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Sample records for human chromosome 2

  1. Regional mapping of loci from human chromosome 2q to sheep chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, H.A.; Pearce, P.D.; Maher, D.W.; Malcolm, A.A.; Wood, N.J.; Phua, S.H.; Broad, T.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The human chromosome 2q loci, fibronectin 1 (FN1), the [alpha]1 chain of type III collagen (COL3A1), and the [delta] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRND) have been regionally assigned to sheep chromosome 2q by in situ hybridization. COL3A1 is pericentromeric (2q12-q21), while FN1 and CHRND are in the subterminal region at 2q41-q44 and 2q42-qter, respectively. The mapping of FN1 assigns the sheep synthenic group U11, which contains FN1, villin 1 (VIL1), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), and [gamma] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRNG), to sheep chromosome 2q. Inhibin-[alpha] (INHA) is also assigned to sheep chromosome 2q as FN1 and INHA compose sheep linkage group 3. These seven loci are members of a conserved chromosomal segment in human, mouse, and sheep. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Aup1, a novel gene on mouse Chromosome 6 and human Chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Wonhee; Weber, J.S.; Meisler, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    We have cloned a novel mouse cDNA, Aup1, encoding a predicted protein of 410 amino acid residues. The 1.5-kb Aup1 transcript is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues. An evolutionary relationship to the Caenorhabditis elegans predicted protein F44b9.5 is indicated by the 35% identity and 53% conservation of the amino acid sequences. Nineteen related human ESTs spanning 80% of the protein have also been identified, with a predicted amino acid sequence identity of 86% between the human and the mouse proteins. The gene has been mapped to a conserved linkage group on human chromosome 2p13 and mouse Chromosome 6. Aup1 was eliminated as a candidate gene for two closely linked disorders, human LGMD2B and mouse mnd2. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Localization of the oncogene c-erbA2 to human chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Rider, S H; Gorman, P A; Shipley, J M; Moore, G; Vennstrom, B; Solomon, E; Sheer, D

    1987-05-01

    The human c-erbA1 gene has been previously mapped to chromosome 17. We have now mapped c-erbA2 to the short arm of chromosome 3, using a human genomic probe in Southern analysis of DNA from a panel of human/mouse somatic cell hybrids. In situ hybridization using the same probe on metaphase chromosomes has enabled fine chromosome mapping of c-erbA2 to the chromosome region 3p21-pter. PMID:3674756

  5. Sequence, genomic structure, and chromosomal assignment of human DOC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Albertsen, H.M.; Williams, B.; Smith, S.A.

    1996-04-15

    DOC-2 is a human gene originally identified as a 767-bp cDNA fragment isolated from normal ovarian epithelial cells by differential display against ovarian carcinoma cells. We have now determined the complete cDNA sequence of the 3.2-kb DOC-2 transcript and localized the gene to chromosome 5. A 12.5-kb genomic fragment at the 5{prime}-end of DOC-2 has also been sequenced, revealing the intron-exon structure of the first eight exons (788 bases) of the DOC-2 gene. Translation of the DOC-2 cDNA predicts a hydrophobic protein of 770 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 82.5 kDa. Comparison of the DNA and amino acid sequences of DOC-2 to publicly accessible sequence data-bases revealed 83% identity to p96, a murine-responsive phosphoprotein. In addition, about 45% identity was observed between the first 140 N-terminal residues of DOC-2 and the Caenorhabditas elegans M110.5 and Drosophila melanoaster Dab genes. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Origin of human chromosome 2: An ancestral telomere-telomere fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ijdo, J.W.; Baldini, A.; Ward, D.C.; Reeders, S.T.; Wells, R.A. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors identified two allelic genomic cosmids from human chromosome 2, c8.1 and c29B, each containing two inverted arrays of the vertebrate telomeric repeat in a head-to-head arrangement, 5{prime}(TTAGGG){sub n}-(CCCTAA){sub m}3{prime}. Sequences flanking this telomeric repeat are characteristic of present-day human pretelomeres. BAL-31 nuclease experiments with yeast artificial chromosome clones of human telomeres and fluorescence in situ hybridization reveal that sequences flanking these inverted repeats hybridize both to band 2q13 and to different, but overlapping, subsets of human chromosome ends. They conclude that the locus cloned in cosmids c8.1 and c29B is the relic of an ancient telomere-telomere fusion and marks the point at which two ancestral ape chromosomes fused to give rise to human chromosome 2.

  7. Regional localization of the gene for thyroid peroxidase to human chromosome 2p25 and mouse chromosome 12C

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Yuichi; Onogi, Satoshi; Fujita, Teizo

    1995-02-10

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) plays a central role in thyroid gland function. The enzyme catalyzes two important reactions of thyroid hormone synthesis, i.e., the iodination of tyrosine residues in thyroglobulin and phenoxy-ester formation between pairs of iodinated tyrosines to generate the thyroid hormones, thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Previously, we isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse TPOs and assigned the human TPO gene to the short arm of chromosome 2 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. By a similar analysis of DNA from somatic cell hybrids, the human TPO gene was mapped to 2pter-p12. The mouse TPO gene was localized to chromosome 12 using a rat TPO cDNA as a probe to hybridize with mouse-hamster somatic cell hybrids. In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm the localization of human and mouse TPO genes to human chromosome 2 and mouse chromosome 12 and to assign them regionally to 2p25 and 12C, respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase gene (STM): Localization to human chromosome 16p11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, I.A.; Her, C.; Weinshilboum, M.

    1994-09-01

    Thermolabile (TL) phenol sulfotransferase (PST) catalyzes the sulfate conjugation of phenolic monoamine neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. We recently cloned a cDNA for human liver TL PST and expressed it in COS-1 cells. We now report the chromosomal localization of the human TL PST gene (STM) as well as its partial sequence. DNA from NIGMS Human/Rodent Somatic Cell Hybrid Mapping Panels 1 and 2 was screened by use of the PCR, and the STM gene was mapped to chromosome 16. Regional localization to 16p11.2 was performed by PCR analysis of a high-resolution mouse/human somatic cell hybrid panel that contained defined portions of human chromosome 16. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Construction and characterization of a human chromosome 2-specific BAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Shouse, S.; Manson, J.

    1994-12-01

    We have constructed a human chromosome 2-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using DNA from the somatic cell hybrid GM10826. The average size of the clones is about 63 kb. The coverage and distribution of the library were estimated by screening with known polymorphic genetic markers and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Twenty-one markers tested positive when DNA pools prepared from approximately one-sixth of the library were screened with 33 known markers. This is consistent with the theoretical calculation of 63% coverage at one genomic equivalent. This suggested that the coverage of the library is approximately 5-6X. FISH analysis with 54 BACs revealed single site hybridization to chromosome 2, and the clones were distributed randomly on the chromosome. We have also performed direct sequencing of the BAC insert ends to generate sequence-tagged sites suitable for mapping and chromosome walking. This is the first reported human chromosome 2-specific BAC library and should provide a resource for physical mapping and disease searching for this chromosome. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  10. A 37-kb fragment common to the pericentromeric region of human chromosomes 13 and 21 and to the ancestral inactive centromere of chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Charlieu, J.P.; Laurent, A.M.; Orti, R.; Bellis, M.; Roizes, G. INSERM U 249, Montpellier ); Viegas-Pequignot, E. )

    1993-03-01

    A YAC clone from a chromosome 21-specific partial library was localized by in situ hybridization to the pericentromeric region of chromosomes 13 and 21 and to the long arm of chromosome 2, where an ancestral inactive centromere is present. Restriction mapping of the insert showed that it may contain tandemly repeated DNA. Probes for [alpha]-satellite and satellite II and III failed to hybridize with the cloned DNA. Shotgun subcloning might reveal a sequence that seems to be specific for chromosome 21. Alu-PCR was performed to generate probes from the YAC clone to map it more precisely, using a somatic hybrid containing only human chromosome 21. The inter-Alu sequences thus isolated were found to be clustered in an approximately 37-kb-long fragment common to chromosomes 2, 13, and 21, which might be involved in the centromeric function of these chromosomes. 33 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. PMID:12421751

  12. Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} gene in human and rat: Chromosomal localization and polymorphic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, A.; Simon, J.S.; Jacob, H.J.

    1995-03-01

    The authors report the chromosomal localization and a simple sequence repeat (SSR) in the cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) gene in both human and rat. A (CA){sub 18} repeat in the promoter of the rat gene was determined to exhibit length polymorphism when analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 19 different inbred rat strains. Genotyping for this marker in 234 F{sub 2} progeny of a SHRXBN intercross mapped the gene to rat chromosome 13. Using a PCR strategy, a fragment of the promoter for the human gene was isolated, and a (CA){sub 18} repeat was identified. Since this marker displayed a low heterozygosity index, they also identified a mononucleotide repeat in the promoter for cPLA{sub 2} that displayed a polymorphism information content value of 0.76. The human gene was mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to chromosome 1q25. Of interest, the gene encoding the enzyme prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (cyclooxygenase-2), which acts on the arachidonic acid product of cPLA{sub 2}, was previously localized to this same chromosomal region, raising the possibility of coordinate regulation. Identification of intragenic markers may facilitate studies of polymorphic variants of these genes as candidates for disorders in which perturbations of the eicosanoid cascade may play a role. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Localization of the kappa opioid receptor gene to human chromosome band 8q11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kazuki; Takeda, Jun; Bell, G.I.; Espinosa, R.; Le Beau, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Using the cloned mouse kappa opioid receptor cDNA clone as a probe, screened a human genomic library and isolated a clone containing part of the human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1), designated [lambda]hSR4-1. To determine the chromosomal localization of OPRK1, [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA was labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of bio-11-dUTP and hybridized to human metaphase cells prepared from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes as described previously. Hybridization of the OPRK1-specific probe [lambda]hSR4-1 DNA to normal human metaphase chromosomes resulted in specific labeling only of chromosome 8. Specific labeling of 8q11 was observed on all 4 (6 cells), 3 (9 cells), 2 (9 cells), or 1 (1 cell) chromatid of the chromosome 8 homologs in 25 cells examined. Of 72 signals observed, 70 were located at 8q11. 1 signal was located at 7q11 and at 12p11. In most cells, the signal on 8q was located at 8q11.2. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Dinucleotide repeat loci contribute highly informative genetic markers to the human chromosome 2 linkage map

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S. ); Sherman, S.L. ); Naylor, S.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Microsatellite repeat loci can provide informative markers for genetic linkage. Currently, the human chromosome 2 genetic linkage map has very few highly polymorphic markers. Being such a large chromosome, it will require a large number of informative markers for the dense coverage desired to allow disease genes to be mapped quickly and accurately. Dinucleotide repeat loci from two anonymous chromosome 2 genomic DNA clones were sequenced so that oligonucleotide primers could be designed for amplifying each locus using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Five sets of PCR primers were also generated from nucleotide sequences in the GenBank Database of chromosome 2 genes containing dinucleotide repeats. In addition, one PCR primer pair was made that amplifies a restriction fragment length polymorphism on the TNP1 gene. These markers were placed on the CEPH genetic linkage map by screening the CEPH reference DNA panel with each primer set, combining these data with those of other markers previously placed on the map, and analyzing the combined data set using CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. The microsatellite loci are highly informative markers and the TNP1 locus, as expected, is only moderately informative. A map was constructed with 38 ordered loci (odds [ge] 1000:1) spanning 296 cM (male) and 476 cM (female) of chromosome 2 compared with 306 cM (male) and 529 cM (female) for a previous map of 20 markers. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The evolution of African great ape subtelomeric heterochromatin and the fusion of human chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R; Sajjadian, Saba; Vives, Laura; Sudmant, Peter H; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Graves, Tina A; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2012-06-01

    Chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes differ from human chromosomes by the presence of large blocks of subterminal heterochromatin thought to be composed primarily of arrays of tandem satellite sequence. We explore their sequence composition and organization and show a complex organization composed of specific sets of segmental duplications that have hyperexpanded in concert with the formation of subterminal satellites. These regions are highly copy number polymorphic between and within species, and copy number differences involving hundreds of copies can be accurately estimated by assaying read-depth of next-generation sequencing data sets. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses suggest that the structures have arisen largely independently in the two lineages with the exception of a few seed sequences present in the common ancestor of humans and African apes. We propose a model where an ancestral human-chimpanzee pericentric inversion and the ancestral chromosome 2 fusion both predisposed and protected the chimpanzee and human genomes, respectively, to the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatin. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between duplicated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements that rapidly alter the cytogenetic landscape in a short period of evolutionary time. PMID:22419167

  16. The evolution of African great ape subtelomeric heterochromatin and the fusion of human chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R.; Sajjadian, Saba; Vives, Laura; Sudmant, Peter H.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2012-01-01

    Chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes differ from human chromosomes by the presence of large blocks of subterminal heterochromatin thought to be composed primarily of arrays of tandem satellite sequence. We explore their sequence composition and organization and show a complex organization composed of specific sets of segmental duplications that have hyperexpanded in concert with the formation of subterminal satellites. These regions are highly copy number polymorphic between and within species, and copy number differences involving hundreds of copies can be accurately estimated by assaying read-depth of next-generation sequencing data sets. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses suggest that the structures have arisen largely independently in the two lineages with the exception of a few seed sequences present in the common ancestor of humans and African apes. We propose a model where an ancestral human-chimpanzee pericentric inversion and the ancestral chromosome 2 fusion both predisposed and protected the chimpanzee and human genomes, respectively, to the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatin. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between duplicated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements that rapidly alter the cytogenetic landscape in a short period of evolutionary time. PMID:22419167

  17. The human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) gene is located in the chromosome 2q14 region

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.; Jones, C.; Hart, I.; Bleskan, J.; Berger, R.; Geyer, D. ); Eisenberg, S.P. ); Smith, M.F. Jr.; Arend, W.P. )

    1993-01-01

    The gene for human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) has been assigned to chromosome 2 on the basis of Southern blot analysis of a series of human-Chinese hamster cell hybrids. Using a yeast artificial chromosome containing the IL1RN gene as a probe, the human IL1RN gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 2 at band 2q14.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This site is near the positions of genes for human IL-l[alpha], IL-1[beta], and types I and II IL-1 receptors, as reported by other laboratories. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, K.; Kastury, K.; Druck, T.

    1994-07-15

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding {open_quotes}adapter{close_quotes} proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ hybridization. The NCK locus is at chromosome region 3q21, a region involved in neoplasia-associated changes; the SHC cognate locus, SHC1, is at 1q21, and the GRB2 locus is at 17q22-qter telomeric to the HOXB and NGFR loci. Both SHC1 and GRB2 are in chromosome regions that may be duplicated in some tumor types. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  19. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationship between the disease locus for galactokinase deficiency galactosemia, which is responsible for cataracts in newborns and possibly presenile cataracts in adults, and the two galactokinase loci is unknown. Images PMID:1438294

  1. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  2. Regional assignment of the human homebox-containing gene EN1 to chromosome 2q13-q21

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, A.; Muenke, M. ); Logan, C. ); Joyner, A.L. Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Toronto )

    1993-01-01

    The human homeobox-containing genes EN1 and EN2 are closely related to the Drosophila pattern formation gene engrailed (en), which may be important in brain development, as shown by gene expression studies during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we have refined the localization of EN1 to human chromosome 2q13-q21 using a mapping panel of rodent/human cell hybrids containing different regions of chromosome 2 and a lymphoblastoid cell line with an interstitial deletion, del(2) (q21-q23.2). This regional assignment of EN1 increases to 22 the number of currently known genes on human chromosome 2q that have homologs on the proximal region of mouse chromosome 1. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Identification of the human {beta}A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): Localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsebos, T.J.M.; Cerosaletti, K.M.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-08-10

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine {beta}A2 crystalline gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe. Regional localization to 2q34-q36 was established by hybridizing the CRYBA2 probe to microcell and radiation hybrids containing defined fragments of chromosome 2 as the only human contribution. The CRYBA2 probe was also used to localize, by interspecific backcross mapping, the mouse gene (Cryba2) to the central portion of chromosome 1 in a region of known human chromosome 2 homology. Finally, we demonstrate that in both species the {beta}A2 crystallin gene is linked but separable from the {gamma}A crystallin gene. The {beta}A2 crystallin gene is a candidate gene for human and mouse hereditary cataract. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  5. Large-scale cloning of human chromosome 2-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Rezonzew, R. |; Stanton, V.P. Jr.

    1995-03-20

    We report here an efficient approach to the establishment of extended YAC contigs on human chromosome 2 by using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR-based screening strategy for YAC DNA pools. Genomic DNA was extracted from 1152 YAC pools comprised of 55,296 YACs mostly derived from the CEPH Mark I library. Alu-element-mediated PCR was performed for each pool, and amplification products were spotted on hybridization membranes (IRS filters). IRS probes for the screening of the IRS filters were obtained by Alu-element-mediated PCR. Of 708 distinct probes obtained from chromosome 2-specific somatic cell hybrids, 85% were successfully used for library screening. Similarly, 80% of 80 YAC walking probes were successfully used for library screening. Each probe detected an average of 6.6 YACs, which is in good agreement with the 7- to 7.5-fold genome coverage provided by the library. In a preliminary analysis, we have identified 188 YAC groups that are the basis for building contigs for chromosome 2. The coverage of the telomeric half of chromosome 2q was considered to be good since 31 of 34 microsatellites and 22 of 23 expressed sequence tags that were chosen from chromosome region 2q13-q37 were contained in a chromosome 2 YAC sublibrary generated by our experiments. We have identified a minimum of 1610 distinct chromosome 2-specific YACs, which will be a valuable asset for the physical mapping of the second largest human chromosome. 81 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. The gene encoding p120{sup cas}, a novel catenin, localizes on human chromosome 11q11 (CTNND) and mouse chromosome 2 (Catns)

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, A.B.; Daniel, J.M.; Shapiro, D.N.

    1996-01-01

    The p120{sub cas} gene encodes a protein tyrosine kinase substrate that associates with the cell-cell adhesion protein complex containing E-cadherin and its cytoplasmic cofactors {alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin, and plakoglobin. Like other components of the cadherin/catenin complex, defects in p120{sup cas} may contribute to cell malignancy. We have determined the chromosomal location of the p120{sup cas} gene in human and mouse using fluorescence in situ hybridization and interspecific backcross analysis, respectively. The human p120{sub cas} gene (CTNND) is localized immediately adjacent to the centromere on the long arm of chromosome 11 in band 11q11. The murine p120{sup cas} gene (Catns) was assigned to the middle of chromosome 2. Neither locus is currently known to be associated with disease or malignancy. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  7. ATR, BRCA1 and gammaH2AX localize to unsynapsed chromosomes at the pachytene stage in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cruz, R; Roig, I; Robles, P; Scherthan, H; Garcia Caldés, M

    2009-01-01

    Asynapsis of homologous chromosomes at the pachytene stage has been associated with gametogenic failure and infertility, but the cellular mechanisms involved are currently unknown in human meiocytes. In mice, the protein encoded by the breast-cancer susceptibility gene Brca1 has been described to direct kinase ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related) to any unpaired DNA at the pachytene stage, where ATR triggers H2AX phosphorylation, resulting in the silencing of those chromosomes. In this study, the distribution of ATR, BRCA1 and the phosphorylated histone gammaH2AX is assessed by immunofluorescence in human oocytes and it is found that they localize at unpaired chromosomes at the pachytene stage. Evidence is shown to propose that BRCA1, ATR and gammaH2AX in the human may be part of a system such as the one previously described in mouse, which signals unsynapsed chromosomes at pachytene and may lead to their silencing. PMID:19146767

  8. The human BARX2 gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hjalt, T A; Murray, J C

    1999-12-15

    The BARX genes 1 and 2 are Bar class homeobox genes expressed in craniofacial structures during development. In this report, we present the genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and polymorphic markers in BARX2. The gene has four exons, ranging in size from 85 to 1099 bp. BARX2 is localized on human chromosome 11q25, as determined by radiation hybrid mapping. In the mouse, Barx2 is coexpressed with Pitx2 in several tissues. Based on the coexpression, BARX2 was assumed to be a candidate gene for those cases of Rieger syndrome that cannot be associated with mutations of PITX2. Mutations in PITX2 cause some cases of Rieger syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder affecting eyes, teeth, and umbilicus. DNA from Rieger patients was subjected to single-strand conformation polymorphism screening of the BARX2 coding region. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in a normal population, although no etiologic mutations were detectable in over 100 cases of Rieger syndrome or in individuals with related ocular disorders. PMID:10644443

  9. Assignment of three human markers in chromosome 21q11 to mouse chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Shen, Y; Tong, S; Kao, F T

    1997-09-01

    Three unique sequence microclones from human chromosome region 21q11 were assigned to mouse chromosome 16 using a mouse/Chinese hamster cell hybrid 96Az2 containing a single mouse chromosome 16. This comparative mapping provides further homology between human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 to include the very proximal portion of the long arm of human chromosome 21. Since this part of human chromosome 21 is associated with mental retardation in Down syndrome individuals, its homologous mouse region should also be included in the construction of mouse models for studying Down syndrome phenotypes including mental retardation. PMID:9546078

  10. Human bradykinin B2 receptor: Nucleotide sequence analysis and assignment to chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, S.J.; Slynn, G.; Thomas, C.; Hopkins, B.; Briggs, I.; Graham, A. )

    1993-02-01

    Functional cDNA clones for human bradykinin B2 receptor were isolated from uterus RNA by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method and by screening a human cosmid library with rat bradykinin B2 receptor probe. We isolated several overlapping clones from the cosmid library, each of which encodes the entire protein-coding sequence. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene codes for a 364-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 41,442 Da that is highly homologous to rat bradykinin B2 receptor cDNA (81%). The entire human cDNA sequence was cloned into an expression vector and mRNA was synthesised by in vitro transcription. Applications of bradykinin caused membrane current responses in Xenopus oocytes injected with the in vitro-synthesized mRNA. Preincubation with the potent B2 antagonist, HOE140, prevented this response. The genomic clone is intronless, and we have identified an upstream promoter region and a downstream polyadenylation signal. The human bradykinin B2 receptor gene has been mapped to chromosome 14 using PCR to specifically amplify DNA from somatic cell hybrids. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Chromosomal mapping of the human and mouse homologues of two new members of the AP-2 family of transcription factors

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, J.A.; Sheer, D.; Bosher, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The AP-2 transcription factor has been shown to play an important role in the development of tissues of ectodermal origin and has also been implicated in mammary oncogenesis. It has recently been found that AP-2 is encoded by a family of related genes, AP-2{alpha}, AP-2{beta}, and AP-2{gamma}. As a further step in understanding the role of each of these genes has in development, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the chromosomal locations of the mouse and human homologues of the newly isolated AP-2{beta} and AP-2{gamma} genes. Tcfap2b and Tcfap2c map to mouse chromosomes 1A2-4 and 2H3-4, respectively, while TFAP2B and TFAP2C map to human chromosomes 6p12 and 20q13.2, the later being a region that is frequently amplified in breast carcinoma. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Human ETS2 gene on chromosome 21 is not rearranged in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Nalbantoglu, J.; Sergovich, F.R.; Papas, T.S. )

    1988-10-01

    The human ETS2 gene, a member of the ETS gene family, with sequence homology with the retroviral ets sequence of the avian erythroblastosis retrovirus E26 is located on chromosome 21. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome (DS) patients with partial trisomy 21 allowed us to reinforce the supposition that ETS2 may be a gene of the minimal DS genetic region. It was originally proposed that a duplication of a portion of the DS region represents the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease, a condition associated also with DS. No evidence of either rearrangements or duplications of ETS2 could be detected in DNA from fibroblasts and brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients with either the sporadic or the familiar form of the disease. Thus, an altered ETS2 gene dosage does not seem to be a genetic cause or component of Alzheimer disease.

  13. Mapping of the phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) to human chromosome 16p12. 1-p11. 2 and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, T.P.; Obermoeller, R.D. ); Leiter, E.H.; Chapman, H.D. ); Falany, C.N. ); Deng, Z.; Siciliano, M.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have recently cloned a cDNA encoding the human phenol-preferring phenol sulfotransferase (P-PST) enzyme. An oligonucleotide primer pair based on the human STP (representing sulfotransferase, phenol-preferring) cDNA sequence was synthesized and was employed in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of human genomic DNA to identify a 525-bp DNA fragment. The DNA sequence of this portion of the STP gene, near the 5[prime] end of the coding region, was determined. The amplified genomic fragment contained two small introns of 104 and 89 bp. When DNA samples from a human-hamster somatic cell hybrid panel were screened by PCR using these primers, only those hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 were positive for the 525-bp genomic fragment. To identify the specific region on chromosome 16 that contained the STP gene, PCR amplification reactions were performed on a human-mouse somatic cell hybrid panel containing defined portions of human chromosome 16. The results indicated that STP is localized proximal to the gene for protein kinase C, [beta]1 polypeptide (PRKCB1), in the region from the distal portion of 16p11.2 to p12.1. The human STP gene maps near the locus for Batten disease (CLN3). Furthermore, the authors have determined by genotyping of murine interspecific backcross progeny that the homologous gene in mouse (Stp) localizes to the syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7 near the D7Mit8 (at 54 cM) and D7Bir1 markers. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Localization of the human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) gene to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Burkin, D.J.; Jones, C. ); Kimbro, K.S.; Taylor, M.W. ); Barr, B.L.; Gupta, S.L. )

    1993-07-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the first enzyme in the catabolic pathway for tryptophan. This extrahepatic enzyme differs from the hepatic enzyme, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), in molecular as well as enzymatic characteristics, although both enzymes catalyze the same reaction: cleavage of tryptophan into N-formylkynurenine. The induction of IDO by IFN-[gamma] plays a role in the antigrowth effect of IFN-[gamma] in cell cultures and in the inhibition of intracellular pathogens, e.g., Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci. Tryptophan is also the precursor for the synthesis of serotonin, and reduced levels of tryptophan and serotonin found in AIDS patients have been correlated with the presence of IFN-[gamma] and consequent elevation of IDO activity. The IDO enzyme has been purified and characterized, and its cDNA and genomic DNA clones have been isolated and analyzed. DNA from hybrid cells containing fragments of human chromosome 8 was used to determine the regional localization of the IDO gene on chromosome 8. The hybrids R30-5B and R30-2A contain 8p11 [yields] qter and 8q13 [yields] qter, respectively. Hybrid 229-3A contains the 8pter [yields] q11. The hybrid R30-2A was negative for the IDO gene, whereas R30-5B and 229-3A were positive as analyzed by PCR and verified by Southern blotting. Only the region close to the centromere is shared by R30-5B and 229-3A hybrids. The results indicate that the IDO gene is located on chromosome 8p11 [yields] q11.

