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Sample records for human dna ligases

  1. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  2. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers. PMID:20518483

  3. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  4. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  5. SCR7 is neither a selective nor a potent inhibitor of human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Greco, George E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Brooks, Rhys C; Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    DNA ligases are attractive therapeutics because of their involvement in completing the repair of almost all types of DNA damage. A series of DNA ligase inhibitors with differing selectivity for the three human DNA ligases were identified using a structure-based approach with one of these inhibitors being used to inhibit abnormal DNA ligase IIIα-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB)s in breast cancer, neuroblastoma and leukemia cell lines. Raghavan and colleagues reported the characterization of a derivative of one of the previously identified DNA ligase inhibitors, which they called SCR7 (designated SCR7-R in our experiments using SCR7). SCR7 appeared to show increased selectivity for DNA ligase IV, inhibit the repair of DSBs by the DNA ligase IV-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, reduce tumor growth, and increase the efficacy of DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities in mouse xenografts. In attempting to synthesize SCR7, we encountered problems with the synthesis procedures and discovered discrepancies in its reported structure. We determined the structure of a sample of SCR7 and a related compound, SCR7-G, that is the major product generated by the published synthesis procedure for SCR7. We also found that SCR7-G has the same structure as the compound (SCR7-X) available from a commercial vendor (XcessBio). The various SCR7 preparations had similar activity in DNA ligation assay assays, exhibiting greater activity against DNA ligases I and III than DNA ligase IV. Furthermore, SCR7-R failed to inhibit DNA ligase IV-dependent V(D)J recombination in a cell-based assay. Based on our results, we conclude that SCR7 and the SCR7 derivatives are neither selective nor potent inhibitors of DNA ligase IV. PMID:27235626

  6. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J.; Hendrickson, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene’s essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells. PMID:24837021

  7. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  8. In vitro mutagenesis and functional expression in Escherichia coli of a cDNA encoding the catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, K; Barnes, D E; Lindahl, T

    1991-01-01

    Human cDNAs encoding fragments of DNA ligase I, the major replicative DNA ligase in mammalian cells, have been expressed as lacZ fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. A cDNA encoding the carboxyl-terminal catalytic domain of human DNA ligase I was able to complement a conditional-lethal DNA ligase mutation in E. coli as measured by growth of the mutant strain at the non-permissive temperature. Targeted deletions of the amino and carboxyl termini of the catalytic domain identified a minimum size necessary for catalytic function and a maximum size for optimal complementing activity in E. coli. The human cDNA was subjected to systematic site-directed mutagenesis in vitro and mutant polypeptides assayed for functional expression in the E. coli DNA ligase mutant. Such functional analysis of the active site of DNA ligase I identified specific residues required for the formation of an enzyme-adenylate reaction intermediate. Images PMID:1956768

  9. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  10. Structural insights into the role of domain flexibility in human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Grossmann, J Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M; Blundell, Tom L

    2012-07-01

    Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  11. Structural Insights into the Role of Domain Flexibility in Human DNA Ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Takashi; Wu, Qian; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Grossmann, J. Günter; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of the architecture of DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and interactions with XRCC4 and XLF-Cernunnos is necessary for understanding its role in the ligation of double-strand breaks during nonhomologous end joining. Here we report the structure of a subdomain of the nucleotidyltrasferase domain of human LigIV and provide insights into the residues associated with LIG4 syndrome. We use this structural information together with the known structures of the BRCT/XRCC4 complex and those of LigIV orthologs to interpret small-angle X-ray scattering of LigIV in complex with XRCC4 and size exclusion chromatography of LigIV, XRCC4, and XLF-Cernunnos. Our results suggest that the flexibility of the catalytic region is limited in a manner that affects the formation of the LigIV/XRCC4/XLF-Cernunnos complex. PMID:22658747

  12. DNA ligase III is the major high molecular weight DNA joining activity in SV40-transformed human fibroblasts: normal levels of DNA ligase III activity in Bloom syndrome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, A E; Starr, R; Schultz, R A

    1993-01-01

    The phenotypes of cultured cell lines established from individuals with Bloom syndrome (BLM), including an elevated spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), are consistent with a defect in DNA joining. We have investigated the levels of DNA ligase I and DNA ligase III in an SV40-transformed control and BLM fibroblast cell line, as well as clonal derivatives of the BLM cell line complemented or not for the elevated SCE phenotype. No differences in either DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III were detected in extracts from these cell lines. Furthermore, the data indicate that in dividing cultures of SV40-transformed fibroblasts, DNA ligase III contributes > 85% of high molecular weight DNA joining activity. This observation contrasts with previous studies in which DNA ligase I was reported to be the major DNA joining activity in extracts from proliferating mammalian cells. Images PMID:8265359

  13. DNA Ligase IV and Artemis Act Cooperatively to Suppress Homologous Recombination in Human Cells: Implications for DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR. PMID:23967291

  14. Length-dependent binding of human XLF to DNA and stimulation of XRCC4.DNA ligase IV activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haihui; Pannicke, Ulrich; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2007-04-13

    An XRCC4-like factor, called XLF or Cernunnos, was recently identified as another important factor in the non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) process. NHEJ is the major pathway for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. The similarity in the putative secondary structures of XLF and XRCC4 as well as the association of XLF with XRCC4.DNA ligase IV in vivo suggested a role in the final ligation step of NHEJ. Here, we find that purified XLF directly interacts with purified XRCC4.DNA ligase IV complex and stimulates the ligase complex in a direct assay for ligation activity. Purified XLF has DNA binding activity, but this binding is dependent on DNA length in a manner most consistent with orientation of the C-terminal alpha helices parallel to the DNA helix. To better understand the function of XLF, we purified an XLF mutant (R57G), which was identified in patients with NHEJ deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency. Surprisingly, the mutant protein retained its ability to stimulate XRCC4.DNA ligase IV but failed to translocate to the nucleus, and this appears to be the basis for the NHEJ defect in this patient. PMID:17317666

  15. Human BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase activity counteracts chromatin barriers to DNA resection.

    PubMed

    Densham, Ruth M; Garvin, Alexander J; Stone, Helen R; Strachan, Joanna; Baldock, Robert A; Daza-Martin, Manuel; Fletcher, Alice; Blair-Reid, Sarah; Beesley, James; Johal, Balraj; Pearl, Laurence H; Neely, Robert; Keep, Nicholas H; Watts, Felicity Z; Morris, Joanna R

    2016-07-01

    The opposing activities of 53BP1 and BRCA1 influence pathway choice in DNA double-strand-break repair. How BRCA1 counteracts the inhibitory effect of 53BP1 on DNA resection and homologous recombination is unknown. Here we identify the site of BRCA1-BARD1 required for priming ubiquitin transfer from E2∼ubiquitin and demonstrate that BRCA1-BARD1's ubiquitin ligase activity is required for repositioning 53BP1 on damaged chromatin. We confirm H2A ubiquitination by BRCA1-BARD1 and show that an H2A-ubiquitin fusion protein promotes DNA resection and repair in BARD1-deficient cells. BRCA1-BARD1's function in homologous recombination requires the chromatin remodeler SMARCAD1. SMARCAD1 binding to H2A-ubiquitin and optimal localization to sites of damage and activity in DNA repair requires its ubiquitin-binding CUE domains. SMARCAD1 is required for 53BP1 repositioning, and the need for SMARCAD1 in olaparib or camptothecin resistance is alleviated by 53BP1 loss. Thus, BRCA1-BARD1 ligase activity and subsequent SMARCAD1-dependent chromatin remodeling are critical regulators of DNA repair. PMID:27239795

  16. Structural alterations of DNA ligase I in Bloom syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, A E; Weksberg, R; Tomlinson, S; Lindahl, T

    1987-01-01

    Cell lines derived from seven patients with Bloom syndrome all contain a DNA ligase I with unusual properties. Six lines were shown to have a reduced level of this enzyme activity and the residual enzyme was anomalously heat-labile. The seventh line contained a dimeric rather than monomeric form of ligase I. Several cell lines representative of other inherited human syndromes have apparently normal DNA ligases. The data indicate that Bloom syndrome is due to a defect in the structure of DNA ligase I caused by a "leaky" point mutation occurring at one of at least two alternative sites. PMID:3479778

  17. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  18. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 is required for the response of human cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yili; Seifert, Anne; Chua, Joy Shijia; Maure, Jean-François; Golebiowski, Filip; Hay, Ronald T

    2012-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that RNF4, a highly conserved small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, plays a critical role in the response of mammalian cells to DNA damage. Human cells in which RNF4 expression was ablated by siRNA or chicken DT40 cells with a homozygous deletion of the RNF4 gene displayed increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Recruitment of RNF4 to double-strand breaks required its RING and SUMO interaction motif (SIM) domains and DNA damage factors such as NBS1, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1), RNF8, 53BP1, and BRCA1. In the absence of RNF4, these factors were still recruited to sites of DNA damage, but 53BP1, RNF8, and RNF168 displayed delayed clearance from such foci. SILAC-based proteomics of SUMO substrates revealed that MDC1 was SUMO-modified in response to ionizing radiation. As a consequence of SUMO modification, MDC1 recruited RNF4, which mediated ubiquitylation at the DNA damage site. Failure to recruit RNF4 resulted in defective loading of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 onto ssDNA. This appeared to be a consequence of reduced recruitment of the CtIP nuclease, resulting in inefficient end resection. Thus, RNF4 is a novel DNA damage-responsive protein that plays a role in homologous recombination and integrates SUMO modification and ubiquitin signaling in the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:22661230

  19. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Huwiler, K.G.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-09-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, the authors have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA ligase genes. Human DNA ligase I cDNAs from normal and BS cells complemented a S. cerevisiae DNA ligase mutation, and protein extracts prepared from S. cerevisiae transformants expressing normal and BS cDNA contained comparable levels of DNA ligase I activity. DNA sequencing and Northern blot analysis of DNA ligase I expression in two BS human fibroblast lines representing each of the two aberrant DNA ligase I molecular phenotypes demonstrated that this gene was unchanged in BS cells. Thus, another factor may be responsible for the observed reduction in DNA ligase I activity associated with this chromosomal breakage syndrome.

  20. Engineered DNA ligases with improved activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Morton, Susan K; Deiderick, Heather; Gerth, Monica L; Paul, Hayden A; Gerber, Ilana; Patel, Ankita; Ellington, Andrew D; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Patrick, Wayne M

    2013-07-01

    The DNA ligase from bacteriophage T4 is one of the most widely used enzymes in molecular biology. It has evolved to seal single-stranded nicks in double-stranded DNA, but not to join double-stranded fragments with cohesive or blunt ends. Its poor activity in vitro, particularly with blunt-ended substrates, can lead to failed or sub-optimal experimental outcomes. We have fused T4 DNA ligase to seven different DNA-binding proteins, including eukaryotic transcription factors, bacterial DNA repair proteins and archaeal DNA-binding domains. Representatives from each of these classes improved the activity of T4 DNA ligase, by up to 7-fold, in agarose gel-based screens for cohesive- and blunt-ended fragment joining. Overall, the most active variants were p50-ligase (i.e. NF-κB p50 fused to T4 DNA ligase) and ligase-cTF (T4 DNA ligase fused to an artificial, chimeric transcription factor). Ligase-cTF out-performed T4 DNA ligase by ∼160% in blunt end 'vector + insert' cloning assays, and p50-ligase showed an improvement of a similar magnitude when it was used to construct a library for Illumina sequencing. The activity of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase was also enhanced by fusion to p50. Together, these results suggest that our protein design strategy is a generalizable one for engineering improved DNA ligases. PMID:23754529

  1. Molecular characterisation of a DNA ligase gene of the extremely thermophilic archaeon Desulfurolobus ambivalens shows close phylogenetic relationship to eukaryotic ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Kletzin, A

    1992-01-01

    A 3382 bp fragment containing a gene for a DNA ligase from the extremely thermophilic, acidophilic, and facultatively anaerobic archaeon (archaebacterium) Desulfurolobus ambivalens was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence (600 amino acids, 67619 molecular weight) showed 30-34% sequence identity with the ATP-dependent eucaryal (eukaryotic) DNA ligases of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the human DNA ligase I, and with the Vaccinia DNA ligase. Distant similarity to the DNA ligases from the bacteriophages T3, T4, T6, T7 and the African swine fever virus was found, whereas no similarities were detectable to the NAD-dependent DNA ligases from the bacteria (eubacteria) Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus, to the ATP-dependent RNA-ligase of bacteriophage T4, and to the tRNA-Ligase from S.cerevisiae. A detailed comparison of the phylogenetic relationship of the amino acid sequences of all known DNA and RNA ligases is presented including a complete alignment of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The in vivo-transcription initiation and termination sites of the D.ambivalens gene were mapped. The calculated transcript length was 1904-1911 nt. Images PMID:1437556

  2. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. DNA ligase I mediates essential functions in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, J H; Xiao, Y; Weaver, D T

    1995-01-01

    DNA replication, repair, and recombination are essential processes in mammalian cells. Hence, the application of gene targeting to the study of these DNA metabolic pathways requires the creation of nonnull mutations. We have developed a method for introducing partially defective mutants in murine embryonic stem cells that circumvents the problem of cellular lethality of targeted mutations at essential loci. Using this approach, we have determined that mammalian DNA ligase I is essential for cell viability. Thus, DNA ligases II and III are not redundant with DNA ligase I for the function(s) associated with cell proliferation. Partial complementation of the lethal DNA ligase I null mutation allowed the creation of deficient embryonic stem cell lines. We found that a wild-type DNA ligase I cDNA, as well as a variant DNA ligase I cDNA, was able to rescue the lethality of the homozygous null mutation, whereas an N-terminal deletion mutant consisting of the minimal DNA ligase I catalytic domain was not. This observation demonstrates that sequences outside the DNA ligase I catalytic domain are essential for DNA ligase I function in vivo. PMID:7623824

  4. Differential response between the p53 ubiquitin-protein ligases Pirh2 and MdM2 following DNA damage in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Wenrui; Gao, Li; Wu Xin; Zhang Yang; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A. . E-mail: Miguel.villalona@osumc.edu

    2006-10-15

    Pirh2, a recently identified ubiquitin-protein ligase, has been reported to promote p53 degradation. Pirh2 physically interacts with p53 and promotes ubiquitination of p53 independently of MDM2. Like MDM2, Pirh2 is thought to participate in an autoregulatory feedback loop that controls p53 function. We have previously reported that Pirh2 was overexpressed in human and murine lung cancers as compared to uninvolved lung tissue. Pirh2 increase could potentially cause degradation of wildtype p53 and reduce its tumor suppression function in the lung tumor cells. Since Pirh2 has been reported to be transactivated by p53, however, the mechanisms by which a high level of Pirh2 expression is maintained in tumor cells despite low level of wildtype p53 protein are unclear. In order to evaluate p53 involvement in the transactivation of Pirh2, we evaluated Pirh2, MDM2, p53 and p21 expression with Western blot analysis and real time PCR after {gamma} irradiation or cisplatin DNA damage treatment using human cancer cell lines containing wildtype (A549, MCF-7), mutant (H719) and null (H1299) p53. Surprisingly, Pirh2 expression was not affected by the presence of wildtype p53 in the cancer cells. In contrast, MDM2 was upregulated by wildtype p53 in A549 and MCF-7 cells and was absent from the H1299 and the H719 cells. We conclude that Pirh2 operates in a distinct manner from MDM2 in response to DNA damage in cancer cells. Pirh2 elevation in p53 null cells indicates the existence of additional molecular mechanisms for Pirh2 upregulation and suggests that p53 is not the sole target of Pirh2 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  5. Polynucleotide 3'-terminal phosphate modifications by RNA and DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; McReynolds, Larry A

    2014-11-28

    RNA and DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl ends of nucleic acids. In this work, we describe the ability of the thermophilic RNA ligase MthRnl from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum to recognize and modify the 3'-terminal phosphate of RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This ligase can use an RNA 3'p substrate to generate an RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or convert DNA3'p to ssDNA(3')pp(5')A. An RNA ligase from the Thermus scotoductus bacteriophage TS2126 and a predicted T4 Rnl1-like protein from Thermovibrio ammonificans, TVa, were also able to adenylate ssDNA 3'p. These modifications of RNA and DNA 3'-phosphates are similar to the activities of RtcA, an RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase. The initial step involves adenylation of the enzyme by ATP, which is then transferred to either RNA 3'p or DNA 3'p to generate the adenylated intermediate. For RNA (3')pp(5')A, the third step involves attack of the adjacent 2' hydroxyl to generate the RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate. These steps are analogous to those in classical 5' phosphate ligation. MthRnl and TS2126 RNA ligases were not able to modify a 3'p in nicked double-stranded DNA. However, T4 DNA ligase and RtcA can use 3'-phosphorylated nicks in double-stranded DNA to produce a 3'-adenylated product. These 3'-terminal phosphate-adenylated intermediates are substrates for deadenylation by yeast 5'Deadenylase. Our findings that classic ligases can duplicate the adenylation and phosphate cyclization activity of RtcA suggests that they have an essential role in metabolism of nucleic acids with 3'-terminal phosphates. PMID:25324547

  6. Functional domains of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Doherty, A J; Wigley, D B

    1999-01-01

    The crystal structure of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from bacteriophage T7 revealed that the protein comprised two structural domains. In order to investigate the biochemical activities of these domains, we have overexpressed them separately and purified them to homogeneity. The larger N-terminal domain retains adenylation and ligase activities, though both at a reduced level. The adenylation activity of the large domain is stimulated by the presence of the smaller domain, suggesting that a conformational change is required for adenylation in the full length protein. The DNA binding properties of the two fragments have also been studied. The larger domain is able to band shift both single and double-stranded DNA, while the smaller fragment is only able to bind to double-stranded DNA. These data suggest that the specificity of DNA ligases for nick sites in DNA is produced by a combination of these different DNA binding activities in the intact enzyme. PMID:9878388

  7. Defects in DNA ligase I trigger PCNA ubiquitylation at Lys 107.

    PubMed

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalysed by DNA ligase I (ref. 1). An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibits growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression, probably due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. As DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to address this issue. We uncovered a new pathway, which facilitates ubiquitylation at Lys 107 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Unlike ubiquitylation at Lys 164 of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, which triggers translesion synthesis, modification of Lys 107 is not dependent on the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) Rad6 (ref. 4) nor the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rad18 (ref. 5), but requires the E2 variant Mms2 (ref. 6) in conjunction with Ubc4 (ref. 7) and the E3 Rad5 (Refs 8, 9). Surprisingly, DNA ligase I-deficient S. cerevisiae cdc9-1 cells that carry a PCNAK107R mutation are inviable, because they cannot activate a robust DDR. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitylation of PCNA in response to DNA ligase I deficiency is conserved in humans, yet the lysine residue that is modified remains to be determined. We propose that PCNA ubiquitylation provides a 'DNA damage code' that allows cells to categorize different types of defects that arise during DNA replication. PMID:20010813

  8. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  9. Effective interaction studies for inhibition of DNA ligase protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, Periyasamy; Daisy, Pitchai

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important human pathogen for more than 100 years. It is among the most important causative agent of human infections in the twenty-first century. DNA ligase is the main protein responsible for the replication of S. aureus. In order to control the replication mechanism, DNA ligase is a successive drug target, hence we have chosen this protein for this study. We performed virtual screening using ZINC database for identification of potent inhibitor against DNA ligase. Based on the scoring methods, we have selected best five compounds from the ZINC database. In order to improve the accuracy, selected compounds were subjected into Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) docking, for which the results showed high docking score, compared to glide docking score. QPLD is more accurate as it includes charges in the scoring function, which was not available in the glide docking. Binding energy calculation results also indicated that selected compounds have good binding capacity with the target protein. In addition, these compounds on screening have good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity property. In this study, we identified few compounds that particularly work against DNA ligase protein, having better interaction phenomenon and it would help further the experimental analysis. PMID:25055026

  10. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  11. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  12. Evidence that a single DNA ligase is involved in replication and recombination in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, F; Roman, H

    1979-01-01

    The possible existence in yeast of different nuclear DNA ligase enzymes led us to ask whether induced recombination (gene conversion) involves the same ligase as that involved in DNA replication. The conditional cdc9 mutant is known to be defective, under restrictive conditions, in the rejoining of Okazaki fragments. We show here that under the same conditions, x-ray-induced convertants within the cdc9 locus are produced with kinetics indicating that most, if not all, of the conversion events require the participation of the cdc9-controlled ligase. Thus, the same DNA ligase is involved in DNA replication and in induced gene conversion. PMID:388446

  13. The ubiquitin ligase APC/CCdh1 puts the brakes on DNA-end resection

    PubMed Central

    Lafranchi, Lorenzo; Sartori, Alessandro A

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly deleterious lesions and their misrepair can promote genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer. DNA-end resection is a cell cycle-regulated mechanism that is required for the faithful repair of DSBs. We recently discovered that the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-Cdh1 (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase is responsible for the timely degradation of CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP), a key DNA-end resection factor, providing a new layer of regulation of DSB repair in human cells. PMID:27308488

  14. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures. PMID:26508902

  15. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions). PMID:25728944

  16. Nucleotide sequence, heterologous expression and novel purification of DNA ligase from Bacillus stearothermophilus(1).

    PubMed

    Brannigan, J A; Ashford, S R; Doherty, A J; Timson, D J; Wigley, D B

    1999-07-13

    The gene for DNA ligase (EC 6.5.1.2) from thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NCA1503 has been cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence determined. The ligase gene encodes a protein 670 amino acids in length. The gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the enzyme has been purified to homogeneity. Preliminary characterisation confirms that it is a thermostable, NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase. PMID:10407164

  17. Genetic effects of XRCC4 and ligase IV genes on human glioma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Keping; Qin, Juan; Zhao, Yumei; Zhang, Honglian

    2016-09-28

    Ligase IV and XRCC4 genes, important molecules in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, may play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. To detect their effects on the risk of human glioma, their gene expression differences between 110 human glioma tissues and 50 healthy brain tissues were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, two tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ligase IV and four SNPs in XRCC4 genes were genotyped in 317 glioma patients and 352 healthy controls. The association of glioma and ligase IV/XRCC4 was evaluated using methods for SNP, haplotype, and gene-gene interaction analysis. Compared with those in normal brain tissues, the relative gene expression levels of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly downregulated in glioma tissue (P=0.0017 and 0.0006, respectively). Single SNP analysis indicated that only rs10131 in ligase IV remained significantly associated with glioma (P=0.0036) after 10 000 permutation tests. Haplotype analysis showed that the haplotype profiles of ligase IV and XRCC4 were significantly different between glioma patients and healthy controls (P=0.004 and 3.13E-6, respectively). Finally, the gene-gene interaction analysis suggested that the three-locus model (rs1805388, rs10131, and rs2075685) was the best model for ligase IV and XRCC4 to have interaction effects on the risk of glioma. In conclusion, both ligase IV and XRCC4 may act in concert to modulate the development of glioma. PMID:27508978

  18. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4(-/-) cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ. PMID:26787905

  19. An African swine fever virus gene with homology to DNA ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J M; Kerr, S M; Smith, G L; Dixon, L K

    1992-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the SalI g region of the genome of a virulent isolate of ASFV (Malawi Lil 20/1) has revealed an open reading frame with the potential to encode a 48 kilodalton (kD) polypeptide which has significant homology with eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA ligases. This ASFV encoded gene also contains the putative active site region of DNA ligases including the lysine residue which is necessary for enzyme-adenylate adduct formation, but lacks the C-terminal basic region conserved in other eukaryotic DNA ligases. A novel [32P]-labelled potential DNA ligase-adenylate adduct of M(r) 45 kD was observed upon incubation of ASFV infected cell cytoplasmic extracts with alpha-[32P]-ATP and subsequent analysis of products by SDS/PAGE. These data together suggest that ASFV encodes its own DNA ligase. Images PMID:1614852

  20. Detection of low abundant mutations in DNA using single-molecule FRET and ligase detection reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Farquar, Hannah; Stryjewski, Wieslaw J.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.; Cheng, Yu-Wei; Barany, Francis

    2003-06-01

    New strategies for analyzing molecular signatures of disease states in real time using single pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) were developed to rapidly detect point mutations in unamplified genomic DNA (DNA diagnostics). The assay was carried out using allele-specific primers, which flanked the point mutation in the target gene fragment and were ligated using a thremostable ligase enzyme only when the genomic DNA carried this mutation (ligase detection reaction, LDR). We coupled LDR with spFRET to identify a single base mutation in codon 12 of a K-ras oncogene that has high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A simple diode laser-based fluorescence system capable of interrogating single fluorescent molecules undergoing FRET was used to detect photon bursts generated from the MB probes formed upon ligation. We demonstrated the ability to rapidly discriminate single base differences in heterogeneous populations having as little as 600 copies of human genomic DNA without PCR amplification. Single base difference in the K-ras gene was discriminated in less than 5 min at a frequency of 1 mutant DNA per 10 normals using only a single LDR thermal cycle of genomic DNA. Real time analyses of point mutations were also performed in PMMA microfluidic device.

  1. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Nair,P.; Nandakumar, J.; Smith, P.; Odell, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.

  2. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase. PMID:24900632

  3. Fragment-Based Discovery of 6-Azaindazoles As Inhibitors of Bacterial DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase. PMID:24900632

  4. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available. PMID:26762768

  5. Cernunnos interacts with the XRCC4 x DNA-ligase IV complex and is homologous to the yeast nonhomologous end-joining factor Nej1.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Malivert, Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Revy, Patrick; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre

    2006-05-19

    DNA double strand breaks are considered as the most harmful DNA lesions and are repaired by either homologous recombination or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). A new NHEJ factor, Cernunnos, has been identified, the defect of which leads to a severe immunodeficiency condition associated with microcephaly and other developmental defects in humans. This presentation is reminiscent to that of DNA-ligase IV deficiency and suggests a possible interplay between Cernunnos and the XRCC4 x DNA-ligase IV complex. We show here that Cernunnos physically interacts with the XRCC4 x DNA-ligase IV complex. Moreover, a combination of sensitive methods of sequence analysis revealed that Cernunnos can be associated with the XRCC4 family of proteins and that it corresponds to the genuine homolog of the yeast Nej1 protein. Altogether these results shed new lights on the last step, the DNA religation, of the NHEJ pathway. PMID:16571728

  6. Single-stranded DNA ligation and XLF-stimulated incompatible DNA end ligation by the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex: influence of terminal DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiafeng; Lu, Haihui; Tsai, Albert G; Schwarz, Klaus; Lieber, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    The double-strand DNA break repair pathway, non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ), is distinctive for the flexibility of its nuclease, polymerase and ligase activities. Here we find that the joining of ends by XRCC4-ligase IV is markedly influenced by the terminal sequence, and a steric hindrance model can account for this. XLF (Cernunnos) stimulates the joining of both incompatible DNA ends and compatible DNA ends at physiologic concentrations of Mg2+, but only of incompatible DNA ends at higher concentrations of Mg2+, suggesting charge neutralization between the two DNA ends within the ligase complex. XRCC4-DNA ligase IV has the distinctive ability to ligate poly-dT single-stranded DNA and long dT overhangs in a Ku- and XLF-independent manner, but not other homopolymeric DNA. The dT preference of the ligase is interesting given the sequence bias of the NHEJ polymerase. These distinctive properties of the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex explain important aspects of its in vivo roles. PMID:17717001

  7. Low levels of DNA ligases III and IV sufficient for effective NHEJ.

    PubMed

    Windhofer, Frank; Wu, Wenqi; Iliakis, George

    2007-11-01

    Cells of higher eukaryotes rejoin double strand breaks (DSBs) in their DNA predominantly by a non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway that utilizes the products of DNA-PKcs, Ku, LIG4, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos, Artemis as well as DNA polymerase lambda (termed D-NHEJ). Mutants with defects in these proteins remove a large proportion of DSBs from their genome utilizing an alternative pathway of NHEJ that operates as a backup (B-NHEJ). While D-NHEJ relies exclusively on DNA ligase IV, recent work points to DNA ligase III as a component of B-NHEJ. Here, we use RNA interference (RNAi) to further investigate the activity requirements for DNA ligase III and IV in the pathways of NHEJ. We report that 70-80% knock down of LIG3 expression has no detectable effect on DSB rejoining, either in D-NHEJ proficient cells, or in cells where D-NHEJ has been chemically or genetically compromised. Surprisingly, also LIG4 knock down has no effect on repair proficient cells, but inhibits DSB rejoining in a radiosensitive cell line with a hypomorphic LIG4 mutation that severely compromises its activity. The results suggest that complete coverage for D-NHEJ or B-NHEJ is afforded by very low ligase levels and demonstrate residual end joining by DNA ligase IV in cells of patients with mutations in LIG4. PMID:17492771

  8. DNA break-induced sumoylation is enabled by collaboration between a SUMO ligase and the ssDNA-binding complex RPA

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Inn; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Upon genome damage, large-scale protein sumoylation occurs from yeast to humans to promote DNA repair. Currently, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that, upon DNA break induction, the budding yeast SUMO ligase Siz2 collaborates with the ssDNA-binding complex RPA (replication protein A) to induce the sumoylation of recombination factors and confer damage resistance. Both RPA and nuclease-generated ssDNA promote Siz2-mediated sumoylation. Mechanistically, the conserved Siz2 interaction with RPA enables Siz2 localization to damage sites. These findings provide a molecular basis for recruiting SUMO ligases to the vicinity of their substrates to induce sumoylation upon DNA damage. PMID:26253534

  9. The C-Terminal Domain of Yeast PCNA Is Required for Physical And Functional Interactions With Cdc9 DNA Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, S.; Chapados, B.R.; Schmidt, K.H.; Kolodner, R.D.; Tainer, J.A.; Tomkinson, A.E.

    2007-07-13

    There is compelling evidence that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA sliding clamp, co-ordinates the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments during eukaryotic DNA replication. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of functional PCNA:ligase I interactions has been incomplete. Here we present the co-crystal structure of yeast PCNA with a peptide encompassing the conserved PCNA interaction motif of Cdc9, yeast DNA ligase I. The Cdc9 peptide contacts both the inter-domain connector loop (IDCL) and residues near the C-terminus of PCNA. Complementary mutational and biochemical results demonstrate that these two interaction interfaces are required for complex formation both in the absence of DNA and when PCNA is topologically linked to DNA. Similar to the functionally homologous human proteins, yeast RFC interacts with and inhibits Cdc9 DNA ligase whereas the addition of PCNA alleviates inhibition by RFC. Here we show that the ability of PCNA to overcome RFC-mediated inhibition of Cdc9 is dependent upon both the IDCL and the C-terminal interaction interfaces of PCNA. Together these results demonstrate the functional significance of the {beta}-zipper structure formed between the C-terminal domain of PCNA and Cdc9 and reveal differences in the interactions of FEN-1 and Cdc9 with the two PCNA interfaces that may contribute to the coordinated, sequential action of these enzymes.

  10. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of an archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirokazu; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2005-12-01

    Crystals of the archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus were obtained using 6.6%(v/v) ethanol as a precipitant and diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. DNA ligases seal single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA and their function is essential to maintain the integrity of the genome during various aspects of DNA metabolism, such as replication, excision repair and recombination. DNA-strand breaks are frequently generated as reaction intermediates in these events and the sealing of these breaks depends solely on the proper function of DNA ligase. Crystals of the archaeal DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus were obtained using 6.6%(v/v) ethanol as a precipitant and diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. They belong to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.1, b = 88.3, c = 63.4 Å, β = 108.9°. The asymmetric unit contains one ligase molecule.

  11. Discovery and design of DNA and RNA ligase inhibitors in infectious microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily known as DNA and RNA ligases carry out the enzymatic process of polynucleotide ligation. These guardians of genomic integrity share a three-step ligation mechanism, as well as common core structural elements. Both DNA and RNA ligases have experienced a surge of recent interest as chemotherapeutic targets for the treatment of a range of diseases, including bacterial infection, cancer, and the diseases caused by the protozoan parasites known as trypanosomes. Objective In this review, we will focus on efforts targeting pathogenic microorganisms; specifically, bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, which are promising broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, and ATP-dependent RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei, the species responsible for the devastating neurodegenerative disease, African sleeping sickness. Conclusion High quality crystal structures of both NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and the Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase have facilitated the development of a number of promising leads. For both targets, further progress will require surmounting permeability issues and improving selectivity and affinity. PMID:20354588

  12. XLF interacts with the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex to promote DNA nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Ahnesorg, Peter; Smith, Philippa; Jackson, Stephen P

    2006-01-27

    DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a predominant pathway of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells, and defects in it cause radiosensitivity at the cellular and whole-organism levels. Central to NHEJ is the protein complex containing DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4. By searching for additional XRCC4-interacting factors, we identified a previously uncharacterized 33 kDa protein, XRCC4-like factor (XLF, also named Cernunnos), that has weak sequence homology with XRCC4 and is predicted to display structural similarity to XRCC4. We show that XLF directly interacts with the XRCC4-Ligase IV complex in vitro and in vivo and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of XLF in human cell lines leads to radiosensitivity and impaired NHEJ. Furthermore, we establish that NHEJ-deficient 2BN cells derived from a radiosensitive and immune-deficient patient lack XLF due to an inactivating frameshift mutation in its gene, and that reintroduction of wild-type XLF into such cells corrects their radiosensitivity and NHEJ defects. XLF thus constitutes a novel core component of the mammalian NHEJ apparatus. PMID:16439205

  13. Structure of the DNA Ligase-Adenylate Intermediate: Lysine (ε-amino)-Linked Adenosine Monophosphoramidate*

    PubMed Central

    Gumport, Richard I.; Lehman, I. R.

    1971-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase-adenylate intermediate releases adenosine 5′-monophosphate linked to the ε-amino group of lysine by a phosphoamide bond. Measurements of the rate of hydroxylaminolysis of the ligase-adenylate provide further support for a phosphoamide linkage in the native enzyme. Lysine (ε-amino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate has also been isolated from the T4 phage-induced ligase-adenylate intermediate. These results indicate that an initial step of the DNA ligase reaction consists of the nucleophilic attack of the ε-amino group of a lysine residue of the enzyme on the adenylyl phosphorus of DPN or ATP that leads to the formation of enzyme-bound lysine (εamino)-linked adenosine monophosphoramidate. PMID:4944632

  14. Ubiquitin ligase activity of TFIIH and the transcriptional response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yuichiro; Masuda, Claudio A; Chang, Wei-Hau; Komori, Hirofumi; Wang, Dong; Hunter, Tony; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-04-15

    Core transcription factor (TF) IIH purified from yeast possesses an E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity, which resides, at least in part, in a RING finger (RNF) domain of the Ssl1 subunit. Yeast strains mutated in the Ssl1 RNF domain are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). This increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents does not reflect a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Rather, it correlates with reduced transcriptional induction of genes involved in DNA repair, suggesting that the E3 Ub ligase activity of TFIIH mediates the transcriptional response to DNA damage. PMID:15837426

  15. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leva, Valentina; Bione, Silvia; Carriero, Roberta; Mazzucco, Giulia; Palamidessi, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI) which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression. PMID:26151554

  16. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  17. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  18. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  19. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  20. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Bauer, Robert J.; Nichols, Nicole M.; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. PMID:26365241

  1. Synthesis of bisphosphonate derivatives of ATP by T4 DNA ligase, ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1) and other ligases.

