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Sample records for human craniofacial disorders

  1. Regenerative Strategies for Craniofacial Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Catharine B.; Pomerantz, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial disorders present markedly complicated problems in reconstruction because of the complex interactions of the multiple, simultaneously affected tissues. Regenerative medicine holds promise for new strategies to improve treatment of these disorders. This review addresses current areas of unmet need in craniofacial reconstruction and emphasizes how craniofacial tissues differ from their analogs elsewhere in the body. We present a problem-based approach to illustrate current treatment strategies for various craniofacial disorders, to highlight areas of need, and to suggest regenerative strategies for craniofacial bone, fat, muscle, nerve, and skin. For some tissues, current approaches offer excellent reconstructive solutions using autologous tissue or prosthetic materials. Thus, new “regenerative” approaches would need to offer major advantages in order to be adopted. In other tissues, the unmet need is great, and we suggest the greatest regenerative need is for muscle, skin, and nerve. The advent of composite facial tissue transplantation and the development of regenerative medicine are each likely to add important new paradigms to our treatment of craniofacial disorders. PMID:23248598

  2. Mouse Models of Rare Craniofacial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, Annita; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    A rare disease is defined as a condition that affects less than 1 in 2000 individuals. Currently more than 7000 rare diseases have been documented, and most are thought to be of genetic origin. Rare diseases primarily affect children, and congenital craniofacial syndromes and disorders constitute a significant proportion of rare diseases, with over 700 having been described to date. Modeling craniofacial disorders in animal models has been instrumental in uncovering the etiology and pathogenesis of numerous conditions and in some cases has even led to potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. In this chapter, we focus primarily on two general classes of rare disorders, ribosomopathies and ciliopathies, and the surprising finding that the disruption of fundamental, global processes can result in tissue-specific craniofacial defects. In addition, we discuss recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of an extremely rare and specific craniofacial condition known as syngnathia, based on the first mouse models for this condition. Approximately 1% of all babies are born with a minor or major developmental anomaly, and individuals suffering from rare diseases deserve the same quality of treatment and care and attention to their disease as other patients. PMID:26589934

  3. Heritability of the Human Craniofacial Complex.

    PubMed

    Šešelj, Maja; Duren, Dana L; Sherwood, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying normal variation and the genetic underpinnings of anatomical structures is one of the main goals of modern morphological studies. However, the extent of genetic contributions to normal variation in craniofacial morphology in humans is still unclear. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the genetic underpinnings of normal craniofacial morphology. The sample under investigation consists of 75 linear and angular measurements spanning the entire craniofacial complex, recorded from lateral cephalographs of 1,379 participants in the Fels Longitudinal Study. Heritabilities for each trait were estimated using SOLAR, a maximum-likelihood variance components approach utilizing all pedigree information for parameter estimation. Trait means and mean effects of the covariates age, sex, age(2) , sex × age, and sex × age(2) were simultaneously estimated in the analytic models. All traits of the craniofacial complex were significantly heritable. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.10 to 0.60, with the majority being moderate. It is important to note that we found similar ranges of heritability occurring across the different functional/developmental components of the craniofacial complex, the splanchnocranium, the basicranium, and the neurocranium. This suggests that traits from different regions of the craniofacial complex are of comparable utility for the purposes of population history and phylogeny reconstruction. At the same time, this genetic influence on craniofacial morphology signals a caution to researchers of nongenetic studies to consider the implications of this finding when selecting samples for study given their project design and goals. PMID:26097051

  4. A review of craniofacial disorders caused by spliceosomal defects.

    PubMed

    Lehalle, D; Wieczorek, D; Zechi-Ceide, R M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Lyonnet, S; Amiel, J; Gordon, C T

    2015-11-01

    The spliceosome is a large ribonucleoprotein complex that removes introns from pre-mRNA transcripts. Mutations in EFTUD2, encoding a component of the major spliceosome, have recently been identified as the cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis, Guion-Almeida type (MFDGA), characterized by mandibulofacial dysostosis, microcephaly, external ear malformations and intellectual disability. Mutations in several other genes involved in spliceosomal function or linked aspects of mRNA processing have also recently been identified in human disorders with specific craniofacial malformations: SF3B4 in Nager syndrome, an acrofacial dysostosis (AFD); SNRPB in cerebrocostomandibular syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence and rib defects; EIF4A3 in the AFD Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence, median mandibular cleft and limb defects; and TXNL4A in Burn-McKeown syndrome, involving specific craniofacial dysmorphisms. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular aspects of these syndromes. Given the apparent sensitivity of craniofacial development to defects in mRNA processing, it is possible that mutations in other proteins involved in spliceosomal function will emerge in the future as causative for related human disorders. PMID:25865758

  5. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bavia, Paula Furlan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. Material and Methods A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts’ analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. Results No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general. PMID:27489610

  6. Altered FGF signalling in congenital craniofacial and skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Shahida; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway has been the focus of intense genetic and functional research for several decades. The emerging data implicate FGF signalling in diverse regulatory processes, both in the developing embryo as well as in the adult organism. Alterations in this tightly regulated pathway can lead to a number of pathological conditions, ranging from well-recognized congenital disorders to cancer. In order to mediate their cellular processes, FGFs signal through a subfamily of tyrosine kinase receptors, called FGF receptors (FGFRs). In humans, four FGFRs are described, and, to date, mutations in FGFR1, FGFR2, and FGFR3 have been shown to underlie human developmental disorders. FGFs/FGFRs are known to be key players in both endochondral and intramembranous bone development. In this review, we focus on the major developmental craniofacial and skeletal disorders which result from altered FGF signalling. PMID:26686047

  7. Single gene disorders with craniofacial and oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    Gene and environmental factors are instrumental in genesis of complex and wide range of disorders and syndromes. The newer gene sequencing and other advanced technologies have made our previous knowledge of genetic etiopathogenesis of various disorders more transparent. Single gene disorders refer to the disorders caused due to mutations in a single gene and a fair number of these manifest as craniofacial defects and anomalies. This review is an attempt to give a detailed insight into the varied single gene disorders and syndromes with an emphasis on dental implications. PMID:25707843

  8. Oral and Craniofacial Clinical Signs Associated to Genetic Conditions in Human Identification Part I: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Fouad; Aoun, Nicole; el Husseini, Hassan; Jassar, Houssam; Sayah, Fida; Salameh, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Forensic dentistry is one of the most reliable methods used in human identification when other technique as fingerprint, DNA, visual identification cannot be used. Genetic disorders have several manifestations that can target the intra-oral cavity, the cranio-facial area or any location in the human body. Materials and Methods: A literature search of the scientific database (Medline and Science Direct) for the years 1990 to 2014 was carried out to find out all the available papers that indicate oral, cranio-facial signs, genetic and human identification. Results: A table with 10 genetic conditions was described with oral and cranio-facial signs that can help forensic specialist in human identification. Conclusion: This review showed a correlation between genetics, facial and intra-oral signs that would help forensic ondontologist in the identification procedures. PMID:26028912

  9. Craniofacial syndromes and sleep-related breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Leng; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Abel, François; Gozal, David

    2016-06-01

    Children with craniofacial syndromes are at risk of sleep disordered breathing, the most common being obstructive sleep apnea. Midface hypoplasia in children with craniosynostosis and glossoptosis in children with Pierre Robin syndrome are well recognized risk factors, but the etiology is often multifactorial and many children have multilevel airway obstruction. We examine the published evidence and explore the current management strategies in these complex patients. Some treatment modalities are similar to those used in otherwise healthy children such as adenotonsillectomy, positive pressure ventilation and in the refractory cases, tracheostomy. However, there are some distinct approaches such as nasopharyngeal airways, tongue lip adhesion, mandibular distraction osteogenesis in children with Pierre Robin sequence, and midface advancement in children with craniosynostoses. Clinicians should have a low threshold for referral for evaluation of sleep-disordered-breathing in these patients. PMID:26454241

  10. The old and new face of craniofacial research: How animal models inform human craniofacial genetic and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Williams, Trevor; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2016-07-15

    The craniofacial skeletal structures that comprise the human head develop from multiple tissues that converge to form the bones and cartilage of the face. Because of their complex development and morphogenesis, many human birth defects arise due to disruptions in these cellular populations. Thus, determining how these structures normally develop is vital if we are to gain a deeper understanding of craniofacial birth defects and devise treatment and prevention options. In this review, we will focus on how animal model systems have been used historically and in an ongoing context to enhance our understanding of human craniofacial development. We do this by first highlighting "animal to man" approaches; that is, how animal models are being utilized to understand fundamental mechanisms of craniofacial development. We discuss emerging technologies, including high throughput sequencing and genome editing, and new animal repository resources, and how their application can revolutionize the future of animal models in craniofacial research. Secondly, we highlight "man to animal" approaches, including the current use of animal models to test the function of candidate human disease variants. Specifically, we outline a common workflow deployed after discovery of a potentially disease causing variant based on a select set of recent examples in which human mutations are investigated in vivo using animal models. Collectively, these topics will provide a pipeline for the use of animal models in understanding human craniofacial development and disease for clinical geneticist and basic researchers alike. PMID:26808208

  11. Disorders of Sex Development: Lessons to be Learned from Studies of Spina Bifida and Craniofacial Conditions.

    PubMed

    Holmbeck, G N; Aspinall, C L

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss research methods and clinical management strategies employed with other conditions (i. e., spina bifida and craniofacial conditions) and how these methods and strategies could be applied to youth with disorders of sex development (DSD). The review focuses specifically on the potential overlap between DSD and these other conditions across the following 3 areas: (1) developmentally-oriented theories that underlie the research base for chronic physical conditions; (2) research designs and methodological features that have proved fruitful in these areas; and (3) the potential applicability to DSD of clinical management practices for youth with craniofacial conditions. PMID:25719736

  12. A multinational deployment of 3D laser scanning to study craniofacial dysmorphology in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Jeff; Wernert, Eric; Moore, Elizabeth; Ward, Richard; Wetherill, Leah F.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2007-01-01

    Craniofacial anthropometry (the measurement and analysis of head and face dimensions) has been used to assess and describe abnormal craniofacial variation (dysmorphology) and the facial phenotype in many medical syndromes. Traditionally, anthropometry measurements have been collected by the direct application of calipers and tape measures to the subject's head and face, and can suffer from inaccuracies due to restless subjects, erroneous landmark identification, clinician variability, and other forms of human error. Three-dimensional imaging technologies promise a more effective alternative that separates the acquisition and measurement phases to reduce these variabilities while also enabling novel measurements and longitudinal analysis of subjects. Indiana University (IU) is part of an international consortium of researchers studying fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Fetal alcohol exposure results in predictable craniofacial dysmorphologies, and anthropometry has been proven to be an effective diagnosis tool for the condition. IU is leading a project to study the use of 3D surface scanning to acquire anthropometry data in order to more accurately diagnose FASD, especially in its milder forms. This paper describes our experiences in selecting, verifying, supporting, and coordinating a set of 3D scanning systems for use in collecting facial scans and anthropometric data from around the world.

  13. The role of physical therapy in craniofacial pain disorders: an adjunct to dental pain management.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, S

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of craniofacial pain disorders is often complicated by diverse factors such as acute or chronic trauma and persistent postural changes. In addition, emotional issues and life stress often cloud the recovery process. Physical therapists, with their diverse knowledge base and highly competent treatment skills, can be quite effective in assisting dentists and physicians with management of the many difficult upper quarter and craniofacial pain syndromes. This article reviews the role of myofascial and craniosacral dysfunction, as well as the function of posture, tension, and stress in the development of these syndromes. Additionally, it provides a comprehensive overview of the many evaluative techniques and treatment options that can be provided by today's physical therapists. PMID:1843484

  14. Utilizing the chicken as an animal model for human craniofacial ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Schock, Elizabeth N; Chang, Ching-Fang; Youngworth, Ingrid A; Davey, Megan G; Delany, Mary E; Brugmann, Samantha A

    2016-07-15

    The chicken has been a particularly useful model for the study of craniofacial development and disease for over a century due to their relatively large size, accessibility, and amenability for classical bead implantation and transplant experiments. Several naturally occurring mutant lines with craniofacial anomalies also exist and have been heavily utilized by developmental biologist for several decades. Two of the most well known lines, talpid(2) (ta(2)) and talpid(3) (ta(3)), represent the first spontaneous mutants to have the causative genes identified. Despite having distinct genetic causes, both mutants have recently been identified as ciliopathic. Excitingly, both of these mutants have been classified as models for human craniofacial ciliopathies: Oral-facial-digital syndrome (ta(2)) and Joubert syndrome (ta(3)). Herein, we review and compare these two models of craniofacial disease and highlight what they have revealed about the molecular and cellular etiology of ciliopathies. Furthermore, we outline how applying classical avian experiments and new technological advances (transgenics and genome editing) with naturally occurring avian mutants can add a tremendous amount to what we currently know about craniofacial ciliopathies. PMID:26597494

  15. Phenotypic evolution of human craniofacial morphology after admixture: a geometric morphometrics approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; González-José, Rolando; González-Martín, Antonio; Van der Molen, Silvina; Talavera, Arturo; Hernández, Patricia; Hernández, Miquel

    2006-03-01

    An evolutionary, diachronic approach to the phenotypic craniofacial pattern arisen in a human population after high levels of admixture and gene flow was achieved by means of geometric morphometrics. Admixture has long been studied after molecular data. Nevertheless, few efforts have been made to explain the morphological outcome in human craniofacial samples. The Spanish-Amerindian contact can be considered a good scenario for such an analysis. Here we present a comparative analysis of craniofacial shape changes observed between two putative ancestor groups, Spanish and precontact Aztecs, and two diachronic admixed groups, corresponding to early and late colonial periods from the Mexico's Central Valley. Quantitative shape comparisons of Amerindian, Spanish, and admixed groups were used to test the expectations of quantitative genetics for admixture events. In its simplest form, this prediction states that an admixed group will present phenotypic values falling between those of both parental groups. Results show that, in general terms, although the human skull is a complex, integrated structure, the craniofacial morphology observed fits the theoretical expectations of quantitative genetics. Thus, it is predictive of population structure and history. In fact, results obtained after the craniofacial analysis are in accordance with previous molecular and historical interpretations, providing evidence that admixture is a main microevolutionary agent influencing modern Mexican gene pool. However, expectations are not straightforward when moderate shape changes are considered. Deviations detected at localized structures, such as the upper and lower face, highlight the evolution of a craniofacial pattern exclusively inherent to the admixed groups, indicating that quantitative characters might respond to admixture in a complicated, nondirectional way. PMID:16323202

  16. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J.

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A genome-wide linkage scan for quantitative trait loci influencing the craniofacial complex in humans(Homo sapiens sapiens)

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Richard J.; Duren, Dana L.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Blangero, John; Dyer, Thomas D.; Cole, Shelley A.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Chumlea, Wm. Cameron; Siervogel, Roger M.; Choh, Audrey C.; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Lee, Miryoung; Towne, Bradford

    2011-01-01

    The genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex has been the subject of intense scrutiny because of the high frequency of congenital malformations. Numerous animal models have been used to document the early development of the craniofacial complex, but few studies have focused directly on the genetic underpinnings of normal variation in the human craniofacial complex. The current study examines 80 quantitative traits derived from lateral cephalographs of 981 participants in the Fels Longitudinal Study, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio. Quantitative genetic analyses were conducted using the SOLAR analytic platform, a maximum-likelihood variance components method that incorporates all familial information for parameter estimation. Heritability estimates were significant and of moderate to high magnitude for all craniofacial traits. Additionally, significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for 10 traits from the three developmental components (basicranium, splanchnocranium, and neurocranium) of the craniofacial complex. These QTL were found on chromosomes 3, 6, 11, 12, and 14. This study of the genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex elucidates fundamental information of the genetic architecture of the craniofacial complex in humans. PMID:21328561

  18. Facing up to the Challenges of Advancing Craniofacial Research

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, Paul A.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial anomalies are among the most common human birth defects and have considerable functional, aesthetic, and social consequences. The early developmental origin as well as the anatomical complexity of the head and face render these tissues prone to genetic and environmental insult. The establishment of craniofacial clinics offering comprehensive care for craniofacial patients at a single site together with international research networks focused on the origins and treatment of craniofacial disorders has led to tremendous advances in our understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of congenital craniofacial anomalies. However, the genetic, environmental, and developmental sources of many craniofacial disorders remain unknown. To overcome this problem and further advance craniofacial research, we must recognize current challenges in the field and establish priority areas for study. We still need (i) a deeper understanding of variation during normal development and within the context of any disorder, (ii) improved genotyping and phenotyping and understanding of the impact of epigenetics, (iii) continued development of animal models and functional analyses of genes and variants, and (iv) integration of patient derived cells and tissues together with 3D printing and quantitative assessment of surgical outcomes for improved practice. Only with fundamental advances in each of these areas will we be able to meet the challenge of translating potential therapeutic and preventative approaches into clinical solutions and reduce the financial and emotional burden of craniofacial anomalies. PMID:25820983

  19. Sensitivity analysis of a validated subject-specific finite element model of the human craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Szwedowski, T D; Fialkov, J; Whyne, C M

    2011-01-01

    Developing a more complete understanding of the mechanical response of the craniofacial skeleton (CFS) to physiological loads is fundamental to improving treatment for traumatic injuries, reconstruction due to neoplasia, and deformities. Characterization of the biomechanics of the CFS is challenging due to its highly complex structure and heterogeneity, motivating the utilization of experimentally validated computational models. As such, the objective of this study was to develop, experimentally validate, and parametrically analyse a patient-specific finite element (FE) model of the CFS to elucidate a better understanding of the factors that are of intrinsic importance to the skeletal structural behaviour of the human CFS. An FE model of a cadaveric craniofacial skeleton was created from subject-specific computed tomography data. The model was validated based on bone strain measurements taken under simulated physiological-like loading through the masseter and temporalis muscles (which are responsible for the majority of craniofacial physiologic loading due to mastication). The baseline subject-specific model using locally defined cortical bone thicknesses produced the strongest correlation to the experimental data (r2 = 0.73). Large effects on strain patterns arising from small parametric changes in cortical thickness suggest that the very thin bony structures present in the CFS are crucial to characterizing the local load distribution in the CFS accurately. PMID:21381488

