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Sample records for human circulatory system

  1. Representations of the Human Circulatory System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion; Angon, Yolanda Postigo

    2009-01-01

    There is no agreement about the robustness of intuitive representations of the circulatory system and their susceptibility to change by instruction. In this paper, we analyse to what extent students with varying degrees of biology instruction and different ages (High School Health Science and Social Science students and first and final year…

  2. An Integrated Simulation Tool for Modeling the Human Circulatory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Ken'ichi; Kitamura, Tadashi

    This paper presents an integrated simulation of the circulatory system in physiological movement. The large circulatory system model includes principal organs and functional units in modules in which comprehensive physiological changes such as nerve reflexes, temperature regulation, acid/base balance, O2/CO2 balance, and exercise are simulated. A beat-by-beat heart model, in which the corresponding electrical circuit problems are solved by a numerical analytic method, enables calculation of pulsatile blood flow to the major organs. The integration of different perspectives on physiological changes makes this simulation model applicable for the microscopic evaluation of blood flow under various conditions in the human body.

  3. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  4. Mathematical circulatory system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method of modeling a circulatory system including a regulatory mechanism parameter. In one embodiment, a regulatory mechanism parameter in a lumped parameter model is represented as a logistic function. In another embodiment, the circulatory system model includes a compliant vessel, the model having a parameter representing a change in pressure due to contraction of smooth muscles of a wall of the vessel.

  5. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Ninth Grade Students' Understanding of Human Circulatory System Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkhawaldeh, Salem A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the conceptual change text oriented instruction over traditionally designed instruction on ninth grade students' understanding of the human circulatory system concepts, and their retention of this understanding. The subjects of this study consist of 73 ninth grade female students…

  6. The Persistence of Misconceptions about the Human Blood Circulatory System among Students in Different Grade Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgur, Sami

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, it is aimed to investigate the persistence of misconceptions in the topic of the human blood circulatory system among students in different grade levels. For this reason, after discussions with biology educators, two tests consisting of open-ended questions were developed by the researcher and administered to students in four…

  7. Students' Achievement in Human Circulatory System Unit: The Effect of Reasoning Ability and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the effect of gender and reasoning ability on the human circulatory system concepts achievement and attitude toward biology. Reports a statistically significant mean difference between concrete and formal students with regard to achievement and attitude toward biology. (Contains 24 references.) (Author/YDS)

  8. Learning in a Non-Physical Science Domain: The Human Circulatory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Michelene T. H.; And Others

    This research explores the moment-by-moment understanding students exhibit in the learning of a non-physical science domain--the human circulatory system. The goal was to understand how students learn by capturing the nature of their initial mental models (naive conceptions), and by seeing how new information gets assimilated into their mental…

  9. Students' Alternative Conceptions of the Human Circulatory System: A Cross-Age Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaudin, Mary W.; Mintzes, Joel J.

    1985-01-01

    Concept maps and structured/clinical interviews were completed by 25 fourth graders and 25 college freshmen to determine knowledge of the human circulatory system. Students (N=945) at various levels were then measured for misconception frequencies. Student preconceptions appear to be tenacious, but confrontation strategies may assist fundamental…

  10. Developing seventh grade students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Raved, Lena; Yarden, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Developing systems thinking skills in school can provide useful tools to deal with a vast amount of medical and health information that may help learners in decision making in their future lives as citizen. Thus, there is a need to develop effective tools that will allow learners to analyze biological systems and organize their knowledge. Here, we examine junior high school students' systems thinking skills in the context of the human circulatory system. A model was formulated for developing teaching and learning materials and for characterizing students' systems thinking skills. Specifically, we asked whether seventh grade students, who studied about the human circulatory system, acquired systems thinking skills, and what are the characteristics of those skills? Concept maps were used to characterize students' systems thinking components and examine possible changes in the students' knowledge structure. These maps were composed by the students before and following the learning process. The study findings indicate a significant improvement in the students' ability to recognize the system components and the processes that occur within the system, as well as the relationships between different levels of organization of the system, following the learning process. Thus, following learning students were able to organize the systems' components and its processes within a framework of relationships, namely the students' systems thinking skills were improved in the course of learning using the teaching and learning materials. PMID:25520948

  11. Numerical Models of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity: Brain Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; David, Tim

    2003-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach is presented to model the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Models required for CFD simulation relevant to major hemodynamic issues are introduced such as non-Newtonian flow models governed by red blood cells, a model for arterial wall motion due to fluid-wall interactions, a vascular bed model for outflow boundary conditions, and a model for auto-regulation mechanism. The three-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with these models are solved iteratively using the pseudocompressibility method and dual time stepping. Moving wall boundary conditions from the first-order fluid-wall interaction model are used to study the influence of arterial wall distensibility on flow patterns and wall shear stresses during the heart pulse. A vascular bed modeling utilizing the analogy with electric circuits is coupled with an auto-regulation algorithm for multiple outflow boundaries. For the treatment of complex geometry, a chimera overset grid technique is adopted to obtain connectivity between arterial branches. For code validation, computed results are compared with experimental data for steady and unsteady non-Newtonian flows. Good agreement is obtained for both cases. In sin-type Gravity Benchmark Problems, gravity source terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effect of gravitational variation on the human circulatory system. This computational approach is then applied to localized blood flows through a realistic carotid bifurcation and two Circle of Willis models, one using an idealized geometry and the other model using an anatomical data set. A three- dimensional anatomical Circle of Willis configuration is reconstructed from human-specific magnetic resonance images using an image segmentation method. The blood flow through these Circle of Willis models is simulated to provide means for studying gravitational effects on the brain

  12. Development and Validation of a Two-Tier Instrument to Examine Understanding of Internal Transport in Plants and the Human Circulatory System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jing-Ru

    2004-01-01

    This study is intended to develop an assessment instrument to investigate students' understandings about internal transport in plants and human circulatory system. A refined process of a two-tier diagnostic test was used to develop the instrument. Finally, three versions of the Internal Transport in Plants and the Human Circulatory System test…

  13. The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Students' Understanding of the Human Circulatory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren; Geban, Omer

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the contribution of conceptual change texts accompanied by concept mapping instruction to 10th-grade students' understanding of the human circulatory system. Indicates that the conceptual change texts accompanied by concept mapping instruction produced a positive effect on students' understanding of concepts. Concludes that students…

  14. Relations of Cognitive and Motivational Variables with Students' Human Circulatory System Achievement in Traditional and Learning Cycle Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadi, Özlem; Çakiroglu, Jale

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the relationships among students' relevant prior knowledge, meaningful learning orientation, reasoning ability, self-efficacy, locus of control, attitudes toward biology and achievement with the human circulatory system (HCS) using the learning cycle (LC) and the traditional classroom setting. The study…

  15. Students' Visualization of Diagrams Representing the Human Circulatory System: The Use of Spatial Isomorphism and Representational Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' interpretation of diagrams representing the human circulatory system. We conducted an interview study with three students aged 14-15 (Year 10) who were studying biology in a Hong Kong school. During the interviews, students were asked to interpret diagrams and relationships between diagrams that represented…

  16. Students' Visualization of Diagrams Representing the Human Circulatory System: The use of spatial isomorphism and representational conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' interpretation of diagrams representing the human circulatory system. We conducted an interview study with three students aged 14-15 (Year 10) who were studying biology in a Hong Kong school. During the interviews, students were asked to interpret diagrams and relationships between diagrams that represented aspects of the circulatory system. All diagrams used in the interviews had been used by their teacher when teaching the topic. Students' interpretations were expressed by their verbal response and their drawing. Dual coding theory was used to interpret students' responses. There was evidence that one student relied on verbal recall as a strategy in interpreting diagrams. It was found that students might have relied unduly on similarities in spatial features, rather than on deeper meanings represented by conventions, of diagrams when they associated diagrams that represented different aspects of the circulatory system. A pattern of students' understanding of structure-behaviour-function relationship of the biological system was observed. This study suggests the importance of a consistent diagrammatic and verbal representation in communicating scientific ideas. Implications for teaching practice that facilitates learning with diagrams and address students' undue focus on spatial features of diagrams are discussed.

  17. The human heart and the circulatory system as an interesting interdisciplinary topic in lessons of physics and biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volná, M.; Látal, F.; Kubínek, R.; Richterek, L.

    2014-01-01

    Many topics which are closely related can be found in the national curriculum of the Czech Republic for physics and biology. One of them is the heart and the circulatory system in the human body. This topic was examined cross curriculum, a teaching module was created and the topic was chosen for our research. The task was to determine if the students of bachelor study are aware of connections between physics and biology within this topic and whether we can help them effectively to describe the corresponding physics phenomena in the human body connected, for example, with a heart attack or with the measurement of blood pressure. In this paper, the heart and the circulatory system are presented as suitable topics for an interdisciplinary teaching module which includes both theoretical and experimental parts. The module was evaluated by a group of first-year undergraduate students of physics at the Faculty of Science, Palacký University. The acquired knowledge was compared with another control group through a test. The highest efficiency of the module was evaluated on the basis of questions that covered the calculation problems.

  18. Application of a PExSim for modeling a POLVAD artificial heart and the human circulatory system with left ventricle assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewnicka, Alicja; Fajdek, Bartlomiej; Janiszowski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a model of the human circulatory system with the possible addition of a parallel assist device, which was developed for the purpose of artificial heart monitoring. Information about an identification experiment of an extracorporeal ventricle assist device POLVAD is included. The modelling methods applied and the corresponding functional blocks in a PExSim package are presented. The results of the simulation for physiological conditions, left ventricle failure and pathological conditions with parallel assistance are included.

  19. The Circulatory System. Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This instructional modular unit with instructor's guide provides materials on aspects of one of the major systems of the human body--the circulatory system. Its purpose is to introduce the student to the structures and functions of the human circulatory system--and the interrelationships of the two--and to familiarize the student with some of the…

  20. 78 FR 11208 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... approval application for the MitraClip Delivery System sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The system consists...

  1. 76 FR 58019 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... sponsored by AtriCure, Inc., for the AtriCure Synergy Ablation System to be used for the treatment of...

  2. Physics of the Circulatory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Heuvelen, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some calculations and demonstrations illustrating the role of physics in cardiovascular system. Describes a model for the system, work done by the heart, pressure in blood vessel, and gravitational effects. (YP)

  3. 77 FR 18829 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel...

  4. The Circulatory System in Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Hollenberg, Steven M; Waldman, Brett

    2016-07-01

    In the cirrhotic liver, distortion of the normal liver architecture is caused by structural and vascular changes. Portal hypertension is often associated with a hyperdynamic circulatory syndrome in which cardiac output and heart rate are increased and systemic vascular resistance is decreased. The release of several vasoactive substances is the primary factor involved in the reduction of mesenteric arterial resistance, resulting in sodium and water retention with eventual formation of ascites. Management of these patients with acute cardiac dysfunction often requires invasive hemodynamic monitoring in an intensive care unit setting to tailor decisions regarding use of fluids and vasopressors. PMID:27339674

  5. Children's Beliefs about the Human Circulatory System: An Aid for Teachers Regarding the Role Intuitive Beliefs Play in the Development of Formal Concepts in 7-14-Year Olds. Report No. 82:16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catherall, Robin W.

    This exploratory study was aimed at uncovering children's beliefs and ideas about the human circulatory system. Thirty-two subjects, aged 7 to 14 years, were interviewed using a modification of Piaget's clinical method. The data were analyzed by developing a conceptual inventory of beliefs for each of five research questions. It was found that the…

  6. From Head to Toe: Respiratory, Circulatory, and Skeletal Systems. Book 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Arthur, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to supplement curricular programs dealing with the human body, this booklet offers an activity-based, student-oriented approach for middle school teachers and students. Twelve activities focus on principles and skills related to the respiratory, circulatory, and skeletal systems. Each activity consists of student sheets and a teacher's…

  7. 77 FR 25183 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  8. 76 FR 36548 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  9. 78 FR 67365 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  10. NUCLEAR-FUELED CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS IV: RADIOLOGIC PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, F. N.; Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    If an implantable artificial heart can be developed, it should prove beneficial to a significant group of patients. A variety of energy sources, such as biologic, electromagnetic, and nuclear, are under evaluation. Currently, biologic fuel cell technology is not sufficiently advanced to permit its extrapolation to the power levels required for implantable circulatory support systems. Electromagnetic systems have the disadvantage of heavy batteries of considerable bulk requiring frequent recharging. Radioisotope-fueled thermal engine systems have the potential of providing degrees of freedom not possible with rechargeable units. However, radiosotope circulatory support systems subject their recipients to prolonged intracorporeal radiation, add to environmental background radiation, and constitute an exceedingly small, but finite, hazard due to possible violation of fuel containment. PMID:15215965

  11. Functional stability of cerebral circulatory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Y. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The functional stability of the cerebral circulation system seems to be based on the active mechanisms and on those stemming from specific of the biophysical structure of the system under study. This latter parameter has some relevant criteria for its quantitative estimation. The data obtained suggest that the essential part of the mechanism for active responses of cerebral vessels which maintains the functional stability of this portion of the vascular system, consists of a neurogenic component involving central nervous structures localized, for instance, in the medulla oblongata.

  12. ICD-11 and SNOMED CT Common Ontology: circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Rector, Alan; Spackman, Kent; Millar, Jane; Campbell, James; Ustün, Bedirhan; Chute, Christopher G; Solbrig, Harold; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Persson, Kristina Brand

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of semantic interoperability between data in electronic health records and aggregated data for health statistics requires efforts to carefully align the two domain terminologies ICD and SNOMED CT. Both represent a new generation of ontology-based terminologies and classifications. The proposed alignment of these two systems and, in consequence, the validity of their cross-utilisation, requires a specific resource, named Common Ontology. We present the ICD-11 SNOMED CT Common Ontology building process including: a) the principles proposed for aligning the two systems with the help of a common model of meaning, b) the design of this common ontology, and c) preliminary results of the application to the diseases of the circulatory system. PMID:25160347

  13. Adhesion Molecules: Master Controllers of the Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric P; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Lee, Warren L; Downey, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript will review our current understanding of cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) relevant to the circulatory system, their physiological role in control of vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, and their importance in pathophysiological (disease) processes such as acute lung injury, atherosclerosis, and pulmonary hypertension. This is a complex and rapidly changing area of research that is incompletely understood. By design, we will begin with a brief overview of the structure and classification of the major groups of adhesion molecules and their physiological functions including cellular adhesion and signaling. The role of specific CAMs in the process of platelet aggregation and hemostasis and leukocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration will be reviewed as examples of the complex and cooperative interplay between CAMs during physiological and pathophysiological processes. The role of the endothelial glycocalyx and the glycobiology of this complex system related to inflammatory states such as sepsis will be reviewed. We will then focus on the role of adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of specific disease processes involving the lungs and cardiovascular system. The potential of targeting adhesion molecules in the treatment of immune and inflammatory diseases will be highlighted in the relevant sections throughout the manuscript. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:945-973, 2016. PMID:27065171

  14. Design of a hydraulic analog of the circulatory system for evaluating artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Donovan, F M

    1975-01-01

    A major problem in improving artificial heart designs is the absence of methods for accurate in vitro testing of artificial heart systems. A mock circulatory system has been constructed which hydraulically simulates the systemic and pulmonary circulations of the normal human. The device is constructed of 1/2 in. acrylic sheet and has overall dimensions of 24 in. wide, 16 in. tall, and 8 in. deep. The artificial heart to be tested is attached to the front of the device, and pumps fluid from the systemic venous chamber into the pulmonary arterial chamber and from the pulmonary venous chamber into the systemic arterial chamber. Each of the four chambers is hermetically sealed. The compliance of each chamber is determined by the volume of air trapped above the fluid in that chamber. The pulmonary and systemic resistances are set automatically by bellows-operated valves to simulate the barroreceptor response in the systemic arteries and the passive pulmonary resistance response in the pulmonary arteries. Cardiac output is measured by a turbine flowmeter in the systemic circulation. Results using the Kwan-Gett artificial heart show a good comparison between the mock circulatory system response and the calf response. PMID:1225373

  15. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. PMID:26646071

  16. Evaluation of exercise-respiratory system modifications and preliminary respiratory-circulatory system integration scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The respiratory control system, functioning as an independent system, is presented with modifications of the exercise subroutine. These modifications illustrate an improved control of ventilation rates and arterial and compartmental gas tensions. A very elementary approach to describing the interactions of the respiratory and circulatory system is presented.

  17. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases and Malformations in Children in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Thais Rocha; Soares, Gabriel Porto; Klein, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Glaucia Maria Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Background The epidemiological profile of mortality in a population is important for the institution of measures to improve health care and reduce mortality Objective To estimate mortality rates and the proportional mortality from cardiovascular diseases and malformations of the circulatory system in children and adolescents. Methods This is a descriptive study of mortality from cardiovascular diseases, malformations of the circulatory system, from all causes, ill-defined causes and external causes in children and adolescents in the state of Rio de Janeiro from 1996 to 2012. Populations were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE) and deaths obtained from the Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System (DATASUS)/Ministry of Health. Results There were 115,728 deaths from all causes, 69,757 in males. The annual mortality from cardiovascular diseases was 2.7/100,000 in men and 2.6/100,000 in women. The annual mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was 7.5/100,000 in men and 6.6/100,000 in women. Among the specific causes of circulatory diseases, cardiomyopathies had the highest rates of annual proportional mortality, and from malformations of the circulatory system, it occurred due to unspecified malformations of the circulatory system, at all ages and in both genders. Conclusion Mortality from malformations of the circulatory system was most striking in the first years of life, while cardiovascular diseases were more relevant in adolescents. Low access to prenatal diagnosis or at birth probably prevented the proper treatment of malformations of the circulatory system. PMID:27192384

  18. The Circulatory System [and] Instructor's Guide: The Circulatory System. Health Occupations Education Module: Instructional Materials in Anatomy and Physiology for Pennsylvania Health Occupations Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This module on the circulatory system is one of 17 modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. It is part of an eight-unit subset on anatomy and physiology within the set of 17 modules. Following a preface which explains to the student how to use the…

  19. Mock circulatory system for the evaluation of left ventricular assist devices, endoluminal prostheses, and vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Daniel; Fonseca, Jeison; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José Francisco; Manrique, Ricardo; Guerrino, Domingos; Prakasan, Akash Kuzhiparambil; Ortiz, Jaime Pinto; Lucchi, Julio Cesar

    2008-06-01

    A new digital computer mock circulatory system has been developed in order to replicate the physiologic and pathophysiologic characteristics of the human cardiovascular system. The computer performs the acquisition of pressure, flow, and temperature in an open loop system. A computer program has been developed in Labview programming environment to evaluate all these physical parameters. The acquisition system was composed of pressure, flow, and temperature sensors and also signal conditioning modules. In this study, some results of flow, cardiac frequencies, pressures, and temperature were evaluated according to physiologic ventricular states. The results were compared with literature data. In further works, performance investigations will be conducted on a ventricular assist device and endoprosthesis. Also, this device should allow for evaluation of several kinds of vascular diseases. PMID:18422796

  20. Assessment of left heart and pulmonary circulation flow dynamics by a new pulsed mock circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanné, David; Bertrand, Eric; Kadem, Lyes; Pibarot, Philippe; Rieu, Régis

    2010-05-01

    We developed a new mock circulatory system that is able to accurately simulate the human blood circulation from the pulmonary valve to the peripheral systemic capillaries. Two independent hydraulic activations are used to activate an anatomical-shaped left atrial and a left ventricular silicon molds. Using a lumped model, we deduced the optimal voltage signals to control the pumps. We used harmonic analysis to validate the experimental pulmonary and systemic circulation models. Because realistic volumes are generated for the cavities and the resulting pressures were also coherent, the left atrium and left ventricle pressure-volume loops were concordant with those obtained in vivo. Finally we explored left atrium flow pattern using 2C-3D+T PIV measurements. This gave a first overview of the complex 3D flow dynamics inside realistic left atrium geometry.

  1. Noninvasive optoacoustic system for rapid diagnostics and management of circulatory shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Kinsky, Michael; Prough, Donald S.

    2012-02-01

    Circulatory shock is lethal, if not promptly diagnosed and effectively treated. Typically, circulatory shock resuscitation is guided by blood pressure, heart rate, and mental status, which have poor predictive value. In patients, in whom early goaldirected therapy was applied using central venous oxygenation measurement, a substantial reduction of mortality was reported (from 46.5% to 30%). However, central venous catheterization is invasive, time-consuming and often results in complications. We proposed to use the optoacoustic technique for noninvasive, rapid assessment of central venous oxygenation. In our previous works we demonstrated that the optoacoustic technique can provide measurement of blood oxygenation in veins and arteries due to high contrast and high resolution. In this work we developed a novel optoacoustic system for noninvasive, automatic, real-time, and continuous measurement of central venous oxygenation. We performed pilot clinical tests of the system in human subjects with different oxygenation in the internal jugular vein and subclavian vein. A novel optoacoustic interface incorporating highly-sensitive optoacoustic probes and standard ultrasound imaging probes were developed and built for the study. Ultrasound imaging systems Vivid i and hand-held Vscan (GE Healthcare) as well as Site-Rite 5 (C.R. Bard) were used in the study. We developed a special algorithm for oxygenation monitoring with minimal influence of overlying tissue. The data demonstrate that the system provides precise measurement of venous oxygenation continuously and in real time. Both current value of the venous oxygenation and trend (in absolute values and for specified time intervals) are displayed in the system. The data indicate that: 1) the optoacoustic system developed by our group is capable of noninvasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific veins; 2) clinical ultrasound imaging systems can facilitate optoacoustic probing of specific blood vessels; 3) the

  2. Scaling approach to study the changes through the gestation of human fetal cardiac and circulatory behaviors.

    PubMed

    Pennati, G; Fumero, R

    2000-04-01

    During human gestation, fetal body size increases considerably and important transformations occur to hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system of the fetus. Vascular compliances and resistances as well as the cardiac function show important changes. In order to investigate these modifications, a mathematical approach based on scaling techniques was developed. Vascular and cardiac parameters of the human fetus were related by allometric equations to the anatomical dimensions of vessels that, in turn, depend on the fetal body weight and the gestational age. A scaling factor (b) was identified for each parameter under study: vascular resistances and flow inertances decrease with gestational age (b= -0.33 for flow inertances) whereas vascular compliances remarkably increase (b= 1.33). Scaling factors were also adopted for the fetal cardiac parameters, according to experimental data on the development of fetal myocardium. Parameter values calculated for each week of the last trimester of the fetal gestation, were tested using a mathematical lumped parameter model, previously developed for a human fetus near the term of the gestation. The validation of the scaling method adopted for the parameters was performed by comparing the results of the simulations with a group of data obtained by Doppler velocimetry at different stages of fetal normal gestation. The adopted allometric equations were appropriate in describing the development of the human fetal circulatory system. The ductus venosus, the ductus arteriosus, and the foramen ovale, that conclude their function at the birth moment, as well as the lungs and the brain, do not follow the general growth rate and require different scaling factors. PMID:10870901

  3. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H; Fisher, James P

    2015-04-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response of the muscle is relatively small compared with the onset of leg cycling, where a marked increase in muscle blood flow rapidly occurs as a consequence of multiple redundant mechanisms. We recorded blood pressure (BP; brachial artery), stroke volume (pulse contour analysis), cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions and following cholinergic blockade (glycopyrrolate). Under control conditions, isometric handgrip elicited an initial increase in BP (+5 ± 2 mmHg at 3 s and +3 ± 1 mmHg at 10 s, P < 0.05), while SVR dropped after 3 s (-27 ± 6% at 20 s; P < 0.05). Cholinergic blockade abolished the isometric handgrip-induced fall in SVR and, thereby, augmented the pressor response (+13 ± 3 mmHg at 10 s; P < 0.05 vs. control). In contrast, cholinergic blockade had a nonsignificant effect on changes in BP and SVR at the onset of leg cycling exercise. These findings suggest that a cholinergic mechanism is important for the BP and SVR responses at the onset of isometric handgrip exercise in humans. PMID:25589014

  4. The Decapod Crustacean Circulatory System: A Case That Is neither Open nor Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaw, Iain J.

