cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Lichtenstein, Lee; Freeman, Samuel S; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan; Pugh, Trevor J; Cherniack, Andrew D; Ambrogio, Lauren; Cibulskis, Kristian; Bertelsen, Bjørn; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra; Treviño, Victor; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Guadarrama, Alberto Salido; Wright, Alexi A; Rosenberg, Mara W; Duke, Fujiko; Kaplan, Bethany; Wang, Rui; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Walline, Heather M; Lawrence, Michael S; Stewart, Chip; Carter, Scott L; McKenna, Aaron; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P; Espinosa-Castilla, Magali; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Wik, Elisabeth; Halle, Mari K; Hoivik, Erling A; Krakstad, Camilla; Gabiño, Nayeli Belem; Gómez-Macías, Gabriela Sofia; Valdez-Chapa, Lezmes D; Garza-Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Maytorena, German; Vazquez, Jorge; Rodea, Carlos; Cravioto, Adrian; Cortes, Maria L; Greulich, Heidi; Crum, Christopher P; Neuberg, Donna S; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Escareno, Claudia Rangel; Akslen, Lars A; Carey, Thomas E; Vintermyr, Olav K; Gabriel, Stacey B; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Getz, Gad; Salvesen, Helga B; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-02-20

    Cervical cancer is responsible for 10-15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The aetiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in cervical carcinomas is well established. Previous studies have also implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS as well as several copy-number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas. Here we report whole-exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, transcriptome sequencing of 79 cases and whole-genome sequencing of 14 tumour-normal pairs. Previously unknown somatic mutations in 79 primary squamous cell carcinomas include recurrent E322K substitutions in the MAPK1 gene (8%), inactivating mutations in the HLA-B gene (9%), and mutations in EP300 (16%), FBXW7 (15%), NFE2L2 (4%), TP53 (5%) and ERBB2 (6%). We also observe somatic ELF3 (13%) and CBFB (8%) mutations in 24 adenocarcinomas. Squamous cell carcinomas have higher frequencies of somatic nucleotide substitutions occurring at cytosines preceded by thymines (Tp*C sites) than adenocarcinomas. Gene expression levels at HPV integration sites were statistically significantly higher in tumours with HPV integration compared with expression of the same genes in tumours without viral integration at the same site. These data demonstrate several recurrent genomic alterations in cervical carcinomas that suggest new strategies to combat this disease. PMID:24390348

  13. The detective, prognostic, and predictive value of DNA methylation in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Cao, Baoping; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 90 % of esophageal cancer cases. Genetic and epigenetic changes have been found to accumulate during the development of various cancers, including esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC). Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two major risk factors for ESCC, and both tobacco and alcohol were found to induce methylation changes in ESCC. Growing evidence demonstrates that aberrant epigenetic changes play important roles in the multiple-step processes of carcinogenesis and tumor progression. DNA methylation may occur in the key components of cancer-related signaling pathways. Aberrant DNA methylation affects genes involved in cell cycle, DNA damage repair, Wnt, TGF-β, and NF-κB signaling pathways, including P16, MGMT, SFRP2, DACH1, and ZNF382. Certain genes methylated in precursor lesions of the esophagus demonstrate that DNA methylation may serve as esophageal cancer early detection marker, such as methylation of HIN1, TFPI-2, DACH1, and SOX17. CHFR methylation is a late stage event in ESCC and is a sensitive marker for taxanes in human ESCC. FHIT methylation is associated with poor prognosis in ESCC. Aberrant DNA methylation changes may serve as diagnostic, prognostic, and chemo-sensitive markers. Characterization of the DNA methylome in ESCC will help to better understand its mechanisms and develop improved therapies. PMID:27110300

  14. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Development and Progression of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Khaled Waleed; Chantiri, Mansour; Bassit, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, regulate many cellular activities including cell migration, differentiation, adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis. Use of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein?2 (rhBMP?2) in oral and maxillofacial surgery has seen a tremendous increase. Due to its role in many cellular pathways, the influence of this protein on carcinogenesis in different organs has been intensively studied over the past decade. BMPs also have been detected to have a role in the development and progression of many tumors, particularly disease-specific bone metastasis. In oral squamous cell carcinoma - the tumor type accounting for more than 90% of head and neck malignancies- aberrations of both BMP expression and associated signaling pathways have a certain relation with the development and progression of the disease by regulating a range of biological functions in the altered cells. In the current review, we discuss the influence of BMPs -especially rhBMP-2- in the development and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27039814