  16. Progesterone receptor gene maps to human chromosome band 11q13, the site of the mammary oncogene int-2

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.L.; Kao, F.T.; Wei, Q.; Hartz, J.A.; Greene, G.L.; Zarucki-Schulz, T.; Conneely, O.M.; Jones, C.; Puck, T.T.; O'Malley, B.W.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-05-01

    Progesterone is involved in the development and progression of breast cancers, and progesterone receptors (PR) are important markers of hormone dependence and disease prognosis. The authors have used a human PR cDNA probe, genomic DNA blotting of a series of Chinese hamster-human cell hybrids, and in situ hybridization to map the human PR gene to chromosome 11, band q13. This band also contains the human homolog of the mouse mammary tumor virus integration site, int-2, which surrounds a protooncogene thought to be involved in the development of murine mammary cancers. That these two genes share the same chromosomal location raises important questions about their possible linkage and about the relationship between the mammary-specific oncogene and the steroid hormone in the development, growth, and hormone dependence of human breast cancers.

  17. The human gene for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) is located on chromosome 9 but is not the familial dysautonomia gene

    SciTech Connect

    Slaugenhaupt, S.A. |; Liebert, C.B.; Lucente, D.E.

    1995-02-10

    The neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 2 (NTRK2) gene is a member of the trk family of tyrosine protein kinases, which encode receptors for the nerve growth factor-related proteins known as neurotrophins. The neurotrophins and their receptors have long been considered candidate genes for familial dysautonomia (FD), a hereditary sensory neuropathy resulting from the congenital loss of both sensory and autonomic neurons. The DYS gene has recently been mapped to human chromosome 9q31-q33, and therefore we set out to determine the chromosomal localization of the candidate gene NTRK2. A mouse trkB probe was hybridized to both somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosome 9 and a human chromosome 9 flow-sorted cosmid library. The human homologue of trkB, NTRK2, was assigned to chromosome 9. To localize the NTRK2 gene further, a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism was identified within a cosmid that contains NTRK2 exon sequences. This marker was genotyped in the CEPH reference pedigrees and places the NTRK2 gene near D9S1 on the proximal long arm of human chromosome 9. The NTRK2 gene is located approximately 22 cm proximal to DYS and shows several recombinants in disease families. Therefore, the NTRK2 gene can now be excluded as a candidate gene for familial dysautonomia. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Homologs of Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 map to mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 9q33

    SciTech Connect

    Taketo, Makoto; Parker, K.L.; Howard, T.A.

    1995-01-20

    SF-1, a nuclear receptor that regulates gene expression of the cytochrome P450 steroid hydroxylases, and ELP, an embryonal protein that suppresses expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTR, are isoforms transcribed from the same gene by alternative promoter usage and splicing. This gene is the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila fushi-tarazu factor 1 (FTZ-Fl) gene. We have mapped the mouse gene Ftzf1 to the proximal quarter of Chr 2 by a linkage analysis using interspecific backcross mice, and its human homolog FTZ1 to Chr 9q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The mouse and human genes are located in the homologous regions of mouse Chr 2 and human Chr 9, respectively. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Chromosome mapping of the human arrestin (SAG), {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase 2 (ADRBK2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, G.; Sallese, M.; Stornaiuolo, A.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of proteins play a major role in determining homologous desensitization of G-coupled receptors: {beta}-adrenergic receptor kinase ({beta}ARK), which phosphorylates the agonist-occupied receptor and its functional cofactor, {beta}-arrestin. Both {beta}ARK and {beta}-arrestin are members of multigene families. The family of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases includes rhodopsin kinase, {beta}ARK1, {beta}ARK2, IT11-A (GRK4), GRK5, and GRK6. The arrestin/{beta}-arrestin gene family includes arrestin (also known as S-antigen), {beta}-arrestin 1, and {beta}-arrestin 2. Here we report the chromosome mapping of the human genes for arrestin (SAG), {beta}arrestin 2 (ARRB2), and {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH results confirmed the assignment of the gene coding for arrestin (SAG) to chromosome 2 and allowed us to refine its localization to band q37. The gene coding for {beta}-arrestin 2 (ARRB2) was mapped to chromosome 17p13 and that coding for {beta}ARK2 (ADRBK2) to chromosome 22q11. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene (BDKRB2) encoding human bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Xing Ma; Dan-Zhao Wang; Limei Chen

    1994-09-15

    The bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor (BDKRB2) has high affinity for the intact kinins, which mediate a wide spectrum of biological effects, including pain, inflammation, vasodilation, and smooth muscle contraction and relaxation. In the present study, the authors have cloned and sequenced the gene encoding human bradykinin B{sub 2} receptor from a human genomic library. The B{sub 2} receptor gene contains three exons separated by two introns. The first and second exons are noncoding, while the third exon contains the full-length coding region, which encodes a protein of 364 amino acids forming 7 transmembrane domains. The human B{sub 2} gene shares high sequence identity with rat and mouse B{sub 2} receptor genes and significant similarity with the gene encoding the angiotensin II type I receptor in the nucleotide sequence and exon-intron arrangement. In the 5` flanking region, a consensus TATA box and several putative transcription factor-binding sites have been identified. Genomic Southern blot analysis showed that the B{sub 2} receptor is encoded by a single-copy gene that was localized to chromosome 14q32 by in situ hybridization. In a Southern blot analysis following reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction, the human B{sub 2} receptor was found to be expressed in most human tissues. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. High-LET radiation-induced aberrations in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes of human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Gotoh, E.; Durante, M.; Wu, H.; George, K.; Furusawa, Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the number of initial chromatid breaks induced by low- or high-LET irradiations, and to compare the kinetics of chromatid break rejoining for radiations of different quality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (290MeV/u), silicon (490MeV/u) and iron (200 and 600 MeV/u). Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin A. Chromatid breaks and exchanges in G2 cells were scored. PCC were collected after several post-irradiation incubation times, ranging from 5 to 600 min. RESULTS: The kinetics of chromatid break rejoining following low- or high-LET irradiation consisted of two exponential components representing a rapid and a slow time constant. Chromatid breaks decreased rapidly during the first 10min after exposure, then continued to decrease at a slower rate. The rejoining kinetics were similar for exposure to each type of radiation. Chromatid exchanges were also formed quickly. Compared to low-LET radiation, isochromatid breaks were produced more frequently and the proportion of unrejoined breaks was higher for high-LET radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with gamma-rays, isochromatid breaks were observed more frequently in high-LET irradiated samples, suggesting that an increase in isochromatid breaks is a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  3. Human chromosome 17 comparative anchor loci are conserved on bovine chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Womack, J.E.

    1995-05-20

    Eight comparative anchor loci on human chromosome 17, TP53, CHRNB1, THRA1, CRYB1, NF1, MPO, MYL4, and P4HB, were mapped to bovine chromosome 19 using bovine x hamster and bovine x mouse hybrid somatic cell lines. This completes the synteny mapping of human chromosome 17 comparative anchor loci in cattle, all of which have been mapped to bovine chromosome 19 and mouse chromosome 11, with the exception of CSH1. It is likely that the suggested homologue of human CSH1, PL1 on cattle chromosome 23, is a not true homologue of the human gene. This study reveals the largest conserved synteny segment among human, cattle, and mouse autosomes described to date. While all of the genes mapped to cattle chromosome 19 are on human chromosome 17, genes on mouse chromosome 11 are distributed on 7 human chromosomes, supporting the hypothesis that there is greater conservation of synteny between human and bovine chromosomes than between human and mouse. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  5. The gene for human erythrocyte protein 4. 2 maps to chromosome 15q15

    SciTech Connect

    Najfeld, V. ); Ballard, S.G.; Menninger, J.; Ward, D.C. ); Bouhassira, E.E.; Schwartz, R.S.; Nagel, R.L.; Rybicki, A.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Protein 4.2 (P4.2), one of the major components of the red-blood-cell membrane, is located on the interior surface, where it binds with high affinity to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3. Individuals whose red blood cells are deficient in P4.2 have osmotically fragile, abnormally shaped cells and moderate hemolytic anemia. cDNA clones from both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} coding regions of the P4.2 gene were used to map its chromosomal location by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The probes, individually or in combination, gave specific hybridization signals on chromosome 15. The hybridization locus was identified by combining fluorescence images of the probe signals with fluorescence banding patterns generated by Alu-PCR (R-like) probe and by DAPI staining (G-like). The authors results demonstrate that the locus of the P4.2 gene is located within 15q15.

  6. Human creatine kinase genes on chromosomes 15 and 19, and proximity of the gene for the muscle form to the genes for apolipoprotein C2 and excision repair.

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, R L; Olson, E; Strauss, A W; Thompson, L H; Bachinski, L L; Siciliano, M J

    1988-01-01

    The human chromosomal assignments of genes of the creatine kinase (CK) family--loci for brain (CKBB), muscle (CKMM), and mitochondrial (CKMT) forms--were studied by Southern filter hybridization analysis of DNAs isolated from a human x rodent somatic cell hybrid clone panel. Probes for the 3'-noncoding sequences of human CKBB and CKMM hybridized concordantly only to DNAs from somatic cell hybrids containing chromosomes 14 and 19, respectively. Thus the earlier assignment of the gene coding for the CKBB isozyme to chromosome 14 was confirmed by molecular means, as was the provisional assignment of CKMM to the long arm of chromosome 19. A probe containing canine sequences for CKMM cross-hybridized with human sequences on chromosomes 14 and 19, a result consistent with the assignments of CKBB and CKMM. A probe containing human sequences for CKMT enabled the provisional assignment of CKMT to human chromosome 15. Independent hybrids with portions of the long arm of chromosome 19 missing indicated the order of genes on the long arm of chromosome 19 as being cen-GPI-(TGFB, CYP1)-[CKMM, (APOC2-ERCC1)]-(CGB, FTL). The unexpectedly more distal location of APOC2 among the genes on the long arm--and APOC2's close association with CKMM--is discussed with respect to the close linkage relationship of APOC2 to myotonic muscular dystrophy. Images Figure 1 PMID:3400641

  7. Mapping of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor [beta]3 gene (CHRNB3) within chromosome 8p11. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Koyama; Sudo, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1994-05-15

    The authors have used an exon amplification method to construct a transcriptional map for human chromosome 8. With this method, transcribed sequences from defined regions of genomic DNA can be efficiently isolated using cosmid clones mapped to human chromosome 8. Cosmid DNAs were digested with BglII and BamHI and ligated into a BamHI site of an exon trapping vector, pSPL1. Transfection of the subcloned DNAs into Cos7 cells, isolation of cytoplasmic RNA, synthesis of cDNA by reverse transcriptase, and amplification of spliced fragments were performed according to the method described by Buckler et al. Amplified fragments were subcloned into a plasmid, pBluescriptII, and sequenced by the dideoxy chain termination method. Sequence analysis to search for similarity or identity to known genes with the program FASTA detected complete identity of one (ET634-2) of these exon amplification fragments, 227 bp in length, to the nucleotide sequence at 1138-1364 of the cDNA for the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) [beta]3 gene. This transcribed fragment, containing a part of the human nAChR [beta]3 gene, was isolated from cosmid clone cCI8-328, which was previously mapped to 8p11.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Localization of this gene to chromosome agreed with the results of previous mapping experiments using somatic hybrid cell lines.

  8. Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Intermediate Variant Alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 Delineate New Phylogenetic Substructure in Human Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree

    PubMed Central

    Myres, Natalie M.; Ritchie, Kathleen H.; Lin, Alice A.; Hughes, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to evaluate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Methods Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 short tandem repeat loci. DNA sequencing and median-joining network analyses were used to evaluate Y-chromosome lineages displaying intermediate variant alleles. Results We show that DYS392.2 occurs on a single haplogroup background, specifically I1*-M253, and likely represents a new phylogenetic subdivision in this European haplogroup. Intermediate variants DYS449.2 and DYS385.2 both occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds, and when evaluated within specific haplogroup contexts, delineate new phylogenetic substructure, with DYS449.2 being informative within haplogroup A-P97 and DYS385.2 in haplogroups D-M145, E1b1a-M2, and R1b*-M343. Sequence analysis of variant alleles observed within the various haplogroup backgrounds showed that the nature of the intermediate variant differed, confirming the mutations arose independently. Conclusions Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles, while relatively rare, typically occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds. This distribution indicates that such mutations arise at a rate generally intermediate to those of binary markers and Y-STR loci. As a result, intermediate-sized Y-STR variants can reveal phylogenetic substructure within the Y-chromosome phylogeny not currently detected by either binary or Y-STR markers alone, but only when such variants are evaluated within a haplogroup context. PMID:19480020

  9. Human GluR6 kainate receptor (GRIK2): Molecular cloning, expression, polymorphism, and chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Paschen, W.; Blackstone, C.D.; Huganir, R.L. ); Ross, C.A. Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Koeln )

    1994-04-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate the majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the brain, and molecular cloning studies have revealed several distinct families. Because neuropathological states and possibly human disorders may involve kainate-preferring glutamate receptors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone for the human GluR6 kainate-preferring receptor. This clone shows a very high sequence similarity with that of the rat, except for a part of the 3[prime] untranslated region in which there is a TAA triplet repeat. When the protein was overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, it had a molecular weight, an antibody recognition, and a glutamate ligand-binding profile similar to those of the rate GluR6 receptor. Northern analysis showed expression in both human cerebral and cerebellar cortices. By PCR analysis of rodent-human monochromosomal cell lines, the human GluR6 could be assigned to chromosome 6. The length of the TAA triplet repeat was polymorphic in the normal population, with at least four alleles and an observed heterozygosity of about 45%. These studies should provide the basis for expression or linkage studies of the GluR6 kainate receptor in human disease or neuropathologic states. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  10. The gene encoding human glutathione synthetase (GSS) maps to the long arm of chromosome 20 at band 11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G.C.; Vaska, V.L.; Ford, J.H.

    1995-12-10

    Two forms of glutathione synthetase deficiency have been described. While one form is mild, causing hemolytic anemia, the other more severe form causes 5-oxoprolinuria with secondary neurological involvement. Despite the existence of two deficiency phenotypes, Southern blots hybridized with a glutathione synthetase cDNA suggest that there is a single glutathione synthetase gene in the human genome. Analysis of somatic cell hybrids showed the human glutathione synthetase gene (GSS) to be located on chromosome 20, and this assignment has been refined to subband 20q11.2 using in situ hybridization. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Multicolor spectral karyotyping of human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schröck, E; du Manoir, S; Veldman, T; Schoell, B; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Ning, Y; Ledbetter, D H; Bar-Am, I; Soenksen, D; Garini, Y; Ried, T

    1996-07-26

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified. PMID:8662537

  12. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  13. High-resolution comprehensive radiation hybrid maps of the porcine chromosomes 2p and 9p compared with the human chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Liu, W-S; Yasue, H; Eyer, K; Hiraiwa, H; Shimogiri, T; Roelofs, B; Landrito, E; Ekstrand, J; Treat, M; Paes, N; Lemos, M; Griffith, A C; Davis, M L; Meyers, S N; Yerle, M; Milan, D; Beever, J E; Schook, L B; Beattie, C W

    2008-01-01

    We are constructing high-resolution, chromosomal 'test' maps for the entire pig genome using a 12,000-rad WG-RH panel (IMNpRH2(12,000-rad))to provide a scaffold for the rapid assembly of the porcine genome sequence. Here we present an initial, comparative map of human chromosome (HSA) 11 with pig chromosomes (SSC) 2p and 9p. Two sets of RH mapping vectors were used to construct the RH framework (FW) maps for SSC2p and SSC9p. One set of 590 markers, including 131 microsatellites (MSs), 364 genes/ESTs, and 95 BAC end sequences (BESs) was typed on the IMNpRH2(12,000-rad) panel. A second set of 271 markers (28 MSs, 138 genes/ESTs, and 105 BESs) was typed on the IMpRH(7,000-rad) panel. The two data sets were merged into a single data-set of 655 markers of which 206 markers were typed on both panels. Two large linkage groups of 72 and 194 markers were assigned to SSC2p, and two linkage groups of 84 and 168 markers to SSC9p at a two-point LOD score of 10. A total of 126 and 114 FW markers were ordered with a likelihood ratio of 1000:1 to the SSC2p and SSC9p RH(12,000-rad) FW maps, respectively, with an accumulated map distance of 4046.5 cR(12,000 )and 1355.2 cR(7,000 )for SSC2p, and 4244.1 cR(12,000) and 1802.5 cR(7,000) for SSC9p. The kb/cR ratio in the IMNpRH2(12,000-rad) FW maps was 15.8 for SSC2p, and 15.4 for SSC9p, while the ratio in the IMpRH(7,000-rad) FW maps was 47.1 and 36.3, respectively, or an approximately 3.0-fold increase in map resolution in the IMNpRH(12,000-rad) panel over the IMpRH(7,000-rad) panel. The integrated IMNpRH(12,000-rad) andIMpRH(7,000-rad) maps as well as the genetic and BAC FPC maps provide an inclusive comparative map between SSC2p, SSC9p and HSA11 to close potential gaps between contigs prior to sequencing, and to identify regions where potential problems may arise in sequence assembly. PMID:18467842

  14. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; He, Xiaoyuan; Orr, Bernardo; Wutz, Gordana; Hill, Victoria; Peters, Jan-Michael; Compton, Duane A.; Waldman, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26871722

  15. Human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel (GIRK1) gene (KCNJ3): Localization to chromosome 2 and identification of a simple tandem repeat polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, M.; Powell, K.L.; Espinosa, R. III; Philipson, L.H.; Le Beau, M.M.; Bell, G.I. )

    1994-05-01

    The gene encoding the human G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel designated GIRK1 (gene symbol, KCNJ3) was mapped to chromosome 2 by analyzing its segregation in a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. This assignment was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes, and the gene was further localized to band 2q24.1. A highly informative simple tandem repeat DNA polymorphism of the form (CA)[sub n] was identified and used to localize KCNJ3 within the genetic map of the long arm of chromosome 2. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  17. Assignment of the tyrosinase-related protein-2 gene (TYRP2) to human chromosome 13q31-q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Extended synteny with mouse chromosome 14

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.A. ); Baker, E.; Sutherland, G.R. )

    1994-05-01

    A recombinant human genomic liver DNA [lambda]-phage library was screened with the insert of the pHuTRP-2 cDNA clone to isolate a series of bacteriophage with inserts spanning the human TYRP2 gene. One of the [lambda]-phage clones ([lambda]HuT-YRP2-7) containing a 2-kb HindIII fragment with the 5[prime] exon sequence of the cDNA as determined by sequence analysis was used for the gene localization study. DNA prepared from the phage by Qiagen chromatography was nick-translated with biotin-14-dATP and hybridized in situ at a final concentration of 5 ng/[mu]l to metaphases from two normal males. The fluorescence in situ hybridization method was modified from that previously described in that chromosomes were stained before analysis with both propidium iodide as counterstain and DAPI for chromosome identification. Twenty metaphases from the first normal male were examined for fluorescent signal. All of these metaphases showed signal on one or both chromatids of chromosome 13 in the region 13q31-q33; 88% of this signal was at the interface of bands 13q31-q32. There was a total of four nonspecific background dots observed in these 20 metaphases. A similar result was obtained from hybridization of the probe to 20 metaphases from the second normal male (data not shown). This region has also been shown to contain the propionyl coenzyme A carboxylase [alpha]-chain gene by in situ hybridization. The localization of the TYRP2 locus to human chromosome 13q31-q32 extends the syntenic region of chromosome 13 with mouse chromosome 14. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  18. The mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar) maps to chromosome 2 in a region homologous to human 9q33-q34

    SciTech Connect

    Brunialti, A.L.B.; Guenet, J.L.; Harding, C.O.; Wolff, J.A.

    1996-08-15

    The autosomal recessive mouse mutation sarcosinemia (sar), which was discovered segregating in the progeny of a male whose premeiotic germ cells had been treated with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea, is characterized by a deficiency in sarcosine dehydrogenase activity. Using an intersubspecific cross, we mapped the sar locus to mouse chromosome 2, approximately 15-18 cM from the centromere. The genetic localization of this locus in the mouse allows the identification of a candidate region in human (9q33-q34) where the homologous disease should map. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Molecular anatomy of human chromosome 9: comparative mapping of the immunoglobulin processed pseudogene C epsilon 3 (IGHEP2) in primates.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, H; Ishida, T; Ueda, S; Sofuni, T; Mizusawa, H

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypic homology in relation to human chromosome 9 (HSA 9) was studied through comparative mapping of the immunoglobulin-processed pseudogene C epsilon 3 (IGHEP2) in primates. IGHEP2, which has been mapped to 9p24.2 --> p24.1 in the human genome, was assigned to PTR 11q34 (common chimpanzee), PPA 11q34 (pygmy chimpanzee), PPY 13q16 (orangutan), HLA 8qter (white-handed gibbon), HAG 8qter (agile gibbon), and MFU 14q22 (Japanese macaque) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To verify the breakpoints of presumed pericentric inversions on the ancestral great ape chromosomes, three DNA markers on HSA 9, cCI9-37 (9q22.1 --> q22.2), cCI9-135 (9q22.32 --> q22.33), and cCI9-208 (9p13.3 --> p13.2), were also assigned to PTR/PPA 11p11 (cCI9-37 and 135), PTR/PPA 11q22 (cCI9-208), PPY 13q22 (cCI9-37 and 135), and PPY 13q12 (cCI9-208). These data more clearly define the position of the breakpoints of pericentric inversions that occurred in the human-chimp ancestral and chimpanzee ancestral chromosomes and support the hypothesis of HSA 9 genesis previously derived from banding analyses of HSA 9 and its homologs. PMID:8646893

  20. Fibulin-2 (FBLN2): Human cDNA sequence, mRNA expression, and mapping of the gene on human and mouse chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.Z.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, Z.Y.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-2 is a new extracellular matrix protein recently identified by characterizing mouse cDNA clones. Fibulin-2 mRNA is prominently expressed in mouse heart tissue and is present in low amounts in other tissues. In this study, the authors isolated and sequenced a 4.1-kb human fibulin-2 cDNA, which encoded a mature protein of 1157 amino acids preceded by a 27-residue signal sequence. The predicted polypeptide contains three consecutive anaphylatoxin-related segments (domain I) in its central region followed by 10 EGF-like repeats (domain II), 9 of which have a consensus sequence for calcium binding. The 408-residue N-terminal region consists of two separate subdomains, a cysteine-rich segment of 150 residues (Na subdomain) and a cysteine-free segment with a stretch of acidic amino acids (Nb subdomain). The 115-residue C-terminal segment (domain III) is similar to the C variant of fibulin-1. The amino acid sequences of the human and mouse fibulin-2 share {approximately}90% identity in domains Na, I, II, and III but only 62% identity in domain Nb. The human cDNA lacks an EGF-like repeat, which is alternatively spliced in the mouse cDNA clones, and a potential cell-binding Arg-Gly-Asp sequence found in the Nb domain of the mouse counterpart. Northern blot analysis of mRNA from various human tissues reveals an abundant 4.5-kb transcript in heart, placenta, and ovary tissue. The expression pattern differs from that of fibulin-1. The fibulin-2 gene was localized by in situ hybridization to the p24-p25 region of human chromosome 3 and to the band D-E of mouse chromosome 6. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Assignment of the human pro-melanin-concentrating hormone gene (PMCH) to chromosome 12q23-q24 and two variant genes (PMCHL1 and PMCHL2) to chromosome 5p14 and 5q12-q13

    SciTech Connect

    Pedeutour, F. ); Szpirer, C. ); Nahon, J.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide that has been isolated from salmon pituitary and rat hypothalamus. In mammals, pro-MCH (PMCH) encodes two putative peptides, named NEI and NGE, in addition to MCH. Those peptides are expressed predominantly in hypothalamus and display a broad array of functions in rat brain. The authors have previously mapped the PMCH locus on human chromosome 12q and rat chromosome 7. Genomic cloning has revealed the existence of two distinct MCH genes in human: one authentic and one variant. In this report, they describe Southern blotting analysis with DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrids and demonstrate that the authentic human MCH (hMCH) gene is located as expected on chromosome 12, while the variant form of hMCH gene is located on chromosome 5. Direct chromosomal assignment of the authentic and variant hMCH genes was obtained by using fluorescence in situ hybridization on metaphase chromosomes. A strong signal was observed in 12q23-q24 with the authentic HMCH genomic DNA probe. Surprisingly, two signals were conspicuously found in 5p14 and 5q12-q13 with different variant hMCH genomic DNA probes. These loci were designated PMCHL1 and PMCHL2. Evidence of physiological and pathological data in rodents together with locus linkage analyses in human suggests that hMCH authentic and variant genes may be involved in human brain disorders. 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Strategies for sequencing human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-06-01

    This project funded for four years (02.92 to 01.96) was a renewal of a project funded for 2.5 years (07.89 to 01.92). This report covers the period 07.89 to 07.94. The original project was entitled {open_quotes}Correlation of physical and genetic maps of Human Chromosome 16{close_quotes}. The aim over this period was to construct a cytogenetic-based physical map of chromosome 16, to enable integration of its physical and genetic maps. This was achieved by collaboration and isolation of new markers until each bin on the physical map contained a polymorphic marker on the linkage map. A further aim was to integrate all mapping data for this chromosome and to achieve contig closure over band q24.