    2005-02-01

    Historically, the decapod crustacean circulatory system has been classed as open. However, recent work on the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, suggests the circulatory system may be more complex than previously described. Corrosion casting techniques were refined and used to map the circulatory system of a variety of crab species (order: Decapoda; family: Cancridae) to determine if the complexity observed in the blue crab was present in other species. Seven arteries arose from the single chambered heart. The anterior aorta, the paired anterolateral arteries, and the paired hepatic arteries exited from the anterior aspect of the heart. The small-diameter posterior aorta exited posteriorly from the heart. Exiting from the ventral surface of the heart, the sternal artery branched to supply the legs and mouthparts of the crab. These arteries were more complex than previously described, with arterioles perfusing all areas of the body. The arterioles split into fine capillary-like vessels. Most of these capillaries were blind ending. However, in several areas (antennal gland, supraesophageal ganglion) complete capillary beds were present. After passing through the capillary-like vessels, blood drained into a series of sinuses. However, rather than being arbitrary spaces as previously described, scanning electron micrographs showed the sinuses to be distinct units. Most of the sinuses formed a series of flattened membrane-bound lacunae. This complexity may qualify the decapod crustacean circulatory system as one that is "partially closed" rather than open.

  5. Bilingual Skills Training Program. Barbering/Cosmetology. Module 10.0: Circulatory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern New Mexico Community Coll., El Rito.

    This module on the circulatory or vascular system is the tenth of ten (CE 028 308-318) in the barbering/cosmetology course of a bilingual skills training program. (A Vocabulary Development Workbook for modules 6-10 is available as CE 028 313.) The course is designed to furnish theoretical and laboratory experience. Module objectives are for…

  6. Effects of a new nitro compound on the systemic circulatory system in dogs.

    PubMed

    Taki, K; Hashiba, Y; Sumita, T; Shoji, T; Ishikawa, N

    1991-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of a newly synthesized nitro compound (E-4701) on the systemic circulatory system with special reference to venous return and vascular compliance. Dogs were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. After opening the chest, cannulae were inserted into the superior and inferior vena cavae and into the right atrial appendage. The venous flow from the caval veins was redirected to a blood reservoir with an outlet at a constant height. The blood was pumped into the right atrium at a constant flow rate. E-4701 had a hypotensive effect, and also caused a decrease in reservoir blood volume; i.e., a decrease in venous return. Venous return via the superior vena cava was increased, whereas return via the inferior vena cava was decreased. Similar effects on the systemic circulatory system were observed with nitroprusside. The lowest dose of nitroprusside that caused a significant reduction in blood pressure was the same dose as that which caused a decrease in reservoir blood volume. However, a low dose of E-4701 caused a significant reduction in reservoir blood volume without affecting the systemic blood pressure. Arterial and venous compliances were increased by both E-4701 and nitroprusside. Nitroglycerin and isosorbide dinitrate increased venous compliance, but did not affect arterial compliance. The results suggest that E-4701 caused an almost equipotent reduction in blood pressure and venous return by dilating the arterial and venous vascular beds. The capacitance vessels may be more sensitive to E-4701 than the resistance vessels. PMID:1720838

  7. OUTCOMES OF THE FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Ündar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of the Conference was to bring together internationally know clinicians, bioengineers, and basic scientists involved in research on pediatric mechanical cardiac support systems and pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The primary focus was to explicitly describe the problems with current pediatric mechanical circulatory support systems, methods, and techniques during acute and chronic support. The organizers were able to bring together respected international scholars from over 25 different countries at past conferences that has already made a significant impact on the treatment of pediatric cardiac patients during the past three years. Over 1,300 participants (250–300 participants each year) from many countries, including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States, have participated in the 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 events. To date, The Fifth International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion is the only conference solely dedicated to pediatric cardiac devices used during acute and chronic mechanical circulatory support. There is no other national or international conference to precisely define the problems with pediatric cardiac patients, and to suggest solutions with new methodologies and devices for pediatric patients, but specifically for neonates and infants. PMID:20021466

  8. Global solution to a hyperbolic problem arising in the modeling of blood flow in circulatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Weihua; Clark, M. E.; Zhao, Meide; Curcio, Anthony

    2007-07-01

    This paper considers a system of first-order, hyperbolic, partial differential equations in the domain of a one-dimensional network. The system models the blood flow in human circulatory systems as an initial-boundary-value problem with boundary conditions of either algebraic or differential type. The differential equations are nonhomogeneous with frictional damping terms and the state variables are coupled at internal junctions. The existence and uniqueness of the local classical solution have been established in our earlier work [W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A hyperbolic system of equations of blood flow in an arterial network, J. Appl. Math. 64 (2) (2003) 637-667; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, Blood flow in a network, Nonlinear Anal. Real World Appl. 5 (2004) 463-485; W. Ruan, M.E. Clark, M. Zhao, A. Curcio, A quasilinear hyperbolic system that models blood flow in a network, in: Charles V. Benton (Ed.), Focus on Mathematical Physics Research, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, 2004, pp. 203-230]. This paper continues the analysis and gives sufficient conditions for the global existence of the classical solution. We prove that the solution exists globally if the boundary data satisfy the dissipative condition (2.3) or (3.2), and the norms of the initial and forcing functions in a certain Sobolev space are sufficiently small. This is only the first step toward establishing the global existence of the solution to physiologically realistic models, because, in general, the chosen dissipative conditions (2.3) and (3.2) do not appear to hold for the originally proposed boundary conditions (1.3)-(1.12).

  9. An "ancient" complexity? Evolutionary morphology of the circulatory system in Xiphosura.

    PubMed

    Göpel, Torben; Wirkner, Christian S

    2015-08-01

    Horseshoe crabs (Xiphosura) have been an object of zoological research for almost 200 years. Although some morphological work on the circulatory system has been done, the three-dimensional structure of this complex organ system has never been shown satisfactorily and some crucial questions remain unanswered. Here, the circulatory systems of juveniles of the horseshoe crab taxa Limulus polyphemus and Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda were investigated using a combination of an injection method and micro-computed tomography. Data were processed and 3D-visualized using reconstruction software. Furthermore, the heart was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the histology of some structures was investigated via light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results show the high degree of complexity of the arterial and lacunar systems of Xiphosura and provide insights into their three-dimensional structure and relationship to other organ systems such as the central nervous system. We show that the major lacunae, previously described as vessel-like - though indeed highly ramified - can clearly be distinguished from arteries in histological sections because they have no distinct walls. Similarities and differences between the xiphosuran species and arachnids are highlighted and possible phylogenetic implications and evolutionary scenarios discussed. PMID:25964110

  10. Burden of Circulatory System Diseases and Ignored Barriers of Knowledge Translation

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri, Hamed-Basir; Saravani, Shahzad; Shokraneh, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Circulatory system disease raise third highest disability-adjusted life years among Iranians and ischemic cardiac diseases are main causes for such burden. Despite available evidences on risk factors of the disease, no effective intervention was implemented to control and prevent the disease. This paper non-systematically reviews available literature on the problem, solutions, and barriers of implementation of knowledge translation in Iran. It seems that there are ignored factors such as cultural and motivational issues in knowledge translation interventions but there are hopes for implementation of started projects and preparation of students as next generation of knowledge transferors. PMID:24250994

  11. Perturbation analysis of internal balancing for lightly damped mechanical systems with gyroscopic and circulatory forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, P. A.; Mingori, D. L.; Wei, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate expressions are developed for internally balanced singular values corresponding to the modes of mechanical systems with gyroscopic forces, light damping, and small circulatory forces. A brief overview is first given of the balanced realization model reduction method, including a discussion of recent work. The models considered are defined, and a perturbation analysis is used to show that the modal representation becomes asymptotically balanced as damping reduces to zero. The approximate balanced singular values are calculated, and a simple example of a flexible, dual-spin spacecraft is given as an illustration of the results.

  12. Noninvasive optoacoustic system for rapid diagnosis and management of circulatory shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. N.; Seeton, Roger; Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Prough, Donald S.

    2013-03-01

    Circulatory shock can lead to death or severe complications, if not promptly diagnosed and effectively treated. Typically, diagnosis and management of circulatory shock are guided by blood pressure and heart rate. However, these variables have poor specificity, sensitivity, and predictive value. Early goal-directed therapy in septic shock patients, using central venous catheterization (CVC), reduced mortality from 46.5% to 30%. However, CVC is invasive and complication-prone. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for noninvasive, rapid assessment of peripheral and central venous oxygenation. In this work we used a medical grade optoacoustic system for noninvasive, ultrasound image-guided measurement of central and peripheral venous oxygenation. Venous oxygenation during shock declines more rapidly in the periphery than centrally. Ultrasound imaging of the axillary [peripheral] and internal jugular vein [central] was performed using the Vivid e (GE Healthcare). We built an optoacoustic interface incorporating an optoacoustic transducer and a standard ultrasound imaging probe. Central and peripheral venous oxygenations were measured continuously in healthy volunteers. To simulate shock-induced changes in central and peripheral oxygenation, we induced peripheral vasoconstriction in the upper extremity by using a cooling blanket. Central and peripheral venous oxygenations were measured before (baseline) and after cooling and after rewarming. During the entire experiment, central venous oxygenation was relatively stable, while peripheral venous oxygenation decreased by 5-10% due to cooling and recovered after rewarming. The obtained data indicate that noninvasive, optoacoustic measurements of central and peripheral venous oxygenation may be used for diagnosis and management of circulatory shock with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Non-Intrusive Device for Real-Time Circulatory System Assessment with Advanced Signal Processing Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, E.; Postolache, O.; Girão, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a device that uses three cardiography signals to characterize several important parameters of a subject's circulatory system. Using electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmogram, and ballistocardiogram, three heart rate estimates are acquired from beat-to-beat time interval extraction. Furthermore, pre-ejection period, pulse transit time (PTT), and pulse arrival time (PAT) are computed, and their long-term evolution is analyzed. The system estimates heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV) from the heart rate and PAT time series, to infer the activity of the cardiac autonomic system. The software component of the device evaluates the frequency content of HRV and BPV, and also their fractal dimension and entropy, thus providing a detailed analysis of the time series' regularity and complexity evolution, to allow personalized subject evaluation.

  14. Stability of circulatory elastic systems in the presence of magnetic damping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. E.; Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of a type of magnetic damping on the stability of equilibrium of some circulatory elastic systems is examined. A simple system with two degrees of freedom is considered first, and a destabilization is found to be caused by the magnetic field. The nature of the destabilization, however, is not identical to that caused by internal viscous damping. The differences and similarities between the two effects are discussed, and the results are also compared with those of linear external viscous damping. A continuous cantilever bar subjected to a follower force at its free end is then examined. It is found that the critical load is independent of the strength of the magnetic field, and is considerably lower than the corresponding critical load in the absence of a magnetic field. Finally, the continuous cantilever is treated approximately by Galerkin's procedure and also by using a two-degree-of-freedom model of the cantilever; the results obtained are qualitatively the same.

  15. [Forming a community at risk for circulatory system diseases among workers engaged into underground mining].

    PubMed

    Shliapnikov, D M; Shur, P Z; Kostarev, V G; Alexeyev, V B; Vlasova, E M; Uhabov, V M

    2015-01-01

    Forming a community at risk for circulatory system diseases will increase efficiency of medical and prophylactic measures on managing risk of arterial hypertension. Epidemiologic analysis helped to reveal reliable connection between arterial hypertension predictors and work conditions of mining machine operators and supported actualization of high occupational risk suggested in a priori evaluation. Mathematic modelling helped to forecast increase in the disease probability: with noise level of 94 dB after 10 years of work, 17.9% of workers are expected to have arterial hypertension preventing from further occupational activity. Forecasting results of arterial hypertension probability help to form risk groups for medical and preventive technologies managing occupational risk, and predictors enable to specify necessity of individual medical preventive measures. PMID:27024920

  16. [The gender aspects of diet factors effect on development of diseases of circulatory system among rural population].

    PubMed

    Kamalova, F M; Valeeva, E R

    2014-01-01

    The unhealthy diet is one of important controllable risk factors of development of noninfectious diseases. The gender differences in attitude to one's own health confirm significance of their effect on health condition. The study was carried out to establish the effect of diet factors on the rate of diseases of circulatory system in rural population with consideration of gender distribution. The analysis of results of sampling examination of rural population established that 51% of disease rate in males and 22% of disease rate in females are related to diseases of circulatory system. In males and females rate of diseases of circulatory system is determined by diet factors. The direction of relationship is direct and inverse, differs in males and females and depends on diet factors. The gender differences were manifested not only in conditionality of rate of diseases of circulatory system by diet factors but also by their mutual interaction. The health management of rural population is based on examination and analysis of relationship between health of rural population and factors of their diet. PMID:25799749

  17. Effect of 5E Instructional Model in Student Success in Primary School 6th Year Circulatory System Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardak, Osman; Dikmenli, Musa; Saritas, Ozge

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to research the effect of the 5E instructional model on primary (sixth grade) student success during the circulatory system unit. This study was conducted with 38 students in two different classes by the same researcher in 2006-2007. One of the classes was assigned as the control group and the other as the experimental…

  18. Continuous flow total artificial heart: modeling and feedback control in a mock circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hassan A; Kerr, Daniel T; Franchek, Matthew A; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Benkowski, Robert J; Cohn, William E; Tuzun, Egemen; Radovancevic, Branislav; Frazier, O H; Kadipasaoglu, Kamuran A

    2008-01-01

    We developed a mock circulatory loop and used mathematical modeling to test the in vitro performance of a physiologic flow control system for a total artificial heart (TAH). The TAH was constructed from two continuous flow pumps. The objective of the control system was to maintain loop flow constant in response to changes in outflow resistance of either pump. Baseline outflow resistances of the right (pulmonary vascular resistance) and the left (systemic vascular resistance) pumps were set at 2 and 18 Wood units, respectively. The corresponding circuit flow was 4 L/min. The control system consisted of two digital integral controllers, each regulating the voltage, hence, the rotational speed of one of the pumps. The in vitro performance of the flow control system was validated by increasing systemic and pulmonary vascular resistances in the mock loop by 4 and 8 Wood units (simulating systemic and pulmonary hypertension conditions), respectively. For these simulated hypertensive states, the flow controllers regulated circuit flow back to 4 L/min within seconds by automatically adjusting the rotational speed of either or both pumps. We conclude that this multivariable feedback mechanism may constitute an adequate supplement to the inherent pressure sensitivity of rotary blood pumps for the automatic flow control and left-right flow balance of a dual continuous flow pump TAH system. PMID:18496274

  19. Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Frebel, Helge; Nindl, Veronika; Schuepbach, Reto A; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Richter, Kirsten; Vogel, Johannes; Wagner, Carsten A; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kurrer, Michael; Ludewig, Burkhard; Oxenius, Annette

    2012-12-17

    The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1-PD-L1-mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1-deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1-PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell-mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell-mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1-PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections. PMID:23230000

  20. Pumping Rate Study of a Left Ventricular Assist Device in a Mock Circulatory System.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaoqi; Yang, Ming; Xu, Liang; Ou, Wenchu; Xu, Zihao; Meng, Fan; Huang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the hemodynamic influence of the change of pump rate on the cardiovascular system with consideration of heart rate and the resonant characteristics of the arterial system when a reliable synchronous triggering source is unavailable. Hemodynamic waveforms are recorded at baseline conditions and with the pump rate of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) at 55, 60, 66, and 70 beats per minute for four test conditions in a mock circulatory system. The total input work (TIW) and energy equivalent pressure (EEP) are calculated as metrics for evaluating the hemodynamic performance within different test conditions. Experimental results show that TIW and EEP achieve their maximum values, where the pump rate is equal to the heart rate. In addition, it demonstrates that TIW and EEP are significantly affected by changing pump rate of LVAD, especially when the pump rate is closing to the natural frequency of the arterial system. When a reliable synchronous triggering source is not available for LVAD, it is suggested that selecting a pump rate equal to the resonant frequency of the arterial system could achieve better supporting effects. PMID:26955001

  1. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Circulatory...

  2. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circulatory...

  3. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circulatory...

  4. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Circulatory...

  5. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Circulatory...

  6. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  7. Development of an in-vitro circulatory system with known resistance and capacitance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offerdahl, C. D.; Schaub, J. D.; Koenig, S. C.; Swope, R. D.; Ewert, D. L.; Convertino, V. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    An in-vitro (hydrodynamic) model of the circulatory system was developed. The model consisted of a pump, compliant tubing, and valves for resistance. The model is used to simulate aortic pressure and flow. These parameters were measured using a Konigsburg Pressure transducer and a Triton ART2 flow probe. In addition, venous pressure and flow were measured on the downstream side of the resistance. The system has a known compliance and resistance. Steady and pulsatile flow tests were conducted to determine the resistance of the model. A static compliance test was used to determine the compliance of the system. The aortic pressure and flow obtained from the hydrodynamic model will be used to test the accuracy of parameter estimation models such as the 2-element and 4-element Windkessel models and the 3-element Westkessel model. Verifying analytical models used in determining total peripheral resistance (TPR) and systemic arterial compliance (SAC) is important because it provides insight into hemodynamic parameters that indicate baroreceptor responsiveness to situations such as changes in gravitational acceleration.

  8. Programmed death 1 protects from fatal circulatory failure during systemic virus infection of mice

    PubMed Central

    Frebel, Helge; Nindl, Veronika; Schuepbach, Reto A.; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Richter, Kirsten; Vogel, Johannes; Wagner, Carsten A.; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Kurrer, Michael; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2012-01-01

    The inhibitory programmed death 1 (PD-1)–programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway contributes to the functional down-regulation of T cell responses during persistent systemic and local virus infections. The blockade of PD-1–PD-L1–mediated inhibition is considered as a therapeutic approach to reinvigorate antiviral T cell responses. Yet previous studies reported that PD-L1–deficient mice develop fatal pathology during early systemic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, suggesting a host protective role of T cell down-regulation. As the exact mechanisms of pathology development remained unclear, we set out to delineate in detail the underlying pathogenesis. Mice deficient in PD-1–PD-L1 signaling or lacking PD-1 signaling in CD8 T cells succumbed to fatal CD8 T cell–mediated immunopathology early after systemic LCMV infection. In the absence of regulation via PD-1, CD8 T cells killed infected vascular endothelial cells via perforin-mediated cytolysis, thereby severely compromising vascular integrity. This resulted in systemic vascular leakage and a consequential collapse of the circulatory system. Our results indicate that the PD-1–PD-L1 pathway protects the vascular system from severe CD8 T cell–mediated damage during early systemic LCMV infection, highlighting a pivotal physiological role of T cell down-regulation and suggesting the potential development of immunopathological side effects when interfering with the PD-1–PD-L1 pathway during systemic virus infections. PMID:23230000

  9. User's instructions for the Guyton circulatory dynamics model using the Univac 1110 batch and demand processing (with graphic capabilities)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, G. T.

    1974-01-01

    The model presents a systems analysis of a human circulatory regulation based almost entirely on experimental data and cumulative present knowledge of the many facets of the circulatory system. The model itself consists of eighteen different major systems that enter into circulatory control. These systems are grouped into sixteen distinct subprograms that are melded together to form the total model. The model develops circulatory and fluid regulation in a simultaneous manner. Thus, the effects of hormonal and autonomic control, electrolyte regulation, and excretory dynamics are all important and are all included in the model.

  10. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Family in Ascidians, Halocynthia roretzi (Sea Squirt). Its High Expression in Circulatory System-Containing Tissues.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Shibuya, Masabumi

    2013-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-VEGF Receptor (VEGFR) system is an important pathway for regulation of angiogenesis. However, its evolutionary development, particularly the step from invertebrates to vertebrates, is still largely unknown. Here, we molecularly cloned the VEGFR-like gene from Halocynthia roretzi, a species belonging to the Tunicata, the chordate subphylum recently considered the sister group of vertebrates. The cDNA encoded a homolog of human VEGFR, including the transmembrane domain, and the tyrosine kinase domain with a kinase-insert region, which was designated S. sq VEGFR (GenBank AB374180). Similar to Tunicates including ascidians in the phylogenetic tree, the Amphioxus, another chordate, is located close to vertebrates. However, S. sq VEGFR has a higher homology than the Amphioxus VEGFR-like molecule (GenBank AB025557) to human VEGFR in the kinase domain-2 region. The S. sq VEGFR mRNA was expressed at highest levels in circulatory system-containing tissues, suggesting that S. sq VEGFR plays an important role in the formation or maintenance of circulatory system in Tunicates, Halocynthia roretzi. PMID:23455462

  11. Interdisciplinary studies on the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems: Collaboration of industry and academe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to acquaint the Houston community with specific areas of available technology, both public and private, to demonstrate to industry how this technology may be acquired and put to use to provide new and useful services for man. Much of the technology utilized in the development of nuclear-fueled circulatory support systems in our laboratories has evolved from industry, NASA, and AEC; our projects involve radiation biology, thermodynamics, energy transfers, hemodynamics, hematology, pathology, and surgery.