  15. Cyclic mechanical stretch augments hyaluronan production in cultured human uterine cervical fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Maki; Itoh, Hiroaki; Sagawa, Norimasa; Yura, Shigeo; Korita, Daizo; Kakui, Kazuyo; Kawamura, Makoto; Hirota, Naoyoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Fujii, Shingo

    2005-09-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) a glycosaminoglycan with high affinity for water molecules stimulates local inflammatory reactions. Parturition causes a dramatic increase in the amount of HA fragments in the uterine cervix, thereby contributing to a rapid softening as well as opening of the cervical canal, i.e. cervical ripening. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of cyclic distension caused by labour in the augmentation of HA production during cervical ripening. Immunohistochemistry and/or RT-PCR detected hyaluronan synthase (HAS)1, 2 and 3 in samples of human cervical tissue obtained from pregnant women. Labour-like cyclic mechanical stretch for 24, 36 and 48 h significantly enhanced the secretion of HA, from cultured human uterine cervical fibroblast (CxF) cells, 128.7, 151.4 and 173.2%, respectively, concomitant with a significant augmentation of HAS1 (36, 48 h), HAS2 (24, 36 and 48 h) and HAS3 (48 h) mRNA expression. Cyclic mechanical stretch for 12, 36 and 48 h increased molecular size of the HA secreted from CxF cells. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical stretch of the uterine cervix caused by the presenting part of the fetus in labour may contribute to the increase in the secretion of HA during the process of cervical ripening. PMID:16199413

  16. Characterization of a novel human papillomavirus DNA in the cervical carcinoma cell line ME180.

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, S; Delius, H; Kahn, T; Hofmann, B; zur Hausen, H; Schwarz, E

    1991-01-01

    The human cervical carcinoma cell line ME180 was examined for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and RNA. The integrated DNA of a presumably new HPV type showing a relationship closer to HPV39 than to HPV18 was cloned and sequenced. HPV sequences from the E6-E7-E1 region are expressed as poly(A)+ RNAs. Images PMID:1716694

  17. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves. PMID:26320444

  18. Morphological selection of human spermatozoa in cervical mucus "in vivo".

    PubMed

    Ragni, G; Di Pietro, R; Bestetti, O; De Lauretis, L; Olivares, D; Guercilena, S

    1985-01-01

    Spermatozoa morphology at two levels in the cervical canal was compared, at the external and internal uterine orifices, in samples taken "in vivo" during 21 postcoital tests (P.C.T.s). P.C.T.s with cervical mucus, with Moghissi scores lower than 10 and exo- and endocervical pH less than 7 were excluded. At the upper level of the cervical canal, 12 of the 21 P.C.T. showed more than 5% more normal spermatozoa than at the lower level of the canal (in 5 of these P.C.T. the increase was greater than 10%). Selection for normal heads was seen in 2 and for normal tails in 4. The P.C.T. that selected for normal tails all had greater than 10% abnormal tails at the external orifice. These results confirm that there is some selection of spermatozoa during passage through the cervical canal. Above all, the selection appears to exclude those spermatozoa with defective locomotive mechanisms (abnormal tails), which indicates that the mucus acts as a "passive filter" with selection depending on the spermatozoa themselves in relation to motility. PMID:4061891

  19. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  1. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus–Positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gillison, Maura L.; Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Anderson, William F.; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now established as the principal cause of an increase in incidence of a subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNCs) in numerous geographic regions around the world. Further study of the epidemiology of HPV-positive HNC will be critical to the development and implementation of public health interventions to reverse these global incidence trends. Here, recent data are reviewed to provide insight into several topics, including incidence trends and projections for HPV-positive HNC; the worldwide HPV-attributable fraction; sex disparities in cancer risk; the epidemiology of oral HPV infection; the latency period between infection and cancer; the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccination; and prospects for secondary prevention through screening for oral HPV infection or seroreactivity to viral antigens. The identification of a single necessary cause for any cancer provides a rare and perhaps extraordinary opportunity for cancer prevention. PMID:26351338

  3. Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus-Positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gillison, Maura L; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Anderson, William F; Fakhry, Carole