  3. Localization of a highly conserved human potassium channel gene (NGK2-KV4-KCNC1) to chromosome 11p15

    SciTech Connect

    Ried, T.; Ward, D.C. ); Rudy, B.; Miera, V.S. de; Lau, D.; Sen, K. )

    1993-02-01

    Several genes (the Shaker or Sh gene family) encoding components of voltage-gated K[sub +] channels have been identified in various species. Based on sequence similarities Sh genes are classified into four groups or subfamilies. Mammalian genes of each one of these subfamilies also show high levels of sequence similarity to one of four related Drosophila genes: Shaker, Shab, Shaw, and Shal. Here we report the isolation of human cDNAs for a Shaw-related product (NGK2,KV2.1a) previously identified in rat and mice. A comparison of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of NGK2 in rodents and humans shows that this product is highly conserved in mammals; the human NGK2 protein shows over 99% amino acid sequence identity to its rodent homologue. The gene (NGK2-KV4; KCNC1) encoding NGK2 was mapped to human chromosome 11p15 by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the human NGK2 cDNAs. 65 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  5. Human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) gene: Complete genomic structure and localization on the genetic map of chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Enjyoji, Kei-ichi; Emi, Mitsuru; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Imada, Motohiro; Kato, Hisao ); Leppert, M.L.; Lalouel, J.M. Univ. of Utah Medical School, Salt Lake City, UT )

    1993-08-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), a protease inhibitor that circulates in association with plasma lipoproteins (VLDL, LDL and HDL), helps to regulate the extrinsic blood coagulation cascade. The authors have cloned a 125-kb genomic region containing the entire human TFPI gene on six overlapping cosmids and prepared a restriction map of this contig to clarify gene structure. More than half (45 kb) of the 85-kb gene is occupied with 5[prime] noncoding elements: coding begins at exon 3. A HindIII RFLP identified with one cosmid was genotyped in the CEPH panel of 559 reference families. Linkage analysis using markers on human chromosome 2 located the TFPI gene on 2q, 36 cM proximal to D2S43(pYNZ15) and 13 cM distal to the crystalline [gamma]-polypeptide locus CRYGP1(p5G1). 31 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Full-sized HERV-K (HML-2) human endogenous retroviral LTR sequences on human chromosome 21: map locations and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Kurdyukov, S G; Lebedev, Y B; Artamonova, I I; Gorodentseva, T N; Batrak, A V; Mamedov, I Z; Azhikina, T L; Legchilina, S P; Efimenko, I G; Gardiner, K; Sverdlov, E D

    2001-07-25

    One of the evolutionary mechanisms for acquisition of novel functional sequences can be domestication of exogenous retroviruses that have been integrated into the germ line. The whole genome mapping of such elements in various species could reveal differences in positions of the retroviral integration and suggest possible roles of these differences in speciation. Here, we describe the number, locations and sequence features of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K (HML-2) long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences on human chromosome 21. We show that their distribution along the chromosome is not only non-random but also roughly correlated with the gene density. Amplification of orthologous LTR sites from a number of primate genomes produced patterns of presence and absence for each LTR sequence and allowed determination of the phylogenetic ages and evolutionary order of appearance of individual LTRs. The identity level and phylogenetic age of the LTRs did not correlate with their map locations. Thus, despite the non-random distribution of LTRs, they have apparently been inserted randomly into the chromosome relative to each other. As evidenced in previous studies of chromosomes 19 and 22, this is a characteristic of HERV-K integration. PMID:11483360

  7. MYCN is retained in single copy at chromosome 2 band p23-24 during amplification in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Corvi, R.; Amler, L.C.; Savelyeva, L.; Gehring, M.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-06-07

    Amplification of the human N-myc protooncogene, MYCN, is frequently seen either in extrachromosomal double minutes or in homogeneously staining regions of aggressively growing neuroblastomas. MYCN maps to chromosome 2 band p23-24, but homogeneously staining regions have never been observed at this band, suggesting transposition of MYCN during amplification. The authors have employed fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine the status of MYCN at 2p23-24 in five human neuroblastoma cell lines. All five lines carried, in addition to amplified MYCN in homogeneously staining regions or double minutes, single-copy MYCN at the normal position. In one line there was coamplification of MYCN together with DNA of the host chromosome 12, to which MYCN had been transposed. The results suggest a model of amplification where MYCN is retained at its original location. They further sustain the view that either the initial events of MYCN amplification or the further evolution of amplified MYCN copies follow mechanisms different from those leading to amplification of drug-resistance genes.

  8. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  9. Localization of the human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to chromosome 14q32.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, M.; Marsh, S.; Carter, N.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of human kinesin light chain gene (KNS2) to human chromosome 14q32.3 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Further studies will need to be conducted to see whether mutations in the KNS2 gene are associated with hereditary diseases. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. A region of consistent deletion in neuroblastoma maps within human chromosome 1p36.2-36.3

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.S.; Maris, J.M.; Beltinger, C.

    1995-06-06

    Deletion of the short arm of human chromosome 1 is the most common cytogenetic abnormality observed in neuroblastoma. To characterize the region of consistent deletion, we performed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) studies on 122 neuroblastoma tumor samples with 30 distal chromosome 1p polymorphisms. LOH was detected in 32 of the 122 tumors (26%). A single region of LOH, marked distally by D1Z2 and proximally by D1S228, was detected in all tumors demonstrating loss. Also, cells from a patient with a constitutional deletion of 1p36, and from a neuroblastoma cell line with a small 1p36 deletion, were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cells from both sources had interstitial deletions of 1p36.2-36.3 which overlapped the consensus region of LOH defined by the tumors. Interstitial deletion in the constitutional case was confirmed by allelic loss studies using the panel of polymorphic markers. Four proposed candidate genes-DAN, ID3 (heir-1), CDC2L1 (p58), and TNFR2-were shown to lie outside of the consensus region of allelic loss, as defined by the above deletions. These results more precisely define the location of a neuroblastoma suppressor gene within 1p36.2-36.3, eliminating 33 centimorgans of proximal 1p36 from consideration. Furthermore, a consensus region of loss, which excludes the four leading candidate genes, was found in all tumors with 1p36 LOH. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Functional structure of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 23, describes the functional structure of the human X chromosome. It provides a functional map of the human X chromosome, discussing in depth the inactivation center, always-active regions, and critical region. Finally, it provides a summary of X inactivation. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Patterns of recombination on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Schlumpf, K.S.; Kim, D.; Haines, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Virtually all genetic linkage maps generated to date are gross averages across individuals, ages, and (often) sexes. In addition, although some level of positive interference has been assumed, until recently little evidence to support this in humans has been available. The major stumbling block has been the quality of the data available, since even a few genotypic errors can have drastic effects on both the map length and the number of apparent recombinants. In addition, variation in recombination by factors other than sex have pretty much been ignored. To explore recombination in more detail, we have generated a microsatellite marker map of human chromosome 22. This map includes 32 markers genotyped through 46 sibships of the Venezuelan Reference Pedigree (VRP). Extensive error checking and regenotyping was performed to remove as many genotypic errors as possible, but no genotypes were removed simply because they created unlikely events. The following 1000:1 odds map has been obtained: cen--F8VWFP1--11--S264--3-S311--4--S257--2--TOP1P2--3--S156--1--CRYB2--1--S258--2--S310--6--S193--1--S275--3--S268--1--S280--4--S304--3--S283--2--LiR1--3--IL2RB--3--S299--1--S302--1--S537--2--S270--4--PDGF--8--S274--qter. The female map (91 cM) is twice as long as the male map (46 cM) and the log-likelihood difference in the maps (22.3) is highly significant (P=0.001, df=22) and appears constant across the chromosome. Analysis of recombination with age showed no particular trends for either males or females when chromosomes were grouped into three categories (20, 20-30, 30+) by parental age at birth of child. Positive interference was found in maternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=30.5 (4), p<0.005), but not in paternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=6.24 (3), P=0.10). This contrasts to data from chromosomes 9 and 21 where positive interference was found for both sexes. More detailed analyses are in progress.

  13. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the human A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor gene (ADORA2B) and its pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, M.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Luneau, C.J.

    1995-05-20

    To determine the chromosomal localization of the human A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor, the corresponding genomic clone was isolated and used as a probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes. Partial sequence analysis of the A{sub 2b} gene (ADORA2B) revealed an intron that interrupted the coding region corresponding to the second intracellular loop similar to that reported for A{sub 1} and A{sub 2a} adenosine receptor genes. A pseudogene for the A{sub 2b} receptor was also identified; it exhibited 79% identity to the A{sub 2b} adenosine receptor cDNA coding sequence and contained multiple deletions, point mutations, and frame shifts and two in-frame stops. These changes would result in the inability to encode a functional receptor. The genomic clones were utilized to localize the A{sub 2b} receptor to chromosome 17p12 and the A{sub 2b} pseudogene to chromosome 1q32. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Research on automatic human chromosome image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Delie; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Jian

    2007-11-01

    Human chromosome karyotyping is one of the essential tasks in cytogenetics, especially in genetic syndrome diagnoses. In this thesis, an automatic procedure is introduced for human chromosome image analysis. According to different status of touching and overlapping chromosomes, several segmentation methods are proposed to achieve the best results. Medial axis is extracted by the middle point algorithm. Chromosome band is enhanced by the algorithm based on multiscale B-spline wavelets, extracted by average gray profile, gradient profile and shape profile, and calculated by the WDD (Weighted Density Distribution) descriptors. The multilayer classifier is used in classification. Experiment results demonstrate that the algorithms perform well.

  15. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome. PMID:25252301

  16. Assignment of the human nuclear hormone receptor, NUC1 (PPARD), to chromosome 6p21.1-p21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Xing, Guo-Qiang; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1996-08-01

    This report describes the localization of the human nuclear hormone receptor, NUC1 (PPARD), to human chromosome 6p21.1-p21.2 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction of somatic cell hybrid panels. The relationship of this gene`s location to certain hereditary diseases is discussed. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, A.; Matthews, L. H.; Burton, J.; Ashurst, J. L.; Howe, K. L.; Ashcroft, K. J.; Beare, D. M.; Burford, D. C.; Hunt, S. E.; Griffiths-Jones, S.; Jones, M. C.; Keenan, S. J.; Oliver, K.; Scott, C. E.; Ainscough, R.; Almeida, J. P.; Ambrose, K. D.; Andrews, D. T.; Ashwell, R. I. S.; Babbage, A. K.; Bagguley, C. L.; Bailey, J.; Bannerjee, R.; Barlow, K. F.; Bates, K.; Beasley, H.; Bird, C. P.; Bray-Allen, S.; Brown, A. J.; Brown, J. Y.; Burrill, W.; Carder, C.; Carter, N. P.; Chapman, J. C.; Clamp, M. E.; Clark, S. Y.; Clarke, G.; Clee, C. M.; Clegg, S. C. M.; Cobley, V.; Collins, J. E.; Corby, N.; Coville, G. J.; Deloukas, P.; Dhami, P.; Dunham, I.; Dunn, M.; Earthrowl, M. E.; Ellington, A. G.; Faulkner, L.; Frankish, A. G.; Frankland, J.; French, L.; Garner, P.; Garnett, J.; Gilbert, J. G. R.; Gilson, C. J.; Ghori, J.; Grafham, D. V.; Gribble, S. M.; Griffiths, C.; Hall, R. E.; Hammond, S.; Harley, J. L.; Hart, E. A.; Heath, P. D.; Howden, P. J.; Huckle, E. J.; Hunt, P. J.; Hunt, A. R.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.; Kay, M.; Kimberley, A. M.; King, A.; Laird, G. K.; Langford, C. J.; Lawlor, S.; Leongamornlert, D. A.; Lloyd, D. M.; Lloyd, C.; Loveland, J. E.; Lovell, J.; Martin, S.; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M.; McLaren, S. J.; McMurray, A.; Milne, S.; Moore, M. J. F.; Nickerson, T.; Palmer, S. A.; Pearce, A. V.; Peck, A. I.; Pelan, S.; Phillimore, B.; Porter, K. M.; Rice, C. M.; Searle, S.; Sehra, H. K.; Shownkeen, R.; Skuce, C. D.; Smith, M.; Steward, C. A.; Sycamore, N.; Tester, J.; Thomas, D. W.; Tracey, A.; Tromans, A.; Tubby, B.; Wall, M.; Wallis, J. M.; West, A. P.; Whitehead, S. L.; Willey, D. L.; Wilming, L.; Wray, P. W.; Wright, M. W.; Young, L.; Coulson, A.; Durbin, R.; Hubbard, T.; Sulston, J. E.; Beck, S.; Bentley, D. R.; Rogers, J.; Ross, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  18. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Dunham, A; Matthews, L H; Burton, J; Ashurst, J L; Howe, K L; Ashcroft, K J; Beare, D M; Burford, D C; Hunt, S E; Griffiths-Jones, S; Jones, M C; Keenan, S J; Oliver, K; Scott, C E; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Andrews, D T; Ashwell, R I S; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Bannerjee, R; Barlow, K F; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burrill, W; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M E; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S C M; Cobley, V; Collins, J E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Deloukas, P; Dhami, P; Dunham, I; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M E; Ellington, A G; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A G; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gilbert, J G R; Gilson, C J; Ghori, J; Grafham, D V; Gribble, S M; Griffiths, C; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E A; Heath, P D; Howden, P J; Huckle, E J; Hunt, P J; Hunt, A R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Laird, G K; Langford, C J; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Lloyd, C; Loveland, J E; Lovell, J; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; McLaren, S J; McMurray, A; Milne, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K M; Rice, C M; Searle, S; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C A; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thomas, D W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tubby, B; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; West, A P; Whitehead, S L; Willey, D L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wright, M W; Young, L; Coulson, A; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Sulston, J E; Beck, S; Bentley, D R; Rogers, J; Ross, M T

    2004-04-01

    Chromosome 13 is the largest acrocentric human chromosome. It carries genes involved in cancer including the breast cancer type 2 (BRCA2) and retinoblastoma (RB1) genes, is frequently rearranged in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and contains the DAOA locus associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We describe completion and analysis of 95.5 megabases (Mb) of sequence from chromosome 13, which contains 633 genes and 296 pseudogenes. We estimate that more than 95.4% of the protein-coding genes of this chromosome have been identified, on the basis of comparison with other vertebrate genome sequences. Additionally, 105 putative non-coding RNA genes were found. Chromosome 13 has one of the lowest gene densities (6.5 genes per Mb) among human chromosomes, and contains a central region of 38 Mb where the gene density drops to only 3.1 genes per Mb. PMID:15057823

  19. Chromosomal localization of mouse and human genes encoding the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (SFRS1) and SC-35 (SFRS2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, J.R. Jr.; Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    The mammalian SR-type splicing factors ASF/SF2 and SC-35 play crucial roles in pre-mRNA splicing and have been shown to shift splice site choice in vitro. We have mapped the ASF/SF2 gene in mice and humans and the SC-35 gene in mice. Somatic cell hybrid mapping of the human ASF/SF2 gene (SFRS1 locus) reveals that it resides on chromosome 17, and fluorescence in situ hybridization refines this localization to 17q21.3-q22. Recombinant inbred mapping of the mouse ASF/ SF2 gene (Sfrs1 locus) and the mouse SC-35 gene (Sfrs2 locus) demonstrates that both genes are located in a part of mouse chromosome 11 that is homologous to human chromosome 17. Mapping of Sfrs1 using F{sub 1} hybrid backcross mice between the strains C57BL/6 and DDK places Sfrs1 very near the marker D11Mit38 and indicates that the ASF/SF2 gene is closely linked to the Ovum mutant locus. 59 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  1. A 12-Mb complete coverage BAC contig map in human chromosome 16p13.1-p11.2.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Kang, H L; Xu, X; Wang, M; Dho, S H; Huh, J R; Lee, B J; Kalush, F; Bocskai, D; Ding, Y; Tesmer, J G; Lee, J; Moon, E; Jurecic, V; Baldini, A; Weier, H U; Doggett, N A; Simon, M I; Adams, M D; Kim, U J

    1999-08-01

    We have constructed a complete coverage BAC contig map that spans a 12-Mb genomic segment in the human chromosome 16p13.1-p11.2 region. The map consists of 68 previously mapped STSs and 289 BAC clones, 51 of which-corresponding to a total of 7.721 Mb of genomic DNA-have been sequenced, and provides a high resolution physical map of the region. Contigs were initially built based mainly on the analysis of STS contents and restriction fingerprint patterns of the clones. To close the gaps, probes derived from BAC clone ends were used to screen deeper BAC libraries. Clone end sequence data obtained from chromosome 16-specific BACs, as well as from public databases, were used for the identification of BACs that overlap with fully sequenced BACs by means of sequence match. This approach allowed precise alignment of clone overlaps in addition to restriction fingerprint comparison. A freehand contig drawing software tool was developed and used to manage the map data graphically and generate a real scale physical map. The map we present here is approximately 3.5 x deep and provides a minimal tiling path that covers the region in an array of contigous, overlapping BACs. PMID:10447511

  2. Identification of a novel zinc finger protein gene (ZNF298) in the GAP2 of human chromosome 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Kazunori; Kudoh, Jun; Okui, Michiyo; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi . E-mail: shimizu@dmb.med.keio.ac.jp

    2005-07-01

    We have isolated a novel zinc finger protein gene, designated ZNF298, as a candidate gene for a particular phenotype of Down syndrome or bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) which maps to human chromosome 21q22.3. ZNF298 gene consists of 25 exons spanning approximately 80 kb in a direction from the telomere to centromere. There are four kinds of transcripts that harbor three types of 3' UTR. These four transcripts (ZNF298a, ZNF298b, ZNF298c, and ZNF298d) contain putative open reading frames encoding 1178, 1198, 555, and 515 amino acids, respectively. ZNF298 gene was ubiquitously expressed in various tissues at very low level. The protein motif analysis revealed that ZNF298 proteins contain a SET [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] domain, multiple C2H2-type zinc finger (ZnF{sub C}2H2) domains, several nuclear localization signals (NLSs), and PEST sequences. Nuclear localization of ZNF298 protein was confirmed by transfection of expression vector of GFP-tagged protein into two human cell lines. Interestingly, this gene crosses over a clone gap (GAP2) remaining in the band 21q22.3. We obtained the DNA fragments corresponding to GAP2 using ZNF298 cDNA sequence as anchor primers for PCR and determined its genomic DNA sequence.

  3. Paradigm Lost: The Human Chromosome Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Lawrence; Blystone, Robert V.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses whether the discovery in 1956 that humans have a chromosome number of 46, as opposed to 47 or 48 as previously thought, fits into a paradigm shift of the Kuhnian type. Concludes that Kuhn probably would not have considered the chromosome number shift to be large enough to be a focus for one of his paradigms. (AIM)

  4. Identification of the locus for human polymorphic cataract on chromosome 2 near gamma-crystallin gene cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Rogaev, E.I.; Rogaeva, E.A.; Keryanov, S.

    1994-09-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in human population. While positive linkage data have been obtained for some forms of inherited cataract, no evidence for mutations in any genes have been reported for human inherited cataract existing as an isolated abnormality. Previously, we have described the autosomal dominant polymorphic congenital cataract (PCC) which is characterized by partial opacity located between the fetal nucleus of the lens and the equator. The number, color and form of opacity is varied. We described pedigrees with 73 affected individuals, and used this in a linkage analysis with a set of polymorphic DNA markers randomly placed across the genome as well as with markers selected from some of the candidate genes or from nearby chromosomal regions. We have found evidence for segregation of a cataract locus with DNA markers from 2q36. The causative genetic defect has been mapped to a 20 cM interval which includes a cluster of gamma-crystallin genes. The gamma-crystallin proteins are abundant soluble low molecular weight proteins in the lens. We have used the trinucleotide repeat polymorphic markers from intron 2 of gamma-crystallin B gene and found the segregation of this marker with the disease with no evidence for recombination in the pedigree containing 62 affected individuals. These data suggest that the non-nuclear forms of human cataract may be caused by defects in gamma-crystallin genes.

  5. Cloning of two human homologs of the Drosophila single-minded gene SIM1 on chromosome 6q and SIM2 on 21q within the Down syndrome chromosomal region.

    PubMed

    Chrast, R; Scott, H S; Chen, H; Kudoh, J; Rossier, C; Minoshima, S; Wang, Y; Shimizu, N; Antonarakis, S E

    1997-06-01

    As part of our effort to clone genes of human chromosome 21 that may contribute to Down syndrome, we have previously isolated four exons with homology to Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene, which encodes a transcription factor that is a master regulator of fruit fly neurogenesis. These exons were used to clone and characterize two human homologs of the Drosophila sim gene, SIM1 and SIM2, which map to chromosomes 6q16.3-q21 and 21q22.2, respectively; SIM2 maps within the so-called Down syndrome chromosomal region. Recently, two mouse homologs, Sim1 and Sim2, also have been identified. There is a high level of homology among human, mouse, and Drosophila sim genes in their amino-terminal half where the conserved bHLH, PAS1, PAS2, and HST domains are present. In contrast, the carboxy-terminal parts are only homologous between SIM1 and Sim1 and SIM2 and Sim2. Two isoforms (SIM2 and SIM2s) of human SIM2 have been detected that differ in their 3' ends. Northern blot analysis revealed one mRNA SIM1 species of approximately 9.5 kb and four different mRNA SIM2 species of 2.7, 3, 4.4, and 6 kb in human fetal kidney. The function of both human SIM1 and SIM2 is unknown. However, three copies of SIM2 may contribute to some specific Down syndrome phenotypes because of (1) mapping position, (2) potential function as transcriptional repressor, (3) likely dimerization with other transcription factors, (4) the temporal and spatial expression pattern of mouse Sim2, and (5) the potentially analogous role of human SIM2 to that of Drosophila sim during neurogenesis. PMID:9199934

  6. X chromosome inactivation: how human are mice?

    PubMed

    Vasques, L R; Klöckner, M N; Pereira, L V

    2002-01-01

    Mammals perform dosage compensation of X-linked gene products between XY males and XX females by transcriptionally silencing all but one X chromosome per diploid cell, a process called X chromosome inactivation (XCI). XCI involves counting X chromosomes in a cell, random or imprinted choice of one X to remain active, initiation and spread of the inactivation signal in CIS throughout the other X chromosomes, and maintenance of the inactive state of those X chromosomes during cell divisions thereafter. Most of what is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the different steps of XCI has been studied in the mouse. In this review we compare XCI in mouse and human, and discuss how much of the murine data can be extrapolated to humans. PMID:12900542

  7. The human serotonin N-acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.87) gene (AANAT): Structure, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.L.; Bernard, M.; Roseboom, P.H.

    1996-05-15

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, AA-NAT, HGMW-approved symbol AANAT;EC 2.3.1.87) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis and controls the night/day rhythm in melatonin production in the vertebrate pineal gland. We have found that the human AA-NAT gene spans {approx}2.5 kb, contains four exons, and is located at chromosome 17q25. The open reading frame encodes a 23.2-kDa protein that is {approx}80% identical to sheep and rat AA-NAT. The AA-NAT transcript ({approx}1 kb) is highly abundant in the pineal gland and is expressed at lower levels in the retina and in the Y79 retinoblastoma cell line. AA-NAT mRNA is also detectable at low levels in several brain regions and the pituitary gland, but not in several peripheral tissues examined. Brain and pituitary AA-NAT could modulate serotonin-dependent aspects of human behavior and pituitary function. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Mapping immunoglobulin gene-related DNA probes to the central region of normal and pericentrically inverted human chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lautner-Rieske, A.; Zachau, H.G.; Hameister, H.; Barbi, G.

    1993-05-01

    Several immunoglobulin {kappa}-related sequences were transposed in evolution from the short arm to the long arm of chromosome 2. The common pericentric inversion of this chromosome found in present-day populations results in an apparent reinversion of those sequences to the short arm and the transposition of the {kappa} and CD8{alpha} loci to the long arm. This is shown by in situ hybridization and PFGE experiments with hybridization probes from both arms of chromosome 2, i.e., from 2cen-p12 and 2cen-q13. The inversion breakpoints lie outside of all hybridization sites, and the inversion is described as inv(2)(p12q14). The possibility of common breakpoints in ancient and present-day pericentric inversions is discussed. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  10. Structure and linkage of the D2 dopamine receptor and neural cell adhesion molecule genes on human chromosome 11q23

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, J.H.; Djabali, M.; Selleri, L.; McElligott, D.L.; Evans, G.A. ); Grandy, D.K.; Civelli, O. )

    1992-12-01

    The gene encoding the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) is located on human chromosome 11q23 and has been circumstantially associated with a number of human disorders including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and susceptibility to alcoholism. To determine the physical structure of the DRD2 gene, the authors utilized cosmid cloning, isolation of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to construct a long-range physical map of human chromosome 11q23 linking the genes for the DRD2 and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). The D2 dopamine receptor gene extends over 270 kb and includes an intron of approximately 250 kb separating the putative first exon from the exons encoding the receptor protein. The resulting physical map spans more than 1.5 mb of chromosome band 11q23 and links the DRD2 gene with the gene encoding the NCAM located 150 kb 3[prime] of the DRD2 gene and transcribed from the same DNA strand. They additionally located the sites of at least four hypomethylated HTF islands within the physical map, which potentially indicate the sites of additional genes. High-resolution fluorescent in situ suppression hybridization using cosmid and YAC clones localized this gene cluster between the ApoAI and STMY loci at the interface of bands 11q22.3 and 11q23.1. 40 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  12. Localization of the DCTN1 gene encoding p150{sup Glued} to human chromosome 2p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbaur, E.L.F.; Tokito, M.K.

    1996-02-01

    This report discusses the genetic mapping of the DCTN1 gene to human chromosome 2p13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This gene encodes the largest polypeptide of the dynactin complex, which is one of two microtubule-based biological motor protein complexes. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Construction and characterization of region-specific microdissection libraries and single-copy microclones for short arm of human chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, J.; Kao, F.T. |; Tong, S.; Qi, J.

    1994-07-01

    The short arm of human chromosome 2, comprising approximately 93 million bp, has been divided into four regions to construct region-specific microdissection libraries to facilitate physical mapping and gene cloning. These four regions include 2p23-p25 (designated 2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (2P3), and 2p11-p13 (2P4). Together with three previously constructed microdissection libraries of 2P1, 2P2 and 2P4, a fourth library for the region 2P3 has been constructed and characterized to complete all four region-specific libraries for the entire 2p. The 2P3 library is very large, potentially comprising 1,000,000 recombinant microclones with insert sizes ranging between 50 and 800 bp and a mean of 250 bp. Approximately 40% of the microclones contain unique sequences. Of the 77 single-copy microclones analyzed, 66 clones (86%) hybridized to both human and chromosome 2 DNAs, indicating that they were derived from human and are chromosome 2 specific. The hybridizing HindIII genomic fragments for the 66 microclones have also been determined.