  12. Single and combined effects of air pollutants on circulatory and respiratory system-related mortality in Belgrade, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Stojić, Svetlana Stanišić; Stanišić, Nemanja; Stojić, Andreja; Šoštarić, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between short- and long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and soot and mortality attributed to circulatory and respiratory diseases in Belgrade area (Serbia). The analyzed data set comprised results of regular pollutant monitoring and corresponding administrative records on frequency of daily mortality in the period 2009-2014. Nonlinear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects of temperature were examined by means of distributed lag nonlinear models. The air pollutant loadings and circulatory system-related death rates in Belgrade area are among the highest in Europe. Data demonstrated that excess risk of death with short-term exposure to elevated concentrations of PM10, SO2, and soot was not significant, whereas marked effect size estimates for exposure over 90 d preceding mortality were found. The influence of chronic exposure was shown to be greater for respiratory than circulatory system-related mortality. When stratified by age and gender, higher risk was noted for male individuals below the age of 65 years. PMID:26699658

  13. Results following implantation of mechanical circulatory support systems: The Montreal Heart Institute experience

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamamsy, Ismaïl; Jacques, Frédéric; Perrault, Louis P; Bouchard, Denis; Demers, Philippe; White, Michel; Pelletier, Guy B; Racine, Normand; Pellerin, Michel; Carrier, Michel

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical circulatory support systems (MCSS) have been available in Canada since 1986. Accepted indications include bridging to transplantation or recovery. The present study reviewed the results following MCSS implantation at the Montreal Heart Institute (Montreal, Quebec). METHODS: From September 1987 to September 2006, 43 MCSS were implanted (32 Thoratec [Thoratec Corporation, USA], nine Cardio West TAH [SynCardia Systems Inc, USA], two Novacor [World Heart Corporation, Canada]) in 43 patients (mean [± SD] age 44±13 years; range 19 to 64 years). Indications for implantation included cardiogenic shock due to ischemic (n=19), viral (n=10) or other types of cardiomyopathies (n=14). RESULTS: The mean ejection fraction before implantation was 17.6±6.5% (range 10% to 45%). Before MCSS implantation, most patients showed signs of end-organ failure, including mechanical ventilation (77%), central venous pressure higher than 16 mmHg (44%), oliguria (35%) and hepatic dysfunction (19%). The mean duration of MCSS support was 22.8±32.8 days (range one to 158 days). Survival to transplantation or recovery was 74%. Only one patient was successfully bridged to recovery. Complications were common during MCSS support. They included re-exploration for bleeding (47%), respiratory failure (44%), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (40%), infection (33%) and neurological events (16%). Only one patient had device failure. In patients successfully bridged to transplantation, early actuarial survival (one month) following transplantation averaged 71±8% and was 57±9% at one year. CONCLUSION: MCSS support with a left ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart provides an effective means of bridging terminally ill patients to transplantation or recovery. Early survival after transplantation shows satisfactory results. However, these results come at the expense of frequent device-related complications, and device failure remains a constant threat. PMID

  14. In vitro performance analysis of a novel pulsatile diagonal pump in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pump performance of the third-generation Medos diagonal pump, the Deltastream DP3, on hemodynamic profile and pulsatility in a simulated pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) system. The experimental circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 pump head and console (MEDOS Medizintechnik AG, Stolberg, Germany), a 14-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric arterial cannula and a 20-Fr Terumo TenderFlow Pediatric venous return cannula (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), and 3 ft of tubing with an internal diameter of in. for both arterial and venous lines. Trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 250 mL/min to 1000 mL/min (250-mL/min increments) and rotational speeds ranging from 1000 to 4000 rpm (1000-rpm increments) using human blood (hematocrit 40%). The postcannula pressure was maintained at 60 mm Hg by a Hoffman clamp. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a Labview-based acquisition system. The pump provided adequate nonpulsatile and pulsatile flow, created more hemodynamic energy under pulsatile mode, and generated higher positive and negative pressures when the inlet and outlet of the pump head, respectively, were clamped. After the conversion from nonpulsatile to pulsatile mode, the flow rates and the rotational speeds increased. In conclusion, the novel Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump is able to supply the required flow rate for pediatric MCS, generate adequate quality of pulsatility, and provide surplus hemodynamic energy output in a simulated pediatric MCS system. PMID:24237183

  15. [THE CHARACTERISTIC OF SOMATOTYPE AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM OF STUDENT YOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST OF RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Timofeieva, A V; Klimova, T M; Mikhailova, A E; Zakharova, R N; Vinokurova, S P; Timofeiev, L F

    2015-01-01

    The article considers results of single-step study in random sampling of female students of the M.K. Ammosov north-east federal university (n=456). The study was carried out to investigate somatotype and functional state of circulatory system. The standard technique was applied to measure height, body mass, chest circumference, level of arterial pressure and rate of heart beats. The type of somatotype was established using Pignet index. The tone of vegetative system was determined using Kérdö index. The adaptation potential of circulatory system was determined using functional changes index. The results of study established that in 61% of examined female students the type of constitution corresponds to normosthenic one. The percentage of persons with asthenic and hypersthenic type of constitution amounted to 27% and 12% correspondingly. The signs of increasing oftone ofsympathetic nervous system are observed in 89% of girls. The functional condition of circulatory system is evaluated as "tension of adaptation mechanisms" that is apparently related to period of adaptation to new conditions. The prolonged preservation of such states results in exhaustion offunctional resources of organism and can promote development of diseases. In conditions of impacting of unfavorable ecological factors the deconditionning disorders can significantly contribute to health disturbances and decreasing of life quality. To preserve youth's health during period of education the comprehensive strategy is to be implemented such components as dynamic monitoring of health, organization of adequate diet, explanation of necessity of observance of sleep and rest pattern, development of conditions for active aerobic physical exertion and activities on correction of risk factors of development of diseases are to be included. PMID:26987173

  16. Development and initial in vivo testing of a new hydraulic drive system (Paedipump) for circulatory support in infants.

    PubMed

    Reiss, N; Morshuis, M; Landich, R; Frerichs, I; Frerichs, A; Hellige, G; Illian, M; Dramburg, W; Scheid, P; Minami, K; Körfer, R

    1998-07-01

    The main limitation in the use of circulatory support in children is the lack of an adequate system with regard to size and pumping capacity. Recently, two pneumatically driven ventricular support systems with low volume chambers for use in a pediatric population became available. We have developed a hydraulic drive system with an advantageous exact control of the stroke volume. The system enables two different modes of operation: the full-empty and the filled-empty modes. In both cases the ventricle is empty at the end of systole. This new system was tested in experimental animals (6 pigs, body weight 9.5-14.0 kg) with normal and reduced left ventricular function (MAP<45 mmHg). A 25 ml ventricle (HIA-Medos) was implanted. The full-empty and the filled-empty mode used led to a significant load reduction, both in animals with normal and impaired cardiac function. Plasma lactate levels, pH-values and total body O2-consumption were in the normal range during circulatory support indicating adequate organ perfusion. Results showed that sufficient ventricular support was achieved during all pumping modes due to the possibility of controlling and modifying the stroke volume of the hydraulically driven support system employed according to necessity. This is a promising feature for its future application in infants with congenital or acquired heart diseases. PMID:9745998

  17. Atmospheric pressure fluctuations in the far infrasound range and emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didyk, L. A.; Gorgo, Yu. P.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Bogdanov, V. B.; Buytaert, J. A. N.; Lysenko, V. A.; Didyk, N. P.; Vershygora, A. V.; Erygina, V. T.

    2008-09-01

    This study examines whether a relation exists between rapid atmospheric pressure fluctuations, attributed to the far infrasound frequency range (APF), and a number of emergency transport events coded as circulatory system diseases (EEC). Over an entire year, the average integral amplitudes of APF in the range of periods from 3 s to 120 s over each hour (HA) were measured. Daily dynamics of HA averaged over the year revealed a wave shape with smooth increase from night to day followed by decrease from day to night. The total daily number of EEC within the city of Kiev, Ukraine, was related to the daily mean of HA (DHA) and to the ratio of HA averaged over the day time to HA averaged over the night time (Rdn), and was checked for confounding effects of classical meteorological variables through non-parametric regression algorithms. The number of EEC were significantly higher on days with high DHA (3.72 11.07 Pa, n = 87) compared to the low DHA (0.7 3.62 Pa, n = 260, p = 0.01), as well at days with low Rdn (0.21 1.64, n = 229) compared to the high Rdn (1.65 7.2, n = 118, p = 0.03). A difference between DHA and Rdn effects on the emergency events related to different categories of circulatory diseases points to a higher sensitivity of rheumatic and cerebro-vascular diseases to DHA, and ischaemic and hypertensive diseases to Rdn. Results suggest that APF could be considered as a meteorotropic factor capable of influencing circulatory system diseases.

  18. Mortality from Circulatory System Diseases among French Uranium Miners: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Drubay, Damien; Caër-Lorho, Sylvaine; Laroche, Pierre; Laurier, Dominique; Rage, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    A significant association has been observed between radon exposure and cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) mortality among French uranium miners, but risk factors for circulatory system diseases (CSD) have not been previously considered. We conducted new analyses in the recently updated (through 2007) French cohort of uranium miners (n = 5,086), which included 442 deaths from CSD, 167 of them from ischemic heart disease (IHD) and 105 from CeVD. A nested case-control study was then set up to collect and investigate the influence of these risk factors on the relationships between mortality from CSD and occupational external gamma ray and internal ionizing radiation exposure (radon and long-lived radionuclides) in this updated cohort. The nested case-control study included miners first employed after 1955, still employed in 1976 and followed up through 2007. Individual information about CSD risk factors was collected from medical files for the 76 deaths from CSD (including 26 from IHD and 16 from CeVD) and 237 miners who had not died of CSD by the end of follow-up. The exposure-risk relationships were assessed with a Cox proportional hazard model weighted by the inverse sampling probability. A significant increase in all CSD and CeVD mortality risks associated with radon exposure was observed in the total cohort [hazard ratios: HRCSD/100 working level months (WLM) = 1.11, 95% confidence interval (1.01; 1.22) and HRCeVD/100 WLM = 1.25 (1.09; 1.43), respectively]. A nonsignificant exposure-risk relationship was observed for every type of cumulative ionizing radiation exposure and every end point [e.g., HRCSD/100WLM = 1.43 (0.71; 2.87)]. The adjustment for each CSD risk factor did not substantially change the exposure-risk relationships. When the model was adjusted for overweight, hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and smoking status, the HR/100WLM for CSD, for example, was equal to 1.21 (0.54; 2.75); and when it was adjusted for risk factors selected with the

  19. Relationships between Digestive, Circulatory, and Urinary Systems in Portuguese Primary Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Graça S.; Clèment, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 63 Portuguese primary schoolbooks (1920-2005) were analyzed. The analysis focused on text information (reference to blood absorption and association of the digestive system to other human systems) and on information from images (presence or absence of image "confusion" (when the sequence of the digestive tract is not…

  20. On the contribution of group III and IV muscle afferents to the circulatory response to rhythmic exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Runnels, Sean; Morgan, David E; Trinity, Joel D; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Wray, D Walter; Reese, Van R; Richardson, Russell S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the role of skeletal muscle afferent feedback in circulatory control during rhythmic exercise in humans. Nine healthy males performed single leg knee-extensor exercise (15/30/45 watts, 3 min each) under both control conditions (Ctrl) and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing μ-opioid receptor-sensitive muscle afferents. Cardiac output and femoral blood flow were determined, and femoral arterial/venous blood samples were collected during the final minute of each workload. To rule out cephalad migration of fentanyl to the brainstem, we documented unchanged resting ventilatory responses to different levels of hypercapnia. There were no haemodynamic differences between conditions at rest. However, during exercise cardiac output was ∼20% lower with fentanyl blockade compared to control (P < 0.05), secondary to a 6% and 13% reduction in heart rate and stroke volume, respectively. Throughout exercise mean arterial pressure (MAP) was reduced by 7% (P < 0.01) which is likely to have contributed to the 15% fall in femoral blood flow. However, MAP was not completely responsible for this peripheral haemodynamic change as vascular conductance was also attenuated (∼9%). Evidence of increasing noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.09) implicated an elevation in sympathetic outflow in this response. The attenuated femoral blood flow during exercise with fentanyl was associated with a 17% reduction in leg O2 delivery (P < 0.01) and a concomitant rise in the arteriovenous O2 difference (4–9%), but leg O2 consumption remained 7–13% lower than control (P < 0.05). Our findings reveal an essential contribution of continuous muscle afferent feedback to ensure the appropriate haemodynamic and ultimately metabolic response to rhythmic exercise in humans. PMID:21646407

  1. Long-term allergen exposure induces adipose tissue inflammation and circulatory system injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chien-Cheng; Su, Huey-Jen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to study whether allergen exposure can induce inflammation and lower the anti-inflammation levels in serum and in adipose tissues, and further develop cardiovascular injury. Our data showed that heart rate was significantly higher in the OVA-challenged mice compared to control mice. Moreover, there were higher expressions of pro-inflammation genes in the OVA-challenged mice in adipose tissues, and the expressions of anti-inflammation genes were lower. The levels of inflammation mediators were associated in serum and adipose tissues. The level of circulatory injury lactate dehydrogenase was significantly associated with the levels of E-selectin, resistin and adiponectin in the serum. The hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry stains indicated the OVA-challenged mice had higher levels of inflammation. In summary, the current study demonstrated allergen exposure can cause cardiovascular injury, and inflammatory mediators in adipose tissues play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular injury. PMID:27004794

  2. [Preoperative preparation of pregnant with hypertension according to state of the autonomic nervous system and circulatory system].

    PubMed

    Gur'ianov, V A; Tolmachev, G N; Volodin, A V; Marichik, N V; Nemirovskiĭ, V B; Pivovarova, G M; Shepetovskaia, N L

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in patients with hypertension is considered in the spotlight of creation of general adaptation syndrome. According to evidence, when a stable hypertension in pregnant patients with hyper- and eukinetic types of haemodynamics is observed, the response of circulatory system and body fluid compartments has a moderate difference with normal. In pregnant patients with hypertension and a hypokinetic type of haemodynamics and pregnant patients with gestosis developed against the background of eukinetic type of hypertension, a physiological decrease of total peripheral resistance (TPR) is absent, which contributes into interstitial hyperhydration. In pregnant patients with gestosis developed against the background of hypokinetic type of haemodynamics, a pathological rise of TPR occurs, which is followed with a more significant interstitial hyperhydration. A differentiated preoperative preparation of pregnant with hypertension with the calcium antagonists and hydroxyethyl starch solution (130/0,4) favours the conversion of hyper- and hypokinetic types of haemodynamics to eukinetic, forms a physiological type of sympathicotonia and improves the water-salt metabolism. PMID:21400790

  3. Effect of Nano-sized Carbon Black Particles on Lung and Circulatory System by Inhalation Exposure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min-Gu; Cho, Hae-Won; Han, Jeong-Hee; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Rim, Kyung-Taek; Yang, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Hwa; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to establish a novel method to generate nano-sized carbon black particles (nano-CBPs) with an average size smaller than 100 nm for examining the inhalation exposure risks of experimental rats. We also tested the effect of nano-CBPs on the pulmonary and circulatory systems. Methods We used chemical vapor deposition (CVD) without the addition of any additives to generate nano-CBPs with a particle size (electrical mobility diameter) of less than 100nm to examine the effects of inhalation exposure. Nano-CBPs were applied to a nose-only inhalation chamber system for studying the inhalation toxicity in rats. The effect on the lungs and circulatory system was determined according to the degree of inflammation as quantified by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). The functional alteration of the hemostatic and vasomotor activities was measured by plasma coagulation, platelet activity, contraction and relaxation of blood vessels. Results Nano-CBPs were generated in the range of 83.3-87.9 nm. Rats were exposed for 4 hour/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks to 4.2 × 106, 6.2 × 105, and 1.3 × 105 particles/cm3. Exposure of nano-CBPs by inhalation resulted in minimal pulmonary inflammation and did not appear to damage the lung tissue. In addition, there was no significant effect on blood functions, such as plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation, or on vasomotor function. Conclusion We successfully generated nano-CBPs in the range of 83.3-87.9 nm at a maximum concentration of 4.2 × 106 particles/cm3 in a nose-only inhalation chamber system. This reliable method can be useful to investigate the biological and toxicological effects of inhalation exposure to nano-CBPs on experimental rats. PMID:22953212

  4. Circulatory response evoked by a 3 s bout of dynamic leg exercise in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Wieling, W; Harms, M P; ten Harkel, A D; van Lieshout, J J; Sprangers, R L

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying the pronounced transient fall in arterial blood pressure evoked by a 3 s bout of bicycle exercise were investigated in twenty healthy young adults and four patients with hypoadrenergic orthostatic hypotension. 2. In healthy subjects a 3 s bout of upright cycling induced a 28 +/- 3 mmHg fall in mean arterial pressure at 12 s. The fall in mean arterial pressure was preceded by a 12 +/- 2 mmHg rise in right atrial pressure at 3 s and accompanied by a 54 +/- 7% increase in left ventricle stroke volume at 6 s. Systemic vascular resistance dropped 48 +/- 2% at 7 s after the start of the manoeuvre to remain at that level for approximately 5 s. The total response lasted about 20 s. During sustained upright cycling the initial fall in mean arterial pressure was also present, but less pronounced (17 +/- 2 vs. 26 +/- 3 mmHg). A 3 s bout of supine cycling in four patients with hypoadrenergic orthostatic hypotension also elicited a pronounced fall in mean arterial pressure (22 +/- 4 mmHg) and in systemic vascular resistance (38 +/- 4%). 3. A bout of exercise with a large muscle mass induces two main effects. First, it mechanically increases filling of the heart due to activation of the muscle pump, resulting in an increase in cardiac output. Second, it induces a drop in systemic vascular resistance. The increase in cardiac output is not sufficient to compensate fully for the pronounced fall in systemic vascular resistance and the result is a transient fall in arterial pressure at the onset of whole-body exercise. The rise in right atrial pressure evoked by 3 s cycling is abrupt and large, but the almost immediate onset and rapid fall of the systemic vascular resistance is too fast for sympathetically mediated reflex effects due to stimulation of the cardiopulmonary afferents. An important factor involved in the drop in systemic vascular resistance appears to be local, non-autonomically mediated vasodilatation in exercising muscles, since it also

  5. Effect of micro mist sauna bathing on thermoregulatory and circulatory functions and thermal sensation in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2016-05-01

    moderate and effective thermal effect during micro mist sauna bathing than the conventional mist sauna bathing. In addition, micro mist sauna is as effective for heating the human subjects as bathtub bathing as well as more moderate thermal and sweating sensations.

  6. Effect of micro mist sauna bathing on thermoregulatory and circulatory functions and thermal sensation in humans.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2016-05-01

    micro mist sauna produced by water crushing method induced more moderate and effective thermal effect during micro mist sauna bathing than the conventional mist sauna bathing. In addition, micro mist sauna is as effective for heating the human subjects as bathtub bathing as well as more moderate thermal and sweating sensations. PMID:26384686

  7. A fast building and effective hydraulic pediatric mock circulatory system for the evaluation of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Ruan, Xiaodong; Zou, Jun; Qian, Wenwei; Fu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    A mock circulatory system (MCS) has been proven a useful tool in the development of a ventricular assist device. Nowadays a MCS aimed at the evaluation of pediatric blood pumps, which require many different considerations compared with that of adults, has become an urgent need. This article presents the details on how the dynamic process of the left ventricle, which is described in terms of the pressure-volume loop (P-V loop), and the properties of the circulation such as compliance and resistance are simulated by hydraulic elements. A simple control method is introduced to reproduce the physiological afterload and preload sensitivities of the mock ventricle for the first time. Hemodynamic performance of the system is obtained by medical sensors to validate the similarity of the device to the native cardiovascular system. The actual sensitivities of the mock ventricle are obtained intuitively from the changes of the P-V loops. The aortic input impedance of the MCS is also obtained and compared with the data from previous medical reports. At last a pediatric left ventricular assist device (LVAD) prototype is introduced for testing to further verify the effectiveness of the MCS. The experimental results indicate that this pediatric MCS is capable of reproducing basic hemodynamic characteristics of a child in both normal and pathological conditions and it is sufficient for testing a pediatric LVAD. Besides, most components constituting the main hydraulic part of this MCS are inexpensive off-the-shelf products, making the MCS easy and fast to build. PMID:24088901

  8. Hemodynamic evaluation of a chronically implanted, electrically powered left ventricular assist system: responses to acute circulatory stress.

    PubMed

    McKay, R G; Penny, W F; Wyman, R M; Clay, W; Carr, J G; Bernhard, W F; Grossman, W

    1991-12-01

    Hemodynamic stress testing was performed in four calves with a chronically implanted left ventricular assist device consisting of a double-valved pump interposed between the left ventricular apex and the descending thoracic aorta. The device was powered either pneumatically (n = 1) or with a transcutaneous energy transmission system (n = 3). Hemodynamic evaluation (cardiac output and right and left ventricular and pulmonary and carotid artery pressures) was carried out at baseline and during all hemodynamically stressed states. Atrial pacing and ventricular pacing to a heart rate of 140 beats/min resulted in no significant change in right or left heart filling pressures or cardiac output. Preload reduction with nitroprusside or transient inferior vena cava balloon occlusion resulted in a marked decrease in left ventricular pressure with preservation of mean arterial pressure. Phenylephrine administration resulted in a marked rise in mean arterial pressure with no change in cardiac output or filling pressure. Induction of ventricular fibrillation resulted in a decrease of mean left ventricular pressure to 11 +/- 8 mm Hg, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at greater than or equal to 50 mm Hg. It is concluded that a multicomponent, implantable, electrically powered assist system is capable of maintaining a normal cardiac output under a wide range of loading conditions and chronotropic states. Although this device is clearly preload dependent, it is capable of maintaining normal systemic pressures during conditions of severe left ventricular dysfunction and circulatory collapse. PMID:1960330

  9. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-03-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  10. Influence of apnoeic oxygenation in respiratory and circulatory system under general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexander; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Kolettas, Vasilis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Kiougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Drylis, Georgios; Kesisis, Georgios; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Apnoeic oxygenation is an alternative technique of oxygenation which is recommended in the consecutive oxygen administration with varying flows (2-10 lt/min) through a catheter which is positioned over the keel of the trachea. Apnoeic oxygenation maintains for a significant period of time the oxygenation of blood in breathless conditions. This technique was first applied in 1947 by Draper, Whitehead, and Spencer and it was studied sporadically by other inventors too. However, the international literature shows few studies that have examined closely apnoeic oxygenation and its effects on Hemodynamic image and the respiratory system of the human body. Recently they have begun to arise some studies which deal with the application of this technique in several conditions such as difficult tracheal intubation, ventilation of guinea pigs in campaign conditions where the oxygen supply is limited and calculable, the application of this technique in combination with the use of extracorporeal removal of carbon dioxide (CO2). All the above indicate, the clinical use of this technique. PMID:24672687

  11. A biplane roentgen videometry system for dynamic /60 per second/ studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, E.; Wood, E. H.; Heintzen, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A roentgen-television digital-computer technique and a display system developed for dynamic circulatory structure studies are described. Details are given for a videoroentgenographic setup which is used for obtaining biplane roentgen silhouettes of a left ventricle. A 60 per sec measurement of the shape and volume of angiographically outlined cardiac chambers can be made by this technique along with simultaneous ECG, pressure, and flow measurements accessible for real-time digital computer processing and analysis.

  12. [Hemodynamic correlation between the reaction of circulatory system on physical activity and exogenic adrenaline in liquidators of Chernobyl accident with neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A N; Vereskun, S B

    2007-01-01

    The article presents a correlation analysis between hemodynamic changes occurred after performing submaximum physical activity using bicycle ergometer (physical stress) and intravenous injection of adrenalin (pharmacological stress) in 30 liquidators of Chernobyl accident and who have a neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome. It enables to establish interrelations for a number of maximal values of parameters of hemodynamics which is determined by the same shifts in circulatory system with sympathoadrenal direction during these two kinds of stress influence. PMID:18416159

  13. Active musculoskeletal structures equipped with a circulatory system and a network of ionic polymeric gel muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Shahinpoor, M.; Mojarrad, M.

    1994-12-31

    Presented are descriptions of design and fabrication of an active musculoskeletal structure composed of an artificial human skeleton of 5.3 feet in height. This skeletal structure is further equipped with an artificial heart in the form of a multi-channel computer-controlled fluid pump. The fluid pump may be programmed to selectively pump either an acid, a base or de-ionized water to a network of veins that feed a network of pairs of antagonist contractile synthetic muscles. These muscles are manufactured in the laboratory from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber bundles that are specially designed and packaged inside flexible, hyperelastic latex membranes. Each pair of muscles act as a pair of antagonist actuator similar to the biceps and triceps muscles of the human arm. The initial fabrication indicates that it is possible to dynamically control such active musculoskeletal structures. A model is also presented for the dynamic control of such antagonist muscles. The model is intended to be used to study the human musculoskeletal dynamics.