    PubMed

    Günther Sillero, María A; de Diego, Anabel; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2008-05-15

    T4 DNA ligase and the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1), catalyze the synthesis of ATP beta,gamma-bisphosphonate derivatives. Concerning T4 DNA ligase: (i) etidronate (pC(OH)(CH(3))p) displaced the AMP moiety of the complex E-AMP in a concentration dependent manner; (ii) the K(m) values and the rate of synthesis k(cat) (s(-1)), determined for the following compounds were, respectively: etidronate, 0.73+/-0.09 mM and (70+/-10)x10(-3) s(-1); clodronate (pCCl(2)p), 0.08+/-0.01 mM and (4.1+/-0.3)x10(-3) s(-1); methylenebisphosphonate (pCH(2)p), 0.024+/-0.001 mM and (0.6+/-0.1)x10(-3) s(-1); tripolyphosphate (P(3)) (in the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate, p(4)A), 1.30+/-0.30 mM and (6.2+/-1.1)x10(-3) s(-1); (iii) in the presence of GTP and ATP, inhibition of the synthesis of Ap(4)G was observed with clodronate but not with pamidronate (pC(OH)(CH(2)-CH(2)-NH(3))p). Concerning the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1): methylenebisphosphonate was the only bisphosphonate, out of the ones tested, that served as substrate for the synthesis of an ATP derivative (K(m)=0.36+/-0.09 mM and k(cat)=0.15+/-0.02 s(-1)). None of the above bisphosphonates were substrates of the reaction catalyzed by luciferase or by acyl-CoA synthetase. The ability of acetyl-CoA synthetase to use methylenebisphosphonate as substrate depended on the commercial source of the enzyme. In our view this report widens our knowledge of the enzymes able to metabolize bisphosphonates, a therapeutic tool widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:18378215

  2. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  3. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Sara L.; Hansen, Rebecca K.; Wagner, Sebastian A.; van Cuijk, Loes; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Choudhary, Chunaram; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Marteijn, Jurgen A.; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), promoting their K48-linked ubiquitylation and degradation. Only a single mammalian STUbL, RNF4, has been identified. We show that human RNF111/Arkadia is a new STUbL, which used three adjacent SIMs for specific recognition of poly-SUMO2/3 chains, and used Ubc13–Mms2 as a cognate E2 enzyme to promote nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV)-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response. PMID:23751493

  4. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A; van Cuijk, Loes; van Belle, Gijsbert J; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Choudhary, Chunaram; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Marteijn, Jurgen A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2013-06-10

    Protein modifications by ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) play key roles in cellular signaling pathways. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) directly couple these modifications by selectively recognizing SUMOylated target proteins through SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs), promoting their K48-linked ubiquitylation and degradation. Only a single mammalian STUbL, RNF4, has been identified. We show that human RNF111/Arkadia is a new STUbL, which used three adjacent SIMs for specific recognition of poly-SUMO2/3 chains, and used Ubc13-Mms2 as a cognate E2 enzyme to promote nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV)-induced SUMOylation and ubiquitylation. Moreover, we show that RNF111 facilitated NER by regulating the recruitment of XPC to UV-damaged DNA. Our findings establish RNF111 as a new STUbL that directly links nonproteolytic ubiquitylation and SUMOylation in the DNA damage response. PMID:23751493

  5. Cell cycle-dependent localization and properties of a second mitochondrial DNA ligase in Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Krishna Murari; Hines, Jane C; Ray, Dan S

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA in kinetoplastid protozoa is contained in a single highly condensed structure consisting of thousands of minicircles and approximately 25 maxicircles. The disk-shaped structure is termed kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and is located in the mitochondrial matrix near the basal body. We have previously identified a mitochondrial DNA ligase (LIG kbeta) in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata that localizes to antipodal sites flanking the kDNA disk where several other replication proteins are localized. We describe here a second mitochondrial DNA ligase (LIG kalpha). LIG kalpha localizes to the kinetoplast primarily in cells that have completed mitosis and contain either a dividing kinetoplast or two newly divided kinetoplasts. Essentially all dividing or newly divided kinetoplasts show localization of LIG kalpha. The ligase is present on both faces of the kDNA disk and at a high level in the kinetoflagellar zone of the mitochondrial matrix. Cells containing a single nucleus show localization of the LIG kalpha to the kDNA but at a much lower frequency. The mRNA level of LIG kalpha varies during the cell cycle out of phase with that of LIG kbeta. LIG kalpha transcript levels are maximal during the phase when cells contain two nuclei, whereas LIG kbeta transcript levels are maximal during S phase. The LIG kalpha protein decays with a half-life of 100 min in the absence of protein synthesis. The periodic expression of the LIG kalpha transcript and the instability of the LIG kalpha protein suggest a possible role of the ligase in regulating minicircle replication. PMID:16400168

  6. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  7. DNA ligase IV as a new molecular target for temozolomide

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Natsuko; Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 ; Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Ohnishi, Ken; McKinnon, Peter J.; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2009-10-02

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is a methylating agent used in chemotherapy against glioblastoma. This work was designed to clarify details in repair pathways acting to remove DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by TMZ. Cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts were used which were deficient in DSB repair genes such as homologous recombination repair-related genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group 2 (XRCC2)and radiation sensitive mutant54 (Rad54), non-homologous end joining repair-related gene DNAligase IV (Lig4). Cell sensitivity to drug treatments was assessed using colony forming assays. The most effective molecular target which was correlated with TMZ cell sensitivity was Lig4. In addition, it was found that small interference RNAs (siRNA) for Lig4 efficiently enhanced cell lethality induced by TMZ in human glioblastoma A172 cells. These findings suggest that down regulation of Lig4 might provide a useful tool for cell sensitization during TMZ chemotherapy.

  8. Solving the SAT problem using a DNA computing algorithm based on ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Wang, Shi; Zhan, Aibin

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA computing algorithm based on a ligase chain reaction is demonstrated to solve an SAT problem. The proposed DNA algorithm can solve an n-variable m-clause SAT problem in m steps and the computation time required is O (3m+n). Instead of generating the full-solution DNA library, we start with an empty test tube and then generate solutions that partially satisfy the SAT formula. These partial solutions are then extended step by step by the ligation of new variables using Taq DNA ligase. Correct strands are amplified and false strands are pruned by a ligase chain reaction (LCR) as soon as they fail to satisfy the conditions. If we score and sort the clauses, we can use this algorithm to markedly reduce the number of DNA strands required throughout the computing process. In a computer simulation, the maximum number of DNA strands required was 2(0.48n) when n=50, and the exponent ratio varied inversely with the number of variables n and the clause/variable ratio m/n. This algorithm is highly space-efficient and error-tolerant compared to conventional brute-force searching, and thus can be scaled-up to solve large and hard SAT problems. PMID:17904730

  9. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface

    PubMed Central

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference - NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity. PMID:26964677

  10. Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening on the XRCC4/DNA Ligase IV Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchon, Grégory; Bombarde, Oriane; Trivedi, Mansi; Négrel, Aurélie; Inard, Cyril; Giudetti, Brigitte; Baltas, Michel; Milon, Alain; Modesti, Mauro; Czaplicki, Georges; Calsou, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    The association of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) with XRCC4 is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in humans. DSBs cytotoxicity is largely exploited in anticancer therapy. Thus, NHEJ is an attractive target for strategies aimed at increasing the sensitivity of tumors to clastogenic anticancer treatments. However the high affinity of the XRCC4/Lig4 interaction and the extended protein-protein interface make drug screening on this target particularly challenging. Here, we conducted a pioneering study aimed at interfering with XRCC4/Lig4 assembly. By Molecular Dynamics simulation using the crystal structure of the complex, we first delineated the Lig4 clamp domain as a limited suitable target. Then, we performed in silico screening of ~95,000 filtered molecules on this Lig4 subdomain. Hits were evaluated by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry, Saturation Transfer Difference - NMR spectroscopy and interaction assays with purified recombinant proteins. In this way we identified the first molecule able to prevent Lig4 binding to XRCC4 in vitro. This compound has a unique tripartite interaction with the Lig4 clamp domain that suggests a starting chemotype for rational design of analogous molecules with improved affinity.

  11. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  12. Discovery of bacterial NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: improvements in clearance of adenosine series.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huynh, Hoan; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Chen, Brendan; Albert, Robert; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rooney, Michael T; Hu, Haiqing; Newman, Joseph V; Mills, Scott D

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of clearance of adenosine inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. To reduce Cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic clearance, many strategies were explored; however, most modifications resulted in compounds with reduced antibacterial activity and/or unchanged total clearance. The alkyl side chains of the 2-cycloalkoxyadenosines were fluorinated, and compounds with moderate antibacterial activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rat and dog were identified. PMID:22154350

  13. The Inhibitory Effect of Non-Substrate and Substrate DNA on the Ligation and Self-Adenylylation Reactions Catalyzed by T4 DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Robert J.; Evans, Thomas C.; Lohman, Gregory J. S.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are essential both to in vivo replication, repair and recombination processes, and in vitro molecular biology protocols. Prior characterization of DNA ligases through gel shift assays has shown the presence of a nick site to be essential for tight binding between the enzyme and its dsDNA substrate, with no interaction evident on dsDNA lacking a nick. In the current study, we observed a significant substrate inhibition effect, as well as the inhibition of both the self-adenylylation and nick-sealing steps of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked, non-substrate dsDNA. Inhibition by non-substrate DNA was dependent only on the total DNA concentration rather than the structure; with 1 μg/mL of 40-mers, 75-mers, or circular plasmid DNA all inhibiting ligation equally. A >15-fold reduction in T4 DNA ligase self-adenylylation rate when in the presence of high non-nicked dsDNA concentrations was observed. Finally, EMSAs were utilized to demonstrate that non-substrate dsDNA can compete with nicked dsDNA substrates for enzyme binding. Based upon these data, we hypothesize the inhibition of T4 DNA ligase by non-nicked dsDNA is direct evidence for a two-step nick-binding mechanism, with an initial, nick-independent, transient dsDNA-binding event preceding a transition to a stable binding complex in the presence of a nick site. PMID:26954034

  14. Derivatized versions of ligase enzymes for constructing DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Christian, Allen T.; Tucker, James D.; Dzenitis, John M.; Papavasiliou, Alexandros P.

    2006-08-15

    A method of making very long, double-stranded synthetic poly-nucleotides. A multiplicity of short oligonucleotides is provided. The short oligonucleotides are sequentially hybridized to each other. Enzymatic ligation of the oligonucleotides provides a contiguous piece of PCR-ready DNA of predetermined sequence.

  15. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    PubMed

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments. PMID:26907780

  16. Human ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligase deficiency causes syndromic multisystem autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Naomi J; Molleston, Jean P; Strauss, Kevin A; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A; Squires, Robert H; Rider, Nicholas L; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Cummings, Oscar W; Morton, D Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G

    2010-03-12

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  17. Human ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Deficiency Causes Syndromic Multisystem Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Naomi J.; Molleston, Jean P.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Torres-Martinez, Wilfredo; Sherman, Eric A.; Squires, Robert H.; Rider, Nicholas L.; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R.; Cummings, Oscar W.; Morton, D. Holmes; Puffenberger, Erik G.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Absence of Itch E3 ubiquitin ligase in mice has been shown to cause severe autoimmune disease. Using autozygosity mapping in a large Amish kindred, we identified a linkage region on chromosome 20 and selected candidate genes for screening. We describe, in ten patients, identification of a mutation resulting in truncation of ITCH. These patients represent the first reported human phenotype associated with ITCH deficiency. These patients not only have multisystem autoimmune disease but also display morphologic and developmental abnormalities. This disorder underscores the importance of ITCH ubiquitin ligase in many cellular processes. PMID:20170897

  18. RNF4, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, promotes DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Galanty, Yaron; Belotserkovskaya, Rimma; Coates, Julia; Jackson, Stephen P

    2012-06-01

    Protein ubiquitylation and sumoylation play key roles in regulating cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that human RNF4, a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase, is recruited to DSBs in a manner requiring its SUMO interaction motifs, the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1 and PIAS4, and various DSB-responsive proteins. Furthermore, we reveal that RNF4 depletion impairs ubiquitin adduct formation at DSB sites and causes persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) associated with defective DSB repair, hypersensitivity toward DSB-inducing agents, and delayed recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. We establish that RNF4 regulates turnover of the DSB-responsive factors MDC1 and replication protein A (RPA) at DNA damage sites and that RNF4-depleted cells fail to effectively replace RPA by the homologous recombination factors BRCA2 and RAD51 on resected DNA. Consistent with previous data showing that RNF4 targets proteins to the proteasome, we show that the proteasome component PSMD4 is recruited to DNA damage sites in a manner requiring its ubiquitin-interacting domains, RNF4 and RNF8. Finally, we establish that PSMD4 binds MDC1 and RPA1 in a DNA damage-induced, RNF4-dependent manner and that PSMD4 depletion cause MDC1 and γH2AX persistence in irradiated cells. RNF4 thus operates as a DSB response factor at the crossroads between the SUMO and ubiquitin systems. PMID:22661229

  19. XLF-Cernunnos promotes DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 re-adenylation following ligation.

    PubMed

    Riballo, Enriqueta; Woodbine, Lisa; Stiff, Thomas; Walker, Sarah A; Goodarzi, Aaron A; Jeggo, Penny A

    2009-02-01

    XLF-Cernunnos (XLF) is a component of the DNA ligase IV-XRCC4 (LX) complex, which functions during DNA non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here, we use biochemical and cellular approaches to probe the impact of XLF on LX activities. We show that XLF stimulates adenylation of LX complexes de-adenylated by pyrophosphate or following LX decharging during ligation. XLF enhances LX ligation activity in an ATP-independent and dependent manner. ATP-independent stimulation can be attributed to enhanced end-bridging. Whilst ATP alone fails to stimulate LX ligation activity, addition of XLF and ATP promotes ligation in a manner consistent with XLF-stimulated readenylation linked to ligation. We show that XLF is a weakly bound partner of the tightly associated LX complex and, unlike XRCC4, is dispensable for LX stability. 2BN cells, which have little, if any, residual XLF activity, show a 3-fold decreased ability to repair DNA double strand breaks covering a range of complexity. These findings strongly suggest that XLF is not essential for NHEJ but promotes LX adenylation and hence ligation. We propose a model in which XLF, by in situ recharging DNA ligase IV after the first ligation event, promotes double stranded ligation by a single LX complex. PMID:19056826

  20. Comprehensive database of human E3 ubiquitin ligases: application to aquaporin-2 regulation.

    PubMed

    Medvar, Barbara; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Sarkar, Abhijit; Knepper, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is regulated in part via vasopressin-mediated changes in protein half-life that are in turn dependent on AQP2 ubiquitination. Here we addressed the question, "What E3 ubiquitin ligase is most likely to be responsible for AQP2 ubiquitination?" using large-scale data integration based on Bayes' rule. The first step was to bioinformatically identify all E3 ligase genes coded by the human genome. The 377 E3 ubiquitin ligases identified in the human genome, consisting predominant of HECT, RING, and U-box proteins, have been used to create a publically accessible and downloadable online database (https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/E3-ligases/). We also curated a second database of E3 ligase accessory proteins that included BTB domain proteins, cullins, SOCS-box proteins, and F-box proteins. Using Bayes' theorem to integrate information from multiple large-scale proteomic and transcriptomic datasets, we ranked these 377 E3 ligases with respect to their probability of interaction with AQP2. Application of Bayes' rule identified the E3 ligases most likely to interact with AQP2 as (in order of probability): NEDD4 and NEDD4L (tied for first), AMFR, STUB1, ITCH, ZFPL1. Significantly, the two E3 ligases tied for top rank have also been studied extensively in the reductionist literature as regulatory proteins in renal tubule epithelia. The concordance of conclusions from reductionist and systems-level data provides strong motivation for further studies of the roles of NEDD4 and NEDD4L in the regulation of AQP2 protein turnover. PMID:27199454

  1. Sister chromatid telomere fusions, but not NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal telomere fusions, occur independently of DNA ligases 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Liddiard, Kate; Ruis, Brian; Takasugi, Taylor; Harvey, Adam; Ashelford, Kevin E.; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Baird, Duncan M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres shorten with each cell division and can ultimately become substrates for nonhomologous end-joining repair, leading to large-scale genomic rearrangements of the kind frequently observed in human cancers. We have characterized more than 1400 telomere fusion events at the single-molecule level, using a combination of high-throughput sequence analysis together with experimentally induced telomeric double-stranded DNA breaks. We show that a single chromosomal dysfunctional telomere can fuse with diverse nontelomeric genomic loci, even in the presence of an otherwise stable genome, and that fusion predominates in coding regions. Fusion frequency was markedly increased in the absence of TP53 checkpoint control and significantly modulated by the cellular capacity for classical, versus alternative, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). We observed a striking reduction in inter-chromosomal fusion events in cells lacking DNA ligase 4, in contrast to a remarkably consistent profile of intra-chromosomal fusion in the context of multiple genetic knockouts, including DNA ligase 3 and 4 double-knockouts. We reveal distinct mutational signatures associated with classical NHEJ-mediated inter-chromosomal, as opposed to alternative NHEJ-mediated intra-chromosomal, telomere fusions and evidence for an unanticipated sufficiency of DNA ligase 1 for these intra-chromosomal events. Our findings have implications for mechanisms driving cancer genome evolution. PMID:26941250

  2. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    PubMed

    Dantuma, Nico P; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  3. Real Estate in the DNA Damage Response: Ubiquitin and SUMO Ligases Home in on DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Dantuma, Nico P.; Pfeiffer, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO are intimately connected with the cellular response to various types of DNA damage. A striking feature is the local accumulation of these proteinaceous post-translational modifications in the direct vicinity to DNA double-strand breaks, which plays a critical role in the formation of ionizing radiation-induced foci. The functional significance of these modifications is the coordinated recruitment and removal of proteins involved in DNA damage signaling and repair in a timely manner. The central orchestrators of these processes are the ubiquitin and SUMO ligases that are responsible for accurately tagging a broad array of chromatin and chromatin-associated proteins thereby changing their behavior or destination. Despite many differences in the mode of action of these enzymes, they share some striking features that are of direct relevance for their function in the DNA damage response. In this review, we outline the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the recruitment of ubiquitin and SUMO ligases and discuss the importance of chromatin proximity in this process. PMID:27148355

  4. Cullin3-KLHL15 ubiquitin ligase mediates CtIP protein turnover to fine-tune DNA-end resection

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Lorenza P.; Himmels, Sarah-Felicitas; Trenner, Anika; Walker, Christina; von Aesch, Christine; Eggenschwiler, Aline; Murina, Olga; Enchev, Radoslav I.; Peter, Matthias; Freire, Raimundo; Porro, Antonio; Sartori, Alessandro A.

    2016-01-01

    Human CtIP is a decisive factor in DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice by enabling DNA-end resection, the first step that differentiates homologous recombination (HR) from non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). To coordinate appropriate and timely execution of DNA-end resection, CtIP function is tightly controlled by multiple protein–protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Here, we identify the Cullin3 E3 ligase substrate adaptor Kelch-like protein 15 (KLHL15) as a new interaction partner of CtIP and show that KLHL15 promotes CtIP protein turnover via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A tripeptide motif (FRY) conserved across vertebrate CtIP proteins is essential for KLHL15-binding; its mutation blocks KLHL15-dependent CtIP ubiquitination and degradation. Consequently, DNA-end resection is strongly attenuated in cells overexpressing KLHL15 but amplified in cells either expressing a CtIP-FRY mutant or lacking KLHL15, thus impacting the balance between HR and NHEJ. Collectively, our findings underline the key importance and high complexity of CtIP modulation for genome integrity. PMID:27561354

  5. Cullin3-KLHL15 ubiquitin ligase mediates CtIP protein turnover to fine-tune DNA-end resection.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Lorenza P; Himmels, Sarah-Felicitas; Trenner, Anika; Walker, Christina; von Aesch, Christine; Eggenschwiler, Aline; Murina, Olga; Enchev, Radoslav I; Peter, Matthias; Freire, Raimundo; Porro, Antonio; Sartori, Alessandro A

    2016-01-01

    Human CtIP is a decisive factor in DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice by enabling DNA-end resection, the first step that differentiates homologous recombination (HR) from non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). To coordinate appropriate and timely execution of DNA-end resection, CtIP function is tightly controlled by multiple protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Here, we identify the Cullin3 E3 ligase substrate adaptor Kelch-like protein 15 (KLHL15) as a new interaction partner of CtIP and show that KLHL15 promotes CtIP protein turnover via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. A tripeptide motif (FRY) conserved across vertebrate CtIP proteins is essential for KLHL15-binding; its mutation blocks KLHL15-dependent CtIP ubiquitination and degradation. Consequently, DNA-end resection is strongly attenuated in cells overexpressing KLHL15 but amplified in cells either expressing a CtIP-FRY mutant or lacking KLHL15, thus impacting the balance between HR and NHEJ. Collectively, our findings underline the key importance and high complexity of CtIP modulation for genome integrity. PMID:27561354

  6. h-Goliath, paralog of GRAIL, is a new E3 ligase protein, expressed in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Guais, Adeline; Siegrist, Sylvie; Solhonne, Brigitte; Jouault, Hélène; Guellaën, Georges; Bulle, Frédérique

    2006-06-01

    In Drosophila, the RING finger protein d-Goliath was originally identified as a transcription factor involved in the embryo mesoderm formation [Bouchard, M.L., Cote, S., 1993. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein. Gene 125, 205-209]. In mouse, the m-Goliath mRNA level was shown to be increased in growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis of myeloid cells [Baker, S.J., Reddy, E.P., 2000. Cloning of murine G1RP, a novel gene related to Drosophila melanogaster g1. Gene 248, 33-40]. Due to its putative function of transcription factor in apoptosis, we cloned the human cDNA for h-Goliath and characterized the expression of the protein in blood and bone marrow cells. The human protein of 419 aa (44 kDa) contains a protease-associated domain, a transmembrane domain and a RING-H2 motif. This structure classifies h-Goliath as a new member of a human family of ubiquitin ligases with GRAIL (gene related to anergy in lymphocytes) as founder. This E3 ligase controls the development of T cell clonal anergy by ubiquitination [Anandasabapathy, N., Ford, G.S., Bloom, D., Holness, C., Paragas, V., Seroogy, C., Skrenta, H., Hollenhorst, M., Fathman, C.G., Soares, L., 2003. GRAIL: an E3 ubiquitin ligase that inhibits cytokine gene transcription is expressed in anergic CD4+ T cells. Immunity 18, 535-547]. In vitro ubiquitination studies support the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of h-Goliath. In human, the protein is expressed under 3 isoforms, a major one at 28 kDa and two others at 46 and 55 kDa. These proteins come from a common precursor (44 kDa) as we observed using in vitro transcription-translation. Using immunohistochemistry on blood or bone marrow smears, of healthy or leukemia samples, we found that the protein expression was restricted to the cytoplasm of progenitors and fully differentiated leukocyte populations. We did not observe any modification of h-Goliath expression or localization in leukemia. In these cells

  7. Segregation of relaxed replicated dimers when DNA ligase and DNA polymerase I are limited during oriC-specific DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, B R; Maier, P G; Greene, R S

    1989-01-01

    An in vitro Escherichia coli oriC-specific DNA replication system was used to investigate the DNA replication pathways of oriC plasmids. When this system was perturbed by the DNA ligase inhibitor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), alterations occurred in the initiation of DNA synthesis and processing of intermediates and DNA products. Addition of high concentrations of NMN soon after initiation resulted in the accumulation of open circular dimers (OC-OC). These dimers were decatenated to open circular monomers (form II or OC), which were then processed to closed circular supercoiled monomers (form I or CC) products. After a delay, limited ligation of the interlinked dimers (OC-OC to CC-OC and CC-CC) also occurred. Similar results were obtained with replication protein extracts from polA mutants. The presence of NMN before any initiation events took place prolonged the existence of nicked template DNA and promoted, without a lag period, limited incorporation into form II molecules. This DNA synthesis was nonspecific with respect to oriC, as judged by DnaA protein dependence, and presumably occurred at nicks in the template DNA. These results are consistent with oriC-specific initiation requiring closed supercoiled molecules dependent on DNA ligase activity. The results also show that decatenation of dimers occurs readily on nicked dimer and represents an efficient pathway for processing replication intermediates in vitro. Images PMID:2544556

  8. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-01-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells. Images PMID:1103146

  9. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work indicates that San1 is

  10. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a thermostable DNA ligase from the archaeon Thermococcus sibiricus.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T E; Bezsudnova, E Y; Dorokhov, B D; Slutskaya, E S; Polyakov, K M; Dorovatovskiy, P V; Ravin, N V; Skryabin, K G; Kovalchuk, M V; Popov, V O

    2012-02-01

    DNA ligases join single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA by catalyzing the formation of a phosphodiester bond between adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini. Their function is essential to maintain the integrity of the genome in DNA replication, recombination and repair. A recombinant ATP-dependent DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon Thermococcus sibiricus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were grown by vapour diffusion using the hanging-drop method with 17%(w/v) PEG 4000 and 8.5%(v/v) 2-propanol as precipitants. A diffraction experiment was performed with a single crystal, which diffracted X-rays to 3.0 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 58.590, b = 87.540, c = 126.300 Å. PMID:22297989

  11. Highly sensitive DNA methylation analysis at CpG resolution by surface-enhanced Raman scattering via ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Wee, Eugene J H; Trau, Matt

    2015-07-11

    Sensitive and accurate DNA methylation analysis at CpG resolution was demonstrated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) via ligase chain reaction (LCR). The method was sensitive to 10% changes in methylation and the accuracy of methylation estimates in cells and serum DNA validated with sequencing. The LCR/SERS approach may have broad applications as an alternative (epi)genetic detection method. PMID:26063626

  12. Structural Insight into the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Vif SOCS Box and Its Role in Human E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley,B.; Ehrlich, E.; Short, L.; Yu, Y.; Xiao, Z.; Yu, X.; Xiong, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virion infectivity factor (Vif) causes the proteasome-mediated destruction of human antiviral protein APOBEC3G by tethering it to a cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase composed of ElonginB, ElonginC, Cullin5, and Rbx2. It has been proposed that HIV Vif hijacks the E3 ligase through two regions within its C-terminal domain: a BC box region that interacts with ElonginC and a novel zinc finger motif that interacts with Cullin5. We have determined the crystal structure of the HIV Vif BC box in complex with human ElonginB and ElonginC. This complex presents direct structural evidence of the recruitment of a human ubiquitin ligase by a viral BC box protein that mimics the conserved interactions of cellular ubiquitin ligases. We further mutated conserved hydrophobic residues in a region downstream of the Vif BC box. These mutations demonstrate that this region, the Vif Cullin box, composes a third E3-ligase recruiting site critical for interaction between Vif and Cullin5. Furthermore, our homology modeling reveals that the Vif Cullin box and zinc finger motif may be positioned adjacent to the N terminus of Cullin5 for interaction with loop regions in the first cullin repeat of Cullin5.

  13. Homology Modeling of NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont of Brugia malayi and Its Drug Target Potential Using Dispiro-Cycloalkanones

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Nag, Jeetendra K.; Pandey, Jyoti; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Shah, Priyanka; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial nematodes maintain a mutualistic relationship with the endosymbiont Wolbachia. Depletion of Wolbachia produces profound defects in nematode development, fertility, and viability and thus has great promise as a novel approach for treating filarial diseases. NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is an essential enzyme of DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Therefore, in the present study, the antifilarial drug target potential of the NAD+-dependent DNA ligase of the Wolbachia symbiont of Brugia malayi (wBm-LigA) was investigated using dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds. Dispiro-cycloalkanone specifically inhibited the nick-closing and cohesive-end ligation activities of the enzyme without inhibiting human or T4 DNA ligase. The mode of inhibition was competitive with the NAD+ cofactor. Docking studies also revealed the interaction of these compounds with the active site of the target enzyme. The adverse effects of these inhibitors were observed on adult and microfilarial stages of B. malayi in vitro, and the most active compounds were further monitored in vivo in jirds and mastomys rodent models. Compounds 1, 2, and 5 had severe adverse effects in vitro on the motility of both adult worms and microfilariae at low concentrations. Compound 2 was the best inhibitor, with the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) (1.02 μM), followed by compound 5 (IC50, 2.3 μM) and compound 1 (IC50, 2.9 μM). These compounds also exhibited the same adverse effect on adult worms and microfilariae in vivo (P < 0.05). These compounds also tremendously reduced the wolbachial load, as evident by quantitative real-time PCR (P < 0.05). wBm-LigA thus shows great promise as an antifilarial drug target, and dispiro-cycloalkanone compounds show great promise as antifilarial lead candidates. PMID:25845868

  14. Sensitive detection of point mutation by electrochemiluminescence and DNA ligase-based assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huijuan; Wu, Baoyan

    2008-12-01

    The technology of single-base mutation detection plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and prognosis of genetic-based diseases. Here we reported a new method for the analysis of point mutations in genomic DNA through the integration of allele-specific oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) with magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection scheme. In this assay the tris(bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR) labeled probe and the biotinylated probe are designed to perfectly complementary to the mutant target, thus a ligation can be generated between those two probes by Taq DNA Ligase in the presence of mutant target. If there is an allele mismatch, the ligation does not take place. The ligation products are then captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of the TBR label. Results showed that the new method held a low detection limit down to 10 fmol and was successfully applied in the identification of point mutations from ASTC-α-1, PANC-1 and normal cell lines in codon 273 of TP53 oncogene. In summary, this method provides a sensitive, cost-effective and easy operation approach for point mutation detection.

  15. A single amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of Aeropyrum pernix DNA ligase impairs its interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kamigochi, Toru; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-09-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is known as a DNA sliding clamp that acts as a platform for the assembly of enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Previously, it was reported that a crenarchaeal PCNA formed a heterotrimeric structure, and that each PCNA subunit has distinct binding specificity to PCNA-binding proteins. Here we describe the PCNA-binding properties of a DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Based on our findings on the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase-PCNA interaction, we predicted that the aromatic residue, Phe132, in the DNA-binding domain of A. pernix DNA ligase (ApeLig) would play a critical role in binding to A. pernix PCNA (ApePCNA). Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that the ApeLig F132A mutant does not interact with an immobilized subunit of ApePCNA. Furthermore, we could not detect any stimulation of the ligation activity of the ApeLig F132A protein by ApePCNA in vitro. These results indicated that the phenylalanine, which is located in our predicted PCNA-binding region in ApeLig, has a critical role for the physical and functional interaction with ApePCNA. PMID:17487442

  16. Quantitative Lys-ϵ-Gly-Gly (diGly) Proteomics Coupled with Inducible RNAi Reveals Ubiquitin-mediated Proteolysis of DNA Damage-inducible Transcript 4 (DDIT4) by the E3 Ligase HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joel W.; Nagel, Jane; Hoving, Sjouke; Gerrits, Bertran; Bauer, Andreas; Thomas, Jason R.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Schirle, Markus; Luchansky, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted degradation of proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via the activities of E3 ubiquitin ligases regulates diverse cellular processes, and misregulation of these enzymes contributes to the pathogenesis of human diseases. One of the challenges facing the UPS field is to delineate the complete cohort of substrates for a particular E3 ligase. Advances in mass spectrometry and the development of antibodies recognizing the Lys-ϵ-Gly-Gly (diGly) remnant from ubiquitinated proteins following trypsinolysis have provided a tool to address this question. We implemented an inducible loss of function approach in combination with quantitative diGly proteomics to find novel substrates of HUWE1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase), an E3 ligase implicated in cancer and intellectual disabilities. diGly proteomics results led to the identification of DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) as a putative HUWE1 substrate. Cell-based assays demonstrated that HUWE1 interacts with and regulates ubiquitination and stability of DDIT4. Together these data suggest a model in which HUWE1 mediates DDIT4 proteasomal degradation. Our results demonstrate proof of concept that inducible knockdown of an E3 ligase in combination with diGly proteomics provides a potentially advantageous method for identifying novel E3 substrates that may help to identify candidates for therapeutic modulation in the UPS. PMID:25147182

  17. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin; Ding, Nan; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Jufang; Huang, Dejun

    2015-09-01

    Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1-8h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells. PMID:26201248

  18. The Structural Basis for Partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III-alpha BRCT-mediated Dimer Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    M Cuneo; S Gabel; J Krahn; M Ricker; R London

    2011-12-31

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  19. The structural basis for partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA ligase III-[alpha] BRCT-mediated dimer complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Gabel, Scott A.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Ricker, Melissa A.; London, Robert E.

    2011-11-17

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  20. The Human EKC/KEOPS Complex Is Recruited to Cullin2 Ubiquitin Ligases by the Human Tumour Antigen PRAME

    PubMed Central

    Costessi, Adalberto; Mahrour, Nawel; Sharma, Vikram; Stunnenberg, Rieka; Stoel, Marieke A.; Tijchon, Esther; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    The human tumour antigen PRAME (preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma) is frequently overexpressed during oncogenesis, and high PRAME levels are associated with poor clinical outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the molecular pathways in which PRAME is implicated are not well understood. We recently characterized PRAME as a BC-box subunit of a Cullin2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase. In this study, we mined the PRAME interactome to a deeper level and identified specific interactions with OSGEP and LAGE3, which are human orthologues of the ancient EKC/KEOPS complex. By characterizing biochemically the human EKC complex and its interactions with PRAME, we show that PRAME recruits a Cul2 ubiquitin ligase to EKC. Moreover, EKC subunits associate with PRAME target sites on chromatin. Our data reveal a novel link between the oncoprotein PRAME and the conserved EKC complex and support a role for both complexes in the same pathways. PMID:22912744

  1. C-terminal region of bacterial Ku controls DNA bridging, DNA threading and recruitment of DNA ligase D for double strand breaks repair

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Stephen; Baconnais, Sonia; Roblin, Pierre; Nicolas, Pierre; Drevet, Pascal; Simonson, Héloïse; Piétrement, Olivier; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Le Cam, Eric; Noirot, Philippe; Lecointe, François

    2016-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining is a ligation process repairing DNA double strand breaks in eukaryotes and many prokaryotes. The ring structured eukaryotic Ku binds DNA ends and recruits other factors which can access DNA ends through the threading of Ku inward the DNA, making this protein a key ingredient for the scaffolding of the NHEJ machinery. However, this threading ability seems unevenly conserved among bacterial Ku. As bacterial Ku differ mainly by their C-terminus, we evaluate the role of this region in the loading and the threading abilities of Bacillus subtilis Ku and the stimulation of the DNA ligase LigD. We identify two distinct sub-regions: a ubiquitous minimal C-terminal region and a frequent basic C-terminal extension. We show that truncation of one or both of these sub-regions in Bacillus subtilis Ku impairs the stimulation of the LigD end joining activity in vitro. We further demonstrate that the minimal C-terminus is required for the Ku-LigD interaction, whereas the basic extension controls the threading and DNA bridging abilities of Ku. We propose that the Ku basic C-terminal extension increases the concentration of Ku near DNA ends, favoring the recruitment of LigD at the break, thanks to the minimal C-terminal sub-region. PMID:26961308

  2. The α-thio and/or β-γ-hypophosphate analogs of ATP as cofactors of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Roza; Korczynski, Dariusz; Nawrot, Barbara; Stec, Wojciech J; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2016-08-01

    T4 DNA ligase is one of the most commonly used enzymes for in vitro molecular research and a useful model for testing the ligation mechanism of ATP-dependent DNA ligation. To better understand the influence of phosphate group modifications in the ligation process, a series of ATP analogs were tested as cofactors. P-diastereomers of newly developed β,γ-hypo-ATPαS (thio) and β,γ-hypo-ATP (oxo) were synthesized and their activity was compared to ATPαS and their natural precursors. The evaluation of presented ATP analogs revealed the importance of the α-phosphate stereogenic center in ATPαS for the T4 DNA ligase activity and sheds new light on the interaction between ATP-dependent DNA ligases and cofactors. PMID:27337226

  3. Human DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Wood, R D; Mitchell, M; Sgouros, J; Lindahl, T

    2001-02-16

    Cellular DNA is subjected to continual attack, both by reactive species inside cells and by environmental agents. Toxic and mutagenic consequences are minimized by distinct pathways of repair, and 130 known human DNA repair genes are described here. Notable features presently include four enzymes that can remove uracil from DNA, seven recombination genes related to RAD51, and many recently discovered DNA polymerases that bypass damage, but only one system to remove the main DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light. More human DNA repair genes will be found by comparison with model organisms and as common folds in three-dimensional protein structures are determined. Modulation of DNA repair should lead to clinical applications including improvement of radiotherapy and treatment with anticancer drugs and an advanced understanding of the cellular aging process. PMID:11181991

  4. Redundant function of DNA ligase 1 and 3 in alternative end-joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Meek, Katheryn; Yu, Kefei

    2016-02-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammals and resolves the DSBs generated during both V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes and class switch recombination (CSR) in antigen-stimulated B cells. In contrast to the absolute requirement for NHEJ to resolve DSBs associated with V(D)J recombination, DSBs associated with CSR can be resolved in NHEJ-deficient cells (albeit at a reduced level) by a poorly defined alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. Deletion of DNA ligase IV (Lig4), a core component of the NHEJ pathway, reduces CSR efficiency in a mouse B-cell line capable of robust cytokine-stimulated CSR in cell culture. Here, we report that CSR levels are not further reduced by deletion of either of the two remaining DNA ligases (Lig1 and nuclear Lig3) in Lig4(-/-) cells. We conclude that in the absence of Lig4, Lig1, and Lig3 function in a redundant manner in resolving switch region DSBs during CSR. PMID:26787901

  5. Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase: characterization of its kinetics of catalysis and development of a high-throughput screening compatible chemiluminescent hybridization protection assay

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    DNA ligases are key enzymes involved in the repair and replication of DNA. Prokaryotic DNA ligases uniquely use NAD+ as the adenylate donor during catalysis, whereas eukaryotic enzymes use ATP. This difference in substrate specificity makes the bacterial enzymes potential targets for therapeutic intervention. We have developed a homogeneous chemiluminescence-based hybridization protection assay for Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase that uses novel acridinium ester technology and demonstrate that it is an alternative to the commonly used radiometric assays for ligases. The assay has been used to determine a number of kinetic constants for S. aureus DNA ligase catalysis. These included the Km values for NAD+ (2.75±0.1 μM) and the acridinium-ester-labelled DNA substrate (2.5±0.2 nM). A study of the pH-dependencies of kcat, Km and kcat/Km has revealed values of kinetically influential ionizations within the enzyme–substrate complexes (kcat) and free enzyme (kcat/Km). In each case, the curves were shown to be composed of one kinetically influential ionization, for kcat, pKa=6.6±0.1 and kcat/Km, pKa=7.1±0.1. Inhibition characteristics of the enzyme against two Escherichia coli DNA ligase inhibitors have also been determined with IC50 values for these being 3.30±0.86 μM for doxorubicin and 1.40±0.07 μM for chloroquine diphosphate. The assay has also been successfully miniaturized to a sufficiently low volume to allow it to be utilized in a high-throughput screen (384-well format; 20 μl reaction volume), enabling the assay to be used in screening campaigns against libraries of compounds to discover leads for further drug development. PMID:15283677

  6. Concerted action of the ubiquitin-fusion degradation protein 1 (Ufd1) and Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) in the DNA-damage response.