  20. Discovery and characterization of spontaneous mouse models of craniofacial dysmorphology.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Kristina; Fairfield, Heather; Borgeia, Suhaib; Curtain, Michelle; Hassan, Mohamed G; Dionne, Louise; Yong Karst, Son; Coombs, Harold; Bronson, Roderick T; Reinholdt, Laura G; Bergstrom, David E; Donahue, Leah Rae; Cox, Timothy C; Murray, Stephen A

    2016-07-15

    Craniofacial abnormalities are among the most common features of human genetic syndromes and disorders. The etiology of these conditions is often complex, influenced by both genetic context and the environment. Frequently, craniofacial abnormalities present as part of a syndrome with clear comorbid phenotypes, providing additional insight into mechanisms of the causative gene or pathway. The mouse has been a key tool in our understanding of the genetic mechanisms of craniofacial development and disease, and can provide excellent models for human craniofacial abnormalities. While powerful genetic engineering tools in the mouse have contributed significantly our understanding of craniofacial development and dysmorphology, forward genetic approaches provide an unbiased means to identify new genes and pathways. Moreover, spontaneous mutations can occur on any number of genetic backgrounds, potentially revealing critical genes that require a specific genetic context. Here we report discovery and phenotyping of 43 craniofacial mouse models, derived primarily from a screen for spontaneous mutations in production colonies at the Jackson Laboratory. We identify the causative gene for 33 lines, including novel genes in pathways not previously connected to craniofacial development, and novel alleles of known genes that present with unique phenotypes. Together with our detailed characterization, this work provides a valuable gene discovery resource for the craniofacial community, and a rich source of mouse models for further investigation. PMID:26234751

  1. Craniofacial changes and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing in healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Maria Christina Thomé; Fiorott, Bruna Santos; Finck, Nathalia Silveira; de Araújo, Maria Teresa Martins

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The main cause of mouth breathing and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in childhood is associated with upper airway narrowing to varying degrees. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of morphological and functional craniofacial changes and the main clinical symptoms of SDB in healthy children. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted. A sample comprising 687 healthy schoolchildren, aged 7-12 years old and attending public schools, was assessed by medical history, clinical medical and dental examination, and respiratory tests. The self-perceived quality of life of mouth breathing children was obtained by a validated questionnaire. RESULTS: Out of the total sample, 520 children were nose breathers (NB) while 167 (24.3%) were mouth breathers (MB); 32.5% had severe hypertrophy of the palatine tonsils, 18% had a Mallampati score of III or IV, 26.1% had excessive overjet and 17.7% had anterior open bite malocclusion. Among the MB, 53.9% had atresic palate, 35.9% had lip incompetence, 33.5% reported sleepiness during the day, 32.2% often sneezed, 32.2% had a stuffy nose, 19.6% snored, and 9.4% reported having the feeling to stop breathing while asleep. However, the self-perception of their quality of life was considered good. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of facial changes as well as signs and symptoms of mouth breathing were found among health children, requiring early diagnosis and treatment to reduce the risk of SDB. PMID:26154460

  2. Shape covariation between the craniofacial complex and first molars in humans

    PubMed Central

    Polychronis, Georgios; Halazonetis, Demetrios J

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of mutual genetic loci in morphogenesis of the face and teeth implies shape covariation between these structures. However, teeth finalize their shape at an early age, whereas the face grows and is subjected to environmental influences for a prolonged period; it is therefore conceivable that covariation might modulate with age. Here we investigate the extent of this covariation in humans by measuring the 3D shape of the occlusal surface of the permanent first molars and the shape of the craniofacial complex from lateral radiographs, at two maturations stages. A sample of Greek subjects was divided into two groups (110 adult, 110 prepubertal) with equally distributed gender. The occlusal surfaces of the right first molars were 3D scanned from dental casts; 265 and 274 landmarks (including surface and curve semilandmarks) were digitized on the maxillary and mandibular molars, respectively. The corresponding lateral cephalometric radiographs were digitized with 71 landmarks. Geometric morphometric methods were used to assess shape variation and covariation. The vertical dimension of the craniofacial complex was the main parameter of shape variation, followed by anteroposterior deviations. The male craniofacial complex was larger (4.0–5.7%) and was characterized by a prominent chin and clockwise rotation of the cranial base (adult group only). Allometry was weak and statistically significant only when examined for the sample as a whole (percent variance explained: 2.1%, P = 0.0002). Covariation was statistically significant only between the lower first molar and the craniofacial complex (RV = 14.05%, P = 0.0099, and RV = 12.31%, P = 0.0162, for the prepubertal and adult groups, respectively). Subtle age-related covariation differences were noted, indicating that environmental factors may influence the pattern and strength of covariation. However, the main pattern was similar in both groups: a class III skeletal pattern (relative maxillary retrusion and

  3. [Craniofacial neuralgias].

    PubMed

    Mikula, Ivan

    2008-05-01

    Craniofacial neuralgias are characterized by sudden paroxysmal pain along the distribution of one or more of the cranial or upper cervical spinal nerves. The most significant neuralgia of the craniofacial region is trigeminal neuralgia, while geniculate neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia and occipital neuralgia are less common. Trigeminal neuralgia may be primary or secondary. Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia or tic douloureux has been recognized for centuries as an extremely painful disorder most commonly involving the maxillary nerve. Recurrent lancinating, shocklike unilateral pain lasting for seconds to minutes is provoked by non noxious stimulation of the skin at specific sites around the face and less frequently by movement of the tongue. The trigger zones are usually within the same dermatome as the painful sensation. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce pain. Idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia occurs somewhat more frequently in women and usually begins in individuals 50 to 70 years of age. There is no pain between attacks, and the frequency of painful episodes can range from several per day to only a few per year. With time, the features may become more atypical, with greater areas of more enduring and dull pain and occasionally bilateral pain, rarely on both sides simultaneously. No sensory or reflex deficit is detectable by routine neurologic testing. Diagnostic local anesthetic blocks will identify the specific nerves involved and the trigger point distribution. Neurologic and neuroradiologic examination is advised in all cases to rule out diseases such as intracranical tumors, vascular malformations or multiple sclerosis. PMID:18710080

  4. Effect of bite force and diet composition on craniofacial diversification of Southern South American human populations.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Lumila; Bernal, Valeria; Novellino, Paula; Perez, S Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Ecological factors can be important to shape the patterns of morphological variation among human populations. Particularly, diet plays a fundamental role in craniofacial variation due to both the effect of the nutritional status-mostly dependent on the type and amount of nutrients consumed-on skeletal growth and the localized effects of masticatory forces. We examine these two dimensions of diet and evaluate their influence on morphological diversification of human populations from southern South America during the late Holocene. Cranial morphology was measured as 3D coordinates defining the face, base and vault. Size, form, and shape variables were obtained for 474 adult individuals coming from 12 samples. Diet composition was inferred from carious lesions and δ(13) C data, whereas bite forces were estimated using traits of main jaw muscles. The spatial structure of the morphological and ecological variables was measured using correlograms. The influence of diet composition and bite force on morphometric variation was estimated by a spatial regression model. Cranial variation and diet composition display a geographical structure, while no geographical pattern was observed in bite forces. Cranial variation in size and form is significantly associated with diet composition, suggesting a strong effect of systemic factors on cranial growth. Conversely, bite forces do not contribute significantly to the pattern of morphological variation among the samples analyzed. Overall, these results show that an association between diet composition and hardness cannot be assumed, and highlight the complex relationship between morphological diversification and diet in human populations. PMID:24985052

  5. Selective brain cooling seems to be a mechanism leading to human craniofacial diversity observed in different geographical regions.

    PubMed

    Irmak, M K; Korkmaz, A; Erogul, O

    2004-01-01

    Selective brain cooling (SBC) can occur in hyperthermic humans despite the fact that humans have no carotid rete, a vascular structure that facilitates countercurrent heat exchange located at the base of the skull in some mammals. Emissary and angular veins, upper respiratory tract, tympanic cavity and cerebrospinal fluid are major components of SBC system in humans. The efficiency of SBC is increased by evaporation of sweat on the head and by ventilation through the nose, but it is surprising to find out that mammals do not display SBC during exercise hyperthermia. What is the explanation then for the SBC at high body temperatures? Our hypothesis is that selective brain cooling protects the brain from thermal damage in a long-standing manner by allowing adaptive mechanisms to change the craniofacial morphology appropriate for different environmental conditions. Since the brain can only be as big that can cool, it is not surprising to find a lower (below 1300 cm(3)) cranial volume in Australian Aborigines with respect to the one (over 1450 cm(3)) in Eskimos. In addition to lower brain volume, other craniofacial features such as thick everted lips, broader nasal cavity and bigger paranasal sinuses that provide more evaporating surfaces seem to be anatomical variations developed in time for an effective SBC in hot climates. It was reported previously that these biological adaptations result from the tissues of neural crest origin. Among the crest derivatives, leptomeninges (pia and arachnoid mater), skeletal and connective tissues of the face and much of the skull seem to be structures upon which environment operates to produce more convenient craniofacial morphology for an effective SBC. In conclusion, selective brain cooling seems to be a mechanism leading to adaptive craniofacial diversity observed in different geographical regions. Thus, SBC is necessary for long-term biological adaptation, not for protecting the brain from acute thermal damage. PMID:15504564

  6. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  7. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  8. 77 FR 35990 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  1. 76 FR 22111 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  8. Geometric morphometric analysis of craniofacial variation, ontogeny and modularity in a cross-sectional sample of modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Wellens, H L L; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Halazonetis, D J

    2013-01-01

    This investigation aimed to quantify craniofacial variation in a sample of modern humans. In all, 187 consecutive orthodontic patients were collected, of which 79 were male (mean age 13.3, SD 3.7, range 7.5–40.8) and 99 were female (mean age 12.3, SD 1.9, range 8.7–19.1). The male and female subgroups were tested for differences in mean shapes and ontogenetic trajectories, and shape variability was characterized using principal component analysis. The hypothesis of modularity was tested for six different modularity scenarios. The results showed that there were subtle but significant differences in the male and female Procrustes mean shapes. Males were significantly larger. Mild sexual ontogenetic allometric divergence was noted. Principal component analysis indicated that, of the four retained biologically interpretable components, the two most important sources of variability were (i) vertical shape variation (i.e. dolichofacial vs. brachyfacial growth patterns) and (ii) sagittal relationships (maxillary prognatism vs. mandibular retrognathism, and vice versa). The mandible and maxilla were found to constitute one module, independent of the skull base. Additionally, we were able to confirm the presence of an anterior and posterior craniofacial columnar module, separated by the pterygomaxillary plane, as proposed by Enlow. These modules can be further subdivided into four sub-modules, involving the posterior skull base, the ethmomaxillary complex, a pharyngeal module, and the anterior part of the jaws. PMID:23425043

  9. Hcfc1b, a zebrafish ortholog of HCFC1, regulates craniofacial development by modulating mmachc expression

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Anita M.; Geiger, Elizabeth A.; Achilly, Nate; Rosenblatt, David S.; Maclean, Kenneth N.; Stabler, Sally P.; Artinger, Kristin B.; Appel, Bruce; Shaikh, Tamim H.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in HCFC1 (MIM300019), have been recently associated with cblX (MIM309541), an X-linked, recessive disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies including craniofacial abnormalities. HCFC1 is a transcriptional co-regulator that modulates the expression of numerous downstream target genes including MMACHC, but it is not clear how these HCFC1 targets play a role in the clinical manifestations of cblX. To begin to elucidate the mechanism by which HCFC1 modulates disease phenotypes, we have carried out loss of function analyses in the developing zebrafish. Of the two HCFC1 orthologs in zebrafish, hcfc1a and hcfc1b, the loss of hcfc1b specifically results in defects in craniofacial development. Subsequent analysis revealed that hcfc1b regulates cranial neural crest cell differentiation and proliferation within the posterior pharyngeal arches. Further, the hcfc1b-mediated craniofacial abnormalities were rescued by expression of human MMACHC, a downstream target of HCFC1 that is aberrantly expressed in cblX. Furthermore, we tested distinct human HCFC1 mutations for their role in craniofacial development and demonstrated variable effects on MMACHC expression in humans and craniofacial development in zebrafish. Notably, several individuals with mutations in either HCFC1 or MMACHC have been reported to have mild to moderate facial dysmorphia. Thus, our data demonstrates that HCFC1 plays a role in craniofacial development, which is in part mediated through the regulation of MMACHC expression. PMID:25281006

  10. Unmasking the ciliopathies: craniofacial defects and the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Claudio R; Metzis, Vicki; Wicking, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the primary cilium has emerged as a pivotal sensory organelle that acts as a major signaling hub for a number of developmental signaling pathways. In that time, a vast number of proteins involved in trafficking and signaling have been linked to ciliary assembly and/or function, demonstrating the importance of this organelle during embryonic development. Given the central role of the primary cilium in regulating developmental signaling, it is not surprising that its dysfunction results in widespread defects in the embryo, leading to an expanding class of human congenital disorders known as ciliopathies. These disorders are individually rare and phenotypically variable, but together they affect virtually every vertebrate organ system. Features of ciliopathies that are often overlooked, but which are being reported with increasing frequency, are craniofacial abnormalities, ranging from subtle midline defects to full-blown orofacial clefting. The challenge moving forward is to understand the primary mechanism of disease given the link between the primary cilium and a number of developmental signaling pathways (such as hedgehog, platelet-derived growth factor, and WNT signaling) that are essential for craniofacial development. Here, we provide an overview of the diversity of craniofacial abnormalities present in the ciliopathy spectrum, and reveal those defects in common across multiple disorders. Further, we discuss the molecular defects and potential signaling perturbations underlying these anomalies. This provides insight into the mechanisms leading to ciliopathy phenotypes more generally and highlights the prevalence of widespread dysmorphologies resulting from cilia dysfunction. PMID:26173831

  11. Disorder in Complex Human System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdeniz, K. Gediz

    2011-11-01

    Since the world of human and whose life becomes more and more complex every day because of the digital technology and under the storm of knowledge (media, internet, governmental and non-governmental organizations, etc...) the simulation is rapidly growing in the social systems and in human behaviors. The formation of the body and mutual interactions are left to digital technological, communication mechanisms and coding the techno genetics of the body. Deconstruction begins everywhere. The linear simulation mechanism with modern realities are replaced by the disorder simulation of human behaviors with awareness realities. In this paper I would like to introduce simulation theory of "Disorder Sensitive Human Behaviors". I recently proposed this theory to critique the role of disorder human behaviors in social systems. In this theory the principle of realty is the chaotic awareness of the complexity of human systems inside of principle of modern thinking in Baudrillard's simulation theory. Proper examples will be also considered to investigate the theory.

  12. Human peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Depreter, Marianne; Espeel, Marc; Roels, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane-bound cell organelles performing numerous metabolic functions. The present article aims to give an overview of our current knowledge about inherited peroxisomal disorders in which these organelles are lacking or one or more of their functions are impaired. They are multiorgan disorders and the nervous system is implicated in most. After a summary of the historical names and categories, each having distinct symptoms and prognosis, microscopic pathology is reviewed in detail. Data from the literature are added to experience in the authors' laboratory with 167 liver biopsy and autopsy samples from peroxisomal patients, and with a smaller number of chorion samples for prenatal diagnosis, adrenal-, kidney-, and brain samples. Various light and electron microscopic methods are used including enzyme- and immunocytochemistry, polarizing microscopy, and morphometry. Together with other laboratory investigations and clinical data, this approach continues to contribute to the diagnosis and further characterization of peroxisomal disorders, and the discovery of novel variants. When liver specimens are examined, three main groups including 9 novel variants (33 patients) are distinguished: (1) absence or (2) presence of peroxisomes, and (3) mosaic distribution of cells with and without peroxisomes (10 patients). Renal microcysts, polarizing trilamellar inclusions, and insoluble lipid in macrophages in liver, adrenal cortex, brain, and in interstitial cells of kidney are also valuable for classification. On a genetic basis, complementation of fibroblasts has classified peroxisome biogenesis disorders into 12 complementation groups. Peroxisome biogenesis genes (PEX), knock-out-mice, and induction of redundant genes are briefly reviewed, including some recent results with 4-phenylbutyrate. Finally, regulation of peroxisome expression during development and in cell cultures, and by physiological factors is discussed. PMID:12740827

  13. The Ribosome Biogenesis Factor Nol11 Is Required for Optimal rDNA Transcription and Craniofacial Development in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, John N.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2015-01-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  14. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John N; Sondalle, Samuel B; Del Viso, Florencia; Baserga, Susan J; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2015-03-01

    The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC) of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival. PMID:25756904

  15. A systematic review of the oral and craniofacial manifestations of cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corcuera-Flores, José-Ramón; Casttellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Serrera-Figallo, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is an autosomal disorder. Because it affects few people in the population it is considered a rare disease, yet it is one of the most common autosomal chromosomal syndromes in humans. It entails pathognomonic alterations that affect the craniofacial and oral anatomy of patients. The aim of this study is to review these craniofacial and oral abnormalities in patients with Cri du chat syndrome. The PubMed Medline database was searched using two different strategies. First, we used "Dentistry" and "Cri du chat" as keywords; second, we used "Cri du chat" and "craniofacial." Seven articles in which the main orofacial and cranio-skeletal characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome were described were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cri du Chat syndrome entails pathognomonic characteristics in the craniofacial area (epicanthus, short philtrum, and wide nasal bridge), the oral area (mandibular retrognathism and anterior open bite) and the cranial region (alterations at the cranial base angle and a small upper airway). However, more studies on larger samples are needed to specify the orofacial and craniofacial characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome more accurately. Clin. Anat. 29:555-560, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26457586

  16. 75 FR 28031 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2010-05-19

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  17. 78 FR 3009 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  18. 76 FR 57061 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Kelly, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Inst of Dental &...