  15. Conserved synteny between pig chromosome 8 and human chromosome 4 but rearranged and distorted linkage maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ellegren, H.; Edfors-Lilja, I.; Anderson, L. ); Wintero, A.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The porcine genes encoding interleukin 2, alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) gamma polypeptide, and osteopontin were mapped to chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Together with previous assignments to this chromosome (the albumin, platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, and fibrinogen genes), an extensive syntenic homology with human chromosome 4 was discovered. Loci from about three-quarters of the q arm of human chromosome 4 are on pig chromosome 8. However, the linear order of the markers is not identical in the two species, and there are several examples of interspecific differences in the recombination fractions between adjacent markers. The conserved synteny between man and the pig gives strong support to a previous suggestion that a synteny group present in the ancestor of mammalian species has been retained on human chromosome 4q. Since loci from this synteny group are found on two cattle chromosomes, the bovine rearrangement must have occurred after the split of Suidae and Bovidae within Artiodactyla. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Human endopeptidase (THOP1) is localized on chromosome 19 within the linkage region for the late-onset Alzheimer disease AD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Meckelein, B.; Abraham, C.R.; De Silva, H.A.R.

    1996-01-15

    A cDNA encoding the rat endopeptidase 24.15 was used to determine the chromosomal localization of the respective human gene. Hybridization to DNA from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids assigned the human gene to chromosome 19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes localized the human endopeptidase 24.15 to 19q13.3. 27 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Chromosomal localization of the human P2y6 purinoceptor gene and phylogenetic analysis of the P2y purinoceptor family.

    PubMed

    Somers, G R; Hammet, F; Woollatt, E; Richards, R I; Southey, M C; Venter, D J

    1997-08-15

    The G-protein-coupled P2Y purinoceptors mediate a variety of physiological effects in response to extracellular nucleotides. With the recent discovery of several new members from a variety of species, the P2Y purinoceptor family now encompasses types P2Y1 to P2Y6. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and utilization of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, the human P2Y6 gene was localized to chromosome 11q13.5, between polymorphic markers D11S1314 and D11S916. NCBI database analysis of the remaining human P2Y purinoceptor genes revealed that P2Y2 and P2Y6 mapped to within less than 4 cM, and thus constitute the first described chromosomal clustering of this gene family. Phylogenetic analysis of the P2Y purinoceptor family demonstrated the presence of five evolutionary branches and suggests the occurrence of an ancient gene duplication event. PMID:9286708

  18. Chromosomal localization of human genes for the LDL receptor family member glycoprotein 330 (LRP2) and its associated protein RAP (LRPAP1)

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.; Chen, X.N.; Argraves, K.M.

    1994-07-01

    Glycoprotein 330 (gp330) is a member of a family of receptors with structural similarities to the low-density lipoprotein receptor. Gp330 is expressed by a number of specialized epithelia, including renal proximal tubules, where it can mediate endocytosis of ligands such as complexes of urokinase and the serpin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Gp330 has also been shown to bind in vitro to lipoprotein lipase and apolipoprotein E-enriched {beta}VLDL, suggesting a role for this receptor in lipoprotein metabolism. The 39-kDa protein, referred to as receptor associated protein (RAP), binds to and copurifies with gp330 and antagonizes the ligand binding activity of gp330. In this paper, the authors report the use of homology-PCR cloning to isolate cDNAs encoding human gp330. Using gp330 cDNA and previously isolated human RAP cDNA probes, they performed fluorescence in situ hybridization to map the human chromosomal location of the genes for these proteins. The gene for gp330 was mapped at a single site on the long arm of human chromosome 2 on the border of bands 2q24-q31. The gene for RAP was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 4 at position 4q16.3, which is in the region of the chromosomal deletion causing Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The assignment of chromosomal map positions for gp330 and RAP genes will aid in the evaluation of their potential roles in human diseases such as Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, such as atherosclerosis. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Selective chromatid segregation mechanism proposed for the human split hand/foot malformation development by chromosome 2 translocations: A perspective.

    PubMed

    Klar, Amar J S

    2015-12-01

    Three unrelated chromosome 2q14.1-14.2 region translocations caused the split hand/foot limb malformation development in humans by an unknown mechanism. Their etiology was described by the autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance genetic model although authors stated, "the understanding of the genotype-to-phenotype relationship has been most challenging". The conundrums are that no mutation was found in known genes located at or near the translocation breakpoints, some limbs were malformed while others were not in the same patient and surprisingly breakpoints lie at relatively large distance of more than 2.5 million bases to have caused disorder-causing gene mutations in a single gene. To help understand translocations etiology for limb development, we invoke the selective DNA strand/chromatid-specific epigenetic imprinting and segregation mechanism employed by the two highly diverged fission yeasts to produce daughter cells of different cell types by mitosis. By this mechanism, an anterior- and posterior-limb-tissues-generating pair of daughter cells is produced by a single deterministic cell dividing in the anlagen of the limb bud. Accordingly, malformation develops simply because translocations hinder the proper distribution of chromatid-specific epialleles of a limb developmental gene during the deterministic cell's mitosis. It is tempting to speculate that such a mechanism might involve the HOXD-cluster genes situated centromere-distal to the translocation breakpoints many million bases away at the 2q31.1 region. Further genetic tests of the hypothesis are proposed for the human and mouse limb development. In sum, genetic analysis of translocations suggests that the sequence asymmetry of strands in the double-helical DNA structure of a developmental gene forms the physical basis of daughter cells' developmental asymmetry, thus opposing the morphogen-gradient research paradigm of limb development. PMID:26477560

  20. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  1. The interferon-inducible, double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase gene (DSRAD) maps to human chromosome 1q21.1-21.2

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, H.U.G.; Greulich, K.M.; George, C.X.; Samuel, C.E.

    1995-11-20

    The interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-specific adenosine deaminase is an RNA-modifying enzyme implicated in the generation of biased hypermutations of viral RNAs and the site-selective editing of mammalian mRNAs of neural origin. The gene for the dsRNA-specific adenosine deaminase has been mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of genomic clones to a single locus on human chromosome 1 bands q21.1-21.2. Simultaneous multicolor FISH including X clones and yeast artificial chromosomes showed a localization of the gene in band 1q21 centromeric of D1S1705. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Human metallothionein genes are clustered on chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Karin, M; Eddy, R L; Henry, W M; Haley, L L; Byers, M G; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    The metallothioneins are a family of heavy-metal binding proteins of low molecular weight. They function in the regulation of trace metal metabolism and in the protection against toxic heavy metal ions. In man, the metallothioneins are encoded by at least 10-12 genes separated into two groups, MT-I and MT-II. To understand the genomic organization of these genes and their involvement in hereditary disorders of trace metal metabolism, we have determined their chromosomal location. Using human-mouse cell hybrids and hybridization probes derived from cloned and functional human MT1 and MT2 genes, we show that the functional human genes are clustered on human chromosome 16. Analysis of RNA from somatic cell hybrids indicated that hybrids that contained human chromosome 16 expressed both human MT1 and MT2 mRNA, and this expression is regulated by both heavy metal ions and glucocorticoid hormones. Images PMID:6089206

  3. Molecular analysis and breakpoint definition of a set of human chromosome 21 somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Graw, S.L.; Gardiner, K.; Hart, I.

    1995-11-01

    Rodent-human somatic cell hybrids containing single human chromosomes or chromosome fragments are extremely valuable in physical mapping, marker analysis, and disease mapping. Chromosome 21 has been extensively studied in this fashion, ans a single set of hybrids has been utilized in mapping the majority of chromosome 21 markets. The utility of a set of hybrids depends upon the definition of the human chromosome 21 markers in the preliminary analysis of YACs spanning chromosome 21q. We have used these same markers to evaluate the STS content of a set of 27 chromosome 21 somatic cell hybrids, resulting in the description of the breakpoints at the molecular level, as well as the definition of 35 {open_quotes}bins.{close_quotes} The detailed molecular definition of chromosome 21 content of the hybrids, in combination with the further analysis of chromosome 21 YACs (2), has resulted in the most detailed picture of chromosome 21 to date. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genetic linkage analysis of the Ak1, Col5a1, Epb7. 2, Fpgs, Grp78, Pbx3, and Notch1 genes in the region of mouse chromosome 2 homologous to human chromosome 9q

    SciTech Connect

    Pilz, A. ); Prohaska, R. ); Peters, J. ); Abbott, C. Western General Hospital, Edinburgh )

    1994-05-01

    The genes for adenylate kinase-1 (AK1), folyl polyglutamate synthetase (FPGS), the collagen pro[alpha]1(V) chain (COL5A1), erythrocyte protein band 7.2b (EPB72), and a proto-oncogene homeobox (PBX3) all map to the distal portion of human chromosome 9q (HSA9q) but have not previously been mapped by linkage analysis in the mouse. In this study, the authors have used two interspecific backcrosses to map the mouse homologues of each of these genes to mouse chromosome 2 (MMU2). The Ak1, Col5a1, Epb7.2, Fpgs, and Pbx3 genes were mapped with respect to the genes for Grp78, Rxra, Notch1 (the mouse homologue of TAN1), Spna2, Abl, and Hc (the mouse homologue of C5), all of which have previously been mapped by linkage analysis on MMU2 and have human homologues that map to HSA9q. Two of the reference loci for MMU2, D2Mit1 and Acra, were also mapped in the same cross to facilitate comparisons with existing maps. The consensus gene order deduced by combining data from both crosses is D2Mit1-(Dbh,Notch1)-(Col5a1,Rxra)-Spna2-Abl-(Ak1,Fpgs)-(Grp78,Pbx3)-(Epb7.2,Hc,Gsn)-Aera. These loci therefore form part of the conserved synteny between HSA9q and MMU2. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Chromosome speciation: Humans, Drosophila, and mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.; Coluzzi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements (such as inversions, fusions, and fissions) may play significant roles in the speciation between parapatric (contiguous) or partly sympatric (geographically overlapping) populations. According to the “hybrid-dysfunction” model, speciation occurs because hybrids with heterozygous chromosome rearrangements produce dysfunctional gametes and thus have low reproductive fitness. Natural selection will, therefore, promote mutations that reduce the probability of intercrossing between populations carrying different rearrangements and thus promote their reproductive isolation. This model encounters a disabling difficulty: namely, how to account for the spread in a population of a chromosome rearrangement after it first arises as a mutation in a single individual. The “suppressed-recombination” model of speciation points out that chromosome rearrangements act as a genetic filter between populations. Mutations associated with the rearranged chromosomes cannot flow from one to another population, whereas genetic exchange will freely occur between colinear chromosomes. Mutations adaptive to local conditions will, therefore, accumulate differentially in the protected chromosome regions so that parapatric or partially sympatric populations will genetically differentiate, eventually evolving into different species. The speciation model of suppressed recombination has recently been tested by gene and DNA sequence comparisons between humans and chimpanzees, between Drosophila species, and between species related to Anopheles gambiae, the vector of malignant malaria in Africa. PMID:15851677

  6. Chromosomal localization of the human retinoid X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Almasan, A.; Mangelsdorf, D.J.; Ong, E.S.; Wahl, G.M.; Evans, R.M. )

    1994-04-01

    The recently described retinoid X receptors (RXRs) respond to the novel retinoid 9-cis-retinoic acid and also serve as heterodimeric partners for the vitamin D, thyroid hormone, and retinoic acid receptors (VDR, TR, and RAR, respectively). In this work, the authors report high-resolution localization of the human RXR genes within cytogenetic bands and also within a standard reference map of cosmid DNA markers on human chromosomes. They have determined the location of the human RXR genes by pairwise hybridization of the RXR cosmids and reference markers, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. They localized (i) RXR[alpha] (RXRA) to chromosome 9 band q34.3; (ii) RXR[beta] (RXRB) to chromosome 6 band 21.3; and (iii) RXR[gamma] (RXRG) to chromosome 1 band q22-q23. Six retinoid-responsive transcription factors have been identified so far, including three retinoic acid receptors in addition to the three RXRs. Interestingly, each of these receptors in human and mouse is encoded by genes located at distinct chromosomal loci and on separate chromosomes. The proximity of RXR genes to loci known to be associated with genetic disorders suggests that their location may be useful in establishing a link between RXRs and certain human diseases. 62 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Atrial Fibrillation Associated Chromosome 4q25 Variants Are Not Associated with PITX2c Expression in Human Adult Left Atrial Appendages

    PubMed Central

    Gore-Panter, Shamone R.; Hsu, Jeffery; Hanna, Peter; Gillinov, A. Marc; Pettersson, Gosta; Newton, David W.; Moravec, Christine S.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Chung, Mina K.; Barnard, John; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF), the most common sustained arrhythmia, has a strong genetic component, but the mechanism by which common genetic variants lead to increased AF susceptibility is unknown. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified that the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most strongly associated with AF are located on chromosome 4q25 in an intergenic region distal to the PITX2 gene. Our objective was to determine whether the AF-associated SNPs on chromosome 4q25 were associated with PITX2c expression in adult human left atrial appendages. Analysis of a lone AF GWAS identified four independent AF risk SNPs at chromosome 4q25. Human adult left atrial appendage tissue was obtained from 239 subjects of European Ancestry and used for SNP analysis of genomic DNA and determination of PITX2c RNA expression levels by quantitative PCR. Subjects were divided into three groups based on their history of AF and pre-operative rhythm. AF rhythm subjects had higher PITX2c expression than those with history of AF but in sinus rhythm. PITX2c expression was not associated with the AF risk SNPs in human adult left atrial appendages in all subjects combined or in each of the three subgroups. However, we identified seven SNPs modestly associated with PITX2c expression located in the introns of the ENPEP gene, ∼54 kb proximal to PITX2. PITX2c expression in human adult left atrial appendages is not associated with the chromosome 4q25 AF risk SNPs; thus, the mechanism by which these SNPs are associated with AF remains enigmatic. PMID:24465984

  8. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  9. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  10. Cloning of the cDNAs for the small subunits of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} and chromosomal location of the human gene (POLD2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Tan, Cheng-Keat; Downey, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    cDNAs encoding the small subunit of bovine and human DNA polymerase {delta} have been cloned and sequenced. The predicted polypeptides, 50,885 and 51,289 Daltons, respectively, are 94% identical, similar to the catalytic subunits. The high degree of conservation of the polypeptides suggests an essential function for the small subunit in the heterodimeric core enzyme. Although the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase 5 shares significant homology with those of the herpes virus family of DNA polymerases, the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase 6 is not homologous to the small subunit of either herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA polymerase (UL42 protein) or the Epstein-Barr virus DNA polymerase (BMRF1 protein). Searches of the protein databases failed to detect significant homology with any protein sequenced thus far. PCR analysis of DNA from a panel of human-hamster hybrid cell lines localized the gene (POLD2) for the small subunit of DNA polymerase 5 to human chromosome 7. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. GenomewidePDB 2.0: A Newly Upgraded Versatile Proteogenomic Database for the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seul-Ki; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2015-09-01

    Since the launch of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) in 2012, the number of "missing" proteins has fallen to 2932, down from ∼5932 since the number was first counted in 2011. We compared the characteristics of missing proteins with those of already annotated proteins with respect to transcriptional expression pattern and the time periods in which newly identified proteins were annotated. We learned that missing proteins commonly exhibit lower levels of transcriptional expression and less tissue-specific expression compared with already annotated proteins. This makes it more difficult to identify missing proteins as time goes on. One of the C-HPP goals is to identify alternative spliced product of proteins (ASPs), which are usually difficult to find by shot-gun proteomic methods due to their sequence similarities with the representative proteins. To resolve this problem, it may be necessary to use a targeted proteomics approach (e.g., selected and multiple reaction monitoring [S/MRM] assays) and an innovative bioinformatics platform that enables the selection of target peptides for rarely expressed missing proteins or ASPs. Given that the success of efforts to identify missing proteins may rely on more informative public databases, it was necessary to upgrade the available integrative databases. To this end, we attempted to improve the features and utility of GenomewidePDB by integrating transcriptomic information (e.g., alternatively spliced transcripts), annotated peptide information, and an advanced search interface that can find proteins of interest when applying a targeted proteomics strategy. This upgraded version of the database, GenomewidePDB 2.0, may not only expedite identification of the remaining missing proteins but also enhance the exchange of information among the proteome community. GenomewidePDB 2.0 is available publicly at http://genomewidepdb.proteomix.org/. PMID:26272709

  12. Cloning of cDNA encoding human rapsyn and mapping of the RAPSN gene locus to chromosome 11p11.2-p11.1

    SciTech Connect

    Buckel, A.; Beeson, D.; Vincent, A.

    1996-08-01

    We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones for the human 43-kDa acetylcholine receptor-associated protein rapsyn. The cDNA encodes a 412-amino-acid protein that has a predicted molecular mass of 46,330 Da and shows 96% sequence identity with mouse rapsyn. Analysis of PCR amplifications, first from somatic cell hybrids and subsequently from radiation hybrids, localizes the human RAPSN gene locus to chromosome 11p11.2-p11.1 in close proximity to ACP2. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  13. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M.

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Role of H2O2 in RET/PTC1 chromosomal rearrangement produced by ionizing radiation in human thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lagente-Chevallier, Odile; Weyemi, Urbain; Talbot, Monique; Métivier, Didier; Courtin, Françoise; Bidart, Jean-Michel; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2010-05-15

    During childhood, the thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenetic effects of ionizing radiation that may lead to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) associated with RET/PTC oncogene rearrangement. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces a transient "oxidative burst" through radiolysis of water, which can cause DNA damage and mediates part of the radiation effects. H(2)O(2) is a potent DNA-damaging agent that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and consequently, chromosomal aberrations. Irradiation by 5 Gy X-ray increased extracellular H(2)O(2). Therefore, we investigated the implication of H(2)O(2) in the generation of RET/PTC1 rearrangement after X-ray exposure. We developed a highly specific and sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR method. By using the human thyroid cell line HTori-3, previously found to produce RET/PTC1 after gamma-irradiation, we showed that H(2)O(2), generated during a 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, causes DNA double-strand breaks and contributes to RET/PTC1 formation. Pretreatment of cells with catalase, a scavenger of H(2)O(2), significantly decreased RET/PTC1 rearrangement formation. Finally, RET/PTC chromosomal rearrangement was detected in HTori-3.1 cells after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) (25 micromol/L), at a dose that did not affect the cell viability. This study shows for the first time that H(2)O(2) is able to cause RET/PTC1 rearrangement in thyroid cells and consequently highlights that oxidative stress could be responsible for the occurrence of RET/PTC1 rearrangement found in thyroid lesions even in the absence of radiation exposure. PMID:20424115

  15. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Sarah

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  17. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  18. Isolation of the human MOX2 homeobox gene and localization to chromosome 7p22.1-p21.3

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriou, M.; Theodorakis, K.; Mankoo, B.

    1995-04-10

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones encoding a novel human homeobox gene, MOX2, the homologue of the murine mox-2 gene. The MOX2 protein contains all of the characteristic features of Mox-2 proteins of other vertebrate species, namely the homeobox, the polyhistidine stretch, and a number of potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. The homeodomain of MOX2 protein is identical to all other vertebrate species reported so far (rodents and amphibians). Outside the homeodomain, Mox-2 proteins share a high degree of identity, except for a few amino acid differences encountered between the human and the rodent polypeptides. A polyhistidine stretch of 12 amino acids in the N terminal region of the protein is also conserved among humans, rodents, and (only partly) amphibians. The chromosomal position of MOX2 was assigned to 7p22.1-p21.3. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Five subunit genes of the human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor are mapped to two linkage groups on chromosome 2 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Lobos, E.A. )

    1993-09-01

    RFLPs were detected in the five subunit genes of the human muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) using genomic DNA or cDNA probes from the homologous mouse loci. The RFLPs at the alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-, and epsilon-subunit gene loci were analyzed for genetic linkage in 16 families (n = 188). Significant evidence was obtained for close linkage of the [beta]- and [epsilon]-nAChR genes and much greater genetic distance between the [alpha]-nAChR gene and the [gamma]/[delta]-nAChR gene complex. The linkage analysis program CRI-MAP was used to map the positions of the [beta]- and [epsilon]-nAChR genes relative to seven markers on chromosome 17. The results indicate the [beta]- and [epsilon]-nAChR probes to a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The [alpha]-, [gamma]-, and [delta]-nAChR genes were placed on a map of 13 chromosome 2 markers. The linkage analysis placed the nAChR genes at two sites on chromosome 2q about equidistant from the marker CRYGP1, with the [alpha]-nAChR gene about 27 cM proximal and the [gamma]/[delta]-nAChR gene complex about 31 cM distal to CRYGP1. 46 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Sequence of human hexokinase III cDNA and assignment of the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome band 5q35.2 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Hiroto; Le Beau, M.M.; Fernald, A.A.

    1996-08-15

    Complementary DNA clones encoding human hexokinase III were isolated from a liver cDNA library. There was 84.7% identity between the amino acid sequences of human and rat hexokinase III. RNA blotting showed the presence of hexokinase III mRNA in liver and lung. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human hexokinase III gene (HK3) to chromosome 5, band q35.2. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Targeted gene walking by low stringency polymerase chain reaction: Assignment of a putative human brain sodium channel gene (SCN3A) to chromosome 2q24-31

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, M.S.; Srivastava, K.; Andresen, J.M.; Ingram, V.M.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1994-04-12

    The authors have developed a low stringency polymerase chain reaction (LSPCR) to isolate the unknown neighboring region around a known DNA sequence, thus allowing efficient targeted gene walking. The method involves the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a single primer under conditions of low stringency for primer annealing (40{degrees}C) for the first few cycles followed by more cycles at high stringency (55{degrees}C). Nested PCRs with end-labeled primers are then used to generate a ladder of radioactive bands, which accurately identifies the targeted fragment(s). They performed LSPCR on human placental DNA using a highly conserved sodium channel-specific primer for 5 cycles at 40{degrees}C followed by 27 cycles at 55{degrees}C for primer annealing. Subsequently, using higher stringency (55{degrees}C) PCR with radiolabeled nested primers for 8 cycles, they have isolated a 0.66-kb fragment of a putative human sodium channel gene. Partial sequence (325 bp) of this fragment revealed a 270-bp region (exon) with homology to the rat brain sodium channel III{alpha} (RBIII) gene at the nucleotide (87%) and amino acid (92%) levels. Therefore, the authors putatively assign this sequence as a part of a gene coding the {alpha}-subunit of a human brain type III sodium channel (SCN3A). Using PCR on two human/rodent somatic cell hybrid panels with primers specific to this putative SCN3A gene, they have localized this gene to chromosome 2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes was used to sublocalize the SCN3A gene to chromosome at 2q24-31. In conclusion, LSPCR is an efficient and sensitive method for targeted gene walking and is also useful for the isolation of homologous genes in related species.

  2. The proteins of human chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Costa, Alberto C S

    2006-08-15

    Recent genomic sequence annotation suggests that the long arm of human chromosome 21 encodes more than 400 genes. Because there is no evidence to exclude any significant segment of 21 q from containing genes relevant to the Down syndrome (DS) cognitive phenotype, all genes in this entire set must be considered as candidates. Only a subset, however, is likely to make critical contributions. Determining which these are is both a major focus in biology and a critical step in efficient development of therapeutics. The subtle molecular abnormality in DS, the 50% increase in chromosome 21 gene expression, presents significant challenges for researchers in detection and quantitation. Another challenge is the current limitation in understanding gene functions and in interpreting biological characteristics. Here, we review information on chromosome 21-encoded proteins compiled from the literature and from genomics and proteomics databases. For each protein, we summarize their evolutionary conservation, the complexity of their known protein interactions and their level of expression in brain, and discuss the implications and limitations of these data. For a subset, we discuss neurologically relevant phenotypes of mouse models that include knockouts, mutations, or overexpression. Lastly, we highlight a small number of genes for which recent evidence suggests a function in biochemical/cellular pathways that are relevant to cognition. Until knowledge deficits are overcome, we suggest that effective development of gene-phenotype correlations in DS requires a serious and continuous effort to assimilate broad categories of information on chromosome 21 genes, plus the creation of more versatile mouse models. PMID:17048356

  3. OCTOBASE: ACEDB implementation of human chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S.; Durbin, R.; Ritter, O.

    1994-09-01

    ACEDB, A C. elegans Database is a generalized genome database that was originally written to meet the needs of the C. elegans community. Additions and refinements to the original database are continually being made. Documentation, code and data available from anonymous FTP servers at lirmm, lirmm.fr, cele,mrc-lmb,cam.ac.uk and ncbi.nim.nih.gov. ACEDB can be used to create new databases without the need for reprogramming, and has been implemented for a number of different species as well as several human chromosomes. It displays data through a graphical interface in a manner that closely resembles the way that geneticists model their data. We have chosen to name the chromosome 8 database that relies upon the ACEDB implementation OCTOBASE. This database allows the user to view the chromosome at all levels from the cytogenetic ideogram to the DNA sequence. Besides allowing displays that span several orders of magnitude, the database will also allow simultaneously display of several types of genetic map, such as the linkage, STS content and physical map. The database also provides an excellent tool for the entry of routine laboratory data as it is collected. The gridded clone display is particularly useful for data entry. Since the database is generalized it can also be custom modified to meet the needs of individual users. Overall OCTOBASE meets the needs of the community for entry of the large amounts for data that are now being collected for chromosome 8.