    PubMed

    Køhler, Julie Bonne; Jørgensen, Maria Louise Mønster; Beinoraité, Gabriele; Thorsen, Michael; Thon, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes many players in the DNA-damage response (DDR) catalyze protein sumoylation or ubiquitylation. Emphasis has been placed on how these modifications orchestrate the sequential recruitment of repair factors to sites of DNA damage or stalled replication forks. Here, we shed light on a pathway in which sumoylated factors are eliminated through the coupled action of Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) and the ubiquitin-fusion degradation protein 1 (Ufd1). Ufd1 is a subunit of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 complex implicated in the sorting of ubiquitylated substrates for degradation by the proteasome. We find that in fission yeast, Ufd1 interacts physically and functionally with the Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Rfp1, homologous to human RNF4, and with the Sumo E3 ligase Pli1, homologous to human PIAS1. Deleting a C-terminal domain of Ufd1 that mediates the interaction of Ufd1 with Rfp1, Pli1, and Sumo (ufd1ΔCt(213-342) ) lead to an accumulation of high-molecular-weight Sumo conjugates and caused severe genomic instabilities. The spectrum of sensitivity of ufd1ΔCt(213-342) cells to genotoxins, the epistatic relationships of ufd1ΔCt(213-342) with mutations in DNA repair factors, and the localization of the repair factor Rad22 in ufd1ΔCt(213-342) cells point to ufd1ΔCt(213-342) cells accumulating aberrant structures during replication that require homologous recombination (HR) for their repair. We present evidence that HR is however often not successful in ufd1ΔCt(213-342) cells and we identify Rad22 as one of the high-molecular-weight conjugates accumulating in the ufd1ΔCt(213-342) mutant consistent with Rad22 being a STUbL/Ufd1 substrate. Suggesting a direct role of Ufd1 in the processing of Sumo-conjugates, Ufd1 formed nuclear foci colocalizing with Sumo during the DDR, and Sumo-conjugates accumulated in foci in the ufd1ΔCt(213-342) mutant. Broader functional relationships between Ufd1 and STUbLs conceivably affect numerous cellular processes

  7. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H F; Fousteri, Maria I

    2007-07-20

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase IIIalpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensable for ligation of NER-induced breaks and repair of UV lesions in quiescent cells. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that two distinct complexes differentially carry out gap filling in NER. XRCC1-Lig3 and DNA polymerase delta colocalize and interact with NER components in a UV- and incision-dependent manner throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase epsilon are recruited to UV-damage sites only in proliferating cells. This study reveals an unexpected and key role for XRCC1-Lig3 in maintenance of genomic integrity by NER in both dividing and nondividing cells and provides evidence for cell-cycle regulation of NER-mediated repair synthesis in vivo. PMID:17643379

  8. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new

  9. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Enhances E1A Functional Activity.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins have long been known as the central regulators of virus infection as well as the major source of adenovirus oncogenic potential. Not only do they activate expression of other early viral genes, they make viral replication possible in terminally differentiated cells, at least in part, by binding to the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor family of proteins to activate E2F transcription factors and thus viral and cellular DNA synthesis. We demonstrate in an accompanying article (F. Dallaire et al., mSphere 1:00014-15, 2016) that the human adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase complex formed by the E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic E1A activation of E2F transactivation factors. Acting alone in the absence of E1A, the Ad5 E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K was shown to bind E2F, disrupt E2F/Rb complexes, and induce hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis, as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny. While these activities were significantly lower than those exhibited by E1A, we report here that this ligase complex appeared to enhance E1A activity in two ways. First, the E4orf6/E1B55K complex was shown to stabilize E1A proteins, leading to higher levels in infected cells. Second, the complex was demonstrated to enhance the activation of E2F by E1A products. These findings indicated a new role of the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase complex in promoting adenovirus replication. IMPORTANCE Following our demonstration that adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins is able to mimic the activation of E2F by E1A, we conducted a series of studies to determine if this complex might also promote the ability of E1A to do so. We found that the complex both significantly stabilizes E1A proteins and also enhances their ability to activate E2F. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for

  10. Efficient synthesis of stably adenylated DNA and RNA adapters for microRNA capture using T4 RNA ligase 1.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunke; Liu, Kelvin J; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA profiling methods have become increasingly important due to the rapid rise of microRNA in both basic and translational sciences. A critical step in many microRNA profiling assays is adapter ligation using pre-adenylated adapters. While pre-adenylated adapters can be chemically or enzymatically prepared, enzymatic adenylation is preferred due to its ease and high yield. However, previously reported enzymatic methods either require tedious purification steps or use thermostable ligases that can generate side products during the subsequent ligation step. We have developed a highly efficient, template- and purification-free, adapter adenylation method using T4 RNA ligase 1. This method is capable of adenylating large amounts of adapter at ~100% efficiency and can efficiently adenylate both DNA and RNA bases. We find that the adenylation reaction speed can differ between DNA and RNA and between terminal nucleotides, leading to bias if reactions are not allowed to run to completion. We further find that the addition of high PEG levels can effectively suppress these differences. PMID:26500066

  11. The DNA Ligase IV Syndrome R278H Mutation Impairs B Lymphopoiesis via Error-Prone Nonhomologous End-Joining.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Welner, Robert S; Chan, Mei-Yee; Troppito, Logan; Staber, Philipp B; Tenen, Daniel G; Yan, Catherine T

    2016-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA repair protein DNA ligase IV (LIG4) lead to immunodeficiency with varying severity. In this study, using a murine knock-in model, we investigated the mechanisms underlying abnormalities in class switch recombination (CSR) associated with the human homozygous Lig4 R278H mutation. Previously, we found that despite the near absence of Lig4 end-ligation activity and severely reduced mature B cell numbers, Lig4(R278H/R278H) (Lig4(R/R)) mice exhibit only a partial CSR block, producing near normal IgG1 and IgE but substantially reduced IgG3, IgG2b, and IgA serum levels. In this study, to address the cause of these abnormalities, we assayed CSR in Lig4(R/R) B cells generated via preassembled IgH and IgK V region exons (HL). This revealed that Lig4(R278H) protein levels while intact exhibited a higher turnover rate during activation of switching to IgG3 and IgG2b, as well as delays in CSR kinetics associated with defective proliferation during activation of switching to IgG1 and IgE. Activated Lig4(R/R)HL B cells consistently accumulated high frequencies of activation-induced cytidine deaminase-dependent IgH locus chromosomal breaks and translocations and were more prone to apoptosis, effects that appeared to be p53-independent, as p53 deficiency did not markedly influence these events. Importantly, NHEJ instead of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) was revealed as the predominant mechanism catalyzing robust CSR. Defective CSR was linked to failed NHEJ and residual A-EJ access to unrepaired double-strand breaks. These data firmly demonstrate that Lig4(R278H) activity renders NHEJ to be more error-prone, and they predict increased error-prone NHEJ activity and A-EJ suppression as the cause of the defective B lymphopoiesis in Lig4 patients. PMID:26608917

  12. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E; Blanchette, Paola

    2016-01-01

    The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  13. The Human Adenovirus Type 5 E4orf6/E1B55K E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Can Mimic E1A Effects on E2F

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Frédéric; Schreiner, Sabrina; Blair, G. Eric; Dobner, Thomas; Branton, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human adenovirus E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase is well known to promote viral replication by degrading an increasing number of cellular proteins that inhibit the efficient production of viral progeny. We report here a new function of the adenovirus 5 (Ad5) viral ligase complex that, although at lower levels, mimics effects of E1A products on E2F transcription factors. When expressed in the absence of E1A, the E4orf6 protein in complex with E1B55K binds E2F, disrupts E2F/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) complexes, and induces hyperphosphorylation of Rb, leading to induction of viral and cellular DNA synthesis as well as stimulation of early and late viral gene expression and production of viral progeny of E1/E3-defective adenovirus vectors. These new and previously undescribed functions of the E4orf6/E1B55K E3 ubiquitin ligase could play an important role in promoting the replication of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE During the course of work on the adenovirus E3 ubiquitin ligase formed by the viral E4orf6 and E1B55K proteins, we found, very surprisingly, that expression of these species was sufficient to permit low levels of replication of an adenovirus vector lacking E1A, the central regulator of infection. E1A products uncouple E2F transcription factors from Rb repression complexes, thus stimulating viral gene expression and cell and viral DNA synthesis. We found that the E4orf6/E1B55K ligase mimics these functions. This finding is of significance because it represents an entirely new function for the ligase in regulating adenovirus replication. PMID:27303679

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD regulates S-phase and G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Marcia A; Saunders, Darren N; Henderson, Michelle J; Clancy, Jennifer L; Russell, Amanda J; Lehrbach, Gillian; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Watts, Colin K W; Sutherland, Robert L

    2007-12-15

    The cellular response to DNA damage is critical for maintenance of genomic integrity and inhibition of tumorigenesis. Mutations or aberrant expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD have been observed in a number of carcinomas and we recently reported that EDD modulates activity of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, CHK2. Here, we demonstrate that EDD is necessary for G(1)/S and intra S phase DNA damage checkpoint activation and for the maintenance of G(2)/M arrest after double strand DNA breaks. Defective checkpoint activation in EDD-depleted cells led to radio-resistant DNA synthesis, premature entry into mitosis, accumulation of polyploid cells, and cell death via mitotic catastrophe. In addition to decreased CHK2 activation in EDD-depleted cells, the expression of several key cell cycle mediators including Cdc25A/C and E2F1 was altered, suggesting that these checkpoint defects may be both CHK2-dependent and -independent. These data support a role for EDD in the maintenance of genomic stability, emphasising the potential importance of dysregulated EDD expression and/or function in the evolution of cancer. PMID:18073532

  15. Identification of a conserved 5'-dRP lyase activity in bacterial DNA repair ligase D and its potential role in base excision repair.

    PubMed

    de Ory, Ana; Nagler, Katja; Carrasco, Begoña; Raguse, Marina; Zafra, Olga; Moeller, Ralf; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-02-29

    Bacillus subtilis is one of the bacterial members provided with a nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) system constituted by the DNA-binding Ku homodimer that recruits the ATP-dependent DNA Ligase D (BsuLigD) to the double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) ends. BsuLigD has inherent polymerization and ligase activities that allow it to fill the short gaps that can arise after realignment of the broken ends and to seal the resulting nicks, contributing to genome stability during the stationary phase and germination of spores. Here we show that BsuLigD also has an intrinsic 5'-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate (dRP) lyase activity located at the N-terminal ligase domain that in coordination with the polymerization and ligase activities allows efficient repairing of 2'-deoxyuridine-containing DNA in an in vitro reconstituted Base Excision Repair (BER) reaction. The requirement of a polymerization, a dRP removal and a final sealing step in BER, together with the joint participation of BsuLigD with the spore specific AP endonuclease in conferring spore resistance to ultrahigh vacuum desiccation suggest that BsuLigD could actively participate in this pathway. We demonstrate the presence of the dRP lyase activity also in the homolog protein from the distantly related bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, allowing us to expand our results to other bacterial LigDs. PMID:26826709

  16. Identification of a conserved 5′-dRP lyase activity in bacterial DNA repair ligase D and its potential role in base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ory, Ana; Nagler, Katja; Carrasco, Begoña; Raguse, Marina; Zafra, Olga; Moeller, Ralf; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is one of the bacterial members provided with a nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) system constituted by the DNA-binding Ku homodimer that recruits the ATP-dependent DNA Ligase D (BsuLigD) to the double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) ends. BsuLigD has inherent polymerization and ligase activities that allow it to fill the short gaps that can arise after realignment of the broken ends and to seal the resulting nicks, contributing to genome stability during the stationary phase and germination of spores. Here we show that BsuLigD also has an intrinsic 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphate (dRP) lyase activity located at the N-terminal ligase domain that in coordination with the polymerization and ligase activities allows efficient repairing of 2′-deoxyuridine-containing DNA in an in vitro reconstituted Base Excision Repair (BER) reaction. The requirement of a polymerization, a dRP removal and a final sealing step in BER, together with the joint participation of BsuLigD with the spore specific AP endonuclease in conferring spore resistance to ultrahigh vacuum desiccation suggest that BsuLigD could actively participate in this pathway. We demonstrate the presence of the dRP lyase activity also in the homolog protein from the distantly related bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, allowing us to expand our results to other bacterial LigDs. PMID:26826709

  17. TRIM24 Is a p53-Induced E3-Ubiquitin Ligase That Undergoes ATM-Mediated Phosphorylation and Autodegradation during DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Abhinav K.; Allton, Kendra; Duncan, Aundrietta D.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 protects cells from genomic insults and is a target of mutation in more than 50% of human cancers. Stress-mediated modification and increased stability of p53 promote p53 interaction with chromatin, which results in transcription of target genes that are critical for the maintenance of genomic integrity. We recently discovered that TRIM24, an E3-ubiquitin ligase, ubiquitinates and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of p53. Here, we show that TRIM24 is destabilized by ATM-mediated phosphorylation of TRIM24S768 in response to DNA damage, which disrupts TRIM24-p53 interactions and promotes the degradation of TRIM24. Transcription of TRIM24 is directly induced by damage-activated p53, which binds p53 response elements and activates expression of TRIM24. Newly synthesized TRIM24 interacts with phosphorylated p53 to target it for degradation and termination of the DNA damage response. These studies indicate that TRIM24, like MDM2, controls p53 levels in an autoregulatory feedback loop. However, unlike MDM2, TRIM24 also targets activated p53 to terminate p53-regulated response to DNA damage. PMID:24820418

  18. EM Structure of human APC/CCDH1-EMI1 reveals multimodal mechanism of E3 ligase shutdown

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Jeremiah J.; Brown, Nicholas G.; Petzold, Georg; Watson, Edmond R.; Grace, Christy R. R.; Nourse, Amanda; Jarvis, Marc A.; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Peters, Jan-Michael; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2013-01-01

    The Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) is a ~1.5 MDa multiprotein E3 ligase enzyme that regulates cell division by promoting timely ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Inhibition of human APC/CCDH1 during interphase by Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 (EMI1) is essential for accurate coordination of DNA synthesis and mitosis. Here, we report a hybrid structural approach involving NMR, electron microscopy, and enzymology, which reveal that EMI1’s 143-residue C-terminal domain inhibits multiple APC/CCDH1 functions. The intrinsically disordered D-box, Linker, and Tail elements, together with a structured zinc-binding domain, bind distinct regions of APC/CCDH1 to synergistically both block the substrate-binding site and inhibit ubiquitin chain elongation. The functional importance of intrinsic structural disorder is explained by enabling a small inhibitory domain to bind multiple sites to shut down multiple functions of a “molecular machine” nearly 100 times its size. PMID:23708605

  19. Synthesis of ATP derivatives of compounds of the mevalonate pathway (isopentenyl di- and triphosphate; geranyl di- and triphosphate, farnesyl di- and triphosphate, and dimethylallyl diphosphate) catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase and other ligases Potential relationship with the effect of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sillero, Maria A Günther; de Diego, Anabel; Tavares, Janeth E F; Silva, Joana A D Catanho da; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2009-08-15

    Compounds of the mevalonate pathway containing a terminal di- or triphosphate (mev-PP or mev-PPP) were tested as substrates of several enzyme ligases (T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase, firefly luciferase and other ligases) for the synthesis of ATP derivatives of the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA type. T4 RNA ligase, in the presence of ATP and the substrates: geranyl, farnesyl or isopentenyl triphosphates, and geranyl, farnesyl, dimethylallyl or isopentenyl diphosphates, all at 0.3 mM concentration, catalyzed the synthesis of the corresponding ATP derivatives at a relative rate of activity of: 7.6+/-1.4 mU/mg or 100%; 39%; 42%; 24%; 18%; 12% and 6%, respectively. Inhibition (%) of the synthesis by excess of substrate (0.8 mM vs. 0.3 mM) was observed with farnesyl diphosphate (99%); farnesyl triphosphate (96%) and geranyl triphosphate (32%). V(max), K(m), K(cat) and K(cat)/K(m) values were also determined. The K(cat)/K(m) values calculated were for: farnesyl triphosphate, 166; geranyl triphosphate, 52.2; farnesyl diphosphate, 12.1; geranyl diphosphate, 8.6; isopentenyl triphosphate, 6.7; dimethylallyl diphosphate, 3.1 and isopentenyl diphosphate, 0.9. Similar results were obtained with T4 DNA ligase. The above-mentioned compounds were also substrates of firefly luciferase synthesizing the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA derivatives. In our hands, neither the acyl- or acetyl-CoA synthetases nor the ubiquiting activating enzyme (E1) catalyzed the synthesis of ATP derivatives of these compounds. The results here presented could be related with the mechanism of action of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts or tumor cells. PMID:19414000

  20. Cdc48 and a ubiquitin ligase drive disassembly of the CMG helicase at the end of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    De Piccoli, Giacomo; Labib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome replication is initiated by a universal mechanism in eukaryotic cells, involving the assembly and activation at replication origins of the CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) DNA helicase, which is essential for the progression of replication forks. Disassembly of CMG is likely to be a key regulated step at the end of chromosome replication, but the mechanism was unknown until now. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase known as SCFDia2 promotes ubiquitylation of CMG during the final stages of chromosome replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Cdc48/p97 segregase then associates with ubiquitylated CMG, leading rapidly to helicase disassembly. These findings indicate that the end of chromosome replication in eukaryotes is controlled in a similarly complex fashion to the much-better-characterized initiation step. PMID:25342810

  1. Characterization of Mycobacterium smegmatis PolD2 and PolD1 as RNA/DNA polymerases homologous to the POL domain of bacterial DNA ligase D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; Bhattarai, Hitesh; Yan, Han-Guang; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacteria exploit nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) to repair DNA double-strand breaks. The core NHEJ machinery comprises the homodimeric DNA end-binding protein Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD), a modular enzyme composed of a C-terminal ATP-dependent ligase domain (LIG), a central 3’-phosphoesterase domain (PE), and an N-terminal polymerase domain (POL). LigD POL is proficient at adding templated and nontemplated deoxynucleotide and ribonucleotides to DNA ends in vitro and is the catalyst in vivo of unfaithful NHEJ events involving nontemplated single-nucleotide additions to blunt DSB ends. Here, we identify two mycobacterial proteins, PolD1 and PolD2, as stand-alone homologs of the LigD POL domain. Biochemical characterization of PolD1 and PolD2 shows that they resemble LigD POL in their monomeric quaternary structures, their ability to add templated and nontemplated nucleotides to primer-templates and blunt ends, and their preference for rNTPs versus dNTPs. Deletion of polD1, polD2, or both, in an M. smegmatis strain carrying an inactivating mutation in LigD POL failed to reveal a role for PolD1 or PolD2 in templated nucleotide additions during NHEJ of 5’-overhang DSBs or in clastogen resistance. Whereas our results document the existence and characteristics of new stand-alone members of the LigD POL family of RNA/DNA polymerases, they imply that other polymerases can perform fill-in synthesis during mycobacterial NHEJ. PMID:23198659

  2. XRCC4/XLF Interaction Is Variably Required for DNA Repair and Is Not Required for Ligase IV Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sunetra; de Melo, Abinadabe J.; Xu, Yao; Tadi, Satish K.; Négrel, Aurélie; Hendrickson, Eric; Modesti, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The classic nonhomologous end-joining (c-NHEJ) pathway is largely responsible for repairing double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. XLF stimulates the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex by an unknown mechanism. XLF interacts with XRCC4 to form filaments of alternating XRCC4 and XLF dimers that bridge DNA ends in vitro, providing a mechanism by which XLF might stimulate ligation. Here, we characterize two XLF mutants that do not interact with XRCC4 and cannot form filaments or bridge DNA in vitro. One mutant is fully sufficient in stimulating ligation by XRCC4/Lig4 in vitro; the other is not. This separation-of-function mutant (which must function as an XLF homodimer) fully complements the c-NHEJ deficits of some XLF-deficient cell strains but not others, suggesting a variable requirement for XRCC4/XLF interaction in living cells. To determine whether the lack of XRCC4/XLF interaction (and potential bridging) can be compensated for by other factors, candidate repair factors were disrupted in XLF- or XRCC4-deficient cells. The loss of either ATM or the newly described XRCC4/XLF-like factor, PAXX, accentuates the requirement for XLF. However, in the case of ATM/XLF loss (but not PAXX/XLF loss), this reflects a greater requirement for XRCC4/XLF interaction. PMID:26100018

  3. Circadian control of XPA and excision repair of cisplatin-DNA damage by cryptochrome and HERC2 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Hong; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Reardon, Joyce T; Sancar, Aziz

    2010-03-16

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs. It kills cancer cells by damaging their DNA, and hence cellular DNA repair capacity is an important determinant of its efficacy. Here, we investigated the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage in mouse liver and testis tissue extracts prepared at regular intervals over the course of a day. We find that the XPA protein, which plays an essential role in repair of cisplatin damage by nucleotide excision repair, exhibits circadian oscillation in the liver but not in testis. Consequently, removal of cisplatin adducts in liver extracts, but not in testis extracts, exhibits a circadian pattern with zenith at approximately 5 pm and nadir at approximately 5 am. Furthermore, we find that the circadian oscillation of XPA is achieved both by regulation of transcription by the core circadian clock proteins including cryptochrome and by regulation at the posttranslational level by the HERC2 ubiquitin ligase. These findings may be used as a guide for timing of cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:20304803

  4. Ancient human DNA.

    PubMed

    Kirsanow, Karola; Burger, Joachim

    2012-01-20

    The contribution of palaeogenetic data to the study of various aspects of hominin biology and evolution has been significant, and has the potential to increase substantially with the widespread implementation of next generation sequencing techniques. Here we discuss the present state-of-the-art of ancient human DNA analysis and the characteristics of hominin aDNA that make sequence validation particularly complex. A brief overview of the development of anthropological palaeogenetic analysis is given to illustrate the technical challenges motivating recent technological advancements. PMID:22169595

  5. RBCK1, an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Interacts with and Ubiquinates the Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Ritu; Coulter, Sherry; Kinyamu, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) plays a pivotal role in the disposition and detoxification of numerous foreign and endogenous chemicals by increasing transcription of numerous target genes, including phase I and II drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid screening identified an E3 ubiquitin ligase, RBCK1 (Ring-B-box-coiled-coil protein interacting with protein kinase C-1), as a human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)–interacting protein. Coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed the interaction between RBCK1 and hPXR when both were ectopically expressed in AD-293 cells. Domain mapping studies showed that the interaction between RBCK1 and hPXR involves all RBCK1 domains. We further demonstrate that RBCK1 ubiquitinates hPXR, and this may target hPXR for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Simultaneous ectopic overexpression of RBCK1 and PXR decreased PXR levels in AD-293 cells, and this decrease was inhibited by the proteasomal inhibitor MG-132 (carbobenzoxy-Leu-Leu-leucinal). Furthermore, overexpression of RBCK1 decreased endogenous levels of PXR in HepG2 cells. Of importance, ectopic overexpression and silencing of endogenous RBCK1 in primary human hepatocytes resulted in a decrease and increase, respectively, in endogenous PXR protein levels and in the induction of PXR target genes by rifampicin. These results suggest that RBCK1 is important for the ubiquitination of PXR and may play a role in its proteasomal degradation. PMID:23160820

  6. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 localizes to etoposide-exposed mitotic chromosomes: implication for a novel DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki; Fujimitsu, Yuka; Sasano, Takeshi; Yoshikai, Yushi; Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Nariai, Yuko; Urano, Takeshi; Saitoh, Hisato

    2014-04-25

    RNF4, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL), localizes to the nucleus and functions in the DNA damage response during interphase of the cell cycle. RNF4 also exists in cells undergoing mitosis, where its regulation and function remain poorly understood. Here we showed that administration of etoposide, an anticancer DNA topoisomerase II poison, to mitotic human cervical cancer HeLa cells induced SUMO-2/3-dependent localization of RNF4 to chromosomes. The FK2 antibody signals, indicative of poly/multi-ubiquitin assembly, were detected on etoposide-exposed mitotic chromosomes, whereas the signals were negligible in cells depleted for RNF4 by RNA interference. This suggests that RNF4 functions as a STUbL in the etoposide-induced damage response during mitosis. Indeed, RNF4-depletion sensitized mitotic HeLa cells to etoposide and increased cells with micronuclei. These results indicate the importance of the RNF4-mediated STUbL pathway during mitosis for the maintenance of chromosome integrity and further implicate RNF4 as a target for topo II poison-based therapy for cancer patients. PMID:24695317

  7. Analysis of the distribution and evolution of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases of bacteria delineates a distinct phylogenetic group 'Lig E'.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Hjerde, Erik; Kahlke, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of a minimal ATP-dependent DNA ligase in Haemophilus influenzae, bacteria were thought to only possess a NAD-dependent ligase, which was involved in sealing of Okazaki fragments. We now know that a diverse range of bacterial species possess up to six of these accessory bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligases (b-ADLs), which vary in size and enzymatic domain associations. Here we compare the domain structure of different types of b-ADLs and investigate their distribution among the bacterial domain to describe possible evolutionary trajectories that gave rise to the sequence and structural diversity of these enzymes. Previous biochemical and genetic analyses have delineated three main classes of these enzymes: Lig B, Lig C and Lig D, which appear to have descended from a common ancestor within the bacterial domain. In the present study, we delineate a fourth group of b-ADLs, Lig E, which possesses a number of unique features at the primary and tertiary structural levels. The biochemical characteristics, domain structure and inferred extracellular location sets this group apart from the other b-ADLs. The results presented here indicate that the Lig E type ligases were horizontally transferred into bacteria in a separate event from other b-ADLs possibly from a bacteriophage. PMID:26412580

  8. Deletion of the DNA Ligase IV Gene in Candida glabrata Significantly Increases Gene-Targeting Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Yuke; Fiori, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Candida glabrata is reported as the second most prevalent human opportunistic fungal pathogen in the United States. Over the last decades, its incidence increased, whereas that of Candida albicans decreased slightly. One of the main reasons for this shift is attributed to the inherent tolerance of C. glabrata toward the commonly used azole antifungal drugs. Despite a close phylogenetic distance to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homologous recombination works with poor efficiency in C. glabrata compared to baker's yeast, in fact limiting targeted genetic alterations of the pathogen's genome. It has been shown that nonhomologous DNA end joining is dominant over specific gene targeting in C. glabrata. To improve the homologous recombination efficiency, we have generated a strain in which the LIG4 gene has been deleted, which resulted in a significant increase in correct gene targeting. The very specific function of Lig4 in mediating nonhomologous end joining is the reason for the absence of clear side effects, some of which affect the ku80 mutant, another mutant with reduced nonhomologous end joining. We also generated a LIG4 reintegration cassette. Our results show that the lig4 mutant strain may be a valuable tool for the C. glabrata research community. PMID:26048009

  9. Structure of the human Parkin ligase domain in an autoinhibited state

    PubMed Central

    Wauer, Tobias; Komander, David

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the protein Parkin are associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disease in men. Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase of the structurally uncharacterized RING-in-between-RING(IBR)-RING (RBR) family, which, in an HECT-like fashion, forms a catalytic thioester intermediate with Ub. We here report the crystal structure of human Parkin spanning the Unique Parkin domain (UPD, also annotated as RING0) and RBR domains, revealing a tightly packed structure with unanticipated domain interfaces. The UPD adopts a novel elongated Zn-binding fold, while RING2 resembles an IBR domain. Two key interactions keep Parkin in an autoinhibited conformation. A linker that connects the IBR with the RING2 over a 50-Å distance blocks the conserved E2∼Ub binding site of RING1. RING2 forms a hydrophobic interface with the UPD, burying the catalytic Cys431, which is part of a conserved catalytic triad. Opening of intra-domain interfaces activates Parkin, and enables Ub-based suicide probes to modify Cys431. The structure further reveals a putative phospho-peptide docking site in the UPD, and explains many PD-causing mutations. PMID:23727886

  10. Kinetic mechanism and fidelity of nick sealing by Escherichia coli NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA)

    PubMed Central

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli DNA ligase (EcoLigA) repairs 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks in duplex DNA via reaction of LigA with NAD+ to form a covalent LigA-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP intermediate (step 1); transfer of AMP to the nick 5′-PO4 to form an AppDNA intermediate (step 2); and attack of the nick 3′-OH on AppDNA to form a 3′-5′ phosphodiester (step 3). A distinctive feature of EcoLigA is its stimulation by ammonium ion. Here we used rapid mix-quench methods to analyze the kinetic mechanism of single-turnover nick sealing by EcoLigA–AMP. For substrates with correctly base-paired 3′-OH/5′-PO4 nicks, kstep2 was fast (6.8–27 s−1) and similar to kstep3 (8.3–42 s−1). Absent ammonium, kstep2 and kstep3 were 48-fold and 16-fold slower, respectively. EcoLigA was exquisitely sensitive to 3′-OH base mispairs and 3′ N:abasic lesions, which elicited 1000- to >20000-fold decrements in kstep2. The exception was the non-canonical 3′ A:oxoG configuration, which EcoLigA accepted as correctly paired for rapid sealing. These results underscore: (i) how EcoLigA requires proper positioning of the nick 3′ nucleoside for catalysis of 5′ adenylylation; and (ii) EcoLigA's potential to embed mutations during the repair of oxidative damage. EcoLigA was relatively tolerant of 5′-phosphate base mispairs and 5′ N:abasic lesions. PMID:26857547

  11. Kinetic mechanism and fidelity of nick sealing by Escherichia coli NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA).

    PubMed

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-03-18

    Escherichia coli DNA ligase (EcoLigA) repairs 3'-OH/5'-PO4 nicks in duplex DNA via reaction of LigA with NAD(+) to form a covalent LigA-(lysyl-Nζ)-AMP intermediate (step 1); transfer of AMP to the nick 5'-PO4 to form an AppDNA intermediate (step 2); and attack of the nick 3'-OH on AppDNA to form a 3'-5' phosphodiester (step 3). A distinctive feature of EcoLigA is its stimulation by ammonium ion. Here we used rapid mix-quench methods to analyze the kinetic mechanism of single-turnover nick sealing by EcoLigA-AMP. For substrates with correctly base-paired 3'-OH/5'-PO4 nicks, kstep2 was fast (6.8-27 s(-1)) and similar to kstep3 (8.3-42 s(-1)). Absent ammonium, kstep2 and kstep3 were 48-fold and 16-fold slower, respectively. EcoLigA was exquisitely sensitive to 3'-OH base mispairs and 3' N:abasic lesions, which elicited 1000- to >20000-fold decrements in kstep2. The exception was the non-canonical 3' A:oxoG configuration, which EcoLigA accepted as correctly paired for rapid sealing. These results underscore: (i) how EcoLigA requires proper positioning of the nick 3' nucleoside for catalysis of 5' adenylylation; and (ii) EcoLigA's potential to embed mutations during the repair of oxidative damage. EcoLigA was relatively tolerant of 5'-phosphate base mispairs and 5' N:abasic lesions. PMID:26857547

  12. A Defect in DNA Ligase4 Enhances the Frequency of TALEN-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Cermak, Tomas; Hoshino, Tomoki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Mori, Akiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Hamada, Masao; Katayose, Yuichi; Starker, Colby; Voytas, Daniel F; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-02-01

    We have established methods for site-directed mutagenesis via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the endogenous rice (Oryza sativa) waxy gene and demonstrated stable inheritance of TALEN-induced somatic mutations to the progeny. To analyze the role of classical nonhomologous end joining (cNHEJ) and alternative nonhomologous end joining (altNHEJ) pathways in TALEN-induced mutagenesis in plant cells, we investigated whether a lack of DNA Ligase4 (Lig4) affects the kinetics of TALEN-induced double-strand break repair in rice cells. Deep-sequencing analysis revealed that the frequency of all types of mutations, namely deletion, insertion, combination of insertion with deletion, and substitution, in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in a lig4 heterozygous mutant or the wild type. In addition, the ratio of large deletions (greater than 10 bp) and deletions repaired by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to total deletion mutations in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in the lig4 heterozygous mutant or wild type. Furthermore, almost all insertions (2 bp or greater) were shown to be processed via copy and paste of one or more regions around the TALENs cleavage site and rejoined via MMEJ regardless of genetic background. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dysfunction of cNHEJ leads to a shift in the repair pathway from cNHEJ to altNHEJ or synthesis-dependent strand annealing. PMID:26668331

  13. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes. PMID:26125914

  14. A Defect in DNA Ligase4 Enhances the Frequency of TALEN-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis in Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cermak, Tomas; Sugimoto, Kazuhiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Mori, Akiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Hamada, Masao; Katayose, Yuichi; Voytas, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    We have established methods for site-directed mutagenesis via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the endogenous rice (Oryza sativa) waxy gene and demonstrated stable inheritance of TALEN-induced somatic mutations to the progeny. To analyze the role of classical nonhomologous end joining (cNHEJ) and alternative nonhomologous end joining (altNHEJ) pathways in TALEN-induced mutagenesis in plant cells, we investigated whether a lack of DNA Ligase4 (Lig4) affects the kinetics of TALEN-induced double-strand break repair in rice cells. Deep-sequencing analysis revealed that the frequency of all types of mutations, namely deletion, insertion, combination of insertion with deletion, and substitution, in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in a lig4 heterozygous mutant or the wild type. In addition, the ratio of large deletions (greater than 10 bp) and deletions repaired by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to total deletion mutations in lig4 null mutant calli was higher than that in the lig4 heterozygous mutant or wild type. Furthermore, almost all insertions (2 bp or greater) were shown to be processed via copy and paste of one or more regions around the TALENs cleavage site and rejoined via MMEJ regardless of genetic background. Taken together, our findings indicate that the dysfunction of cNHEJ leads to a shift in the repair pathway from cNHEJ to altNHEJ or synthesis-dependent strand annealing. PMID:26668331

  15. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  16. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Renard, Brian M.; Birkeland, Shanda R.; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure-function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4-Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association. PMID:25457772

  17. DNA Ligases I and III Cooperate in Alternative Non-Homologous End-Joining in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena; Bednar, Theresa; Wu, Wenqi; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Iliakis, George

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies suggest that vertebrates remove double-strand breaks (DSBs) from their genomes predominantly by two non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. While canonical NHEJ depends on the well characterized activities of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and LIG4/XRCC4/XLF complexes, the activities and the mechanisms of the alternative, backup NHEJ are less well characterized. Notably, the contribution of LIG1 to alternative NHEJ remains conjectural and although biochemical, cytogenetic and genetic experiments implicate LIG3, this contribution has not been formally demonstrated. Here, we take advantage of the powerful genetics of the DT40 chicken B-cell system to delineate the roles of LIG1 and LIG3 in alternative NHEJ. Our results expand the functions of LIG1 to alternative NHEJ and demonstrate a remarkable ability for LIG3 to backup DSB repair by NHEJ in addition to its essential function in the mitochondria. Together with results on DNA replication, these observations uncover a remarkable and previously unappreciated functional flexibility and interchangeability between LIG1 and LIG3. PMID:23555685

  18. Overexpression of the human ubiquitin E3 ligase CUL4A alleviates hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Can; Zhang, Li-Yang; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Xian-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Xiang

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of human CUL4A (hCUL4A) in PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of hCUL4A on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hCUL4A suppresses apoptosis and DNA damage and thus promotes cell survival. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hCUL4A regulates apoptosis-related proteins and cell cycle regulators. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin E3 ligase CUL4A plays important roles in diverse cellular processes including carcinogenesis and proliferation. It has been reported that the expression of CUL4A can be induced by hypoxic-ischemic injury. However, the effect of elevated expression of CUL4A on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury is currently unclear. In this study, human CUL4A (hCUL4A) was expressed in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells using adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer, and the effects of hCUL4A expression on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury were investigated. In PC12 cells subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation, we found that hCUL4A suppresses apoptosis and DNA damage by regulating apoptosis-related proteins and cell cycle regulators (Bcl-2, caspase-3, p53 and p27); consequently, hCUL4A promotes cell survival. Taken together, our results reveal the beneficial effects of hCUL4A in PC12 cells upon hypoxia-reoxygenation injury.