  19. 76 FR 5183 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research..., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Inst. of Dental & Craniofacial...

  20. 77 FR 64815 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  1. 77 FR 10540 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  2. 77 FR 76297 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research...-594-0652, rwagenaa@mail.nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial...., MS, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific ] Review Branch, National Institute of...

  3. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Design and Development of Novel Dental Composite Restorative Systems Review Panel....

  4. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  5. 77 FR 57098 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-09-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  6. 75 FR 7486 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special..., PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of Dental...

  7. De Novo Duplication of 7p21.1p22.2 in a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Craniofacial Dysmorphism

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Achandira M.; Al-Mamari, Watfa; Al-Sayegh, Abeer; Al-Kindy, Adila

    2015-01-01

    The duplication of the short arm of chromosome 7 as de novo is extremely rare. The phenotype spectrum varies depending on the region of duplication. We report a case of de novo duplication of chromosomal region 7p21.1p22.2 in a three-year-old male child with autism who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in Muscat, Oman, in January 2012. The patient was diagnosed with craniofacial dysmorphism, global developmental delay, hypotonia and bilateral cryptorchidism. The duplication was detected by conventional G-banded karyotype analysis/fluorescence in situ hybridisation and confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridisation. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of chromosomal region 7p21.1 involvement in an autistic patient showing features of a 7p duplication phenotype. Identifying genes in the duplicated region using molecular techniques is recommended to promote characterisation of the phenotype and associated condition. It may also reveal the possible role of these genes in autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26357560

  8. Craniofacial and Dental Development in Costello Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Alice F.; Oberoi, Snehlata; Landan, Maya; Charles, Cyril; Massie, Jessica C.; Fairley, Cecilia; Rauen, Katherine A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is a RASopathy characterized by a wide range of cardiac, musculoskeletal, dermatological, and developmental abnormalities. The RASopathies are defined as a group of syndromes caused by activated Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Specifically, CS is caused by activating mutations in HRAS. Although receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, which is upstream of Ras/MAPK, is known to play a critical role in craniofacial and dental development, the craniofacial and dental features of CS have not been systematically defined in a large group of individuals. In order to address this gap in our understanding and fully characterize the CS phenotype, we evaluated the craniofacial and dental phenotype in a large cohort (n=41) of CS individuals. We confirmed that the craniofacial features common in CS include macrocephaly, bitemporal narrowing, convex facial profile, full cheeks, and large mouth. Additionally, CS patients have a characteristic dental phenotype that includes malocclusion with anterior open bite and posterior crossbite, enamel hypo-mineralization, delayed tooth development and eruption, gingival hyperplasia, thickening of the alveolar ridge, and high palate. Comparison of the craniofacial and dental phenotype in CS with other RASopathies, such as cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC), provides insight into the complexities of Ras/MAPK signaling in human craniofacial and dental development. PMID:24668879

  9. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources. PMID:27285892

  10. 76 FR 38193 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, Review of PAR-11-144 NIDCR U01... of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Rm...

  11. 77 FR 23488 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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    2012-04-19

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  12. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-02-04

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  13. 76 FR 30373 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial...: Marilyn Moore-Hoon, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Institute of...

  14. Brain, Craniofacial, and Dental Lesions of a Free-ranging Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Implicated in a Human Attack in Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Schwabenlander, Marc; Stepaniuk, Kevin; Carstensen, Michelle; Armién, Aníbal G

    2016-01-01

    We describe significant brain, craniofacial, and dental lesions in a free-ranging wolf (Canis lupus) involved in a human attack. On postmortem examination, the wolf presented asymmetric atrophy and bone remodeling affecting the mandible, incisive, maxilla, lacrimal, palatine, frontal, and ethmoid bones. There was an asymmetrical skeletal malocclusion and dental abnormalities including rotated, malpositioned, partially erupted teeth, and an odontogenic cyst associated with an unerupted canine tooth. Brain changes were bilateral loss and atrophy of extensive cortex regions including olfactory bulb, peduncles, and tract, and the frontal lobe. We highlight the relevance of a thorough postmortem examination of wildlife to elucidate disease-based abnormal behavior as the reason for human-animal conflict. PMID:26540333

  15. Influence of congenital facial nerve palsy on craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehoon; Park, Sang Woo; Kwon, Geun-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Seung-Hak; Kim, Jae Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sukwha

    2014-11-01

    Facial muscles are of major importance in human craniofacial growth and development. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether congenital facial nerve palsy influences craniofacial growth in craniofacial microsomia. Fifty-one patients with unilateral craniofacial microsomia and no history of craniofacial skeletal surgery whose radiographs were taken after craniofacial growth was complete were included in this study. These patients were divided into groups in which the facial nerve was involved or uninvolved. The authors evaluated a total of seven measurement items to analyze the midface and mandibular asymmetry. Twenty patients had facial nerve involvement, and 31 had no involvement. None of the measurement items revealed any significant differences between the facial nerve-involved group and the uninvolved group within the same modified Pruzansky grade. There was no correlation between the type of facial nerve involvement and the measurement items. In relationships among the measurement items within each group, maxillary asymmetry was indirectly correlated with mandibular asymmetry or midline deviation through the occlusal plane angle in the uninvolved groups. However, in the facial nerve-involved group, the relationships disappeared. When the correlations in the facial nerve-involved group were compared with those of the uninvolved group, the relationships in the uninvolved group appeared more significant than in the facial nerve-involved group. The loss of relationships between the upper and lower jaw in the facial nerve-involved group might have been caused by subtle changes, which occur in midfacial bones and in the mandible due to facial nerve palsy. The main limitation of our study is that aside from facial nerve palsy, craniofacial microsomia has many factors that can influence craniofacial growth, such as hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle and soft tissue deficiencies. PMID:25210001

  16. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase NOSIP Modulates Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity in Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Meike; Prelle, Carola; Küchler, Philipp; Kovacevic, Igor; Moser, Markus; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Oess, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans. PMID:25546391

  17. Craniofacial characteristics of Croatian and Syrian populations.

    PubMed

    Grbesa, Durdica; Pezerović-Panijan, Ruzica; Kalaya, Mohamed Nadim; Gorsić, Irma; Cavcić, Anamarija; Zura, Nikolino; Berberović, Behija

    2007-12-01

    Craniofacial area is apart of the human body which undergoes the greatest changes during development and is characterized by uneven growth. External and internal factors affect the growth and development of craniofacial structures. They are responsible for the occurrence of specific craniofacial characteristics in different races or populations within the same race. The present study investigates the possible differences of the basic head and face shapes between the Croatian and Syrian populations. The sample included 400 subjects of both sexes aged 18-24 years and was divided into a Croatian and a Syrian group with 200 subjects each. Six variables defined according to Martin and Saller were measured by standard anthropometric instruments. The results of the study demonstrated statistically significant differences between our subjects in all variables except face width. The dolichocephalic head type and the mesoprosopic face type were predominant in the Croatian population, while the brachycephalic head type and the euryprosopic face type dominated in the Syrian population. PMID:18217470

  18. A noncoding expansion in EIF4A3 causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, a craniofacial disorder associated with limb defects.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Francine P; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R F; Weiner, Andrea M J; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B; Andersen, Gregers R; McGowan, Simon J; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L G; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. PMID:24360810

  19. Human Genetic Disorders of Axon Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews symptoms and signs of aberrant axon connectivity in humans, and summarizes major human genetic disorders that result, or have been proposed to result, from defective axon guidance. These include corpus callosum agenesis, L1 syndrome, Joubert syndrome and related disorders, horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis, Kallmann syndrome, albinism, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1, Duane retraction syndrome, and pontine tegmental cap dysplasia. Genes mutated in these disorders can encode axon growth cone ligands and receptors, downstream signaling molecules, and axon transport motors, as well as proteins without currently recognized roles in axon guidance. Advances in neuroimaging and genetic techniques have the potential to rapidly expand this field, and it is feasible that axon guidance disorders will soon be recognized as a new and significant category of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:20300212

  20. A Noncoding Expansion in EIF4A3 Causes Richieri-Costa-Pereira Syndrome, a Craniofacial Disorder Associated with Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Favaro, Francine P.; Alvizi, Lucas; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Bertola, Debora; Felix, Temis M.; de Souza, Josiane; Raskin, Salmo; Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Weiner, Andrea M.J.; Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Calcaterra, Nora B.; Andersen, Gregers R.; McGowan, Simon J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; de Almeida, Maria L.G.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome is an autosomal-recessive acrofacial dysostosis characterized by mandibular median cleft associated with other craniofacial anomalies and severe limb defects. Learning and language disabilities are also prevalent. We mapped the mutated gene to a 122 kb region at 17q25.3 through identity-by-descent analysis in 17 genealogies. Sequencing strategies identified an expansion of a region with several repeats of 18- or 20-nucleotide motifs in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of EIF4A3, which contained from 14 to 16 repeats in the affected individuals and from 3 to 12 repeats in 520 healthy individuals. A missense substitution of a highly conserved residue likely to affect the interaction of eIF4AIII with the UPF3B subunit of the exon junction complex in trans with an expanded allele was found in an unrelated individual with an atypical presentation, thus expanding mutational mechanisms and phenotypic diversity of RCPS. EIF4A3 transcript abundance was reduced in both white blood cells and mesenchymal cells of RCPS-affected individuals as compared to controls. Notably, targeting the orthologous eif4a3 in zebrafish led to underdevelopment of several craniofacial cartilage and bone structures, in agreement with the craniofacial alterations seen in RCPS. Our data thus suggest that RCPS is caused by mutations in EIF4A3 and show that EIF4A3, a gene involved in RNA metabolism, plays a role in mandible, laryngeal, and limb morphogenesis. PMID:24360810

  1. Bone Repair Cells for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, G; Kaigler, D; Rasperini, G; Avila-Ortiz, G; Bartel, R; Giannobile, WV

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex craniofacial deformities is a clinical challenge in situations of injury, congenital defects or disease. The use of cell-based therapies represents one of the most advanced methods for enhancing the regenerative response for craniofacial wound healing. Both Somatic and Stem Cells have been adopted in the treatment of complex osseous defects and advances have been made in finding the most adequate scaffold for the delivery of cell therapies in human regenerative medicine. As an example of such approaches for clinical application for craniofacial regeneration, Ixmyelocel-T or bone repair cells are a source of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells. They are produced through the use of single pass perfusion bioreactors for CD90+ mesenchymal stem cells and CD14+ monocyte/macrophage progenitor cells. The application of ixmyelocel-T has shown potential in the regeneration of muscular, vascular, nervous and osseous tissue. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight cell therapies used to repair bony and soft tissue defects in the oral and craniofacial complex. The field at this point remains at an early stage, however this review will provide insights into the progress being made using cell therapies for eventual development into clinical practice. PMID:22433781

  2. Cichlid fishes as a model to understand normal and clinical craniofacial variation.

    PubMed

    Powder, Kara E; Albertson, R Craig

    2016-07-15

    We have made great strides towards understanding the etiology of craniofacial disorders, especially for 'simple' Mendelian traits. However, the facial skeleton is a complex trait, and the full spectrum of genetic, developmental, and environmental factors that contribute to its final geometry remain unresolved. Forward genetic screens are constrained with respect to complex traits due to the types of genes and alleles commonly identified, developmental pleiotropy, and limited information about the impact of environmental interactions. Here, we discuss how studies in an evolutionary model - African cichlid fishes - can complement traditional approaches to understand the genetic and developmental origins of complex shape. Cichlids exhibit an unparalleled range of natural craniofacial morphologies that model normal human variation, and in certain instances mimic human facial dysmorphologies. Moreover, the evolutionary history and genomic architecture of cichlids make them an ideal system to identify the genetic basis of these phenotypes via quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping and population genomics. Given the molecular conservation of developmental genes and pathways, insights from cichlids are applicable to human facial variation and disease. We review recent work in this system, which has identified lbh as a novel regulator of neural crest cell migration, determined the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways mediate species-specific bone morphologies, and examined how plastic responses to diet modulate adult facial shapes. These studies have not only revealed new roles for existing pathways in craniofacial development, but have identified new genes and mechanisms involved in shaping the craniofacial skeleton. In all, we suggest that combining work in traditional laboratory and evolutionary models offers significant potential to provide a more complete and comprehensive picture of the myriad factors that are involved in the development of complex traits. PMID:26719128

  3. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jhamb, Aakarsh; Mohanty, Sujata; Jhamb, Parul A

    2012-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia can present clinically in varied forms which may appear as collision of different pathologic processes. We report a rare case of craniofacial fibrous dysplasia with coexisting epithelial lined cyst and superimposed osteomyelitis with sequestrum formation. Its clinical features and management with possible hypotheses are described along with the post operative course. Pertinent literature has been reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis of this unique occurrence. PMID:23248490

  4. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C Ben; Swartz, Mary E; Foroud, Tatiana M; Eberhart, Johann K

    2013-08-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  5. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C. Ben; Swartz, Mary E.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2013-01-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  6. Human disorders of peroxisome metabolism and biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Waterham, Hans R; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Wanders, Ronald J A

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisomes are dynamic organelles that play an essential role in a variety of cellular catabolic and anabolic metabolic pathways, including fatty acid alpha- and beta-oxidation, and plasmalogen and bile acid synthesis. Defects in genes encoding peroxisomal proteins can result in a large variety of peroxisomal disorders either affecting specific metabolic pathways, i.e., the single peroxisomal enzyme deficiencies, or causing a generalized defect in function and assembly of peroxisomes, i.e., peroxisome biogenesis disorders. In this review, we discuss the clinical, biochemical, and genetic aspects of all human peroxisomal disorders currently known. PMID:26611709

  7. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Pat; Magliocca, Kelly R; Lee, Janice S

    2012-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of the natural history and molecular abnormalities, many questions remain surrounding the progression and management of fibrous dysplasia (FD). In the absence of comorbidities, the expected behavior of craniofacial FD (CFD) is to be slow growing and without functional consequence. Understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms contributing to the various phenotypes of this condition, as well as the predictors of the different behaviors of FD lesions, must be improved. Long-term follow-up of patients with CFD is vital because spontaneous recovery is unlikely, and the course of disease can be unpredictable. PMID:22771278

  8. Fibronectin and craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; AlShomer, Feras; Alqahtani, Abdullah; Alhadlg, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Fibronectin is an essential component of the extracellular matrix. The role of fibronectin in craniofacial surgery has not been previously reviewed. Fibronectin mediates bone differentiation and development of the skull. Studies have shown that normal development of the skull requires a specific pattern of expression around the epithelial-mesenchymal interface of the neurocranium. Fibronectin is also essential in mediating the migration of neural crest cells to form the facial skeleton. The calvaria of patients with Apert and Crouzon syndromes have an abnormally elevated collagen level. However, fibronectin levels are elevated in the former syndrome and decreased in the latter syndrome. The significance of this requires further research. Fibronectin gene expression is increased in port wine-derived fibroblasts in patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Normal palatogenesis also requires a specific pattern of expression of fibronectin around the maxillary process as well as the roof of the stomodeum, and several studies have linked the development of cleft lip/palate to an imbalance of fibronectin content of the extracellular matrix. Fibronectin mediates cell-to-cell attachment during repair of calvarial defects; hence, fibronectin has been used as a carrier for bone morphogenetic proteins to treat calvarial defects. Finally, fibronectin is now an essential component in stem cell technology related to craniofacial surgery. PMID:24322634

  9. NEUROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN GLYCOSYLATION DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Eklund, Erik A.; Ng, Bobby G.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    This review will present principles of glycosylation, describe the relevant glycosylation pathways and their related disorders, and highlight some of the neurological aspects and issues that continue to challenge researchers. Over 100 rare human genetic disorders that result from deficiencies in the different glycosylation pathways are known today. Most of these disorders impact the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Patients typically have developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, seizures, neuropathy, and metabolic abnormalities in multiple organ systems. Between these disorders there is great clinical diversity because all cell types differentially glycosylate proteins and lipids. The patients have hundreds of mis-glycosylated products afflicting a myriad of processes including cell signaling, cell-cell interaction and cell migration. This vast complexity in glycan composition and function, along with limited analytic tools has impeded the identification of key glycosylated molecules that cause pathologies, and to date few critical target proteins have been pinpointed. PMID:25840006

  10. 76 FR 4123 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, ZDE1 VH (13) NIDCR Review of Small Research Grants for Data Analysis and...

  11. 75 FR 82033 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

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  12. 75 FR 13561 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  13. 75 FR 4833 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Dr., Rm 4AN 32J,...

  14. 75 FR 55592 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Council, September 27, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to September 27, 2010, 3...

  15. 78 FR 65343 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... published in the Federal Register on September 16, 2013, 78 FR 56902. Meeting date has changed from October... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, October 7, 2013, 10:00 a.m. to October 7,...

  16. 77 FR 49820 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  17. 75 FR 62546 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research..., National Inst of Dental & Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Dr. Rm 4AN...

  18. 78 FR 50066 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  19. 78 FR 24761 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  20. 76 FR 23612 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  1. 76 FR 51995 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory...