  4. The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Rinn, John L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Hartman, Stephen; Harrison, Paul M.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A DNA microarray representing nearly all of the unique sequences of human Chromosome 22 was constructed and used to measure global-transcriptional activity in placental poly(A)+ RNA. We found that many of the known, related and predicted genes are expressed. More importantly, our study reveals twice as many transcribed bases as have been reported previously. Many of the newly discovered expressed fragments were verified by RNA blot analysis and a novel technique called differential hybridization mapping (DHM). Interestingly, a significant fraction of these novel fragments are expressed antisense to previously annotated introns. The coding potential of these novel expressed regions is supported by their sequence conservation in the mouse genome. This study has greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome. To facilitate the dissemination of these results to the scientific community, we have developed a comprehensive Web resource to present the findings of this study and other features of human Chromosome 22 at http://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. PMID:12600945

  5. Comparative chromosome painting in mammals: Human and the Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fengtang; Mueller, S.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    We have used human chromosome-specific painting probes for in situ hybridization on Indian muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak vaginalis, 2n = 6, 7) metaphase chromosomes to identify the homologous chromosome regions of the entire human chromosome set. Chromosome rearrangements that have been involved in the karyotype evolution of these two species belonging to different mammalian orders were reconstructed based on hybridization patterns. Although, compared to human chromosomes, the karyotype of the Indian muntjac seems to be highly rearranged, we could identify a limited number of highly conserved homologous chromosome regions for each of the human chromosome-specific probes. We identified 48 homologous autosomal chromosome segments, which is in the range of the numbers found in other artiodactyls and carnivores recently analyzed by chromosome painting. The results demonstrate that the reshuffling of the muntjac karyotype is mostly due to fusions of huge blocks of entire chromosomes. This is in accordance with previous chromosome painting analyses between various Muntjac species and contrasts the findings for some other mammals (e.g., gibbons, mice) that show exceptional chromosome reshuffling due to multiple reciprocal translocation events. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Three-region specific microdissection libraries for the long arm of human chromosome 2, regions q33-q35, q31-q32, and q23-q24

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Tong, S.; Whittier, A.

    1995-09-01

    Three region-specific libraries have been constructed from the long arm of human chromosome 2, including regions 2q33-35 (2Q2 library), 2q31-32 (2Q3) and 2q23-24 (2Q4). Chromosome microdissection and the MboI linker-adaptor microcloning techniques were used in constructing these libraries. The libraries comprised hundreds of thousands of microclones in each library. Approximately half of the microclones in the library contained unique or low-copy number sequence inserts. The insert sizes ranged between 50 and 800 bp, with a mean of 130-190 bp. Southern blot analysis of individual unique sequence microclones showed that 70-94% of the microclones were derived from the dissected region. 31 unique sequence microclones from the 2Q2 library, 31 from 2Q3, and 30 from 2Q4, were analyzed for insert sizes, the hybridizing genomic HindIII fragment sizes, and cross-hybridization to rodent species. These libraries and the short insert microclones derived from the libraries should be useful for high resolution physical mapping, sequence-ready reagents for large scale genomic sequencing, and positional cloning of disease-related genes assigned to these regions, e.g. the recessive familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis assigned to 2q33-q35, and a type I diabetes susceptibility gene to 2q31-q33. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes. PMID:26099605

  8. Two human relaxin genes are on chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R J; Hudson, P; Shine, J; Niall, H D; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B

    1984-01-01

    We have recently cloned two different human relaxin gene sequences. One of these (H1) was isolated from a human genomic clone bank and the other (H2) from a cDNA library prepared from human pregnant ovarian tissue. Southern gel analysis of the relaxin genes within the genomes of several unrelated individuals showed that all genomes contained both relaxin genes. Hence it is unlikely (p less than 0.001) that the two relaxin gene sequences are alleles. Rather, it is probable that there are two relaxin genes within the human genome. It is likely that relaxin and insulin genes have evolved from a common ancestral gene by gene duplication, since structural similarities between insulin and relaxin are evident at both the peptide and gene level. To investigate the evolutionary relationship between the two human relaxin genes and the insulin gene, we have determined the chromosomal position of the relaxin genes using mouse/human cell hybrids. We found that the human insulin and relaxin genes are on different chromosomes. Both human relaxin genes are located on the short arm region of chromosome 9. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6548703

  9. Chromosomal localization of the human fibromodulin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roughley, P.J.; Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and mapping of genes is a fundamental step in understanding inherited diseases. This study reports the chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding fibromodulin, a collagen-binding proteoglycan which exhibits a wide distribution in connective tissue extracellular matrices. Attempts to localize the gene utilizing a probe covering the published coding region of the human fibromodulin cDNA were unsuccessful. Thus, in order to obtain an alternate probe, the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNA was cloned utilizing the 3{prime}-RACE protocol. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA with probes covering either the coding sequence or the 3{prime}-untranslated region revealed simple patterns, indicative of a single-copy gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the 3{prime}-untranslated region probe resulted in hybridization at two chromosomal regions. The majority of signals were observed at 1q32, but some signals were also observed at 9q34.1. The localization of the fibromodulin gene to chromosome 1 was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrid lines. In addition to allowing the gene localization, cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region demonstrates that the human fibromodulin cDNA possesses an insert of approximately 160 base pairs which is not present in the published bovine sequence. The human sequence also possesses a single polyadenylation signal, yielding a 3 kb mRNA which was observed in Northern blotting experiments. These results now provide the necessary information to evaluate the potential role of fibromodulin in genetic disorders of connective tissues.

  10. Human neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1: Structure of the gene (SLC1A4) and localization to chromosome 2p13-p15

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, K.; Dueker, M.; Stoffel, W.

    1994-11-01

    Screening for cDNAs encoding proteins similar to the sodium-coupled glutamate transporter GLAST1 led to the isolation of a cDNA clone coding for a protein that turned out to be identical to the recently described neutral amino acid transporter ASCT1. The new member of the GLAST-related transporter family does not transport glutamate or aspartate but alanine, serine, cysteine, and threonine instead. The expressed sequence tag EST02446, a short cDNA sequence found in the course of a large-scale sequencing project of human brain-derived cDNA, showed significant similarity to the eukaryotic glutamate transporter GLAST1 and was therefore used as probe in the search for further glutamate transporter cDNAs. Fragments of the cDNA were used for the isolation and characterization of human ASCT1 genomic clones. The ORF of 1572 bp encoding 524 amino acid residues is distributed over 8 exons, which span at least 40 kb of human chromosomal DNA. The ASCT1 gene locus was assigned to chromosome 2p13-p15 by chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) studies. The gene structure is not related to any other previously characterized transporter gene. In contrast to the genes of the sodium-coupled nonglutamate neurotransmitter transporters, it shows no obvious correspondence between intron/exon structure and transmembrane organization. The transcription start site in human liver tissue was determined by primer extension analysis to be located 291 bp upstream of the initiating ATG codon. The DNA region immediately upstream of the transcription start lacks any TATA or CAAT boxes but contains several bindings sites for the transcription factors Sp1 and Egr-1. The ASCT1 gene (SLC1A4) structure reported here will facilitate the characterization of the genes of the other members of the GLAST-related transporter family and might be useful in the elucidation of amino acid transport-related defects. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A.; Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J.

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Assignment of human potassium channel gene KCNA4 (Kv1. 4, PCN2) to chromosome 11q13. 4 [r arrow] q14. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Philipson, L.H.; Bell, G.I. ); Eddy, R.L.; Shows, T.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Both electrically excitable and nonexcitable tissues express voltage-sensitive K[sup +] channels. Since the original isolation of the Drosophila Shaker gene encoding voltage-sensitive K[sub +] channels, five additional related gene families have been described: the Shal, Shab, and Shaw families and the K-eag and Slo genes. A seventh family of slowly activating K[sup +] channels, minK of IsK, is structurally unrelated to the others. Seven human genes related to the Shaker subfamily have been described. We recently described the cloning of a fast-inactivating human voltage-gated K[sup +] channel, PCN2. Here we report the mapping of the gene encoding PNC2, designated KNCA4, to chromosome 11 by analyzing its segregation in a panel of reduced human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. In situ hybridization to prometaphase chromoxomes localized KCNA4 to the long arm of chromosome 11 in the region of bands q13.4 [r arrow] q14.1.

  13. The human MCP-3 gene (SCYA7): Cloning, sequence analysis, and assignment to the C-C chemokine gene cluster on chromosome 17q11. 2-q12

    SciTech Connect

    Opdenakker, G.; Fiten, P.; Nys, G.; Froyen, G.; Van Damme, J. ); Van Roy, N.; Speleman, F.; Laureys, G. )

    1994-05-15

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) are chemokines involved in macrophage recruitment during inflammation and cancer. A full-size MCP-3 cDNA was used to isolate the functional human MCP-3 gene. Based on restriction analysis, subclones were selected and the MCP-3 gene sequence was completed. In addition to a dense region with direct and inverted repeats and palindromic sequences, a double microsatellite (CA)[sub n]-(GA)[sub n] was found at the 5[prime]-end of the MCP-3 gene, and an RFLP was detected. The gene was regionally mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to human chromosome 17, subbands q11.2-q12. This site contains the MCP-subset of C-C chemokines and can be distinguished from the syntenic MIP-1[alpha] locus. SCYA7 was assigned as the locus symbol of the MCP-3 gene. Double-labeling experiments confirmed the regional assignment of the MCP-3 gene close to the ERBB2 locus on human chromosome 17. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Syntenic conservation between humans and cattle. I. Human chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Threadgill, D W; Womack, J E

    1990-09-01

    Bovine X hamster hybrid somatic cells have been used to investigate the syntenic relationship of nine loci in the bovine that have homologous loci on human chromosome 9. Six loci, ALDH1, ALDOB, C5, GGTB2, GSN, and ITIL, were assigned to the previously identified bovine syntenic group U18 represented by ACO1, whereas the other three loci, ABL, ASS, and GRP78, mapped to a new, previously unidentified autosomal syntenic group. Additionally, a secondary locus, ABLL, which cross-hybridized with the ABL probe, was mapped to bovine syntenic group U1 with the HSA 1 loci PGD and ENO1. The results predict that ACO1 will map proximal to ALDH1; GRP78 distal to ITIL and C5; GSN proximal to AK1, ABL, and ASS on HSA 9; GRP78 to MMU 2; and ITIL and GSN to MMU 4. PMID:2081596

  15. A high-resolution annotated physical map of the human chromosome 13q12-13 region containing the breast cancer susceptibility locus BRCA2.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, S G; Cayanis, E; de Fatima Bonaldo, M; Bowcock, A M; Deaven, L L; Edelman, I S; Gallardo, T; Kalachikov, S; Lawton, L; Longmire, J L; Lovett, M; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Rothstein, R; Russo, J J; Soares, M B; Sunjevaric, I; Venkatraj, V S; Warburton, D; Zhang, P; Efstratiadis, A

    1996-01-01

    Various types of physical mapping data were assembled by developing a set of computer programs (Integrated Mapping Package) to derive a detailed, annotated map of a 4-Mb region of human chromosome 13 that includes the BRCA2 locus. The final assembly consists of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with 42 members spanning the 13q12-13 region and aligned contigs of 399 cosmids established by cross-hybridization between the cosmids, which were selected from a chromosome 13-specific cosmid library using inter-Alu PCR probes from the YACs. The end sequences of 60 cosmids spaced nearly evenly across the map were used to generate sequence-tagged sites (STSs), which were mapped to the YACs by PCR. A contig framework was generated by STS content mapping, and the map was assembled on this scaffold. Additional annotation was provided by 72 expressed sequences and 10 genetic markers that were positioned on the map by hybridization to cosmids. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8570617

  16. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  17. The Proteins of Human Chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Costa, Alberto C. S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent genomic sequence annotation suggests that the long arm of human chromosome 21 encodes more than 400 genes. Because there is no evidence to exclude any significant segment of 21q from containing genes relevant to the Down syndrome cognitive phenotype, all genes in this entire set must be considered as candidates. Only a subset, however, is likely to make critical contributions. Determining which these are is both a major focus in biology and a critical step in efficient development of therapeutics. The subtle molecular abnormality in Down syndrome, the 50% increase in chromosome 21 gene expression, presents significant challenges for researchers in detection and quantitation. Another challenge is the current limitation in understanding gene functions and in interpreting biological characteristics. Here, we review information on chromosome 21-encoded proteins compiled from the literature and from genomics and proteomics databases. For each protein, we summarize their evolutionary conservation, the complexity of their known protein interactions and their level of expression in brain, and discuss the implications and limitations of these data. For a subset, we discuss neurologically relevant phenotypes of mouse models that include knockouts, mutations or overexpression. Lastly, we highlight a small number of genes for which recent evidence suggests a function in biochemical/cellular pathways that are relevant to cognition. Until knowledge deficits are overcome, we suggest that effective development of gene-phenotype correlations in Down syndrome requires a serious and continuous effort to assimilate broad categories of information on chromosome 21 genes, plus the creation of more versatile mouse models. PMID:17048356

  18. Over-representation of specific regions of chromosome 22 in cells from human glioma correlate with resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea

    PubMed Central

    Hank, Nicole C; Shapiro, Joan Rankin; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2006-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant form of brain tumor. Despite treatment including surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation, these tumors typically recur. The recurrent tumor is often resistant to further therapy with the same agent, suggesting that the surviving cells that repopulate the tumor mass have an intrinsic genetic advantage. We previously demonstrated that cells selected for resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) are near-diploid, with over-representation of part or all of chromosomes 7 and 22. While cells from untreated gliomas often have over-representation of chromosome 7, chromosome 22 is typically under-represented. Methods We have analyzed cells from primary and recurrent tumors from the same patient before and after in vitro selection for resistance to clinically relevant doses of BCNU. Karyotypic analyses were done to demonstrate the genetic makeup of these cells, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses have defined the region(s) of chromosome 22 retained in these BCNU-resistant cells. Results Karyotypic analyses demonstrated that cells selected for BCNU resistance were near-diploid with over-representation of chromosomes 7 and 22. In cells where whole copies of chromosome 22 were not identified, numerous fragments of this chromosome were retained and inserted into several marker and derivative chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses using whole chromosome paints confirmed this finding. Additional FISH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 22 have allowed us to map the over-represented region to 22q12.3–13.32. Conclusion Cells selected for BCNU resistance either in vivo or in vitro retain sequences mapped to chromosome 22. The specific over-representation of sequences mapped to 22q12.3–13.32 suggest the presence of a DNA sequence important to BCNU survival and/or resistance located in this region of chromosome 22

  19. Assignment of human glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene (GCDH) to the short arm of chromosome 19 (19p13. 2) by in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, C.R.; Gregory, C.A.; Singal, R. ); Duncan, A.M.V. ); Goodman, S.I. )

    1994-05-01

    Here, the authors report the mapping of GCDH to chromosome 19 by both in situ hybridization and human-hamster somatic cell hybrid analysis. In situ hybridization of a 688-bp genomic fragment of GCDH to BrdU-synchronized peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed as described in Duncan et al. The positions of silver grains directly over or touching well-banded metaphase chromosomes were mapped to an ISCN idiogram. The same 688-bp genomic fragment was hybridized to a Southern blot of the same panel of EcoRI-digested DNA from 22 hybrid cell lines containing various complements of human and hamster chromosomes, one hamster cell line, and parental human lymphoblasts as previously described. The GCDH gene segregated with human chromosome 19 with 100% concordance for the absence of presence of chromosome 19 (with positive isozymes for chromosome 19) (data not shown). The analysis of the distribution of 600 grains following in situ hybridization revealed a significant clustering of grains in the short arm of chromosome 19. Of 600 grains, 94 mapped to this region, with a peak distribution at 19p13.2. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Mapping of the first preferentially expressed cDNA in human fetal cochlea to human 14q11.2-12 and to a region of homologous synteny on mouse chromosome 12

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, N.G.; Weremowicz, S.; Kovatch, K.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated a cDNA, Coch-5B2 (D14S564E) from a human fetal cochlear cDNA library by subtractive hybridization and differential screening methods. This is the first cDNA to date shown to be expressed preferentially in human fetal cochlea (membranous labyrinth). On Northern blot of a panel of 14 human fetal tissue RNAs including cochlea, brain, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, kidney, lung, skin, thymus, adrenal, small intestine, eye, sternal cartilage, and cultured fibroblasts, very high level expression of D14S564E is seen only in cochlea; very faint bands are discernible in brain and eye. Sequence comparison of this clone to sequences in GenBank/EMBL data bases shows no match to any known genes, indicating that it represents a novel cochlear sequence. Chromosome localization of this cochlear cDNA may provide insight into a region of the human genome to which human deafness disorders may map. We have assigned D14S564E to human chromosome 14 using the NIGMS human/rodent somatic cell hybrid mapping panel 1, and regionally to q11.2-q12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Besides detection of the human genomic band on the hybrid panel, genomic bands were seen for mouse and hamster, demonstrating evolutionary conservation of D14S564E. By FISH, signal was detected on human 14q11.2-q12 in 20 metaphases. In 3 metaphases, signal was present on both chromosome 14s. The mouse homolog of this cochlear cDNA was also used to probe human metaphases by FISH: signal was detected in the same region, 14q11.2-12, as the human clone in 5 metaphases, confirming human mapping data and homology to the human cDNA. The human cochlear D14S564E was genetically mapped in the mouse to chromosome 12, in a region of homology with human 14q11.2-q12. This region on mouse 12 contains the asp-1 (audiogenic seizure prone) locus and future studies will be directed at determining whether D14S564E is a candidate gene for this disorder.

  1. Genetic and morphological features of human iPSC-derived neurons with chromosome 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) deletions

    PubMed Central

    Das, DK; Tapias, V; D’Aiuto, L; Chowdari, KV; Francis, L; Zhi, Y; Ghosh, Bhattacharjee A; Surti, U; Tischfield, J; Sheldon, M; Moore, JC; Fish, K; Nimgaonkar, V

    2015-01-01

    Background Copy number variation on chromosome 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) causes deletion of CYFIP1, NIPA1, NIPA2 and TUBGCP5; it also affects brain structure and elevates risk for several neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dendritic spine abnormalities. In rodents, altered cyfip1 expression changes dendritic spine morphology, motivating analyses of human neuronal cells derived from iPSCs (iPSC-neurons). Methods iPSCs were generated from a mother and her offspring, both carrying the 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) deletion, and a non-deletion control. Gene expression in the deletion region was estimated using quantitative real-time PCR assays. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and iPSC-neurons were characterized using immunocytochemistry. Results CYFIP1, NIPA1, NIPA2 and TUBGCP5 gene expression was lower in iPSCs, NPCs and iPSC-neurons from the mother and her offspring in relation to control cells. CYFIP1 and PSD95 protein levels were lower in iPSC-neurons derived from the CNV bearing individuals using Western blot analysis. At 10 weeks post-differentiation, iPSC-neurons appeared to show dendritic spines and qualitative analysis suggested that dendritic morphology was altered in 15q11.2 deletion subjects compared with control cells. Conclusions The 15q11.2 (BP1-BP2) deletion is associated with reduced expression of four genes in iPSC-derived neuronal cells; it may also be associated altered iPSC-neuron dendritic morphology. PMID:26528485

  2. Imprinting of the gene encoding a human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p57KIP2, on chromosome 11p15.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, S; Thompson, J S; Edwards, M C; Bartletta, J M; Grundy, P; Kalikin, L M; Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Feinberg, A P

    1996-01-01

    Parental origin-specific alterations of chromosome 11p15 in human cancer suggest the involvement of one or more maternally expressed imprinted genes involved in embryonal tumor suppression and the cancer-predisposing Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57KIP2, whose overexpression causes G1 phase arrest, was recently cloned and mapped to this band. We find that the p57KIP2 gene is imprinted, with preferential expression of the maternal allele. However, the imprint is not absolute, as the paternal allele is also expressed at low levels in most tissues, and at levels comparable to the maternal allele in fetal brain and some embryonal tumors. The biochemical function, chromosomal location, and imprinting of the p57KIP2 gene match the properties predicted for a tumor suppressor gene at 11p15.5. However, as the p57KIP2 gene is 500 kb centromeric to the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 2, it is likely to be part of a large domain containing other imprinted genes. Thus, loss of heterozygosity or loss of imprinting might simultaneously affect several genes at this locus that together contribute to tumor and/or growth- suppressing functions that are disrupted in BWS and embryonal tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610162

  3. Assessment of aneuploidy in human oocytes and preimplantation embryos by chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, N.; Viegas-Pequignot, E.; Plachot, M.

    1994-09-01

    The poor quality of chromosome preparations often observed after fixation of oocytes and embryos did not usually allow accurate identification of chromosomes involved in non-disjunctions. We, therefore, used chromosome painting to determine the incidence of abnormalities for chromosomes 1 and 7. A total of 50 oocytes inseminated for IVF and showing no signs of fertilization as well as 37 diploid embryos donated for research were fixed according to the Dyban`s technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was carried out using whole chromosome painting DNA probes specific for human chromosome 1 and 7. The incidence of aneuploidy was 28%, 10% and 60% for metaphase II, polar body and sperm chromosomes, respectively. The high incidence of aneuploidy observed in sperm prematurely condensed sperm chromosomes is due to the fact that usually far less than 23 sperm chromatids are observed, maybe as a consequence of incomplete chromosome condensation. Thirty seven embryos were analyzed with the same probes. 48% of early embryos were either monosomic 1 or 7 or mosaics comprising blastomeres with 1, 2 or 3 signals. Thus, 8 among the 11 abnormal embryos had hypodiploid cells (25 to 37 chromosomes) indicating either an artefactual loss of chromosomes or a complex anomaly of nuclear division (maltinucleated blastomeres, abnormal migration of chromosomes at anaphase). We therefore calculated a {open_quotes}corrected{close_quotes} incidence of aneuploidy for chromosomes 1 or 7 in early embryos: 18%. 86% of the blastocysts showed mosaicism 2n/3 or 4n as a consequence of the formation of the syncitiotrophoblast. To conclude, chromosome painting is an efficient method to accurately identify chromosomes involved in aneuploidy. This technique should allow us to evaluate the incidence of non-disjunction for all chromosome pairs. Our results confirm the high incidence of chromosome abnormalities occurring as a consequence of meiotic or mitotic non-disjunctions in human oocytes and embryos.

  4. Construction and availability of human chromosome-specific gene libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fuscoe, J.C.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.

    1985-06-14

    This report briefly describes Phase I of the project, the production of complete digest fibraries. Each laboratory is currently in the process of sorting individual human chromosomes from normal human fibroblasts or human X hamster hybrids. The goal of 4 x 10/sup 6/ chromosomes for cloning purposes has been achieved. Each laboratory is also in the process of cloning the chromosomal DNA, after complete digestion with a 6-cutter, into the bacteriophage vector Charon 21A. 3 refs.

  5. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D.

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Attenuation of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control in human tumor cells is associated with increased frequencies of unrejoined chromosome breaks but not increased cytotoxicity following radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.; Cowan, J.; Grdina, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    The contribution of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control to ionizing radiation responses was examined in ten human tumor cell lines. Most of the delay in cell cycle progression seen in the first cell cycle following radiation exposure was due to blocks in G{sub 2} and there were large cell line-to-cell line variations in the length of the G{sub 2} block. Longer delays were seen in cell lines that had mutations in p53. There was a highly significant inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks seen as chromosome terminal deletions in mitosis, and observation that supports the hypothesis that the signal for G{sub 2} delay in mammalian cells is an unrejoined chromosome break. There were also an inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the level of chromosome aneuploidy in each cell line, suggesting that the G{sub 2} and mitotic spindel checkpoints may be linked to each other. Attenuation in G{sub 2} checkpoint control was not associated with alterations in either the frequency of induced chromosome rearrangements or cell survival following radiation exposure suggesting that chromosome rearrangements, the major radiation-induced lethal lesion in tumor cells, form before cells enters G{sub 2}. Thus, agents that act solely to override G{sub 2} arrest should produce little radiosensitization in human tumor cells.