  14. 75 FR 7282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... approval application (PMA) for the Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillators (CRT-Ds) sponsored by... recommendations and vote on a PMA for the REVO MRI Pacemaker System sponsored by Medtronic. The REVO MRI...

  15. 77 FR 16038 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... the premarket approval application (PMA) for the HeartWare Ventricular Assist System (HVAS) sponsored..., the committee will discuss, make recommendations and vote on information related to the PMA for...

  16. 75 FR 81282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... premarket approval application (PMA)) or reclassify to class II (subject to premarket notification (510(k... PMA supplement for the RX Acculink Carotid Stent System, sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The RX...

  17. 78 FR 55081 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... Delivery System allows the placement of the Pressure Sensor within the distal pulmonary artery. There are... Sensor is properly positioned within the distal pulmonary artery. Once the Sensor is in position,...

  18. On the destabilizing effect of damping on discrete and continuous circulatory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luongo, Angelo; D`Annibale, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    The 'Ziegler paradox', concerning the destabilizing effect of damping on elastic systems loaded by nonconservative positional forces, is addressed. The paper aims to look at the phenomenon in a new perspective, according to which no surprising discontinuities in the critical load exist between undamped and damped systems. To show that the actual critical load is found as an (infinitesimal) perturbation of one of the infinitely many sub-critically loaded undamped systems. A series expansion of the damped eigenvalues around the distinct purely imaginary undamped eigenvalues is performed, with the load kept as a fixed, although unknown, parameter. The first sensitivity of the eigenvalues, which is found to be real, is zeroed, so that an implicit expression for the critical load multiplier is found, which only depends on the 'shape' of damping, being independent of its magnitude. An interpretation is given of the destabilization paradox, by referring to the concept of 'modal damping', according to which the sign of the projection of the damping force on the eigenvector of the dual basis, and not on the eigenvector itself, is the true responsible for stability. The whole procedure is explained in detail for discrete systems, and successively extended to continuous systems. Two sample structures are studied for illustrative purposes: the classical reverse double-pendulum under a follower force and a linear visco-elastic beam under a follower force and a dead load.

  19. 76 FR 56200 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... and are pre-loaded onto 6 or 7 Fr \\1\\ (diameter of 2 or 2.3 mm) delivery systems. Upon deployment, the... femoropopliteal arteries having reference vessel diameter from 4 mm to 9 mm and total lesion lengths per patient of 280 mm. \\1\\ ``Fr'' stands for French. It is a term that defines the diameter of a catheter....

  20. Assessment of a continuous blood gas monitoring system in animals during circulatory stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The study was aimed to determine the measurement accuracy of The CDI™ blood parameter monitoring system 500 (Terumo Cardiovascular Systems Corporation, Ann Arbor MI) in the real-time continuous measurement of arterial blood gases under different cardiocirculatory stress conditions Methods Inotropic stimulation (Dobutamine 2.5 and 5 μg/kg/min), vasoconstriction (Arginine-vasopressin 4, 8 and 16 IU/h), hemorrhage (-10%, -20%, -35%, and -50% of the theoretical volemia), and volume resuscitation were induced in ten swine (57.4 ± 10.7 Kg).Intermittent blood gas assessments were carried out using a routine gas analyzer at any experimental phase and compared with values obtained at the same time settings during continuous monitoring with CDI™ 500 system. The Bland-Altman analysis was employed. Results Bias and precision for pO2 were - 0.06 kPa and 0.22 kPa, respectively (r2 = 0.96); pCO2 - 0.02 kPa and 0.15 kPa, respectively; pH -0.001 and 0.01 units, respectively ( r2 = 0.96). The analysis showed very good agreement for SO2 (bias 0.04,precision 0.33, r2 = 0.95), Base excess (bias 0.04,precision 0.28, r2 = 0.98), HCO3 (bias 0.05,precision 0.62, r2 = 0.92),hemoglobin (bias 0.02,precision 0.23, r2 = 0.96) and K+ (bias 0.02, precision 0.27, r2 = 0.93). The sensor was reliable throughout the experiment during hemodynamic variations. Conclusions Continuous blood gas analysis with the CDI™ 500 system was reliable and it might represent a new useful tool to accurately and timely monitor gas exchange in critically ill patients. Nonetheless, our findings need to be confirmed by larger studies to prove its reliability in the clinical setting. PMID:21223536

  1. AC Electrothermal Circulatory Pumping Chip for Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Lang, Qi; Wu, Yanshuang; Ren, Yukun; Tao, Ye; Lei, Lei; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2015-12-01

    Herein we describe a novel AC electrothermal (ACET) fluidic circulatory pumping chip to overcome the challenge of fluid-to-tissue ratio for "human-on-a-chip" cell culture systems. To avoid the deleterious effects of Joule heating and electric current on sample cells, a rectangular microchannel was designed with distantly separated regions for pumping and cell culture. Temperature variations were examined using a commercial thermocouple sensor to detect temperature values in both pumping and culture regions. To generate a sufficient ACET circulatory pumping rate, 30 pairs of asymmetrical electrodes were employed in the pumping region; generated ACET velocity was measured by fluorescent microparticle image velocimetry. The benefits of our pumping chip were demonstrated by culturing human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T) and human colon carcinoma cells (SW620) for 72 h with an energized voltage of 3 V and 10 MHz. Cells grew and proliferated well, implying our ACET circulatory pumping chip has great potential for cell culture and tissue engineering applications. PMID:26558750

  2. Teaching Bio-inspired design using heart and circulatory system as a model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Morteza

    2007-11-01

    Cardiovasculr system is an open book of design for an engineer searching for innovation in the particular area of efficient fluid transport. But the routs of technology transfer from nature's technology to engineering science are not always so obvious. The main challenge is how to train our future students to find these hidden innovations and apply them based on sound engineering and scientific principles. As part of a 3 quarter course at Caltech that is called ``Physiology for Bioengineers,'' we try to discuss examples of such cases by introducing students to the critical thinking that is required for model development. In this talk, I will give two examples from the third quarter of this course where students are asked to develop a physics-based model to describe the efficient pumping of blood in embryonic and adult hearts.

  3. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate increased intestinal hemodynamics without systemic circulatory changes in healthy newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangqin; Morton, Jude; Miedzyblocki, Margaret; Lee, Tze Fun; Bigam, David L; Fok, Tai Fai; Chen, Chao; Lee, Shoo K; Davidge, Sandra T; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2009-10-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, tanshinone IIA is a lipid-soluble component of Danshen that has been widely used for various cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders, including neonatal asphyxia. Despite promising effects, little is known regarding the hemodynamic effects of tanshinone IIA in newborn subjects. To examine the dose-response effects of sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) on systemic and regional hemodynamics and oxygen transport, 12 newborn piglets were anesthetized and acutely instrumented for the placement of femoral arterial and venous, pulmonary arterial catheters to measure mean arterial, central venous, and pulmonary arterial pressures, respectively. The blood flow at the common carotid, renal, pulmonary, and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries were continuously monitored after treating the piglets with either STS (0.1-30 mg/kg iv) or saline treatment (n = 6/group). To further delineate the underlying mechanisms for vasorelaxant effects of STS, in vitro vascular myography was carried out to compare its effect on rat mesenteric and carotid arteries (n = 4-5/group). STS dose-dependently increased the SMA blood flow and the corresponding oxygen delivery with no significant effect on systemic and pulmonary, carotid and renal hemodynamic parameters. In vitro studies also demonstrated that STS selectively dilated rat mesenteric but not carotid arteries. Vasodilation in mesenteric arteries was inhibited by apamin and TRAM-34 (calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors) but not by meclofenamate (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor). In summary, without significant hemodynamic effects on newborn piglets, intravenous infusion of STS selectively increased mesenteric perfusion in a dose-dependent manner, possibly via an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor vasodilating pathway. PMID:19617411

  4. Neural crest cell contribution to the developing circulatory system: implications for vascular morphology?

    PubMed

    Bergwerff, M; Verberne, M E; DeRuiter, M C; Poelmann, R E; Gittenberger-de Groot, A C

    1998-02-01

    In this study, the distribution patterns of neural crest (NC) cells (NCCs) in the developing vascular system of the chick were thoroughly studied and examined for a correlation with smooth muscle cell differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. For this purpose, we performed long-term lineage tracing using quail-chick chimera techniques and premigratory NCC infection with a replication-incompetent retrovirus containing the LacZ reporter gene in combination with immunohistochemistry. Results indicate that NCC deposition around endothelial tubes is influenced by anteroposterior positional information from the pharyngeal arterial system. NCCs were shown to be among the first cells to differentiate into primary smooth muscle cells of the arch arteries. At later stages, NCCs eventually differentiated into adventitial fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and nonmuscular cells of the media and intima. NCCs were distributed in the aortic arch and pulmonary arch arteries and in the brachiocephalic and carotid arteries. The coronary and pulmonary arteries and the descending aorta, however, remained devoid of NCCs. A new finding was that the media of part of the anterior cardinal veins was also determined to be NC-derived. NC-derived elastic arteries differed from non-NC elastic vessels in their cellular constitution and elastic fiber organization, and the NC appeared not to be involved in designating a muscular or elastic artery. Boundaries between NC-infested areas and mesodermal vessel structures were mostly very sharp and tended to coincide with marked changes in vascular morphology, with the exception of an intriguing area in the aortic and pulmonary trunks. PMID:9468193

  5. The influence of metabolic and circulatory heterogeneity on the expression of pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Keir, Daniel A; Robertson, Taylor C; Benson, Alan P; Rossiter, Harry B; Kowalchuk, John M

    2016-01-01

    We examined the relationship amongst baseline work rate (WR), phase II pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇(O2p)) time constant (τV̇(O2p)) and functional gain (G(P)=ΔV̇(O2p)/ΔWR) during moderate-intensity exercise. Transitions were initiated from a constant or variable baseline WR. A validated circulatory model was used to examine the role of heterogeneity in muscle metabolism (V̇(O2m)) and blood flow (Q̇(m)) in determining V̇(O2p) kinetics. We hypothesized that τV̇(O2p) and G(P) would be invariant in the constant baseline condition but would increase linearly with increased baseline WR. Fourteen men completed three to five repetitions of ∆40 W step transitions initiated from 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 W on a cycle ergometer. The ∆40 W step transitions from 60, 80, 100 and 120 W were preceded by 6 min of 20 W cycling, from which the progressive ΔWR transitions (constant baseline condition) were examined. The V̇(O2p) was measured breath by breath using mass spectrometry and a volume turbine. For a given ΔWR, both τV̇(O2p) (22-35 s) and G(P) (8.7-10.5 ml min(-1) W(-1)) increased (P < 0.05) linearly as a function of baseline WR (20-120 W). The τV̇(O2p) was invariant (P < 0.05) in transitions initiated from 20 W, but G(P) increased with ΔWR (P < 0.05). Modelling the summed influence of multiple muscle compartments revealed that τV̇(O2p) could appear fast (24 s), and similar to in vivo measurements (22 ± 6 s), despite being derived from τV̇(O2p) values with a range of 15-40 s and τQ̇(m) with a range of 20-45 s, suggesting that within the moderate-intensity domain phase II V̇(O2p) kinetics are slowed dependent on the pretransition WR and are strongly influenced by muscle metabolic and circulatory heterogeneity. PMID:26537768

  6. Numerical modeling of the fetal blood flow in the placental circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Alexander; Gallucci, Sergio; Mirbod, Parisa

    2015-11-01

    The placenta is a unique organ of exchange between the growing fetus and the mother. It incorporates almost all functions of the adult body, acting as the fetal lung, digestive and immune systems, to mention a few. The exchange of oxygen and nutrients takes place at the surface of the villous tree. Using an idealized geometry of the fetal villous trees in the mouse placenta, in this study we performed 3D computational analysis of the unsteady fetal blood flow, gas, and nutrient transport over the chorionic plate. The fetal blood was treated as an incompressible Newtonian fluid, and the oxygen and nutrient were treated as a passive scalar dissolved in blood plasma. The flow was laminar, and a commercial CFD code (COMSOL Multiphysics) has been used for the simulation. COMSOL has been selected because it is multi-physics FEM software that allows for the seamless coupling of different physics represented by partial differential equations. The results clearly illustrate that the specific branching pattern and the in-plane curvature of the fetal villous trees affect the delivery of blood, gas and nutrient transport to the whole placenta.

  7. Transfusion associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2014-06-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4(th) unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication. PMID:24987240

  8. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  9. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans - With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka H A; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  10. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  11. Development of a Deprivation Index and its relation to premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system in Hungary, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Páldy, Anna; Beale, Linda

    2010-05-01

    An association between health and socio-economic status is well known. Based on international and national studies, the aims of this study were to develop a multi-dimensional index at the municipality level, to provide information about socio-economic deprivation in Hungary and to investigate the association between socio-economic status and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. Seven municipality level socio-economic indicators were used from the National Information System of Spatial Development (income, low qualification, unemployment, one-parent families, large families, density of housing and car ownership). After normalisation and standardisation, indicator weights were evaluated using factor analysis. A risk analysis study was conducted using the Rapid Inquiry Facility software to evaluate the association between deprivation and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system for the years 1998-2004. Areas of significantly high deprivation were identified in the northeastern, eastern and southwestern parts of Hungary. A statistically significant association was found between premature cardiovascular mortality and deprivation status in both genders. The Deprivation Index is the first composite index at the municipality level in Hungary and includes key factors that affect socio-economic status. The identified association highlighted the fact that inequalities in socio-economic status may reflect the spatial distribution of health status in a population. The results can be used to inform prevention strategies and help plan local health promotion programs aimed at reducing health inequalities. PMID:20199838

  12. Kinetics of respiratory and circulatory responses to step, impulse, sinusoidal and ramp forcings of exercise load in humans.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    Transient responses of minute ventilation (VE), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), cardiac output (Q) and heart rate (HR) to step, impulse, sinusoidal and ramp changes in exercise load were studied in healthy human subjects at the moderate load range. Exercise was performed in the upright position using a bicycle ergometer. The transient responses to step and impulse forcings fitted essentially to a second-order model consisting of a fast and a slow component, while the responses to sinusoidal and ramp forcings fitted to a first-order model. No significant asymmetry was observed between the on- and off-responses to step forcing. On the contrary, the mean response time (MRT = pure time delay + time constant) of variables to ascending ramp forcing was prolonged, while the MRT to descending ramp was shortened with decreasing ramp slope. The on- and off asymmetry of the MRT was observed in VE, VO2 and VCO2 and, to a lesser extent, also in HR and Q. A non-linear blood flow model, which simulates changes in the wash-in and wash-out time of metabolic substances into and from the chemoreceptor, has been proposed as a likely explanation for the asymmetrical responses. It was concluded that the regulatory system of respiration and circulation might be essentially non-linear in its operation, despite the fact that the cardiorespiratory responses during exercise seemed to fit linear models. PMID:1599881

  13. Pulsatile-flow mechanical circulatory support (MCS) as a bridge to transplantation or recovery. Single-centre experience with the POLCAS system in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Szymański, Jarosław; Juraszek, Andrzej; Kołsut, Piotr; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Tomasz; Sobieszczańska-Małek, Małgorzata; Sitkowska-Rysiak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is a recognised method of treatment for patients with end-stage chronic or acute heart failure. The POLCAS pulsatile-flow system has been used in our institution for 15 years. Currently, it is being widely replaced by continuous-flow mechanical circulatory support equipment of the second and third generations (HeartMateII, HeartWare). The MCS presented in this study is associated with a significant risk of complications and its use is increasingly considered controversial. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the results of treatment utilising the POLCAS MCS system at our institution in 2014. Material and methods The POLCAS system was implanted in 12 patients aged 16-63 years (42 ± 17 years) during a period of 12 months (from January to December, 2014). Full-blown cardiogenic shock was observed in all patients before MCS implantation. Four of the analysed patients (33%) required prior circulatory support with other devices: IABP (n = 2) or ECMO (n = 2). Episodes of cardiac arrest were reported in three patients; three other patients experienced serious arrhythmias, which accelerated the decision to implant MCS. The presented data was retrospectively obtained from the CliniNET system of the Institute of Cardiology. OpenOffice Calc spreadsheet was used for data analysis. Results Average MCS time was 41 days ± 25 (from 15 to 91 days). Survival until transplantation or explantation was 91.67%. The most frequent complications following the therapy were: cardiac tamponade or bleeding requiring an intervention – 25% (n = 3), renal failure requiring dialysis – 25% (n = 3), ischaemic stroke associated with the MCS – 16.6% (n = 2), bacteraemia – 16.6% (n = 2), and wound infection – 8% (n = 1). No malfunctions of the MCS system were reported. Early survival in patients who completed the MCS therapy, defined as discharge, amounted to 63.6% (n = 7). Conclusions The POLCAS heart assist system is an effective

  14. Effect of polyethylene glycol conjugation on the circulatory stability of plasma-derived human butyrylcholinesterase in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Luo, Chunyuan; Tipparaju, Prasanthi; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Saxena, Ashima

    2013-03-25

    Exogenously administered human serum butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) was demonstrated to function as a bioscavenger of highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) compounds in several animal species. Since the enzyme is isolated from human serum, it is currently the most suitable pretreatment for human use. A dose of 200-300 mg/70 kg human adult is projected to provide protection from 2 X LD(50) of soman. Due to the limited supply of Hu BChE, strategies aimed at reducing the dose of enzyme are being explored. In this study, we investigated the effect of modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the in vivo stability of Hu BChE. Mice were given two injections of either Hu BChE or Hu BChE modified with PEG-5K or PEG-20K, six weeks apart. Pharmacokinetic parameters, such as mean residence time (MRT), maximal concentration (C(max)), elimination half-life (T(1/2)), and area under the plasma concentration time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC), were determined. For the first injection, values for MRT, T(1/2), Cmax, and AUC for PEG-5K-Hu BChE and PEG-20K-Hu BChE were similar to those for Hu BChE. These values for the second injection of Hu BChE as well as PEG-Hu BChEs were lower as compared to those for the first injections, likely due to antibody-mediated clearance. PMID:23220586

  15. Teaching Integrative Physiology Using the Quantitative Circulatory Physiology Model and Case Discussion Method: Evaluation of the Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Barbero, A.; Lopez-Novoa, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    One of the problems that we have found when teaching human physiology in a Spanish medical school is that the degree of understanding by the students of the integration between organs and systems is rather poor. We attempted to remedy this problem by using a case discussion method together with the Quantitative Circulatory Physiology (QCP)…

  16. Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Lorts, Angela; Morales, David

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in the pediatric heart failure population has a limited history especially for infants, and neonates. It has been increasingly recognized that there is a rapidly expanding population of children diagnosed and living with heart failure. This expanding population has resulted in increasing numbers of children with medically resistant end-stage heart failure. The traditional therapy for these children has been heart transplantation. However, children with heart failure unlike adults do not have symptoms until they present with end-stage heart failure and therefore, cannot safely wait for transplantation. Many of these children were bridged to heart transplantation utilizing extracorporeal membranous oxygenation as a bridge to transplant which has yielded poor results. As such, industry, clinicians, and the government have refocused interest in developing increasing numbers of MCS options for children living with heart failure as a bridge to transplantation and as a chronic therapy. In this review, we discuss MCS options for short and long-term support that are currently available for infants and children with end-stage heart failure. PMID:24368965

  17. Circulatory responses to hypoxia in experimental myocardial infarction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroll, M.; Robison, S. C.; Harrison, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    Three levels of decreased arterial oxygen saturation elicited a graded circulatory response in dogs, manifested by stepwise increases in cardiac output, left ventricular dp/dt, and stroke volume, and decreases in systemic vascular resistance. Responses to similar hypoxia challenges after experimental myocardial infarction were qualitatively similar but quantitatively less. Although the circulatory compensation for hypoxia was less effective after myocardial infarction, no further deterioration of the haemodynamics was noted.

  18. Activation of the PGI(2)/IP system contributes to the development of circulatory failure in a rat model of endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Höcherl, Klaus; Schmidt, Christoph; Kurt, Birgül; Bucher, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Prostacyclin levels are increased in septic patients and several animal models of septic shock, and selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 improved cardiovascular dysfunction in rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here, we examine the specific role of prostacyclin and of the receptor for prostacyclin (IP) in the development of LPS-induced circulatory failure. Intravenous injection of LPS (10 mg/kg) into male Sprague-Dawley rats caused a strong increase in plasma prostacyclin levels, which was paralleled by a decrease in blood pressure and an increase in heart rate. Moreover, LPS injection increased the mRNA expression of the IP receptor in the heart, aorta, lung, liver, adrenal glands, and kidneys. Cotreatment with the IP antagonist CAY-10441 (1, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) dose-dependently moderated the LPS-induced changes in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, and systemic vascular resistance. The development of cardiovascular failure was ameliorated by CAY-10441 in spite of the typical LPS-induced increases in plasma levels of cytokines and NO. In vitro, cytokines dose- and time-dependently induced IP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Incubation of cells with the stable IP agonist iloprost in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-mehylxanthine resulted in higher cAMP levels in cytokine-treated cells compared with untreated cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate a prominent role of the prostacyclin/IP system in the development of LPS-induced cardiovascular failure. PMID:18606903

  19. Model-referenced cardiovascular circulatory simulator: construction and control.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Kwan-Woong

    2015-04-01

    Physiological feasibility is the most important requirement for cardiovascular circulatory simulators (CCSs). However, previous simulators have been validated by a comparison with specific human data sets, which are valid only for very limited conditions, and so it is difficult to validate the fidelity of a CCS for various body conditions. To overcome this critical limitation, we propose a model-referenced CCS that reproduces the behavior of an electrical-analog model of the cardiovascular circulatory system, for which physiological fidelity is well established over a wide range. In this study, the electrical-analog reference model was realized in the hardware simulator using fluidic element modeling and by the feedback control of a mock ventricle. The proposed simulator showed a good match with the reference model behavior, and its physiological validity was thereby verified. The proposed simulator is able to show responsiveness to various body conditions as well. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report of an in vitro CCS verified to be consistent with reference model behavior. PMID:25345617

  20. A mock circulatory system to assess the performance of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs): does axial flow unload better than centrifugal LVAD?