    2015-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is now established as the principal cause of an increase in incidence of a subset of head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNCs) in numerous geographic regions around the world. Further study of the epidemiology of HPV-positive HNC will be critical to the development and implementation of public health interventions to reverse these global incidence trends. Here, recent data are reviewed to provide insight into several topics, including incidence trends and projections for HPV-positive HNC; the worldwide HPV-attributable fraction; sex disparities in cancer risk; the epidemiology of oral HPV infection; the latency period between infection and cancer; the potential impact of prophylactic HPV vaccination; and prospects for secondary prevention through screening for oral HPV infection or seroreactivity to viral antigens. The identification of a single necessary cause for any cancer provides a rare and perhaps extraordinary opportunity for cancer prevention. PMID:26351338

  4. Evaluation of an Array-Based Method for Human Papillomavirus Detection and Genotyping in Comparison with Conventional Methods Used in Cervical Cancer Screening▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Sierra, Nerea; Martró, Elisa; Castellà, Eva; Llatjós, Mariona; Tarrats, Antoni; Bascuñana, Elisabet; Díaz, Rosana; Carrasco, María; Sirera, Guillem; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer in young women around the world. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially high-risk HPV types (HR-HPV), is necessary for the development of this cancer. HPV-DNA detection is increasingly being used in cervical cancer screening programs, together with the Papanicolau smear test. We evaluated the usefulness of introducing this new array-based HPV genotyping method (i.e., Clinical Arrays Papillomavirus Humano) in the cervical cancer screening algorithm in our center. The results obtained using this method were compared to those obtained by the hybrid capture II high-risk HPV DNA test (HC-II) and Papanicolau in a selected group of 408 women. The array-based assay was performed in women that were HC-II positive or presented cytological alterations. Among 246 array-positive patients, 123 (50%) presented infection with ≥2 types, and HR-HPV types were detected in 206 (83.7%), mainly HPV-16 (24.0%). Up to 132 (33.2%) specimens were classified as ASCUS (for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), and only 48 (36.4%) of them were HPV-DNA positive by either assay; however, 78.7% of these cases were caused by HR-HPV types. The agreement between both HPV-DNA detection techniques was fairly good (n = 367). Screening with Papanicolau smear and HC-II tests, followed by HPV detection and genotyping, provided an optimal identification of women at risk for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, with the identification of specific genotypes, either in single or multiple infections, a better prediction of disease progression was achieved. The array method also made allowed us to determine the possible contribution of the available vaccines in our setting. PMID:19439534

  5. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26550522

  6. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  7. MicroRNA-218 Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Human Cervical Cancer via Promoting Radiation Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wang; Xiaoyun, Han; Haifeng, Qiu; Jing, Li; Weixu, Hu; Ruofan, Dong; Jinjin, Yu; Zongji, Shen

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported frequent loss of microRNA-218 (miR-218) in cervical cancer, which was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. As microRNAs were found invovled in the regulation of radiosensitivity in various human cancers, we therefore aim to investigate the effects of miR-218 on radiosensitivity of cervical cancer in the present study. The clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that loss of miR-218 could predict radioresistance in the primary cervical cancer cells (R2=0.6516, P<0.001). In vitro, abundant miR-218 increased the radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001 for HeLa, P=0.009 for SiHa, P=0.016 for C33A and P=0.01 for CaSki). Upregulation of miR-218 significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, which was further enhanced by the combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation In xenograft growth assay, combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation notably induced cellular apoptosis and suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that miR-218 resensitized cervical cancer cells to radiation via promoting cellular apoptosis. Moreover, we proved that miR-218 as a potent predictor of radiosensitivity in cervical cancer, especially for those patients with loss of miR-218. PMID:24843318

  8. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K.; Chen, Jason J.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers. PMID:25344913

  9. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. Near-infrared micro-Raman spectroscopy for in vitro detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamemoto, Lori E; Misra, Anupam K; Sharma, Shiv K; Goodman, Marc T; Luk, Hugh; Dykes, Ava C; Acosta, Tayro