  7. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Zody, Michael C; Borowsky, Mark L; Kamal, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Taylor, Todd D; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Bugalter, Boris; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeCaprio, David; Engels, Reinhard; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Hafez, Nabil; Hall, Jennifer L; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Itoh, Takehiko; Jaffe, David B; Kuroki, Yoko; Lehoczky, Jessica; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; Noguchi, Hideki; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Piqani, Bruno; Smith, Cherylyn L; Talamas, Jessica A; Topham, Kerri; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Wain, Hester M; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Fujiyama, Asao; Hattori, Masahira; Birren, Bruce W; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Lander, Eric S

    2005-09-22

    Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements. PMID:16177791

  8. Modeling partial monosomy for human chromosome 21q11.2-q21.1 reveals haploinsufficient genes influencing behavior and fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Migdalska, Anna M; van der Weyden, Louise; Ismail, Ozama; White, Jacqueline K; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Logan, Darren W; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of part of human chromosome 21 results in a rare condition known as Monosomy 21. This disease displays a variety of clinical phenotypes, including intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphology, skeletal and cardiac abnormalities, and respiratory complications. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in this disorder, we used chromosome engineering to generate a mouse model carrying a deletion of the Lipi-Usp25 interval, syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.1 in humans. Haploinsufficiency for the 6 genes in this interval resulted in no gross morphological defects and behavioral analysis performed using an open field test, a test of anxiety, and tests for social interaction were normal in monosomic mice. Monosomic mice did, however, display impaired memory retention compared to control animals. Moreover, when fed a high-fat diet (HFD) monosomic mice exhibited a significant increase in fat mass/fat percentage estimate compared with controls, severe fatty changes in their livers, and thickened subcutaneous fat. Thus, genes within the Lipi-Usp25 interval may participate in memory retention and in the regulation of fat deposition. PMID:22276124

  9. The human gene (CSNK2A1) coding for the casein kinase II subunit [alpha] is located on chromosome 20 and contains tandemly arranged Alu repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Wirkner, U.; Lichter, P.; Pyerin, W. ); Voss, H.; Ansorge, W. )

    1994-01-15

    The authors have isolated and characterized an 18.9-kb genomic clone representing a central portion of the human casein kinase II (CKII) subunit [alpha] gene (CSNK2A1). Using the whole clone as a probe, the gene was localized on chromosome 20p13. The clone contains eight exons whose sequences comprise bases 102 to 824 of the coding region of the human CKII[alpha]. The exon/intron splice junctions conform to the gt/ag rule. Three of the nine introns are located at positions corresponding to those in the CKII[alpha] gene of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The introns contain eight complete and eight incomplete Alu repeats. Some of the Alu sequences are arranged in tandems of two or three, which seem to originate from insertions of younger Alu sequences into the poly(A) region of previously integrated Alu sequences, as indicated by flanking direct repeats. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S G; Barlow, K F; McLay, K E; Kaul, R; Swarbreck, D; Dunham, A; Scott, C E; Howe, K L; Woodfine, K; Spencer, C C A; Jones, M C; Gillson, C; Searle, S; Zhou, Y; Kokocinski, F; McDonald, L; Evans, R; Phillips, K; Atkinson, A; Cooper, R; Jones, C; Hall, R E; Andrews, T D; Lloyd, C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Anderson, F; Andrew, R W; Ashwell, R I S; Aubin, K; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Beasley, H; Bethel, G; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, J Y; Brown, A J; Buckley, D; Burton, J; Bye, J; Carder, C; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C; Cobley, V; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Davies, J; Deadman, R; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M; Ellington, A G; Errington, H; Frankish, A; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gay, L; Ghori, M R J; Gibson, R; Gilby, L M; Gillett, W; Glithero, R J; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Hammond, S; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E; Haugen, E; Heath, P D; Holmes, S; Holt, K; Howden, P J; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Hunter, G; Isherwood, J; James, R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A; Kay, M; Kershaw, J K; Kibukawa, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A J; Lad, H; Laird, G; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; Lush, M J; Lyne, R; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Matthews, N S W; McLaren, S; Milne, S; Mistry, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; O'Dell, C N; Oliver, K; Palmeiri, A; Palmer, S A; Parker, A; Patel, D; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phelps, K; Phillimore, B J; Plumb, R; Rajan, J; Raymond, C; Rouse, G; Saenphimmachak, C; Sehra, H K; Sheridan, E; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C; Subramanian, S; Sycamore, N; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Van Helmond, Z; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; White, S; Whitehead, S L; Wilkinson, J E; Willey, D L; Williams, H; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wu, Z; Coulson, A; Vaudin, M; Sulston, J E; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Wooster, R; Dunham, I; Carter, N P; McVean, G; Ross, M T; Harrow, J; Olson, M V; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Bentley, D R; Banerjee, R; Bryant, S P; Burford, D C; Burrill, W D H; Clegg, S M; Dhami, P; Dovey, O; Faulkner, L M; Gribble, S M; Langford, C F; Pandian, R D; Porter, K M; Prigmore, E

    2006-05-18

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome. PMID:16710414

  11. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  12. The human serotonin-7 receptor pseudogene: variation and chromosome location.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, D; Qian, I H; Kusumi, I; Ulpian, C; Tallerico, T; Liu, I S; Seeman, P

    1998-01-01

    We report a variation of the pseudogene for the serotonin-7 receptor in human DNA. Human genomic DNA was amplified, using the polymerase chain reaction method and degenerate oligonucleotide primers for serotonin receptor-like genes. A novel gene DNA sequence of 1325 bp was found. Based on nucleotides, this gene is 88% identical to the serotonin-7 receptor coding sequence. Compared with the previously known serotonin-7 receptor pseudogene, this pseudogene has 1 nucleotide deletion and 4 nucleotide mutations. The gene is located on human chromosome 12 at 12p12.3-p13.2. Images Fig. 1A PMID:9785699

  13. Molecular cytogenetic dissection of human chromosomes 3 and 21 evolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, S.; Stanyon, R.; Finelli, P.; Archidiacono, N.; Wienberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome painting in placental mammalians illustrates that genome evolution is marked by chromosomal synteny conservation and that the association of chromosomes 3 and 21 may be the largest widely conserved syntenic block known for mammals. We studied intrachromosomal rearrangements of the syntenic block 3/21 by using probes derived from chromosomal subregions with a resolution of up to 10–15 Mbp. We demonstrate that the rearrangements visualized by chromosome painting, mostly translocations, are only a fraction of the actual chromosomal changes that have occurred during evolution. The ancestral segment order for both primates and carnivores is still found in some species in both orders. From the ancestral primate/carnivore condition an inversion is needed to derive the pig homolog, and a fission of chromosome 21 and a pericentric inversion is needed to derive the Bornean orangutan condition. Two overlapping inversions in the chromosome 3 homolog then would lead to the chromosome form found in humans and African apes. This reconstruction of the origin of human chromosome 3 contrasts with the generally accepted scenario derived from chromosome banding in which it was proposed that only one pericentric inversion was needed. From the ancestral form for Old World primates (now found in the Bornean orangutan) a pericentric inversion and centromere shift leads to the chromosome ancestral for all Old World monkeys. Intrachromosomal rearrangements, as shown here, make up a set of potentially plentiful and informative markers that can be used for phylogenetic reconstruction and a more refined comparative mapping of the genome. PMID:10618396

  14. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. ); Antonacci, R. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G.

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  16. The gene for human erythrocyte membrane protein band 7. 2 (EPB72) maps to 9q33-q34 centromeric to the Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Upender, M.; Ward, D.C.; Forget, B.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Erthrocyte band 7.2b is a 31-kDa integral phosphoprotein absent from the erythrocytes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt). HSt is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by mouth-shaped erythrocyte morphology on peripheral blood smears. The clinical severity of HSt is variable; some patients experience hemolysis and anemia while others are asymptomatic. The red cell membranes of these patients usually exhibit abnormal permeability to sodium and potassium with resultant modification of intracellular water content. The band 7.2b protein has been purified and the cDNA cloned. The approved gene name and symbol are erythrocyte membrane protein band 7.2 and EPB72, respectively, as assigned by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee. Using a human reticulocyte cDNA library as template, a 491-bp fragment corresponding to the 3' end of the coding region of the EPB72 cDNA was amplified. Three overlapping phase DNA clones were isolated using this probe. Four genomic DNA fragments of 2.0, 2.5, 4.5, and 5.0 kb, respectively, were isolated from these clones. To localize the EPB72 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization, these genomic DNA fragments were labeled with biotin-11-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes as described. Probes were preannealed to C[sub 0]t1-fractionated DNA to block repetitive sequences. Experiments were analyzed and digitally imaged using a cooled CCD camera. The probes, in combination, gave specific hybridization signals only in chromosome 9q. The gene for erythrocyte membrane protein 7.2 localized to 9q33-q34.

  17. Mapping of low-frequency chimeric yeast artificial chromosome libraries from human chromosomes 16 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Campbell, E.W.; Anzick, S.L.; Shera, K.; Campbell, M.; Yoshida, T.M.; McCormick, M.K.; Deaven, L. )

    1994-05-01

    Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones from low-frequency chimeric libraries of human chromosomes 16 and 21 were mapped onto human diploid fibroblast metaphase chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy. YACs mapped onto chromosome 21 were selected to provide subregional location and ordering of known and unknown markers on the long arm of chromosome 21, particularly in the Down syndrome region (q22). YACs mapped onto chromosome 16 were selected to overlap regions spanning chromosome 16 cosmid maps. YAC clones were indirectly labeled with fluorescein, and the total DNA of the chromosome was counterstained with propidium iodide. A single image containing both the FISH signal and the whole chromosome was acquired for each chromosome of interest containing the fluorescent probe signal in a metaphase spread. From the digitized image, the fluorescence intensity profile through the long axis of the chromosome gave the total chromosome length and the probe position. The map position of the probe was expressed as the fractional length (FL) of the total chromosome relative to the end of the short arm (Flpter). From each clone hybridized, 20-40 chromosome images were analyzed. Thirty-eight YACs were mapped onto chromosome 16, and their FLs were distributed along the short and long arms. On chromosome 21, 47 YACs were mapped, including 12 containing known markers. To confirm the order of a dense population of YACs within the Down syndrome region, a two-color mapping strategy was used in which an anonymous YAC was located relative to one or two known markers on the metaphase chromosome. The chromosome FL maps have a 1- to 2-Mb resolution, and the FL measurement of each probe has a typical standard error of 0.5-1 Mb. 14 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The gene for the serpin thrombin inhibitor (P17), protease nexin I, is located on human chromosome 2q33-q35 and on syntenic regions in the mouse and sheep genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.E.; Burkin, D.J.; Fournier, R.E.K.

    1995-05-01

    Protease nexin I (PNI) is the most important physiologic regulator of {alpha}-thrombin in tissues. PNI is highly expressed and developmentally regulated in the nervous system where it is concentrated at neuromuscular junctions and also central synapses in the hippocampus and striatum. Approximately 10% of identified proteins at mammalian neuromuscular junctions are serine protease inhibitors, consistent with their central role in balancing serine protease activity to develop, maintain, and remodel synapses. Southern blot hybridization of PNI cDNA to somatic cell hybrids placed the structural gene for PNI (locus PI7) on human chromosome 2q33-q35 and to syntenic chromosomes in the mouse (chromosome 1) and sheep (chromosome 2). 30 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Assignment of the gene for the core protein II (UQCRC2) subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc[sub 1] complex to human chromosome 16p12

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A.M.V. Kingston General Hospital ); Ozawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiroshi ); Rozen, R. Montreal Children's Hospital )

    1993-11-01

    The mammalian cytochrome be[sub 1] complex (complex III) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain catalyzes electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome c. The complex consists of 10-11 subunits: Core proteins I and II, cytochromes b and c[sub 1], the Rieske iron-sulfur protein, the ubiquinone-binding protein, the hinge protein, and 3-4 subunits of low molecular weight. Cytochrome b is encoded by the mitochondrial genome; the other subunits are encoded by nuclear genes. Both the human cytochrome c[sub 1] and the human ubiquinone-binding protein subunits have been assigned to chromosome 8 by somatic cell hybrid mapping. In this study, the authors used in situ hybridization to map core protein II. In situ hybridization to BrdU-synchronized peripheral blood lymphocytes was performed using the method of Harper and Saunders. Chromosomes were stained with a modified fluorescence, 0.25% Wright's stain procedure. The positions of silver grains directly over or touching well-banded metaphase chromosomes were mapped to an ISCN idiogram. The analysis of the distribution of 200 silver grams following in situ hybridization revealed a significant clustering of grains in the p12 region of chromosome 16. The assignment of the core II subunit to human chromosome 16p12 confirms that it is encoded by the nuclear, rather than the mitochondrial, genome. The identification of a single strong hybridization signal is indicative of one locus with no pseudogenes. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Cloning of human cDNAs for Apg-1 and Apg-2, members of the Hsp110 family, and chromosomal assignment of their genes.

    PubMed

    Nonoguchi, K; Itoh, K; Xue, J H; Tokuchi, H; Nishiyama, H; Kaneko, Y; Tatsumi, K; Okuno, H; Tomiwa, K; Fujita, J

    1999-09-01

    In mice, the Hsp110/SSE family is composed of the heat shock protein (Hsp)110/105, Apg-1 and Apg-2. In humans, however, only the Hsp110/105 homolog has been identified as a member, and two cDNAs, Hsp70RY and HS24/p52, potentially encoding proteins structurally similar to, but smaller than, mouse Apg-2 have been reported. To clarify the membership of Hsp110 family in humans, we isolated Apg-1 and Apg-2 cDNAs from a human testis cDNA library. The human Apg-1 was 100% and 91.8% identical in length and amino acid (aa) sequence, respectively, to mouse Apg-1. Human Apg-2 was one aa shorter than and 95.5% identical in sequence to mouse Apg-2. In ECV304, human endothelial cells Apg-1 but not Apg-2 transcripts were induced in 2 h by a temperature shift from 32 degrees C to 39 degrees C. As found in mice, the response was stronger than that to a 37-42 degrees C shift. The human Apg-1 and Apg-2 genes were mapped to the chromosomal loci 4q28 and 5q23.3-q31.1, respectively, by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. We isolated cDNA and genomic clones encompassing the region critical for the difference between Apg-2 and HS24/p52. Although the primer sets used were derived from the sequences common to both cDNAs, all cDNA and genomic clones corresponded to Apg-2. Using a similar approach, the relationship between Apg-2 and Hsp70RY was assessed, and no clone corresponding to Hsp70RY was obtained. These results demonstrated that the Hsp110 family consists of at least three members, Apg-1, Apg-2 and Hsp110 in humans as well as in mice. The significance of HS24/p52 and Hsp70RY cDNAs previously reported remains to be determined. PMID:10524232

  1. The construction of a physical map for human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.; Alleman, J.; Amemiya, C.; Ashworth, L.K.; Aslanidis, C.; Branscomb, E.W.; Combs, J.; Chen, C.; Christensen, M.; Copeland, A.; Fertitta, A.; Garcia, E.; de Jong, P.J.; Kwan, C.; Lamerdin, J.; Mohrenweiser, H.; Olsen, A.; Slezak, T.; Trask, B.; Tynan, K.

    1990-11-05

    Unlike a genetic map which provides information on the relative position of genes or markers based upon the frequency of genetic recombination, a physical map provides a topographical picture of DNA, i.e. distances in base pairs between landmarks. The landmarks may be genes, gene markers, anonymous sequences, or cloned DNA fragments. Perhaps the most useful type of physical map is one that consists of an overlapping set of cloned DNA fragments (contigs) that span the chromosome. Once genes are assigned to this contig map, sequencing of the genomic DNA can be prioritized to complete the most interesting regions first. While, in practice, complete coverage of a complex genome in recombinant clones may not be possible to achieve, many gaps in a clone map may be closed by using multiple cloning vectors or uncloned large DNA fragments such as those separated by electrophoretic methods. Human chromosome 19 contains about 60 million base pairs of DNA and represents about 2% of the haploid genome. Our initial interest in chromosome 19 originated from the presence of three DNA repair genes which we localized to a region of this chromosome. Our approach to constructing a physical map of human chromosome 19 involves four steps: building a foundation of overlapping cosmid contigs; bridging the gaps in the cosmid map with hybridization-based methods to walk onto DNA cloned in yeast and cosmids: orienting the contigs relative to each other and linking them to the cytological map; and coupling the contig map with the genetic map. The methods we use and the current status of the map are summarized in this report. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Organization of the human gene for nucleobindin (NUC) and its chromosomal assignment to 19q13.2-q13.4

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Keiji; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Momoki

    1996-06-01

    Nucleobindin (Nuc) was first identified as a secreted protein of 55 kDa that promotes production of DNA-specific antibodies in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice. Analysis of cDNA that encoded Nuc revealed that the protein is composed of a signal peptide, a DNA-binding site, two calcium-binding motifs (EF-hand motifs), and a leucine zipper. In the present study, we analysed the organization of the human gene for Nuc (NUC). It consists of 13 exons that are distributed in a region of 32 kb. The functional motifs listed above are encoded in corresponding exons. NUC was expressed in all organs examined. Comparison of nucleotide sequences in the promotre regions between human and mouse NCU genes revealed several conserved sequences. Among them, two Sp1-binding sites and a CCAAT box are of particular interest. The promoter is of the TATA-less type, and transcription starts at multiple sites in both the human and the mouse genes. These features suggest that NUC might normally play a role as a housekeeping gene. NUC was located at human chromosome 19q13.2-q13.4. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Linkage of Inflammatory Bowel Disease to Human Chromosome 6p

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Jochen; Shaw, Sarah H.; Saiz, Robert; Leysens, Nancy; Lantermann, Annette; Mascheretti, Silvia; Lynch, Nicholas J.; MacPherson, Andrew J. S.; Bridger, Stephen; van Deventer, Sander; Stokkers, Pieter; Morin, Phil; Mirza, Mudassar M.; Forbes, Alastair; Lennard-Jones, John E.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Curran, Mark E.; Schreiber, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    Summary Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by a chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. IBD is subdivided into Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis phenotypes. Given the immunologic dysregulation in IBD, the human-leukocyte-antigen region on chromosome 6p is of significant interest. Previous association and linkage analysis has provided conflicting evidence as to the existence of an IBD-susceptibility locus in this region. Here we report on a two-stage linkage and association analysis of both a basic population of 353 affected sibling pairs (ASPs) and an extension of this population to 428 white ASPs of northern European extraction. Twenty-eight microsatellite markers on chromosome 6 were genotyped. A peak multipoint LOD score of 4.2 was observed, at D6S461, for the IBD phenotype. A transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT) result of P=.006 was detected for D6S426 in the basic population and was confirmed in the extended cohort (P=.004; 97 vs. 56 transmissions). The subphenotypes of Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, and mixed IBD contributed equally to this linkage, suggesting a general role for the chromosome 6 locus in IBD. Analysis of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the TNFA and LTA genes did not reveal evidence for association of these important candidate genes with IBD. In summary, we provide firm linkage evidence for an IBD-susceptibility locus on chromosome 6p and demonstrate that TNFA and LTA are unlikely to be susceptibility loci for IBD. PMID:10577918

  4. Correlations between isochores and chromosomal bands in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, S.; Della Valle, G. ); De Sario, A.; Bernardi, G. ); Wiegant, J.; Raap, A.K. )

    1993-11-15

    The human genome is made up of long DNA segments, the isochores, which are compositionally homogeneous and can be subdivided into a small number of families characterized by different G+C levels. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridization (in which excess unlabeled human DNA is added to suppress hybridization of repeated sequences present in the probe, enabling enhanced observation of single-copy sequences) of DNA fractions characterized by an increasing G+C level was carried out to determine the distribution of [open quotes]single-copy[close quotes] sequences corresponding to isochore families L1 + L2, H1, H2, and H3 on metaphase chromosomes. This produced a banding pattern progressing from a relatively diffuse staining to an R-banding, to a T-banding. More specifically, the results showed that (i) T-bands are formed by the G+C-richest isochores of the H3 family and by part of the G+C-rich isochores of the H1 and H2 families (with a predominance of the latter); (ii) R[prime]-bands (namely, R-bands exclusive of T-bands) are formed to almost equal extents by G+C-rich isochores of the H1 families (with a minor contribution of the H2 and H3 families) and by G+C-poor isochores of the L1 + L2 families; (iii) G-bands essentially consist of G+C-poor isochores from the L1 + L2 families, with a minor contribution of isochores from the H1 family. These results not only clarify the correlations between DNA base composition and chromosomal bands but also provide information on the distribution of genes in chromosomes, gene concentration increasing with the G+C levels of isochores.

  5. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C.; Keith, T.P.

    1995-01-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-averaged map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM, and the female map length is 197 cM. The map covers virtually the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map. 39 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Cloning and characterization of Rep-8 (D8S2298E) in the human chromosome 8p11.2-p12

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Yukako; Ichikawa, Koji; Sugawara, Kahori

    1997-01-15

    A novel human gene referred to as the Rep-8 gene (D8S2298E) was cloned by a combination of exon trapping, thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR, and screening of a cDNA library. It is located in human chromosome 8p.11.2-p12. The gene consists of eight exons and spans about 20 kb between the glutathione S-reductase and the protein phosphatase 2A beta subunit genes. The full-length Rep-8 gene contains 1483 nucleotides and codes for a protein of 270 amino acids. Southern blot experiments showed that the Rep-8 gene exists as a single copy per haploid. With a zoo blot analysis, human Rep-8 DNA hybridized strongly with the monkey DNA, but only weakly with the DNAs of species other than Homo sapiens. Northern blot analysis showed that it is expressed abundantly in the testis and ovary, suggesting that the Rep-8 gene product may play a role in reproduction. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Assignment of the lactotransferrin gene to human chromosome 3 and to mouse chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T; Pentecost, B T; Marshall, A; Solomon, A; Bowman, B H; Lalley, P A; Naylor, S L

    1987-11-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family of genes, is the major iron-binding protein in milk and body secretions. The amino acid sequence of LTF consists of two homologous domains homologous to proteins in the transferrin family. Recent isolation of cDNA encoding mouse LTF has expedited the mapping of both mouse and human LTF genes. Southern blot analysis of DNA from mouse-Chinese hamster and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids maps the LTF gene to mouse chromosome 9 and to human chromosome 3, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of cell hybrids containing defined segments of human chromosome 3 demonstrates that the gene is located in the 3q21-qter region. These results suggest that LTF and associated genes of the transferrin family have existed together on the same chromosomal region for 300-500 million years. PMID:3478818

  8. Selection of chromosome 22-specific clones from human genomic BAC library using a chromosome-specific cosmid library pool

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, U.J.; Shizuya, H.; Birren, B.

    1994-07-15

    A new approach to rapidly identify chromosome-specific subsets of clones from a total human genomic library is described. The authors report here the results of screening a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library using the total pool of clones from a chromosome 22-specific cosmid library as a composite probe. The human BAC library was gridded on filters at high density and hybridized with DNA from the pooled chromosome 22-specific Lawrist library under suppressive conditions. In a single hybridization, they picked 280 candidates from the BAC library representing over 30,000 clones (or 1.2 x coverage of human genome). This subset contained more than 60% of the chromosome 22-specific BAC clones that were previously found to be present in the original BAC library. In principle, this approach can be applied to select a subset of clones from other global libraries with relatively large inserts using a pool from a regional library as a composite probe. It is important to note that the target and probe libraries must be based on vectors that share no homology with each other. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  10. Isolation and refined regional mapping of expressed sequences from human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, F.T.; Yu, J.; Patterson, D.

    1994-10-01

    To increase candidate genes from human chromosome 21 for the analysis of Down syndrome and other genetic diseases localized on this chromosome, we have isolated and studied 9 cDNA clones encoded by chromosome 21. For isolating cDNAs, single-copy microclones from a chromosome 21 microdissection library were used in direct screening of various cDNA libraries. Seven of the cDNA clones have been regionally mapped on chromosome 21 using a comprehensive hybrid mapping panel comprising 24 cell hybrids that divide the chromosome into 33 subregions. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions should be useful for identification and cloning of genes responsible for the specific component phenotypes of Down syndrome and other diseases on chromosome 21, including progressive myoclonus epilepsy in 21q22.3. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Human chromosome 21/Down syndrome gene function and pathway database.

    PubMed

    Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Nguyen, Cao; Crinc, Linda S; Cios, Krzysztof J; Gardiner, Katheleen

    2005-12-30

    Down syndrome, trisomy of human chromosome 21, is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. Correlating the increased expression, due to gene dosage, of the >300 genes encoded by chromosome 21 with specific phenotypic features is a goal that becomes more feasible with the increasing availability of large scale functional, expression and evolutionary data. These data are dispersed among diverse databases, and the variety of formats and locations, plus their often rapid growth, makes access and assimilation a daunting task. To aid the Down syndrome and chromosome 21 community, and researchers interested in the study of any chromosome 21 gene or ortholog, we are developing a comprehensive chromosome 21-specific database with the goals of (i) data consolidation, (ii) accuracy and completeness through expert curation, and (iii) facilitation of novel hypothesis generation. Here we describe the current status of data collection and the immediate future plans for this first human chromosome-specific database. PMID:16310977

  12. Autosomal ring chromosomes in human genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ring chromosomes arise following breakage and rejoining in both chromosome arms. They are heterogeneous with variable size and genetic content and can originate from any chromosome. Phenotypes associated with ring chromosomes are highly variable as apart from any deletion caused by ring formation, imbalances from ring instability can also occur. Of interest is ring chromosome 20 which has a significant association with epilepsy with seizure onset in early childhood. Severe growth deficiency without major malformations is a common finding in the ring chromosome carrier. This phenotype associated with ring behaviour and mitotic instability and independent of the chromosome involved has been termed the “ring syndrome”. Precise genotype-phenotype correlations for ring chromosomes may not be possible as influencing factors vary depending on the extent of deletion in ring formation, ring instability and the level of mosaicism. Although ring chromosomes usually arise as de novo events, familial transmission of rings from carrier to offspring has been described and prenatal diagnosis for any pregnancies should always be considered. PMID:26835370

  13. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2015-01-01

    Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition) with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT), such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men. PMID:25814157

  14. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2015-01-01

    Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition) with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT), such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men. PMID:25814157

  15. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Sutherland, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    A Centre d`Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium map of human chromosome 16 has been constructed. The map contains 158 loci defined by 191 different probe/restriction enzyme combinations or primer pairs. The marker genotypes, contributed by 9 collaborating laboratories, originated from the CEPH families DNA. A total of 60 loci, with an average heterozygosity of 68%, have been placed on the framework genetic map. The genetic map contains 7 genes. The length of the sex-average map is 165 cM, with a mean genetic distance between loci of 2.8 cM; the median distance between markers is 2.0 cM. The male map length is 136 cM and the female map length is 197 cM. The map virtually covers the entire chromosome, from D16S85, within 170 to 430 Kb of the 16p telomere, to D16S303 at 16qter. The markers included in the linkage map have been physically mapped on a partial human chromosome 16 somatic cell hybrid panel, thus anchoring the genetic map to the cytogenetic-based physical map.

  16. Chromosomal localization of the human vesicular amine transporter genes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, D.; Finn, P.; Liu, Y.; Roghani, A.; Edwards, R.H.; Klisak, I.; Kojis, T.; Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S. )

    1993-12-01

    The physiologic and behavioral effects of pharmacologic agents that interfere with the transport of monoamine neurotransmitters into vesicles suggest that vesicular amine transport may contribute to human neuropsychiatric disease. To determine whether an alteration in the genes that encode vesicular amine transport contributes to the inherited component of these disorders, the authors have isolated a human cDNA for the brain transporter and localized the human vesciular amine transporter genes. The human brain synaptic vesicle amine transporter (SVAT) shows unexpected conservation with rat SVAT in the regions that diverge extensively between rat SVAT and the rat adrenal chromaffin granule amine transporter (CGAT). Using the cloned sequences with a panel of mouse-human hybrids and in situ hybridization for regional localization, the adrenal CGAT gene (or VAT1) maps to human chromosome 8p21.3 and the brain SVAT gene (or VAT2) maps to chromosome 10q25. Both of these sites occur very close to if not within previously described deletions that produce severe but viable phenotypes. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cosmid clones derived from both euchromatic and heterochromatic regions of the human Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, J; Erickson, R P; Rigby, P W; Goodfellow, P N

    1984-01-01

    Clones containing sequences derived from the human Y chromosome have been isolated from cosmid libraries of a human-mouse hybrid cell line. These libraries were constructed in the new expression vectors Homer V and Homer VI. The collection of cosmids isolated is enriched for unique sequence DNA and only a few of the cosmids contain the tandemly repeated sequences which constitute a major portion of the Y chromosome. Three cosmids have been studied in detail. One cosmid shows extensive homology over at least 20 kb with the long arm of the X chromosome; this homology is outside the predicted homology region required for sex chromosome pairing. The other two clones contain unique sequences specific to the Y chromosome and both map to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome long arm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:6092051

  18. Chromosome breakage after G2 checkpoint release

    PubMed Central

    Deckbar, Dorothee; Birraux, Julie; Krempler, Andrea; Tchouandong, Leopoldine; Beucher, Andrea; Walker, Sarah; Stiff, Tom; Jeggo, Penny; Löbrich, Markus

    2007-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and checkpoint control represent distinct mechanisms to reduce chromosomal instability. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells have checkpoint arrest and DSB repair defects. We examine the efficiency and interplay of ATM's G2 checkpoint and repair functions. Artemis cells manifest a repair defect identical and epistatic to A-T but show proficient checkpoint responses. Only a few G2 cells enter mitosis within 4 h after irradiation with 1 Gy but manifest multiple chromosome breaks. Most checkpoint-proficient cells arrest at the G2/M checkpoint, with the length of arrest being dependent on the repair capacity. Strikingly, cells released from checkpoint arrest display one to two chromosome breaks. This represents a major contribution to chromosome breakage. The presence of chromosome breaks in cells released from checkpoint arrest suggests that release occurs before the completion of DSB repair. Strikingly, we show that checkpoint release occurs at a point when approximately three to four premature chromosome condensation breaks and ∼20 γH2AX foci remain. PMID:17353355

  19. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development

  20. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents. PMID:16541075

  1. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  2. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  4. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage. PMID:25637223

  5. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  6. A functional AT/G polymorphism in the 5'-untranslated region of SETDB2 in the IgE locus on human chromosome 13q14.