  2. 76 FR 48874 - National Institute Of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-08-09

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  3. 78 FR 65348 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ..., MD 20892 which was published in the Federal Register on September 27, 2013, 78 FR 59708. Meeting date... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, October 21, 2013, 9:00 a.m. to October 21,...

  4. 77 FR 74674 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  5. 75 FR 51275 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

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  6. Parathyroid Hormone Applications in the Craniofacial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H.L.; McCauley, L.K.

    2013-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known for its ability to ‘build’ bone, with research in this area centered on its use as an osteoporosis therapeutic. Recent interest has developed regarding its potential for regenerative applications such as fracture healing and osseous defects of the oral cavity. Many years of investigation using murine gene-targeted models substantiate a role for signaling at the PTH/PTH-related protein (PTHrP) receptor (PPR) in intramembranous bone formation in the craniofacial region as well as in tooth development. Pre-clinical studies clearly support a positive role of intermittent PTH administration in craniofacial bones and in fracture healing and implant integration. A few human clinical studies have shown favorable responses with teriparatide (the biologically active fragment of PTH) administration. Favorable outcomes have emerged with teriparatide administration in patients with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). New delivery strategies are in development to optimize targeted application of PTH and to help maximize local approaches. The promising host-modulating potential of PTH requires more information to further its effectiveness for craniofacial regeneration and osseous wound-healing, including a better delineation of cellular targets, temporal effects of PTH action, and improved approaches for local/targeted delivery of PTH. PMID:23071071

  7. 75 FR 65495 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Interagency Pain Research Coordinating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee; Call for Nominations The Department of Health and Human Services has created the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee and is seeking nominations...

  8. Craniofacial shape variation in Twist1+/- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Trish E; Weinberg, Seth M; Khaksarfard, Kameron; Howie, R Nicole; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yu, Jack C; Cray, James J

    2014-05-01

    Craniosynostosis (CS) is a relatively common birth defect resulting from the premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Human genetic studies have identified several genes in association with CS. One such gene that has been implicated in both syndromic (Saethre-Chotzen syndrome) and nonsyndromic forms of CS in humans is TWIST1. In this study, a heterozygous Twist1 knock out (Twist1(+/-) ) mouse model was used to study the craniofacial shape changes associated with the partial loss of function. A geometric morphometric approach was used to analyze landmark data derived from microcomputed tomography scans to compare craniofacial shape between 17 Twist1(+/-) mice and 26 of their Twist1(+/+) (wild type) littermate controls at 15 days of age. The results show that despite the purported wide variation in synostotic severity, Twist1(+/-) mice have a consistent pattern of craniofacial dysmorphology affecting all major regions of the skull. Similar to Saethre-Chotzen, the calvarium is acrocephalic and wide with an overall brachycephalic shape. Mutant mice also exhibited a shortened cranial base and a wider and shorted face, consistent with coronal CS associated phenotypes. The results suggest that these differences are at least partially the direct result of the Twist1 haploinsufficiency on the developing craniofacial skeleton. This study provides a quantitative phenotype complement to the developmental and molecular genetic research previously done on Twist1. These results can be used to generate further hypotheses about the effect of Twist1 and premature suture fusion on the entire craniofacial skeleton. PMID:24585549

  9. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  10. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  11. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  12. Craniofacial plasticity in ancient Peru.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jessica H; Chew, Kristen; Ross, Ann H; Verano, John W

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have utilized craniometric data to explore the roles of genetic diversity and environment in human cranial shape variation. Peru is a particularly interesting region to examine cranial variation due to the wide variety of high and low altitude ecological zones, which in combination with rugged terrain have created isolated populations with vastly different physiological adaptations. This study examines seven samples from throughout Peru in an effort to understand the contributions of environmental adaptation and genetic relatedness to craniofacial variation at a regional scale. Morphological variation was investigated using a canonical discriminant analysis and Mahalanobis D(2) analysis. Results indicate that all groups are significantly different from one another with the closest relationship between Yauyos and Jahuay, two sites that are located geographically close in central Peru but in very different ecozones. The relationship between latitude/longitude and face shape was also examined with a spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran's I) using ArcMap and show that there is significant spatial patterning for facial measures and geographic location suggesting that there is an association between biological variation and geographic location. PMID:25807293

  13. Craniofacial surgery: present and future.

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, L A; Schut, L; Randall, P

    1976-01-01

    The possibilities for radical craniofacial restructuring have increased dramatically in the past 6 years with the development of craniofacial surgery. The field developed from a background of patients with major craniofacial birth defects allowing orderly planning and expansion to correction of a multitude of other craniofacial structural problems. The procedures concentrate upon changing the skeletal structures using extensive subperiostial dissection of soft tissue, and adding bone to fill in areas of deficiency. There are three grades of complexity in craniofacial procedures. After extensive soft tissue sub-periostial stripping about the orbits and upper face, the simplest form consists of onlay bone grafts. The next most complicated involves osteotomies to shift the face into a more normal position. In its most complicated form, abnormal proportions of bone are removed and the orbits or cranium are shifted into a new or normal position. We have had experience with 69 patients since September, 1972. Thirty-six have had intracranial procedures. Infection has been the most serious problem, and there have been no instances of death or blindness. A number of lesser problems occur. Future applications of craniofacial surgery are appearing with great frequency as more experience is gained with its uses. It has particular application in acute and late reconstruction of patients with traumatic defects about the face. Preventive osteotomies are an area with great potential, by releasing stenotic areas of bone and allowing the developing brain to mold the upper face and orbits. There is also applicability in surgery of tumors about the craniofacial structure and in cosmetic surgery. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 1d. Fig. 1e. Fig. 2a. Fig. 2b. Fig. 2c. PMID:984925

  14. Understanding Cleft and Craniofacial Team Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donor Spotlight Fundraising Ideas Vehicle Donation Volunteer Efforts Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area skip to submenu Parents & Individuals Cleft Lip/Palate & Craniofacial Specialists in Your Area Team Disclaimer ...

  15. Prevention of Treacher Collins syndrome craniofacial anomalies in mouse models via maternal antioxidant supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Daisuke; Dixon, Jill; Achilleos, Annita; Dixon, Michael; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial anomalies account for approximately one-third of all birth defects and are a significant cause of infant mortality. Since the majority of the bones, cartilage and connective tissues that comprise the head and face are derived from a multipotent migratory progenitor cell population called the neural crest, craniofacial disorders are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development and although TCS arises primarily through autosomal dominant mutations in TCOF1, no clear genotype–phenotype correlation has been documented. Here we show that Tcof1 haploinsufficiency results in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and neuroepithelial cell death. Consistent with this discovery, maternal treatment with antioxidants minimizes cell death in the neuroepithelium and substantially ameliorates or prevents the pathogenesis of craniofacial anomalies in Tcof1+/− mice. Thus maternal antioxidant dietary supplementation may provide an avenue for protection against the pathogenesis of TCS and similar neurocristopathies. PMID:26792133

  16. Prevention of Treacher Collins syndrome craniofacial anomalies in mouse models via maternal antioxidant supplementation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Dixon, Jill; Achilleos, Annita; Dixon, Michael; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial anomalies account for approximately one-third of all birth defects and are a significant cause of infant mortality. Since the majority of the bones, cartilage and connective tissues that comprise the head and face are derived from a multipotent migratory progenitor cell population called the neural crest, craniofacial disorders are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development and although TCS arises primarily through autosomal dominant mutations in TCOF1, no clear genotype-phenotype correlation has been documented. Here we show that Tcof1 haploinsufficiency results in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and neuroepithelial cell death. Consistent with this discovery, maternal treatment with antioxidants minimizes cell death in the neuroepithelium and substantially ameliorates or prevents the pathogenesis of craniofacial anomalies in Tcof1(+/-) mice. Thus maternal antioxidant dietary supplementation may provide an avenue for protection against the pathogenesis of TCS and similar neurocristopathies. PMID:26792133

  17. Human genetic disorders of sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Astudillo, Leonardo; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Therville, Nicole; Bode, Heiko; Ségui, Bruno; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Hornemann, Thorsten; Levade, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Monogenic defects of sphingolipid biosynthesis have been recently identified in human patients. These enzyme deficiencies affect the synthesis of sphingolipid precursors, ceramides or complex glycosphingolipids. They are transmitted as autosomal recessive or dominant traits, and their resulting phenotypes often replicate the abnormalities seen in murine models deficient for the corresponding enzymes. In quite good agreement with the known critical roles of sphingolipids in cells from the nervous system and the epidermis, these genetic defects clinically manifest as neurological disorders, including paraplegia, epilepsy or peripheral neuropathies, or present with ichthyosis. The present review summarizes the genetic alterations, biochemical changes and clinical symptoms of this new group of inherited metabolic disorders. Hypotheses regarding the molecular pathophysiology and potential treatments of these diseases are also discussed. PMID:25141825

  18. [Hedgehog signaling pathway and human disorders].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The hedgehog signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and cancer formation. This pathway in mammals consists of multiple molecules such as Sonic Hedgehog, PTCH, SMO, and GLI. Mutations of these components result in various human malformations or tumors, i.e., holoprosencephaly, Gorlin syndrome, Greig encephalopolysyndactyly, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, basal cell carcinomas, and medulloblastomas. Recently, small molecules that inhibit this signaling pathway were developed, and clinically applied to cancer therapy. Thus, understanding of these molecular relationships may facilitate the development of new therapies and treatments for diseases caused by hedgehog signaling disorders. PMID:19618878

  19. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  20. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and...

  1. Biomaterials for Craniofacial Bone Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tevlin, R.; McArdle, A.; Atashroo, D.; Walmsley, G.G.; Senarath-Yapa, K.; Zielins, E.R.; Paik, K.J.; Longaker, M.T.; Wan, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell–based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. PMID:25139365

  2. Bone Grafts in Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Elsalanty, Mohammed E.; Genecov, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of cranial and maxillofacial defects is a challenging task. The standard reconstruction method has been bone grafting. In this review, we shall describe the biological principles of bone graft healing, as pertinent to craniofacial reconstruction. Different types and sources of bone grafts will be discussed, as well as new methods of bone defect reconstruction. PMID:22110806

  3. Ribosomopathies: human disorders of ribosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2010-04-22

    Ribosomopathies compose a collection of disorders in which genetic abnormalities cause impaired ribosome biogenesis and function, resulting in specific clinical phenotypes. Congenital mutations in RPS19 and other genes encoding ribosomal proteins cause Diamond-Blackfan anemia, a disorder characterized by hypoplastic, macrocytic anemia. Mutations in other genes required for normal ribosome biogenesis have been implicated in other rare congenital syndromes, Schwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, cartilage hair hypoplasia, and Treacher Collins syndrome. In addition, the 5q- syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome, is caused by a somatically acquired deletion of chromosome 5q, which leads to haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein RPS14 and an erythroid phenotype highly similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Acquired abnormalities in ribosome function have been implicated more broadly in human malignancies. The p53 pathway provides a surveillance mechanism for protein translation as well as genome integrity and is activated by defects in ribosome biogenesis; this pathway appears to be a critical mediator of many of the clinical features of ribosomopathies. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby selective abnormalities in ribosome biogenesis cause specific clinical syndromes will hopefully lead to novel therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:20194897

  4. Hedgehog receptor function during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Seppala, Maisa; Barrell, William; Birjandi, Anahid A; Geoghegan, Finn; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2016-07-15

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway plays a fundamental role in orchestrating normal craniofacial development in vertebrates. In particular, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is produced in three key domains during the early formation of the head; neuroectoderm of the ventral forebrain, facial ectoderm and the pharyngeal endoderm; with signal transduction evident in both ectodermal and mesenchymal tissue compartments. Shh signalling from the prechordal plate and ventral midline of the diencephalon is required for appropriate division of the eyefield and forebrain, with mutation in a number of pathway components associated with Holoprosencephaly, a clinically heterogeneous developmental defect characterized by a failure of the early forebrain vesicle to divide into distinct halves. In addition, signalling from the pharyngeal endoderm and facial ectoderm plays an essential role during development of the face, influencing cranial neural crest cells that migrate into the early facial processes. In recent years, the complexity of Shh signalling has been highlighted by the identification of multiple novel proteins that are involved in regulating both the release and reception of this protein. Here, we review the contributions of Shh signalling during early craniofacial development, focusing on Hedgehog receptor function and describing the consequences of disruption for inherited anomalies of this region in both mouse models and human populations. PMID:26875496

  5. Study on the performance of different craniofacial superimposition approaches (II): Best practices proposal.

    PubMed

    Damas, S; Wilkinson, C; Kahana, T; Veselovskaya, E; Abramov, A; Jankauskas, R; Jayaprakash, P T; Ruiz, E; Navarro, F; Huete, M I; Cunha, E; Cavalli, F; Clement, J; Lestón, P; Molinero, F; Briers, T; Viegas, F; Imaizumi, K; Humpire, D; Ibáñez, O

    2015-12-01

    Craniofacial superimposition, although existing for one century, is still a controversial technique within the scientific community. Objective and unbiased validation studies over a significant number of cases are required to establish a more solid picture on the reliability. However, there is lack of protocols and standards in the application of the technique leading to contradictory information concerning reliability. Instead of following a uniform methodology, every expert tends to apply his own approach to the problem, based on the available technology and deep knowledge on human craniofacial anatomy, soft tissues, and their relationships. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of different craniofacial superimposition methodologies and the corresponding technical approaches to this type of identification. With all the data generated, some of the most representative experts in craniofacial identification joined in a discussion intended to identify and agree on the most important issues that have to be considered to properly employ the craniofacial superimposition technique. As a consequence, the consortium has produced the current manuscript, which can be considered the first standard in the field; including good and bad practices, sources of error and uncertainties, technological requirements and desirable features, and finally a common scale for the craniofacial matching evaluation. Such a document is intended to be part of a more complete framework for craniofacial superimposition, to be developed during the FP7-founded project MEPROCS, which will favour and standardize its proper application. PMID:26482539

  6. [Human skull development and voice disorders].

    PubMed

    Piron, A; Roch, J B

    2006-01-01

    The hominisation of the skull comes with the bipedic posture, due to a network of muscular and aponevrotic forces applied to the cranio-facial skeleton. A brief sight of the morphogenetic origine and issues of these forces help to understand more clearly the postural statement of the larynx, his functions, and his many extrinsic biomechanical bounds; then further his most frequently dysfunctions. The larynx is surrounded by several effective systems of protection: active, activo-passive, passive. The architectural features of the components of the laryngeal system allows us to consider the laryngeal function as an auto-balanced system. All the forces engaged are auto-balanced in a continuum of tension. This lead us to the concept of tensegrity system, neologism coming from tensional integrity described by Buckminster Fuller. The laryngeal employement by extrinsic system is pathological in case of chronicity. Any osteopathic treatment, which aims to restore the losses of laryngeal mobility, has to release first the peripherical structures involved in the laryngeal defense, before normalising the larynx itself Finally, the larynx recovers his functions in a tensegrity system. PMID:17425001

  7. Craniofacial reconstruction following oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to reliably reconstruct complex and sizable wounds has decreased the morbidity of skull base surgery substantially, preventing major complications and allowing treatment of tumors previously considered inoperable. Addressing facial nerve function with static and dynamic procedures as well as fabrication of craniofacial prostheses to replace delicate facial landmarks has further increased surgeons' ability to restore the appearance and function of the face. PMID:23174362

  8. The oral and craniofacial relevance of chemically modified RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Kormann, Michael S D; Khorsand, Behnoush; Salem, Aliasger K

    2016-01-01

    Several tissue engineering strategies in the form of protein therapy, gene therapy, cell therapy, and their combinations are currently being explored for oral and craniofacial regeneration and repair. Though each of these approaches has advantages, they all have common inherent drawbacks of being expensive and raising safety concerns. Using RNA (encoding therapeutic protein) has several advantages that have the potential to overcome these limitations. Chemically modifying the RNA improves its stability and mitigates immunogenicity allowing for the potential of RNA to become an alternative to protein and gene based therapies. This brief review article focuses on the potential of RNA therapeutics in the treatment of disorders in the oral and craniofacial regions. PMID:26896600

  9. National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... and craniofacial health of our nation. Grants & Funding Funding Opportunity Announcements By Topic RFAs PAs See All Grants & Funding Application Forms and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application ...