  19. Dual-color detection of DNA sequence variants by ligase-mediated analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samiotaki, M.; Kwiatkowski, M.; Parik, J.; Landegren, U. )

    1994-03-15

    Genetic screening for sequence variants associated with disease is assuming increasing importance in clinical medicine as well as in research. The authors describe an efficient method for such analyses, comprising a combination of practical features: (1) Amplified DNA samples are analyzed for their ability to serve as templates in standardized allele-specific ligation reactions between oligonucleotide probes; (2) Two allele-specific probes, differentially labeled with either of two lanthanide labels, compete for ligation to a third oligonucleotide (the signal from the two labeled probes can thus be directly compared in a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence detection reaction); and (3) Large sets of analyses are processed in parallel using a 96-pin capture manifold, serving to reduce pipetting steps and the risk of contamination. The authors present here the basis of the technique and its application to the screening for two common mutations causing cystic fibrosis and [alpha][sub 1]-antiytrypsin deficiency. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Structural basis for catalytic activation by the human ZNF451 SUMO E3 ligase

    PubMed Central

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Pichler, Andrea; Lima, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    E3 protein ligases enhance transfer of ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins from E2 conjugating enzymes to substrates by stabilizing the thioester-charged E2~Ubl in a closed configuration optimally aligned for nucleophilic attack. Here, we report biochemical and structural data that define the N-terminal domain of the Homo sapiens ZNF451 as the catalytic module for SUMO E3 ligase activity. ZNF451 catalytic module contains tandem SUMO interaction motifs (SIMs) bridged by a Proline-Leucine-Arginine-Proline (PLRP) motif. The first SIM and PLRP motif engage thioester charged E2~SUMO while the next SIM binds a second molecule of SUMO bound to the backside of E2. We show that ZNF451 is SUMO2 specific and that SUMO-modification of ZNF451 may contribute to activity by providing a second molecule of SUMO that interacts with E2. Our results are consistent with ZNF451 functioning as a bona fide SUMO E3 ligase. PMID:26524494

  1. The p53–Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans

    PubMed Central

    Coffill, Cynthia R.; Lee, Alison P.; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S.; Ghadessy, Farid J.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family—Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73—as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53–Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  2. The p53-Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans.

    PubMed

    Coffill, Cynthia R; Lee, Alison P; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M; Joseph, Thomas L; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S; Ghadessy, Farid J; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P

    2016-02-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family--Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73--as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53-Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  3. A human iPSC model of Ligase IV deficiency reveals an important role for NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and genomic stability of induced pluripotent stem cells and emerging haematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tilgner, K; Neganova, I; Moreno-Gimeno, I; AL-Aama, J Y; Burks, D; Yung, S; Singhapol, C; Saretzki, G; Evans, J; Gorbunova, V; Gennery, A; Przyborski, S; Stojkovic, M; Armstrong, L; Jeggo, P; Lako, M

    2013-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most common form of DNA damage and are repaired by non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Several protein components function in NHEJ, and of these, DNA Ligase IV is essential for performing the final ‘end-joining' step. Mutations in DNA Ligase IV result in LIG4 syndrome, which is characterised by growth defects, microcephaly, reduced number of blood cells, increased predisposition to leukaemia and variable degrees of immunodeficiency. In this manuscript, we report the creation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of LIG4 deficiency, which accurately replicates the DSB repair phenotype of LIG4 patients. Our findings demonstrate that impairment of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in human iPSC results in accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, thus providing new insights into likely mechanisms used by pluripotent stem cells to maintain their genomic integrity. Defects in NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair also led to a significant decrease in reprogramming efficiency of human cells and accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting a key role for NHEJ in somatic cell reprogramming and providing insights for future cell based therapies for applications of LIG4-iPSCs. Although haematopoietic specification of LIG4-iPSC is not affected per se, the emerging haematopoietic progenitors show a high accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, resulting in reduced numbers of mature haematopoietic cells. Together our findings provide new insights into the role of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and differentiation of progenitor cells, which likely underlies the developmental abnormalities observed in many DNA damage disorders. In addition, our findings are important for understanding how genomic instability arises in pluripotent stem cells and for defining appropriate culture conditions that restrict DNA damage and result in ex vivo expansion of stem cells with intact genomes. PMID

  4. A human iPSC model of Ligase IV deficiency reveals an important role for NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and genomic stability of induced pluripotent stem cells and emerging haematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Tilgner, K; Neganova, I; Moreno-Gimeno, I; Al-Aama, J Y; Burks, D; Yung, S; Singhapol, C; Saretzki, G; Evans, J; Gorbunova, V; Gennery, A; Przyborski, S; Stojkovic, M; Armstrong, L; Jeggo, P; Lako, M

    2013-08-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most common form of DNA damage and are repaired by non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Several protein components function in NHEJ, and of these, DNA Ligase IV is essential for performing the final 'end-joining' step. Mutations in DNA Ligase IV result in LIG4 syndrome, which is characterised by growth defects, microcephaly, reduced number of blood cells, increased predisposition to leukaemia and variable degrees of immunodeficiency. In this manuscript, we report the creation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of LIG4 deficiency, which accurately replicates the DSB repair phenotype of LIG4 patients. Our findings demonstrate that impairment of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in human iPSC results in accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, thus providing new insights into likely mechanisms used by pluripotent stem cells to maintain their genomic integrity. Defects in NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair also led to a significant decrease in reprogramming efficiency of human cells and accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting a key role for NHEJ in somatic cell reprogramming and providing insights for future cell based therapies for applications of LIG4-iPSCs. Although haematopoietic specification of LIG4-iPSC is not affected per se, the emerging haematopoietic progenitors show a high accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, resulting in reduced numbers of mature haematopoietic cells. Together our findings provide new insights into the role of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and differentiation of progenitor cells, which likely underlies the developmental abnormalities observed in many DNA damage disorders. In addition, our findings are important for understanding how genomic instability arises in pluripotent stem cells and for defining appropriate culture conditions that restrict DNA damage and result in ex vivo expansion of stem cells with intact genomes. PMID

  5. The role of HERC2 and RNF8 ubiquitin E3 ligases in the promotion of translesion DNA synthesis in the chicken DT40 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mohiuddin; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Keka, Islam Shamima; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Sale, Julian; Narita, Takeo; Abdel-Aziz, H Ismail; Wang, Xin; Ogawa, Saki; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Chiu, Roland; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Lisby, Michael; Takeda, Shunichi

    2016-04-01

    The replicative DNA polymerases are generally blocked by template DNA damage. The resulting replication arrest can be released by one of two post-replication repair (PRR) pathways, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and template switching by homologous recombination (HR). The HERC2 ubiquitin ligase plays a role in homologous recombination by facilitating the assembly of the Ubc13 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with the RNF8 ubiquitin ligase. To explore the role of HERC2 and RNF8 in PRR, we examined immunoglobulin diversification in chicken DT40 cells deficient in HERC2 and RNF8. Unexpectedly, the HERC2(-/-) and RNF8(-/-) cells and HERC2(-/-)/RNF8(-/-) double mutant cells exhibit a significant reduction in the rate of immunoglobulin (Ig) hypermutation, compared to wild-type cells. Further, the HERC2(-/-) and RNF8(-/-) mutants exhibit defective maintenance of replication fork progression immediately after exposure to UV while retaining proficient post-replicative gap filling. These mutants are both proficient in mono-ubiquitination of PCNA. Taken together, these results suggest that HERC2 and RNF8 promote TLS past abasic sites and UV-lesions at or very close to stalled replication forks. PMID:26994443

  6. Ancient DNA and human history

    PubMed Central

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  7. Ancient DNA and human history.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Racimo, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    We review studies of genomic data obtained by sequencing hominin fossils with particular emphasis on the unique information that ancient DNA (aDNA) can provide about the demographic history of humans and our closest relatives. We concentrate on nuclear genomic sequences that have been published in the past few years. In many cases, particularly in the Arctic, the Americas, and Europe, aDNA has revealed historical demographic patterns in a way that could not be resolved by analyzing present-day genomes alone. Ancient DNA from archaic hominins has revealed a rich history of admixture between early modern humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans, and has allowed us to disentangle complex selective processes. Information from aDNA studies is nowhere near saturation, and we believe that future aDNA sequences will continue to change our understanding of hominin history. PMID:27274045

  8. CUL4A ubiquitin ligase: a promising drug target for cancer and other human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Puneet; Nag, Alo

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cullin 4A (CUL4A), a scaffold protein, to recruit a repertoire of substrate adaptors allows it to assemble into distinct E3 ligase complexes to mediate turnover of key regulatory proteins. In the past decade, a considerable wealth of information has been generated regarding its biology, regulation, assembly, molecular architecture and novel functions. Importantly, unravelling of its association with multiple tumours and modulation by viral proteins establishes it as one of the key proteins that may play an important role in cellular transformation. Considering the role of its substrate in regulating the cell cycle and maintenance of genomic stability, understanding the detailed aspects of these processes will have significant consequences for the treatment of cancer and related diseases. This review is an effort to provide a broad overview of this multifaceted ubiquitin ligase and addresses its critical role in regulation of important biological processes. More importantly, its tremendous potential to be exploited for therapeutic purposes has been discussed. PMID:24522884

  9. Disruption of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases Slx5-Slx8/RNF4 alters RecQ-like helicase Sgs1/BLM localization in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Stefanie; Mihalevic, Michael Joseph; Casal, Morgan Alexandra; Bernstein, Kara Anne

    2014-01-01

    RecQ-like helicases are a highly conserved protein family that functions during DNA repair and, when mutated in humans, is associated with cancer and/or premature aging syndromes. The budding yeast RecQ-like helicase Sgs1 has important functions in double-strand break (DSB) repair of exogenously induced breaks, as well as those that arise endogenously, for example during DNA replication. To further investigate Sgs1’s regulation, we analyzed the subcellular localization of a fluorescent fusion of Sgs1 upon DNA damage. Consistent with a role in DSB repair, Sgs1 recruitment into nuclear foci in asynchronous cultures increases after ionizing radiation (IR) and after exposure to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Yet, despite the importance of Sgs1 in replicative damage repair and in contrast to its elevated protein levels during S-phase, we find that the number of Sgs1 foci decreases upon nucleotide pool depletion by hydroxyurea (HU) treatment and that this negative regulation depends on the intra S-phase checkpoint kinase Mec1. Importantly, we identify the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) complex Slx5-Slx8 as a negative regulator of Sgs1 foci, both spontaneously and upon replicative damage. Slx5-Slx8 regulation of Sgs1 foci is likely conserved in eukaryotes, since expression of the mammalian Slx5-Slx8 functional homologue, RNF4, restores Sgs1 focus number in slx8 cells and furthermore, knockdown of RNF4 leads to more BLM foci in U-2 OS cells. Our results point to a model where RecQ-like helicase subcellular localization is regulated by STUbLs in response to DNA damage, presumably to prevent illegitimate recombination events. PMID:25588990

  10. Disruption of SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases Slx5-Slx8/RNF4 alters RecQ-like helicase Sgs1/BLM localization in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Stefanie; Mihalevic, Michael Joseph; Casal, Morgan Alexandra; Bernstein, Kara Anne

    2015-02-01

    RecQ-like helicases are a highly conserved protein family that functions during DNA repair and, when mutated in humans, is associated with cancer and/or premature aging syndromes. The budding yeast RecQ-like helicase Sgs1 has important functions in double-strand break (DSB) repair of exogenously induced breaks, as well as those that arise endogenously, for example during DNA replication. To further investigate Sgs1's regulation, we analyzed the subcellular localization of a fluorescent fusion of Sgs1 upon DNA damage. Consistent with a role in DSB repair, Sgs1 recruitment into nuclear foci in asynchronous cultures increases after ionizing radiation (IR) and after exposure to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Yet, despite the importance of Sgs1 in replicative damage repair and in contrast to its elevated protein levels during S-phase, we find that the number of Sgs1 foci decreases upon nucleotide pool depletion by hydroxyurea (HU) treatment and that this negative regulation depends on the intra S-phase checkpoint kinase Mec1. Importantly, we identify the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) complex Slx5-Slx8 as a negative regulator of Sgs1 foci, both spontaneously and upon replicative damage. Slx5-Slx8 regulation of Sgs1 foci is likely conserved in eukaryotes, since expression of the mammalian Slx5-Slx8 functional homologue, RNF4, restores Sgs1 focus number in slx8 cells and furthermore, knockdown of RNF4 leads to more BLM foci in U-2 OS cells. Our results point to a model where RecQ-like helicase subcellular localization is regulated by STUbLs in response to DNA damage, presumably to prevent illegitimate recombination events. PMID:25588990

  11. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Taraka R.; Stromberger, Carmen; Ge, Ming; Eldin, Karen W.; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS), a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo), which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5). Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5) brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%). However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24271779

  12. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder

    PubMed Central

    Baple, Emma L.; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E.; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A.; Harlalka, Gaurav V.; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A.; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K.; Last, James I.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R.; Green, Catherine M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA’s interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration. PMID:24911150

  13. Purification and properties of human DNA helicase VI.

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, N; Ochem, A; Taneja, P; Tuteja, R; Skopác, D; Falaschi, A

    1995-01-01

    A novel ATP-dependent DNA unwinding enzyme, called human DNA helicase VI (HDH VI), was purified to apparent homogeneity from HeLa cells and characterized. From 327 g of cultured cells, 0.44 mg of pure enzyme was recovered, free of DNA polymerase, ligase, topoisomerase, nicking and nuclease activities. The enzyme behaves as a monomer having an M(r) of 128 kDa, whether determined with SDS-PAGE, or in native conditions. Photoaffinity labelling with [alpha-32P]ATP labelled the 128 kDa protein. Only ATP or dATP hydrolysis supports the unwinding activity for which a divalent cation (Mg2+ > Mn2+) is required. HDH VI unwinds exclusively DNA duplexes with an annealed portion < 32 bp and prefers a replication fork-like structure of the substrate. It cannot unwind blunt-end duplexes and is inactive also on DNA-RNA or RNA-RNA hybrids. HDH VI unwinds DNA unidirectionally by moving in the 3' to 5' direction along the bound strand. Images PMID:7543199

  14. The expression of the ubiquitin ligase subunit Cks1 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slotky, Merav; Shapira, Ma'anit; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Linn, Shai; Futerman, Boris; Tsalic, Medy; Hershko, Dan D

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Loss of the cell-cycle inhibitory protein p27Kip1 is associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. The decrease in the levels of this protein is the result of increased proteasome-dependent degradation, mediated and rate-limited by its specific ubiquitin ligase subunits S-phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2) and cyclin-dependent kinase subunit 1 (Cks1). Skp2 was recently found to be overexpressed in breast cancers, but the role of Cks1 in these cancers is unknown. The present study was undertaken to examine the role of Cks1 expression in breast cancer and its relation to p27Kip1 and Skp2 expression and to tumor aggressiveness. Methods The expressions of Cks1, Skp2, and p27Kip1 were examined immunohistochemically on formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax-embedded tissue sections from 50 patients with breast cancer and by immunoblot analysis on breast cancer cell lines. The relation between Cks1 levels and patients' clinical and histological parameters were examined by Cox regression and the Kaplan–Meier method. Results The expression of Cks1 was strongly associated with Skp2 expression (r = 0.477; P = 0.001) and inversely with p27Kip1 (r = -0.726; P < 0.0001). Overexpression of Cks1 was associated with loss of tumor differentiation, young age, lack of expression of estrogen receptors and of progesterone receptors, and decreased disease-free (P = 0.0007) and overall (P = 0.041) survival. In addition, Cks1 and Skp2 expression were increased by estradiol in estrogen-dependent cell lines but were down-regulated by tamoxifen. Conclusion These results suggest that Cks1 is involved in p27Kip1 down-regulation and may have an important role in the development of aggressive tumor behavior in breast cancer. PMID:16168119

  15. The Drosophila melanogaster DNA Ligase IV gene plays a crucial role in the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and acts synergistically with Rad54.

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Marcin M; Eeken, Jan C J; de Jong, Anja W M; Klink, Ilse; Loos, Marjan; Romeijn, Ron J; van Veen, Bert L; Mullenders, Leon H; Ferro, Wouter; Pastink, Albert

    2003-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV has a crucial role in double-strand break (DSB) repair through nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Most notably, its inactivation leads to embryonic lethality in mammals. To elucidate the role of DNA Ligase IV (Lig4) in DSB repair in a multicellular lower eukaryote, we generated viable Lig4-deficient Drosophila strains by P-element-mediated mutagenesis. Embryos and larvae of mutant lines are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation but hardly so to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or the crosslinking agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisDDP). To determine the relative contribution of NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR) in Drosophila, Lig4; Rad54 double-mutant flies were generated. Survival studies demonstrated that both HR and NHEJ have a major role in DSB repair. The synergistic increase in sensitivity seen in the double mutant, in comparison with both single mutants, indicates that both pathways partially overlap. However, during the very first hours after fertilization NHEJ has a minor role in DSB repair after exposure to ionizing radiation. Throughout the first stages of embryogenesis of the fly, HR is the predominant pathway in DSB repair. At late stages of development NHEJ also becomes less important. The residual survival of double mutants after irradiation strongly suggests the existence of a third pathway for the repair of DSBs in Drosophila. PMID:14704177

  16. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  17. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  18. Chromosome demise in the wake of ligase-deficient replication

    PubMed Central

    Kouzminova, Elena A.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial DNA ligases, NAD+-dependent enzymes, are distinct from eukaryotic ATP-dependent ligases, representing promising targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobials. Yet, the chromosomal consequences of ligase-deficient DNA replication, during which Okazaki fragments accumulate, are still unclear. Using ligA251(Ts), the strongest ligase mutant of Escherichia coli, we studied ligase-deficient DNA replication by genetic and physical approaches. Here we show that replication without ligase kills after a short resistance period. We found that double-strand break repair via RecA, RecBCD, RuvABC and RecG explains the transient resistance, whereas irreparable chromosomal fragmentation explains subsequent cell death. Remarkably, death is mostly prevented by elimination of linear DNA degradation activity of ExoV, suggesting that non-allelic double-strand breaks behind replication forks precipitate DNA degradation that enlarge them into allelic double-strand gaps. Marker frequency profiling of synchronized replication reveals stalling of ligase-deficient forks with subsequent degradation of the DNA synthesized without ligase. The mechanism that converts unsealed nicks behind replication forks first into repairable double-strand breaks and then into irreparable double-strand gaps may be behind lethality of any DNA damaging treatment. PMID:22582878

  19. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4(K271R) mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4(K210R) mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3'-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4(K271R) was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4(K210R) was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4(K271R), but not M10-XRCC4(K210R), showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4(K271R) than in M10-XRCC4(WT), whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4(K210R) as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. PMID:25934149

  20. The Expression of the Ubiquitin Ligase SIAH2 (Seven In Absentia Homolog 2) Is Increased in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Paula; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Soler-Torronteras, Rafael; Caro, Teresa; Medina, Manuel; Álvarez, Antonio; Salvatierra, Ángel; Muñoz, Eduardo; Calzado, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Overall 5-year survival has shown little improvement over the last decades. Seven in absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases that mediate proteasomal protein degradation by poly-ubiquitination. Even though SIAH proteins play a key role in several biological processes, their role in human cancer remains controversial. The aim of the study was to document SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (mRNA, protein level and immunohistochemistry) in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples compared to surrounding healthy tissue from the same patient, and to analyse the association with clinicopathological features. Materials and Methods One hundred and fifty-two samples from a patient cohort treated surgically for primary lung cancer were obtained for the study. Genic and protein expression levels of SIAH2 were analysed and compared with clinic-pathologic variables. Results The present study is the first to analyze the SIAH2 expression pattern at different levels (RNA, protein expression and immunohistochemistry) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We found that SIAH2 protein expression is significantly enhanced in human lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell lung cancer (SCC). Paradoxically, non-significant changes at RNA level were found, suggesting a post-traductional regulatory mechanism. More importantly, an increased correlation between SIAH2 expression and tumor grade was detected, suggesting that this protein could be used as a prognostic biomarker to predict lung cancer progression. Likewise, SIAH2 protein expression showed a strong positive correlation with fluorodeoxyglucose (2-deoxy-2(18F)fluoro-D-glucose) uptake in primary NSCLC, which may assist clinicians in stratifying patients at increased overall risk of poor survival. Additionally, we described an inverse correlation between the expression of SIAH2 and the levels of one of its substrates

  1. Separation of cordycepin from Cordyceps militaris fermentation supernatant using preparative HPLC and evaluation of its antibacterial activity as an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Cai, Guoqiang; He, Yi; Tong, Guotong

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin exhibits various bio-activities, including anticancer, antibacterial, antiviral and immune regulation activities, and is a significant focus of research. However, the preparation of high-purity cordycepin remains challenging. Also, the molecular target with which cordycepin interacts to cause an antibacterial effect remains unknown. In the present study, cordycepin was prepared by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (prep-HPLC) and the purity obtained was 99.6%, indicating that this technique may be useful for the large-scale isolation of cordycepin in the future. The results of computational molecular docking analysis indicated that the interaction energy between cordycepin and NAD+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA) was lower than that between cordycepin and other common antibacterial targets. The highly pure cordycepin obtained by prep-HPLC demonstrated inhibitory activity against LigA from various bacteria in vitro. In conclusion, cordycepin may be useful as a broad-spectrum antibiotic targeting LigA in various bacteria. PMID:27588098

  2. The ubiquitin ligase APC(Cdh1) is required to maintain genome integrity in primary human cells.

    PubMed

    Engelbert, D; Schnerch, D; Baumgarten, A; Wäsch, R

    2008-02-01

    Ensuring precise DNA replication and chromosome segregation is essential during cell division in order to provide genomic stability and avoid malignant growth. Proteolytic control of cell cycle regulators by the anaphase-promoting complex, activated by Cdh1 (APC(Cdh1)), is responsible for a stable G1 phase after mitotic exit allowing accurate preparation for DNA replication in the following S phase. APC(Cdh1) target proteins are frequently upregulated in tumor cells and the inactivation of human Cdh1 might interfere with genome integrity by target stabilization. Here we show that APC(Cdh1) is required for maintaining genomic integrity in primary human cells. Lentiviral-delivered strong and stable suppression of Cdh1 by RNA interference (RNAi) causes aberrant accumulation of several APC(Cdh1) target proteins, such as cyclin A, B, Aurora A or Plk1, which control accurate and equal distribution of the genetic information to daughter cells. This induces a premature and prolonged S phase, mitotic-entry delay and defects in chromosome separation and cytokinesis. Cell cycle deregulation by stable knockdown of Cdh1 leads to activation of p53/p21 and genomic instability, which is further increased by codepletion of p53. Thus, stabilization of APC(Cdh1) targets may initiate aberrant DNA replication and chromosome separation, and trigger a p53 response by deregulating G1 in primary human cells. PMID:17700535

  3. Re-inventing ancient human DNA.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michael; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Hofreiter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, the analysis of ancient human DNA represented one of the most controversial disciplines in an already controversial field of research. Scepticism in this field was only matched by the long-lasting controversy over the authenticity of ancient pathogen DNA. This ambiguous view on ancient human DNA had a dichotomous root. On the one hand, the interest in ancient human DNA is great because such studies touch on the history and evolution of our own species. On the other hand, because these studies are dealing with samples from our own species, results are easily compromised by contamination of the experiments with modern human DNA, which is ubiquitous in the environment. Consequently, some of the most disputed studies published - apart maybe from early reports on million year old dinosaur or amber DNA - reported DNA analyses from human subfossil remains. However, the development of so-called next- or second-generation sequencing (SGS) in 2005 and the technological advances associated with it have generated new confidence in the genetic study of ancient human remains. The ability to sequence shorter DNA fragments than with PCR amplification coupled to traditional Sanger sequencing, along with very high sequencing throughput have both reduced the risk of sequencing modern contamination and provided tools to evaluate the authenticity of DNA sequence data. The field is now rapidly developing, providing unprecedented insights into the evolution of our own species and past human population dynamics as well as the evolution and history of human pathogens and epidemics. Here, we review how recent technological improvements have rapidly transformed ancient human DNA research from a highly controversial subject to a central component of modern anthropological research. We also discuss potential future directions of ancient human DNA research. PMID:25937886

  4. Identification of RFPL3 Protein as a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Modulating the Integration Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Type 1 Preintegration Complex Using a Microtiter Plate-based Assay*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Beng Hui; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Ying, Pamela Ho Rui; Takahashi, Chikako; Han, Qi'En; Chin, Wei Xin; Chao, Sheng-Hao; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Youichi

    2014-01-01

    Integration, one of the hallmarks of retrovirus replication, is mediated by a nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC), in which viral DNA is associated with many protein components that are required for completion of the early phase of infection. A striking feature of the PIC is its powerful integration activity in vitro. The PICs from a freshly isolated cytoplasmic extract of infected cells are able to insert viral DNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro. Therefore, a PIC-based in vitro assay is a reliable system for assessing protein factors influencing retroviral integration. In this study, we applied a microtiter plate-based in vitro assay to a screening study using a protein library that was produced by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system. Using a library of human E3 ubiquitin ligases, we identified RFPL3 as a potential stimulator of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) PIC integration activity in vitro. This enhancement of PIC activity by RFPL3 was likely to be attributed to its N-terminal RING domain. To further understand the functional role of RFPL3 in HIV infection, we created a human cell line overexpressing RFPL3. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that RFPL3 was associated with the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 PICs in infected cells. More importantly, single-round HIV-1 infection was enhanced significantly by RFPL3 expression. Our proteomic approach displays an advantage in the identification of new cellular proteins affecting the integration activity of the PIC and, therefore, contributes to the understanding of functional interaction between retroviral integration complexes and host factors. PMID:25107902

  5. Arsenic is cytotoxic at micromolar concentration, but does not inhibit purified human DNA repair enzymes at less than millimolar concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Lin; Hu, Yu; Dunlop, B.

    1997-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen, but not a mutagen. However it can act as a co-mutagen with UV and alkylating agents, and has been shown to inhibit DNA repair. The activities of several purified human enzymes involved in DNA repair have been tested in the presence of inorganic arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. We have not found that both As(III) and As(V) stimulated the activity of DNA polymerase {beta} (pol {beta}), O{sup 6}methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), and DNA ligase III. The activity of pol {beta} was increased up to 3.5-fold in the presence of 50 mM As (III), and 2-fold in the presence of 20 mM As(V). Inhibition of enzyme activity was only observed with concentrations of As(III) and As(V) higher than 100 mM. Terminal deoxynucleotidal transferase (TdT), an enzyme with homology to pol {beta}, is also stimulated 3-fold by 50 mM As(III). Unlike pol {beta} and TdT, MGMT was preferentially activated by millimolar As(V), rather than As(III). Similar concentrations of inorganic phosphate also increased the activity of MGMT. The activity of DNA ligase I was inhibited by 1 to 5 mM As(III). However, both DNA ligase I and DNA ligase III were significantly activated by As(V). In contrast to these results, human keratinocyte cells exhibit significant cytotoxicity when exposed to 10 {mu}M As(III) and 200 {mu}M AS(V). Cell survival was decreased by over 50% at these concentrations, as measured by neutral red uptake, LDH release, and MTT uptake. Interestingly, both As(III) and As(V) produced increased cell proliferation at submicromolar concentrations. These results suggest that arsenic compounds do not exert their toxic effects by direct inhibition of DNA repair enzymes, but by other mechanisms.

  6. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4{sup K271R} mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4{sup K210R} mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3′-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4{sup K271R} was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4{sup K210R} was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4{sup K271R}, but not M10-XRCC4{sup K210R}, showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4{sup K271R} than in M10-XRCC4{sup WT}, whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4{sup K210R} as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. - Highlights: • XRCC4{sup K271R} is defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is competent for the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K271R} is deficient in DSB repair function. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is mostly normal in DSB repair function.

  7. A Conserved C-terminal Element in the Yeast Doa10 and Human MARCH6 Ubiquitin Ligases Required for Selective Substrate Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zattas, Dimitrios; Berk, Jason M; Kreft, Stefan G; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Specific proteins are modified by ubiquitin at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are degraded by the proteasome, a process referred to as ER-associated protein degradation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two principal ER-associated protein degradation ubiquitin ligases (E3s) reside in the ER membrane, Doa10 and Hrd1. The membrane-embedded Doa10 functions in the degradation of substrates in the ER membrane, nuclear envelope, cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm. How most E3 ligases, including Doa10, recognize their protein substrates remains poorly understood. Here we describe a previously unappreciated but highly conserved C-terminal element (CTE) in Doa10; this cytosolically disposed 16-residue motif follows the final transmembrane helix. A conserved CTE asparagine residue is required for ubiquitylation and degradation of a subset of Doa10 substrates. Such selectivity suggests that the Doa10 CTE is involved in substrate discrimination and not general ligase function. Functional conservation of the CTE was investigated in the human ortholog of Doa10, MARCH6 (TEB4), by analyzing MARCH6 autoregulation of its own degradation. Mutation of the conserved Asn residue (N890A) in the MARCH6 CTE stabilized the normally short lived enzyme to the same degree as a catalytically inactivating mutation (C9A). We also report the localization of endogenous MARCH6 to the ER using epitope tagging of the genomic MARCH6 locus by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated genome editing. These localization and CTE analyses support the inference that MARCH6 and Doa10 are functionally similar. Moreover, our results with the yeast enzyme suggest that the CTE is involved in the recognition and/or ubiquitylation of specific protein substrates. PMID:27068744

  8. Crystal structure of human XLF: a twist in nonhomologous DNA end-joining.

    PubMed

    Andres, Sara N; Modesti, Mauro; Tsai, Chun J; Chu, Gilbert; Junop, Murray S

    2007-12-28

    DNA double-strand breaks represent one of the most severe forms of DNA damage in mammalian cells. One pathway for repairing these breaks occurs via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and depends on XRCC4, LigaseIV, and Cernunnos, also called XLF. Although XLF stimulates XRCC4/LigaseIV to ligate mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends, the mechanistic basis for this function remains unclear. Here we report the structure of a partially functional 224 residue N-terminal fragment of human XLF. Despite only weak sequence similarity, XLF(1-170) shares structural homology with XRCC4(1-159). However, unlike the highly extended 130 A helical domain observed in XRCC4, XLF adopts a more compact, folded helical C-terminal region involving two turns and a twist, wrapping back to the structurally conserved N terminus. Mutational analysis of XLF and XRCC4 reveals a potential interaction interface, suggesting a mechanism for how XLF stimulates the ligation of mismatched ends. PMID:18158905

  9. Crystal Structure of Human XLF: A Twist in Nonhomologous DNA End-Joining

    SciTech Connect

    Andres,S.; Modesit, M.; Tsai, C.; Chu, G.; Junop, M.

    2007-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks represent one of the most severe forms of DNA damage in mammalian cells. One pathway for repairing these breaks occurs via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and depends on XRCC4, LigaseIV, and Cernunnos, also called XLF. Although XLF stimulates XRCC4/LigaseIV to ligate mismatched and noncohesive DNA ends, the mechanistic basis for this function remains unclear. Here we report the structure of a partially functional 224 residue N-terminal fragment of human XLF. Despite only weak sequence similarity, XLF1-170 shares structural homology with XRCC41-159. However, unlike the highly extended 130 Angstroms helical domain observed in XRCC4, XLF adopts a more compact, folded helical C-terminal region involving two turns and a twist, wrapping back to the structurally conserved N terminus. Mutational analysis of XLF and XRCC4 reveals a potential interaction interface, suggesting a mechanism for how XLF stimulates the ligation of mismatched ends.

  10. Establishment of a Wheat Cell-Free Synthesized Protein Array Containing 250 Human and Mouse E3 Ubiquitin Ligases to Identify Novel Interaction between E3 Ligases and Substrate Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hirotaka; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Imamura, Mei; Nakajima, Tatsuro; Doi, Kousuke; Yasuoka, Saki; Takahashi, Chikako; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a key post-translational modification in the regulation of numerous biological processes in eukaryotes. The primary roles of ubiquitination are thought to be the triggering of protein degradation and the regulation of signal transduction. During protein ubiquitination, substrate specificity is mainly determined by E3 ubiquitin ligase (E3). Although more than 600 genes in the human genome encode E3, the E3s of many target proteins remain unidentified owing to E3 diversity and the instability of ubiquitinated proteins in cell. We demonstrate herein a novel biochemical analysis for the identification of E3s targeting specific proteins. Using wheat cell-free protein synthesis system, a protein array containing 227 human and 23 mouse recombinant E3s was synthesized. To establish the high-throughput binding assay using AlphaScreen technology, we selected MDM2 and p53 as the model combination of E3 and its target protein. The AlphaScreen assay specifically detected the binding of p53 and MDM2 in a crude translation mixture. Then, a comprehensive binding assay using the E3 protein array was performed. Eleven of the E3s showed high binding activity, including four previously reported E3s (e.g., MDM2, MDM4, and WWP1) targeting p53. This result demonstrated the reliability of the assay. Another interactors, RNF6 and DZIP3—which there have been no report to bind p53—were found to ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. Further analysis showed that RNF6 decreased the amount of p53 in H1299 cells in E3 activity-dependent manner. These results suggest the possibility that the RNF6 ubiquitinates and degrades p53 in cells. The novel in vitro screening system established herein is a powerful tool for finding novel E3s of a target protein. PMID:27249653

  11. Crystal structures of two bacterial HECT-like E3 ligases in complex with a human E2 reveal atomic details of pathogen-host interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, David Yin-wei; Diao, Jianbo; Chen, Jue

    2012-12-10

    In eukaryotes, ubiquitination is an important posttranslational process achieved through a cascade of ubiquitin-activating (E1), conjugating (E2), and ligase (E3) enzymes. Many pathogenic bacteria deliver virulence factors into the host cell that function as E3 ligases. How these bacterial 'Trojan horses' integrate into the eukaryotic ubiquitin system has remained a mystery. Here we report crystal structures of two bacterial E3s, Salmonella SopA and Escherichia coli NleL, both in complex with human E2 UbcH7. These structures represent two distinct conformational states of the bacterial E3s, supporting the necessary structural rearrangements associated with ubiquitin transfer. The E2-interacting surface of SopA and NleL has little similarity to those of eukaryotic E3s. However, both bacterial E3s bind to the canonical surface of E2 that normally interacts with eukaryotic E3s. Furthermore, we show that a glutamate residue on E3 is involved in catalyzing ubiquitin transfer from E3 to the substrate, but not from E2 to E3. Together, these results provide mechanistic insights into the ubiquitin pathway and a framework for understanding molecular mimicry in bacterial pathogenesis.