    PubMed

    Holt, R J; Vandiedonck, C; Willis-Owen, S A; Knight, J C; Cookson, W O; Moffatt, M F; Zhang, Y

    2015-10-01

    The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated locus on human chromosome 13q14 influencing asthma-related traits contains the genes PHF11 and SETDB2. SETDB2 is located in the same linkage disequilibrium region as PHF11 and polymorphisms within SETDB2 have been shown to associate with total serum IgE levels. In this report, we sequenced the 15 exons of SETDB2 and identified a single previously ungenotyped mutation (AT/G, rs386770867) in the 5'-untranslated region of the gene. The polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with serum IgE levels in our asthma cohort (P=0.0012). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the transcription factor Ying Yang 1 binds to the AT allele, whereas SRY (Sex determining Region Y) binds to the G allele. Allele-specific transcription analysis (allelotyping) was performed in 35 individuals heterozygous for rs386770867 from a panel of 200 British families ascertained through probands with severe stage 3 asthma. The AT allele was found to be significantly overexpressed in these individuals (P=1.26×10(-21)). A dual-luciferase assay with the pGL3 luciferase reporter gene showed that the AT allele significantly affects transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that the IgE-associated AT/G polymorphism (rs386770867) regulates transcription of SETDB2. PMID:26378653

  7. A functional AT/G polymorphism in the 5′-untranslated region of SETDB2 in the IgE locus on human chromosome 13q14

    PubMed Central

    Holt, R J; Vandiedonck, C; Willis-Owen, S A; Knight, J C; Cookson, W O; Moffatt, M F; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin E (IgE)-associated locus on human chromosome 13q14 influencing asthma-related traits contains the genes PHF11 and SETDB2. SETDB2 is located in the same linkage disequilibrium region as PHF11 and polymorphisms within SETDB2 have been shown to associate with total serum IgE levels. In this report, we sequenced the 15 exons of SETDB2 and identified a single previously ungenotyped mutation (AT/G, rs386770867) in the 5′-untranslated region of the gene. The polymorphism was found to be significantly associated with serum IgE levels in our asthma cohort (P=0.0012). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the transcription factor Ying Yang 1 binds to the AT allele, whereas SRY (Sex determining Region Y) binds to the G allele. Allele-specific transcription analysis (allelotyping) was performed in 35 individuals heterozygous for rs386770867 from a panel of 200 British families ascertained through probands with severe stage 3 asthma. The AT allele was found to be significantly overexpressed in these individuals (P=1.26 × 10−21). A dual-luciferase assay with the pGL3 luciferase reporter gene showed that the AT allele significantly affects transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that the IgE-associated AT/G polymorphism (rs386770867) regulates transcription of SETDB2. PMID:26378653

  8. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, T; Geller, R L; Yen, P H; Rosendorff, J; Bernstein, R; Yoshida, A; Shapiro, L J

    1987-07-01

    A pericentric inversion of a human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome [rec(X)] derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3----Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3----Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter----Xq26.3::Xp22.3----Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3----qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state. PMID:3474636

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, T; Geller, R L; Yen, P H; Rosendorff, J; Bernstein, R; Yoshida, A; Shapiro, L J

    1987-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of a human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome [rec(X)] derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3----Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3----Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter----Xq26.3::Xp22.3----Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3----qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state. Images PMID:3474636

  10. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on a recombinant human X chromosome: implications for the spreading of X chromosome inactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.; Geller, R.L.; Yen, P.H.; Rosendorff, J.; Bernstein, R.; Yoshida, A.; Shapiro, L.J.

    1987-07-01

    A pericentric inversion of human X chromosome and a recombinant X chromosome (rec(X)) derived from crossing-over within the inversion was identified in a family. The rec(X) had a duplication of the segment Xq26.3 ..-->.. Xqter and a deletion of Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xpter and was interpreted to be Xqter ..-->.. Xq26.3::Xp22.3 ..-->.. Xqter. To characterize the rec(X) chromosome, dosage blots were done on genomic DNA from carriers of this rearranged X chromosome using a number of X chromosome probes. Results showed that anonymous sequences from the distal end of the long arm to which probes 4D8, Hx120A, DX13, and St14 bind as well as the locus for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) wee duplicated on the rec(X). Mouse-human cell hybrids were constructed that retained the rec(X) in the active or inactive state. Analyses of these hybrid clones for markers from the distal short arm of the X chromosome showed that the rec(X) retained the loci for steroid sulfatase (STS) and the cell surface antigen 12E7 (MIC2); but not the pseudoautosomal sequence 113D. These molecular studies confirm that the rec(X) is a duplication-deficiency chromosome as expected. In the inactive state in cell hybrids, STS and MIC2 (which usually escape X chromosome inactivation) were expressed from the rec(X), whereas G6PD was not. Therefore, in the rec(X) X chromosome inactivation has spread through STS and MIC2 leaving these loci unaffected and has inactivated G6PD in the absence of an inactivation center in the q26.3 ..-->.. qter region of the human X chromosome. The mechanism of spreading of inactivation appears to operate in a sequence-specific fashion. Alternatively, STS and MIC2 may have undergone inactivation initially but could not be maintained in an inactive state.

  11. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Mapping of aldose reductase gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, and 13

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, J.B.; Kojis, T. UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA ); Heinzmann, C.; Sparkes, R.S.; Klisak, I.; Diep, A. ); Carper, D. ); Nishimura, Chihiro ); Mohandas, T. )

    1993-09-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NAD(P)+ 1-oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.21) (AR) catalyzes the reduction of several aldehydes, including that of glucose, to the corresponding sugar alcohol. Using a complementary DNA clone encoding human AR, the authors mapped the gene sequences to human chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 18 by somatic cell hybridization. By in situ hybridization analysis, sequences were localized to human chromosomes 1q32-q43, 3p12, 7q31-q35, 9q22, 11p14-p15, and 13q14-q21. As a putative functional AR gene has been mapped to chromosome 7 and a putative pseudogene to chromosome 3, the sequences on the other seven chromosomes may represent other active genes, non-aldose reductase homologous sequences, or pseudogenes. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O.; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  15. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  16. Cloning and chromosomal localization of the three human syntrophin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Feener, C.A.; Anderson, M.D.S.; Selig, S.

    1994-09-01

    Dystrophin, the protein product the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus, is normally found to be associated with a complex of proteins. Among these dystrophin-associated proteins are the syntrophins, a group of 59 kDa membrane-associated proteins. When the syntrophins are purified based upon their association with dystrophin, they have been shown previously to form two distinct groups, the acidic ({alpha}) and basic ({beta}) forms. Based on peptide and rodent cDNA sequences, three separate syntrophin genes have been cloned and characterized from human tissues. The predicted amino acid sequences from these cDNA reveal that these proteins are related but are distinct with respect to charge, as predicted from their biochemistry. The family consists of one acidic ({alpha}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-1) and two basic ({beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin; and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin, analogous to mouse syntrophin-2) genes. Each of the three genes are widely expressed in a variety of human tissues, but the relative abundance of the three are unique with respect to each other. {alpha}-syntrophin is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle and heart as a single transcript. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin is expressed widely in up to five distinct transcript sizes, and is most abundant in brain. The human chromosomal locations of the three syntrophins are currently being mapped. {beta}{sub 1}-syntrophin maps to chromosome 8q23-24 and {beta}{sub 2}-syntrophin to chromosome 16. The {alpha}-syntrophin gene will be mapped accordingly. Although all three genes are candidates for neuromuscular diseases, the predominant expression of {alpha}-syntrophin in skeletal muscle and heart makes it a strong candidate to be involved in a neuromuscular disease.

  17. Mapping of guanylin to murine chromosome 4 and human chromosome 1p34-p35

    SciTech Connect

    Sciaky, D.; Cohen, M.B.; Jenkins, N.A.

    1995-03-20

    Guanylin is a 15-amino-acid peptide similar in structure and in function to ST{sub a}, the heat stable enterotoxin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (4). Both guanylin and ST{sub a} bind guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased levels of intracellular cGMP and induction of Cl- secretion (4) via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFM) (2). Guanylin is a highly regulated intestinal gene that is differentially expressed along the duodenal-to-colonic and villus-to-crypt axes. Guanylin mRNA abundance is maximal in the distal small intestine and proximal colon, where the mRNA is detected mainly in differentiated villus epithelial cells and superficial colonic epithelial cells, respectively. The murine guanylin gene (Guca2) has been isolated and sequenced; the gene is 1.7 kb and consists of 3 exons. We report here the mapping of Guca2 to mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis and to human chromosome region 1p34-p35 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Chromosomal duplications in bacteria, fruit flies, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lupski, J.R.; Weinstock, G.M.; Roth, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tandem duplication of chromosomal segments has been recognized as a frequent mutational mechanism in several genetic model systems. In bacteria, fruit flies, and humans, duplications form by similar molecular mechanisms and appear to be important in genome evolution. 80 refs.

  19. The third international workshop of human chromosome 5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Third International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Laguna Beach, California, March 5-8, 1994. The pace at which new mapping information has been published in the last year make almost any report outdated before publication. Much of the information in this report and the most recent data from the Human chromosome 5 Genome Center at U.C. Irvine on the physical map of chromosome 5 are accessible via a WWW server. For most loci referred to in this report that can be detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, the sequences of the oligonucleotide primers are available and some primer sequences are provided in this report.

  20. Report of the fourth international workshop on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Delabar, J.M.; Creau, N.; Sinet, P.M. ); Ritter, O. ); Antonarakis, S.E. ); Burmeister, M. ); Chakravarti, A. ); Nizetic, D. ); Ohki, M. ); Patterson, D. )

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes progress toward completing the mapping of human chromosome 21, as presented and discussed at the Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 21. The overall goal of the workshop was to use both previous and new data to construct the genetic linkage map, the pulsed-field macrorestriction map, the YAC, cosmid, and P1 maps, and the gene and clinical disorders maps. Because of the large amount of mapping data now available on chromosome 21, a special effort was made to integrate all mapping information.

  1. Structure of the human gene encoding sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBF1) and localization of SREBF1 and SREBF2 to chromosomes 17p11.2 and 22q13

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, X.; Wu, J.; Goldstein, J.L.

    1995-02-10

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) and SREBP2 are structurally related proteins that control cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating transcription of sterol-regulated genes, including those encoding the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase. SREBP1 and SREBP2 are 47% identical, and they share a novel structure comprising a transcriptionally active NH{sub 2}-terminal basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) domain followed by a membrane attachment domain. Cleavage by a sterol-regulated protease frees the bHLH-Zip domain from the membrane and allows it to enter the nucleus. SREBP1 exists in several forms, possibly as a result of alternative splicing at both the 5{prime} and the 3{prime} ends of the mRNA. The genes for SREBP1 (SREBF1) and SREBP2 (SREBF2) have not been studied. In this paper we describe the cloning and characterization of the human SREBF1 gene. The gene is 26 kb in length and has 22 exons and 20 introns. The 5{prime} and 3{prime} sequences that differ between the two SREBP1 cDNAs are encoded by discrete exons, conforming the hypothesis that they result from alternative splicing. The chromosomal locations of human SREBF1 and SREBF2 were determined by analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The SREBF1 gene mapped to the proximal short arm of chromosome 17 (17p11.2), and the SREBF2 gene was localized to the long arm of chromosome 22 (22q13). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Measurement and purification of human chromosomes by flow cytometry and sorting.

    PubMed Central

    Carrano, A V; Gray, J W; Langlois, R G; Burkhart-Schultz, K J; Van Dilla, M A

    1979-01-01

    The 24 human chromosome types of normal diploid fibroblast cell strain were classified into 15 groups by high-resolution flow cytometry on the basis of 33258 Hoechst fluorescence. Chromosomes associated with each group were flow sorted onto microscope slides and identified by quinacrine banding analysis. DNA cytophotometry of metaphase chromosomes from the same cell strain supported and extended this identification. Four of the groups purified were due to chromosomes of a single type--namely, chromosomes 5, 6, 13, and 17. Eight additional groups were also separated and found to contain the following chromosomes: 1 and 2; 3 and 4; 7, 8, and X; 9--12; 14 and 15; 16 and 18; 20 and Y; and 19, 21, and 22. The average purity for the 12 sorted fractions was 78%. PMID:286320

  3. A Chromosome 8 Gene-Cluster Polymorphism with Low Human Beta-Defensin 2 Gene Copy Number Predisposes to Crohn Disease of the Colon

    PubMed Central

    Fellermann, Klaus; Stange, Daniel E.; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schmalzl, Hartmut; Wehkamp, Jan; Bevins, Charles L.; Reinisch, Walter; Teml, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Stange, Eduard F.

    2006-01-01

    Defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides that protect the intestinal mucosa against bacterial invasion. It has been suggested that deficient defensin expression may underlie the chronic inflammation of Crohn disease (CD). The DNA copy number of the beta-defensin gene cluster on chromosome 8p23.1 is highly polymorphic within the healthy population, which suggests that the defective beta-defensin induction in colonic CD could be due to low beta-defensin–gene copy number. Here, we tested this hypothesis, using genomewide DNA copy number profiling by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction analysis of the human beta-defensin 2 (HBD-2) gene. We showed that healthy individuals, as well as patients with ulcerative colitis, have a median of 4 (range 2–10) HBD-2 gene copies per genome. In a surgical cohort with ileal or colonic CD and in a second large cohort with inflammatory bowel diseases, those with ileal resections/disease exhibited a normal median HBD-2 copy number of 4, whereas those with colonic CD had a median of only 3 copies per genome (P=.008 for the surgical cohort; P=.032 for the second cohort). Overall, the copy number distribution in colonic CD was shifted to lower numbers compared with controls (P=.002 for both the surgical cohort and the cohort with inflammatory bowel diseases). Individuals with ⩽3 copies have a significantly higher risk of developing colonic CD than did individuals with ⩾4 copies (odds ratio 3.06; 95% confidence interval 1.46–6.45). An HBD-2 gene copy number of <4 was associated with diminished mucosal HBD-2 mRNA expression (P=.033). In conclusion, a lower HBD-2 gene copy number in the beta-defensin locus predisposes to colonic CD, most likely through diminished beta-defensin expression. PMID:16909382

  4. Physical mapping of human chromosome segment 9q34

    SciTech Connect

    Cutone, S.; Turner, A.; Rutter, M.

    1994-09-01

    A high resolution physical map of the {approximately}15 Mb that constitute human chromosome region 9q34 is being constructed. YACs have been identified with 138 9q34 markers including 40 genetic markers (STS, SSR), 8 known genes and 90 exons isolated from cosmids localized to 9q34 by FISH or localized to 9q34 by hybridization to somatic cell hybrid mapping panels. In addition, Alu-PCR products (62) and end clones (29) from 9q34 YACs have been utilized to identify additional overlapping clones in the region. A total of 229 markers have identified 257 YACs (62 unique and 195 redundant) that have been organized into 41 contigs and cover > 12 Mb of this region. Fifteen of these contigs are sub-localized within 9q34 based on the presence of a genetic marker, and 26 contigs are localized only to 9q34 based on the origin of the marker they contain. The location of these contigs in 9q34 is being independently confirmed by FISH of YAC Alu-PCR products. Contig extension is being pursued through hybridization of individual YAC Alu-PCR products to Alu-PCR products of clones in a chromosome 9 YAC library and by chromosome walking from YAC end clones. This has resulted in the extension of 14 contigs and the reduction of 5 smaller contigs to 2 larger contigs. In addition, a 1.7 Mb complete, overlapping contig has been constructed in the TSC1 candidate region. It is anticipated that a cloned physical map of 9q34 will aid in the identification of this and other disease genes localized to this chromosome segment.

  5. Characterization of the human gene for microfibril-associated glycoprotein (MFAP2), assignment to chromosome 1p36.1-p35, and linkage to D1S170

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Bashir, M.; Rosenbloom, J.

    1995-02-10

    Microfibril-associated glycoprotein, MAGP (gene symbol MFAP2), is a component of connective tissue microfibrils and a candidate for involvement in the etiology of inherited connective tissue diseases. We have cloned a human MAGP cDNA that is highly homologous to the previously characterized bovine and murine genes. Like the bovine and murine loci, the human gene has eight coding exons, but it contains two alternatively used 5{prime} untranslated exons, whereas only one untranslated exon was described in the bovine and murine Magp genes. By using rodent x human somatic cell hybrid panels and fluorescence chromosomal in situ hybridization, we have assigned the locus to human chromosome 1p36.1-p35. An insertion/ deletion polymorphism has been identified within intron 7. Linkage analysis between this polymorphism and markers on distal chromosome 1 revealed that MAGP is tightly linked to the anonymous marker D1S170. Physical mapping revealed a distance of <100 kb between the two markers. This information can be used to screen for linkage in families with microfibrillar abnormalities that are not linked to the fibrillin genes on chromosomes 15 or 5. 24 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  7. Physical mapping of 43 STSs to human chromosome 6

    SciTech Connect

    Orphanos, V.; Santibanez-Koref, M.; McGown, G.; Hey, Y.; Rackstraw, C.; Boyle, J.M. )

    1994-03-15

    The authors have localized 43 sequence-tagged sites by deletion mapping using a chromosome 6 panel of 18 translocation hybrids. Thirty-four loci were mapped to the long arm of chromosome 6, and 9 were mapped to 6p. Many of the loci contain (CA)[sub n], dinucleotide repeated sequences and therefore will be useful markers for mapping genes on chromosome 6. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1991-01-01

    We have made important progress since the beginning of the current grant year. We have further developed the microdissection and PCR- assisted microcloning techniques using the linker-adaptor method. We have critically evaluated the microdissection libraries constructed by this microtechnology and proved that they are of high quality. We further demonstrated that these microdissection clones are useful in identifying corresponding YAC clones for a thousand-fold expansion of the genomic coverage and for contig construction. We are also improving the technique of cloning the dissected fragments in test tube by the TDT method. We are applying both of these PCR cloning technique to human chromosomes 2 and 5 to construct region-specific libraries for physical mapping purposes of LLNL and LANL. Finally, we are exploring efficient procedures to use unique sequence microclones to isolate cDNA clones from defined chromosomal regions as valuable resources for identifying expressed gene sequences in the human genome. We believe that we are making important progress under the auspices of this DOE human genome program grant and we will continue to make significant contributions in the coming year. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Antibody-based Protein Profiling of the Human Chromosome 21*

    PubMed Central

    Uhlén, Mathias; Oksvold, Per; Älgenäs, Cajsa; Hamsten, Carl; Fagerberg, Linn; Klevebring, Daniel; Lundberg, Emma; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Kondo, Tadashi; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    The Human Proteome Project has been proposed to create a knowledge-based resource based on a systematical mapping of all human proteins, chromosome by chromosome, in a gene-centric manner. With this background, we here describe the systematic analysis of chromosome 21 using an antibody-based approach for protein profiling using both confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, complemented with transcript profiling using next generation sequencing data. We also describe a new approach for protein isoform analysis using a combination of antibody-based probing and isoelectric focusing. The analysis has identified several genes on chromosome 21 with no previous evidence on the protein level, and the isoform analysis indicates that a large fraction of human proteins have multiple isoforms. A chromosome-wide matrix is presented with status for all chromosome 21 genes regarding subcellular localization, tissue distribution, and molecular characterization of the corresponding proteins. The path to generate a chromosome-specific resource, including integrated data from complementary assay platforms, such as mass spectrometry and gene tagging analysis, is discussed. PMID:22042635

  10. Assignment of the Gene for Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Human Chromosome 16 by Mouse-Human Somatic Cell Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Tischfield, Jay A.; Ruddle, Frank H.

    1974-01-01

    A series of mouse-human hybrids was prepared from mouse cells deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.7) and normal human cells. The hybrids were made in medium containing adenine and alanosine, an antimetabolite known to inhibit de novo adenylic acid biosynthesis. The mouse cells, unable to utilize exogenous adenine, were killed in this medium, but the hybrids proliferated as a consequence of their retaining the human aprt gene. The hybrids were then exposed to the adenine analogs 2,6-diaminopurine and 2-fluoroadenine to select for cells that had lost this gene. Before exposure to the adenine analogs, the expression of human adenine phosphoribosyltransferase by the hybrids was strongly associated only with the presence of human chromosome 16, and afterwards this was the only human chromosome consistently lost. This observation suggests that the human aprt gene can be assigned to chromosome 16. Images PMID:4129802

  11. The human alpha 2(IV) collagen gene, COL4A2, is syntenic with the alpha 1(IV) gene, COL4A1, on chromosome 13.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E; Hall, V; Kurkinen, M

    1987-05-01

    We have previously assigned the gene for the alpha 1 chain of type IV collagen to chromosome 13. In this report we show that the gene coding for the second chain of this heterotrimer is on the same chromosome. This is the first example of the genes for both chains of one collagen molecule being syntenic. PMID:3674752

  12. A 6. 5-Mb yeast artificial chromosome contig incorporating 33 DNA markers on the human X chromosome at Xq22

    SciTech Connect

    Vetrie, D.; Kendall, E.; Coffey, A.; Hassock, S.; Collins, J.; Todd, C.; Bobrow, M.; Bentley, D.R. ); Lehrach, H. ); Harris, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The Xq22 region of the human X chromosome contains genes for a number of inherited disorders. Sixty-nine yeast artificial chromosome clones have been isolated and assembled into a 6.5-Mb contig that contains 33 DNA markers localized to this region. This contig extends distally from DXS366 to beyond DXS87 and includes the genes involved in X-linked agammaglobulinemia (btk), Fabry disease (GLA), and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP). The order of markers in this contig is consistent with the known genetic and physical mapping information of Xq22. This cloned material provides a source from which to isolate other genes located in this part of the X chromosome. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Physical mapping of the human glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase gene (GFPT) to chromosome 2p13

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, T.E.; Mudri, S.L.; McKnight, G.L.

    1995-03-20

    Diabetic hyperglycemia influences insulin resistance through a process termed glucose toxicity. Implicated as a source of the mediators of this toxicity is an increased intracellular glucose metabolism through the hexosamine pathway. The hexosamine pathway itself is controlled by the rate-limiting enzyme glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT), which is the first enzyme of the pathway. It has been shown that there is a close correlation between the glucose-mediated reduction of GFAT activity and the onset of insulin desensitization of the glucose transport system, a condition associated with insulin-resistant states of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and obesity. To gain a better understanding of the molecular regulation of GFAT and its role in the induction of insulin resistance, we previously isolated and cloned the cDNA for the human form of this enzyme and expressed the functional protein in Escherichia coli. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Genetic Diversity on the Human X Chromosome Does Not Support a Strict Pseudoautosomal Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Daniel J.; Brotman, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the autosomes, recombination between the X chromosome and the Y chromosome is often thought to be constrained to two small pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) at the tips of each sex chromosome. PAR1 spans the first 2.7 Mb of the proximal arm of the human sex chromosomes, whereas the much smaller PAR2 encompasses the distal 320 kb of the long arm of each sex chromosome. In addition to PAR1 and PAR2, there is a human-specific X-transposed region that was duplicated from the X to the Y chromosome. The X-transposed region is often not excluded from X-specific analyses, unlike the PARs, because it is not thought to routinely recombine. Genetic diversity is expected to be higher in recombining regions than in nonrecombining regions because recombination reduces the effect of linked selection. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity in noncoding regions across the entire X chromosome of a global sample of 26 unrelated genetic females. We found that genetic diversity in PAR1 is significantly greater than in the nonrecombining regions (nonPARs). However, rather than an abrupt drop in diversity at the pseudoautosomal boundary, there is a gradual reduction in diversity from the recombining through the nonrecombining regions, suggesting that recombination between the human sex chromosomes spans across the currently defined pseudoautosomal boundary. A consequence of recombination spanning this boundary potentially includes increasing the rate of sex-linked disorders (e.g., de la Chapelle) and sex chromosome aneuploidies. In contrast, diversity in PAR2 is not significantly elevated compared to the nonPARs, suggesting that recombination is not obligatory in PAR2. Finally, diversity in the X-transposed region is higher than in the surrounding nonPARs, providing evidence that recombination may occur with some frequency between the X and Y chromosomes in the X-transposed region. PMID:27010023

  15. Genetic Diversity on the Human X Chromosome Does Not Support a Strict Pseudoautosomal Boundary.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Daniel J; Brotman, Sarah M; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A

    2016-05-01

    Unlike the autosomes, recombination between the X chromosome and the Y chromosome is often thought to be constrained to two small pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) at the tips of each sex chromosome. PAR1 spans the first 2.7 Mb of the proximal arm of the human sex chromosomes, whereas the much smaller PAR2 encompasses the distal 320 kb of the long arm of each sex chromosome. In addition to PAR1 and PAR2, there is a human-specific X-transposed region that was duplicated from the X to the Y chromosome. The X-transposed region is often not excluded from X-specific analyses, unlike the PARs, because it is not thought to routinely recombine. Genetic diversity is expected to be higher in recombining regions than in nonrecombining regions because recombination reduces the effect of linked selection. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity in noncoding regions across the entire X chromosome of a global sample of 26 unrelated genetic females. We found that genetic diversity in PAR1 is significantly greater than in the nonrecombining regions (nonPARs). However, rather than an abrupt drop in diversity at the pseudoautosomal boundary, there is a gradual reduction in diversity from the recombining through the nonrecombining regions, suggesting that recombination between the human sex chromosomes spans across the currently defined pseudoautosomal boundary. A consequence of recombination spanning this boundary potentially includes increasing the rate of sex-linked disorders (e.g., de la Chapelle) and sex chromosome aneuploidies. In contrast, diversity in PAR2 is not significantly elevated compared to the nonPARs, suggesting that recombination is not obligatory in PAR2. Finally, diversity in the X-transposed region is higher than in the surrounding nonPARs, providing evidence that recombination may occur with some frequency between the X and Y chromosomes in the X-transposed region. PMID:27010023

  16. Human Chromosome 21: Mapping of the chromosomes and cloning of cDNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Antonarakis, S.E.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the research funded by DOE grant DE-FG02-89ER60857 from 6/15/89 to 8/31/91 was to contribute to the physical mapping of human chromosome 21 (HC21) by cloning large fragments of DNA into Yeast Artificial Chromosomes (YACs) and identify YACs that map on HC21. A total of 54 sequence tagged sites (STS) have been developed and mapped in our laboratory to HC21 and can be used as initial reference points for YAC identification and construction of overlapping clones. A small YAC library was constructed which is HC21 specific. DNA from somatic cell hybrid WAV17 or from flow-sorted HC21 was partially digested with EcoRI, ligated into vectors PJS97, PJS98, and YACs have been obtained with average size insert of more than 300 kb. This library has been deposited in D. Patterson's lab for the Joint YAC screening effort. Additional YAC libraries from ICI Pharmaceuticals or from Los Alamos National Laboratories have been screened with several STS and positive YACs have been identified. Work in progress includes screening of YAC libraries in order to construct overlapping clones, characterization of the cloning ends of YACs, characterization of additional STS and cloning of HC21 specific cDNAs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  18. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J.; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L.; Ashurst, Jennifer L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Scott, Carol E.; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L.; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D.; Ansari-Lari, M. Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I. S.; Babbage, Anne K.; Bagguley, Claire L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E.; Barlow, Karen F.; Barrett, Ian P.; Bates, Karen N.; Beare, David M.; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M.; Brown, Andrew J.; Brown, Mary J.; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M.; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C.; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y.; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M.; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G.; Conquer, Jen S.; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E.; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; DeShazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K. James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L.; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E.; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G.; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D.; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J.; Hunt, Adrienne R.; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J.; Joseph, Shirin S.; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K.; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J.; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K.; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M.; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E.; Lovell, Jamieson D.; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H.; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L.; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C.; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O’Dell, Christopher N.; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V.; Pearson, Danita M.; Pelan, Sarah E.; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M.; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A.; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G.; Sehra, Harminder K.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M.; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D.; Smith, Michelle L.; Sotheran, Elizabeth C.; Steingruber, Helen E.; Steward, Charles A.; Storey, Roy; Swann, R. Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E.; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C.; d’Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L.; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; Whiteley, Mathew N.; Wilkinson, Jane E.; Willey, David L.; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L.; Wray, Paul W.; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Willard, Huntington F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Rice, Catherine M.; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L.; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E.; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A.; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  19. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  20. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  1. Localization of a novel natural killer triggering receptor locus to human chromosome 3p23-p21 and mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Young, H.A.; Jenkins, N.A.; Copeland, N.G.; Simek, S.; Lerman, M.I.; Zbar, B.; Glenn, G.; Ortaldo, J.R.; Anderson, S.K.