  10. Growth changes in internal and craniofacial flexion measurements.

    PubMed

    May, R; Sheffer, D B

    1999-09-01

    Growth changes in both internal and craniofacial flexion angles are presented for Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, and modern humans. The internal flexion angle (IFA) was measured from lateral radiographs, and the craniofacial flexion angle (CFA) was calculated from coordinate data. Stage of dental development is used as a baseline for examination of growth changes and nonparametric correlations between flexion angles and dental development stage are tested for significance. In Gorilla, the IFA increases during growth. The IFA is relatively stable in Pan and modern humans. Pan and Gorilla display an increase in the CFA. However, this angle decreases during growth in modern humans. Flexion angles were derived from coordinate data collected for several early hominid crania. Measurements for two robust australopithecine crania indicate strong internal flexion. It has been suggested that cerebellar expansion in this group may relate to derived features of the posterior cranial base. In general, australopithecine crania exhibit craniofacial flexion intermediate between great apes and modern humans. The "archaic" Homo sapiens specimen from Kabwe is most similar to modern humans. PMID:10490467

  11. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Christoph; Gölz, Lina; Götz, Werner; Wolf, Michael; Deschner, James; Jäger, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an exceptionally rare medical disorder caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene. Affected patients display typical features of premature aging. Beside general medical disorders, these patients have several specific features related to the craniofacial phenotype and the oral cavity. In this article, the dental and craniofacial characteristics of a 9-year-old girl with HGPS are presented. It is the first report addressing orthodontic tooth movement and microbiological features in a HGPS patient. We describe and discuss pathologic findings and provide a detailed histology of the teeth which had to be extracted during initial treatment. PMID:25001855

  12. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L.; Merrill, Amy E.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention. PMID:27448281

  13. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Noack Watt, Kristin E; Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L; Merrill, Amy E; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention. PMID:27448281

  14. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  15. Sf3b4-depleted Xenopus embryos: A model to study the pathogenesis of craniofacial defects in Nager syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devotta, Arun; Juraver-Geslin, Hugo; Gonzalez, Jose Antonio; Hong, Chang-Soo; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-15

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis (MFD) is a human developmental disorder characterized by defects of the facial bones. It is the second most frequent craniofacial malformation after cleft lip and palate. Nager syndrome combines many features of MFD with a variety of limb defects. Mutations in SF3B4 (splicing factor 3b, subunit 4) gene, which encodes a component of the pre-mRNA spliceosomal complex, were recently identified as a cause of Nager syndrome, accounting for 60% of affected individuals. Nothing is known about the cellular pathogenesis underlying Nager type MFD. Here we describe the first animal model for Nager syndrome, generated by knocking down Sf3b4 function in Xenopus laevis embryos, using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. Our results indicate that Sf3b4-depleted embryos show reduced expression of the neural crest genes sox10, snail2 and twist at the neural plate border, associated with a broadening of the neural plate. This phenotype can be rescued by injection of wild-type human SF3B4 mRNA but not by mRNAs carrying mutations that cause Nager syndrome. At the tailbud stage, morphant embryos had decreased sox10 and tfap2a expression in the pharyngeal arches, indicative of a reduced number of neural crest cells. Later in development, Sf3b4-depleted tadpoles exhibited hypoplasia of neural crest-derived craniofacial cartilages, phenocopying aspects of the craniofacial skeletal defects seen in Nager syndrome patients. With this animal model we are now poised to gain important insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of Nager type MFD, and to identify the molecular targets of Sf3b4. PMID:26874011

  16. Identification of novel craniofacial regulatory domains located far upstream of SOX9 and disrupted in Pierre Robin sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Christopher T.; Attanasio, Catia; Bhatia, Shipra; Benko, Sabina; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Tiong Y.; Munnich, Arnold; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abadie, Véronique; Temple, I. Karen; Goldenberg, Alice; van Heyningen, Veronica; Amiel, Jeanne; FitzPatrick, David; Kleinjan, Dirk A.; Visel, Axel; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia (CD), a disorder of skeletal development associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSDs). Translocations, deletions and duplications within a ~2 Mb region upstream of SOX9 can recapitulate the CD-DSD phenotype fully or partially, suggesting the existence of an unusually large cis-regulatory control region. Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial disorder that is frequently an endophenotype of CD and a locus for isolated PRS at ~1.2-1.5 Mb upstream of SOX9 has been previously reported. The craniofacial regulatory potential within this locus, and within the greater genomic domain surrounding SOX9, remains poorly defined. We report two novel deletions upstream of SOX9 in families with PRS, allowing refinement of the regions harbouring candidate craniofacial regulatory elements. In parallel, ChIP-Seq for p300 binding sites in mouse craniofacial tissue led to the identification of several novel craniofacial enhancers at the SOX9 locus, which were validated in transgenic reporter mice and zebrafish. Notably, some of the functionally validated elements fall within the PRS deletions. These studies suggest that multiple non-coding elements contribute to the craniofacial regulation of SOX9 expression, and that their disruption results in PRS. PMID:24934569

  17. RSK2 Is a Modulator of Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Marangoni, Pauline; Pilgram, Coralie; Langer, Arnaud; Kuntz, Thibaut; Demassue, Julie; Morkmued, Supawich; Choquet, Philippe; Constantinesco, André; Bornert, Fabien; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Pannetier, Solange; Viriot, Laurent; Hanauer, André; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Background The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1). Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4) was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT) mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray) analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. Conclusions This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets. PMID:24416220

  18. ARCN1 Mutations Cause a Recognizable Craniofacial Syndrome Due to COPI-Mediated Transport Defects.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kosuke; Brett, Maggie; Nishi, Eriko; Drunat, Séverine; Tan, Ee-Shien; Fujiki, Katsunori; Lebon, Sophie; Cham, Breana; Masuda, Koji; Arakawa, Michiko; Jacquinet, Adeline; Yamazumi, Yusuke; Chen, Shu-Ting; Verloes, Alain; Okada, Yuki; Katou, Yuki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Tetsu; Gressens, Pierre; Foo, Roger; Passemard, Sandrine; Tan, Ene-Choo; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Cellular homeostasis is maintained by the highly organized cooperation of intracellular trafficking systems, including COPI, COPII, and clathrin complexes. COPI is a coatomer protein complex responsible for intracellular protein transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. The importance of such intracellular transport mechanisms is underscored by the various disorders, including skeletal disorders such as cranio-lenticulo-sutural dysplasia and osteogenesis imperfect, caused by mutations in the COPII coatomer complex. In this article, we report a clinically recognizable craniofacial disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, severe micrognathia, rhizomelic shortening, microcephalic dwarfism, and mild developmental delay due to loss-of-function heterozygous mutations in ARCN1, which encodes the coatomer subunit delta of COPI. ARCN1 mutant cell lines were revealed to have endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting the involvement of ER stress response in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Given that ARCN1 deficiency causes defective type I collagen transport, reduction of collagen secretion represents the likely mechanism underlying the skeletal phenotype that characterizes this condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of COPI-mediated transport in human development, including skeletogenesis and brain growth. PMID:27476655

  19. The human histaminergic system in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ling; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-03-01

    Histaminergic neurons are exclusively located in the hypothalamic tuberomamillary nucleus, from where they project to many brain areas. The histaminergic system is involved in basic physiological functions, such as the sleep-wake cycle, energy and endocrine homeostasis, sensory and motor functions, cognition, and attention, which are all severely affected in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present recent postmortem findings on the alterations in this system in neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), depression, and narcolepsy. In addition, we highlight the need to validate animal models for these diseases and also for Tourette's syndrome (TS) in relation to alterations in the histaminergic system. Moreover, we discuss the potential for, and concerns over, the use of novel histamine 3 receptor (H3R) antagonists/inverse agonists as treatment for such disorders. PMID:25575625

  20. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects.

    PubMed

    Teven, Chad M; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  1. Biomimetic approaches to complex craniofacial defects

    PubMed Central

    Teven, Chad M.; Fisher, Sean; Ameer, Guillermo A.; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary goals of craniofacial reconstruction include the restoration of the form, function, and facial esthetics, and in the case of pediatric patients, respect for craniofacial growth. The surgeon, however, faces several challenges when attempting a reconstructive cranioplasty. For that reason, craniofacial defect repair often requires sophisticated treatment strategies and multidisciplinary input. In the ideal situation, autologous tissue similar in structure and function to that which is missing can be utilized for repair. In the context of the craniofacial skeleton, autologous cranial bone, or secondarily rib, iliac crest, or scapular bone, is most favorable. Often, this option is limited by the finite supply of available bone. Therefore, alternative strategies to repair craniofacial defects are necessary. In the field of regenerative medicine, tissue engineering has emerged as a promising concept, and several methods of bone engineering are currently under investigation. A growth factor-based approach utilizing bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) has demonstrated stimulatory effects on cranial bone and defect repair. When combined with cell-based and matrix-based models, regenerative goals can be optimized. This manuscript intends to review recent investigations of tissue engineering models used for the repair of craniofacial defects with a focus on the role of BMPs, scaffold materials, and novel cell lines. When sufficient autologous bone is not available, safe and effective strategies to engineer bone would allow the surgeon to meet the reconstructive goals of the craniofacial skeleton. PMID:26389027

  2. Directory: Information Resources for Human Communication Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, Bethesda, MD.

    This directory is designed to encourage networking among individuals and organizations that have an interest in deafness and communication disorders. The main body of the directory includes descriptions and publications of 122 organizations that are national in scope and that focus on health issues relating to hearing, balance, smell, taste,…

  3. Stem Cells in Teeth and Craniofacial Bones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Chai, Y

    2015-11-01

    Stem cells are remarkable, and stem cell-based tissue engineering is an emerging field of biomedical science aiming to restore damaged tissue or organs. In dentistry and reconstructive facial surgery, it is of great interest to restore lost teeth or craniofacial bone defects using stem cell-mediated therapy. In the craniofacial region, various stem cell populations have been identified with regeneration potential. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge concerning the various types of tooth- and craniofacial bone-related stem cells and discuss their in vivo identities and regulating mechanisms. PMID:26350960

  4. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years. PMID:27113634

  5. Cranial neural crest cells on the move: their roles in craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Dwight R; Brugmann, Samantha; Chu, Yvonne; Bajpai, Ruchi; Jame, Maryam; Helms, Jill A

    2011-02-01

    The craniofacial region is assembled through the active migration of cells and the rearrangement and sculpting of facial prominences and pharyngeal arches, which consequently make it particularly susceptible to a large number of birth defects. Genetic, molecular, and cellular processes must be temporally and spatially regulated to culminate in the three-dimension structures of the face. The starting constituent for the majority of skeletal and connective tissues in the face is a pluripotent population of cells, the cranial neural crest cells (NCCs). In this review we discuss the newest scientific findings in the development of the craniofacial complex as related to NCCs. Furthermore, we present recent findings on NCC diseases called neurocristopathies and, in doing so, provide clinicians with new tools for understanding a growing number of craniofacial genetic disorders. PMID:21271641

  6. CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS ON THE MOVE: THEIR ROLES IN CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Dwight R.; Brugmann, Samantha; Chu, Yvonne; Bajpai, Ruchi; Jame, Maryam; Helms, Jill A.

    2010-01-01

    The craniofacial region is assembled through the active migration of cells and the rearrangement and sculpting of facial prominences and pharyngeal arches, which consequently make it particularly susceptible to a large number of birth defects. Genetic, molecular, and cellular processes must be temporally and spatially regulated to culminate in the three-dimension structures of the face. The starting constituent for the majority of skeletal and connective tissues in the face is a pluripotent population of cells, the cranial neural crest cells (NCCs). In this review we discuss the newest scientific findings in the development of the craniofacial complex as related to NCCs. Furthermore, we present recent findings on NCC diseases called neurocristopathies and, in doing so, provide clinicians with new tools for understanding a growing number of craniofacial genetic disorders. PMID:21271641

  7. Core issues in craniofacial myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Robert G.

    2010-11-01

    Branchiomeric craniofacial muscles control feeding, breathing and facial expression. These muscles differ on multiple counts from all other skeletal muscles and originate in a progenitor cell population in pharyngeal mesoderm characterized by a common genetic program with an adjacent population of cardiac progenitor cells, the second heart field, that gives rise to much of the heart. The transcription factors and signaling molecules that trigger the myogenic program at sites of branchiomeric muscle formation are correspondingly distinct from those in somite-derived muscle progenitor cells. Here new insights into the regulatory hierarchies controlling branchiomeric myogenesis are discussed. Differences in embryological origin are reflected in the lineage, transcriptional program and proliferative and differentiation properties of branchiomeric muscle satellite cells. These recent findings have important implications for our understanding of the diverse myogenic strategies operative both in the embryo and adult and are of direct biomedical relevance to deciphering the mechanisms underlying the cause and progression of muscle restricted myopathies.

  8. Genetic basis of human left-right asymmetry disorders.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Xia, Hong; Deng, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other vertebrates exhibit left-right (LR) asymmetric arrangement of the internal organs, and failure to establish normal LR asymmetry leads to internal laterality disorders, including situs inversus and heterotaxy. Situs inversus is complete mirror-imaged arrangement of the internal organs along LR axis, whereas heterotaxy is abnormal arrangement of the internal thoraco-abdominal organs across LR axis of the body, most of which are associated with complex cardiovascular malformations. Both disorders are genetically heterogeneous with reduced penetrance, presumably because of monogenic, polygenic or multifactorial causes. Research in genetics of LR asymmetry disorders has been extremely prolific over the past 17 years, and a series of loci and disease genes involved in situs inversus and heterotaxy have been described. The review highlights the classification, chromosomal abnormalities, pathogenic genes and the possible mechanism of human LR asymmetry disorders. PMID:26258520

  9. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Salvador; Torrealba, Ramón; Nuñez, Marcelo; Uribe, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty) provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen. PMID:25674375

  10. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Charles L; Samson, David R; Krystal, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep-i.e. 'why' sleep evolved-remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Compared to other primates, sleep in great apes has undergone substantial evolutionary change, with all great apes building a sleeping platform or 'nest'. Further evolutionary change characterizes human sleep, with humans having the shortest sleep duration, yet the highest proportion of rapid eye movement sleep among primates. These changes likely reflect that our ancestors experienced fitness benefits from being active for a greater portion of the 24-h cycle than other primates, potentially related to advantages arising from learning, socializing and defending against predators and hostile conspecifics. Perspectives from evolutionary medicine have implications for understanding sleep disorders; we consider these perspectives in the context of insomnia, narcolepsy, seasonal affective disorder, circadian rhythm disorders and sleep apnea. We also identify how human sleep today differs from sleep through most of human evolution, and the implications of these changes for global health and health disparities. More generally, our review highlights the importance of phylogenetic comparisons in understanding human health, including well-known links between sleep, cognitive performance and health in humans. PMID:27470330

  11. Shining evolutionary light on human sleep and sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L.; Samson, David R.; Krystal, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is essential to cognitive function and health in humans, yet the ultimate reasons for sleep—i.e. ‘why’ sleep evolved—remain mysterious. We integrate findings from human sleep studies, the ethnographic record, and the ecology and evolution of mammalian sleep to better understand sleep along the human lineage and in the modern world. Compared to other primates, sleep in great apes has undergone substantial evolutionary change, with all great apes building a sleeping platform or ‘nest’. Further evolutionary change characterizes human sleep, with humans having the shortest sleep duration, yet the highest proportion of rapid eye movement sleep among primates. These changes likely reflect that our ancestors experienced fitness benefits from being active for a greater portion of the 24-h cycle than other primates, potentially related to advantages arising from learning, socializing and defending against predators and hostile conspecifics. Perspectives from evolutionary medicine have implications for understanding sleep disorders; we consider these perspectives in the context of insomnia, narcolepsy, seasonal affective disorder, circadian rhythm disorders and sleep apnea. We also identify how human sleep today differs from sleep through most of human evolution, and the implications of these changes for global health and health disparities. More generally, our review highlights the importance of phylogenetic comparisons in understanding human health, including well-known links between sleep, cognitive performance and health in humans. PMID:27470330

  12. The comparative psychopathology of affective disorders in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Healy, D

    1987-01-01

    Reviews of animal models of affective disorders commonly concentrate on the behavioural features thereof, the supposed neurochemical substrates, the mode of production and the response to treatment of the state in question but ignore questions of psycho pathology. An attempt is made to deal critically with the psychopathology of human and animal affective disorders in the light of current operational criteria for the diagnosis of major depressive disorders. It is argued thatthe psychopathological tradition stemming from Jaspers may be more appropriate to a consideration of animal models of affective disorders than the psychopathological positions implicit in psychoanalysis, behaviourism or current cognitive psychologies and in addition more suited to meet these criteria. The adoption of such a perspective results in a shift of emphasis from abnormalities of psychological content to demonstrable neuropsychological deficits and a definition of affective disorders, whether in animals or humans, as psychosomatic illnesses, possibly involving a pathology of circadian rhythmicity. This perspective also suggests that animal models may be useful in the devel opment of more refined diagnostic criteria for affective disorders in humans. PMID:22158981

  13. The 50 Most Cited Papers in Craniofacial Anomalies and Craniofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Cormac W; Thomas, Sangeetha; Concannon, Elizabeth; Murray, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Background Citation analysis is a recognized scientometric method of classifying cited articles according to the frequency of which they have been referenced. The total number of citations an article receives is considered to reflect it's significance among it's peers. Methods Until now, a bibliometric analysis has never been performed in the specialty of craniofacial anomalies and craniofacial surgery. This citation analysis generates an extensive list of the 50 most influential papers in this developing field. Journals specializing in craniofacial surgery, maxillofacial surgery, plastic surgery, neurosurgery, genetics and pediatrics were searched to demonstrate which articles have cultivated the specialty within the past 55 years. Results The results show an intriguing compilation of papers which outline the fundamental knowledge of craniofacial anomalies and the developments of surgical techniques to manage these patients. Conclusions This citation analysis provides a summation of the current most popular trends in craniofacial literature. These esteemed papers aid to direct our decision making today within this specialty. PMID:26430626

  14. Dental Approach to Craniofacial Syndromes: How Can Developmental Fields Show Us a New Way to Understand Pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The paper consists of three parts. Part 1: Definition of Syndromes. Focus is given to craniofacial syndromes in which abnormal traits in the dentition are associated symptoms. In the last decade, research has concentrated on phenotype, genotype, growth, development, function, and treatment. Part 2: Syndromes before Birth. How can the initial malformation sites in these syndromes be studied and what can we learn from it? In this section, deviations observed in syndromes prenatally will be highlighted and compared to the normal human embryological craniofacial development. Specific focus will be given to developmental fields studied on animal tissue and transferred to human cranial development. Part 3: Developmental Fields Affected in Two Craniofacial Syndromes. Analysis of primary and permanent dentitions can determine whether a syndrome affects a single craniofacial field or several fields. This distinction is essential for insight into craniofacial syndromes. The dentition, thus, becomes central in diagnostics and evaluation of the pathogenesis. Developmental fields can explore and advance the concept of dental approaches to craniofacial syndromes. Discussion. As deviations in teeth persist and do not reorganize during growth and development, the dentition is considered useful for distinguishing between syndrome pathogenesis manifested in a single developmental field and in several fields. PMID:23091490

  15. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  16. Genesis of alcohol-induced craniofacial dysmorphism.