    PubMed

    Sénage, Thomas; Février, Dorothée; Michel, Magali; Pichot, Emmanuel; Duveau, Daniel; Tsui, Steven; Trochu, Jean Noel; Roussel, Jean Christian

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic performances comparisons between different types of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) remain difficult in a clinical context. The aim of this study was to create an experimental model to assess and compare two types of LVAD under hemodynamic conditions that simulated physical effort and pulmonary hypertension. An experimental mock circulatory system was created to simulate the systemic and pulmonary circulations and consisted of pulsatile left and right cardiac simulators (cardiowest pump), air/water tanks to model compliances, and tubes to model the venous and arterial resistances. Two types of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices were connected to this pulsated model: an axial flow pump, Heartmate II (HTM II), and a centrifugal pump, VentrAssist (VTA). The hemodynamic conditions at rest and during exercise were replicated. Mean aortic pressures were not significantly different at rest and during effort but mean flow under maximum pump speed was higher with HTM II (13 L vs. 10 L, p = 0.02). Left atrial pressure was lower at rest and during effort for the HTM II (11 mm Hg vs. 3 mm Hg, p = 0.02 and 9 mm Hg vs. 2 mm Hg, p = 0.008) than with the VTA, but with greater risk of left-ventricle suck-down for the axial flow. Power consumption for a similar flow was lower with the VTA during rest (4.7 W vs. 6.9 W, p = 0.002) and during effort (4.3 W vs. 6.6 W, p = 0.008). In case of high pulmonary vascular resistance with preserved right ventricular function, lower right ventricular pressure was obtained with HTM II (21 mm Hg vs. 28 mm Hg, p = 0.03). Observed results are in favor of a better discharge of the left and right cavities with the HTM II compared to the VTA yet with a higher risk of left cavity collapse occurrence. PMID:24577368

  1. A Mock Circulatory System to Assess the Performance of Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs): Does Axial Flow Unload Better Than Centrifugal LVAD?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic performances comparisons between different types of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) remain difficult in a clinical context. The aim of this study was to create an experimental model to assess and compare two types of LVAD under hemodynamic conditions that simulated physical effort and pulmonary hypertension. An experimental mock circulatory system was created to simulate the systemic and pulmonary circulations and consisted of pulsatile left and right cardiac simulators (cardiowest pump), air/water tanks to model compliances, and tubes to model the venous and arterial resistances. Two types of continuous-flow ventricular assist devices were connected to this pulsated model: an axial flow pump, Heartmate II (HTM II), and a centrifugal pump, VentrAssist (VTA). The hemodynamic conditions at rest and during exercise were replicated. Mean aortic pressures were not significantly different at rest and during effort but mean flow under maximum pump speed was higher with HTM II (13 L vs. 10 L, p = 0.02). Left atrial pressure was lower at rest and during effort for the HTM II (11 mm Hg vs. 3 mm Hg, p = 0.02 and 9 mm Hg vs. 2 mm Hg, p = 0.008) than with the VTA, but with greater risk of left-ventricle suck-down for the axial flow. Power consumption for a similar flow was lower with the VTA during rest (4.7 W vs. 6.9 W, p = 0.002) and during effort (4.3 W vs. 6.6 W, p = 0.008). In case of high pulmonary vascular resistance with preserved right ventricular function, lower right ventricular pressure was obtained with HTM II (21 mm Hg vs. 28 mm Hg, p = 0.03). Observed results are in favor of a better discharge of the left and right cavities with the HTM II compared to the VTA yet with a higher risk of left cavity collapse occurrence. PMID:24577368

  2. [Transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Mouquet, F; Rieux, C; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Caldani, C; Boudjedir, K; Carlier, M

    2012-11-01

    A working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has been in charge of heightening awareness of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) among physicians and nurses. This multidisciplinary group has produced the present document that focuses on epidemiological data provided by the French haemovigilance network, physiopathology, diagnosis, treatment and specific actions that could prevent or minimize the risk of TACO. PMID:23039960

  3. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  4. Bi-ventricular circulatory support with the Abiomed AB5000 system in a patient with idiopathic refractory ventricular fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Cooke, Richard H; Sweet, Leslie C; Boyce, Steven W

    2007-01-01

    A 45-year-old man had life-threatening recurrent idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and persistent cardiogenic shock develop. The episodes of ventricular fibrillation were refractory to aggressive medical management; therefore an Abiomed AB5000 bi-ventricular support system was implanted for arrhythmia control. The device was able to maintain hemodynamic stability during the following 2 weeks. The patient was discharged from the hospital with fully recovered cardiac function. PMID:17184687

  5. [Circulatory survival of irreversible comas].

    PubMed

    Cartier, F; Chevet, D; Garré, M; Launois, B; Thomas, R; Le Pollès, R

    1975-01-18

    On the basis of a series of 53 cases of irreversible coma maintained in circulatory survival with the aim of removing the kidneys, the authors discuss the mode of treatment, with particular reference to the intravenous fluids used and the use of medications influencing the circulation. Fluid and electrolytes given must be adjusted hourly to ensure the exact replacement of urinary losses. Isoprotenerol is the only medication usually necessary. In the event of circulatory insufficiency, which is difficult to foresee and hence prevent, immediate volume expansion in a short a time as possible and isoprotenerol most frequently correct the situation (14 out of 17 cases). Thus effective circulation may be maintained until the kidneys are removed (48 out of 53 cases). 92 p.cent of the grafted kidneys functioned from the first day onwards. PMID:1093120

  6. State of the art of mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Mallidi, Hari R; Anand, Jatin; Cohn, William E

    2014-04-01

    Mechanical circulatory support of the failing heart has become an important means of treating end-stage heart disease. This rapidly growing therapeutic field has produced impressive clinical outcomes and has great potential to help thousands of otherwise terminal patients worldwide. In this review, we examine the state of the art of mechanical circulatory support: current practice, totally implantable systems of the future, evolving biventricular support mechanisms, the potential for myocardial recovery and adjunctive treatment methods, and miniaturized devices with expanded indications for therapy. PMID:24808767

  7. State of the Art of Mechanical Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Anand, Jatin; Cohn, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support of the failing heart has become an important means of treating end-stage heart disease. This rapidly growing therapeutic field has produced impressive clinical outcomes and has great potential to help thousands of otherwise terminal patients worldwide. In this review, we examine the state of the art of mechanical circulatory support: current practice, totally implantable systems of the future, evolving biventricular support mechanisms, the potential for myocardial recovery and adjunctive treatment methods, and miniaturized devices with expanded indications for therapy. PMID:24808767

  8. Human Resource Accounting System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    Main objectives of human resource accounting systems are to satisfy the informational demands made by investors and by operating managers. The paper's main concern is with the internal uses of a human asset system. (Author)

  9. [Circulatory assist devices in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Figulla, H R

    2005-03-24

    One out of 13 patients with an acute myocardial infarction is endangered of cardiogenic shock. In addition, acute valvular leakage, shunt vitiae, and acute myocarditis can lead to acute myocardial failure. As a therapeutic option, mechanical assist devices offer cardiac support and hemodynamic stabilization under these circumstances. The following minimal-invasive devices are used in cardiology and intensive care medicine: intra-aortic balloon pulsation (IABP), intra-vascular axial screw pumps, extra-corporal centrifugal pumps with and without additional membrane oxygenator. The IABP improves left ventricular function by a systolic reduction of the after-load, and an increase of diastolic blood pressure dependent on myocardial function. In contrast, axial screw pumps and centrifugal pumps can provide circulatory support independently of myocardial function. Mechanical assist devices can prevent irreversible damage not only by offering a reduction of myocardial work load, but also by improving organ perfusion in cardiogenic shock situations. Another indication for mechanical circulatory support depicts high-risk coronary angioplasty if the left ventricular ejection fraction is severely reduced or the target vessel supplies more than 50 % of vital myocardium. In case of irreversible heart failure, turbine pumps or centrifugal pumps offer a stabilization for the patient's transfer to a cardiac surgery center. They can also be used for bridging to heart transplantation in acute situations. Technical improvements will enhance the use of mechanical assist devices in the near future. Especially the development of portable emergency devices will enrich therapeutic possibilities in cardiology and intensive care medicine. PMID:15776348

  10. Fusion to an albumin-binding domain with a high affinity for albumin extends the circulatory half-life and enhances the in vivo antitumor effects of human TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yang, Hao; Jia, Dianlong; Nie, Qianxue; Cai, Huawei; Fan, Qing; Wan, Lin; Li, Lin; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-04-28

    Clinical applications of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL) have been limited by their poor pharmacokinetics. Using endogenous albumin as a carrier is an attractive approach for circulatory half-life extension. Here, we produced ABD-hTRAIL and hTRAIL-ABD by fusing the albumin-binding domain (ABD) from protein G to the N- or C-terminus of hTRAIL. We found that ABD-hTRAIL bound human serum albumin (HSA) with a high affinity (0.4±0.18nM) and formed nanoparticles with an average diameter (~12nm) above the threshold (~7nm) of renal filtration. ABD-hTRAIL also bound mouse serum albumin (MSA); thus, its half-life was 40-50-fold greater than that of hTRAIL (14.1±0.87h vs 0.32±0.14h). Tumor uptake of ABD-hTRAIL 8-48h post-injection was 6-16-fold that of hTRAIL. Consequently, the tumor suppression of ABD-hTRAIL in mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts was 3-4 times greater than that of hTRAIL. Additionally, the time period during which ABD-hTRAIL could kill circulating tumor cells was approximately 8 times longer than that of hTRAIL. These results demonstrate that ABD fused to the N-terminus endows hTRAIL with albumin binding ability; once it enters the vasculature, ABD mediates binding with endogenous albumin, thus prolonging the half-life and enhancing the antitumor effect of hTRAIL. However, hTRAIL-ABD did not show a high affinity for albumin and therefore did not display the prolonged circulatory half-life and enhanced antitumor effects. These results demonstrate that N-terminal, but not C-terminal, ABD-fusion is an efficient technique for enhancing the antitumor effects of hTRAIL by using endogenous albumin as a carrier. PMID:26951928

  11. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest. PMID:26860409

  12. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26670067

  13. Fetal Circulatory Variation in an Acute Incident Causing Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Olgan, Safak; Sakinci, Mehmet; Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Cagliyan, Erkan; Altunyurt, Sabahattin

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical artery\\vein, middle cerebral artery, and ductus venosus Doppler velocimetry were performed at 33 weeks of gestation in the settings of an intrauterine growth restricted fetus during a heart rate deceleration. Interestingly, we recorded a sudden onset redistribution of fetal blood flow with fetal bradycardia. Spontaneous normalization of waveforms was observed once fetal heart rate returned to normal. Our case provides evidence to circulatory variation of a human fetus resulting from an acute incident causing bradycardia. PMID:25580322

  14. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  15. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    PubMed

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD. PMID:26810404

  16. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  17. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  18. Circulatory Syndrome: An Evolution of the Metabolic Syndrome Concept!

    PubMed Central

    Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Carney, Shane L; Gillies, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome has been a useful, though controversial construct in clinical practice as well as a valuable model in order to understand the interactions of diverse cardiovascular risk factors. However the increasing importance of the circulatory system in particular the endothelium, in both connecting and controlling organ function has underlined the limitations of the metabolic syndrome definition. The proposed “Circulatory Syndrome” is an attempt to refine the metabolic syndrome concept by the addition of recently documented markers of cardiovascular disease including renal impairment, microalbuminuria, arterial stiffness, ventricular dysfunction and anaemia to more classic factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia and abnormal glucose metabolism; all of which easily measured in clinical practice. These markers interact with each other as well as with other factors such as aging, obesity, physical inactivity, diet and smoking. The final common pathways of inflammation, oxidative stress and hypercoagulability thereby lead to endothelial damage and eventually cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, the Circulatory (MARC) Syndrome, like its predecessor the metabolic syndrome, is only a small step toward an understanding of these complex and as yet poorly understood markers of disease. PMID:22845817

  19. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  20. Acoustic analysis of a mechanical circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Hubbert, Laila; Sundbom, Per; Loebe, Matthias; Peterzén, Bengt; Granfeldt, Hans; Ahn, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical circulatory support technology is continually improving. However, adverse complications do occur with devastating consequences, for example, pump thrombosis that may develop in several parts of the pump system. The aim of this study was to design an experimental clot/thrombosis model to register and analyze acoustic signals from the left ventricular assist device (LVAD) HeartMate II (HMII) (Thoratec Corporation, Inc., Pleasanton, CA, USA) and detect changes in sound signals correlating to clots in the inflow, outflow, and pump housing. Using modern telecom techniques, it was possible to register and analyze the HMII pump-specific acoustic fingerprint in an experimental model of LVAD support using a mock loop. Increase in pump speed significantly (P<0.005) changed the acoustic fingerprint at certain frequency (0-23,000 Hz) intervals (regions: R1-3 and peaks: P1,3-4). When the ball valves connected to the tubing were narrowed sequentially by ∼50% of the inner diameter (to mimic clot in the out- and inflow tubing), the frequency spectrum changed significantly (P<0.005) in P1 and P2 and R1 when the outflow tubing was narrowed. This change was not seen to the same extent when the lumen of the ball valve connected to the inflow tube was narrowed by ∼50%. More significant (P<0.005) acoustic changes were detected in P1 and P2 and R1 and R3, with the largest dB figs. in the lower frequency ranges in R1 and P2, when artificial clots and blood clots passed through the pump system. At higher frequencies, a significant change in dB figs. in R3 and P4 was detected when clots passed through the pump system. Acoustic monitoring of pump sounds may become a valuable tool in LVAD surveillance. PMID:24372095

  1. On a basic model of circulatory, fluid, and electrolyte regulation in the human system based upon the model of Guyton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed description of Guyton's model and modifications are provided. Also included are descriptions of several typical experiments which the model can simulate to illustrate the model's general utility. A discussion of the problems associated with the interfacing of the model to other models such as respiratory and thermal regulation models which is prime importance since these stimuli are not present in the current model is also included. A user's guide for the operation of the model on the Xerox Sigma 3 computer is provided and two programs are described. A verification plan and procedure for performing experiments is also presented.

  2. Postcardiotomy mechanical circulatory support in two infants with williams' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A; Chatzis, Andrew C; Kanakis, Meletios A; Azariadis, Prodromos A; Mitropoulos, Fotios A

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has made their use more efficient and less traumatic. We describe our experience of using the Levitronix CentriMag pump in two patients with Williams' syndrome who underwent surgical correction of supravalvular aortic stenosis. PMID:24741444

  3. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  4. [The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2014-11-01

    Hydrostatic pulmonary edema is a frequent and severe complication of blood transfusion. Recent epidemiological studies open the way for a better prevention of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload. Preventive measures rely solely on the medical and nursing staff. Mitigation strategies include a careful identification of patients and conditions at-risk, a single-unit transfusion policy in patients with chronic anemia, the use of slow infusion rates, the careful monitoring of patient vital signs (particularly systemic arterial blood pressure). Peritransfusion IV diuretics use is likely to be helpful, although optimal prescribing patterns have not been defined. PMID:25277421

  5. Biplane roentgen videometric system for dynamic, 60/sec, studies of the shape and size of circulatory structures, particularly the left ventricle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritman, E. L.; Sturm, R. E.; Wood, E. H.

    1973-01-01

    An operator interactive video system for the measurement of roentgen angiographically outlined structures is described. Left ventricular volume and three-dimensional shapes are calculated from up to 200 pairs of diameters measured from ventriculograms at the rate of 60 pairs of biplane images per second. The accuracy and reproducibility of volumes calculated by the system were established by analysis of roentgenograms of inanimate objects of known volume and by comparison of left ventricular stroke volumes calculated by the system with the stroke volumes calculated by an indicator-dilution technique and an aortic root electromagnetic flowmeter. Computer-generated display of the large amounts of data obtained by the videometry system is described.

  6. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Bouchier, Francis A.; Hannum, David W.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated.

  7. Quantitative three-dimensional dynamic imaging of structure and function of the cardiopulmonary and circulatory systems in all regions of the body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturm, R. E.; Ritman, E. L.; Wood, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The background for, and design of a third generation, general purpose, all electronic spatial scanning system, the DSR is described. Its specified performance capabilities provide dynamic and stop action three dimensional spatial reconstructions of any portion of the body based on a minimum exposure time of 0.01 second for each 28 multiplanar 180 deg scanning set, a maximum scan repetition rate of sixty 28 multiplane scan sets per second, each scan set consisting of a maximum of 240 parallel cross sections of a minimum thickness of 0.9 mm, and encompassing a maximum cylindrical volume about 23 cm in length and up to 38 cm in diameter.

  8. Human portable preconcentrator system

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.; Hannum, David W.; Puissant, James G.; Varley, Nathan R.

    2003-08-12

    A preconcentrator system and apparatus suited to human portable use wherein sample potentially containing a target chemical substance is drawn into a chamber and through a pervious screen. The screen is adapted to capture target chemicals and then, upon heating, to release those chemicals into the chamber. Chemicals captured and then released in this fashion are then carried to a portable chemical detection device such as a portable ion mobility spectrometer. In the preferred embodiment, the means for drawing sample into the chamber comprises a reversible fan which, when operated in reverse direction, creates a backpressure that facilitates evolution of captured target chemicals into the chamber when the screen is heated. The screen can be positioned directly in front of the detector prior to heating to improve detection capability.

  9. Circulatory function during exercise: integration of convection and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Jones, J H

    1994-01-01

    The cardiovascular system has frequently been hypothesized to be the limiting step for O2 transport that determines VO2 max in many species of mammals. Careful analysis of the factors that determine how O2 is transported by the circulation demonstrate that such a single-step limitation cannot exist. Evaluation of the results of experiments in which circulatory O2 transport capacity was experimentally altered demonstrates no direct or absolute relationship between changes in O2 transport capacity and changes in VO2 max. Furthermore, experimental evidence collected during maximal exercise in hypoxia and hyperoxia supports the concept that multiple components of the O2 transport system contribute to limiting O2 flux at VO2 max. Consideration of the basic equations that describe O2 transport through the respiratory system shows that changes in PO2 at each step of the system required to increase O2 flux through that step conflict with the changes in PO2 required to increase flux through adjacent steps. Changes in convection, capacitance, or conductance at one step affect gas transport through the adjacent steps. Hence, no single-step limitation to O2 transport is possible, because the convective and diffusive gas exchangers are interdependent. Increasing QT at VO2 max always increases O2 flux (although not necessarily in proportion to the increase in QT), unless VO2 max is limited by mitochondrial oxidative capacity, as in goats. Cardiovascular structure and function in mammals reflects allometric, adaptive and induced variation. Maximal heart rate is determined strictly by body size, thus maximal QT/Mb is inevitably lower in larger mammals. Adaptive and induced variation elicit hypertrophy of muscle, capillaries, and mitochondria, increasing circulatory capacity and VO2 max. When selection for maximal respiratory function is weak, as in most species of mammals, any component(s) of the respiratory system may be underdeveloped, relative to other structures in the system

  10. Circulatory mitochondrial DNA is a pro-inflammatory agent in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongdi; Ye, Hong; Sun, Zhiping; Shen, Xia; Song, Zongwei; Wu, Xiaochun; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun; Yang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients, and it has been shown to be a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) released into circulation after cell damage can promote inflammation in patients and animal models. However, the role and mechanisms of circulatory mtDNA in chronic inflammation in MHD patients remain unknown. Sixty MHD patients and 20 health controls were enrolled in this study. The circulatory mtDNA was detected by quantitative real-time PCR assay. Plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were quantitated by ELISA assay. Dialysis systems in MHD patients and in vitro were used to evaluate the effect of different dialysis patterns on circulatory mtDNA. Circulatory mtDNA was elevated in MHD patients comparing to that of health control. Regression analysis demonstrated that plasma mtDNA was positively associated with TNF-α and the product of serum calcium and phosphorus, while negatively associated with hemoglobin and serum albumin in MHD patients. MtDNA induced the secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α in the THP-1 cells. Single high-flux hemodialysis (HF-HD) and on line hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) but not low-flux hemodialysis (LF-HD) could partially reduce plasma mtDNA in MHD patients. In vitro, both HD and hemofiltration (HF) could fractional remove mtDNA. Collectively, circulatory mtDNA is elevated and its level is closely correlated with chronic inflammation in MHD patients. HF-HD and HDF can partially reduce circulatory mtDNA in MHD patients. PMID:25485699

  11. Transfusion associated circulatory overload: a critical incident.

    PubMed

    Goodall, E

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a serious but under-recognised complication of blood transfusion. While the exact incidence rate is unknown the associated morbidity and mortality make this a transfusion reaction worthy of attention. This article provides details of a critical incident involving TACO followed by a literature review and discussion written from the perspective of a student ODP. The goal of this article is to raise awareness of TACO amongst hospital staff to facilitate faster recognition and earlier intervention in future events. PMID:24516967

  12. Postoperative mechanical circulatory support with Biomedicus centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Mert, Murat; Akcevin, Atif; Yildiz, Cenk E; Suzer, Kaya

    2005-03-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques, myocardial protection, and management protocols, approximately 1% of patients undergoing open heart operations still need mechanical circulatory support for severe cardiac dysfunction. The Biomedicus centrifugal pump, available in most cardiovascular centers, is a highly effective and relatively inexpensive system compared to other more sophisticated devices for the same purpose. Of 10 patients aged 5 to 61 years who were supported for 22 to 168 hours with a Biomedicus centrifugal pump, 7 (70%) were weaned from support, there was one hospital death, and 6 patients were discharged from hospital. Two sudden deaths occurred in the first 8 months after discharge. Four patients (40%) were still alive after follow-up of 11-55 months, with no restriction in their daily activities. The centrifugal pump is a very cost-effective support system with survival rates comparable to those of more sophisticated devices in short-term ventricular assistance. PMID:15793049

  13. Disorder in Complex Human System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  14. Options for temporary mechanical circulatory support

    PubMed Central

    Saffarzadeh, Areo

    2015-01-01

    Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) refers to a group of devices generally used for less than 30 days to maintain adequate organ perfusion by compensating for a failure of the pumping mechanism of the heart. The increased availability and rapid adoption of new temporary MCS strategies necessitate physicians to become familiar with devices placed both percutaneously and via median sternotomy. This review will examine the different options for commonly used temporary MCS devices including intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs), veno-arterial-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO), TandemHeart® (CardiacAssist, Pittsburg, PA, USA) Impella® and BVS 5000® (both Abiomed Inc., Danvers, MA, USA), CentriMag® and Thoratec percutaneous ventricular assist device (pVAD)® (both Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA). A specific emphasis will be made to describe relevant mechanisms of action, standard placement strategies, hemodynamic effects, relevant contraindications and complications, and important daily management considerations. PMID:26793330

  15. Mechanical circulatory support in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Szczurek, Wioletta; Suliga, Kamil; Rempega, Grzegorz; Rajwa, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of end-stage heart failure patients eligible for heart transplant and the disproportionately low number of donor hearts have led to increased interest in ventricular assist devices (VAD). These devices can be used as a bridge to decision, bridge to recovery, or bridge to candidacy. The main advantage of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is the improvement of organ perfusion and function, which leads to better quality of life and survival. The MCS can also be used as a destination therapy in end-stage heart failure patients who are not eligible for heart transplant. It should be remembered that, despite the tangible benefits, VAD implantation may also be associated with the risk of serious complications, such as bleeding, infection, arrhythmias, blood clots, right ventricular failure, and cardiovascular events. This study presents an up-to-date overview of the current knowledge on the role of MCS in modern medicine. PMID:27516785