    2010-03-01

    Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for detecting critical differences in biological samples with minimum interference in the Raman spectra from the native fluorescence of the samples. The technique is often suggested as a potential screening tool for cancer. In this article we report in vitro Raman spectra of squamous cells in normal and cancerous cervical human tissue from seven patients, which have good signal-to-noise ratio and which were found to be reproducible. These preliminary results show that several Raman features in these spectra could be used to distinguish cancerous cervical squamous cells from normal cervical squamous cells. In general, the Raman spectra of cervical cancer cells show intensity differences compared to those of normal squamous cell spectra. For example, several well-defined Raman peaks of collagen in the 775 to 975 cm(-1) region are observed in the case of normal squamous cells, but these are below the detection limit of normal Raman spectroscopy in the spectra of invasive cervical cancer cells. In the high frequency 2800 to 3100 cm(-1) region, it is found that the peak area under the CH stretching band is lower by a factor of approximately six in the spectra of cervical cancer cells as compared with that of the normal cells. The Raman chemical maps of regions of cancer and normal cells in the cervical epithelium made from the spectral features in the 775 to 975 cm(-1) and 2800 to 3100 cm(-1) regions are also found to show good correlation with each other. PMID:20223058

  11. Knockdown of Pentraxin 3 suppresses tumorigenicity and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chu-Liang; Hung, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as an inflammatory molecule has been shown to be involved in immune response, inflammation, and cancer. However, the effects of PTX3 on the biological features of cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo have not been delineated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that increased PTX3 expression was significantly associated with tumor grade (P < 0.011) and differentiation (P < 0.019). Knocking down PTX3 with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cell lines resulted in inhibited cell viability, diminished colony-forming ability, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, along with downregulated expression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c, and upregulated expression of p-cdc2, p-cdc25c, p21, and p27. Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreased the potential of migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells by inhibiting matrix metalloproteidase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Moreover, in vivo functional studies showed PTX3-knockdown in mice suppressed tumorigenicity and lung metastatic potential. Conversely, overexpression of PTX3 enhanced proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PTX3 contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate PTX3 as a novel therapeutic biomarker for human cervical cancer. PMID:27377307

  12. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  13. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  14. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student’s t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins’ expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  15. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells' clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student's t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins' expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  16. Sensitivity of in situ detection with biotinylated probes of human papilloma virus type 16 DNA in frozen tissue sections of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Walboomers, J M; Melchers, W J; Mullink, H; Meijer, C J; Struyk, A; Quint, W G; van der Noordaa, J; ter Schegget, J

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivity of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA detection by DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated probes (bio-DISH) was estimated by performing this technique on snap-frozen tissue sections of 10 cervical squamous cell carcinomas containing increasing amounts of HPV-16 as determined by Southern blot hybridization. A protocol using serial sections for bio-DISH and DNA extraction was used. The number of positively stained cells and the detection limit were strongly dependent on the treatment of the sections with proteinase K prior to hybridization. At low proteinase K concentration (0.1 micrograms/ml), the detection limit appeared to be 30-40 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell, whereas morphology was preserved. A high proteinase K concentration (1-5 micrograms/ml) often resulted in an increase in the number of positively stained cells but also in a poor morphology. The detection limit was improved to at least 20 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell. PMID:2837906

  17. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  18. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  19. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. IMPORTANCE  : Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an accumulation of DNA

  20. The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

  1. Perception of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccination in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Showket; Nasare, Vilas; Kumari, Malasha; Sharma, Shashi; Khan, Mohammad Aijaz; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) -associated cervical cancer is the second-most common cancer in women worldwide but it is the most frequent gynaecological cancer and cancer associated death in India women. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge about cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccine, HPV vaccine acceptance among school and undergraduates students and their parent’s perception about acceptance of HPV vaccine in Northern part of India (Delhi and NCR regions). Materials and Methods A qualitative questionnaire based survey among 2500 urban/rural students aged 12–22 years was conducted. Results Overall, a low frequency (15%) of HPV and cervical cancer awareness was observed in students and their parents. However, the awareness was much higher in females belonging to urban setup compared to boys with a perception that HPV causes cervical cancer in women only. Additionally, only (13%) participants who were aware of cervical cancer and HPV) were willing to accept HPV vaccination. Apparently, parents of female students were two times more willing to accept HPV vaccination for their ward than male students (p<0.001; OR 95%CI = 2.09 (1.58–2.76). Conclusion Cervical cancer and HPV awareness among school, undergraduate students and also to their parents was found to be very low in this part of India. The level of awareness and education appears to be insignificant determinants in rural compared to urban setup. Better health education will be needed to maximize public awareness for cervical cancer prevention. PMID:25386964