    PubMed

    Sulik, Kathleen K

    2005-06-01

    The initial diagnosis of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) in the United States was made because of the facial features common to the first cohort of patients. This article reviews the development of an FAS mouse model whose craniofacial features are remarkably similar to those of affected humans. The model is based on short-term maternal treatment with a high dosage of ethanol at stages of pregnancy that are equivalent to Weeks 3 and 4 of human gestation. At these early stages of development, alcohol's insult to the developing face is concurrent with that to the brain, eyes, and inner ear. That facial and central nervous system defects consistent with FAS can be induced by more "realistic" alcohol dosages as illustrated with data from an oral alcohol intake mouse model in which maternal blood alcohol levels do not exceed 200 mg/dl. The ethanol-induced pathogenesis involves apoptosis that occurs within 12 hrs of alcohol exposure in selected cell populations of Day 7, 8, and 9 mouse embryos. Experimental evidence from other species also shows that apoptosis underlies ethanol-induced malformations. With knowledge of sensitive and resistant cell populations at specific developmental stages, studies designed to identify the basis for these differing cellular responses and, therefore, to determine the primary mechanisms of ethanol's teratogenesis are possible. For example, microarray comparisons of sensitive and resistant embryonic cell populations have been made, as have in situ studies of gene expression patterns in the populations of interest. Studies that illustrate agents that are effective in diminishing or exacerbating ethanol's teratogenesis have also been helpful in determining mechanisms. Among these agents are antioxidants, sonic hedgehog protein, retinoids, and the peptides SAL and NAP. PMID:15956766

  17. 78 FR 50426 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5...

  18. 76 FR 57748 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5...

  19. 77 FR 29673 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5...

  20. 76 FR 79199 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5...

  1. 77 FR 50140 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5...

  2. 78 FR 65345 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... the Federal Register on August 19, 2013, 78 FR 50426. Meeting date has changed from October 17-18... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial...

  3. 77 FR 11563 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  4. 75 FR 28028 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  5. 76 FR 58284 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  6. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  7. 75 FR 82036 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  8. 76 FR 78013 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  9. 75 FR 67381 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  10. 75 FR 1063 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of...

  11. Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Ramnitz, M S; Gafni, R I; Burke, A B; Boyce, A M; Lee, J S; Wright, J T; Akintoye, S O; Somerman, M J; Collins, M T

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  12. Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Ramnitz, M.S.; Gafni, R.I.; Burke, A.B.; Boyce, A.M.; Lee, J.S.; Wright, J.T.; Akintoye, S.O.; Somerman, M.J.; Collins, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  13. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus

    PubMed Central

    Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  14. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus.

    PubMed

    Frederickson, Joseph A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  15. Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Tissues. An update

    PubMed Central

    Litsas, George

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone is an important regulator of bone homeostasis. In childhood, it determines the longitudinal bone growth, skeletal maturation, and acquisition of bone mass. In adulthood, it is necessary to maintain bone mass throughout life. Although an association between craniofacial and somatic development has been clearly established, craniofacial growth involves complex interactions of genes, hormones and environment. Moreover, as an anabolic hormone seems to have an important role in the regulation of bone remodeling, muscle enhancement and tooth development. In this paper the influence of growth hormone on oral tissues is reviewed. PMID:25674165

  16. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  17. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  18. Homozygous frameshift mutation in TMCO1 causes a syndrome with craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Baozhong; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Turben, Susan; Tan, Haiyan; Zhou, Aimin; Wang, Heng

    2009-01-01

    We identified an autosomal recessive condition in 11 individuals in the Old Order Amish of northeastern Ohio. The syndrome was characterized by distinctive craniofacial dysmorphism, skeletal anomalies, and mental retardation. The typical craniofacial dysmorphism included brachycephaly, highly arched bushy eyebrows, synophrys, long eyelashes, low-set ears, microdontism of primary teeth, and generalized gingival hyperplasia, whereas Sprengel deformity of scapula, fusion of spine, rib abnormities, pectus excavatum, and pes planus represented skeletal anomalies. The genome-wide homozygosity mapping using six affected individuals localized the disease gene to a 3.3-Mb region on chromosome 1q23.3-q24.1. Candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift mutation, c.139_140delAG, in the transmembrane and coiled-coil domains 1 (TMCO1) gene, as the pathogenic change in all affected members of the extended pedigree. This mutation is predicted to result in a severely truncated protein (p.Ser47Ter) of only one-fourth the original length. The TMCO1 gene product is a member of DUF841 superfamily of several eukaryotic proteins with unknown function. The gene has highly conserved amino acid sequence and is universally expressed in all human tissues examined. The high degree of conservation and the ubiquitous expression pattern in human adult and fetal tissues suggest a critical role for TMCO1. This report shows a TMCO1 sequence variant being associated with a genetic disorder in human. We propose “TMCO1 defect syndrome” as the name of this condition. PMID:20018682

  19. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Lisa M; Vallender, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  20. Evolutionary conservation in genes underlying human psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Lisa M.; Vallender, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of the protein-coding regions of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago) and 34 non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals, and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant) compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in humans to the exclusion of non-human primates was absent, however elevated dN/dS was detected in catarrhines as a whole, as well as in cetaceans, possibly as part of a more general trend. Although this may suggest that protein changes associated with schizophrenia and autism are not a cost of the higher brain function found in humans, it may also point to insufficiencies in the study of these diseases including incomplete or inaccurate gene association lists and/or a greater role of regulatory changes or copy number variation. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained. PMID:24834046

  1. Skeletal muscle disorders associated with selenium deficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick; Bignani, Olivier

    2003-06-01

    Skeletal muscle disorders manifested by muscle pain, fatigue, proximal weakness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) elevation have been reported in patients with selenium deficiency. The object of this report was to review the conditions in which selenium deficiency is associated with human skeletal muscle disorders and to evaluate the importance of mitochondrial alterations in these disorders. A systematic literature review using the Medline database and Cochrane Library provided 38 relevant articles. The main conditions associated with selenium deficiency fell into three categories: (1) insufficient selenium intake in low soil-selenium areas; (2) parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption; and (3) chronic conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as chronic alcohol abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In low soil-selenium areas, reversibility of muscle symptoms was similar after selenium supplementation and placebo administration, suggesting a role for other factors in the development of disease. In parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption, muscle symptoms improved after selenium supplementation in 18 of 19 patients (median delay: 4 weeks). The reason that only a minority of selenium-deficient patients present with skeletal muscle disorders is unclear and is possibly related to cofactors, such as viral infections and drugs. Prospective studies of selenium-deficient myopathies would be useful in critically ill patients, alcohol abusers, and HIV-infected patients. PMID:12766976

  2. The FaceBase Consortium: a comprehensive resource for craniofacial researchers

    PubMed Central

    Brinkley, James F.; Fisher, Shannon; Harris, Matthew P.; Holmes, Greg; Hooper, Joan E.; Wang Jabs, Ethylin; Jones, Kenneth L.; Kesselman, Carl; Klein, Ophir D.; Maas, Richard L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Selleri, Licia; Spritz, Richard A.; van Bakel, Harm; Visel, Axel; Williams, Trevor J.; Wysocka, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium, funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, is designed to accelerate understanding of craniofacial developmental biology by generating comprehensive data resources to empower the research community, exploring high-throughput technology, fostering new scientific collaborations among researchers and human/computer interactions, facilitating hypothesis-driven research and translating science into improved health care to benefit patients. The resources generated by the FaceBase projects include a number of dynamic imaging modalities, genome-wide association studies, software tools for analyzing human facial abnormalities, detailed phenotyping, anatomical and molecular atlases, global and specific gene expression patterns, and transcriptional profiling over the course of embryonic and postnatal development in animal models and humans. The integrated data visualization tools, faceted search infrastructure, and curation provided by the FaceBase Hub offer flexible and intuitive ways to interact with these multidisciplinary data. In parallel, the datasets also offer unique opportunities for new collaborations and training for researchers coming into the field of craniofacial studies. Here, we highlight the focus of each spoke project and the integration of datasets contributed by the spokes to facilitate craniofacial research. PMID:27287806

  3. The FaceBase Consortium: a comprehensive resource for craniofacial researchers.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, James F; Fisher, Shannon; Harris, Matthew P; Holmes, Greg; Hooper, Joan E; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Jones, Kenneth L; Kesselman, Carl; Klein, Ophir D; Maas, Richard L; Marazita, Mary L; Selleri, Licia; Spritz, Richard A; van Bakel, Harm; Visel, Axel; Williams, Trevor J; Wysocka, Joanna; Chai, Yang

    2016-07-15

    The FaceBase Consortium, funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, is designed to accelerate understanding of craniofacial developmental biology by generating comprehensive data resources to empower the research community, exploring high-throughput technology, fostering new scientific collaborations among researchers and human/computer interactions, facilitating hypothesis-driven research and translating science into improved health care to benefit patients. The resources generated by the FaceBase projects include a number of dynamic imaging modalities, genome-wide association studies, software tools for analyzing human facial abnormalities, detailed phenotyping, anatomical and molecular atlases, global and specific gene expression patterns, and transcriptional profiling over the course of embryonic and postnatal development in animal models and humans. The integrated data visualization tools, faceted search infrastructure, and curation provided by the FaceBase Hub offer flexible and intuitive ways to interact with these multidisciplinary data. In parallel, the datasets also offer unique opportunities for new collaborations and training for researchers coming into the field of craniofacial studies. Here, we highlight the focus of each spoke project and the integration of datasets contributed by the spokes to facilitate craniofacial research. PMID:27287806

  4. Reciprocal influence of masticatory apparatus, craniofacial structure and whole body homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Moon, Hyung-Joo

    2012-12-01

    There are evidences that the evolution into Homo erectus was partially induced by masticatory muscular dystrophy caused by a gene mutation, which in turn increased brain capacity and led to bipedalism. It is generally accepted that the morphology and function of mammalian skull are partially controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. Archeologic evidences support that the masticatory apparatus have influenced the mechanical stress distribution in hominin skull, and consequently changed craniofacial morphology and function. Even after evolution into H. erectus, alterations in food properties by civilization and cultural preferences have caused modification of human masticatory pattern and accordingly craniofacial structure. Since there are evidences that prehuman and human masticatory apparatus has been influenced the craniofacial and whole body morphology and function, this apparatus in turn might influence whole body homeostasis. Plausible reciprocal influencing mechanisms of the masticatory apparatus on the whole body homeostasis might be (1) direct mechanical influence on the craniofacial structure, (2) distortion of cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and/or (3) several neural/humoral routes. Based on these backgrounds, the hypothesis of the present study is that the morphology and function of masticatory apparatus influence the whole body homeostasis and these interactions are reciprocal. Therefore, human masticatory apparatus, at the present time, should be kept in its physiological status to maintain the whole body homeostasis. We recommend basic and clinical approaches to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22981594

  5. Dental and Craniofacial Anomalies Associated with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome with PITX2 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Simone; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Weisschuh, Nicole; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Pieper, Klaus; Gramer, Gwendolyn; Gramer, Eugen

    2010-01-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) (OMIM Nr.: 180500) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder (1  :  200000) with genetic and morphologic variability. Glaucoma is associated in 50% of the patients. Craniofacial and dental anomalies are frequently reported with ARS. The present study was designed as a multidisciplinary analysis of orthodontic, ophthalmologic, and genotypical features. A three-generation pedigree was ascertained through a family with ARS. Clinically, radiographic and genetic analyses were performed. Despite an identical genotype in all patients, the phenotype varies in expressivity of craniofacial and dental morphology. Screening for PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations by direct DNA-sequencing revealed a P64L missense mutation in PITX2 in all family members, supporting earlier reports that PITX2 is an essential factor in morphogenesis of teeth and craniofacial skeleton. Despite the fact that the family members had identical mutations, morphologic differences were evident. The concomitant occurrence of rare dental and craniofacial anomalies may be early diagnostic indications of ARS. Early detection of ARS and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) helps to prevent visual field loss. PMID:20339518

  6. Bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS): a unique craniosynostosis syndrome or predictable craniofacial phenotype?

    PubMed

    Hing, Anne V; Click, Eleanor S; Holder, Ursula; Seto, Marianne L; Vessey, Kyle; Gruss, Joseph; Hopper, Richard; Cunningham, Michael L

    2009-05-01

    Multisutural craniosynostosis that includes bilateral lambdoid and sagittal synostosis (BLSS) results in a very characteristic head shape with frontal bossing, turribrachycephaly, biparietal narrowing, occipital concavity, and inferior displacement of the ears. This entity has been reported both in the genetics literature as craniofacial dyssynostosis and in the surgical literature as "Mercedes Benz" syndrome. Craniofacial dyssynostosis was first described in 1976 by Dr. Neuhauser when he presented a series of seven patients with synostosis of the sagittal and lambdoid sutures, short stature, and developmental delay. Over the past 30 years nine additional patients with craniofacial dyssynostosis have been reported in the literature adding to the growing evidence for a distinct craniosynostosis syndrome. The term "Mercedes Benz" syndrome was coined by Moore et al. in 1998 due to the characteristic appearance of the fused sutures on three-dimensional CT imaging. In contrast to the aforementioned reported cases of craniofacial dyssynostosis, all three patients had normal development. Recently, there have been several case reports of patients with BLSS and distinct chromosomal anomalies. These findings suggest that BLSS is a heterogeneous disorder perhaps with syndromic, chromosomal, and isolated forms. In this manuscript we will present the largest series of patients with BLSS and review clinical, CT, and molecular findings. PMID:19396832

  7. EARLY CRANIOFACIAL DEVELOPMENT: LIFE AMONG THE SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early Craniofacial Development: Life Among the Signals. Sid Hunter and Keith Ward. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC, 27711

    Haloacetic acids (HAA) are chemicals formed during drinking water disinfection and present in finished tap water. Exposure o...

  8. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  9. Discrimination among adults with craniofacial conditions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to establish the level of perceived discrimination experienced by adults with congenital craniofacial conditions in Australia and to examine predictors of discrimination. Specifically, this study tested whether social support mediates the relationship between discrimination and health. Adults (n = 93) who had been treated at the Australian Craniofacial Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide for congenital craniofacial conditions (not including cleft lip and/or palate) completed questionnaires examining satisfaction with life, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, satisfaction with social support, and satisfaction with appearance. A substantial minority of adults with congenital craniofacial conditions reported that they experience discrimination almost every day in a range of areas. Higher reports of discrimination were related to older age, being male, and less education. Other factors related to higher discrimination included lower levels of satisfaction with life, self-esteem, satisfaction with appearance and mental quality of life, as well as higher levels of anxiety and depression. Social support partially mediated the relationship between discrimination and mental health outcomes. The current study shows that discrimination experiences continue into adulthood confirming the importance of ensuring patients are well supported both by psychosocial services as well as within their own social support networks. PMID:24240765

  10. Injectable Biomaterials for Regenerating Complex Craniofacial Tissues**

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D.; Young, Simon; Klouda, Leda; Wong, Mark; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering complex tissues requires a precisely formulated combination of cells, spatiotemporally released bioactive factors, and a specialized scaffold support system. Injectable materials, particularly those delivered in aqueous solution, are considered ideal delivery vehicles for cells and bioactive factors and can also be delivered through minimally invasive methods and fill complex 3D shapes. In this review, we examine injectable materials that form scaffolds or networks capable of both replacing tissue function early after delivery and supporting tissue regeneration over a time period of weeks to months. The use of these materials for tissue engineering within the craniofacial complex is challenging but ideal as many highly specialized and functional tissues reside within a small volume in the craniofacial structures and the need for minimally invasive interventions is desirable due to aesthetic considerations. Current biomaterials and strategies used to treat craniofacial defects are examined, followed by a review of craniofacial tissue engineering, and finally an examination of current technologies used for injectable scaffold development and drug and cell delivery using these materials. PMID:19750143

  11. Psychosocial adjustment and craniofacial malformations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Pertschuk, M J; Whitaker, L A

    1985-02-01

    Forty-three children between the ages of 6 and 13 years with congenital facial anomalies underwent psychosocial evaluation prior to surgery. Also evaluated were healthy children matched to the craniofacial subjects by sex, age, intelligence, and economic background. Relative to this comparison group, the craniofacial children were found to have poorer self-concept, greater anxiety at the time of evaluation, and more introversion. Parents of the craniofacial children noted more frequent negative social encounters for their children and more hyperactive behavior at home. Teachers reported more problematic classroom behavior. Examination of these results revealed craniofacial malformations to be associated with psychosocial limitations rather than marked deficits. These children tended to function less well than the comparison children, but with few exceptions, they were not functioning in a psychosocially deviant range. Explanations for the observed circumscribed impact of facial deformity include the use of denial as a coping mechanism, possible diminished significance of appearance for younger children, and the restricted environment experienced by most of the subjects. It can be predicted that time would render these protective influences ineffective, so that adolescent and young adult patients could be at far greater psychosocial risk. PMID:3969404

  12. The emerging roles of ribosome biogenesis in craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adam P; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a transient, migratory cell population, which originates during neurulation at the neural folds and contributes to the majority of tissues, including the mesenchymal structures of the craniofacial skeleton. The deregulation of the complex developmental processes that guide migration, proliferation, and differentiation of NCCs may result in a wide range of pathological conditions grouped together as neurocristopathies. Recently, due to their multipotent properties neural crest stem cells have received considerable attention as a possible source for stem cell based regenerative therapies. This exciting prospect underlines the need to further explore the developmental programs that guide NCC differentiation. This review explores the particular importance of ribosome biogenesis defects in this context since a specific interface between ribosomopathies and neurocristopathies exists as evidenced by disorders such as Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome (TCS) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). PMID:24550838