  16. Mechanical circulatory support for destination therapy.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Hullin, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure who are not eligible for heart transplant and whose life expectancy depends mainly on the heart disease may benefit from mechanical circulatory support. Mechanical circulatory support restores adequate cardiac output and organ perfusion and eventually improves patients' clinical condition, quality of life and life expectancy. This treatment is called destination therapy (DT) and we estimate that in Switzerland more than 120 patients per year could benefit from it. In the last 10 years, design of the devices, implantation techniques and prognoses have changed dramatically. The key to successful therapy with a left ventricular assist device is appropriate patient selection, although we are still working on the definition of reliable inclusion and exclusion criteria and optimal timing for surgical implantation. Devices providing best long-term results are continuous flow, rotary or axial blood pumps implanted using minimally invasive techniques on a beating heart. These new devices (Thoratec HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD) have only a single moving part, and have improved durability with virtually 10 years freedom from mechanical failure. In selected patients, the overall actuarial survival of DT patients is 75% at 1 year and 62% at 2 years, with a clear improvement in quality of life compared with medical management only. Complications include bleeding and infections; their overall incidence is significantly lower than with previous devices and their management is well defined. DT is evolving into an effective and reasonably cost-effective treatment option for a growing population of patients not eligible for heart transplant, showing encouraging survival rates at 2 years and providing clear improvement in quality of life. The future is bright for people suffering from chronic heart failure. PMID:26945160

  17. Snake constriction rapidly induces circulatory arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Boback, Scott M; McCann, Katelyn J; Wood, Kevin A; McNeal, Patrick M; Blankenship, Emmett L; Zwemer, Charles F

    2015-07-01

    As legless predators, snakes are unique in their ability to immobilize and kill their prey through the process of constriction, and yet how this pressure incapacitates and ultimately kills the prey remains unknown. In this study, we examined the cardiovascular function of anesthetized rats before, during and after being constricted by boas (Boa constrictor) to examine the effect of constriction on the prey's circulatory function. The results demonstrate that within 6 s of being constricted, peripheral arterial blood pressure (PBP) at the femoral artery dropped to 1/2 of baseline values while central venous pressure (CVP) increased 6-fold from baseline during the same time. Electrocardiographic recordings from the anesthetized rat's heart revealed profound bradycardia as heart rate (fH) dropped to nearly half of baseline within 60 s of being constricted, and QRS duration nearly doubled over the same time period. By the end of constriction (mean 6.5±1 min), rat PBP dropped 2.9-fold, fH dropped 3.9-fold, systemic perfusion pressure (SPP=PBP-CVP) dropped 5.7-fold, and 91% of rats (10 of 11) had evidence of cardiac electrical dysfunction. Blood drawn immediately after constriction revealed that, relative to baseline, rats were hyperkalemic (serum potassium levels nearly doubled) and acidotic (blood pH dropped from 7.4 to 7.0). These results are the first to document the physiological response of prey to constriction and support the hypothesis that snake constriction induces rapid prey death due to circulatory arrest. PMID:26202779

  18. The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS): first annual report.

    PubMed

    de By, Theo M M H; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan; Bushnaq, Hasan; Krabatsch, Thomas; Gustafsson, Finn; Leprince, Pascal; Martinelli, Luigi; Meyns, Bart; Morshuis, Michiel; Netuka, Ivan; Potapov, Evgenij; Zittermann, Armin; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-05-01

    The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS) was founded on 10 December 2009 with the initiative of Roland Hetzer (Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin, Berlin, Germany) and Jan Gummert (Herz- und Diabeteszentrum Nordrhein-Westfalen, Bad Oeynhausen, Germany) with 15 other founding international members. It aims to promote scientific research to improve care of end-stage heart failure patients with ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart as long-term mechanical circulatory support. Likewise, the organization aims to provide and maintain a registry of device implantation data and long-term follow-up of patients with mechanical circulatory support. Hence, EUROMACS affiliated itself with Dendrite Clinical Systems Ltd to offer its members a software tool that allows input and analysis of patient clinical data on a daily basis. EUROMACS facilitates further scientific studies by offering research groups access to any available data wherein patients and centres are anonymized. Furthermore, EUROMACS aims to stimulate cooperation with clinical and research institutions and with peer associations involved to further its aims. EUROMACS is the only European-based Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support with rapid increase in institutional and individual membership. Because of the expeditious data input, the European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgeons saw the need to optimize the data availability and the significance of the registry to improve care of patients with mechanical circulatory support and its potential contribution to scientific intents; hence, the beginning of their alliance in 2012. This first annual report is designed to provide an overview of EUROMACS' structure, its activities, a first data collection and an insight to its scientific contributions. PMID:25820161

  19. Does the use of thiopental provide added cerebral protection during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest?

    PubMed

    Al-Hashimi, Sara; Zaman, Mahvash; Waterworth, Paul; Bilal, Haris

    2013-08-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Does the use of thiopental provide added cerebral protection during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA)? Altogether, more than 62 papers were found using the reported search, of which 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Four of the seven papers used thiopental alongside other neuroprotective methods and agents. The methods included the use of ice packs to the head and core systemic hypothermia. Agents used alongside thiopental included nicardipine and mannitol. Thiopental was found to have the ability to lower oxygen consumption, where oxygen consumption was measured using the phosphocreatinine and adenosine triphosphate ratio. The neuroprotective effect of thiopental was evaluated by assessing the electrical activity of the brain during circulatory arrest, by which it was shown to be advantageous. However, other trials suggested that adding thiopental during circulatory arrest did not provide any extra protection to the brain. The timing of thiopental administration is of importance in order to gain positive outcomes, as it's ability to lower the cerebral energy state may result in unfavourable results if added before hypothermic circulatory arrest, where this may lead to an ischaemic event. We conclude that the use of thiopental during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is beneficial, but if administered too early, it may replete the cerebral energy state before arrest and prove to be detrimental. PMID:23644730

  20. Human Error In Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Nancy M.; Rouse, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents results of research aimed at understanding causes of human error in such complex systems as aircraft, nuclear powerplants, and chemical processing plants. Research considered both slips (errors of action) and mistakes (errors of intention), and influence of workload on them. Results indicated that: humans respond to conditions in which errors expected by attempting to reduce incidence of errors; and adaptation to conditions potent influence on human behavior in discretionary situations.

  1. Elastin insufficiency predisposes to elevated pulmonary circulatory pressures through changes in elastic artery structure.

    PubMed

    Shifren, Adrian; Durmowicz, Anthony G; Knutsen, Russell H; Faury, Gilles; Mecham, Robert P

    2008-11-01

    Elastin is a major structural component of large elastic arteries and a principal determinant of arterial biomechanical properties. Elastin loss-of-function mutations in humans have been linked to the autosomal-dominant disease supravalvular aortic stenosis, which is characterized by stenotic lesions in both the systemic and pulmonary circulations. To better understand how elastin insufficiency influences the pulmonary circulation, we evaluated pulmonary cardiovascular physiology in a unique set of transgenic and knockout mice with graded vascular elastin dosage (range 45-120% of wild type). The central pulmonary arteries of elastin-insufficient mice had smaller internal diameters (P < 0.0001), thinner walls (P = 0.002), and increased opening angles (P = 0.002) compared with wild-type controls. Pulmonary circulatory pressures, measured by right ventricular catheterization, were significantly elevated in elastin-insufficient mice (P < 0.0001) and showed an inverse correlation with elastin level. Although elastin-insufficient animals exhibited mild to moderate right ventricular hypertrophy (P = 0.0001) and intrapulmonary vascular remodeling, the changes were less than expected, given the high right ventricular pressures, and were attenuated compared with those seen in hypoxia-induced models of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The absence of extensive pathological cardiac remodeling at the high pressures in these animals suggests a developmental adaptation designed to maintain right-sided cardiac output in a vascular system with altered elastin content. PMID:18772328

  2. Human Message Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Robert

    A long-standing dispute over the best way to teach communication involves two major positions: teaching communication through practice/performance and teaching communication through theories and principles. This book describes both theories and practices, offering ideas within a systems framework so that each chapter introduces interacting…

  3. Human factors in underwater systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, D

    1993-10-01

    Applications of human factors to undersea engineering and the relationship to aerospace science are explored. Cooperative ventures include the TEKTITE underwater habitat and development of better procedures to prevent decompression sickness. Other research involved the use of alternate gases in diving systems, remote-operation vehicles, and diving system tests. PMID:11541030

  4. Examining human-system interactions: The HSYS (Human SYStem) methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.G.; Harbour, J.L.; Sullivan, C.; Hallbert, B.P. )

    1990-01-01

    HSYS is a model-based methodology developed to examine the many factors which influence Human-SYStem interactions. HSYS is built around a linear model of human performance, called the Input-Action model, which describes five sequential steps: Input Detection, Input Understanding, Action Selection, Action Planning, and Action Execution. HSYS is structured in an hierarchical tree which presents a logical structure for examining potential areas where human performance, hardware or other system components are less than adequate. The HSYS tree consists of five major branches which correspond to the five major components of the Input-Action model. Initial validation was begun by studying accident reports via HSYS and identifying sources of error. The validation process has continued with accident investigations in operational settings. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. NASA Space Flight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillman, Barry; Pickett, Lynn; Russo, Dane; Stroud, Ken; Connolly, Jan; Foley, Tico

    2007-01-01

    NASA has begun a new approach to human factors design standards. For years NASA-STD-3000, Manned Systems Integration Standards, has been a source of human factors design guidance for space systems. In order to better meet the needs of the system developers, NASA is revising its human factors standards system. NASA-STD-3000 will be replaced by two documents: set of broad human systems specifications (including both human factors and medical topics) and a human factors design handbook

  6. The thermal-circulatory ratio (TCR)

    PubMed Central

    Ketko, Itay; Eliyahu, Uri; Epstein, Yoram; Heled, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The common practice in the Israel Defense Force is that all exertional heat related injuries victims undergo a heat tolerance test (HTT) as a part of the “return to duty” process. The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative, supportive physiological index for the assessment of the HTT based on the understanding that heat strain level should combine the thermal and cardiovascular strains. Materials and methods The HTT results of 104 individuals with a history of heat injuries were retrospectively analyzed after randomly divided into two groups (an analysis group and a validation group). Rectal temperature and heart rate were monitored continuously during the test. Using the ratio between those two variables we constructed the TCR (Thermal-Circulatory Ratio) index and defined thresholds for determining heat tolerance based on the HTT. Results Using a TCR value of 0.279 [°C/bpm] or less after completing the 120 min HTT can be used as a significant measure to distinguish between heat tolerance and heat intolerance individuals with sensitivity and specificity of 100% of 89%, respectively. In addition, a TCR value of 0.320 [°C/bpm] or less calculated after 60 min was found as a significant measure to determine heat tolerance with 100% sensitivity and 69% specificity. The latter threshold may assist in significantly shortening the HTT for those individuals whose TCR value matches this criterion. Discussion and conclusion A new index (TCR) that combines the thermal and cardiovascular responses to exercise-heat stress was found to be a valid measure, with high sensitivity and specificity, to support the distinguishing between heat tolerance and heat intolerance individuals following a HTT. Furthermore, the suggested index may enable to shorten the HTT, which will make the test more efficient.

  7. Human System Integration: Regulatory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This document was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy Integrated Product team. Using a Human System Integration (HIS) perspective, a regulatory analyses of the FARS (specifically Part 91), the Airman s Information Manual (AIM) and the FAA Controllers Handbook (7110.65) was conducted as part of a front-end approach needed to derive HSI requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. The review of the above aviation reference materials yielded eighty-four functions determined to be necessary or highly desirable for flight within the Air Traffic Management System. They include categories for Flight, Communications, Navigation, Surveillance, and Hazard Avoidance.

  8. Human Services Course Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soong, Robert K.; And Others

    This paper deals with various teaching methods and techniques currently is use in junior colleges in the Chicago area including traditional as well as innovative methods. The basic assumption is that teaching and learning are both essential aspects of the same system. The human services field is defined as encompassing the basic area of social…

  9. Description, validation, and modification of the Guyton model for space-flight applications. Part A. Guyton model of circulatory, fluid and electrolyte control. Part B. Modification of the Guyton model for circulatory, fluid and electrolyte control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    The mathematical model that has been a cornerstone for the systems analysis of space-flight physiological studies is the Guyton model describing circulatory, fluid and electrolyte regulation. The model and the modifications that are made to permit simulation and analysis of the stress of weightlessness are described.

  10. Human Factors Considerations in System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. M. (Editor); Vanbalen, P. M. (Editor); Moe, K. L. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Human factors considerations in systems design was examined. Human factors in automated command and control, in the efficiency of the human computer interface and system effectiveness are outlined. The following topics are discussed: human factors aspects of control room design; design of interactive systems; human computer dialogue, interaction tasks and techniques; guidelines on ergonomic aspects of control rooms and highly automated environments; system engineering for control by humans; conceptual models of information processing; information display and interaction in real time environments.

  11. Chronic low-dose exposure in the Techa River Cohort: risk of mortality from circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Krestinina, Lyudmila Yurievna; Epifanova, Svetlana; Silkin, Stanislav; Mikryukova, Lyudmila; Degteva, Marina; Shagina, Natalia; Akleyev, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mortality from circulatory diseases for about 30,000 members of the Techa River cohort over the period 1950-2003, and to investigate how these rates depend on radiation doses. This population received both external and internal exposures from (90)Sr, (89)Sr, (137)Cs, and other uranium fission products as a result of waterborne releases from the Mayak nuclear facility in the Southern Urals region of the Russian Federation. The analysis included individualized estimates of the total (external plus internal) absorbed dose in muscle calculated based on the Techa River Dosimetry System 2009. The cohort-average dose to muscle tissue was 35 mGy, and the maximum dose was 510 mGy. Between 1950 and 2003, 7,595 deaths from circulatory diseases were registered among cohort members with 901,563 person years at risk. Mortality rates in the cohort were analyzed using a simple parametric excess relative risk (ERR) model. For all circulatory diseases, the estimated excess relative risk per 100 mGy with a 15-year lag period was 3.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.2-7.5 %, and for ischemic heart disease it was 5.6 % with a 95 % confidence interval of 0.1-11.9 %. A linear ERR model provided the best fit. Analyses with a lag period shorter than 15 years from the beginning of exposure did not reveal any significant risk of mortality from either all circulatory diseases or ischemic heart disease. There was no evidence of an increased mortality risk from cerebrovascular disease (p > 0.5). These results should be regarded as preliminary, since they will be updated after adjustment for smoking and alcohol consumption. PMID:23124827

  12. Mechanical Circulatory Support of the Critically Ill Child Awaiting Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gazit, Avihu Z; Gandhi, Sanjiv K; C Canter, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The majority of children awaiting heart transplantation require inotropic support, mechanical ventilation, and/or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Unfortunately, due to the limited pool of organs, many of these children do not survive to transplant. Mechanical circulatory support of the failing heart in pediatrics is a new and rapidly developing field world-wide. It is utilized in children with acute congestive heart failure associated with congenital heart disease, cardiomyopathy, and myocarditis, both as a bridge to transplantation and as a bridge to myocardial recovery. The current arsenal of mechanical assist devices available for children is limited to ECMO, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation, centrifugal pump ventricular assist devices, the DeBakey ventricular assist device Child; the Thoratec ventricular assist device; and the Berlin Heart. In the spring of 2004, five contracts were awarded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to support preclinical development for a range of pediatric ventricular assist devices and similar circulatory support systems. The support of early development efforts provided by this program is expected to yield several devices that will be ready for clinical trials within the next few years. Our work reviews the current international experience with mechanical circulatory support in children and summarizes our own experience since 2005 with the Berlin Heart, comparing the indications for use, length of support, and outcome between these modalities. PMID:21286278

  13. Simulation of Dilated Heart Failure with Continuous Flow Circulatory Support

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajuan; Loghmanpour, Natasha; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Ferreira, Antonio; Keller, Bradley; Gorcsan, John; Antaki, James

    2014-01-01

    Lumped parameter models have been employed for decades to simulate important hemodynamic couplings between a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and the native circulation. However, these studies seldom consider the pathological descending limb of the Frank-Starling response of the overloaded ventricle. This study introduces a dilated heart failure model featuring a unimodal end systolic pressure-volume relationship (ESPVR) to address this critical shortcoming. The resulting hemodynamic response to mechanical circulatory support are illustrated through numerical simulations of a rotodynamic, continuous flow ventricular assist device (cfVAD) coupled to systemic and pulmonary circulations with baroreflex control. The model further incorporated septal interaction to capture the influence of left ventricular (LV) unloading on right ventricular function. Four heart failure conditions were simulated (LV and bi-ventricular failure with/without pulmonary hypertension) in addition to normal baseline. Several metrics of LV function, including cardiac output and stroke work, exhibited a unimodal response whereby initial unloading improved function, and further unloading depleted preload reserve thereby reducing ventricular output. The concept of extremal loading was introduced to reflect the loading condition in which the intrinsic LV stroke work is maximized. Simulation of bi-ventricular failure with pulmonary hypertension revealed inadequacy of LV support alone. These simulations motivate the implementation of an extremum tracking feedback controller to potentially optimize ventricular recovery. PMID:24465511

  14. Peripheral biomarkers of stroke: Focus on circulatory microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Stroke occurs when blood flow stops, and that stoppage results in reduced oxygen supply to neurons in the brain. The occurrence of stroke increases with age, but anyone at any age can suffer from stroke. Recent research has implicated multiple cellular changes in stroke patients, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory responses, and changes in mRNA and proteins. Recent research has also revealed that stroke is associated with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Stroke can be controlled by modifiable risk factors, including diet, cardiovascular, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression and traumatic brain injury. Stroke is the major risk factor for vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this article is to review the latest developments in research efforts directed at identifying 1) latest developments in identifying biomarkers in peripheral and central nervous system tissues, 2) changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) in patients with stroke, 3) miRNA profile and function in animal brain, and 4) protein biomarkers in ischemic stroke. This article also reviews research investigating circulatory miRNAs as peripheral biomarkers of stroke. PMID:27503360

  15. Circulatory contributors to the phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Shovlin, Claire L.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is mechanistically and therapeutically challenging, not only because of the molecular and cellular perturbations that generate vascular abnormalities, but also the modifications to circulatory physiology that result, and are likely to exacerbate vascular injury. First, most HHT patients have visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Significant visceral AVMs reduce the systemic vascular resistance: supra-normal cardiac outputs are required to maintain arterial blood pressure, and may result in significant pulmonary venous hypertension. Secondly, bleeding from nasal and gastrointestinal telangiectasia leads to iron losses of such magnitude that in most cases, diet is insufficient to meet the ‘hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement.’ Resultant iron deficiency restricts erythropoiesis, leading to anemia and further increases in cardiac output. Low iron levels are also associated with venous and arterial thromboses, elevated Factor VIII, and increased platelet aggregation to circulating 5HT (serotonin). Third, recent data highlight that reduced oxygenation of blood due to pulmonary AVMs results in a graded erythrocytotic response to maintain arterial oxygen content, and higher stroke volumes and/or heart rates to maintain oxygen delivery. Finally, HHT-independent factors such as diet, pregnancy, sepsis, and other intercurrent illnesses also influence vascular structures, hemorrhage, and iron handling in HHT patients. These considerations emphasize the complexity of mechanisms that impact on vascular structures in HHT, and also offer opportunities for targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25914716

  16. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J.; Fleger, S.; Barnes V.

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  17. H2S during circulatory shock: Some unresolved questions

    PubMed Central

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E.; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of “acute on chronic disease”, i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions i) of the “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and, ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as “real” sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable “on line” due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a “constitutive” CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  18. H2S during circulatory shock: some unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    McCook, Oscar; Radermacher, Peter; Volani, Chiara; Asfar, Pierre; Ignatius, Anita; Kemmler, Julia; Möller, Peter; Szabó, Csaba; Whiteman, Matthew; Wood, Mark E; Wang, Rui; Georgieff, Michael; Wachter, Ulrich

    2014-09-15

    Numerous papers have been published on the role of H2S during circulatory shock. Consequently, knowledge about vascular sulfide concentrations may assume major importance, in particular in the context of "acute on chronic disease", i.e., during circulatory shock in animals with pre-existing chronic disease. This review addresses the questions (i) of the "real" sulfide levels during circulatory shock, and (ii) to which extent injury and pre-existing co-morbidity may affect the expression of H2S producing enzymes under these conditions. In the literature there is a huge range on sulfide blood levels during circulatory shock, in part as a result of the different analytical methods used, but also due to the variable of the models and species studied. Clearly, some of the very high levels reported should be questioned in the context of the well-known H2S toxicity. As long as "real" sulfide levels during circulatory shock are unknown and/or undetectable "on line" due to the lack of appropriate techniques, it appears to be premature to correlate the measured blood levels of hydrogen sulfide with the severity of shock or the H2S therapy-related biological outcomes. The available data on the tissue expression of the H2S-releasing enzymes during circulatory shock suggest that a "constitutive" CSE expression may play a crucial role of for the maintenance of organ function, at least in the kidney. The data also indicate that increased CBS and CSE expression, in particular in the lung and the liver, represents an adaptive response to stress states. PMID:24650697

  19. Human nervous system function emulator.

    PubMed

    Frenger, P

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a modular, extensible, open-systems design for a multiprocessor network which emulates the major functions of the human nervous system. Interchangeable hardware/software components, a socketed software bus with plug-and-play capability and self diagnostics are included. The computer hardware is based on IEEE P996.1 bus cards. Its operating system utilizes IEEE 1275 standard software. Object oriented design techniques and programming are featured. A machine-independent high level script-based command language was created for this project. Neural anatomical structures which were emulated include the cortex, brainstem, cerebellum, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems. Motor, sensory, autoregulatory, and higher cognitive artificial intelligence, behavioral and emotional functions are provided. The author discusses how he has interfaced this emulator to machine vision, speech recognition/speech synthesis, an artificial neural network and a dexterous hand to form an android robotic platform. PMID:10834247

  20. Long-Term Mechanical Circulatory Support in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Sandica, Eugen; Blanz, Ute; Mime, Lotfi Ben; Schultz-Kaizler, Ursula; Kececioglu, Deniz; Haas, Nikolaus; Kirchner, Guenther; Zu Knyphausen, Edzard; Lauenroth, Volker; Morshuis, Michiel

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective study reviews our results regarding the long-term support in pediatric patients using two ventricular assist systems between January 2008 and April 2014. We implanted the Berlin Heart EXCOR in 29 patients (median age 3.4 years [interquartile range (IQR) 0.2-16.5], median weight 13 kg [IQR 4.2-67.2]). Twenty-two patients (75.8%) received a left ventricular assist device. Three patients (10.3%) had single-ventricle physiology. One patient (3.4%) had mechanical mitral valve prosthesis. The HeartWare System was implanted in nine patients. The median age was 15.6 years (IQR 12.2-17.9), and the median weight was 54.9 kg (IQR 27.7-66). In the Berlin Heart group, the median support time was 65 days (IQR 4-619), with 3647 days of cardiac support. Nineteen patients (65.5%) were transplanted, six patients (20.7%) recovered, one patient (3.4%) is on support, and three patients (10.3%) died on support. Survival rate was 89.7%. Fourteen blood pumps had been exchanged. Four patients (13.8%) had local signs of infection, and three patients (10.3%) had neurological complications. In the HeartWare group, the median support time was 180 days (IQR 1-1124), with 2839 days of cardiac support. Four patients (44.4%) had local signs of infection, and three (33.3%) had neurological complications. Eight patients (88.9%) have been transplanted, and one patient (11.1%) died on support. Survival rate was 88.9%. Excellent survival is possible after long-term mechanical circulatory support in patients with two- and single-ventricle physiology with a low rate of adverse events. PMID:26411865