  12. Protein oxidation, UVA and human DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Brem, Reto

    2016-08-01

    Solar UVB is carcinogenic. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the carcinogenicity of UVB by excising potentially mutagenic UVB-induced DNA lesions. Despite this capacity for DNA repair, non-melanoma skin cancers and apparently normal sun-exposed skin contain huge numbers of mutations that are mostly attributable to unrepaired UVB-induced DNA lesions. UVA is about 20-times more abundant than UVB in incident sunlight. It does cause some DNA damage but this does not fully account for its biological impact. The effects of solar UVA are mediated by its interactions with cellular photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce oxidative stress. The proteome is a significant target for damage by UVA-induced ROS. In cultured human cells, UVA-induced oxidation of DNA repair proteins inhibits DNA repair. This article addresses the possible role of oxidative stress and protein oxidation in determining DNA repair efficiency - with particular reference to NER and skin cancer risk. PMID:27324272

  13. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  14. DNA Methylation Landscapes of Human Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    van Iperen, Liesbeth; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Tobi, Elmar W.; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Remodelling the methylome is a hallmark of mammalian development and cell differentiation. However, current knowledge of DNA methylation dynamics in human tissue specification and organ development largely stems from the extrapolation of studies in vitro and animal models. Here, we report on the DNA methylation landscape using the 450k array of four human tissues (amnion, muscle, adrenal and pancreas) during the first and second trimester of gestation (9,18 and 22 weeks). We show that a tissue-specific signature, constituted by tissue-specific hypomethylated CpG sites, was already present at 9 weeks of gestation (W9). Furthermore, we report large-scale remodelling of DNA methylation from W9 to W22. Gain of DNA methylation preferentially occurred near genes involved in general developmental processes, whereas loss of DNA methylation mapped to genes with tissue-specific functions. Dynamic DNA methylation was associated with enhancers, but not promoters. Comparison of our data with external fetal adrenal, brain and liver revealed striking similarities in the trajectory of DNA methylation during fetal development. The analysis of gene expression data indicated that dynamic DNA methylation was associated with the progressive repression of developmental programs and the activation of genes involved in tissue-specific processes. The DNA methylation landscape of human fetal development provides insight into regulatory elements that guide tissue specification and lead to organ functionality. PMID:26492326

  15. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  16. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  17. Human DNA polymerase α in binary complex with a DNA:DNA template-primer

    PubMed Central

    Coloma, Javier; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2016-01-01

    The Polα/primase complex assembles the short RNA-DNA fragments for priming of lagging and leading strand DNA replication in eukaryotes. As such, the Polα polymerase subunit encounters two types of substrates during primer synthesis: an RNA:DNA helix and a DNA:DNA helix. The engagement of the polymerase subunit with the DNA:DNA helix has been suggested as the of basis for primer termination in eukaryotes. However, there is no structural information on how the Polα polymerase subunit actually engages with a DNA:DNA helix during primer synthesis. We present here the first crystal structure of human Polα polymerase subunit in complex with a DNA:DNA helix. Unexpectedly, we find that portion of the DNA:DNA helix in contact with the polymerase is not in a B-form but in a hybrid A-B form. Almost all of the contacts observed previously with an RNA primer are preserved with a DNA primer – with the same set of polymerase residues tracking the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA or RNA primer. Thus, rather than loss of specific contacts, the free energy cost of distorting DNA from B- to hybrid A-B form may augur the termination of primer synthesis in eukaryotes. PMID:27032819

  18. DNA diagnosis of human genetic individuality.

    PubMed

    Pena, S D; Prado, V F; Epplen, J T

    1995-11-01

    DNA studies of the human genome have shown polymorphic variation at thousands of sites, defining an absolute genetic uniqueness for each individual. There are many circumstances in which it may be desirable to diagnose this molecular individuality, as for instance, in criminal investigations or paternity testing. Several techniques can be used for this DNA diagnosis and we can choose among them the one that best suits the specific problem at hand. In this review we describe the main methodologies in current use to investigate human DNA polymorphisms, discussing the best application of each option, as well as their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:8751139

  19. Putative E3 Ubiquitin Ligase of Human Rotavirus Inhibits NF-κB Activation by Using Molecular Mimicry To Target β-TrCP

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Marco; Dennis, Allison F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   NF-κB plays a critical role in the induction and maintenance of innate and adaptive immune transcriptional programs. An associated inhibitor of κB protein (IκB) regulates NF-κB activation and contains a degron motif (DSGΦxS) that undergoes phosphorylation following pathogen recognition or other proinflammatory signals. The E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFβ-TrCP recognizes this phosphodegron through its β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP) subunit and induces IκB degradation, allowing NF-κB to translocate to the nucleus and modulate gene expression. Rotavirus (RV), a major cause of pediatric gastroenteritis, can block NF-κB activation through the action of its nonstructural protein NSP1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase that mediates the degradation of β-TrCP or other immunomodulatory proteins in a virus strain-specific manner. Here, we show that NSP1 targets β-TrCP by mimicking the IκB phosphodegron. The NSP1 proteins of most human and porcine RV strains conserve a C-terminal phosphodegron-like (PDL) motif, DSGΦS. Deletion of this motif or mutation of its serine residues disrupts NSP1-mediated degradation of β-TrCP and inhibition of NF-κB activation. Additionally, a point mutation within the phosphodegron-binding pocket protects β-TrCP from NSP1-mediated turnover. Fusion of the PDL motif to an NSP1 protein known to target other immunomodulatory proteins generates a chimeric NSP1 protein that can induce β-TrCP degradation and block NF-κB activation. Other viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus LMP1, HIV-1 Vpu, and vaccinia virus A49) also contain a PDL motif and interact with β-TrCP to inhibit NF-κB activation. Taken together, these data suggest that targeting β-TrCP by molecular mimicry may be a common strategy used by human viruses to evade the host immune response. IMPORTANCE   The transcription factor NF-κB, a central regulator of the host response to infection, is a frequent target of viral antagonism. Pathogen detection

  20. Development of a ligase detection reaction/CGE method using a LIF dual-channel detection system for direct identification of allelic composition of mutated DNA in a mixed population of excess wild-type DNA.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mariko; Shimase, Koji; Noda, Keiichi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2013-05-01

    We developed an inexpensive LIF dual-channel detection system and applied it to a ligase detection reaction (LDR)/CGE method to identify the allelic composition of low-abundance point mutations in a large excess of wild-type DNA in a single reaction with a high degree of certainty. Ligation was performed in a tube with a nonlabeled common primer and multiplex discriminating primers, each labeled with a different standard fluorophore. The discriminating primers were directed against three mutant variations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene that have a high diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. LDR products generated from a particular K-ras mutation through successful ligation events were separated from remaining discriminating primers by CGE, followed by LIF detection using the new system, which consists of two photomultiplier tubes, each with a unique optical filter. Each fluorophore label conjugated to the corresponding LDR product produced a distinct fluorescence signal intensity ratio from the two detection channels, allowing spectral discrimination of the three labels. The ability of this system to detect point mutations in a wild-type sequence-dominated population, and to disclose their allelic composition, was thus demonstrated successfully. PMID:23463388

  1. Cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin.

    PubMed

    Grammer, L C; Metzger, B E; Patterson, R

    1984-03-16

    p6 report two cases of cutaneous allergy to human (recombinant DNA) insulin. Each patient had a history of systemic allergic reactions to porcine insulin and was at least as reactive to human as to porcine insulin by end-point cutaneous titration. Both patients' insulin allergy was managed with animal insulins and both have done well. Our experience with these two patients indicates that human insulin (rDNA) should not be expected to be efficacious in all patients with systemic allergy to insulin. PMID:6366262

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF144B is LPS-inducible in human, but not mouse, macrophages and promotes inducible IL-1β expression.

    PubMed

    Ariffin, Juliana K; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Schaale, Kolja; Gatica-Andrades, Marcela; Blumenthal, Antje; Schroder, Kate; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    Differences in human and mouse immune responses may partly reflect species-specific adaptations and can provide important insights into human immunity. In this study, we show that RNF144B, which encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase, was lipopolysaccharide-inducible in primary human macrophages and in human macrophage-like THP-1 cells. In contrast, Rnf144b was not lipopolysaccharide-inducible in several mouse cell populations, including primary macrophages from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and RAW264.7 macrophages. Similarly, Rnf144b was not up-regulated by infection of C57BL/6 mice with Escherichia coli Although the human and mouse RNF144B genes have conserved transcription start sites, cap analysis of gene expression data confirmed that the RNF144B promoter directs transcription in human but not mouse macrophages. The human and mouse RNF144B genes are controlled by highly conserved TATA-containing promoters, but subtle differences in transcription factor binding sites may account for differential regulation. Using gene silencing, we showed that RNF144B is necessary for priming of inflammasome responses in primary human macrophages. Specifically, RNF144B promotes lipopolysaccharide-inducible IL-1b mRNA expression but does not regulate expression of several other lipopolysaccharide-inducible cytokines (e.g., interleukin-10, interferon-γ) or affect expression of inflammasome components or substrates (e.g., procaspase-1, pro-interleukin-18). Our findings thus revealed a species-specific regulatory mechanism for selective inflammasome priming in human macrophages. PMID:26819317

  3. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    PubMed

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d. PMID:26766115

  4. The DNA-based human karyotype.

    PubMed

    Mayall, B H; Carrano, A V; Moore, D H; Ashworth, L K; Bennett, D E; Mendelsohn, M L

    1984-07-01

    Image cytometry and computer analysis are used to determine the relative DNA content and the DNA-based centromeric index of the 24 chromosomes of the human karyotype. A two-step procedure is used. Chromosomes of cells in metaphase first are stained with quinacrine and identified visually by their fluorescent Q-band patterns. They then are stained for DNA using gallocyanin-chrome alum. The chromosome images are scanned and recorded as digital values of optical density by an CYDAC image cytometric microscope system, CYDAC. The digital images are processed by computer to measure for each chromosome the relative DNA stain contents of the whole chromosome and of the p and q arms and the DNA-based centromeric index. About ten cells are analyzed for each of the donors, who are phenotypically normal men and women. The chromosome measurements are pooled by chromosome type for each donor and are compared among donors. The means of the chromosome measurements give the DNA-based human karyotype. Analysis of the DNA-based data shows that some chromosomes or portions of chromosomes vary significantly among donors. These variants do not correlate with detectable morphologic polymorphisms, such as Q- or C-band variants; thus they represent new and otherwise undetectable chromosome polymorphisms whose genetic basis and clinical significance are yet to be determined. PMID:6205836

  5. Replication pattern of human repeated DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Meneveri, R; Agresti, A; Breviario, D; Ginelli, E

    1984-10-01

    Either aphidicolin- or thymidine-synchronized human HL-60 cells were used to study the replication pattern of a family of human repetitive DNA sequences, the Eco RI 340 bp family (alpha RI-DNA), and of the ladders of fragments generated in total human DNA after digestion with XbaI and HaeIII (alpha satellite sequences). DNAs replicated in early, middle-early, middle-late and late S periods were labelled with BUdR or with [3H]thymidine. The efficiency of the cell synchronization procedure was confirmed by the transition from a high-GC to a high-AT average base composition of the DNA synthesized going from early to late S periods. By hybridizing EcoRI 340 bp repetitive fragments to BUdR-DNAs it was found that this family of sequences is replicated throughout the entire S period. Comparing fluorograph densitometric scans of [3H]DNAs to the scans of ethidium bromide patterns of total HL-60 DNA digested with XbaI and HaeIII, it was observed that DNA synthesized in different S periods is characterized by approximately the same ladder of fragments, while the intensity of each band may vary through the S phase; in particular, the XbaI 2.4 kb fragment becomes undetectable in late S. PMID:6089891

  6. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  7. Apoptosis by aloe-emodin is mediated through down-regulation of calpain-2 and ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won; Jeon, Young Keul; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2012-02-01

    Natural flavonoids are associated with anti-proliferation of cancer growth. However, the antioxidant and anti-proliferation effects of AE (aloe-emodin) have not been well studied. We have investigated how AE affects the proliferation of hepatic hepatocellular carcinoma cells and exerts an anti-cancer effect. The cytotoxic effect of AE was demonstrated using an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay and Huh-7 cells were inhibited by AE treatment in both dose- and time-dependent manners. The IC(50) level of AE was ∼75 μM. AE also has anti-proliferative effects via induction of DNA damage and apoptosis. 2-DE (two-dimensional electrophoresis) revealed that several proteins were related to the anti-cancer effects of AE. CAPN2 (calpain-2) and UBE3A (ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A), which are associated with the apoptosis signalling pathway, were verified by Western blotting. AE exhibited potent anti-proliferative effects on Huh-7 cells via down-regulation of CAPN2 and UBE3A. The findings support the possibility of AE being a chemopreventative agent. PMID:21861846

  8. Perinatal transmission of human papilomavirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rombaldi, Renato L; Serafini, Eduardo P; Mandelli, Jovana; Zimmermann, Edineia; Losquiavo, Kamille P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose was to study the perinatal transmission of human papillomavirus DNA (HPV-DNA) in 63 mother-newborn pairs, besides looking at the epidemiological factors involved in the viral DNA transmission. The following sampling methods were used: (1) in the pregnant woman, when was recruited, in cervix and clinical lesions of the vagina, vulva and perineal region; (2) in the newborn, (a) buccal, axillary and inguinal regions; (b) nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c) cord blood; (3) in the children, buccal was repeated in the 4th week and 6th and 12th month of life. HPV-DNA was identified using two methodologies: multiplex PCR (PGMY09 and MY11 primers) and nested-PCR (genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58). Perinatal transmission was considered when concordance was found in type-specific HPV between mother/newborn or mother/child. HPV-DNA genital was detected in 49 pregnant women submitted to delivery. Eleven newborns (22.4%, n = 11/49) were HPV-DNA positive. In 8 cases (16.3%, n = 8/49) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. At the end of the first month of life three children (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA positive, while two remained positive from birth. In 3 cases (100%, n = 3/3) there was type specific HPV concordance between mother/newborn samples. In the 6th month, a child (2%, n = 1/49) had become HPV-DNA positive between the 1st and 6th month of life, and there was type specific HPV concordance of mother/newborn samples. All the HPV-DNA positive children (22.4%, n = 11/49) at birth and at the end first month of life (6.1%, n = 3/49) became HPV-DNA negative at the age of 6 months. The HPV-DNA positive child (2%, n = 1/49) from 1st to the 6th month of life became HPV-DNA negative between the 6th and 12th month of life and one child had anogenital warts. In the twelfth month all (100%, n = 49/49) the children studied were HPV-DNA negative. A positive and significant correlation was observed between perinatal transmission

  9. Actions of human DNA glycosylases on uracil-containing DNA, methylated DNA and their reconstituted chromatins.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, K; Oikawa, A

    1979-07-26

    Extracts of human lymphoblastoid cells catalyzed complete release of uracil (Ura) from PBS1 DNA, which contains Ura instead of thymine as a normal component (Ura-DNA), and 3-methyladenine (3-MeAde) from DNA methylated with methyl methanesulfonate (Me-DNA). These two activities, Ura-DNA glycosylase and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase, differed in heat stability. Cell extracts released Ura more rapidly and 3-MeAde more slowly from alkali-denatured preparations of Ura- and Me-DNA, respectively, than from native DNA's. On incubation with reconstituted chromatins, prepared from Ura-DNA and Me-DNA, respectively, with calf thymus chromosomal protein by salt gradient dialysis, cell extracts released all the Ura but only about half of the 3-MeAde residues, although both these chromatins were degraded by micrococcal nuclease until about half of the nucleotides became acid soluble. The activities of Ura-DNA and 3-MeAde-DNA glycosylase of xeroderma pigmentosum cells were similar to those of normal cells. PMID:465495

  10. Human insulin: DNA technology's first drug.

    PubMed

    The, M J

    1989-11-01

    The history, biologic activity, and immunogenicity of human insulin are described. Recombinant human insulin first entered clinical trials in humans in 1980. At that time, the A and B chains of the insulin molecule were produced separately and then combined by chemical techniques. Since 1986, a different recombinant process has been used. The human genetic coding for proinsulin is inserted into Escherichia coli cells, which are then grown by fermentation to produce proinsulin. The connecting peptide is cleaved enzymatically from proinsulin to produce human insulin. Studies indicate that there are no important differences between pork insulin and human insulin in terms of therapeutic efficacy and disposition after intravenous administration. Recombinant human insulin has a faster onset of action and lower immunogenicity than pork or beef insulin. Diabetic patients may have an improvement in glucose concentrations when their therapy is switched from animal-source insulin to human insulin. Such a change usually requires a dosage adjustment, which must be determined by a physician. Pharmacists are responsible for educating patients concerning all insulin products and for preventing patients from interchanging insulin products. The availability of human insulin as the first pharmaceutical product manufactured through recombinant DNA technology, however, has had little effect on the pharmacist's role in the care of such patients. The production of human insulin through recombinant DNA technology represents an important advance in the treatment of patients with diabetes. PMID:2690608

  11. DNA methylation contributes to natural human variation

    PubMed Central

    Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Sayols, Sergi; Gomez, Antonio; Sandoval, Juan; Monk, Dave; Hata, Kenichiro; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Wang, Liewei; Esteller, Manel

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are important for establishing cell, tissue, and organism phenotypes, but little is known about their contribution to natural human variation. To determine their contribution to variability, we have generated genome-scale DNA methylation profiles of three human populations (Caucasian-American, African-American, and Han Chinese-American) and examined the differentially methylated CpG sites. The distinctly methylated genes identified suggest an influence of DNA methylation on phenotype differences, such as susceptibility to certain diseases and pathogens, and response to drugs and environmental agents. DNA methylation differences can be partially traced back to genetic variation, suggesting that differentially methylated CpG sites serve as evolutionarily established mediators between the genetic code and phenotypic variability. Notably, one-third of the DNA methylation differences were not associated with any genetic variation, suggesting that variation in population-specific sites takes place at the genetic and epigenetic levels, highlighting the contribution of epigenetic modification to natural human variation. PMID:23908385

  12. Interplay between Cernunnos-XLF and nonhomologous end-joining proteins at DNA ends in the cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Malivert, Laurent; Revy, Patrick; Biard, Denis; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2007-11-01

    Cernunnos-XLF is the most recently identified core component in the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in mammals. It associates with the XRCC4/ligase IV ligation complex and stimulates its activity in a still unknown manner. NHEJ also requires the DNA-dependent protein kinase that contains a Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. To understand the interplay between Cernunnos-XLF and the other proteins implicated in the NHEJ process, we have analyzed the interactions of Cernunnos-XLF and NHEJ proteins in cells after treatment with DNA double strand-breaking agents by means of a detergent-based cellular fractionation protocol. We report that Cernunnos-XLF is corecruited with the core NHEJ components on chromatin damaged with DSBs in human cells and is phosphorylated by the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit. Our data show a pivotal role for DNA ligase IV in the NHEJ ligation complex assembly and recruitment to DSBs because the association of Cernunnos-XLF with the XRCC4/ligase IV complex relies primarily on the DNA ligase IV component, and an intact XRCC4/ligase IV complex is necessary for Cernunnos-XLF mobilization to damaged chromatin. Conversely, a Cernunnos-XLF defect has no apparent impact on the XRCC4/ligase IV association and recruitment to the DSBs or on the stimulation of the DNA-dependent protein kinase on DNA ends. PMID:17720816

  13. Extraction of DNA from Human Skeletal Material.

    PubMed

    Pajnič, Irena Zupanič

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the recovery and analysis of DNA from skeletal remains has been applied to several contexts ranging from disaster victim identification to the identification of the victims of conflict. Here are described procedures for processing the bone and tooth samples including mechanical and chemical cleaning, cutting and powdering in the presence of liquid nitrogen, complete demineralization of bone and tooth powder, DNA extraction, DNA purification using magnetic beads, and the precautions and strategies implemented to avoid and detect contamination. It has proven highly successful in the analysis of bones and teeth from Second World War victims' skeletal remains that have been excavated from mass graves in Slovenia and is also suitable for genetic identification of relatively fresh human remains. PMID:27259733

  14. Scientists Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160189.html Scientists Spot 15 Regions of Human DNA Linked to Depression Many are located near genes ... say they've identified 15 regions of human DNA associated with depression. These regions may contain genes ...

  15. A Human Orthologue of Archaeal DNA Repair Protein Hef is Defective in Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group M

    PubMed Central

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L.; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G.; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.; Wang, Weidong

    2005-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease featuring genomic instability and cancer predisposition1. Nine FA genes have been identified, and their products participate in a DNA damage response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA22,3. We have previously purified a FA core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and 6 other FA proteins4–6. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the FA DNA damage response pathway2,7. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutated in FA patients of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250, renamed FANCM, has sequence similarity to known DNA repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast Mph1 and human ERCC4/XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly due to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between FA proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the FA core complex along DNA. PMID:16116422

  16. Drug resistance to inhibitors of the human double minute-2 E3 ligase is mediated by point mutations of p53, but can be overcome with the p53 targeting agent RITA.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard J; Bjorklund, Chad C; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J; Orlowski, Robert Z

    2012-10-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover and has been validated preclinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, whereas Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis). HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor nongenotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G(2)-M arrest, upregulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared with RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  17. Drug Resistance to Inhibitors of the Human Double Minute-2 E3 Ligase is Mediated by Point Mutations of p53, but can be Overcome with the p53 Targeting Agent RITA

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard J.; Bjorklund, Chad C.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Kuhn, Deborah J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2012-01-01

    The human double minute (HDM)-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays a key role in p53 turnover, and has been validated pre-clinically as a target in multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). HDM-2 inhibitors are entering clinical trials, and we therefore sought to understand potential mechanisms of resistance in lymphoid models. Wild-type p53 H929 MM and Granta-519 MCL cells resistant to MI-63 or Nutlin were generated by exposing them to increasing drug concentrations. MI-63-resistant H929 and Granta-519 cells were resistant to Nutlin, while Nutlin-resistant cells displayed cross-resistance to MI-63. These cells also showed cross-resistance to bortezomib, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and melphalan, but remained sensitive to the small molecule inhibitor RITA. HDM-2 inhibitor-resistant cells harbored increased p53 levels, but neither genotoxic nor non-genotoxic approaches to activate p53 induced HDM-2 or p21. Resequencing revealed wild-type HDM-2, but mutations were found in the p53 DNA binding and dimerization domains. In resistant cells, RITA induced a G2/M arrest, up-regulation of p53 targets HDM-2, PUMA, and NOXA, and PARP cleavage. Combination regimens with RITA and MI-63 resulted in enhanced cell death compared to RITA alone. These findings support the possibility that p53 mutation could be a primary mechanism of acquired resistance to HDM-2 inhibitors in MCL and MM. Furthermore, they suggest that simultaneous restoration of p53 function and HDM-2 inhibition is a rational strategy for clinical translation. PMID:22933706

  18. Active site of the mRNA-capping enzyme guanylyltransferase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: similarity to the nucleotidyl attachment motif of DNA and RNA ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, L D; Buratowski, S

    1994-01-01

    Nascent mRNA chains are capped at the 5' end by the addition of a guanylyl residue to form a G(5')ppp(5')N ... structure. During the capping reaction, the guanylyltransferase (GTP:mRNA guanylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.50) is reversibly and covalently guanylylated. In this enzyme-GMP (E-GMP) intermediate, GMP is linked to the epsilon-amino group of a lysine residue via a phosphoamide bond. Lys-70 was identified as the GMP attachment site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae guanylyltransferase (encoded by the CEG1 gene) by guanylylpeptide sequencing. CEG1 genes with substitutions at Lys-70 were unable to support viability in yeast and produced proteins that were not guanylylated in vitro. The CEG1 active site exhibits sequence similarity to the active sites of viral guanylyltransferases and polynucleotide ligases, suggesting similarity in the mechanisms of nucleotidyl transfer catalyzed by these enzymes. Images PMID:8022828

  19. Low expression of the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CBL Confers Chemoresistance in Human Pancreatic Cancer and is Targeted by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kadera, Brian E.; Toste, Paul A.; Wu, Nanping; Li, Luyi; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Dawson, David W.; Donahue, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Expression of CBL, an ubiquitin ligase, is decreased in 60% of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) and is associated with shorter overall survival. We sought to determine how low CBL directly contributes to clinically more aggressive PDAC. Experimental Design Human PDACs were stained for CBL, pEGFR, and EGFR. CBL-low was modeled in PDAC cells (Panc-1, L3.6pl, AsPC-1) via transient transfection (siRNA) or stable knockdown (shRNA). Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assays and FACS. Immunoblot and a phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase (pRTK) array were used to probe signal transduction. NOD-scid-IL2Rγnull mice were subcutaneously implanted with PDAC or PDACCBL-low cells on opposite flanks and treated with gemcitabine ± erlotinib for ≥4 weeks. Results There was an inverse correlation between CBL and pEGFR protein expression in 12 of 15 tumors. CBL knockdown increased PDAC resistance to gemcitabine and 5-FU by upregulating pEGFR (Y1068), pERK, and pAKT. A pRTK array of PDACCBL-low cells revealed additional activated tyrosine kinases but all to a much lower magnitude than EGFR. Increased chemoresistance from low CBL was abrogated by the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib both in vitro and in vivo. Erlotinib + gemcitabine treated PDACCBL-low cells exhibited greater apoptosis by cleaved PARP, Caspase 3 and Annexin V/PI. Conclusions Low CBL causes chemoresistance in PDAC via stress-induced EGFR activation that can be effectively abrogated by EGFR inhibition. These results suggest that dysregulation of ubiquitination is a key mechanism of EGFR hyperactivation in PDAC and that low CBL may define PDAC tumors likely to respond to erlotinib treatment. PMID:25348515

  20. Regulation of amino acid transporter trafficking by mTORC1 in primary human trophoblast cells is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Changes in placental amino acid transfer directly contribute to altered fetal growth, which increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Placental amino acid transfer is critically dependent on the expression of specific transporters in the plasma membrane of the trophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this process are largely unknown. Nedd4-2 is an ubiquitin ligase that catalyses the ubiquitination of proteins, resulting in proteasomal degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) decreases amino acid uptake in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells by activation of Nedd4-2, which increases transporter ubiquitination resulting in decreased transporter expression in the plasma membrane. mTORC 1 inhibition increased the expression of Nedd4-2, promoted ubiquitination and decreased the plasma membrane expression of SNAT2 (an isoform of the System A amino acid transporter) and LAT1 (a System L amino acid transporter isoform), resulting in decreased cellular amino acid uptake. Nedd4-2 silencing markedly increased the trafficking of SNAT2 and LAT1 to the plasma membrane, which stimulated cellular amino acid uptake. mTORC1 inhibition by silencing of raptor failed to decrease amino acid transport following Nedd4-2 silencing. In conclusion, we have identified a novel link between mTORC1 signalling and ubiquitination, a common posttranslational modification. Because placental mTORC1 is inhibited in fetal growth restriction and activated in fetal overgrowth, we propose that regulation of placental amino acid transporter ubiquitination by mTORC1 and Nedd4-2 constitutes a molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal fetal growth. PMID:26608079

  1. DNA methylation and healthy human aging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meaghan J; Goodman, Sarah J; Kobor, Michael S

    2015-12-01

    The process of aging results in a host of changes at the cellular and molecular levels, which include senescence, telomere shortening, and changes in gene expression. Epigenetic patterns also change over the lifespan, suggesting that epigenetic changes may constitute an important component of the aging process. The epigenetic mark that has been most highly studied is DNA methylation, the presence of methyl groups at CpG dinucleotides. These dinucleotides are often located near gene promoters and associate with gene expression levels. Early studies indicated that global levels of DNA methylation increase over the first few years of life and then decrease beginning in late adulthood. Recently, with the advent of microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies, increases in variability of DNA methylation with age have been observed, and a number of site-specific patterns have been identified. It has also been shown that certain CpG sites are highly associated with age, to the extent that prediction models using a small number of these sites can accurately predict the chronological age of the donor. Together, these observations point to the existence of two phenomena that both contribute to age-related DNA methylation changes: epigenetic drift and the epigenetic clock. In this review, we focus on healthy human aging throughout the lifetime and discuss the dynamics of DNA methylation as well as how interactions between the genome, environment, and the epigenome influence aging rates. We also discuss the impact of determining 'epigenetic age' for human health and outline some important caveats to existing and future studies. PMID:25913071

  2. Structural chromosome abnormalities, increased DNA strand breaks and DNA strand break repair deficiency in dermal fibroblasts from old female human donors

    PubMed Central

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Seggewiß, Sabine; Walter, Regina; Tigges, Julia; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Ohse, Sebastian; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Boege, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts provide a paradigmatic model of cellular adaptation to long-term exogenous stress and ageing processes driven thereby. Here we addressed whether fibroblast ageing analysed ex vivo entails genome instability. Dermal fibroblasts from human female donors aged 20–67 years were studied in primary culture at low population doubling. Under these conditions, the incidence of replicative senescence and rates of age-correlated telomere shortening were insignificant. Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed age-related impairment of mitosis, telomere and chromosome maintenance and induction of genes associated with DNA repair and non-homologous end-joining, most notably XRCC4 and ligase 4. We observed an age-correlated drop in proliferative capacity and age-correlated increases in heterochromatin marks, structural chromosome abnormalities (deletions, translocations and chromatid breaks), DNA strand breaks and histone H2AX-phosphorylation. In a third of the cells from old and middle-aged donors repair of X-ray induced DNA strand breaks was impaired despite up-regulation of DNA repair genes. The distinct phenotype of genome instability, increased heterochromatinisation and (in 30% of the cases futile) up-regulation of DNA repair genes was stably maintained over several cell passages indicating that it represents a feature of geroconversion that is distinct from cellular senescence, as it does not encompass a block of proliferation. PMID:25678531

  3. Posttranslational Regulation of Human DNA Polymerase ι*

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Justyna; McLenigan, Mary P.; Frank, Ekaterina G.; Dai, Xiaoxia; Yang, Wei; Wang, Yinsheng; Woodgate, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Human DNA polymerases (pols) η and ι are Y-family DNA polymerase paralogs that facilitate translesion synthesis past damaged DNA. Both polη and polι can be monoubiquitinated in vivo. Polη has been shown to be ubiquitinated at one primary site. When this site is unavailable, three nearby lysines may become ubiquitinated. In contrast, mass spectrometry analysis of monoubiquitinated polι revealed that it is ubiquitinated at over 27 unique sites. Many of these sites are localized in different functional domains of the protein, including the catalytic polymerase domain, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting region, the Rev1-interacting region, and its ubiquitin binding motifs UBM1 and UBM2. Polι monoubiquitination remains unchanged after cells are exposed to DNA-damaging agents such as UV light (generating UV photoproducts), ethyl methanesulfonate (generating alkylation damage), mitomycin C (generating interstrand cross-links), or potassium bromate (generating direct oxidative DNA damage). However, when exposed to naphthoquinones, such as menadione and plumbagin, which cause indirect oxidative damage through mitochondrial dysfunction, polι becomes transiently polyubiquitinated via Lys11- and Lys48-linked chains of ubiquitin and subsequently targeted for degradation. Polyubiquitination does not occur as a direct result of the perturbation of the redox cycle as no polyubiquitination was observed after treatment with rotenone or antimycin A, which both inhibit mitochondrial electron transport. Interestingly, polyubiquitination was observed after the inhibition of the lysine acetyltransferase KATB3/p300. We hypothesize that the formation of polyubiquitination chains attached to polι occurs via the interplay between lysine acetylation and ubiquitination of ubiquitin itself at Lys11 and Lys48 rather than oxidative damage per se. PMID:26370087

  4. Nuclease-Assisted Suppression of Human DNA Background in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yajing; Giske, Christian G.; Gille-Johnson, Patrik; Emanuelsson, Olof; Lundeberg, Joakim; Gyarmati, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition characterized by a systemic inflammatory response of the body caused by pathogenic microorganisms in the bloodstream. Blood or plasma is typically used for diagnosis, both containing large amount of human DNA, greatly exceeding the DNA of microbial origin. In order to enrich bacterial DNA, we applied the C0t effect to reduce human DNA background: a model system was set up with human and Escherichia coli (E. coli) DNA to mimic the conditions of bloodstream infections; and this system was adapted to plasma and blood samples from septic patients. As a consequence of the C0t effect, abundant DNA hybridizes faster than rare DNA. Following denaturation and re-hybridization, the amount of abundant DNA can be decreased with the application of double strand specific nucleases, leaving the non-hybridized rare DNA intact. Our experiments show that human DNA concentration can be reduced approximately 100,000-fold without affecting the E. coli DNA concentration in a model system with similarly sized amplicons. With clinical samples, the human DNA background was decreased 100-fold, as bacterial genomes are approximately 1,000-fold smaller compared to the human genome. According to our results, background suppression can be a valuable tool to enrich rare DNA in clinical samples where a high amount of background DNA can be found. PMID:25076135

  5. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in eukaryotic histone H3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BirA ligase, a prokaryotic ortholog of human holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), is known to biotinylate proteins. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase may also catalyze biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would render recombinant BirA ligase a useful surrogate for HCS in stud...

  6. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  7. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  8. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  9. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  10. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  11. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    PubMed

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust. PMID:21883207

  12. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. DNA Methylation: Insights into Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Andrew J.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental initiative for evolutionary biologists is to understand the molecular basis underlying phenotypic diversity. A long-standing hypothesis states that species-specific traits may be explained by differences in gene regulation rather than differences at the protein level. Over the past few years, evolutionary studies have shifted from mere sequence comparisons to integrative analyses in which gene regulation is key to understanding species evolution. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in the regulation of numerous biological processes. Nevertheless, the evolution of the human methylome and the processes driving such changes are poorly understood. Here, we review the close interplay between Cytosine-phosphate-Guanine (CpG) methylation and the underlying genome sequence, as well as its evolutionary impact. We also summarize the latest advances in the field, revisiting the main literature on human and nonhuman primates. We hope to encourage the scientific community to address the many challenges posed by the field of comparative epigenomics. PMID:26658498

  14. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  15. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  16. CpG methylation patterns of human mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baojing; Du, Qingqing; Chen, Lu; Fu, Guangping; Li, Shujin; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Bin, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is still in controversy. To clarify this point, we applied the gold standard method for DNA methylation, bisulfite pyrosequencing, to examine human mtDNA methylation status. Before bisulfite conversion, BamHI was used to digest DNA to open the loop of mtDNA. The results demonstrated that the linear mtDNA had significantly higher bisulfite conversion efficiency compared with circular mtDNA. Furthermore, the methylation values obtained from linear mtDNA were significantly lower than that of circular mtDNA, which was verified by SEQUENOM MassARRAY. The above impacts of circular structure were also observed in lung DNA samples but not in saliva DNA samples. Mitochondrial genome methylation of blood samples and saliva samples from 14 unrelated individuals was detected. The detected regions covered 83 CpG sites across mtDNA including D-loop, 12 S rRNA, 16 S rRNA, ND1, COXI, ND3, ND4, ND5, CYTB. We found that the average methylation levels of nine regions were all less than 2% for both sample types. In conclusion, our findings firstly show that the circular structure of mtDNA affects bisulfite conversion efficiency, which leads to overestimation of mtDNA methylation values. CpG methylation in human mtDNA is a very rare event at most DNA regions. PMID:26996456

  17. CpG methylation patterns of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojing; Du, Qingqing; Chen, Lu; Fu, Guangping; Li, Shujin; Fu, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Chunling; Bin, Cong

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic modification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is still in controversy. To clarify this point, we applied the gold standard method for DNA methylation, bisulfite pyrosequencing, to examine human mtDNA methylation status. Before bisulfite conversion, BamHI was used to digest DNA to open the loop of mtDNA. The results demonstrated that the linear mtDNA had significantly higher bisulfite conversion efficiency compared with circular mtDNA. Furthermore, the methylation values obtained from linear mtDNA were significantly lower than that of circular mtDNA, which was verified by SEQUENOM MassARRAY. The above impacts of circular structure were also observed in lung DNA samples but not in saliva DNA samples. Mitochondrial genome methylation of blood samples and saliva samples from 14 unrelated individuals was detected. The detected regions covered 83 CpG sites across mtDNA including D-loop, 12 S rRNA, 16 S rRNA, ND1, COXI, ND3, ND4, ND5, CYTB. We found that the average methylation levels of nine regions were all less than 2% for both sample types. In conclusion, our findings firstly show that the circular structure of mtDNA affects bisulfite conversion efficiency, which leads to overestimation of mtDNA methylation values. CpG methylation in human mtDNA is a very rare event at most DNA regions. PMID:26996456

  18. The human F-Box DNA helicase FBH1 faces Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srs2 and postreplication repair pathway roles.

    PubMed

    Chiolo, Irene; Saponaro, Marco; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Seo, Yeon-Soo; Liberi, Giordano

    2007-11-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srs2 UvrD DNA helicase controls genome integrity by preventing unscheduled recombination events. While Srs2 orthologues have been identified in prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic organisms, human orthologues of Srs2 have not been described so far. We found that the human F-box DNA helicase hFBH1 suppresses specific recombination defects of S. cerevisiae srs2 mutants, consistent with the finding that the helicase domain of hFBH1 is highly conserved with that of Srs2. Surprisingly, hFBH1 in the absence of SRS2 also suppresses the DNA damage sensitivity caused by inactivation of postreplication repair-dependent functions leading to PCNA ubiquitylation. The F-box domain of hFBH1, which is not present in Srs2, is crucial for hFBH1 functions in substituting for Srs2 and postreplication repair factors. Furthermore, our findings indicate that an intact F-box domain, acting as an SCF ubiquitin ligase, is required for the DNA damage-induced degradation of hFBH1 itself. Overall, our findings suggest that the hFBH1 helicase is a functional human orthologue of budding yeast Srs2 that also possesses self-regulation properties necessary to execute its recombination functions. PMID:17724085

  19. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265

  20. Nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) and chromosomal translocations in humans.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Michael R; Gu, Jiafeng; Lu, Haihui; Shimazaki, Noriko; Tsai, Albert G

    2010-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise in dividing cells about ten times per cell per day. Causes include replication across a nick, free radicals of oxidative metabolism, ionizing radiation, and inadvertent action by enzymes of DNA metabolism (such as failures of type II topoisomerases or cleavage by recombinases at off-target sites). There are two major double-strand break repair pathways. Homologous recombination (HR) can repair double-strand breaks, but only during S phase and typically only if there are hundreds of base pairs of homology. The more commonly used pathway is nonhomologous DNA end joining, abbreviated NHEJ. NHEJ can repair a DSB at any time during the cell cycle and does not require any homology, although a few nucleotides of terminal microhomology are often utilized by the NHEJ enzymes, if present. The proteins and enzymes of NHEJ include Ku, DNA-PKcs, Artemis, DNA polymerase mu (Pol micro), DNA polymerase lambda (Pol lambda), XLF (also called Cernunnos), XRCC4, and DNA ligase IV. These enzymes constitute what some call the classical NHEJ pathway, and in wild type cells, the vast majority of joining events appear to proceed using these components. NHEJ is present in many prokaryotes, as well as all eukaryotes, and very similar mechanistic flexibility evolved both convergently and divergently. When two double-strand breaks occur on different chromosomes, then the rejoining is almost always done by NHEJ. The causes of DSBs in lymphomas most often involve the RAG or AID enzymes that function in the specialized processes of antigen receptor gene rearrangement. PMID:20012587

  1. Overexpression of glutamate–cysteine ligase protects human COV434 granulosa tumour cells against oxidative and γ-radiation-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Wanstreet, Mabel M.; Giedzinski, Erich; Limoli, Charles L.; Luderer, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is toxic to ovarian follicles and can cause infertility. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the toxicity of ionizing radiation in several cell types. We have shown that depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) sensitizes follicles and granulosa cells to toxicant-induced apoptosis and that supplementation of GSH is protective. The rate-limiting reaction in GSH biosynthesis is catalysed by glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL), which consists of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a regulatory subunit (GCLM). We hypothesized that overexpression of Gclc or Gclm to increase GSH synthesis would protect granulosa cells against oxidant- and radiation-induced cell death. The COV434 line of human granulosa tumour cells was stably transfected with vectors designed for the constitutive expression of Gclc, Gclm, both Gclc and Gclm or empty vector. GCL protein and enzymatic activity and total GSH levels were significantly increased in the GCL subunit-transfected cells. GCL-transfected cells were resistant to cell killing by treatment with hydrogen peroxide compared to control cells. Cell viability declined less in all the GCL subunit-transfected cell lines 1–8 h after 0.5 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment than in control cells. We next examined the effects of GCL overexpression on responses to ionizing radiation. ROS were measured using a redox-sensitive fluorogenic dye in cells irradiated with 0, 1 or 5 Gy of γ-rays. There was a dose-dependent increase in ROS within 30 min in all cell lines, an effect that was significantly attenuated in Gcl-transfected cells. Apoptosis, assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labelling and activated caspase-3 immunoblotting, was significantly decreased in irradiated Gclc-transfected cells compared to irradiated control cells. Suppression of GSH synthesis in Gclc-transfected cells reversed resistance to radiation. These findings show that

  2. DNA copy number losses in human neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Knuutila, S; Aalto, Y; Autio, K; Björkqvist, A M; El-Rifai, W; Hemmer, S; Huhta, T; Kettunen, E; Kiuru-Kuhlefelt, S; Larramendy, M L; Lushnikova, T; Monni, O; Pere, H; Tapper, J; Tarkkanen, M; Varis, A; Wasenius, V M; Wolf, M; Zhu, Y

    1999-09-01

    This review summarizes reports of recurrent DNA sequence copy number losses in human neoplasms detected by comparative genomic hybridization. Recurrent losses that affect each of the chromosome arms in 73 tumor types are tabulated from 169 reports. The tables are available online at http://www.amjpathol.org and http://www. helsinki.fi/ approximately lglvwww/CMG.html. The genes relevant to the lost regions are discussed for each of the chromosomes. The review is supplemented also by a list of known and putative tumor suppressor genes and DNA repair genes (see Table 1, online). Losses are found in all chromosome arms, but they seem to be relatively rare at 1q, 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, and 20q. Losses and their minimal common overlapping areas that were present in a great proportion of the 73 tumor entities reported in Table 2 (see online) are (in descending order of frequency): 9p23-p24 (48%), 13q21 (47%), 6q16 (44%), 6q26-q27 (44%), 8p23 (37%), 18q22-q23 (37%), 17p12-p13 (34%), 1p36.1 (34%), 11q23 (33%), 1p22 (32%), 4q32-qter (31%), 14q22-q23 (25%), 10q23 (25%), 10q25-qter (25%),15q21 (23%), 16q22 (23%), 5q21 (23%), 3p12-p14 (22%), 22q12 (22%), Xp21 (21%), Xq21 (21%), and 10p12 (20%). The frequency of losses at chromosomes 7 and 20 was less than 10% in all tumors. The chromosomal regions in which the most frequent losses are found implicate locations of essential tumor suppressor genes and DNA repair genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of several tumor types. PMID:10487825

  3. Structural basis for recognition of hemi-methylated DNA by the SRA domain of human UHRF1.

    SciTech Connect

    Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Li, Yanjun; Duan, Shili; Bronner, Christian; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-11-17

    Epigenetic inheritance in mammals is characterized by high-fidelity replication of CpG methylation patterns during development. UHRF1 (also known as ICBP90 in humans and Np95 in mouse) is an E3 ligase important for the maintenance of global and local DNA methylation in vivo. The preferential affinity of UHRF1 for hemi-methylated DNA over symmetrically methylated DNA by means of its SET and RING-associated (SRA) domain and its association with the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) suggests a role in replication of the epigenetic code. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the apo SRA domain of human UHRF1 and a 2.2 {angstrom} structure of its complex with hemi-methylated DNA, revealing a previously unknown reading mechanism for methylated CpG sites (mCpG). The SRA-DNA complex has several notable structural features including a binding pocket that accommodates the 5-methylcytosine that is flipped out of the duplex DNA. Two specialized loops reach through the resulting gap in the DNA from both the major and the minor grooves to read the other three bases of the CpG duplex. The major groove loop confers both specificity for the CpG dinucleotide and discrimination against methylation of deoxycytidine of the complementary strand. The structure, along with mutagenesis data, suggests how UHRF1 acts as a key factor for DNMT1 maintenance methylation through recognition of a fundamental unit of epigenetic inheritance, mCpG.