  13. Wnt Signaling and Its Contribution to Craniofacial Tissue Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Yin, X; Li, J; Salmon, B; Huang, L; Lim, W H; Liu, B; Hunter, D J; Ransom, R C; Singh, G; Gillette, M; Zou, S; Helms, J A

    2015-11-01

    A new field of dental medicine seeks to exploit nature's solution for repairing damaged tissues, through the process of regeneration. Most adult mammalian tissues have limited regenerative capacities, but in lower vertebrates, the molecular machinery for regeneration is an elemental part of their genetic makeup. Accumulating data suggest that the molecular pathways responsible for the regenerative capacity of teleosts, amphibians, and reptiles have fallen into disuse in mammals but that they can be "jumpstarted" by the selective activation of key molecules. The Wnt family of secreted proteins constitutes one such critical pathway: Wnt proteins rank among the most potent and ubiquitous stem cell self-renewing factors, with tremendous potential for promoting human tissue regeneration. Wnt reporter and lineage-tracing strains of mice have been employed to create molecular maps of Wnt responsiveness in the craniofacial tissues, and these patterns of Wnt signaling colocalize with stem/progenitor populations in the rodent incisor apex, the dental pulp, the alveolar bone, the periodontal ligament, the cementum, and oral mucosa. The importance of Wnt signaling in both the maintenance and healing of these craniofacial tissues is summarized, and the therapeutic potential of Wnt-based strategies to accelerate healing through activation of endogenous stem cells is highlighted. PMID:26285808

  14. Thymus, kidney and craniofacial abnormalities in Six 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Souil, Evelyne; Demignon, Josiane; Maire, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    Six genes are widely expressed during vertebrate embryogenesis, suggesting that they are implicated in diverse differentiation processes. To determine the functions of the Six1 gene, we constructed Six1-deficient mice by replacing its first exon by the beta-galactosidase gene. We have previously shown that mice lacking Six1 die at birth due to thoracic skeletal defects and severe muscle hypoplasia affecting most of the body muscles. Here, we report that Six1(-/-) neonates also lack a kidney and thymus, as well as displaying a strong disorganisation of craniofacial structures, namely the inner ear, the nasal cavity, the craniofacial skeleton, and the lacrimal and parotid glands. These organ defects can be correlated with Six1 expression in the embryonic primordium structures as revealed by X-Gal staining at different stages of embryogenesis. Thus, the fetal abnormalities of Six1(-/-) mice appear to result from the absence of the Six 1 homeoprotein during early stages of organogenesis. Interestingly, these Six1 defects are very similar to phenotypes caused by mutations of Eya 1, which are responsible for the BOR syndrome in humans. Close comparison of Six1 and Eya 1 deficient mice strongly suggests a functional link between these two factors. Pax gene mutations also lead to comparable phenotypes, suggesting that a regulatory network including the Pax, Six and Eya genes is required for several types of organogenesis in mammals. PMID:12834866

  15. Reliability of Craniofacial Superimposition Using Three-Dimension Skull Model.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Daniel; Olivieri, Lara; De Angelis, Danilo; Poppa, Pasquale; Galassi, Andrea; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial superimposition is a technique potentially useful for the identification of unidentified human remains if a photo of the missing person is available. We have tested the reliability of the 2D-3D computer-aided nonautomatic superimposition techniques. Three-dimension laser scans of five skulls and ten photographs were overlaid with an imaging software. The resulting superimpositions were evaluated using three methods: craniofacial landmarks, morphological features, and a combination of the two. A 3D model of each skull without its mandible was tested for superimposition; we also evaluated whether separating skulls by sex would increase correct identifications. Results show that the landmark method employing the entire skull is the more reliable one (5/5 correct identifications, 40% false positives [FP]), regardless of sex. However, the persistence of a high percentage of FP in all the methods evaluated indicates that these methods are unreliable for positive identification although the landmark-only method could be useful for exclusion. PMID:26335587

  16. The ADAMTS(L) family and human genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2011-10-15

    ADAMTS designates a family of 19 secreted enzymes, whose the first member ADAMTS1 was described in 1997. The ADAMTS family has a role in extracellular matrix degradation and turn over and has previously been involved in various human biological processes, including connective tissue structure, cancer, coagulation, arthritis, angiogenesis and cell migration. More recently, the ADAMTS(L) family has been described, sharing the same ancillary domain but distinct by the absence of any enzyme activity. Mutations in ADAMTS13, ADAMTS2, ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, ADAMTSL2 and ADAMTSL4 have been identified in distinct human genetic disorders ranging from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura to acromelic dysplasia. The aim of our review was to emphasize the role of this family in the extracellular matrix based on human phenotypes so far identified in relation with ADAMTS(L) mutations. PMID:21880666

  17. Ellis Van Creveld2 is Required for Postnatal Craniofacial Bone Development.

    PubMed

    Badri, Mohammed K; Zhang, Honghao; Ohyama, Yoshio; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Haruko; Ray, Manas; Scott, Greg; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene. Previous case studies reported that EvC patients underwent orthodontic treatment, suggesting the presence of craniofacial bone phenotypes. To investigate whether a mutation in EVC2 gene causes a craniofacial bone phenotype, Evc2 knockout (KO) mice were generated and cephalometric analysis was performed. The heads of wild type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and homozygous Evc2 KO mice (1-, 3-, and 6-week-old) were prepared and cephalometric analysis based on the selected reference points on lateral X-ray radiographs was performed. The linear and angular bone measurements were then calculated, compared between WT, Het and KO and statistically analyzed at each time point. Our data showed that length of craniofacial bones in KO was significantly lowered by ∼20% to that of WT and Het, the growth of certain bones, including nasal bone, palatal length, and premaxilla was more affected in KO, and the reduction in these bone length was more significantly enhanced at later postnatal time points (3 and 6 weeks) than early time point (1 week). Furthermore, bone-to-bone relationship to cranial base and cranial vault in KO was remarkably changed, i.e. cranial vault and nasal bone were depressed and premaxilla and mandible were developed in a more ventral direction. Our study was the first to show the cause-effect relationship between Evc2 deficiency and craniofacial defects in EvC syndrome, demonstrating that Evc2 is required for craniofacial bone development and its deficiency leads to specific facial bone growth defect. Anat Rec, 299:1110-1120, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090777

  18. Screening for obstructive sleep apnea in children treated at a major craniofacial center.

    PubMed

    Paliga, J Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Silvestre, Jason; Taylor, Jesse A

    2014-09-01

    Timely diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with craniofacial disorders may help prevent long-term adverse sequelae of upper airway obstruction, namely pulmonary hypertension, failure to thrive, and impaired neurocognitive development. Currently, little is known about the incidence of OSA in this high-risk population. A prospective study examining the incidence of positive screening for OSA in patients cared for by the craniofacial team at a large, urban referral center was performed. From January 2011 to August 2013, all patient families were asked to complete the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. This validated tool has a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 87% in predicting a positive sleep study when the ratio of positive-total responses is 0.33 or greater. Screening results were evaluated via Chi-squared and Fisher tests according to demographic and clinical variables. A total of 234 children seen in our craniofacial clinic completed the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. The mean screening age was 8.38 years, and 47% were male (110/234). Total incidence of positive OSA screening was 28.2% (66/234). Of the total population, 128 patients had an underlying syndrome (54.7%), whereas 106 patients were nonsyndromic (45.3%). Both groups were at equivalent risk for screening positive for OSA (28.1% versus 28.3%, P = 1.0). Among children with a craniofacial diagnosis, patients with a cleft lip and/or palate were at equivalent risk for screening positive for OSA as patients without a cleft (25.5% versus 32.6%, P = 0.24). The OSA symptoms affect almost one third of patients seen by our craniofacial team. Syndromic and nonsyndromic patients seem to be at equivalent risk as those patients with and without an oropharyngeal cleft. Future work will correlate these findings with formal polysomnography and may serve to heighten awareness of OSA in this at-risk population. PMID:25162551

  19. Etiology of craniofacial malformations in mouse models of blepharophimosis, ptosis and epicanthus inversus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heude, Églantine; Bellessort, Brice; Fontaine, Anastasia; Hamazaki, Manatsu; Treier, Anna-Corina; Treier, Mathias; Levi, Giovanni; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas

    2015-03-15

    Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus-inversus syndrome (BPES) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by narrow palpebral fissures and eyelid levator muscle defects. BPES is often associated to premature ovarian insufficiency (BPES type I). FOXL2, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, is the only gene known to be mutated in BPES. Foxl2 is essential for maintenance of ovarian identity, but the developmental origin of the facial malformations of BPES remains, so far, unexplained. In this study, we provide the first detailed account of the developmental processes leading to the craniofacial malformations associated to Foxl2. We show that, during development, Foxl2 is expressed both by Cranial Neural Crest Cells (CNCCs) and by Cranial Mesodermal Cells (CMCs), which give rise to skeletal (CNCCs and CMCs) and muscular (CMCs) components of the head. Using mice in which Foxl2 is selectively inactivated in either CNCCs or CMCs, we reveal that expression of Foxl2 in CNCCs is essential for the development of extraocular muscles. Indeed, inactivation of Foxl2 in CMCs has only minor effects on muscle development, whereas its inactivation in CNCCs provokes a severe hypoplasia of the levator palpabrae superioris and of the superior and inferior oblique muscles. We further show that Foxl2 deletion in either CNCCs or CMCs prevents eyelid closure and induces subtle skeletal developmental defects. Our results provide new insights in the complex developmental origin of human BPES and could help to understand the origin of other ocular anomalies associated to this syndrome. PMID:25416281

  20. Sh3pxd2b Mice Are a Model for Craniofacial Dysmorphology and Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Tian, Cong; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Han, Feng-chan; Azem, Rami; Yu, Heping; Zheng, Ye; Jin, Ge; Arnold, James E.; Zheng, Qing Y.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial defects that occur through gene mutation during development increase vulnerability to eustachian tube dysfunction. These defects can lead to an increased incidence of otitis media. We examined the effects of a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2bnee) on the progression of otitis media and hearing impairment at various developmental stages. We found that all mice that had the Sh3pxd2bnee mutation went on to develop craniofacial dysmorphologies and subsequently otitis media, by as early as 11 days of age. We found noteworthy changes in cilia and goblet cells of the middle ear mucosa in Sh3pxd2bnee mutant mice using scanning electronic microscopy. By measuring craniofacial dimensions, we determined for the first time in an animal model that this mouse has altered eustachian tube morphology consistent with a more horizontal position of the eustachian tube. All mutants were found to have hearing impairment. Expression of TNF-α and TLR2, which correlates with inflammation in otitis media, was up-regulated in the ears of mutant mice when examined by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The mouse model with a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2bnee) mirrors craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media in humans. PMID:21818352

  1. Sh3pxd2b mice are a model for craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tian, Cong; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Han, Feng-chan; Azem, Rami; Yu, Heping; Zheng, Ye; Jin, Ge; Arnold, James E; Zheng, Qing Y

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial defects that occur through gene mutation during development increase vulnerability to eustachian tube dysfunction. These defects can lead to an increased incidence of otitis media. We examined the effects of a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) on the progression of otitis media and hearing impairment at various developmental stages. We found that all mice that had the Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutation went on to develop craniofacial dysmorphologies and subsequently otitis media, by as early as 11 days of age. We found noteworthy changes in cilia and goblet cells of the middle ear mucosa in Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutant mice using scanning electronic microscopy. By measuring craniofacial dimensions, we determined for the first time in an animal model that this mouse has altered eustachian tube morphology consistent with a more horizontal position of the eustachian tube. All mutants were found to have hearing impairment. Expression of TNF-α and TLR2, which correlates with inflammation in otitis media, was up-regulated in the ears of mutant mice when examined by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The mouse model with a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) mirrors craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media in humans. PMID:21818352

  2. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    PubMed Central

    Ouchi, Takehito; Shibata, Shinsuke; Fujimura, Takumi; Kawana, Hiromasa; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Taneaki

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs). The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research. PMID:27006661

  3. CT and MR Imaging in a Large Series of Patients with Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Mehmet Haydar; Salk, Ismail; Savas, Recep; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Egilmez, Hulusi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In this retrospective review of patients with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia (FD), the clinical and radiological findings of CT and MR scan were analyzed. Material/Methods The study material included 32 patients, at 9 to 68 years of age that were directed for differential diagnostics of several disorders in the head. We recorded CT and MRI data related to the lesion number, location, sidedness, appearance, and sex of the cases with craniofacial FD. Results Of 32 patients involved in this study, 17 had monostotic and 15 had polyostotic involvement pattern. Bones most commonly involved by monostotic involvement in females were, in descending order, mandibular, maxillary, and sphenoid bones, while the sphenoid bone was involved the most in males. Leontiasis ossea was observed in 2 patients. Sclerotic and mixed lesion types were more common in both females and males. In T1- and T2-weighted MRI sequences, hypointensity was more common compared to hyperintensity or heterogeneous intensity. The type of enhancement of lesions was found similar after contrast medium administration. Conclusions In the presence of craniofacial FD during CT or MRI imaging of the head, a detailed description of FD lesions may provide an important clinical benefit by increasing radiological experience during the diagnostics of this rare disorder. PMID:26000068

  4. Antimicrobial potentials and structural disorder of human and animal defensins.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Ehab H; Almehdar, Hussein A; Yacoub, Haitham A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2016-04-01

    Defensins are moonlighting peptides which are broadly distributed throughout all the living kingdoms. They play a multitude of important roles in human health and disease, possessing several immunoregulatory functions and manifesting broad antimicrobial activities against viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Based on their patterns of intramolecular disulfide bridges, these small cysteine-rich cationic proteins are divided into three major types, α-, β-, and θ-defensins, with the α- and β-defensins being further subdivided into a number of subtypes. The various roles played by the defensins in the innate (especially mucosal) and adoptive immunities place these polypeptides at the frontiers of the defense against the microbial invasions. Current work analyzes the antimicrobial activities of human and animal defensins in light of their intrinsic disorder propensities. PMID:26598808

  5. The concept of pattern in craniofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Moyers, R E; Bookstein, F L; Guire, K E

    1979-08-01

    1. There are semantic and associated problems with the word pattern in biology, particularly in orthodontics and facial growth. 2. Pattern, as we use the term, is invariance of relationships--"a set of constraints operating to preserve the integration of parts under varying conditions and through time." 3. Craniofacial pattern can be described and quantified by the identification of craniofacial constants, measures that are relatively invariant. 4. Growth is change and is best identified by studying those measures of size and shape that vary most sensitively through time over development stages. 5. The many traditional cephalometric measures that represent well neither pattern nor growth (mixed) are of less clinical utility than either pure pattern indices or growth indices. 6. The analytical and conceptual separation of pattern and growth seems useful in analysis of morphology, analysis of growth, prediction of growth, and clinical treatment planning. PMID:289292

  6. Craniofacial malformation among endemic cretins in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Israel, H; Johnson, G F; Fierro-Benitez, R

    1983-01-01

    Nearly 6% of the inhabitants of two villages in Ecuador are deaf-mute and mentally retarded cretins. These communities are situated in the Andean highlands where environmental and dietary stores of iodine are extremely scarce. Endemic goiter and cretinism are widespread, and 10% of the cretins are additionally burdened with dwarfism and facial dysmorphia. Those with obvious involvement of the skeletal system were selected in order to study the extent of craniofacial malformation. Their appearance is characterized by midface hypoplasia, a broad nose with a depressed bridge, and a conspicuous circumoral prominence. Radiographic evaluation demonstrates a vertical displacement of the cranial base with an associated upward tilt of the midface. The flattened frontal bone, reduced frontal sinus pneumatization, and diminutive nasal bones collectively create a backward sloping face. The defect in the craniofacial skeleton of these Ecuadorian cretins is characteristic, and it readily sets them apart from the dysmorphism of those cretins with myxedema. PMID:6874895

  7. Imaging findings in craniofacial childhood rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Merks, Johannes H. M.; Saeed, Peerooz; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Bras, Johannes; Pieters, Bradley R.; Adam, Judit A.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the commonest paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma constituting 3–5% of all malignancies in childhood. RMS has a predilection for the head and neck area and tumours in this location account for 40% of all childhood RMS cases. In this review we address the clinical and imaging presentations of craniofacial RMS, discuss the most appropriate imaging techniques, present characteristic imaging features and offer an overview of differential diagnostic considerations. Post-treatment changes will be briefly addressed. PMID:20725831

  8. Holoprosencephaly with Multiple Anomalies of the Craniofacial Bones-An Autopsy Report

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, E.; Chakravarthy, V. Kalyan; Rao, D. Naveen Chandar; Rao, D. Ranga

    2013-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), a disorder which results from a failure of cleavage or the incomplete differentiation of the forebrain structures at various levels or to various degrees, is related to hereditary factors, chromosomal anomalies, cytogenetic abnormalities, and environmental teratogenic factors. We are reporting a case of a multiparous woman who was G3,P3,L2, who delivered a full term foetus with holoprosencephaly and multiple craniofacial anomalies. An autopsy was conducted. Multiple anomalies of the craniofacial bones, which include hypoplasia and synostosis of the frontal bone, anophthalmia, absence of the anterior cranial fossa, hypoplasia of the maxillae, an absent antrum, cleft palate, a central hare lip and arrhinia which includes absence of the nostrils and hypotelorism of the eye placodes, were noted. This case is being reported for its rarity and the available literature was reviewed in this respect. PMID:24086891

  9. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E.; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A.; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K.; Last, James I.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R.; Green, Catherine M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA’s interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration. PMID:24911150