  1. Organ donation after circulatory death: the forgotten donor?

    PubMed

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L; McGregor, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) can be performed on neurologically intact donors who do not fulfill neurologic or brain death criteria before circulatory arrest. This commentary focuses on the most controversial donor-related issues anticipated from mandatory implementation of DCD for imminent or cardiac death in hospitals across the USA. We conducted a nonstructured review of selected publications and websites for data extraction and synthesis. The recommended 5 min of circulatory arrest does not universally fulfill the dead donor rule when applied to otherwise neurologically intact donors. Scientific evidence from extracorporeal perfusion in circulatory arrest suggests that the procurement process itself can be the event causing irreversibility in DCD. Legislative abandonment of the dead donor rule to permit the recovery of transplantable organs is necessary in the absence of an adequate scientific foundation for DCD practice. The designation of organ procurement organizations or affiliates to obtain organ donation consent introduces self-serving bias and conflicts of interest that interfere with true informed consent. It is important that donors and their families are not denied a 'good death', and the impact of DCD on quality of end-of-life care has not been satisfactorily addressed to achieve this. PMID:17020597

  2. Circulatory disease mortality in the Massachusetts tuberculosis fluoroscopy cohort study.

    PubMed

    Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Brenner, Alina V; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    High-dose ionizing radiation is associated with circulatory disease. Risks from lower-dose fractionated exposures, such as from diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. In this study we aimed to ascertain the relationship between fractionated low-to-medium dose radiation exposure and circulatory disease mortality in a cohort of 13,568 tuberculosis patients in Massachusetts, some with fluoroscopy screenings, between 1916 and 1961 and follow-up until the end of 2002. Analysis of mortality was in relation to cumulative thyroid (cerebrovascular) or lung (all other circulatory disease) radiation dose via Poisson regression. Over the full dose range, there was no overall radiation-related excess risk of death from circulatory disease (n = 3221; excess relative risk/Gy -0.023; 95% CI -0.067, 0.028; p = 0.3574). Risk was somewhat elevated in hypertensive heart disease (n = 89; excess relative risk/Gy 0.357; 95% CI -0.043, 1.030, p = 0.0907) and slightly decreased in ischemic heart disease (n = 1950; excess relative risk/Gy -0.077; 95% CI -0.130, -0.012; p = 0.0211). However, under 0.5 Gy, there was a borderline significant increasing trend for all circulatory disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.345; 95% CI -0.032, 0.764; p = 0.0743) and for ischemic heart disease (excess relative risk/Gy 0.465; 95% CI, -0.032, 1.034, p = 0.0682). Pneumolobectomy increased radiation-associated risk (excess relative risk/Gy 0.252; 95% CI 0.024, 0.579). Fractionation of dose did not modify excess risk. In summary, we found no evidence of radiation-associated excess circulatory death risk overall, but there are indications of excess circulatory death risk at lower doses (<0.5 Gy). Although consistent with other radiation-exposed groups, the indications of higher risk at lower doses are unusual and should be confirmed against other data. PMID:26255039

  3. Donation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Le Dinh, Hieu; de Roover, Arnaud; Kaba, Abdour; Lauwick, Séverine; Joris, Jean; Delwaide, Jean; Honoré, Pierre; Meurisse, Michel; Detry, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families. Since then, DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded, particularly for non-vital organs, like kidneys. In liver transplantation (LT), DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction, more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions, higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival, which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process. Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results, and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality. The future of DCD-LT is promising. Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category III DCD donors), better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients), use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion, normothermic machine perfusion, venous systemic oxygen persufflation), and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT. PMID:22969222

  4. Mock Circulatory Loop Compliance Chamber Employing a Novel Real-Time Control Process.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles E; Miller, Gerald E

    2012-12-01

    The use of compliance chambers in mock circulatory loop construction is the predominant means of simulating arterial compliance. Utilizing mock circulatory loops as bench test methods for cardiac assist technologies necessitates that they must be capable of reproducing the circulatory conditions that would exist physiologically. Of particular interest is the ability to determine instantaneous compliance of the system, and the ability to change the compliance in real-time. This capability enables continuous battery testing of conditions without stopping the flow to change the compliance chamber settings, and the simulation of dynamic changes in arterial compliance. The method tested involves the use of a compliance chamber utilizing a circular natural latex rubber membrane separating the fluid and air portions of the device. Change in system compliance is affected by the airspace pressure, which creates more reaction force at the membrane to the fluid pressure. A pressure sensor in the fluid portion of the chamber and a displacement sensor monitoring membrane center deflection allow for real-time inputs to the control algorithm. A predefined numerical model correlates the displacement sensor data to the volume displacement of the membrane. The control algorithm involves a tuned π loop maintaining the volume distention of the membrane via regulation of the air space pressure. The proportional integral (PI) controller tuning was achieved by creating a computational model of the compliance chamber using Simulink™ Simscape(®) toolboxes. These toolboxes were used to construct a model of the hydraulic, mechanical, and pneumatic elements in the physical design. Parameter Estimation™ tools and Design Optimization™ methods were employed to determine unknown physical parameters in the system, and tune the process controller used to maintain the compliance setting. It was found that the resulting control architecture was capable of maintaining compliance along a

  5. A mock circulatory loop for designing and evaluating total artificial hearts.

    PubMed

    Love, Holley C; Timms, Daniel L; Nestler, Frank; Frazier, O H; Cohn, William E

    2014-01-01

    A mock circulatory loop was constructed to facilitate total artificial heart development. The loop includes many novel features such as a pressure-regulated tank to simulate exercise conditions, controllable systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance to create left-right flow imbalances as seen in postural change and breathing, and a left atrial suction valve. Dual HeartMate II pumps and the BiVACOR® rotary total artificial heart were used to generate pressure and flow data characterizing the flow loop. PMID:25571281

  6. Energy transmission and power sources for mechanical circulatory support devices to achieve total implantability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jake X; Smith, Joshua R; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular assist device therapy has radically improved congestive heart failure survival with smaller rotary pumps. The driveline used to power today's left ventricular assist devices, however, continues to be a source of infection, traumatic damage, and rehospitalization. Previous attempts to wirelessly power left ventricular assist devices using transcutaneous energy transfer systems have been limited by restrictions on separation distance and alignment between the transmit and receive coils. Resonant electrical energy transfer allows power delivery at larger distances without compromising safety and efficiency. This review covers the efforts to wirelessly power mechanical circulatory assist devices and the progress made in enhancing their energy sources. PMID:24530103

  7. The prevention of circulatory collapse in left atrial myxoma or left atrail thrombus patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-05-01

    Some patients with myxoma or thrombus may develop to severe hypotension or sudden death. In this article, we hypothesize a clinical scenario that when the myxoma or thrombus blocks in the mitral valve and causes significant hypotension during anesthesia or surgery. Increasing cardiac preload will be an effective preventive method to increasing the mitral valve annulus and decreasing the severity of stenosis, as a result it will prevent circulatory collapse. Our hypothesis will decrease the possibility of lethal mitral valve stenosis induced by left atrial mass blocking the mitral valve area. In addition, we should also maintain a relative slow heart rate and a relative high systemic vascular resistance. PMID:27063074

  8. Crew system dynamics - Combining humans and automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, Mary

    1989-01-01

    Some of the human factor issues involved in effectively combining human and automated systems are examined with particular reference to spaceflights. The concepts of the crew system and crew systems dynamics are defined, and the present status of crew systems is summarized. The possibilities and potential problems aasociated with the use of automated systems are discussed, as are unique capabilities and possible errors introduced by human participants. It is emphasized that the true integration of human and automated systems must allow for the characteristics of both.

  9. Architecting Systems for Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wocken, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Human-system interactions have been largely overlooked in the traditional systems engineering process. Awareness of human factors (HF) has increased in the past few years, but the involvement of HF specialists is still often too little and too late. In systems involving long-duration human space flight, it is essential that the human component be properly considered in the initial architectural definition phase, as well as throughout the system design process. HF analysis must include not only the strengths and limitations of humans in general, but the variability between individuals and within an individual over time, and the dynamics of group interactions.

  10. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  11. Feedbacks in Human-Landscape Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L.; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change.

  12. Current Status of Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Spiliopoulos, Kyriakos; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karayannis, George; Karangelis, Dimos; Koutsias, Stelios; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas; Georgiopoulou, Vasiliki; Skoularigis, John; Butler, Javed; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a major public health problem and its management requires a significant amount of health care resources. Even with administration of the best available medical treatment, the mortality associated with the disease remains high. As therapeutical strategies for heart failure have been refined, the number of patients suffering from the disease has expanded dramatically. Although heart transplantation still represents the gold standard therapeutical approach, the implantation of mechanical circulatory support devices (MCSDs) evolved to a well-established management for this disease. The limited applicability of heart transplantation caused by a shortage of donor organs and the concurrent expand of the patient population with end-stage heart failure led to a considerable utilization of MCSDs. This paper outlines the current status of mechanical circulatory support. PMID:22970403

  13. Addressing Consent Issues in Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    PubMed

    Overby, Kim J; Weinstein, Michael S; Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Given the widening gap between the number of individuals on transplant waiting lists and the availability of donated organs, as well as the recent plateau in donations based on neurological criteria (i.e., brain death), there has been a growing interest in expanding donation after circulatory determination of death. While the prevalence of this form of organ donation continues to increase, many thorny ethical issues remain, often creating moral distress in both clinicians and families. In this article, we address one of these issues, namely, the challenges surrounding patient and surrogate informed consent for donation after circulatory determination of death. First we discuss several general concerns regarding consent related to this form of organ donation, and then we address additional issues that are unique to three different patient categories: adult patients with medical decision-making capacity or potential capacity, adult patients who lack capacity, and pediatric patients. PMID:26225503

  14. [Electrical properties of limb muscular tissue in acute circulatory hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Kolchev, A I; Nasonkin, O S

    1994-01-01

    The study was undertaken to examine dispersion of the complex electric resistance and capacitive impedance of limb muscular tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 100 kHz in acute circulatory hypoxia caused by blood exfusion from the common carotid artery at 10-50% of the circulatory blood volume (CBV) at the same time local blood flow and oxygen tension in muscles were measured. Blood loss of 10-30% of CBV resulted in increased muscular tissue electric conductivity. Decompensated blood loss was characterized by a steady growth of complex electric resistance and capacitive impedance. There were the greatest changes in electric conductivity in the frequency range of 1-10 kHz. PMID:7824348

  15. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm(2)), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis. PMID:27255403

  16. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-01-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis. PMID:27255403

  17. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-06-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis.

  18. A Systems Approach to the Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago, IL. Career Options Research and Development (CORD).

    This document demonstrates the impact of systems analysis on functional job analysis for occupations in human services. The first section discusses the goals and components, and data analysis techniques of the systems approach. In the next section, systems analysis is applied to the tasks performed in a variety of human services occupations. These…

  19. What Research Says: The Cardiovascular System: Children's Conceptions and Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaudin, Mary W.; Mintzes, Joel J.

    1986-01-01

    Reports findings of a study on children's perceptions and alternate conceptions about the human circulatory system. Summarizes the responses of fifth and eighth grade students on questions dealing with the heart and blood. Offers examples of hands-on activities and confrontation strategies that address common misconceptions on circulation. (ML)

  20. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P<0.05) increases in HR and CO but there were no significant (P>0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk

  1. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  2. Osmotic and hormonal stimulation of the third ventricular region of ducks: antidiuretic, circulatory and local neuronal responses.

    PubMed

    Simon-Oppermann, C; Kanosue, K; Günther, O; Schmid, H

    1989-01-01

    By means of local microperfusion of the 3rd cerebral ventricle, antidiuretic and circulatory responses to stimulations with various hypertonic solutions and norepinephrine were analyzed in conscious ducks. The results suggest ionic rather than osmometric responsiveness of periventricular osmoreceptive elements, which is in line with single unit recordings of periventricular neurons tested in vitro for their osmoresponsiveness. These neurons were located subependymally at the site of greatest responsiveness in vivo, and corresponded to morphologically identified neurons projecting to the neuroendocrine hypothalamo-pituitary system. Antidiuresis was combined with increases in arterial pressure and heart rate in response to hypertonic stimulations with monovalent cations; divalent cations produced long-lasting antidiuresis and equivocal circulatory responses. Norepinephrine elicited antidiuresis which was accompanied by arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Osmotically and norepinephrine induced antidiuresis was combined with increases of plasma ADH concentration. Different modulatory actions of intrinsic adrenergic, angiotensinergic and vasotocinergic neurons are suggested in hypothalamic control of autonomic functions. PMID:2554682

  3. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  4. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused review of the recent literature on finite element methods and optimization for VAD simulations. As VAD designs typically fall into two categories, pulsatile and continuous flow devices, we separately address computational challenges of both types of designs, and the interaction with the circulatory system with three representative case studies. In particular, we focus on recent advancements in finite element methodology that has increased the fidelity of VAD simulations. We outline key challenges, which extend to the incorporation of biological response such as thrombosis and hemolysis, as well as shape optimization methods and challenges in computational methodology. PMID:24449607

  5. The quantum human central neural system.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Athanasios; Rekkas, John

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we present Excess Entropy Production for human aging system as the sum of their respective subsystems and electrophysiological status. Additionally, we support the hypothesis of human brain and central neural system quantumness and we strongly suggest the theoretical and philosophical status of human brain as one of the unknown natural Dirac magnetic monopoles placed in the center of a Riemann sphere. PMID:25416114

  6. Do the Spatial Features of an Adjunct Display that Readers Complete while Reading Affect Their Understanding of a Complex System?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; McCormick, Montana K.; McTigue, Erin T.

    2011-01-01

    We varied the spatial features of adjunct displays that depicted a complex scientific system (i.e. human circulatory system). University students (n = 47), who were assigned randomly to a display condition before reading, selected relevant information from the text and wrote it (a) next to a list of definitions (list condition), (b) inside boxes…

  7. Epigenetic Systems View of Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Gilbert

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the history of the hierarchical epigenetic systems view as applied to human development and offers examples of its implementation. Notes the agreement by many authors that the multilevel systems view is the right model for developmental psychology in both human and animal studies. (BC)

  8. Rehabilitation and Visual Impairment: A Human System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Kolk, Charles J.

    1982-01-01

    The rehabilitation of visually impaired persons can be conceptualized by a human systems approach. This paper explaines seven levels of human systems, related factors, and 10 assumptions that lead to high standards for rehabilitation workers and organizations. The concepts are applied to work with clients and use in rehabilitation agencies.…

  9. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems.

    PubMed

    Chin, Anne; Florsheim, Joan L; Wohl, Ellen; Collins, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Feedbacks have been increasingly identified in Earth-environmental systems, with studies of coupled human-natural systems emphasizing ecological phenomena in producing emerging concepts for social-ecological systems. Enormous gaps or uncertainties in knowledge remain with respect to understanding impact-feedback loops within geomorphic systems with significant human alterations, where the impacted geomorphic systems in turn affect humans. Geomorphology should play an important role in public policy by identifying the many diffuse and subtle feedbacks of both local- and global-scale processes. This role is urgent, while time may still be available to mitigate the impacts that limit the sustainability of human societies. Challenges for geomorphology include identification of the often weak feedbacks that occur over varied time and space scales ranging from geologic time to single isolated events and very short time periods, the lack of available data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, the varied tools and metrics needed to represent both physical and human processes, and the need to collaborate with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of geomorphic change, as well as the human responses to such change. PMID:23592016

  10. Respiratory, circulatory, and neurological responses to hanging: a review of animal models.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, Elie; Clément, Renaud; Redpath, Margaret; Sauvageau, Anny

    2010-09-01

    The pathophysiology of hanging is still poorly understood. This article presents a review of eight animal models: four models of isolated occlusion of the vessels of the neck (group 1), one model of combined tracheal and vessel occlusion (group 2), and three models of true animal hanging (group 3). Occlusion of the airway passages in group 2 did not accelerate respiratory arrest compared to group 1. Cessation of cerebral blood flow, rather than airway obstruction, seems to be the main cause of respiratory decline. In general, muscular movements ceased after 1-3.5 min and early generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were described. Complete circulatory collapse seems to occur between 4 and 8.5 min. These observations from animal models of hanging are compared with the data collected from filmed human hangings. Avenues to improve animal models are discussed. PMID:20487163

  11. Recommendations for donation after circulatory death kidney transplantation in Europe.

    PubMed

    van Heurn, L W Ernest; Talbot, David; Nicholson, Michael L; Akhtar, Mohammed Z; Sanchez-Fructuoso, Ana I; Weekers, Laurent; Barrou, Benoit

    2016-07-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors provides an invaluable source for kidneys for transplantation. Over the last decade, we have observed a substantial increase in the number of DCD kidneys, particularly within Europe. We provide an overview of risk factors associated with DCD kidney function and survival and formulate recommendations from the sixth international conference on organ donation in Paris, for best-practice guidelines. A systematic review of the literature was performed using Ovid Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases. Topics are discussed, including donor selection, organ procurement, organ preservation, recipient selection and transplant management. PMID:26340168

  12. Human Systems Integration in the Federal Government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Graves, Gaye L.; Allard, Terry; Blackhurst, Jack; Fitts, David J.; Peters, Sean; Piccione, Dino; Shattuck, Lawrence G.

    2010-01-01

    Human Systems Integration principles and methods can be used to help integrate people, technology, and organizations in an effective and efficient manner. Over the past decade, a wide range of tools, techniques, and technologies have been developed by federal agencies to achieve significant cost and performance benefits. In this discussion, we will explore trends in military human systems integration and learn about the critical role being played by human performance and effectiveness research. We will also examine case studies on the planning and design of future human space flight vehicles, the national air space system and the first nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in over 30 years. And with an eye toward sustaining the discipline s principles and methods, we ll take a look at educating and training the next generation of human systems integration practitioners.

  13. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  14. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    As human interactions with Earth systems intensify in the "Anthropocene", understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes is increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of "feedbacks" in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling these interactions. Deciphering interacting human-landscape feedbacks extends our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Enormous challenges exist, however, in quantifying impact-feedback loops in landscapes with significant human alterations. This paper illustrates an example of human-landscape interactions following a wildfire in Colorado (USA) that elicited feedback responses. After the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, concerns for heightened flood potential and debris flows associated with post-fire hydrologic changes prompted local landowners to construct tall fences at the base of a burned watershed. These actions changed the sediment transport regime and promoted further landscape change and human responses in a positive feedback cycle. The interactions ultimately increase flood and sediment hazards, rather than dampening the effects of fire. A simple agent-based model, capable of integrating social and hydro-geomorphological data, demonstrates how such interacting impacts and feedbacks could be simulated. Challenges for fully capturing human-landscape feedback interactions include the identification of diffuse and subtle feedbacks at a range of scales, the availability of data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, and the varied metrics and data needed to represent both the physical and human systems. By collaborating with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of landscape change, as well as the human responses to those changes, geoscientists could more fully recognize and anticipate the coupled

  15. Human System Drivers for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Steinberg, Susan; Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of DRM4 in terms of the human system includes the ability to meet NASA standards, the inclusion of the human system in the design trade space, preparation for future missions and consideration of a robotic precursor mission. Ensuring both the safety and the performance capability of the human system depends upon satisfying NASA Space Flight Human System Standards.1 These standards in turn drive the development of program-specific requirements for Near-earth Object (NEO) missions. In evaluating DRM4 in terms of these human system standards, the currently existing risk models, technologies and biological countermeasures were used. A summary of this evaluation is provided below in a structure that supports a mission architecture planning activities. 1. Unacceptable Level of Risk The duration of the DRM4 mission leads to an unacceptable level of risk for two aspects of human system health: A. The permissible exposure limit for space flight radiation exposure (a human system standard) would be exceeded by DRM4. B. The risk of visual alterations and abnormally high intracranial pressure would be too high. 1

  16. NASA Human System Risk Assessment Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, D.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA utilizes an evidence based system to perform risk assessments for the human system for spaceflight missions. The center of this process is the multi-disciplinary Human System Risk Board (HSRB). The HSRB is chartered from the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) at NASA Headquarters. The HSRB reviews all human system risks via an established comprehensive risk and configuration management plan based on a project management approach. The HSRB facilitates the integration of human research (terrestrial and spaceflight), medical operations, occupational surveillance, systems engineering and many other disciplines in a comprehensive review of human system risks. The HSRB considers all factors that influence human risk. These factors include pre-mission considerations such as screening criteria, training, age, sex, and physiological condition. In mission factors such as available countermeasures, mission duration and location and post mission factors such as time to return to baseline (reconditioning), post mission health screening, and available treatments. All of the factors influence the total risk assessment for each human risk. The HSRB performed a comprehensive review of all potential inflight medical conditions and events and over the course of several reviews consolidated the number of human system risks to 30, where the greatest emphasis is placed for investing program dollars for risk mitigation. The HSRB considers all available evidence from human research and, medical operations and occupational surveillance in assessing the risks for appropriate mitigation and future work. All applicable DRMs (low earth orbit for 6 and 12 months, deep space for 30 days and 1 year, a lunar mission for 1 year, and a planetary mission for 3 years) are considered as human system risks are modified by the hazards associated with space flight such as microgravity, exposure to radiation, distance from the earth, isolation and a closed environment. Each risk has a summary

  17. Ethical controversies in organ donation after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    2013-05-01

    The persistent mismatch between the supply of and need for transplantable organs has led to efforts to increase the supply, including controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD). Controlled DCD involves organ recovery after the planned withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and the declaration of death according to the cardiorespiratory criteria. Two central ethical issues in DCD are when organ recovery can begin and how to manage conflicts of interests. The "dead donor rule" should be maintained, and donors in cases of DCD should only be declared dead after the permanent cessation of circulatory function. Permanence is generally established by a 2- to 5-minute waiting period. Given ongoing controversy over whether the cessation must also be irreversible, physicians should not be required to participate in DCD. Because the preparation for organ recovery in DCD begins before the declaration of death, there are potential conflicts between the donor's and recipient's interests. These conflicts can be managed in a variety of ways, including informed consent and separating the various participants' roles. For example, informed consent should be sought for premortem interventions to improve organ viability, and organ procurement organization personnel and members of the transplant team should not be involved in the discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment or the declaration of death. It is also important to emphasize that potential donors in cases of DCD should receive integrated interdisciplinary palliative care, including sedation and analgesia. PMID:23629612

  18. The French airbridge for circulatory support in the Carribean†

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Guillaume; Sanchez, Bruno; Hennequin, Jean-Luc; Resière, Dabor; Hommel, Didier; Léonard, Christian; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Roques, François

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We report the assessment and the activities for the first year of our airborne circulatory support mobile unit (CSMU) in the French Caribbean. METHODS From January 2010 to June 2011, 12 patients (mean age = 35.7 years; range: 15–62 years; sex ratio = 1:1) were attended outside Martinique by our CSMU and transferred to our unit by air. RESULTS Eight patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome and were assisted by veno-venous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) four had refractory cardiogenic shock, assisted by extra corporeal life support (ECLS). The average air transfer distance for patients was 912 km (range: 198–1585 km). The average flying time was 124 min (range: 45–255 min). The aircraft used were heliciopter, military transport or private jet. The setting-up of assistance devices and transfer of patients was uneventful. One patient subsequently benefited from heart transplantation after long-term circulatory support. One patient died under ECMO support after 51 days of assistance and another died on the 60th day after withdrawal of ECLS. CONCLUSIONS CSMUs can be very efficient in providing support to patients in refractory shock, when remote from a cardiac surgery centre. The airborne transfer of patients on ECMO/ECLS can be achieved safely, even over long distances. PMID:22659268