  4. Genetically engineered mouse models for functional studies of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihua; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The SCF (SKP1 (S-phase-kinase-associated protein 1), Cullin-1, F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligases, the founding member of Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in mammals. Each individual SCF E3 ligase consists of one adaptor protein SKP1, one scaffold protein cullin-1 (the first family member of the eight cullins), one F-box protein out of 69 family members, and one out of two RING (Really Interesting New Gene) family proteins RBX1/ROC1 or RBX2/ROC2/SAG/RNF7. Various combinations of these four components construct a large number of SCF E3s that promote the degradation of many key regulatory proteins in cell-context, temporally, and spatially dependent manners, thus controlling precisely numerous important cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, gene transcription, signal transduction, DNA replication, maintenance of genome integrity, and tumorigenesis. To understand how the SCF E3 ligases regulate these cellular processes and embryonic development under in vivo physiological conditions, a number of mouse models with transgenic (Tg) expression or targeted deletion of components of SCF have been established and characterized. In this review, we will provide a brief introduction to the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, followed by a comprehensive overview on the existing Tg and knockout (KO) mouse models of the SCF E3s, and discuss the role of each component in mouse embryogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, carcinogenesis, as well as other pathogenic processes associated with human diseases. We will end with a brief discussion on the future directions of this research area and the potential applications of the knowledge gained to more effective therapeutic interventions of human diseases. PMID:23528706

  5. Human DNA adduct measurements: state of the art.

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, M C; Weston, A

    1996-01-01

    Human DNA adduct formation (covalent modification of DNA with chemical carcinogens) is a promising biomarker for elucidating the molecular epidemiology of cancer. Classes of compounds for which human DNA adducts have been observed include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrosamines, mycotoxins, aromatic amines, heterocyclic amines, ultraviolet light, and alkylating cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Most human DNA adduct exposure monitoring has been performed with either 32P-postlabeling or immunoassays, neither of which is able to chemically characterize specific DNA adducts. Recently developed combinations of methods with chemical and physical end points have allowed identification of specific adducts in human tissues. Studies are presented that demonstrate that high ambient levels of benzo[a]pyrene are associated with high levels of DNA adducts in human blood cell DNA and that the same DNA adduct levels drop when the ambient PAH levels decrease significantly. DNA adduct dosimetry, which has been achieved with some dietary carcinogens and cancer chemotherapeutic agents, is described, as well as studies correlating DNA adducts with other biomarkers. It is likely that some toxic, noncarcinogenic compounds may have genotoxic effects, including oxidative damage, and that adverse health outcomes other than cancer may be correlated with DNA adduct formation. The studies presented here may serve as useful prototypes for exploration of other toxicological end points. PMID:8933030

  6. Diffusion of human Replication Protein A along single stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Binh; Sokoloski, Joshua; Galletto, Roberto; Elson, Elliot L.; Wold, Marc S.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a eukaryotic single stranded (ss) DNA binding protein that plays critical roles in most aspects of genome maintenance, including replication, recombination and repair. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, destabilizes DNA secondary structure and facilitates binding of other proteins to ssDNA. However, RPA must be removed from or redistributed along ssDNA during these processes. To probe the dynamics of RPA-DNA interactions, we combined ensemble and single molecule fluorescence approaches to examine human RPA diffusion along ssDNA and find that an hRPA hetero-trimer can diffuse rapidly along ssDNA. Diffusion of hRPA is functional in that it provides the mechanism by which hRPA can transiently disrupt DNA hairpins by diffusing in from ssDNA regions adjacent to the DNA hairpin. hRPA diffusion was also monitored by the fluctuations in fluorescence intensity of a Cy3 fluorophore attached to the end of ssDNA. Using a novel method to calibrate the Cy3 fluorescence intensity as a function of hRPA position on the ssDNA, we estimate a one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of hRPA on ssDNA of D1 ~5000 nucleotide2s−1 at 37°C. Diffusion of hRPA while bound to ssDNA enables it to be readily repositioned to allow other proteins access to ssDNA. PMID:25058683

  7. Hybrid joint formation in human V(D)J recombination requires nonhomologous DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Tong, Jiangen; Lieber, Michael R

    2006-02-01

    In V(D)J recombination, the RAG proteins bind at a pair of signal sequences adjacent to the V, D, or J coding regions and cleave the DNA, resulting in two signal ends and two hairpinned coding ends. The two coding ends are joined to form a coding joint, and the two signal ends are joined to form a signal joint; this joining is done by the nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) pathway. A recombinational alternative in which a signal end is recombined with a coding end can also occur in a small percentage of the V(D)J recombination events in murine and human cells, and these are called hybrids (or hybrid joints). Two mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of these hybrids. One mechanism is via NHEJ, after initial cutting by RAGs. The second mechanism does not rely on NHEJ, but rather invokes that the RAGs can catalyze joining of the signal to the hairpinned coding end, by using the 3'OH of the signal end as a nucleophile to attack the phosphodiester bonds of the hairpinned coding end. In the present study, we addressed the question of which type of hybrid joining occurs in a physiological environment, where standard V(D)J recombination presumably occurs and normal RAG proteins are endogenously expressed. We find that all hybrids in vivo require DNA ligase IV in human cells, which is the final component of the NHEJ pathway. Hence, hybrid joints rely on NHEJ rather than on the RAG complex for joining. PMID:16275127

  8. The tumour antigen PRAME is a subunit of a Cul2 ubiquitin ligase and associates with active NFY promoters

    PubMed Central

    Costessi, Adalberto; Mahrour, Nawel; Tijchon, Esther; Stunnenberg, Rieka; Stoel, Marieke A; Jansen, Pascal W; Sela, Dotan; Martin-Brown, Skylar; Washburn, Michael P; Florens, Laurence; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G

    2011-01-01

    The human tumour antigen PRAME (preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma) is frequently overexpressed in tumours. High PRAME levels correlate with poor clinical outcome of several cancers, but the mechanisms by which PRAME could be involved in tumourigenesis remain largely elusive. We applied protein-complex purification strategies and identified PRAME as a substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin2-based E3 ubiquitin ligase. PRAME can be recruited to DNA in vitro, and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that PRAME is specifically enriched at transcriptionally active promoters that are also bound by NFY and at enhancers. Our results are consistent with a role for the PRAME ubiquitin ligase complex in NFY-mediated transcriptional regulation. PMID:21822215

  9. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Human Radiation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments. PMID:26406369

  10. Human cytomegalovirus induces JC virus DNA replication in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronn, R; Albrecht, I; Stephan, S; Bürkle, A; zur Hausen, H

    1993-01-01

    JC virus, a human papovavirus, is the causative agent of the demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare but fatal disease which develops as a complication of severe immunosuppression. Latent JC virus is harbored by many asymptomatic carriers and is transiently reactivated from the latent state upon immunosuppression. JC virus has a very restricted host range, with human glial cells being the only tissue in which it can replicate at reasonable efficiency. Evidence that latent human cytomegalovirus is harbored in the kidney similar to latent JC virus led to the speculation that during episodes of impaired immunocompetence, cytomegalovirus might serve as helper virus for JC virus replication in otherwise nonpermissive cells. We show here that cytomegalovirus infection indeed leads to considerable JC virus DNA replication in cultured human fibroblasts that are nonpermissive for the replication of JC virus alone. Cytomegalovirus-mediated JC virus replication is dependent on the JC virus origin of replication and T antigen. Ganciclovir-induced inhibition of cytomegalovirus replication is associated with a concomitant inhibition of JC virus replication. These results suggest that reactivation of cytomegalovirus during episodes of immunosuppression might lead to activation of latent JC virus, which would enhance the probability of subsequent PML development. Ganciclovir-induced repression of both cytomegalovirus and JC virus replication may form the rational basis for the development of an approach toward treatment or prevention of PML. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248262

  11. Differential role of nonhomologous end joining factors in the generation, DNA damage response, and myeloid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Felgentreff, Kerstin; Du, Likun; Weinacht, Katja G.; Dobbs, Kerry; Bartish, Margarita; Giliani, Silvia; Schlaeger, Thorsten; DeVine, Alexander; Schambach, Axel; Woodbine, Lisa J.; Davies, Graham; Baxi, Sachin N.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Bleesing, Jack; Gennery, Andrew; Manis, John; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a key pathway for efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and V(D)J recombination. NHEJ defects in humans cause immunodeficiency and increased cellular sensitivity to ionizing irradiation (IR) and are variably associated with growth retardation, microcephaly, and neurodevelopmental delay. Repair of DNA DSBs is important for reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To compare the specific contribution of DNA ligase 4 (LIG4), Artemis, and DNA-protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKcs) in this process and to gain insights into phenotypic variability associated with these disorders, we reprogrammed patient-derived fibroblast cell lines with NHEJ defects. Deficiencies of LIG4 and of DNA-PK catalytic activity, but not Artemis deficiency, were associated with markedly reduced reprogramming efficiency, which could be partially rescued by genetic complementation. Moreover, we identified increased genomic instability in LIG4-deficient iPSCs. Cell cycle synchronization revealed a severe defect of DNA repair and a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, particularly in LIG4- and DNA-PK catalytically deficient iPSCs. Impaired myeloid differentiation was observed in LIG4-, but not Artemis- or DNA-PK–mutated iPSCs. These results indicate a critical importance of the NHEJ pathway for somatic cell reprogramming, with a major role for LIG4 and DNA-PKcs and a minor, if any, for Artemis. PMID:24889605

  12. DNA Demethylation Dynamics in the Human Prenatal Germline.

    PubMed

    Gkountela, Sofia; Zhang, Kelvin X; Shafiq, Tiasha A; Liao, Wen-Wei; Hargan-Calvopiña, Joseph; Chen, Pao-Yang; Clark, Amander T

    2015-06-01

    Global DNA demethylation in humans is a fundamental process that occurs in pre-implantation embryos and reversion to naive ground state pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, the extent of DNA methylation reprogramming in human germline cells is unknown. Here, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of human prenatal germline cells from 53 to 137 days of development. We discovered that the transcriptome and methylome of human germline is distinct from both human PSCs and the inner cell mass (ICM) of human blastocysts. Using this resource to monitor the outcome of global DNA demethylation with reversion of primed PSCs to the naive ground state, we uncovered hotspots of ultralow methylation at transposons that are protected from demethylation in the germline and ICM. Taken together, the human germline serves as a valuable in vivo tool for monitoring the epigenome of cells that have emerged from a global DNA demethylation event. PMID:26004067

  13. Genomic DNA transposition induced by human PGBD5

    PubMed Central

    Henssen, Anton G; Henaff, Elizabeth; Jiang, Eileen; Eisenberg, Amy R; Carson, Julianne R; Villasante, Camila M; Ray, Mondira; Still, Eric; Burns, Melissa; Gandara, Jorge; Feschotte, Cedric; Mason, Christopher E; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Transposons are mobile genetic elements that are found in nearly all organisms, including humans. Mobilization of DNA transposons by transposase enzymes can cause genomic rearrangements, but our knowledge of human genes derived from transposases is limited. In this study, we find that the protein encoded by human PGBD5, the most evolutionarily conserved transposable element-derived gene in vertebrates, can induce stereotypical cut-and-paste DNA transposition in human cells. Genomic integration activity of PGBD5 requires distinct aspartic acid residues in its transposase domain, and specific DNA sequences containing inverted terminal repeats with similarity to piggyBac transposons. DNA transposition catalyzed by PGBD5 in human cells occurs genome-wide, with precise transposon excision and preference for insertion at TTAA sites. The apparent conservation of DNA transposition activity by PGBD5 suggests that genomic remodeling contributes to its biological function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10565.001 PMID:26406119

  14. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Izevskaya, Vera L.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2013-01-01

    The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA) was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA). Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2) that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments. PMID:23533696

  15. Alterations of DNA methylation and clinicopathological diversity of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yae

    2008-09-01

    Alterations of DNA methylation can account for the histological heterogeneity, reflected in the stepwise progression and complex biological characteristics of human cancers, that genetic alterations alone cannot explain. Analysis of DNA methylation status in tissue samples can be an aid to understanding the molecular mechanisms of multistage carcinogenesis. Human cancer cells show a drastic change in DNA methylation status, that is, overall DNA hypomethylation and regional DNA hypermethylation, which results in chromosomal instability and silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Overexpression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 is not a secondary result of increased cell proliferative activity but may underline the CpG island methylator phenotype of cancers. Splicing alteration of DNMT3B may result in chromosomal instability through DNA hypomethylation of pericentromeric satellite regions. Alterations of DNA methylation are observed even in the precancerous stage frequently associated with chronic inflammation and/or persistent viral infection or with cigarette smoking. Precancerous conditions showing alterations of DNA methylation may generate more malignant cancers. Aberrant DNA methylation is significantly associated with aggressiveness of cancers and poorer outcome of cancer patients. Genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation status based on array-based technology may identify DNA methylation profiles that can be used as appropriate indicators for carcinogenetic risk estimation and prognostication. PMID:18801069

  16. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  17. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE.

    PubMed

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S

    2016-05-19

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE-a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  18. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here, we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA translocation during RAP proceeds through a previously uncharacterized kinetic substep during which the 3‧-end of the DNA substrate base pairs downstream within the hTR template. The rate constant for DNA primer realignment reveals this step is not rate limiting for RAP, suggesting a second slow conformational change repositions the RNA:DNA hybrid into the telomerase active site and drives the extrusion of the 5‧-end of the DNA primer out of the enzyme complex.

  19. Hypomethylation of DNA from Benign and Malignant Human Colon Neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelz, Susan E.; Vogelstein, Bert; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    1985-04-01

    The methylation state of DNA from human colon tissue displaying neoplastic growth was determined by means of restriction endonuclease analysis. When compared to DNA from adjacent normal tissue, DNA from both benign colon polyps and malignant carcinomas was substantially hypomethylated. With the use of probes for growth hormone, γ -globin, α -chorionic gonadotropin, and γ -crystallin, methylation changes were detected in all 23 neoplastic growths examined. Benign polyps were hypomethylated to a degree similar to that in malignant tissue. These results indicate that hypomethylation is a consistent biochemical characteristic of human colonic tumors and is an alteration in the DNA that precedes malignancy.

  20. Molecular cloning of viral DNA from human genital warts.

    PubMed Central

    de Villiers, E M; Gissmann, L; zur Hausen, H

    1981-01-01

    The DNA of human papilloma virus type 6 (HPV 6) has been cloned in Escherichia coli K-12 by using pBR322 as vector. The DNA was cloned at the BamHI and EcoRI cleavage sites. This DNA was mapped by employing further restriction endonucleases and by terminal labeling. No major differences were noted as compared to HPV 6 DNA originating directly from a genital wart. The existence of at least two DNA subtypes (HPV 6a and 6b) became apparent. Images PMID:6275126

  1. [DNA adducts in human female genital organs].

    PubMed

    Postawski, Krzysztof; Przadka-Rabaniuk, Dorota; Monist, Marta; Baranowski, Włodzimierz

    2007-12-01

    DNA adducts, one of genetic damages markers, precede and finally can lead to oncogenic mutations. They appear in genome as a result of DNA bases damages caused by various and numerous environmental factors eg. ultraviolet light, ionic radiation, toxins and also endogenic substances, for example estrogens. It is believed that the creation of DNA adducts is a necessary but insufficient process for the neoplastic transformation of the cell. The following review presents concise knowledge about the DNA adducts creation and their sequels served in healthy and cancerous tissues of the female genital organs, on the base of the available data. PMID:18411923

  2. A role for XLF in DNA repair and recombination in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Farjana Jahan; Kweon, Junghun; Wang, Yongbao; Lee, Eu Han; Kan, Yinan; Lichter, Natalie; Weisensel, Natalie; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Classic non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is required for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in lymphoid V(D)J recombination. A core C-NHEJ component is the DNA ligase IV co-factor, Cernunnos/XLF (hereafter XLF). In patients, mutations in XLF cause predicted increases in radiosensitivity and deficits in immune function, but also cause other less well-understood pathologies including neural disorders. To characterize XLF function(s) in a defined genetic system, we used a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting strategy to inactivate both copies of the XLF locus in the human HCT116 cell line. Analyses of XLF-null cells (which were viable) showed that they were highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and a radiomimetic DNA damaging agent, etoposide. XLF-null cells had profound DNA DSB repair defects as measured by in vivo plasmid end-joining assays and were also dramatically impaired in their ability to form either V(D)J coding or signal joints on extrachromosomal substrates. Thus, our somatic XLF-null cell line recapitulates many of the phenotypes expected from XLF patient cell lines. Subsequent structure:function experiments utilizing the expression of wild-type and mutant XLF cDNAs demonstrated that all of the phenotypes of an XLF deficiency could be rescued by the overexpression of a wild-type XLF cDNA. Unexpectedly, mutant forms of XLF bearing point mutations at amino acid positions L115 and L179, also completely complemented the null phenotype suggesting, in contrast to predictions to the contrary, that these mutations do not abrogate XLF function. Finally, we demonstrate that the absence of XLF causes a small, but significant, increase in homologous recombination, implicating XLF in DSB pathway choice regulation. We conclude that human XLF is a non-essential, but critical, C-NHEJ-repair factor. PMID:24461734

  3. A role for XLF in DNA repair and recombination in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fattah, Farjana; Kweon, Junghun; Wang, Yongbao; Lee, Eu Han; Kan, Yinan; Lichter, Natalie; Weisensel, Natalie; Hendrickson, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Classic non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is required for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in lymphoid V(D)J recombination. A core C-NHEJ component is the DNA ligase IV co-factor, Cernunnos/XLF (hereafter XLF). In patients, mutations in XLF cause predicted increases in radiosensitivity and deficits in immune function, but also cause other less well-understood pathologies including neural disorders. To characterize XLF function(s) in a defined genetic system, we used a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting strategy to inactivate both copies of the XLF locus in the human HCT116 cell line. Analyses of XLF-null cells (which were viable) showed that they were highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and a radiomimetic DNA damaging agent, etoposide. XLF-null cells had profound DNA DSB repair defects as measured by in vivo plasmid end-joining assays and were also dramatically impaired in their ability to form either V(D)J coding or signal joints on extrachromosomal substrates. Thus, our somatic XLF-null cell line recapitulates many of the phenotypes expected from XLF patient cell lines. Subsequent structure:function experiments utilizing the expression of wild-type and mutant XLF cDNAs demonstrated that all of the phenotypes of an XLF deficiency could be rescued by the overexpression of a wild-type XLF cDNA. Unexpectedly, mutant forms of XLF bearing point mutations at amino acid positions L115 and L179, also completely complemented the null phenotype suggesting, in contrast to predictions to the contrary, that these mutations do not abrogate XLF function. Finally, we demonstrate that the absence of XLF causes a small, but significant, increase in homologous recombination, implicating XLF in DSB pathway choice regulation. We conclude that human XLF is a non-essential, but critical, C-NHEJ-repair factor. PMID:24461734

  4. Lability of DNA polymerase alpha correlated with decreased DNA synthesis and increased age in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Busbee, D.; Sylvia, V.; Stec, J.; Cernosek, Z.; Norman, J.

    1987-12-01

    DNA excision repair and mitogen-initiated blastogenesis in human cells declined in efficiency as an apparent function of decreased DNA polymerase alpha specific activity with increased age of the cell donor. DNA polymerase alpha isolated from fetal cells contained a single, high-specific-activity enzyme form that could not be further activated and that was stable with regard to enzyme activity and affinity for DNA template-primer. DNA polymerase alpha isolated from adult-derived cells contained both low-specific-activity and high-specific-activity forms. The low-activity enzyme form, which showed low affinity of binding to DNA template-primer, was activated by treatment with phosphatidylinositol, /sup 32/P-ATP, and phosphatidylinositol kinase, resulting in a /sup 32/P-labeled enzyme that exhibited high affinity of binding to DNA template-primer. The activated enzyme was unstable, exhibiting a loss of /sup 32/P-label correlated with the loss of both specific activity and high affinity of binding to DNA template-primer. The data suggest that DNA polymerase alpha isolated from adult-derived human cells has low-activity and high-activity forms. Decreased specific activity of DNA polymerase alpha correlated with increased age of the donor appears to be a function of loss of an enzyme activator molecule resulting in diminished ability of the enzyme to bind DNA template-primer.

  5. SCF-FBXO31 E3 Ligase Targets DNA Replication Factor Cdt1 for Proteolysis in the G2 Phase of Cell Cycle to Prevent Re-replication*

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pegah; Jeffery, Jessie; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Schulz, Renèe B.; Callen, David F.; Kumar, Raman; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    FBXO31 was originally identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene in breast, ovarian, hepatocellular, and prostate cancers. By screening a set of cell cycle-regulated proteins as potential FBXO31 interaction partners, we have now identified Cdt1 as a novel substrate. Cdt1 DNA replication licensing factor is part of the pre-replication complex and essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity. We show that FBXO31 specifically interacts with Cdt1 and regulates its abundance by ubiquitylation leading to subsequent degradation. We also show that Cdt1 regulation by FBXO31 is limited to the G2 phase of the cell cycle and is independent of the pathways previously described for Cdt1 proteolysis in S and G2 phase. FBXO31 targeting of Cdt1 is mediated through the N terminus of Cdt1, a region previously shown to be responsible for its cell cycle regulation. Finally, we show that Cdt1 stabilization due to FBXO31 depletion results in re-replication. Our data present an additional pathway that contributes to the FBXO31 function as a tumor suppressor. PMID:24828503

  6. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A

    2016-07-27

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR(®) Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4-6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  7. Field contamination of skeletonized human remains with exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Edson, Suni M; Christensen, Alexander F

    2013-01-01

    The Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory reports the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of over 800 skeletal samples a year for the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command-Central Identification Laboratory. These sequences are generated from degraded skeletal remains that are presumed to belong to U.S. service members missing from past military conflicts. In the laboratory, it is possible to control for contamination of remains; however, in the field, it can be difficult to prevent modern DNA from being transferred to skeletal elements and being carried forward through the analysis process. Four such cases are described here along with the controls in place in the laboratory to eliminate the possibility of the exogenous DNA being reported as authentic. In each case, the controls implemented by the laboratories prevented the false reporting of contaminant exogenous DNA from remains that were either faunal or human, but lacked endogenous DNA. PMID:22994903

  8. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. PMID:26149767

  9. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  10. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Sriramachandran, Annie M; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Covalent posttranslational modification with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modulates functions of a wide range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Sumoylation affects the activity, interaction properties, subcellular localization and the stability of its substrate proteins. The recent discovery of a novel class of ubiquitin ligases (E3), termed ULS (E3-S) or STUbL, that recognize sumoylated proteins, links SUMO modification to the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Here we review recent insights into the properties and function of these ligases and their roles in regulating sumoylated proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. PMID:24018209

  11. Transcription factor single-minded 2 (SIM2) is ubiquitinated by the RING-IBR-RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Okui, Michiyo; Yamaki, Akiko; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2005-09-10

    Human single-minded 2 (SIM2) is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH/PAS) family of transcription factors and is associated with the etiology of Down syndrome phenotype. Here, we examined a possibility of the post-translational modification of SIM2 protein by transfecting various expression constructs followed by the analysis with immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. In fact, transient expression of SIM2 cDNA in HEK293 cells revealed poly-ubiquitination of SIM2 protein. In the stable transfectants, a proteasome inhibitor MG132 protected the poly-ubiquitinated SIM2 protein from degradation. Furthermore, in the cells co-transfected with SIM2 and each of four different E3 ubiquitin ligases, SIM2 was immunoprecipitated with the RING-IBR-RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases, Parkin and HHARI, but it was not immunoprecipitated with other E3 ligases, such as one RING-type Siah-1 and the PHD type AIRE. A series of deletion constructs revealed that Parkin actually binds to SIM2 with the IBR (294-377)-RING2 (378-465) domains and that the sites for poly-ubiquitination of SIM2 reside within the PAS1-PAS2 region (aa 141-289). We postulated that transcription factor SIM2 and E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin may interact each other to play an important physiological role in the brain development which is controlled by ubiquitination. PMID:15963499

  12. Complementary DNA sequencing: Expressed sequence tags and human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.D.; Kelley, J.M.; Gocayne, J.D.; Dubnick, M.; Wu, A.; Olde, B.; Moreno, R.F.; Kerlavage, A.R.; McCombie, W.R.; Venter, J.C. ); Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Hong Xiao; Merril, C.R. )

    1991-06-21

    Automated partial DNA sequencing was conducted on more than 600 randomly selected human brain complementary DNA (cDNA) clones to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). ESTs have applications in the discovery of new human genes, mapping of the human genome, and identification of coding regions in genomic sequences. Of the sequences generated, 337 represent new genes, including 48 with significant similarity to genes from other organisms, such as a yeast RNA polymerase II subunit; Drosophila kinesin, Notch, and Enhancer of split; and a murine tyrosine kinase receptor. Forty-six ESTs were mapped to chromosomes after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. This fast approach to cDNA characterization will facilitate the tagging of most human genes in a few years at a fraction of the cost of complete genomic sequencing, provide new genetic markers, and serve as a resource in diverse biological research fields.

  13. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  14. RNAi-based screening identifies the Mms22L–Nfkbil2 complex as a novel regulator of DNA replication in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Piwko, Wojciech; Olma, Michael H; Held, Michael; Bianco, Julien N; Pedrioli, Patrick G A; Hofmann, Kay; Pasero, Philippe; Gerlich, Daniel W; Peter, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Cullin 4 (Cul4)-based ubiquitin ligases emerged as critical regulators of DNA replication and repair. Over 50 Cul4-specific adaptors (DNA damage-binding 1 (Ddb1)–Cul4-associated factors; DCAFs) have been identified and are thought to assemble functionally distinct Cul4 complexes. Using a live-cell imaging-based RNAi screen, we analysed the function of DCAFs and Cul4-linked proteins, and identified specific subsets required for progression through G1 and S phase. We discovered C6orf167/Mms22-like protein (Mms22L) as a putative human orthologue of budding yeast Mms22, which, together with cullin Rtt101, regulates genome stability by promoting DNA replication through natural pause sites and damaged templates. Loss of Mms22L function in human cells results in S phase-dependent genomic instability characterised by spontaneous double-strand breaks and DNA damage checkpoint activation. Unlike yeast Mms22, human Mms22L does not stably bind to Cul4, but is degraded in a Cul4-dependent manner and upon replication stress. Mms22L physically and functionally interacts with the scaffold-like protein Nfkbil2 that co-purifies with histones, several chromatin remodelling and DNA replication/repair factors. Together, our results strongly suggest that the Mms22L–Nfkbil2 complex contributes to genome stability by regulating the chromatin state at stalled replication forks. PMID:21113133

  15. The Role of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl Proteins in β-Elemene Reversing Multi-Drug Resistance of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Mu, Xiao-Dong; Li, En-Zhe; Luo, Ying; Song, Na; Qu, Xiu-Juan; Hu, Xue-Jun; Liu, Yun-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that β-elemene, a compound isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Curcuma wenyujin, is capable of reversing tumor MDR, although the mechanism remains elusive. In this study, β-Elemene treatment markedly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 in both K562/DNR and SGC7901/ADR cells and significantly inhibited the expression of P-gp. Treatment of SGC7901/ADR cells with β-elemene led to downregulation of Akt phosphorylation and significant upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, c-Cbl and Cbl-b. Importantly, β-elemene significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity of DOX in nude mice bearing SGC7901/ADR xenografts. Taken together, our results suggest that β-elemene may target P-gp-overexpressing leukemia and gastric cancer cells to enhance the efficacy of DOX treatment. PMID:23665906

  16. A DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Assenov, Yassen; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Balint, Balazs; Siebert, Reiner; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hidalgo, Manuel; Tan, Aik-Choon; Galm, Oliver; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Villanueva, Alberto; Carmona, Javier; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Berdasco, Maria; Moreno, Victor; Capella, Gabriel; Monk, David; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Martinez, Ramon; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Prosper, Felipe; Agirre, Xabier; Fraga, Mario F.; Graña, Osvaldo; Perez-Jurado, Luis; Mora, Jaume; Puig, Susana; Prat, Jaime; Badimon, Lina; Puca, Annibale A.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Lengauer, Thomas; Bridgewater, John; Bock, Christoph; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Most of the studies characterizing DNA methylation patterns have been restricted to particular genomic loci in a limited number of human samples and pathological conditions. Herein, we present a compromise between an extremely comprehensive study of a human sample population with an intermediate level of resolution of CpGs at the genomic level. We obtained a DNA methylation fingerprint of 1628 human samples in which we interrogated 1505 CpG sites. The DNA methylation patterns revealed show this epigenetic mark to be critical in tissue-type definition and stemness, particularly around transcription start sites that are not within a CpG island. For disease, the generated DNA methylation fingerprints show that, during tumorigenesis, human cancer cells underwent a progressive gain of promoter CpG-island hypermethylation and a loss of CpG methylation in non-CpG-island promoters. Although transformed cells are those in which DNA methylation disruption is more obvious, we observed that other common human diseases, such as neurological and autoimmune disorders, had their own distinct DNA methylation profiles. Most importantly, we provide proof of principle that the DNA methylation fingerprints obtained might be useful for translational purposes by showing that we are able to identify the tumor type origin of cancers of unknown primary origin (CUPs). Thus, the DNA methylation patterns identified across the largest spectrum of samples, tissues, and diseases reported to date constitute a baseline for developing higher-resolution DNA methylation maps and provide important clues concerning the contribution of CpG methylation to tissue identity and its changes in the most prevalent human diseases. PMID:21613409

  17. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  18. DNA Repair Enzyme-Liposomes: Human Skin Cancer Prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-16

    This project centered on responses of human cells to ultraviolet radiation at the fundamental and practical levels. At the fundamental levels, the relation of DNA damage to cell signaling events such as cytokine induction were studied; paths in human cells for dealing with DNA damage were studied at the nucleotide sequence level. At the practical, new, effective and inexpensive UVB filters were devised and characterized; further, to make low frequency DNA damage quantitation more generally available, a commercially-obtainable electrophoretic mode (Contour Clamped Homogeneous Electric Field) was tested and determined to give good dispersions of high molecular length DNAs.

  19. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    PubMed Central

    Girish, KL; Rahman, Farzan S; Tippu, Shoaib R

    2010-01-01

    The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains. PMID:21731342

  20. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Barron, Martin J.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Gospel, Amy; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Samuels, David C.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Plusa, Stefan M.; Needham, Stephanie J.; Greaves, Laura C.; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of the respiratory chain and has remarkable genetics based on uniparental inheritance. Within human populations, the mitochondrial genome has a high rate of sequence divergence with multiple polymorphic variants and thus has played a major role in examining the evolutionary history of our species. In recent years it has also become apparent that pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations play an important role in neurological and other diseases. Patients harbor many different mtDNA mutations, some of which are mtDNA mutations, some of which are inherited, but others that seem to be sporadic. It has also been suggested that mtDNA mutations play a role in aging and cancer, but the evidence for a causative role in these conditions is less clear. The accumulated data would suggest, however, that mtDNA mutations occur on a frequent basis. In this article we describe a new phenomenon: the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells that result in a significant biochemical defect in their progeny. These studies have important consequences not only for understanding of the finding of mtDNA mutations in aging tissues and tumors, but also for determining the frequency of mtDNA mutations within a cell. PMID:14597761

  1. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Cravens, Shannen L.; Schonhoft, Joseph D.; Rowland, Meng M.; Rodriguez, Alyssa A.; Anderson, Breeana G.; Stivers, James T.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  2. Molecular crowding enhances facilitated diffusion of two human DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Shannen L; Schonhoft, Joseph D; Rowland, Meng M; Rodriguez, Alyssa A; Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2015-04-30

    Intracellular space is at a premium due to the high concentrations of biomolecules and is expected to have a fundamental effect on how large macromolecules move in the cell. Here, we report that crowded solutions promote intramolecular DNA translocation by two human DNA repair glycosylases. The crowding effect increases both the efficiency and average distance of DNA chain translocation by hindering escape of the enzymes to bulk solution. The increased contact time with the DNA chain provides for redundant damage patrolling within individual DNA chains at the expense of slowing the overall rate of damaged base removal from a population of molecules. The significant biological implication is that a crowded cellular environment could influence the mechanism of damage recognition as much as any property of the enzyme or DNA. PMID:25845592

  3. DNA damage response induced by HZE particles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David; Aroumougame, Asaithamby

    Convincing evidences indicate that high-linear energy transfer (LET) ionizing radiation (IR) induced complex DNA lesions are more difficult to repair than isolated DNA lesions induced by low-LET IR; this has been associated with the increased RBE for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in high energy charged-particle irradiated human cells. We have employed an in situ method to directly monitor induction and repair of clustered DNA lesions at the single-cell level. We showed, consistent with biophysical modeling, that the kinetics of loss of clustered DNA lesions was substantially compromised in human fibroblasts. The unique spatial distribution of different types of DNA lesions within the clustered damages determined the cellular ability to repair these damages. Importantly, examination of metaphase cells derived from HZE particle irradiated cells revealed that the extent of chromosome aberrations directly correlated with the levels of unrepaired clustered DNA lesions. In addition, we used a novel organotypic human lung three-dimensional (3D) model to investigate the biological significance of unrepaired DNA lesions in differentiated lung epithelial cells. We found that complex DNA lesions induced by HZE particles were even more difficult to be repaired in organotypic 3D culture, resulting enhanced cell killing and chromosome aberrations. Our data suggest that DNA repair capability in differentiated cells renders them vulnerable to DSBs, promoting genome instability that may lead to carcinogenesis. As the organotypic 3D model mimics human lung, it opens up new experimental approaches to explore the effect of radiation in vivo and will have important implications for evaluating radiation risk in human tissues.