  10. [Mechanisms of growth, development and disease of the craniofacial skeleton].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial skeleton is derived from several pieces of bone, which hold the brain and house the sensory organ of vision, hearing, taste and smell. It also serves as an entrance of the digestive and respiratory tracts. Hence, craniofacial complex develops under sophisticated balance between the shape and the function. Disruption of such balance leads to various types of malformation and/or deformation of the face. This review focuses on the molecular aspects of growth and developments of the craniofacial structures and also on the genetic basis of congenital craniofacial malformations. PMID:26728542

  11. Venous air embolism during a craniofacial procedure.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R J; Mulliken, J B

    1988-07-01

    The possibility of venous air embolism exists whenever the craniofacial operative field is above the level of the heart. Craniotomy with the high-torque craniotome is hypothesized to have produced venous air embolism in the patient described in this report. The diagnosis of venous air embolism is determined by transesophageal Doppler probe, transesophageal echocardiogram or external echocardiogram, and end-tidal N2 and CO2 determinations. Treatment includes control of the air entry sites, aspiration of air from the right atrium via a catheter placed prior to operation, and discontinuing nitrous oxide. If these measures are unsuccessful, the operative field should be transposed below heart level and the procedure terminated. In the event of significant hemodynamic compromise, closed cardiac massage should be tried; if that fails, open cardiac massage and direct aspiration are necessary. The true incidence of venous air embolism in craniofacial operations may be much higher than previously suspected. We therefore recommend placement of appropriate monitoring equipment to detect intracardiac air in those major craniofacial procedures in which there is a potential for intravascular air ingress. PMID:3289061

  12. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  13. Midline Anterior Craniofacial Approach for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Bryan John; Traynelis, Vincent C.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Funk, Gerry F.; Menezes, Arnold H.; Hoffman, Henry T.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty consecutive cases of midline anterior craniofacial procedures for the treatment of malignant neoplasms arising from the paranasal sinuses were reviewed. Posterior and lateral base craniofacial procedures were specifically excluded. This review compares the results, in terms of survival and major complication rate, between en bloc and piecemeal resections. The average follow-up was 4 years and 3 months. Sixteen patients were treated with an en bloc resection. The major complication rate was 31%. One-year survival rate was 94% for the en bloc resection group, 67% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival for en bloc resection dropped to 56, 33, and 67%, respectively. Fourteen patients were treated with piecemeal resections. The major complication rate was 21%. One-year survival rate was 83% for the piecemeal resection group, 60% for patients with positive margins, and 100% for patients with clear margins. Three-year survival dropped to 70, 60, and 80%, respectively. Although it is considered desirable to obtain an en bloc resection in some craniofacial procedures, we conclude that a piecemeal resection is a viable alternative in situations where an en bloc procedure is difficult to obtain safely. ImagesFigure 1p43-bFigure 2p44-b PMID:17171080

  14. Fuz Regulates Craniofacial Development through Tissue Specific Responses to Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zichao; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Niederreither, Karen; Venugopalan, Shankar; Florez, Sergio; Finnell, Richard H.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz−/− mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz−/− mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz−/− mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21935430

  15. Cranio-facial remodeling in domestic dogs is associated with changes in larynx position.

    PubMed

    Plotsky, Kyle; Rendall, Drew; Chase, Kevin; Riede, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The hyo-laryngeal complex is a multi-segmented structure integrating the oral and pharyngeal cavities and thus a variety of critical functions related to airway control, feeding, and vocal communication. Currently, we lack a complete understanding of how the hyoid complex, and the functions it mediates, can also be affected by changes in surrounding cranio-facial dimensions. Here, we explore these relationships in a breed of domestic dog, the Portuguese Water Dog, which is characterized by strong cranio-facial variation. We used radiographic images of the upper body and head of 55 adult males and 51 adult females to obtain detailed measures of cranio-facial variation and hyoid anatomy. Principal components analysis revealed multiple orthogonal dimensions of cranio-facial variation, some of which were associated with significant differences in larynx position: the larynx occupied a more descended position in individuals with shorter, broader faces than in those with longer, narrower faces. We then tested the possibility that caudal displacement of the larynx in brachycephalic individuals might reflect a degree of tongue crowding resulting from facial shortening and reduction of oral and pharyngeal spaces. A cadaver sample was used to obtain detailed measurements of constituent bones of the hyoid skeleton and of the tongue body, and their relationships to cranio-facial size and shape and overall body size supported the tongue-crowding hypothesis. Considering the presence of descended larynges in numerous mammalian taxa, our findings establish an important precedent for the possibility that laryngeal descent can be initiated, and even sustained, in part in response to remodeling of the face and cranium for selective pressures unrelated to vocal production. These integrated changes could also have been involved in hominin evolution, where the different laryngeal positions in modern humans compared with nonhuman primates have been traditionally linked to the evolution

  16. Similar impressions of humanness for human and artificial singing voices in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Shinji; Tamura, Yuri; Igarashi, Miki; Kato, Nobumasa; Nakano, Tamami

    2016-08-01

    People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit impairments in the perception of and orientation to social information related to humans, and some people with ASD show higher preference toward human-like robots than other humans. We speculated that this behavioural bias in people with ASD is caused by a weakness in their perception of humanness. To address this issue, we investigated whether people with ASD detect a subtle difference between the same song sung by human and artificial voices even when the lyrics, melody and rhythm are identical. People without ASD answered that the songs sung by a human voice evoked more impressions of humanness (human-likeness, animateness, naturalness, emotion) and more positive feelings (warmth, familiarity, comfort) than those sung by an artificial voice. In contrast, people with ASD had similar impressions of humanness and positive feelings for the songs sung by the human and artificial voices. The evaluations of musical characteristics (complexity, regularity, brightness) did not differ between people with and without ASD. These results suggest that people with ASD are weak in their ability to perceive psychological attributes of humanness. PMID:27107740

  17. Transferrin receptor facilitates TGF-β and BMP signaling activation to control craniofacial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lei, R; Zhang, K; Liu, K; Shao, X; Ding, Z; Wang, F; Hong, Y; Zhu, M; Li, H; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    The Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), consisting of cleft palate, glossoptosis and micrognathia, is a common human birth defect. However, how this abnormality occurs remains largely unknown. Here we report that neural crest cell (NCC)-specific knockout of transferrin receptor (Tfrc), a well known transferrin transporter protein, caused micrognathia, cleft palate, severe respiratory distress and inability to suckle in mice, which highly resemble human PRS. Histological and anatomical analysis revealed that the cleft palate is due to the failure of palatal shelves elevation that resulted from a retarded extension of Meckel's cartilage. Interestingly, Tfrc deletion dramatically suppressed both transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in cranial NCCs-derived mandibular tissues, suggesting that Tfrc may act as a facilitator of these two signaling pathways during craniofacial morphogenesis. Together, our study uncovers an unknown function of Tfrc in craniofacial development and provides novel insight into the etiology of PRS. PMID:27362800

  18. Proteomic analysis of human osteoprogenitor response to disordered nanotopography

    PubMed Central

    Kantawong, Fahsai; Burchmore, Richard; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that microgroove-initiated contact guidance can induce bone formation in osteoprogenitor cells (OPGs) and produce changes in the cell proteome. For proteomic analysis, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) can be used as a powerful diagnostic method to provide comparable data between the proteomic profiles of cells cultured in different conditions. This study focuses on the response of OPGs to a novel nanoscale pit topography with osteoinductive properties compared with planar controls. Disordered near-square nanopits with 120 nm diameter and 100 nm depth with an average 300 nm centre-to-centre spacing (300 nm spaced pits in square pattern, but with ±50 nm disorder) were fabricated on 1×1 cm2 polycaprolactone sheets. Human OPGs were seeded onto the test materials. DIGE analysis revealed changes in the expression of a number of distinct proteins, including upregulation of actin isoforms, beta-galectin1, vimentin and procollagen-proline, 2-oxoglutarate 4-dioxygenase and prolyl 4-hydroxylase. Downregulation of enolase, caldesmon, zyxin, GRASP55, Hsp70 (BiP/GRP78), RNH1, cathepsin D and Hsp27 was also observed. The differences in cell morphology and mineralization are also reported using histochemical techniques. PMID:19068473

  19. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs. PMID:25126564

  20. OCT imaging of craniofacial anatomy in xenopus embryos (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Engin; Jonas, Stephan M.; Griffin, John; Hooper, Michael C.; Choma, Michael A.; Khokha, Mustafa K.

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of craniofacial defects is incompletely understood. The ability to obtain large amounts of gene sequence data from families affected by craniofacial defects is opening up new ways to understand molecular genetic etiological factors. One important link between gene sequence data and clinical relevance is biological research into candidate genes and molecular pathways. We present our recent research using OCT as a nondestructive phenotyping modality of craniofacial morphology in Xenopus embryos, an important animal model for biological research in gene and pathway discovery. We define 2D and 3D scanning protocols for a standardized approach to craniofacial imaging in Xenopus embryos. We define standard views and planar reconstructions for visualizing normal anatomy and landmarks. We compare these views and reconstructions to traditional histopathology using alcian blue staining. In addition to being 3D, nondestructive, and having much faster throughout, OCT can identify craniofacial features that are lost during traditional histopathological preparation. We also identify quantitative morphometric parameters to define normative craniofacial anatomy. We also note that craniofacial and cardiac defects are not infrequently present in the same patient (e.g velocardiofacial syndrome). Given that OCT excels at certain aspects of cardiac imaging in Xenopus embryos, our work highlights the potential of using OCT and Xenopus to study molecular genetic factors that impact both cardiac and craniofacial development.

  1. Craniofacial dysmorphology: Studies in honor of Samuel Pruzansky

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.M.; Rollnick, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Regional Specification of Cell-Specific Gene Expression During Craniofacial Development; Timing Cleft Palate Closure - Age Should Not Be the Sole Determinant; Excess of Parental Non-Righthandedness in Children with Right-Sided Cleft Lip: A Preliminary Report; and The Application of Roentgencephalometry to the Study of Craniofacial Anomalies.

  2. Neural Crest-Specific TSC1 Deletion in Mice Leads to Sclerotic Craniofacial Bone Lesion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Sun, Shaogang; Wang, Li; Guan, Jun-Lin; Giovannini, Marco; Zhu, Yuan; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. TSC has high frequency of osseous manifestations such as sclerotic lesions in the craniofacial region. However, an animal model that replicates TSC craniofacial bone lesions has not yet been described. The roles of Tsc1 and the sequelae of Tsc1 dysfunction in bone are unknown. In this study, we generated a mouse model of TSC with a deletion of Tsc1 in neural crest-derived (NCD) cells that recapitulated the sclerotic craniofacial bone lesions in TSC. Analysis of this mouse model demonstrated that TSC1 deletion led to enhanced mTORC1 signaling in NCD bones and the increase in bone formation is responsible for the aberrantly increased bone mass. Lineage mapping revealed that TSC1 deficient NCD cells overpopulated the NCD bones. Mechanistically, hyperproliferation of osteoprogenitors at an early postnatal stage accounts for the increased osteoblast pool. Intriguingly, early postnatal treatment with rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor, can completely rescue the aberrant bone mass, but late treatment cannot. Our data suggest that enhanced mTOR signaling in NCD cells can increase bone mass through enlargement of the osteoprogenitor pool, which likely explains the sclerotic bone lesion observed in TSC patients. PMID:25639352

  3. VEGF stimulates intramembranous bone formation during craniofacial skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xuchen; Bradbury, Seth R; Olsen, Bjorn R; Berendsen, Agnes D

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) has been associated with severe craniofacial anomalies in both humans and mice. Cranial neural crest cell (NCC)-derived VEGF regulates proliferation, vascularization and ossification of cartilage and membranous bone. However, the function of VEGF derived from specific subpopulations of NCCs in controlling unique aspects of craniofacial morphogenesis is not clear. In this study a conditional knockdown strategy was used to genetically delete Vegfa expression in Osterix (Osx) and collagen II (Col2)-expressing NCC descendants. No major defects in calvaria and mandibular morphogenesis were observed upon knockdown of VEGF in the Col2(+) cell population. In contrast, loss of VEGF in Osx(+) osteoblast progenitor cells led to reduced ossification of calvarial and mandibular bones without affecting the formation of cartilage templates in newborn mice. The early stages of ossification in the developing jaw revealed decreased initial mineralization levels and a reduced thickness of the collagen I (Col1)-positive bone template upon loss of VEGF in Osx(+) precursors. Increased numbers of proliferating cells were detected within the jaw mesenchyme of mutant embryos. Explant culture assays revealed that mandibular osteogenesis occurred independently of paracrine VEGF action and vascular development. Reduced VEGF expression in mandibles coincided with increased phospho-Smad1/5 (P-Smad1/5) levels and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) expression in the jaw mesenchyme. We conclude that VEGF derived from Osx(+) osteoblast progenitor cells is required for optimal ossification of developing mandibular bones and modulates mechanisms controlling BMP-dependent specification and expansion of the jaw mesenchyme. PMID:26899202

  4. Craniofacial Reconstruction with Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Derrick C.; Wong, Victor W.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold enormous promise for the treatment of complex tissue defects throughout the entire body. The ability for iPSCs to form all tissue types makes them an ideal autogenous cellular building block for tissue engineering strategies designed to replace any combination of skin, muscle, nerve, and bone deficiencies in the craniofacial region. Several obstacles to their use remain, however, chief among which include concerns over insertional mutagenesis and tumorigenicity. As studies continue to develop strategies minimizing these risks, the potential for development of patient-specific regenerative therapies has become tantalizingly close. PMID:22627398

  5. Stature estimation from craniofacial anthropometry in Bangladeshi Garo adult females.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Z; Banu, L A; Alam, M M; Rahman, M F

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of stature is an important tool in forensic examination especially in unknown, highly decomposed, fragmentary and mutilated human remains. When the evidences are skeletal remains; forensic anthropology has put forward means to estimate the stature from the skeletal and even from fragmentary bones. Sometimes, craniofacial remains are brought in for forensic and postmortem examination. In such a situation, estimation of stature becomes equally important along with other parameters like age, sex, race, etc. Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics and architecture where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products. It is well established that a single standard of craniofacial aesthetics is not appropriate for application to diverse racial and ethnic groups. Bangladesh is a country not only for the Bengalis; the country harbours many cultures and people of different races because of the colonial rules of the past regimes. Like other ethnic groups, the Garos (study subjects) have their own set of language, social structure, cultures and economic activities and religious values. In the above context, the present study was attempted to establish ethnic specific anthropometric data for the Bangladeshi Garo adult females. The study also attempted to find out the correlation of the craniofacial dimensions with stature and to determine multiplication factors. The study was an observational, cross-sectional and primarily descriptive in nature with some analytical components. The study was carried out with a total number of one hundred Garo adult females, aged between 25-45 years. Craniofacial dimension such as head circumference, head length, facial height from 'nasion' to 'gnathion', bizygomatic breadth and stature were measured using a measuring tape, spreading caliper, steel plate and steel tape and sliding caliper. The data were then statistically

  6. The chick embryo as a model for the effects of prenatal exposure to alcohol on craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Kiecker, Clemens

    2016-07-15

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), a syndrome characterised by a broad range of clinical manifestations including craniofacial dysmorphologies and neurological defects. The characterisation of the mechanisms by which ethanol exerts its teratogenic effects is difficult due to the pleiotropic nature of its actions. Different experimental model systems have been employed to investigate the aetiology of FASD. Here, I will review studies using these different model organisms that have helped to elucidate how ethanol causes the craniofacial abnormalities characteristic of FASD. In these studies, ethanol was found to impair the prechordal plate-an important embryonic signalling centre-during gastrulation and to negatively affect the induction, migration and survival of the neural crest, a cell population that generates the cartilage and most of the bones of the skull. At the cellular level, ethanol appears to inhibit Sonic hedgehog signalling, alter levels of retionoic acid activity, trigger a Ca(2+)-CamKII-dependent pathway that antagonises WNT signalling, affect cytoskeletal dynamics and increase oxidative stress. Embryos of the domestic chick Gallus gallus domesticus have played a central role in developing a working model for the effects of ethanol on craniofacial development because they are easily accessible and because key steps in craniofacial development are particularly well established in the avian embryo. I will finish this review by highlighting some potential future avenues of fetal alcohol research. PMID:26777098

  7. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan M; Garic, Ana; Berres, Mark E; Flentke, George R

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development, including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genome-wide SNP analysis links PDGFRA with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and - resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss-and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene-ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to ethanol's neurotoxicity. PMID

  8. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan M.; Garic, Ana; Berres, Mark E.; Flentke, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development, including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genome-wide SNP analysis links PDGFRA with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and – resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss-and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene–ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to ethanol’s neurotoxicity

  9. Using 501c3 Foundations in the Care of Cleft and Craniofacial Children.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin S; Henry, Byron T

    2016-05-01

    This article relates to the use of 501c3 foundations in the care of patients with cleft and craniofacial disorders. Both authors are medical directors and founders of foundations that serve these children: A Smile for a Child Foundation was set up to help children locally; Free to Smile was set up as an international missions foundation. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of each type of foundation as well as the struggles and successes foundations face to help children locally and internationally. PMID:27150307

  10. Translational genetic approaches to substance use disorders: bridging the gap between mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Abraham A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    While substance abuse disorders only occur in humans, mice and other model organisms can make valuable contributions to genetic studies of these disorders. In this review, we consider a few specific examples of how model organisms have been used in conjunction with studies in humans to study the role of genetic factors in substance use disorders. In some examples genes that were first discovered in mice were subsequently studied in humans. In other examples genes or specific polymorphisms in genes were first studied in humans and then modeled in mice. Using anatomically and temporally specific genetic, pharmacological and other environmental manipulations in conjunction with histological analyses, mechanistic insights that would be difficult to obtain in humans have been obtained in mice. We hope these examples illustrate how novel biological insights about the effect of genes on substance use disorders can be obtained when mouse and human genetic studies are successfully integrated. PMID:22170288