  2. Characterization of human cervical remodeling throughout pregnancy using in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Vargis, Elizabeth; Slaughter, Chris; Rudin, Amy P.; Herington, Jennifer L.; Bennett, Kelly A.; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-02-01

    Globally, fifteen million babies are born preterm each year, affecting 1 in 8 pregnancies in the US alone. Cervical remodeling includes a biochemical cascade of changes that ultimately result in the thinning and dilation of the cervix for passage of a fetus. This process is poorly understood and is the focus of this study. Our group is utilizing Raman spectroscopy to evaluate biochemical changes occurring in the human cervix throughout pregnancy. This technique has high molecular specificity and can be performed in vivo, with the potential to unveil new molecular dynamics essential for cervical remodeling.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Genotype-Specific Prevalence Across the Continuum of Cervical Neoplasia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joste, Nancy E.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Hunt, William C.; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H.; Castle, Philip E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Prior to widespread HPV vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. Methods A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens were tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. Results The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. The prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma, most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, −31, −52, −58, −33, and −39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, −18, −31, −45, −52, and −33 for invasive cancers. Conclusions Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Impact Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. PMID:25363635

  4. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  5. Evidence of disrupted high-risk human papillomavirus DNA in morphologically normal cervices of older women

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Sarah M.; Pereira, Merlin; Roberts, Sally; Cuschieri, Kate; Nuovo, Gerard; Athavale, Ramanand; Young, Lawrence; Ganesan, Raji; Woodman, Ciarán B.

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes nearly 100% of cervical carcinoma. However, it remains unclear whether HPV can establish a latent infection, one which may be responsible for the second peak in incidence of cervical carcinoma seen in older women. Therefore, using Ventana in situ hybridisation (ISH), quantitative PCR assays and biomarkers of productive and transforming viral infection, we set out to provide the first robust estimate of the prevalence and characteristics of HPV genomes in FFPE tissue from the cervices of 99 women undergoing hysterectomy for reasons unrelated to epithelial abnormality. Our ISH assay detected HR-HPV in 42% of our study population. The majority of ISH positive samples also tested HPV16 positive using sensitive PCR based assays and were more likely to have a history of preceding cytological abnormality. Analysis of subsets of this population revealed HR-HPV to be transcriptionally inactive as there was no evidence of a productive or transforming infection. Critically, the E2 gene was always disrupted in those HPV16 positive cases which were assessed. These findings point to a reservoir of transcriptionally silent, disrupted HPV16 DNA in morphologically normal cervices, re-expression of which could explain the increase in incidence of cervical cancer observed in later life. PMID:26875676

  6. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  7. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  8. Evidence of disrupted high-risk human papillomavirus DNA in morphologically normal cervices of older women.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sarah M; Pereira, Merlin; Roberts, Sally; Cuschieri, Kate; Nuovo, Gerard; Athavale, Ramanand; Young, Lawrence; Ganesan, Raji; Woodman, Ciarán B

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes nearly 100% of cervical carcinoma. However, it remains unclear whether HPV can establish a latent infection, one which may be responsible for the second peak in incidence of cervical carcinoma seen in older women. Therefore, using Ventana in situ hybridisation (ISH), quantitative PCR assays and biomarkers of productive and transforming viral infection, we set out to provide the first robust estimate of the prevalence and characteristics of HPV genomes in FFPE tissue from the cervices of 99 women undergoing hysterectomy for reasons unrelated to epithelial abnormality. Our ISH assay detected HR-HPV in 42% of our study population. The majority of ISH positive samples also tested HPV16 positive using sensitive PCR based assays and were more likely to have a history of preceding cytological abnormality. Analysis of subsets of this population revealed HR-HPV to be transcriptionally inactive as there was no evidence of a productive or transforming infection. Critically, the E2 gene was always disrupted in those HPV16 positive cases which were assessed. These findings point to a reservoir of transcriptionally silent, disrupted HPV16 DNA in morphologically normal cervices, re-expression of which could explain the increase in incidence of cervical cancer observed in later life. PMID:26875676

  9. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L.; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  10. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792