  19. Humanized hemato-lymphoid system mice

    PubMed Central

    Theocharides, Alexandre P.A.; Rongvaux, Anthony; Fritsch, Kristin; Flavell, Richard A.; Manz, Markus G.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, incrementally improved xenograft mouse models, supporting the engraftment and development of a human hemato-lymphoid system, have been developed and now represent an important research tool in the field. The most significant contributions made by means of humanized mice are the identification of normal and leukemic hematopoietic stem cells, the characterization of the human hematopoietic hierarchy, and their use as preclinical therapy models for malignant hematopoietic disorders. Successful xenotransplantation depends on three major factors: tolerance by the mouse host, correct spatial location, and appropriately cross-reactive support and interaction factors such as cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules. Each of these can be modified. Experimental approaches include the genetic modification of mice to faithfully express human support factors as non-cross-reactive cytokines, to create free niche space, the co-transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells, the implantation of humanized ossicles or other stroma, and the implantation of human thymic tissue. Besides the source of hematopoietic cells, the conditioning regimen and the route of transplantation also significantly affect human hematopoietic development in vivo. We review here the achievements, most recent developments, and the remaining challenges in the generation of pre-clinically-predictive systems for human hematology and immunology, closely resembling the human situation in a xenogeneic mouse environment. PMID:26721800

  20. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  1. Human Resource Administration in Catholic School Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobzanski, Joan L.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a comprehensive human resource program, the purpose of which is to enhance the quality of Catholic education for all students. Defines the assumptions on which the formation and implementation of human resource programs for Catholic schools are based. Highlights the role and responsibilities of Catholic school system leaders. (VWC)

  2. System C: an essay in human relatedness.

    PubMed

    Riggs, B C

    1978-07-01

    The system of dyadic human relationship, designated System C, is examined in terms of unique qualities and measures useful for both research and teaching in the area of dynamic psychiatric interviews. Implications are indicated in polyadic systems, and a new aspect of transference is noted. A sample of interview material is analyzed as illustration. PMID:696953

  3. Analysis of circulatory mitochondrial DNA level after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and potential prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chaoyi; Gu, Jun; Qian, Hong; Meng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Our research letter found that circulatory mtDNA level increased after the end of CPB and positive correlations between mtDNA and peak CRP level, peak BNP level, and peak PCT level, which revealed the prognostic role of perioperative circulatory mtDNA level in patients who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:27316503

  4. 9 CFR 309.4 - Livestock showing symptoms of certain metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases... metabolic, toxic, nervous, or circulatory disturbances, nutritional imbalances, or infectious or parasitic diseases. 309.4 Section 309.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  5. The course of circulatory and cerebral recovery after circulatory arrest: influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, E O; Holm, S

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors on circulatory and neurological recovery for up to 1 year following circulatory arrest of cardio-pulmonary aetiology in 231 patients. Initially, all patients were unconscious and 106 had some cortical activity recorded in the immediate post-resuscitation EEG (Group I), while 125 had no such activity initially (Group II). The following variables were explored: age, sex, medical history, cause and location of arrest, initial cardiac dysrhythmia, duration of life support, metabolic acidosis, pulse-pressure product and heart pump function capacity early after resuscitation. Outcome measures were duration and quality of circulatory survival, cause of death, neurological recovery and ultimate outcome. First year survival was 33% in Group I and 16% in Group II. Severe heart failure and brain death occurred mainly in Group II. Circulatory recovery was negatively influenced by out-of-hospital arrest, metabolic acidosis and pulse-pressure products below 150. Neurological recovery was negatively influenced by initial dysrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, pulse-pressure products below 150, post-arrest heart failure and/or pulmonary complications. It seems that circulatory and cerebral outcomes are mainly determined by the global ischaemic insults sustained during the circulatory arrest period. PMID:10625157

  6. Human Rating the Orion Parachute System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machin, Ricardo A.; Fisher, Timothy E.; Evans, Carol T.; Stewart, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    Human rating begins with design. Converging on the requirements and identifying the risks as early as possible in the design process is essential. Understanding of the interaction between the recovery system and the spacecraft will in large part dictate the achievable reliability of the final design. Component and complete system full-scale flight testing is critical to assure a realistic evaluation of the performance and reliability of the parachute system. However, because testing is so often difficult and expensive, comprehensive analysis of test results and correlation to accurate modeling completes the human rating process. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Orion program uses parachutes to stabilize and decelerate the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) spacecraft during subsonic flight in order to deliver a safe water landing. This paper describes the approach that CEV Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) will take to human rate the parachute recovery system for the CEV.

  7. Human systems dynamics: Toward a computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eoyang, Glenda H.

    2012-09-01

    A robust and reliable computational model of complex human systems dynamics could support advancements in theory and practice for social systems at all levels, from intrapersonal experience to global politics and economics. Models of human interactions have evolved from traditional, Newtonian systems assumptions, which served a variety of practical and theoretical needs of the past. Another class of models has been inspired and informed by models and methods from nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and complexity science. None of the existing models, however, is able to represent the open, high dimension, and nonlinear self-organizing dynamics of social systems. An effective model will represent interactions at multiple levels to generate emergent patterns of social and political life of individuals and groups. Existing models and modeling methods are considered and assessed against characteristic pattern-forming processes in observed and experienced phenomena of human systems. A conceptual model, CDE Model, based on the conditions for self-organizing in human systems, is explored as an alternative to existing models and methods. While the new model overcomes the limitations of previous models, it also provides an explanatory base and foundation for prospective analysis to inform real-time meaning making and action taking in response to complex conditions in the real world. An invitation is extended to readers to engage in developing a computational model that incorporates the assumptions, meta-variables, and relationships of this open, high dimension, and nonlinear conceptual model of the complex dynamics of human systems.

  8. Mechanical circulatory support: strategies and outcomes in pediatric congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Bennett Pearce, F; Dabal, Robert J; Carlo, Waldemar F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute or progressive heart failure in the setting of congenital heart disease may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to enhance survival while awaiting cardiac transplantation. Because the majority of MCS devices are implanted after prior cardiac operations, special precautions are necessary at the time of implant. MCS in single ventricle patients usually requires ventricular and aortic cannulation, with a systemic to pulmonary artery shunt for pulmonary blood flow. Limited outcomes data is available, with less than 15% of pediatric MCS patients having congenital heart disease. The Berlin EXCOR is the only durable device currently available for infants. Neurologic complications are the major cause of mortality, and survival during support is poor for infants <5 kg. Patients post-Fontan with acute cardiac failure and/or respiratory failure are at high risk for death before transplant and should be considered for MCS therapy. Several emerging miniature continuous flow devices will soon broaden the landscape of available pediatric devices. PMID:24725719

  9. Circulatory mobility in post-Mao China: temporary migrants in Kaiping county, Pearl River Delta region.

    PubMed

    Woon, Y

    1993-01-01

    "Since the 1980s, it has been possible for the Chinese peasant household to diversify its economic base by making use of its social networks to place members in a distant community as migrant workers. Through a microstudy of 50 such migrants in Kaiping County in the Pearl River Delta region, this article illustrates the interplay between macro, meso, and micro factors in the causes and processes of circulatory mobility in post-Mao China. It is found that Hong Kong's search for cheap labor, the PRC's household registration system, and Kaiping's strong localism provide the context in which migrants and their households have to adjust. The particular behavior pattern of these migrants also bears the stamp of their rational household decision-making processes as well as their feelings of moral obligation toward their kin in their community of origin." PMID:12287570

  10. [Circulatory responses to adrenaline administration at rest, during physical loading and under anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Palets, L D; Lissova, O I

    1978-06-01

    In chronic experiments, the effects of 0.5 and 2.5 mcg/kg/min adrenaline infusion on central hemodynamics of conscions and anesthetized dogs were studied. Circulatory reactions elicited by blood volume change and running on treadmill were compared before and during adrenaline infusion. In conscions dogs, infusion of 0.5 mcg/kg/min adrenaline increased cardiac output and central venous pressure, decreased systemic vascular resistance and pumping heart capacity, while mean arterial pressure and heart rate were unchanged. It did not change pumping heart capacity in anesthetized dogs. Infusion of 0.5 mcg/kg/min adrenaline did not change the tendency of hemodynamic reactions on hemorrhage and blood transfusion. Exercise during adrenaline infusion resulted in a more cardiac output increase and lesser heart rate increase than without adrenaline. Infusion of 2.5 mcg/kg/min adrenaline induced more significant increase of arterial pressure in conscions dogs than in anesthetized. PMID:680266

  11. EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION vs. COUNTERPULSATILE, PULSATILE, AND CONTINUOUS LEFT VENTRICULAR UNLOADING FOR PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bartoli, Carlo R.; Koenig, Steven C.; Ionan, Constantine; Gillars, Kevin J.; Mitchell, Mike E.; Austin, Erle H.; Gray, Laman A.; Pantalos, George M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite progress with adult ventricular assist devices (VADs), limited options exist to support pediatric patients with life-threatening heart disease. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) remains the clinical standard. To characterize (patho)physiologic responses to different modes of mechanical unloading of the failing pediatric heart, ECMO was compared to either intraaortic balloon pump (IABP), pulsatile-flow (PF)VAD, or continuous-flow (CF)VAD support in a pediatric heart failure model. DESIGN Experimental. SETTING Large animal laboratory operating room. SUBJECTS Yorkshire piglets (n=47, 11.7±2.6 kg). INTERVENTIONS In piglets with coronary ligation-induced cardiac dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support devices were implanted and studied during maximum support. MEASUREMENTS and MAIN RESULTS Left ventricular, right ventricular, coronary, carotid, systemic arterial, and pulmonary arterial hemodynamics were measured with pressure and flow transducers. Myocardial oxygen consumption and total-body oxygen consumption (VO2) were calculated from arterial, venous, and coronary sinus blood sampling. Blood flow was measured in 17 organs with microspheres. Paired student t-tests compared baseline and heart failure conditions. One-way repeated-measures ANOVA compared heart failure, device support mode(s), and ECMO. Statistically significant (p<0.05) findings included: 1) improved left ventricular blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, CFVAD, and ECMO but not IABP support, 2) improved global myocardial blood supply/demand ratio during PFVAD, and CFVAD but not IABP or ECMO support, and 3) diminished pulsatility during ECMO and CFVAD but not IABP and PFVAD support. A profile of systems-based responses was established for each type of support. CONCLUSIONS Each type of pediatric VAD provided hemodynamic support by unloading the heart with a different mechanism that created a unique profile of physiological changes. These data contribute novel, clinically

  12. Circulatory changes associated with the closure of the ductus arteriosus in hatching emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae).

    PubMed

    Shell, Lauren; Burggren, Warren; Muirhead, David; Nelson, Thomas C; Dzialowski, Edward M

    2016-01-01

    In developing avian embryos, the right and left ductus arteriosi (DA) allow for a shunt of systemic venous return away from the lungs to the body and chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Unlike in mammals where the transition from placental respiration to lung respiration is instantaneous, in birds the transition from embryonic CAM respiration to lung respiration can take over 24h. To understand the physiological consequences of this long transition we examined circulatory changes and DA morphological changes during hatching in the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae), a primitive ratite bird. By tracking microspheres injected into a CAM vein, we observed no change in DA blood flow between the pre-pipped to internally pipped stages. Two hours after external pipping, however, a significant decrease in DA blood flow occurred, evident from a decreased systemic blood flow and subsequent increased lung blood flow. Upon hatching, the right-to-left shunt disappeared. These physiological changes in DA blood flow correspond with a large decrease in DA lumen diameter from the pre-pipped stages to Day 1 hatchlings. Upon hatching, the right-to-left shunt disappeared and at the same time apoptosis of smooth muscle cells began remodeling the DA for permanent closure. After the initial smooth muscle contraction, the lumen disappeared as intimal cushioning formed, the internal elastic lamina degenerated, and numerous cells underwent regulated apoptosis. The DA closed rapidly between the initiation of external pipping and hatching, resulting in circulatory patterns similar to the adult. This response is most likely produced by increased DA constriction in response to increased arterial oxygen levels and the initiation of vessel remodeling. PMID:26549875

  13. The Humanity in Management Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausner, David

    More emphasis should be placed on "human factors" in the management information systems (MIS). They should be tailored to their users--the administrators, faculty, and students. Easy communication with an information system is a basic necessity, just as is the ability to get simpler answers to the most complex questions. All levels of the…

  14. System for Odorless Disposal of Human Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Dave; Lewis, Tod

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual system provides clean, hygienic storage. Disposal system stores human wastes compactly. Releases no odor or bacteria and requires no dangerous chemicals or unpleasant handling. Stabilizes waste by natural process of biodegradation in which microbial activity eventually ceases and ordors and bacteria reduced to easily contained levels. Simple and reliable and needs little maintenance.

  15. Curriculum Development: A Humanized System Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrist, Robert S.

    Capitalizing on the potential of a systems approach requires continuous recognition that the purpose of an educational institution is to help human beings grow and develop. All people affected by the program of a school system should reach consensus on issues where possible and clarify issues that need additional study and dialogue. A school…

  16. Policy Interactions in Human-Landscape Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlak, Andrea K.

    2014-01-01

    Given the heightened pace and extent of human interactions with landscapes, there is increasing recognition of the interdependence of hydrogeomorphological, ecological, and human systems in understanding human-landscape interactions. There is also widespread agreement for greater integration across disciplinary boundaries to generate new knowledge urgently needed for theory building to understand, predict, and respond to rapidly changing human-landscape systems. The development of new conceptual frameworks, methods, tools, and collaborations linking across the natural and social sciences are key elements to such integration. In an effort to contribute to a broader conceptual framework for human-landscape systems, this paper describes how environmental policy research has contributed to four integrative themes—thresholds and tipping points; spatial scales and boundaries; feedback loops; and time scales and lags—developed by participants in an NSF-sponsored interdisciplinary workshop. As a broad and heterogeneous body of literature, environmental policy research reflects a diversity of methodological and theoretical approaches around institutions, actors, processes, and ideas. We integrate across multiple subfields and research programs to help identify complementarities in research that may support future interdisciplinary collaborative work. We conclude with a discussion of future research questions to help advance greater interdisciplinary research around human-landscape systems.

  17. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Era of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Yamini; Cooper, Lauren B; Parikh, Kishan S; Felker, G Michael; Milano, Carmelo A; Rogers, Joseph G; Hernandez, Adrian F; Patel, Chetan B

    2016-01-01

    Left heart disease (LHD) represents the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and is associated with worse prognosis compared with LHD without PH. In addition, PH due to LHD may prevent patients from receiving heart transplantation, because of risk of perioperative right ventricular failure. Current literature lacks comprehensive descriptions and management strategies of PH due to LHD. In this review, we summarize the literature that is available to highlight the definition, pathogenesis, and prognosis of PH due to LHD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in this population. Finally, we provide recommendations regarding the management and reassessment of PH due to LHD in the specific context of MCS. PMID:27442856

  18. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur. PMID:23465703

  19. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1370 - Human growth hormone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human growth hormone test system. 862.1370 Section... Systems § 862.1370 Human growth hormone test system. (a) Identification. A human growth hormone test system is a device intended to measure the levels of human growth hormone in plasma. Human growth...

  3. ["Tracking" the magnitude of arterial pressure in the circulatory system].

    PubMed

    Amosov, N M; Beregovskiĭ, B A; Lissova, O I; Palets, B L

    1976-11-01

    Steady--state characteristics of arterial and venous pressure, cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, heart rate, and pumping heart capacity depending on blood volume change were studied in dogs under conditons of rest, exercises, light and deep narcosis. The tracking mean arterial pressure was found to be the main principle of hemodynamic regulation. In unanesthetized animals the tracking is based on heart regulation component mainly, while under light narcosis it is the vascular component. In deep narcosis it is the suppressed tracking principle: arterial pressure change is proportional to blood volume changes. PMID:1022536

  4. Respiratory and Circulatory Systems, Science (Experimental): 5363.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Alan; And Others

    This biology course is especially recommended for students interested in a vocation in nursing, medical technology, dental hygiene or other para-medical areas. In part, it is considered a second course in biology. The course includes an intensive in-depth study of the respiratory structures, nerve and chemical control of breathing, gas exchange,…

  5. Influence of psoriasis on circulatory system function assessed in echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Milaniuk, Sylwia; Pietrzak, Aldona; Mosiewicz, Barbara; Mosiewicz, Jerzy; Reich, Kristian

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a chronic disease with a multifactorial pathogenesis. It affects about 2-4 % of the population all over the world. In course of psoriatic arthritis, joints' damages are observed. In patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, there is increased morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases observed. The aim of the study is to analyze the echocardiography of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis on the basis of the literature available in PubMed database. Abnormalities found in echocardiography of patients with psoriasis include valvular defects (40.7 % of the patients), left ventricle diastolic dysfunction (27.8 %), and left ventricle hypertrophy (11.1 %). Left ventricle's systolic disorders, increased aorta stiffness index and increased pulmonary artery blood pressure were also observed in this group of patients. PMID:26121943

  6. [Human resources for local health systems].

    PubMed

    Linger, C

    1989-01-01

    The economic and social crises affecting Latin America have had a profound social and political effect on its structures. This paper analyzes this impact from 2 perspectives: 1) the impact on the apparatus of the state, in particular on its health infra-structures; and 2) the direction of the democratic process in the continent and the participatory processes of civil societies. The institutionalization of the Local Health Systems (SILOS) is an effort to analyze the problem from within the health sector and propose solutions. This paper discusses the issues of human resource development in health systems; training in human resource development and human resource development in local health care systems. There are 3 strategies used to change health systems: 1) The judicial-political system: The state's apparatus 2) The political-administrative system: the national health care system; and 3) the political-operative system: local health care systems. To assure implementation of SILOS there are 4 steps to be followed: 1) create political conditions that allow the transformation and development of local health systems; 2) development of high-level institutional and political initiatives to develop health care networks; 3) offer key players institutional space and social action to develop the SILOS process; 4) rapidly develop SILOS in regions to assure its integration with other development efforts. The labor force in the health sector and organized communities play critical roles in proposing and institutionalizing health programs. PMID:2766984

  7. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/SP-2015-3709, Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide, also known as the "HSIPG," provides a tool for implementing HSI activities within the NASA systems engineering framework. The HSIPG is written to aid the HSI practitioner engaged in a program or project (P/P), and serves as a knowledge base to allow the practitioner to step into an HSI lead or team member role for NASA missions. Additionally, this HSIPG is written to address the role of HSI in the P/P management and systems engineering communities and aid their understanding of the value added by incorporating good HSI practices into their programs and projects. Through helping to build a community of knowledgeable HSI practitioners, this document also hopes to build advocacy across the Agency for establishing strong, consistent HSI policies and practices. Human Systems Integration (HSI) has been successfully adopted (and adapted) by several federal agencies-most notably the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-as a methodology for reducing system life cycle costs (LCCs). These cost savings manifest themselves due to reductions in required numbers of personnel, the practice of human-centered design, decreased reliance on specialized skills for operations, shortened training time, efficient logistics and maintenance, and fewer safety-related risks and mishaps due to unintended human/system interactions. The HSI process for NASA establishes how cost savings and mission success can be realized through systems engineering. Every program or project has unique attributes. This HSIPG is not intended to provide one-size-fits-all recommendations for HSI implementation. Rather, HSI processes should be tailored to the size, scope, and goals of individual situations. The instructions and processes identified here are best used as a starting point for implementing human-centered system concepts and designs across programs and projects of varying types, including

  8. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This brief abstract reviews the development of the current day approach to human system risk management for space flight and the development of the critical components of this process over the past few years. The human system risk management process now provides a comprehensive assessment of each human system risk by design reference mission (DRM) and is evaluated not only for mission success but also for long-term health impacts for the astronauts. The discipline of bioastronautics is the study of the biological and medical effects of space flight on humans. In 1997, the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) initiated the Bioastronautics Roadmap (Roadmap) as the "Critical Path Roadmap", and in 1998 participation in the roadmap was expanded to include the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) and the external community. A total of 55 risks and 250 questions were identified and prioritized and in 2000, the Roadmap was base-lined and put under configuration control. The Roadmap took into account several major advisory committee reviews including the Institute of Medicine (IOM) "Safe Passage: Astronaut care for Exploration Missions", 2001. Subsequently, three collaborating organizations at NASA HQ (Chief Health and Medical Officer, Office of Space Flight and Office of Biological & Physical Research), published the Bioastronautics Strategy in 2003, that identified the human as a "critical subsystem of space flight" and noted that "tolerance limits and safe operating bands must be established" to enable human space flight. These offices also requested a review by the IOM of the Roadmap and that review was published in October 2005 as "A Risk Reduction Strategy for Human Exploration of Space: A Review of NASA's Bioastronautics Roadmap", that noted several strengths and weaknesses of the Roadmap and made several recommendations. In parallel with the development of the Roadmap, the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) began a process in

  9. Development of Human System Integration at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; McGuire, Kerry; Thompson, Shelby; Vos, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Human Systems Integration seeks to design systems around the capabilities and limitations of the humans which use and interact with the system, ensuring greater efficiency of use, reduced error rates, and less rework in the design, manufacturing and operational deployment of hardware and software. One of the primary goals of HSI is to get the human factors practitioner involved early in the design process. In doing so, the aim is to reduce future budget costs and resources in redesign and training. By the preliminary design phase of a project nearly 80% of the total cost of the project is locked in. Potential design changes recommended by evaluations past this point will have little effect due to lack of funding or a huge cost in terms of resources to make changes. Three key concepts define an effective HSI program. First, systems are comprised of hardware, software, and the human, all of which operate within an environment. Too often, engineers and developers fail to consider the human capacity or requirements as part of the system. This leads to poor task allocation within the system. To promote ideal task allocation, it is critical that the human element be considered early in system development. Poor design, or designs that do not adequately consider the human component, could negatively affect physical or mental performance, as well as, social behavior. Second, successful HSI depends upon integration and collaboration of all the domains that represent acquisition efforts. Too often, these domains exist as independent disciplines due to the location of expertise within the service structure. Proper implementation of HSI through participation would help to integrate these domains and disciplines to leverage and apply their interdependencies to attain an optimal design. Via this process domain interests can be integrated to perform effective HSI through trade-offs and collaboration. This provides a common basis upon which to make knowledgeable decisions. Finally

  10. Human behavior in online social systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.

    2009-06-01

    We present and study data concerning human behavior in four online social systems: (i) an Internet community of friends of over 107 people, (ii) a music community website with over 106 users, (iii) a gamers’ community server with over 5 × 106 users and (iv) a booklovers’ website with over 2.5 × 105 users. The purpose of those systems is different; however, their properties are very similar. We have found that the distribution of human activity (e.g., the sum of books read or songs played) has the form of a power law. Moreover, the relationship between human activity and time has a power-law form, too. We present a simple interest-driven model of the evolution of such systems which explains the emergence of two scaling regimes.