  4. Human DNA polymerase θ grasps the primer terminus to mediate DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Karl E; Averill, April M; Aller, Pierre; Wood, Richard D; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    DNA polymerase θ protects against genomic instability via an alternative end-joining repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Polymerase θ is overexpressed in breast, lung and oral cancers, and reduction of its activity in mammalian cells increases sensitivity to double-strand break-inducing agents, including ionizing radiation. Reported here are crystal structures of the C-terminal polymerase domain from human polymerase θ, illustrating two potential modes of dimerization. One structure depicts insertion of ddATP opposite an abasic-site analog during translesion DNA synthesis. The second structure describes a cognate ddGTP complex. Polymerase θ uses a specialized thumb subdomain to establish unique upstream contacts to the primer DNA strand, including an interaction with the 3'-terminal phosphate from one of five distinctive insertion loops. These observations demonstrate how polymerase θ grasps the primer to bypass DNA lesions or extend poorly annealed DNA termini to mediate end-joining. PMID:25775267

  5. Human DNA polymerase θ grasps the primer terminus to mediate DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Karl E.; Averill, April M.; Aller, Pierre; Wood, Richard D.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase θ protects against genomic instability via an alternative end-joining repair pathway for DNA double-strand breaks. Breast, lung and oral cancers over-express polymerase θ, and reduction of its activity in mammalian cells increases sensitivity to double-strand break inducing agents, including ionizing radiation. Reported here are crystal structures of the C-terminal polymerase domain from human polymerase θ, illustrating two potential modes of dimerization. One structure depicts insertion of ddATP opposite an abasic site analog during translesion DNA synthesis. The second structure describes a cognate ddGTP complex. Polymerase θ employs a specialized thumb subdomain to establish unique upstream contacts to the primer DNA strand, including an interaction to the 3’-terminal phosphate from one of five distinctive insertion loops. These observations demonstrate how polymerase θ grasps the primer to bypass DNA lesions, or extend poorly annealed DNA termini to mediate end-joining. PMID:25775267

  6. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  7. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  8. The dynamic DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Agustin F.; Rosales, Cecilia; Lopez-Nieva, Pilar; Graña, Osvaldo; Ballestar, Esteban; Ropero, Santiago; Espada, Jesus; Melo, Sonia A.; Lujambio, Amaia; Fraga, Mario F.; Pino, Irene; Javierre, Biola; Carmona, Francisco J.; Acquadro, Francesco; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Meijer, Chris J.; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Lloveras, Belen; Capella, Gabriel; Quer, Josep; Buti, Maria; Esteban, Juan-Ignacio; Allende, Helena; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Castellsague, Xavier; Minarovits, Janos; Ponce, Jordi; Capello, Daniela; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cigudosa, Juan Cruz; Gomez-Lopez, Gonzalo; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Piris, Miguel Angel; Bosch, Francesc X.; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Kieff, Elliott; Esteller, Manel

    2009-01-01

    The natural history of cancers associated with virus exposure is intriguing, since only a minority of human tissues infected with these viruses inevitably progress to cancer. However, the molecular reasons why the infection is controlled or instead progresses to subsequent stages of tumorigenesis are largely unknown. In this article, we provide the first complete DNA methylomes of double-stranded DNA viruses associated with human cancer that might provide important clues to help us understand the described process. Using bisulfite genomic sequencing of multiple clones, we have obtained the DNA methylation status of every CpG dinucleotide in the genome of the Human Papilloma Viruses 16 and 18 and Human Hepatitis B Virus, and in all the transcription start sites of the Epstein-Barr Virus. These viruses are associated with infectious diseases (such as hepatitis B and infectious mononucleosis) and the development of human tumors (cervical, hepatic, and nasopharyngeal cancers, and lymphoma), and are responsible for 1 million deaths worldwide every year. The DNA methylomes presented provide evidence of the dynamic nature of the epigenome in contrast to the genome. We observed that the DNA methylome of these viruses evolves from an unmethylated to a highly methylated genome in association with the progression of the disease, from asymptomatic healthy carriers, through chronically infected tissues and pre-malignant lesions, to the full-blown invasive tumor. The observed DNA methylation changes have a major functional impact on the biological behavior of the viruses. PMID:19208682

  9. Functional Consequences of Mitochondrial DNA Deletions in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Majora, Marc; Wittkampf, Tanja; Schuermann, Bianca; Schneider, Maren; Franke, Susanne; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Bernerd, Françoise; Schroeder, Peter; Krutmann, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Deletions within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are thought to contribute to extrinsic skin aging. To study the translation of mtDNA deletions into functional and structural changes in the skin, we seeded human skin fibroblasts into collagen gels to generate dermal equivalents. These cells were either derived from Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) patients, who constitutively carry large amounts of the UV-inducible mitochondrial common deletion, or normal human volunteers. We found that KSS fibroblasts, in comparison with normal human fibroblasts, contracted the gels faster and more strongly, an effect that was dependent on reactive oxygen species. Gene expression and Western blot analysis revealed significant upregulation of lysyl oxidase (LOX) in KSS fibroblasts. Treatment with the specific LOX inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile decreased the contraction difference between KSS and normal human fibroblast equivalents. Also, addition of the antioxidant N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone reduced the contraction difference by inhibiting collagen gel contraction in KSS fibroblasts, and both β-aminopropionitrile and N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone diminished LOX activity. These data suggest a causal relationship between mtDNA deletions, reactive oxygen species production, and increased LOX activity that leads to increased contraction of collagen gels. Accordingly, increased LOX expression was also observed in vivo in photoaged human and mouse skin. Therefore, mtDNA deletions in human fibroblasts may lead to functional and structural alterations of the skin. PMID:19661442

  10. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F.; Brown, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Evidence for lack of DNA photoreactivating enzyme in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Ywan Feng Li; Sang-Tae Kim; Sancar, A. )

    1993-05-15

    Photoreactivating enzyme (DNA photolyase; deoxyribocyclobutadipyrimidine pyrimidine-lyase, EC 4.1.99.3) repairs uv damage to DNA by utilizing the energy of near-uv/visible light to split pyrimidine dimers into monomers. The enzyme is widespread in nature but is absent in certain species in a seemingly unpredictable manner. Its presence in humans has been a source of considerable controversy. To help resolve the issue the authors used a very specific and sensitive assay to compare photoreactivation activity in human, rattlesnake, yeast, and Escherichia coli cells. Photolyase was easily detectable in E. coli, yeast, and rattlesnake cell-free extracts but none was detected in cell-free extracts from HeLa cells or human white blood cells with an assay capable of detecting 10 molecules per cell. They conclude that humans most likely do not have DNA photolyase. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Human Rap1 modulates TRF2 attraction to telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Janoušková, Eliška; Nečasová, Ivona; Pavloušková, Jana; Zimmermann, Michal; Hluchý, Milan; Marini, Victoria; Nováková, Monika; Hofr, Ctirad

    2015-03-11

    More than two decades of genetic research have identified and assigned main biological functions of shelterin proteins that safeguard telomeres. However, a molecular mechanism of how each protein subunit contributes to the protecting function of the whole shelterin complex remains elusive. Human Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) forms a multifunctional complex with Telomeric Repeat binding Factor 2 (TRF2). Rap1-TRF2 complex is a critical part of shelterin as it suppresses homology-directed repair in Ku 70/80 heterodimer absence. To understand how Rap1 affects key functions of TRF2, we investigated full-length Rap1 binding to TRF2 and Rap1-TRF2 complex interactions with double-stranded DNA by quantitative biochemical approaches. We observed that Rap1 reduces the overall DNA duplex binding affinity of TRF2 but increases the selectivity of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Additionally, we observed that Rap1 induces a partial release of TRF2 from DNA duplex. The improved TRF2 selectivity to telomeric DNA is caused by less pronounced electrostatic attractions between TRF2 and DNA in Rap1 presence. Thus, Rap1 prompts more accurate and selective TRF2 recognition of telomeric DNA and TRF2 localization on single/double-strand DNA junctions. These quantitative functional studies contribute to the understanding of the selective recognition of telomeric DNA by the whole shelterin complex. PMID:25675958

  13. Geographic variation of human mitochondrial DNA from Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.; Wilson, A.C. ); Jorde, L.B. ); Bhatia, K. )

    1990-03-01

    High resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction maps, consisting of an average of 370 sites per mtDNA map, were constructed for 119 people from 25 localities in Papua, New Guinea (PNG). Comparison of these PNG restriction maps to published maps from Australian, Caucasian, Asian and African mtDNAs reveals that PNG has the lowest amount of mtDNA variation, and that PNG mtDNA lineages originated from Southeast Asia. The statistical significance of geographic structuring of populations with respect to mtDNA was assessed by comparing observed G{sub ST} values to a distribution of G{sub ST} values generated by random resampling of the data. These analyses show that there is significant structuring of mtDNA variation among worldwide populations, between highland and coastal PNG populations, and even between two highland PNG populations located approximately 200 km apart. However, coastal PNG populations are essentially panmictic, despite being spread over several hundred kilometers. The high resolution technique for examining mtDNA variation, coupled with extensive geographic sampling within a single defined area, leads to an enhanced understanding of the influence of geography on mtDNA variation in human populations.

  14. Human Rap1 modulates TRF2 attraction to telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Janoušková, Eliška; Nečasová, Ivona; Pavloušková, Jana; Zimmermann, Michal; Hluchý, Milan; Marini, Victoria; Nováková, Monika; Hofr, Ctirad

    2015-01-01

    More than two decades of genetic research have identified and assigned main biological functions of shelterin proteins that safeguard telomeres. However, a molecular mechanism of how each protein subunit contributes to the protecting function of the whole shelterin complex remains elusive. Human Repressor activator protein 1 (Rap1) forms a multifunctional complex with Telomeric Repeat binding Factor 2 (TRF2). Rap1–TRF2 complex is a critical part of shelterin as it suppresses homology-directed repair in Ku 70/80 heterodimer absence. To understand how Rap1 affects key functions of TRF2, we investigated full-length Rap1 binding to TRF2 and Rap1–TRF2 complex interactions with double-stranded DNA by quantitative biochemical approaches. We observed that Rap1 reduces the overall DNA duplex binding affinity of TRF2 but increases the selectivity of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Additionally, we observed that Rap1 induces a partial release of TRF2 from DNA duplex. The improved TRF2 selectivity to telomeric DNA is caused by less pronounced electrostatic attractions between TRF2 and DNA in Rap1 presence. Thus, Rap1 prompts more accurate and selective TRF2 recognition of telomeric DNA and TRF2 localization on single/double-strand DNA junctions. These quantitative functional studies contribute to the understanding of the selective recognition of telomeric DNA by the whole shelterin complex. PMID:25675958

  15. Respiratory-deficient human fibroblasts exhibiting defective mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, A G; Cooper, J M; Leonard, J V; Schapira, A H

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized cultured skin fibroblasts from two siblings affected with a fatal mitochondrial disease caused by a nuclear genetic defect. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain function was severely decreased in these cells. Southern-blot analysis showed that the fibroblasts had reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mtDNA was unstable and was eliminated from the cultured cells over many generations, generating the rho0 genotype. As the mtDNA level decreased, the cells became more dependent upon pyruvate and uridine for growth. Nuclear-encoded subunits of respiratory-chain complexes were synthesized and imported into the mitochondria of the mtDNA-depleted cells, albeit at reduced levels compared with the controls. Mitochondrial protein synthesis directed by the residual mtDNA indicated that the mtDNA was expressed and that the defect specifically involves the replication or maintenance of mtDNA. This is a unique example of a respiratory-deficient human cell line exhibiting defective mtDNA replication. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7848281

  16. A new gene involved in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination is located on human chromosome 10p.

    PubMed

    Moshous, D; Li, L; Chasseval, R; Philippe, N; Jabado, N; Cowan, M J; Fischer, A; de Villartay, J P

    2000-03-01

    V(D)J recombination, accountable for the diversity of T cell receptor- and immunoglobulin-encoding genes, is initiated by a lymphoid-specific DNA double-strand break. The general DNA repair machinery is responsible for the resolution of this break. Any defect in one of the known components of the DNA repair/V(D)J recombination machinery (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV) leads to abortion of the V(D)J rearrangement process, early block in both T and B cell maturation, and ultimately to severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) in several animal models. A human SCID condition is also characterized by an absence of mature T and B lymphocytes, and is associated with an increase in sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents (RS-SCID). None of the above-mentioned genes are defective in these patients, arguing for the likelihood of the existence of yet another unknown component of the V(D)J recombination/DNA repair apparatus. Athabascan-speaking (SCIDA) Navajo and Apache Native Americans have a very high incidence of T(-)B(-)SCID. The SCIDA locus is highly linked with markers on chromosome 10p, although the exact molecular defect has not been recognized in these patients. We show here that cells with the SCIDA defect are impaired in the DNA repair phase of V(D)J recombination similarly to RS-SCID, precisely an absence of V(D)J coding joint formation. Moreover, genotyping analysis in several RS-SCID families corroborates a linkage of the RS-SCID locus to the SCIDA region on chromosome 10p. These results demonstrate the presence of a new essential DNA repair/V(D)J recombination gene in this region, the mutation of which causes RS-SCID in humans. PMID:10699181

  17. Ancient origin of animal U-box ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The patterns of emergence and diversification of the families of ubiquitin ligases provide insights about the evolution of the eukaryotic ubiquitination system. U-box ubiquitin ligases (UULs) are proteins characterized by containing a peculiar protein domain known as U box. In this study, the origin of the animal UUL genes is described. Results Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that six of the seven main UUL-encoding genes found in humans (UBE4A, UBE4B, UIP5, PRP19, CHIP and CYC4) were already present in the ancestor of all current metazoans and the seventh (WDSUB1) is found in placozoans, cnidarians and bilaterians. The fact that only 4 - 5 genes orthologous to the human ones are present in the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis suggests that several animal-specific cooptions of the U box to generate new genes occurred. Significantly, Monosiga contains five additional UUL genes that are not present in animals. One of them is also present in distantly-related protozoans. Along animal evolution, losses of UUL-encoding genes are rare, except in nematodes, which lack three of them. These general patterns are highly congruent with those found for other two families (RBR, HECT) of ubiquitin ligases. Conclusions Finding that the patterns of emergence, diversification and loss of three unrelated families of ubiquitin ligases (RBR, HECT and U-box) are parallel indicates that there are underlying, linage-specific evolutionary forces shaping the complexity of the animal ubiquitin system. PMID:20979629

  18. Frequency of varicella zoster virus DNA in human adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Badani, Hussain; White, Teresa; Schulick, Nicole; Raeburn, Christopher D; Topkaya, Ibrahim; Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in ganglionic neurons derived from neural crest cells. Because the adrenal gland also contains medullary chromaffin cells of neural crest origin, we examined human adrenal glands and medullary chromaffin cell tumors (pheochromocytomas) for VZV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). We found VZV, but not HSV-1, DNA in 4/63 (6 %) normal adrenal glands. No VZV transcripts or antigens were detected in the 4 VZV DNA-positive samples. No VZV or HSV-1 DNA was found in 21 pheochromocytomas. PMID:26843382

  19. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  20. Factors underlying variable DNA methylation in a human community cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lucia L.; Emberly, Eldon; Fraser, Hunter B.; Neumann, Sarah M.; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E.; Kobor, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is emerging as an attractive mechanism to explain the persistent genomic embedding of early-life experiences. Tightly linked to chromatin, which packages DNA into chromosomes, epigenetic marks primarily serve to regulate the activity of genes. DNA methylation is the most accessible and characterized component of the many chromatin marks that constitute the epigenome, making it an ideal target for epigenetic studies in human populations. Here, using peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected from a community-based cohort stratified for early-life socioeconomic status, we measured DNA methylation in the promoter regions of more than 14,000 human genes. Using this approach, we broadly assessed and characterized epigenetic variation, identified some of the factors that sculpt the epigenome, and determined its functional relation to gene expression. We found that the leukocyte composition of peripheral blood covaried with patterns of DNA methylation at many sites, as did demographic factors, such as sex, age, and ethnicity. Furthermore, psychosocial factors, such as perceived stress, and cortisol output were associated with DNA methylation, as was early-life socioeconomic status. Interestingly, we determined that DNA methylation was strongly correlated to the ex vivo inflammatory response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to stimulation with microbial products that engage Toll-like receptors. In contrast, our work found limited effects of DNA methylation marks on the expression of associated genes across individuals, suggesting a more complex relationship than anticipated. PMID:23045638

  1. Mutational spectrometry without phenotypic selection: human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Khrapko, K; Coller, H; André, P; Li, X C; Foret, F; Belenky, A; Karger, B L; Thilly, W G

    1997-01-01

    By first separating mutant from nonmutant DNA sequences on the basis of their melting temperatures and then increasing the number of copies by high-fidelity DNA amplification, we have developed a method that allows observation of point mutations in biological samples at fractions at or above 10-6. Using this method, we have observed the hotspot point mutations that lie in 100 base pairs of the mitochondrial genome in samples of cultured cells and human tissues. To date, 19 mutants have been isolated, their fractions ranging from 4x10-4 down to the limit of detection. We performed specific tests to determine if the observed signals were artefacts arising from contamination, polymerase errors during PCR or DNA adducts created during the procedure. We also tested the possibilities that DNA replication mismatch intermediates, or endogenous DNA adducts that were originally present in the cells, were included with true mutants in our separation steps and converted to mutants during PCR. We show that while most of the mutants behave as double-stranded point mutants in the cells, some appear to arise at least in part from mismatch intermediates or cellular DNA adducts. This technology is therefore sufficient for the observation of the spectrum of point mutations in human mitochondrial DNA and is a tool for discovering the primary causes of these mutations. PMID:9016616

  2. Inheritance of DNA Transferred from American Trypanosomes to Human Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Mariana M.; Nitz, Nadjar; Araujo, Perla F.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Teixeira, Antonio R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecies DNA transfer is a major biological process leading to the accumulation of mutations inherited by sexual reproduction among eukaryotes. Lateral DNA transfer events and their inheritance has been challenging to document. In this study we modified a thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR by using additional targeted primers, along with Southern blots, fluorescence techniques, and bioinformatics, to identify lateral DNA transfer events from parasite to host. Instances of naturally occurring human infections by Trypanosoma cruzi are documented, where mitochondrial minicircles integrated mainly into retrotransposable LINE-1 of various chromosomes. The founders of five families show minicircle integrations that were transferred vertically to their progeny. Microhomology end-joining of 6 to 22 AC-rich nucleotide repeats in the minicircles and host DNA mediates foreign DNA integration. Heterogeneous minicircle sequences were distributed randomly among families, with diversity increasing due to subsequent rearrangement of inserted fragments. Mosaic recombination and hitchhiking on retrotransposition events to different loci were more prevalent in germ line as compared to somatic cells. Potential new genes, pseudogenes, and knockouts were identified. A pathway of minicircle integration and maintenance in the host genome is suggested. Thus, infection by T. cruzi has the unexpected consequence of increasing human genetic diversity, and Chagas disease may be a fortuitous share of negative selection. This demonstration of contemporary transfer of eukaryotic DNA to the human genome and its subsequent inheritance by descendants introduces a significant change in the scientific concept of evolutionary biology and medicine. PMID:20169193

  3. Ring finger protein 146/Iduna is a Poly (ADP-ribose) polymer binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Chan, Christine Hui-shan; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that Ring finger protein 146 (RNF146), also called Iduna, have neuroprotective property due to its inhibition of Parthanatos via binding with Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The Parthanatos is a PAR dependent cell death that has been implicated in many human diseases. RNF146/Iduna acts as a PARsylation-directed E3 ubquitin ligase to mediate tankyrase-dependent degradation of axin, thereby positively regulates Wnt signaling. RNF146/Iduna can also facilitate DNA repair and protect against cell death induced by DNA damaging agents or γ-irradiation. It can translocate to the nucleus after cellular injury and promote the ubiquitination and degradation of various nuclear proteins involved in DNA damage repair. The PARsylation-directed ubquitination mediated by RNF146/Iduna is analogous to the phosphorylation-directed ubquitination catalyzed by Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin complex. RNF146/Iduna has been found to be implicated in neurodegenerative disease and cancer development. Therefore modulation of the PAR-binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ligase activity of RNF146/Iduna could have therapeutic significance for diseases, in which PAR and PAR-binding proteins play key pathophysiologic roles. PMID:22274711

  4. Comprehensive identification and analysis of human accelerated regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gittelman, Rachel M.; Hun, Enna; Ay, Ferhat; Madeoy, Jennifer; Pennacchio, Len; Noble, William S.; Hawkins, R. David; Akey, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that changes in gene regulation have played an important role in human evolution, but regulatory DNA has been much more difficult to study compared with protein-coding regions. Recent large-scale studies have created genome-scale catalogs of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To better define regulatory DNA that has been subject to human-specific adaptive evolution, we performed comprehensive evolutionary and population genetics analyses on over 18 million DHSs discovered in 130 cell types. We identified 524 DHSs that are conserved in nonhuman primates but accelerated in the human lineage (haDHS), and estimate that 70% of substitutions in haDHSs are attributable to positive selection. Through extensive computational and experimental analyses, we demonstrate that haDHSs are often active in brain or neuronal cell types; play an important role in regulating the expression of developmentally important genes, including many transcription factors such as SOX6, POU3F2, and HOX genes; and identify striking examples of adaptive regulatory evolution that may have contributed to human-specific phenotypes. More generally, our results reveal new insights into conserved and adaptive regulatory DNA in humans and refine the set of genomic substrates that distinguish humans from their closest living primate relatives. PMID:26104583

  5. Brain cDNA clone for human cholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    McTiernan, C; Adkins, S; Chatonnet, A; Vaughan, T A; Bartels, C F; Kott, M; Rosenberry, T L; La Du, B N; Lockridge, O

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA library from human basal ganglia was screened with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to portions of the amino acid sequence of human serum cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8). Five overlapping clones, representing 2.4 kilobases, were isolated. The sequenced cDNA contained 207 base pairs of coding sequence 5' to the amino terminus of the mature protein in which there were four ATG translation start sites in the same reading frame as the protein. Only the ATG coding for Met-(-28) lay within a favorable consensus sequence for functional initiators. There were 1722 base pairs of coding sequence corresponding to the protein found circulating in human serum. The amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA exactly matched the 574 amino acid sequence of human serum cholinesterase, as previously determined by Edman degradation. Therefore, our clones represented cholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8) rather than acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7). It was concluded that the amino acid sequences of cholinesterase from two different tissues, human brain and human serum, were identical. Hybridization of genomic DNA blots suggested that a single gene, or very few genes, coded for cholinesterase. Images PMID:3477799

  6. Comprehensive identification and analysis of human accelerated regulatory DNA.

    PubMed

    Gittelman, Rachel M; Hun, Enna; Ay, Ferhat; Madeoy, Jennifer; Pennacchio, Len; Noble, William S; Hawkins, R David; Akey, Joshua M

    2015-09-01

    It has long been hypothesized that changes in gene regulation have played an important role in human evolution, but regulatory DNA has been much more difficult to study compared with protein-coding regions. Recent large-scale studies have created genome-scale catalogs of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To better define regulatory DNA that has been subject to human-specific adaptive evolution, we performed comprehensive evolutionary and population genetics analyses on over 18 million DHSs discovered in 130 cell types. We identified 524 DHSs that are conserved in nonhuman primates but accelerated in the human lineage (haDHS), and estimate that 70% of substitutions in haDHSs are attributable to positive selection. Through extensive computational and experimental analyses, we demonstrate that haDHSs are often active in brain or neuronal cell types; play an important role in regulating the expression of developmentally important genes, including many transcription factors such as SOX6, POU3F2, and HOX genes; and identify striking examples of adaptive regulatory evolution that may have contributed to human-specific phenotypes. More generally, our results reveal new insights into conserved and adaptive regulatory DNA in humans and refine the set of genomic substrates that distinguish humans from their closest living primate relatives. PMID:26104583

  7. Finding human promoter groups based on DNA physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jia; Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zhao, Hongya; Yan, Hong

    2009-10-01

    DNA rigidity is an important physical property originating from the DNA three-dimensional structure. Although the general DNA rigidity patterns in human promoters have been investigated, their distinct roles in transcription are largely unknown. In this paper, we discover four highly distinct human promoter groups based on similarity of their rigidity profiles. First, we find that all promoter groups conserve relatively rigid DNAs at the canonical TATA box [a consensus TATA(A/T)A(A/T) sequence] position, which are important physical signals in binding transcription factors. Second, we find that the genes activated by each group of promoters share significant biological functions based on their gene ontology annotations. Finally, we find that these human promoter groups correlate with the tissue-specific gene expression.

  8. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  9. Natural human gene correction by small extracellular genomic DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Leonid A; Rogachev, Vladimir A; Likhacheva, Anastasia C; Bogachev, Sergei S; Sebeleva, Tamara E; Shilov, Alexander G; Baiborodin, Sergei I; Petrova, Natalia A; Mechetina, Ludmila V; Shurdov, Mikhail A; Wickstrom, Eric

    2007-09-15

    Classical gene targeting employs natural homologous recombination for a gene correction using a specially designed and artificially delivered DNA construct but the method is very inefficient. On the other hand, small DNA fragments in the form of tiny chromatin-like particles naturally present in blood plasma can spontaneously penetrate into human cells and cell nuclei. We hypothesized that these natural DNA nanoparticles with recombinagenic free ends might be effective agents for gene replacement therapy. We demonstrate that a mixture of small fragments of total human chromatin from non-mutant cells added to a culture medium without transfection agents efficiently repaired a 47 base pair deletion in the CASP3 gene in 30% of treated human MCF7 breast cancer cells, as shown by restoration of caspase-3 apoptotic function and CASP3 DNA and mRNA structure. Such an innate gene replacement mechanism might function naturally in an organism using its own apoptotic DNA fragments. This mechanism might enable human cancer cell phenotype normalization in the presence of excess normal cells. PMID:17703110

  10. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA{sup 4977}

    SciTech Connect

    Shenkar, R.; Navidi, W.; Tavare, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA{sup 4977} is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation rate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA{sup 4977} in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10{sup {minus}8} per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  12. Human DNA polymerase. alpha. : Predicted functional domains and relationships with viral DNA polymerases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.F.; Wong, S.W.; Korn, D. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary sequence of human DNA polymerase {alpha} deduced from the full-length cDNA contains regions of striking similarity to sequences in replicative DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli phages PRD1 and T4, Bacillus phage {phi}19, yeast DNA polymerase I, yeast linear plasmid pGKL1, maize S1 mitochondrial DNA, herpes family viruses, vaccinia virus, and adenovirus. The conservation of these homologous regions across this vast phylogenetic expanse indicates that these prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases may all have evolved from a common primordial gene. Based on the sequence analysis and genetic results from yeast and herpes simplex virus studies, these consensus sequences are suggested to define potential sites that subserve essential roles in the DNA polymerase reaction. Two of these conserved regions appear to participate directly in the active site required for substrate deoxynucleotide interaction. One region toward the carboxyl-terminus has the potential to be the DNA interacting domain is predicted toward the amino-terminus. The provisional assignment of these domains can be used to identify unique or dissimilar features of functionally homologous catalytic sites in viral DBA polymerases of pathogenetic significance and thereby serve to guide more rational antiviral drug design.

  13. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G.; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E.

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  14. DNA binding properties of human Cdc45 suggest a function as molecular wedge for DNA unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Szambowska, Anna; Tessmer, Ingrid; Kursula, Petri; Usskilat, Christian; Prus, Piotr; Pospiech, Helmut; Grosse, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The cell division cycle protein 45 (Cdc45) represents an essential replication factor that, together with the Mcm2-7 complex and the four subunits of GINS, forms the replicative DNA helicase in eukaryotes. Recombinant human Cdc45 (hCdc45) was structurally characterized and its DNA-binding properties were determined. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed that hCdc45 exists as an alpha-helical monomer and possesses a structure similar to its bacterial homolog RecJ. hCdc45 bound long (113-mer or 80-mer) single-stranded DNA fragments with a higher affinity than shorter ones (34-mer). hCdc45 displayed a preference for 3′ protruding strands and bound tightly to single-strand/double-strand DNA junctions, such as those presented by Y-shaped DNA, bubbles and displacement loops, all of which appear transiently during the initiation of DNA replication. Collectively, our findings suggest that hCdc45 not only binds to but also slides on DNA with a 3′–5′ polarity and, thereby acts as a molecular ‘wedge’ to initiate DNA strand displacement. PMID:24293646

  15. Probing transient protein-mediated DNA linkages using nanoconfinement

    PubMed Central

    Roushan, Maedeh; Kaur, Parminder; Karpusenko, Alena; Countryman, Preston J.; Ortiz, Carlos P.; Fang Lim, Shuang; Wang, Hong; Riehn, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic technique for probing protein-catalyzed transient DNA loops that is based on nanofluidic channels. In these nanochannels, DNA is forced in a linear configuration that makes loops appear as folds whose size can easily be quantified. Using this technique, we study the interaction between T4 DNA ligase and DNA. We find that T4 DNA ligase binding changes the physical characteristics of the DNA polymer, in particular persistence length and effective width. We find that the rate of DNA fold unrolling is significantly reduced when T4 DNA ligase and ATP are applied to bare DNA. Together with evidence of T4 DNA ligase bridging two different segments of DNA based on AFM imaging, we thus conclude that ligase can transiently stabilize folded DNA configurations by coordinating genetically distant DNA stretches. PMID:25379073

  16. Inaccurate DNA Synthesis in Cell Extracts of Yeast Producing Active Human DNA Polymerase Iota

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Alena V.; Grabow, Corinn; Gening, Leonid V.; Tarantul, Vyacheslav Z.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates “G” opposite template “T” more frequently than incorporates the correct “A.” We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of “G” versus “A” method of Gening, abbreviated as “misGvA”). We provide unambiguous proof of the “misGvA” approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The “misGvA” activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts. PMID:21304950

  17. Anthocyanidins modulate the activity of human DNA topoisomerases I and II and affect cellular DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, Michael; Fritz, Jessica; Barthelmes, Hans U; Christensen, Morten O; Larsen, Morten K; Boege, Fritz; Marko, Doris

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of anthocyanidins on human topoisomerases I and II and its relevance for DNA integrity within human cells. Anthocyanidins bearing vicinal hydroxy groups at the B-ring (delphinidin, DEL; cyanidin, CY) were found to potently inhibit the catalytic activity of human topoisomerases I and II, without discriminating between the IIalpha and the IIbeta isoforms. However, in contrast to topoisomerase poisons, DEL and CY did not stabilize the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediates (cleavable complex) of topoisomerase I or II. Using recombinant topoisomerase I, the presence of CY or DEL (> or = 1 microM) effectively prohibited the stabilization of the cleavable complex by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. We furthermore investigated whether the potential protective effect vs topoisomerase I poisons is reflected also on the cellular level, affecting the DNA damaging properties of camptothecin. Indeed, in HT29 cells, low micromolar concentrations of DEL (1-10 microM) significantly diminished the DNA strand breaking effect of camptothecin (100 microM). However, at concentrations > or = 50 microM, all anthocyanidins tested (delphinidin, cyanidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, and paeonidin), including those not interfering with topoisomerases, were found to induce DNA strand breaks in the comet assay. All of these analogues were able to compete with ethidium bromide for the intercalation into calf thymus DNA and to replace the minor groove binder Hoechst 33258. These data indicate substantial affinity to double-stranded DNA, which might contribute at least to the DNA strand breaking effect of anthocyanidins at higher concentrations (> or = 50 microM). PMID:16167831

  18. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Aged garlic extract enhances heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit expression via the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Kei; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Morihara, Naoaki

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway defends cells against oxidative stress and regulates the cellular redox balance. Activation of this pathway induces a variety of antioxidant enzymes, resulting in the protection of our bodies against oxidative damage. It has been reported that aged garlic extract (AGE), a garlic preparation that is rich in water-soluble cysteinyl moieties, reduces oxidative stress and helps to ameliorate of cardiovascular, renal and hepatic diseases. We hypothesized that AGE enhances the expression of antioxidant enzymes via the Nrf2-ARE pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture. Gene expression of antioxidant enzymes was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and antioxidant enzymes expression were evaluated using western blotting analyses. We found that AGE promoted the accumulation of Nrf2 into the nucleus in a time- and dose-dependent manner and increased the gene expression and polypeptide level of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM). Moreover, the effect of AGE in elevating the gene expression of HO-1 and GCLM was found to be mediated via Nrf2 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that AGE induces the expression of HO-1 and GCLM, which are antioxidant enzymes, via activation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. PMID:26507778

  20. A nuclear protein associated with human cancer cells binds preferentially to a human repetitive DNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. ); Law, M.L.; Puck, T.T. Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver )

    1989-11-01

    A protein (Rp66) of 66 kDa was shown by DNA-binding protein blot assay to bind to a human repetitive DNA sequence (low-repeat sequences; LRS) in each of 10 transformed human cell lines examined. This protein-DNA interaction was not observed in 11 normal human cell cultures or in the Chinese hamster cell line CHO-K1. Gel retardation assay confirmed the specificity of the protein-DNA binding between Rp66 and LRS. In a histiocytic lymphoma human cell line, U937, that can be induced to differentiate in the presence of phorbol ester, this binding disappeared after cell differentiation. These together with other results cited suggest a regulatory role for these repetitive sequences in the human genome, with particular application to cancer.

  1. Hexameric ring structure of human MCM10 DNA replication factor

    PubMed Central

    Okorokov, Andrei L; Waugh, Alastair; Hodgkinson, Julie; Murthy, Andal; Hong, Hye Kyung; Leo, Elisabetta; Sherman, Michael B; Stoeber, Kai; Orlova, Elena V; Williams, Gareth H

    2007-01-01

    The DNA replication factor minichromosome maintenance 10 (MCM10) is a conserved, abundant nuclear protein crucial for origin firing. During the transition from pre-replicative complexes to pre-initiation complexes, MCM10 recruitment to replication origins is required to provide a physical link between the MCM2–7 complex DNA helicase and DNA polymerases. Here, we report the molecular structure of human MCM10 as determined by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis. The MCM10 molecule is a ring-shaped hexamer with large central and smaller lateral channels and a system of inner chambers. This structure, together with biochemical data, suggests that this important protein uses its architecture to provide a docking module for assembly of the molecular machinery required for eukaryotic DNA replication. PMID:17823614

  2. Insulin allergy treated with human insulin (recombinant DNA).

    PubMed

    De Leeuw, I; Delvigne, C; Bekaert, J

    1982-01-01

    Two insulin-dependent diabetic subjects treated with pork and beef insulin during a period of 6 mo developed severe local reactions. Both patients had an important allergic history (asthma, urticaria, drug reactions, rhinitis). Skin-testing revealed type I allergy to beef and pork insulin. Specific IgE-insulin binding was demonstrated with both insulins. After negative skin testing with NPH Lilly human insulin (recombinant DNA), treatment was started with this compound and remained successful during a period of 6-9 mo. In one patient a local reaction occurred when regular human insulin (recombinant DNA) was added to NPH in order to obtain better control. Skin testing with regular human insulin was positive, but not with NPH human insulin alone. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains unsolved. PMID:6765530

  3. Human DHX9 helicase unwinds triple-helical DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aklank; Bacolla, Albino; Chakraborty, Prasun; Grosse, Frank; Vasquez, Karen M

    2010-08-24

    Naturally occurring poly(purine.pyrimidine) rich regions in the human genome are prone to adopting non-canonical DNA structures such as intramolecular triplexes (i.e., H-DNA). Such structure-forming sequences are abundant and can regulate the expression of several disease-linked genes. In addition, the use of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to modulate gene structure and function has potential as an approach to targeted gene therapy. Previously, we found that endogenous H-DNA structures can induce DNA double-strand breaks and promote genomic rearrangements. Herein, we find that the DHX9 helicase co-immunoprecipitates with triplex DNA structures in mammalian cells, suggesting a role in the maintenance of genome stability. We tested this postulate by assessing the helicase activity of purified human DHX9 on various duplex and triplex DNA substrates in vitro. DHX9 displaced the third strand from a specific triplex DNA structure and catalyzed the unwinding with a 3' --> 5' polarity with respect to the displaced third strand. Helicase activity required a 3'-single-stranded overhang on the third strand and was dependent on ATP hydrolysis. The reaction kinetics consisted of a pre-steady-state burst phase followed by a linear, steady-state pseudo-zero-order reaction. In contrast, very little if any helicase activity was detected on blunt triplexes, triplexes with 5'-overhangs, blunt duplexes, duplexes with overhangs, or forked duplex substrates. Thus, triplex structures containing a 3'-overhang represent preferred substrates for DHX9, where it removes the strand with Hoogsteen hydrogen-bonded bases. Our results suggest the involvement of DHX9 in maintaining genome integrity by unwinding mutagenic triplex DNA structures. PMID:20669935

  4. HUMAN DHX9 HELICASE UNWINDS TRIPLE HELICAL DNA STRUCTURES☟

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aklank; Bacolla, Albino; Chakraborty, Prasun; Grosse, Frank; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring poly(purine·pyrimidine) rich regions in the human genome are prone to adopt non-canonical DNA structures such as intramolecular triplexes (i.e. H-DNA). Such structure-forming sequences are abundant and can regulate the expression of several diseases-linked genes. In addition, the use of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to modulate gene structure and function has potential as an approach to targeted gene therapy. Previously, we found that endogenous H-DNA structures can induce DNA double-strand breaks and promote genomic rearrangements. Herein, we find that the DHX9 helicase co-immunoprecipitates with triplex DNA structures in mammalian cells, suggesting a role in the maintenance of genome stability. We tested this postulate by assessing the helicase activity of purified human DHX9 on various duplex and triplex DNA substrates in vitro. DHX9 displaced the third strand from a specific triplex DNA structure and catalyzed the unwinding with a 3′→5′ polarity with respect to the displaced third strand. Helicase activity required a 3′-single-stranded overhang on the third strand and was dependent on ATP hydrolysis. The reaction kinetics consisted of a pre-steady-state burst phase followed by a linear, steady-state pseudo-zero-order-reaction. In contrast, very little, if any helicase activity was detected on blunt triplexes, triplexes with 5′-overhangs, blunt duplexes, duplexes with overhangs, or forked duplex substrates. Thus, triplex structures containing a 3′-overhang represent preferred substrates for DHX9, where it removes the strand with Hoogsteen hydrogen-bonded bases. Our results suggest the involvement of DHX9 in maintaining genome integrity by unwinding mutagenic triplex DNA structures. PMID:20669935

  5. Genetically encoded optical activation of DNA recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Arbely, E; Zhang, J; Chou, C; Uprety, R; Chin, J W; Deiters, A

    2016-06-30

    We developed two tightly regulated, light-activated Cre recombinase enzymes through site-specific incorporation of two genetically-encoded photocaged amino acids in human cells. Excellent optical off to on switching of DNA recombination was achieved. Furthermore, we demonstrated precise spatial control of Cre recombinase through patterned illumination. PMID:27277957

  6. Two-dimensional DNA fingerprinting of human individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Uitterlinden, A.G.; Slagboom, P.E.; Knook, D.L.; Vijg, J. )

    1989-04-01

    The limiting factor in the presently available techniques for the detection of DNA sequence variation in the human genome is the low resolution of Southern blot analysis. To increase the analytical power of this technique, the authors applied size fractionation of genomic DNA restriction fragments in conjunction with their sequence-dependent separation in denaturing gradient gels; the two-dimensional separation patterns obtained were subsequently transferred to nylon membranes. Hybridization analysis using minisatellite core sequences as probes resulted in two-dimensional genomic DNA fingerprints with a resolution of up to 625 separated spots per probe per human individual; by conventional Southern blot analysis, only 20-30 bands can be resolved. Using the two-dimensional DNA fingerprinting technique, they demonstrate in a small human pedigree the simultaneous transmission of 37 polymorphic fragments (out of 365 spots) for probe 33.15 and 105 polymorphic fragments (out of 625 spots) for probe 33.6. In addition, a mutation was detected in this pedigree by probe 33.6. They anticipate that this method will be of great use in studies aimed at (i) measuring human mutation frequencies, (ii) associating genetic variation with disease, (iii) analyzing genomic instability in relation to cancer and aging, and (iv) linkage analysis and mapping of disease genes.