    1993-05-01

    A novel gene (NKTR) that is involved in the recognition of tumor cells by large granular lymphocytes (LGLs) has been assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 3 in the region 3p23-p21 by somatic cell hybrid analysis. Interspecific backcross analysis revealed that the murine homologue maps to the distal end of mouse chromosome 9 and is closely linked to the locus coding for cholecystokinin (Cck). This region of mouse 9 shares a region of homology with human 3p. Thus, the placement of NKTR in these regions confirms and extends the relationship between these human and mouse chromosomes. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Assignment of the gene (EPLG2) encoding a high-affinity binding protein for the receptor tyrosine kinase elk to a 200-kilobasepair region in human chromosome Xq12

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, F.A.; Beckmann, M.P.; Lyman, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Elk is a member of the eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Elk is expressed only in the brain and testes of the developing and adult rat, and the interaction of elk with its ligand(s) has been suggested to play a role in the development or maintenance of the nervous system. The mouse gene Eplg2 encodes a potential elk ligand that is highly conserved among rat, mouse, and human. Eplg2 has been mapped to the central portion of the mouse X chromosome, tightly linked to the androgen receptor (Ar) locus. Linkage conservation between the mouse and the human X chromosomes suggested that the human homologue (EPLG2) would map near human AR, in the interval Xq11-q12. In the present study, we have confirmed this prediction and have localized EPLG2 to a 200-kb interval in Xq12 by somatic cell hybrid analysis, two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) hybridization. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Human decorin gene: Intron-exon junctions and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, U.; Young, M.F.; Fisher, L.W. ); Vogel, W.; Just, W. )

    1993-01-01

    All of the protein-encoding exons and the 3[prime]flanking region of the human decorin gene have been cloned an partially sequenced. The locations of the intron-exon junctions within the coding portion of the gene were identical to those found for the homologous human gene, biglycan. The sizes of the introns in the decorin gene, however, were substantially larger than those of the same introns of the biglycan gene. Portions of introns 1, 2, and 3 as well as exon 1 were not found during our extensive screening process. The 5[prime] end of intron 2 was found to have an AG-rich region followed immediately by a CT-rich region. Furthermore, the 5[prime] end of intron 3 was very rich in thymidine, whereas the 3[prime] end of intron 7 was rich in adenosine. Several cDNA clones constructed from cultured human bone cell mRNA were found to contain a different sequence at the 5[prime] end compared to that previously published for mRNA from a human embryonic fibroblast cell line. We were also unable to find the alternate 3[prime] flanking region of the previously published cDNA sequence. We have mapped the human decorin gene by in situ methods to chromosome 12q2l.3. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Chad; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Zody, Michael C; Asakawa, Shuichi; Taudien, Stefan; Garber, Manuel; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Schueler, Mary G; Shimizu, Atsushi; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Asakawa, Teruyo; Blechschmidt, Karin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dooley, Kathleen T; Dorris, Lester; Engels, Reinhard; Glöckner, Gernot; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Ishikawa, Sabine K; Jaffe, David B; Kamat, Asha; Kudoh, Jun; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Lokitsang, Tashi; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Charles D; Mauceli, Evan; Menzel, Uwe; Mihalev, Atanas H; Minoshima, Shinsei; Murayama, Yuji; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Parker, Stephen C J; Polley, Andreas; Raymond, Christina K; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rodriguez, Joseph; Sasaki, Takashi; Schilhabel, Markus; Siddiqui, Roman; Smith, Cherylyn L; Sneddon, Tam P; Talamas, Jessica A; Tenzin, Pema; Topham, Kerri; Venkataraman, Vijay; Wen, Gaiping; Yamazaki, Satoru; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Rosenthal, Andre; Birren, Bruce W; Platzer, Matthias; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Lander, Eric S

    2006-01-19

    The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution. PMID:16421571

  5. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  6. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  7. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. )

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  8. The morbid anatomy of the human genome: chromosomal location of mutations causing disease.

    PubMed Central

    McKusick, V A; Amberger, J S

    1993-01-01

    Information is given in tabular form derived from a synopsis of the human gene map which has been updated continuously since 1973 as part of Mendelian Inheritance in Man (Johns Hopkins University Press, 10th ed, 1992) and of OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, available generally since 1987). The part of the synopsis reproduced here consists of chromosome by chromosome gene lists of loci for which there are associated disorders (table 1), a pictorial representation of this information (fig 1a-d), and an index of disorders for which the causative mutations have been mapped (table 2). In table 1, information on genes that have been located to specific chromosomal positions and are also the site of disease producing mutations is arranged by chromosome, starting with chromosome 1 and with the end of the short arm of the chromosome in each case. In table 2 an alphabetized list of these disorders and the chromosomal location of the mutation in each case are provided. Both in the 'Disorder' field of table 1 and in table 2, the numbers 1, 2, or 3 in parentheses after the name of the disorder indicate that its chromosomal location was determined by mapping of the wildtype gene (1), by mapping of the clinical phenotype (2), or by both strategies (3). PMID:8423603

  9. Assignment of the human fast skeletal troponin T gene (TNNT3) to chromosome 11p15.5: Evidence for the presence of 11pter in a monochromosome 9 somatic cell hybrid in NIGMS mapping panel 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Chengjian; Jha, P.K.; Sarkar, S.

    1996-02-01

    Human fast skeletal troponin T (TnT{sub f}), the tropomyosin binding component of the multisubunit troponin complex, plays an important role in the Ca{sup 2+} regulation of striated muscle contraction. Specific primers designed from the 3{prime} end of human TnT{sub f} cDNA were used to amplify an intronic region by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This TnT{sub f}-specific PCR product was detected from two somatic cell hybrids containing human chromosomes 9 and 11, respectively, in NIGMS mapping panel 2. However, further studies with other somatic hybrid cell lines (Bios Laboratory) localized the TnT{sub f} genomic probe generated by extended PCR, showing the sublocalization of the gene to band p15.5 on chromosome 11. This locus is of specific interest, as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and various childhood and adult tumor-related abnormalities have been mapped to this region. The study also indicates the presence of an 11pter region in the NIGMS cell hybrid GM10611, which has previously been reported to contain only human chromosome 9. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Integration of 28 STSs into the physical map of human chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Gerken, S.; White, R.; Bradley, P.

    1994-12-01

    Genes on human chromosome 18 are associated with familial glucocorticoid deficiency (MC2R), pemphigus vulgaris (DSG3) and foliaceus (DSG1), familial amyloidosis (TTR), colorectal carcinoma (DCC), erythropoietic protoporphyria (FECH), follicular lymphoma (BCL2, FVT1), and congenital methemoglobinemia (CYB5). As the resolution of human genetic maps improves, linkage between other diseases and specific regions of chromosome 18 will occur. A physical map of human chromosome 18 will prove useful in identifying candidate genes that are associated with these disorders. Using various physical and genetic mapping techniques, over 35 genes and 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are assigned to human chromosome 18. Most of these genes and several of the ESTs were sublocalized using a well-defined panel of somatic cell hybrids that contain different segments of human chromosome 18. Despite recent efforts, progress in mapping human chromosome 18 has lagged behind that achieved for other chromosomes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to integrate 9 new transcriptional tags [8 brain ESTs (8) and the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) (3)] and 19 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) into the physical map of human chromosome 18. The SSRs were isolated by screening genomic DNA libraries constructed in M13mp18 vectors with oligonucleotide probes that detected dinucleotide d(CA)- and tetranucleotide-repeat motifs. DNA sequences of clones that contained microsatellite repeats were obtained by thermal-cycle sequencing, and STSs were developed from clones that contained numerous repeats. STSs that identified highly polymorphic loci in eight unrelated CEPH parents were used for genotyping. Results of linkage analyses and estimates of heterozygosity for these markers will be reported. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Investigating chromosome damage and gammaH2AX response in human lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets as potential biomarkers of radiation sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.

    This thesis examines in vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients exhibiting late normal tissue damage after receiving radiotherapy, for lymphocyte response. Chromosomal aberrations, translocations and proliferation rate are measured, as well as gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets. The goal of this thesis is to determine whether the lymphocyte response to in vitro radiation could be used as a marker for radiosensitivity. Patients were selected from a randomized clinical trial evaluating the optimal timing of Dose Escalated Radiation and short course Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% developed Grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood was drawn from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated and were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes, excess fragments and proliferation rates (at 6 Gy), translocations, stable and unstable damage (at 4 Gy), and dose response (up to 10 Gy), along with time response after 2 Gy (0 -- 24 h). Chromosome aberrations, excess fragments per cell, translocations per cell and proliferation rates were analyzed by brightfield and fluorescent microscopy, while the gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Both groups were statistically similar for all endpoints at 0 Gy. At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell, the mean number of excess fragments per cell and the proportion of cells in second metaphase. At 4 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the two cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of translocations per cell, the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell and the mean number of deletions per cell. There were no significant differences between the gammaH2AX

  12. Chromosomal localization and structure of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.; Huberman, E. |; Collart, F.; Varkony, T.; Drabkin, H.

    1994-05-01

    We determined the chromosomal localization and structure of the gene encoding human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205), an enzyme associated with cellular proliferation, malignant transformation, and differentiation. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for type II IMPDH, we screened a panel of human-Chinese hamster cell somatic hybrids and a separate deletion panel of chromosome 3 hybrids and localized the gene to 3p21.1{yields}p24.2. Two overlapping yeast artificial chromosome clones containing the full gene for type II IMPDH were isolated and a physical map of 117 kb of human genomic DNA in this region of chromosome 3 was constructed. The gene for type II IMPDH was localized and oriented on this map and found to span no more than 12.5 kb.

  13. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Assignment of the locus for Waardenburg syndrome type I to human chromosome 2q37 and possible homology to the Splotch mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Foy, C; Newton, V; Wellesley, D; Harris, R; Read, A P

    1990-01-01

    We have demonstrated close linkage between the locus for the autosomal dominant Waardenburg syndrome type I and the placental alkaline phosphatase locus on chromosome 2q37. In five families the peak lod score was 4.76 at a recombination fraction of .023. In the mouse the Splotch locus maps to near the homologous position. Splotch mice have white spotting and hearing defects, suggesting that Splotch may be the murine homologue of Waardenburg syndrome type I. PMID:2339698

  15. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C.; Giorgi, D.

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  16. The DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 14.

    PubMed

    Heilig, Roland; Eckenberg, Ralph; Petit, Jean-Louis; Fonknechten, Núria; Da Silva, Corinne; Cattolico, Laurence; Levy, Michaël; Barbe, Valérie; de Berardinis, Véronique; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Pelletier, Eric; Vico, Virginie; Anthouard, Véronique; Rowen, Lee; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Sun, Hui; Du, Hui; Pepin, Kymberlie; Artiguenave, François; Robert, Catherine; Cruaud, Corinne; Brüls, Thomas; Jaillon, Olivier; Friedlander, Lucie; Samson, Gaelle; Brottier, Philippe; Cure, Susan; Ségurens, Béatrice; Anière, Franck; Samain, Sylvie; Crespeau, Hervé; Abbasi, Nissa; Aiach, Nathalie; Boscus, Didier; Dickhoff, Rachel; Dors, Monica; Dubois, Ivan; Friedman, Cynthia; Gouyvenoux, Michel; James, Rose; Madan, Anuradha; Mairey-Estrada, Barbara; Mangenot, Sophie; Martins, Nathalie; Ménard, Manuela; Oztas, Sophie; Ratcliffe, Amber; Shaffer, Tristan; Trask, Barbara; Vacherie, Benoit; Bellemere, Chadia; Belser, Caroline; Besnard-Gonnet, Marielle; Bartol-Mavel, Delphine; Boutard, Magali; Briez-Silla, Stéphanie; Combette, Stephane; Dufossé-Laurent, Virginie; Ferron, Carolyne; Lechaplais, Christophe; Louesse, Claudine; Muselet, Delphine; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Pateau, Emilie; Petit, Emmanuelle; Sirvain-Trukniewicz, Peggy; Trybou, Arnaud; Vega-Czarny, Nathalie; Bataille, Elodie; Bluet, Elodie; Bordelais, Isabelle; Dubois, Maria; Dumont, Corinne; Guérin, Thomas; Haffray, Sébastien; Hammadi, Rachid; Muanga, Jacqueline; Pellouin, Virginie; Robert, Dominique; Wunderle, Edith; Gauguet, Gilbert; Roy, Alice; Sainte-Marthe, Laurent; Verdier, Jean; Verdier-Discala, Claude; Hillier, LaDeana; Fulton, Lucinda; McPherson, John; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Wilson, Richard; Scarpelli, Claude; Gyapay, Gábor; Wincker, Patrick; Saurin, William; Quétier, Francis; Waterston, Robert; Hood, Leroy; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-02-01

    Chromosome 14 is one of five acrocentric chromosomes in the human genome. These chromosomes are characterized by a heterochromatic short arm that contains essentially ribosomal RNA genes, and a euchromatic long arm in which most, if not all, of the protein-coding genes are located. The finished sequence of human chromosome 14 comprises 87,410,661 base pairs, representing 100% of its euchromatic portion, in a single continuous segment covering the entire long arm with no gaps. Two loci of crucial importance for the immune system, as well as more than 60 disease genes, have been localized so far on chromosome 14. We identified 1,050 genes and gene fragments, and 393 pseudogenes. On the basis of comparisons with other vertebrate genomes, we estimate that more than 96% of the chromosome 14 genes have been annotated. From an analysis of the CpG island occurrences, we estimate that 70% of these annotated genes are complete at their 5' end. PMID:12508121

  17. Evaluating the Relationship between Spermatogenic Silencing of the X Chromosome and Evolution of the Y Chromosome in Chimpanzee and Human

    PubMed Central

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M.; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J. Anton

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals. PMID:21179482

  18. Analysis of human spermatozoa for Y chromosomal nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapp, R.W. Jr.; Jacobson, C.B.

    1980-01-01

    The YFF sperm assay, which is a quantification of the incidence of sperm with two fluorescent bodies (YFF . two fluorescent bodies), was performed to measure Y chromosomal nondisjunction. Three categories of human subjects were analyzed: 1) nonexposed, 2) exposed to antineoplastic agents - ie, chemo- and radiation therapy, and 3) dibromochloropropane (DBCP)-exposed. The individuals exposed to antineoplastic agents showed a three- to four-fold increase in the incidence of YFF sperm three to six weeks after the initiation of exposure to Adriamycin and X-irradiation. The maximum percentages of YFF per 1,000 sperm for each individual in this exposed group was analyzed by Wilcoxon's distribution free rank sum test using a one-sided alternative. The exposed individuals' maximum YFF percentages were statistically significantly increased when compared to the maximum YFF values of the nonexposed controls. The individuals exposed to the nematocide DBCP also exhibited a statistically significant increase in the number of sperm containing two Y chromosomes as determined by chi-square analysis with one degree of freedom (P less than 0.01). Data presented herein show statistically significant increases in the incidence of double Y chromosomes as measured by the presence of YFF sperm following exposure to Adriamycin, X-irradiation, and DBCP. It is suggested that men who have a history of antineoplastic therapy could be evaluated for evidence of Y-Y nondisjunction with this method. In the event of an increased YFF sperm level, genetic counseling and amniocentesis should be made available to the spouse where pregnancy has occurred. Further, because this procedure measures gametic mutation, is relatively simple, and is noninvasive, it should be considered for inclusion as part of a battery of medical tests for monitoring industrial populations.

  19. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, T.K.; Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R.

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  1. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1992-08-01

    Project aims for the past year have been to refine the cytogenetic based physical map of human chromosome 16. This has been achieved by extending the panel of mouse/human hybrids of chromosome 16 to over sixty hybrids and mapping approximately 250 DNA makers. The high resolution of this physical map, with an average distance between breakpoints of less than 1.6 Mb, and the availability of at least one STS in the majority of these intervals, will be the basis for constructing extensive contigs of cloned DNA.

  2. Clonal evolution and tumor progression in 2 human colorectal adenoma-derived cell-lines invitro - the involvement of chromosome-1 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hague, A; Hanlon, K; Paraskeva, C

    1992-07-01

    Two human colorectal adenoma cell lines, S/RG and S/AN, have been continuously passaged in vitro to determine whether they would immortalize and if specific cytogenetic changes were involved in immortalization and tumor progression. At passage 7, S/RG was highly aneuploid, but had no abnormalities of chromosome 1 (Paraskeva et al, Cancer Res 49: 1282-1286, 1989). With continued passage under two independent sets of growth conditions an isochromosome Iq and derivatives of this isochromosome occurred as specific abnormalities. S/AN was near-diploid at passage 10, with a deletion in lp and monosomy 18. The karyotype at passage 44 showed no change. The cell lines are stable in that they have remained anchorage-dependent and non-tumorigenic after several years in culture and S/AN has retained a near diploid karyotype. These cell lines are therefore highly valuable for further studies of tumor progression in human colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:21584532

  3. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  4. Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP): Chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Singhto, Nilubon; Chen, Yi-Ju; Cheng, Chia-Ying; Chiangjong, Wararat; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Lam, Henry H N; Peerapen, Paleerath; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tipthara, Phornpimon; Pandey, Akhilesh; Poon, Terence C W; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chung, Maxey C M; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2014-07-01

    Following an official announcement of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), the Chromosome 12 (Ch12) Consortium has been established by five representative teams from five Asian countries including Thailand (Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University), Singapore (National University of Singapore), Taiwan (Academia Sinica), Hong Kong (The Chinese University of Hong Kong), and India (Institute of Bioinformatics). We have worked closely together to extensively and systematically analyze all missing and known proteins encoded by Ch12 for their tissue/cellular/subcellular localizations. The target organs/tissues/cells include kidney, brain, gastrointestinal tissues, blood/immune cells, and stem cells. In the later phase, post-translational modifications and functional significance of Ch12-encoded proteins as well as their associations with human diseases (i.e., immune diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancers) will be defined. We have collaborated with other chromosome teams, Human Kidney and Urine Proteome Project (HKUPP), AOHUPO Membrane Proteomics Initiative, and other existing HUPO initiatives in the Biology/Disease-Based Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) to delineate functional roles and medical implications of Ch12-encoded proteins. The data set to be obtained from this multicountry consortium will be an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to fulfill the missions and goals of the C-HPP and the global Human Proteome Project (HPP). PMID:24831074

  5. [Human chromosome banding with raw extract of fruits or leaves of papaya].

    PubMed

    Solís, M V

    2001-01-01

    One week old human chromosome preparations were treated with filtrate from one liquefied leaf (53 g) of papaya (Carica papaya) in 100 ml of distilled water, and stained with 1.5% Giemsa (pH 6.8). Good chromosome banding was obtained after 2 min of treatment. Solutions that have been frozen even for years are effective and the method is cheaper and easier than others. PMID:12189805

  6. YAC contig mapping of six expressed sequences encoded by human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Cox, M.; Patterson, D. |

    1995-03-01

    Six cDNA clones from human chromosome 21 have been mapped in a set of complete YAC contig spanning the entire chromosome 21q. The mapping positions between two STSs on the YAC contig and the NotI coordinates starting from the telomere of 21q were determined for the cDNA clones. The YAC contig mapping positions agree well with those using a comprehensive somatic cell hybrid mapping panel. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Construction of a chromosome specific library of human MARs and mapping of matrix attachment regions on human chromosome 19.

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, L G; Tsevegiyn, T; Akopov, S B; Ashworth, L K; Sverdlov, E D

    1996-01-01

    Using a novel procedure a representative human chromosome 19-specific library was constructed of short sequences, which bind preferentially to the nuclear matrix (matrix attachment regions, or MARs). Judging by 20 clones sequenced so far, the library contains > 50% of human inserts, about 90% of which are matrix-binding by the in vitro test. Computer analysis of sequences of eight human MARs did not reveal any significant homologies with the EMBL Nucleotide Data Base entries as well as between MARs themselves. Eight MARs were assigned to individual positions on the chromosome 19 physical map. The library constructed can serve as a good source of MAR sequences for comparative analysis and classification and for further chromosome mapping of MARs as well. PMID:8614638

  8. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage.

    PubMed

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; Lupski, James R; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Bugalter, Boris E; Butler, Jonathan; Chang, Jean L; Chen, Chao-Kung; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; Cuomo, Christina A; de Jong, Pieter J; DeCaprio, David; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael; Gilbert, James; Gibson, Richard; Gnerre, Sante; Goldstein, Steven; Grafham, Darren V; Grocock, Russell; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hart, Elizabeth; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Humphray, Sean; Jaffe, David B; Jones, Matt; Kamal, Michael; Khodiyar, Varsha K; LaButti, Kurt; Laird, Gavin; Lehoczky, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Loveland, Jane; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Lucy; Mauceli, Evan; McCarroll, Steven A; Mihalev, Atanas H; Mudge, Jonathan; Nguyen, Cindy; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Schwartz, David C; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steward, Charles; Swarbreck, David; Venkataraman, Vijay; Whittaker, Charles A; Yang, Xiaoping; Zimmer, Andrew R; Bradley, Allan; Hubbard, Tim; Birren, Bruce W; Rogers, Jane; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-04-20

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome. PMID:16625196

  9. A sequence-tagged site map of human chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Smith, M W; Clark, S P; Hutchinson, J S; Wei, Y H; Churukian, A C; Daniels, L B; Diggle, K L; Gen, M W; Romo, A J; Lin, Y

    1993-09-01

    We report the construction of 370 sequence-tagged sites (STSs) that are detectable by PCR amplification under sets of standardized conditions and that have been regionally mapped to human chromosome 11. DNA sequences were determined by sequencing directly from cosmid templates using primers complementary to T3 and T7 promoters present in the cloning vector. Oligonucleotide PCR primers were predicted by computer and tested using a battery of genomic DNAs. Cosmids were regionally localized on chromosome 11 by using fluorescence in situ hybridization or by analyzing a somatic cell hybrid panel. Additional STSs corresponding to known genes and markers on chromosome 11 were also produced under the same series of standardized conditions. The resulting STSs provide uniform coverage of chromosome 11 with an average spacing of 340 kb. The DNA sequence determined for use in STS production corresponds to about 0.1% (116 kb) of chromosome 11 and has been analyzed for the presence of repetitive sequences, similarities to known genes and motifs, and possible exons. Computer analysis of this sequence has identified and therefore mapped at least eight new genes on chromosome 11. PMID:8244387

  10. Technologies for large-scale physical mapping of human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1994-12-01

    Since its inception 6 years ago, the Human Genome Project has made rapid progress towards its ultimate goal of developing the complete sequence of all human chromosomes. This progress has been made possible through the development of automated devices by laboratories throughout the world that aid the molecular biologist in various phases of the project. The initial phase involves the generation of physical and genetic maps of each chromosome. This task is nearing completion at a low resolution level with several instances of very high detailed maps being developed for isolated chromosomes. In support of the initial mapping thrust of this program, the robotics and automation effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed DNA gridding technologies along with associated database and user interface systems. This paper will discuss these systems in detail and focus on the formalism developed for subsystems which allow for facile system integration.