  7. Association of Global DNA Methylation and Global DNA Hydroxymethylation with Metals and Other Exposures in Human Blood DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wan-yee; Shang, Yan; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Ledesma, Marta; Leon, Montserrat; Laclaustra, Martin; Pollak, Jonathan; Guallar, Eliseo; Cole, Shelley A.; Fallin, M. Dani; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association between human blood DNA global methylation and global hydroxymethylation has not been evaluated in population-based studies. No studies have evaluated environmental determinants of global DNA hydroxymethylation, including exposure to metals. Objective: We evaluated the association between global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation in 48 Strong Heart Study participants for which selected metals had been measured in urine at baseline and DNA was available from 1989–1991 (visit 1) and 1998–1999 (visit 3). Methods: We measured the percentage of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in samples using capture and detection antibodies followed by colorimetric quantification. We explored the association of participant characteristics (i.e., age, adiposity, smoking, and metal exposure) with both global DNA methylation and global DNA hydroxymethylation. Results: The Spearman’s correlation coefficient for 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was 0.32 (p = 0.03) at visit 1 and 0.54 (p < 0.001) at visit 3. Trends for both epigenetic modifications were consistent across potential determinants. In cross-sectional analyses, the odds ratios of methylated and hydroxymethylated DNA were 1.56 (95% CI: 0.95, 2.57) and 1.76 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.88), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median percentage of dimethylarsinate. The corresponding odds ratios were 1.64 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.65) and 1.16 (95% CI: 0.70, 1.94), respectively, for the comparison of participants above and below the median cadmium level. Arsenic exposure and metabolism were consistently associated with both epigenetic markers in cross-sectional and prospective analyses. The positive correlation of 5-mC and 5-hmC levels was confirmed in an independent study population. Conclusions: Our findings support that both epigenetic measures are related at the population level. The consistent trends in the associations between these two epigenetic

  8. Translesion synthesis past acrolein-derived DNA adducts by human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ.

    PubMed

    Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Minko, Irina G; Lloyd, R Stephen; Copeland, William C

    2013-05-17

    Acrolein, a mutagenic aldehyde, is produced endogenously by lipid peroxidation and exogenously by combustion of organic materials, including tobacco products. Acrolein reacts with DNA bases forming exocyclic DNA adducts, such as γ-hydroxy-1,N(2)-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (γ-HOPdG) and γ-hydroxy-1,N(6)-propano-2'-deoxyadenosine (γ-HOPdA). The bulky γ-HOPdG adduct blocks DNA synthesis by replicative polymerases but can be bypassed by translesion synthesis polymerases in the nucleus. Although acrolein-induced adducts are likely to be formed and persist in mitochondrial DNA, animal cell mitochondria lack specialized translesion DNA synthesis polymerases to tolerate these lesions. Thus, it is important to understand how pol γ, the sole mitochondrial DNA polymerase in human cells, acts on acrolein-adducted DNA. To address this question, we investigated the ability of pol γ to bypass the minor groove γ-HOPdG and major groove γ-HOPdA adducts using single nucleotide incorporation and primer extension analyses. The efficiency of pol γ-catalyzed bypass of γ-HOPdG was low, and surprisingly, pol γ preferred to incorporate purine nucleotides opposite the adduct. Pol γ also exhibited ∼2-fold lower rates of excision of the misincorporated purine nucleotides opposite γ-HOPdG compared with the corresponding nucleotides opposite dG. Extension of primers from the termini opposite γ-HOPdG was accomplished only following error-prone purine nucleotide incorporation. However, pol γ preferentially incorporated dT opposite the γ-HOPdA adduct and efficiently extended primers from the correctly paired terminus, indicating that γ-HOPdA is probably nonmutagenic. In summary, our data suggest that acrolein-induced exocyclic DNA lesions can be bypassed by mitochondrial DNA polymerase but, in the case of the minor groove γ-HOPdG adduct, at the cost of unprecedented high mutation rates. PMID:23543747

  9. Structure and mechanism of human DNA polymerase [eta

    SciTech Connect

    Biertümpfel, Christian; Zhao, Ye; Kondo, Yuji; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago; Gregory, Mark; Lee, Jae Young; Masutani, Chikahide; Lehmann, Alan R.; Hanaoka, Fumio; Yang, Wei

    2010-11-03

    The variant form of the human syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XPV) is caused by a deficiency in DNA polymerase {eta} (Pol{eta}), a DNA polymerase that enables replication through ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers. Here we report high-resolution crystal structures of human Pol{eta} at four consecutive steps during DNA synthesis through cis-syn cyclobutane thymine dimers. Pol{eta} acts like a 'molecular splint' to stabilize damaged DNA in a normal B-form conformation. An enlarged active site accommodates the thymine dimer with excellent stereochemistry for two-metal ion catalysis. Two residues conserved among Pol{eta} orthologues form specific hydrogen bonds with the lesion and the incoming nucleotide to assist translesion synthesis. On the basis of the structures, eight Pol{eta} missense mutations causing XPV can be rationalized as undermining the molecular splint or perturbing the active-site alignment. The structures also provide an insight into the role of Pol{eta} in replicating through D loop and DNA fragile sites.

  10. Signatures of Climatic Change In Human Mitochondrial Dna From Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, M. B.; Macaulay, V. A.; Torroni, A.; Bandelt, H.-J.

    Founder analysis is an approach to analysing non-recombining DNA sequence data, such as variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which aims at identifying and dating migrations into new territory. We applied the approach to about 4,000 human mtDNA sequences from Europe and the Near East, in order to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived at various times during the continent's past. We found that the major signal dates to about 15,000 years ago, at the time of rewarming following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). There is little or no archaeological evidence for immigration into Europe at this time, and the record indicates that at least parts of southern Europe remained populated during the LGM. Therefore, we interpret this signal as the trace of a bottleneck at the time of the LGM, as a result of the retreat from northern Europe during the peak of the glaciation, followed by a re-expansion from one or more refugial zones. Immigration episodes then figure at the beginning of the Early Upper Palaeolithic, during the Middle Upper Palaeolithic, and with the Neolithic. The impact of the latter on the composition of the European mtDNA pool was evidently rather minor. This result implies that climate is likely to have been a major force shaping human demographic history in Europe.

  11. Interplay between Ku, Artemis, and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit at DNA ends.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Jérôme; Frit, Philippe; Delteil, Christine; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Salles, Bernard; Calsou, Patrick

    2006-09-22

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) by the nonhomologous end-joining pathway in mammals requires at least seven proteins involved in a simplified two-step process: (i) recognition and synapsis of the DNA ends dependent on the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) formed by the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs in association with Artemis; (ii) ligation dependent on the DNA ligase IV.XRCC4.Cernunnos-XLF complex. The Artemis protein exhibits exonuclease and endonuclease activities that are believed to be involved in the processing of a subclass of DSB. Here, we have analyzed the interactions of Artemis and nonhomologous end-joining pathway proteins both in a context of human nuclear cell extracts and in cells. DSB-inducing agents specifically elicit the mobilization of Artemis to damaged chromatin together with DNA-PK and XRCC4/ligase IV proteins. DNA-PKcs is necessary for the loading of Artemis on damaged DNA and is the main kinase that phosphorylates Artemis in cells damaged with highly efficient DSB producers. Under kinase-preventive conditions, both in vitro and in cells, Ku-mediated assembly of DNA-PK on DNA ends is responsible for a dissociation of the DNA-PKcs. Artemis complex. Conversely, DNA-PKcs kinase activity prevents Artemis dissociation from the DNA-PK.DNA complex. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a model in which a DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation is necessary both to activate Artemis endonuclease activity and to maintain its association with the DNA end site. This tight functional coupling between the activation of both DNA-PKcs and Artemis may avoid improper processing of DNA. PMID:16857680

  12. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

  13. Unstable high molecular weight inverted repetitive DNA in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J C; Rucinsky, T E

    1982-01-01

    About 1% of newly synthesized DNA from PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes can be isolated as large (up to 90 kilobase pairs) double stranded fragments that resist sequential alkali and heat denaturation steps but are not closed circular. By electron microscopy about 1% have single-strand hairpin loops at one end and therefore present inverted repetitive sequences (IR-DNA). Most of the remainder have a blunt-appearing double-strand terminus at both ends (78%) or one end (18%). Indirect evidence indicates that these also are inverted complementary structures with terminal hairpin loops too small to be visualized: (1) Treatment with either a 5' or 3' single-strand exonuclease generates essentially only fragments with a single strand at one end; (2) with partial denaturation, the number of fragments with identifiable single-strand hairpin loops increases (to about 20%); (3) after S1 nuclease digestion, greater than 95% can be fully heat denatured. Cot analysis indicates that these fragments are derived from dispersed sites throughout the genome. Up to 25% of DNA released from lymphocytes during growth similarly resists denaturation, and released DNA and IR-DNA are both enriched in the same set of repetitive sequences. Thus at least a portion of IR-DNA appears to be unstable. Images PMID:7145706

  14. CRISPaint allows modular base-specific gene tagging using a ligase-4-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L.; Höning, Klara; Ebert, Thomas S.; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific insertion of heterologous genetic material into genomes provides a powerful means to study gene function. Here we describe a modular system entitled CRISPaint (CRISPR-assisted insertion tagging) that allows precise and efficient integration of large heterologous DNA cassettes into eukaryotic genomes. CRISPaint makes use of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to introduce a double-strand break (DSB) at a user-defined genomic location. A universal donor DNA, optionally provided as minicircle DNA, is cleaved simultaneously to be integrated at the genomic DSB, while processing the donor plasmid at three possible positions allows flexible reading-frame selection. Applying this system allows to create C-terminal tag fusions of endogenously encoded proteins in human cells with high efficiencies. Knocking out known DSB repair components reveals that site-specific insertion is completely dependent on canonical NHEJ (DNA-PKcs, XLF and ligase-4). A large repertoire of modular donor vectors renders CRISPaint compatible with a wide array of applications. PMID:27465542

  15. CRISPaint allows modular base-specific gene tagging using a ligase-4-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Höning, Klara; Ebert, Thomas S; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    The site-specific insertion of heterologous genetic material into genomes provides a powerful means to study gene function. Here we describe a modular system entitled CRISPaint (CRISPR-assisted insertion tagging) that allows precise and efficient integration of large heterologous DNA cassettes into eukaryotic genomes. CRISPaint makes use of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to introduce a double-strand break (DSB) at a user-defined genomic location. A universal donor DNA, optionally provided as minicircle DNA, is cleaved simultaneously to be integrated at the genomic DSB, while processing the donor plasmid at three possible positions allows flexible reading-frame selection. Applying this system allows to create C-terminal tag fusions of endogenously encoded proteins in human cells with high efficiencies. Knocking out known DSB repair components reveals that site-specific insertion is completely dependent on canonical NHEJ (DNA-PKcs, XLF and ligase-4). A large repertoire of modular donor vectors renders CRISPaint compatible with a wide array of applications. PMID:27465542

  16. Microhomology-mediated end joining is the principal mediator of double-strand break repair during mitochondrial DNA lesions

    PubMed Central

    Tadi, Satish Kumar; Sebastian, Robin; Dahal, Sumedha; Babu, Ravi K.; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with various mitochondrial disorders. The deletions identified in humans are flanked by short, directly repeated mitochondrial DNA sequences; however, the mechanism of such DNA rearrangements has yet to be elucidated. In contrast to nuclear DNA (nDNA), mtDNA is more exposed to oxidative damage, which may result in double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although DSB repair in nDNA is well studied, repair mechanisms in mitochondria are not characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanisms of DSB repair in mitochondria using in vitro and ex vivo assays. Whereas classical NHEJ (C-NHEJ) is undetectable, microhomology-mediated alternative NHEJ efficiently repairs DSBs in mitochondria. Of interest, robust microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) was observed with DNA substrates bearing 5-, 8-, 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-nt microhomology. Furthermore, MMEJ efficiency was enhanced with an increase in the length of homology. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and protein inhibition assays suggest the involvement of CtIP, FEN1, MRE11, and PARP1 in mitochondrial MMEJ. Knockdown studies, in conjunction with other experiments, demonstrated that DNA ligase III, but not ligase IV or ligase I, is primarily responsible for the final sealing of DSBs during mitochondrial MMEJ. These observations highlight the central role of MMEJ in maintenance of mammalian mitochondrial genome integrity and is likely relevant for deletions observed in many human mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26609070

  17. Tiggers and DNA transposon fossils in the human genome.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, A F; Riggs, A D

    1996-01-01

    We report several classes of human interspersed repeats that resemble fossils of DNA transposons, elements that move by excision and reintegration in the genome, whereas previously characterized mammalian repeats all appear to have accumulated by retrotransposition, which involves an RNA intermediate. The human genome contains at least 14 families and > 100,000 degenerate copies of short (180-1200 bp) elements that have 14- to 25-bp terminal inverted repeats and are flanked by either 8 bp or TA target site duplications. We describe two ancient 2.5-kb elements with coding capacity, Tigger1 and -2, that closely resemble pogo, a DNA transposon in Drosophila, and probably were responsible for the distribution of some of the short elements. The deduced pogo and Tigger proteins are related to products of five DNA transposons found in fungi and nematodes, and more distantly, to the Tc1 and mariner transposases. They also are very similar to the major mammalian centromere protein CENP-B, suggesting that this may have a transposase origin. We further identified relatively low-copy-number mariner elements in both human and sheep DNA. These belong to two subfamilies previously identified in insect genomes, suggesting lateral transfer between diverse species. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8643651

  18. Structure and two-metal mechanism of a eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent RNA ligases are agents of RNA repair that join 3′-OH and 5′-PO4 RNA ends. Naegleria gruberi RNA ligase (NgrRnl) exemplifies a family of RNA nick-sealing enzymes found in bacteria, viruses, and eukarya. Crystal structures of NgrRnl at three discrete steps along the reaction pathway—covalent ligase-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP•Mn2+ intermediate; ligase•ATP•(Mn2+)2 Michaelis complex; and ligase•Mn2+ complex—highlight a two-metal mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer, whereby (i) an enzyme-bound “catalytic” metal coordination complex lowers the pKa of the lysine nucleophile and stabilizes the transition state of the ATP α phosphate; and (ii) a second metal coordination complex bridges the β- and γ-phosphates. The NgrRnl N domain is a distinctively embellished oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold that engages the γ-phosphate and associated metal complex and orients the pyrophosphate leaving group for in-line catalysis with stereochemical inversion at the AMP phosphate. The unique domain architecture of NgrRnl fortifies the theme that RNA ligases have evolved many times, and independently, by fusions of a shared nucleotidyltransferase domain to structurally diverse flanking modules. The mechanistic insights to lysine adenylylation gained from the NgrRnl structures are likely to apply broadly to the covalent nucleotidyltransferase superfamily of RNA ligases, DNA ligases, and RNA capping enzymes. PMID:26512110

  19. Ultrasensitive detection of single nucleotide polymorphism in human mitochondrial DNA utilizing ion-mediated cascade surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy amplification.

    PubMed

    Shi, Muling; Zheng, Jing; Tan, Yongjun; Tan, Guixiang; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Li, Xia; Zhou, Zhiguang; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-03-01

    Although surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been featured by high sensitivity, additional signal enhancement is still necessary for trace amount of biomolecules detection. In this paper, a SERS amplified approach, featuring "ions-mediated cascade amplification (IMCA)", was proposed by utilizing the dissolved silver ions (Ag(+)) from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). We found that using Ag(+) as linkage agent can effectively control the gaps between neighboring 4-aminobenzenethiol (4-ABT) encoded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs@4-ABT) to form "hot spots" and thus produce SERS signal output, in which the SERS intensity was proportional to the concentration of Ag(+). Inspired by this finding, the IMCA was utilized for ultrasensitive detection of single nucleotide polymorphism in human mitochondrial DNA (16189T → C). Combining with the DNA ligase reaction, each target DNA binding event could successfully cause one AgNP introduction. By detecting the dissolved Ag(+) from AgNPs using IMCA, low to 3.0 × 10(-5) fm/μL targeted DNA can be detected, which corresponds to extractions from 200 nL cell suspension containing carcinoma pancreatic β-cell lines from diabetes patients. This IMCA approach is expected to be a universal strategy for ultrasensitive detection of analytes and supply valuable information for biomedical research and clinical early diagnosis. PMID:25622288

  20. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  1. Bayesian classification for promoter prediction in human DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercher, J.-F.; Jardin, P.; Duriez, B.

    2006-11-01

    Many Computational methods are yet available for data retrieval and analysis of genomic sequences, but some functional sites are difficult to characterize. In this work, we examine the problem of promoter localization in human DNA sequences. Promoters are regulatory regions that governs the expression of genes, and their prediction is reputed difficult, so that this issue is still open. We present the Chaos Game representation (CGR) of DNA sequences which has many interesting properties, and the notion of `genomic signature' that proved relevant in phylogeny applications. Based on this notion, we develop a (naïve) bayesian classifier, evaluate its performances, and show that its adaptive implementation enable to reveal or assess core-promoter positions along a DNA sequence.

  2. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  3. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in human genomic DNA by using denaturing gradient gel blots

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis can detect sequence differences outside restriction-enzyme recognition sites. DNA sequence polymorphisms can be detected as restriction-fragment melting polymorphisms (RFMPs) in genomic DNA by using blots made from denaturing gradient gels. In contrast to the use of Southern blots to find sequence differences, denaturing gradient gel blots can detect differences almost anywhere, not just at 4-6-bp restriction-enzyme recognition sites. Human genomic DNA was digested with one of several randomly selected 4-bp recognition-site restriction enzymes, electrophoresed in denaturing gradient gels, and transferred to nylon membranes. The blots were hydridized with radioactive probes prepared from the factor VIII, type II collagen, insulin receptor, [beta][sub 2]-adrenergic receptor, and 21-hydroxylase genes; in unrelated individuals, several RFM's were found in fragments from every locus tested. No restriction map or sequence information was used to detect RFMP's.

  4. Analysis of human accelerated DNA regions using archaic hominin genomes.

    PubMed

    Burbano, Hernán A; Green, Richard E; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  5. Analysis of Human Accelerated DNA Regions Using Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Hernán A.; Green, Richard E.; Maricic, Tomislav; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Kelso, Janet; Pollard, Katherine S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante

    2012-01-01

    Several previous comparisons of the human genome with other primate and vertebrate genomes identified genomic regions that are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution but fast-evolving on the human lineage. These human accelerated regions (HARs) may be regions of past adaptive evolution in humans. Alternatively, they may be the result of non-adaptive processes, such as biased gene conversion. We captured and sequenced DNA from a collection of previously published HARs using DNA from an Iberian Neandertal. Combining these new data with shotgun sequence from the Neandertal and Denisova draft genomes, we determine at least one archaic hominin allele for 84% of all positions within HARs. We find that 8% of HAR substitutions are not observed in the archaic hominins and are thus recent in the sense that the derived allele had not come to fixation in the common ancestor of modern humans and archaic hominins. Further, we find that recent substitutions in HARs tend to have come to fixation faster than substitutions elsewhere in the genome and that substitutions in HARs tend to cluster in time, consistent with an episodic rather than a clock-like process underlying HAR evolution. Our catalog of sequence changes in HARs will help prioritize them for functional studies of genomic elements potentially responsible for modern human adaptations. PMID:22412940

  6. Partial purification and characterization of DNA from the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Schmeckpeper, B J; Smith, K D; Dorman, B P; Ruddle, F H; Talbot, C C

    1979-01-01

    Human X chromosome DNA was partially purified from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing a single human chromosome, the X. Enrichment of such DNA was accomplished by two sequential reassociations of radiolabeled hybrid cell DNA with large excesses of mouse DNA. Unreassociated hybrid cell DNA was used as a probe for human X chromosome sequences. The human-specific fraction of probe DNA CONTAINED THREE COMPONENTS. Two of these reassociated to human DNAs at rates proportional to the number of X chromosomes present. These two components were thus localized to the X chromosome. One of these X-specific components, representing about 80% of human-specific probe DNA, consisted of single copy or very low order reiterated DNA. The second X-specific component, representing about 10% of human-specific probe DNA, was about 20-30 times more reiterated. The remaining 10% of human-specific probe DNA, although derived from the X chromosome, reassociated to human DNAs at a rate independent of the number of X chromosomes present. This component was thus homologous to autosomal as well as X chromosome DNA. The probe DNA accounts for approximately half of the human X chromosome, suggesting that the remainder may have homology with mouse DNA. PMID:293740

  7. Human age estimation from blood using mRNA, DNA methylation, DNA rearrangement, and telomere length.

    PubMed

    Zubakov, Dmitry; Liu, Fan; Kokmeijer, Iris; Choi, Ying; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Broer, Linda; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Lewin, Jörn; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-09-01

    Establishing the age of unknown persons, or persons with unknown age, can provide important leads in police investigations, disaster victim identification, fraud cases, and in other legal affairs. Previous methods mostly relied on morphological features available from teeth or skeletal parts. The development of molecular methods for age estimation allowing to use human specimens that possess no morphological age information, such as bloodstains, is extremely valuable as this type of samples is commonly found at crime scenes. Recently, we introduced a DNA-based approach for human age estimation from blood based on the quantification of T-cell specific DNA rearrangements (sjTRECs), which achieves accurate assignment of blood DNA samples to one of four 20-year-interval age categories. Aiming at improving the accuracy of molecular age estimation from blood, we investigated different types of biomarkers. We started out by systematic genome-wide surveys for new age-informative mRNA and DNA methylation markers in blood from the same young and old individuals using microarray technologies. The obtained candidate markers were validated in independent samples covering a wide age range using alternative technologies together with previously proposed DNA methylation, sjTREC, and telomere length markers. Cross-validated multiple regression analysis was applied for estimating and validating the age predictive power of various sets of biomarkers within and across different marker types. We found that DNA methylation markers outperformed mRNA, sjTREC, and telomere length in age predictive power. The best performing model included 8 DNA methylation markers derived from 3 CpG islands reaching a high level of accuracy (cross-validated R(2)=0.88, SE±6.97 years, mean absolute deviation 5.07 years). However, our data also suggest that mRNA markers can provide independent age information: a model using a combined set of 5 DNA methylation markers and one mRNA marker could provide

  8. Cullin 3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Cancer Biology: Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Ruey-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes and are multiprotein complexes. In these complexes, the Cullin protein serves as a scaffold to connect two functional modules of the ligases, the catalytic subunit and substrate-binding subunit. To date, eight members of the Cullin family proteins have been identified. In the Cul3 ubiquitin ligases, Bric-a-brac/Tramtrack/Broad complex (BTB) domain-containing proteins function as a bridge to connect Cul3 and substrates. While the BTB domain is responsible for Cul3 binding, these proteins usually contain an additional domain for substrate interaction, such as MATH, kelch, Zn finger, and PAM, Highwire, and RPM-1 (PHR domain). With the existence of a large number of BTB proteins in human, the Cul3 ubiquitin ligases ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involving in diverse cellular functions. In this review, we will discuss recent advances on the functions of Cul3 ubiquitin ligases in cancer development, progression, and therapeutic response and the dysregulation of Cul3-mediated ubiquitination events in human malignancies. In particular, we will focus on three Cul3 substrate adaptors, kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap1), kelch-like family member 20 (KLHL20), and speckle type BTB/POZ protein (SPOP), with the intent to highlight novel targets in cancer therapy. PMID:27200299

  9. Structural Determinants of Human FANCF Protein That Function in the Assembly of a DNA Damage Signaling Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Kowal,P.; Gurtan, A.; Stuckert, P.; D'Andrea, A.; Ellenberger, T.

    2007-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive and X-linked chromosomal instability disorder. At least eight FA proteins (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L, and M) form a nuclear core complex required for monoubiquitination of a downstream protein, FANCD2. The human FANCF protein reportedly functions as a molecular adaptor within the FA nuclear complex, bridging between the subcomplexes A:G and C:E. Our x-ray crystallographic studies of the C-terminal domain of FANCF reveal a helical repeat structure similar to the Cand1 regulator of the Cul1-Rbx1-Skp1-Fbox(Skp2) ubiquitin ligase complex. Two C-terminal loops of FANCF are essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and normal cellular resistance to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C. FANCF mutants bearing amino acid substitutions in this C-terminal surface fail to interact with other components of the FA complex, indicating that this surface is critical for the proper assembly of the FA core complex.

  10. DNA amplification is rare in normal human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.A.; Watt, F.M.; Hudson, D.L.; Stark, G.R. ); Smith, H.S.; Hancock, M.C. )

    1990-03-01

    Three types of normal human cells were selected in tissue culture with three drugs without observing a single amplification event from a total of 5 x 10{sup 8} cells. No drug-resistant colonies were observed when normal foreskin keratinocytes were selected with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate or with hydroxyurea or when normal mammary epithelial cells were selected with methotrexate. Some slightly resistant colonies with limited potential for growth were obtained when normal diploid fibroblast cells derived from fetal lung were selected with methotrexate or hydroxyurea but careful copy-number analysis of the dihydrofolate reductase and ribonucleotide reductase genes revealed no evidence of amplification. The rarity of DNA amplification in normal human cells contrasts strongly with the situation in tumors and in established cell lines, where amplification of onogenes and of genes mediating drug resistance is frequent. The results suggest that tumors and cell lines have acquired the abnormal ability to amplify DNA with high frequency.

  11. SUMO-modification and elimination of the active DNA demethylation enzyme TDG in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Taishi; Fujimitsu, Yuka; Yoshikai, Yushi; Sasano, Takashi; Yamada, Koji; Murakami, Masataka; Urano, Takeshi; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2014-05-01

    Thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG) is a base excision repair enzyme that interacts with the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4 and functions in the active DNA demethylation pathway. Here we showed that both SUMOylated and non-modified forms of endogenous TDG fluctuated during the cell cycle and in response to drugs that perturbed cell cycle progression, including hydroxyurea and nocodazole. Additionally, we detected a SUMOylation-independent association between TDG and RNF4 in vitro as well as in vivo, and observed that both forms of TDG were efficiently degraded in RNF4-depleted cells when arrested at S phase. Our findings provide insights into the in vivo dynamics of TDG SUMOylation and further clarify the TDG-RNF4 interaction. PMID:24727457

  12. DNA methylation dynamics in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Koichiro; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-07-01

    Indeed human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are considered to be powerful tools in regenerative medicine. To enable the use of hiPSCs in the field of regenerative medicine, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of reprogramming during the transformation of somatic cells into hiPSCs. Genome-wide epigenetic modification constitutes a critical event in the generation of iPSCs. In other words, to analyze epigenetic changes in iPSCs means to elucidate reprogramming processes. We have established a large number of hiPSCs derived from various human tissues and have obtained their DNA methylation profiles. Comparison analyses indicated that the epigenetic patterns of various hiPSCs, irrespective of their source tissue, were very similar to one another and were similar to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). However, the profiles of hiPSCs and hESCs exhibited epigenetic differences, which were caused by random aberrant hypermethylation at early passages. Interestingly, continuous passaging of the hiPSCs diminished the differences between DNA methylation profiles of hiPSCs and hESCs. The number of aberrant DNA methylation regions may thus represent a useful epigenetic index for evaluating hiPSCs in the context of therapeutic applications. PMID:27083573

  13. Defining functional DNA elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kellis, Manolis; Wold, Barbara; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kundaje, Anshul; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ward, Lucas D.; Birney, Ewan; Crawford, Gregory E.; Dekker, Job; Dunham, Ian; Elnitski, Laura L.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Gerstein, Mark; Giddings, Morgan C.; Gilbert, David M.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Green, Eric D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim; Kent, Jim; Lieb, Jason D.; Myers, Richard M.; Pazin, Michael J.; Ren, Bing; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Weng, Zhiping; White, Kevin P.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, attention turned to identifying and annotating its functional DNA elements. As a complement to genetic and comparative genomics approaches, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project was launched to contribute maps of RNA transcripts, transcriptional regulator binding sites, and chromatin states in many cell types. The resulting genome-wide data reveal sites of biochemical activity with high positional resolution and cell type specificity that facilitate studies of gene regulation and interpretation of noncoding variants associated with human disease. However, the biochemically active regions cover a much larger fraction of the genome than do evolutionarily conserved regions, raising the question of whether nonconserved but biochemically active regions are truly functional. Here, we review the strengths and limitations of biochemical, evolutionary, and genetic approaches for defining functional DNA segments, potential sources for the observed differences in estimated genomic coverage, and the biological implications of these discrepancies. We also analyze the relationship between signal intensity, genomic coverage, and evolutionary conservation. Our results reinforce the principle that each approach provides complementary information and that we need to use combinations of all three to elucidate genome function in human biology and disease. PMID:24753594

  14. Requirement for the Kinase Activity of Human DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in DNA Strand Break Rejoining

    PubMed Central

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Kumano, Satoshi; Boubnov, Nikolai V.; Story, Michael D.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Peterson, Scott R.; Chen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an enormous, 470-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase that has homology with members of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase superfamily. This protein contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by assembling broken ends of DNA molecules in combination with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. It may also serve as a molecular scaffold for recruiting DNA repair factors to DNA strand breaks. This study attempts to better define the role of protein kinase activity in the repair of DNA DSBs. We constructed a contiguous 14-kb human DNA-PKcs cDNA and demonstrated that it can complement the DNA DSB repair defects of two mutant cell lines known to be deficient in DNA-PKcs (M059J and V3). We then created deletion and site-directed mutations within the conserved PI 3-kinase domain of the DNA-PKcs gene to test the importance of protein kinase activity for DSB rejoining. These DNA-PKcs mutant constructs are able to express the protein but fail to complement the DNA DSB or V(D)J recombination defects of DNA-PKcs mutant cells. These results indicate that the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is essential for the rejoining of DNA DSBs in mammalian cells. We have also determined a model structure for the DNA-PKcs kinase domain based on comparisons to the crystallographic structure of a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. This structure gives some insight into which amino acid residues are crucial for the kinase activity in DNA-PKcs. PMID:10207111

  15. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  16. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  17. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  18. Human DNA quantification and sample quality assessment: Developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) system.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Margaret M; Thompson, Jonelle M; McLaren, Robert S; Purpero, Vincent M; Thomas, Kelli J; Dobrowski, Patricia A; DeGroot, Gretchen A; Romsos, Erica L; Storts, Douglas R

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the total amount of human DNA isolated from a forensic evidence item is crucial for DNA normalization prior to short tandem repeat (STR) DNA analysis and a federal quality assurance standard requirement. Previous commercial quantification methods determine the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations, but provide limited information about the condition of the DNA sample. The PowerQuant(®) System includes targets for quantification of total human and total human male DNA as well as targets for evaluating whether the human DNA is degraded and/or PCR inhibitors are present in the sample. A developmental validation of the PowerQuant(®) System was completed, following SWGDAM Validation Guidelines, to evaluate the assay's specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy, as well as the ability to detect degraded DNA or PCR inhibitors. In addition to the total human DNA and total human male DNA concentrations in a sample, data from the degradation target and internal PCR control (IPC) provide a forensic DNA analyst meaningful information about the quality of the isolated human DNA and the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample that can be used to determine the most effective workflow and assist downstream interpretation. PMID:27206225

  19. Characterization and Promoter Analysis of a Cotton Ring-Type Ubiquitin Ligase (E3) Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cotton fiber cDNA, GhRING1, and its corresponding gene have been cloned and characterized. The GhRING1 gene encodes a RING-type ubiquitin ligase (E3) containing 337 amino acids (aa). The GhRING1 protein contains a RING finger motif with conserved cysteine and histine residues at the C-terminus a...

  20. AUTOUBIQUITINATION OF BCA2 RING E3 LIGASE REGULATES ITS OWN STABILITY AND AFFECTS CELL MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Amemiya, Yutaka; Azmi, Peter; Seth, Arun

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that ubiquitination plays a role in cancer by changing the function of key cellular proteins. Previously, we isolated BCA2 gene from a library enriched for breast tumor mRNAs. The BCA2 protein is a RING type E3 ubiquitin ligase and is overexpressed in human breast tumors. In order to deduce the biochemical and biological function of BCA2, we searched for BCA2 binding partners using human breast and fetal brain cDNA libraries and BacterioMatch two-hybrid system. We identified 62 interacting partners, majority of those were found to encode ubiquitin precursor proteins including ubiquitin C and ubiquitinA-52. Using several deletion and point mutants, we found that the BCA2 zinc finger (BZF) domain at the N-terminus specifically binds ubiquitin and ubiquitinated proteins. The autoubiquitination activity of BCA2, RING-H2 mutant, BZF mutant, and various lysine mutants of BCA2 were investigated. Our results indicate that the BCA2 protein is strongly ubiquitinated and no ubiquitination is detected with the BCA2 RING-H2 mutant, indicating that the RING domain is essential for autoubiquitination. Mutation of the K26 and K32 lysines in the BZF domain also abrogated autoubiquitination activity. Interestingly, mutation of the K232 and K260 lysines in and near the RING domain resulted in an increase in autoubiquitination activity. Additionally, in cellular migration assays, BCA2 mutants showed altered cell motility compared to wild-type BCA2. On the basis of these findings, we propose that BCA2 maybe an important factor regulating breast cancer cell migration/metastasis. We put-forward a novel model for BCA2 E3 ligase mediated cell regulation. PMID:18819927

  1. Thermodynamics of the DNA Damage Repair Steps of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) is a key enzyme responsible for initiating the base excision repair of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanosine (oxoG). In this study a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of hOGG1 with specific and non-specific DNA-substrates is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. The standard Gibbs energies, enthalpies and entropies of specific stages of the repair process were determined via kinetic measurements over a temperature range using the van’t Hoff approach. The three steps which are accompanied with changes in the DNA conformations were detected via 2-aminopurine fluorescence in the process of binding and recognition of damaged oxoG base by hOGG1. The thermodynamic analysis has demonstrated that the initial step of the DNA substrates binding is mainly governed by energy due to favorable interactions in the process of formation of the recognition contacts, which results in negative enthalpy change, as well as due to partial desolvation of the surface between the DNA and enzyme, which results in positive entropy change. Discrimination of non-specific G base versus specific oxoG base is occurring in the second step of the oxoG-substrate binding. This step requires energy consumption which is compensated by the positive entropy contribution. The third binding step is the final adjustment of the enzyme/substrate complex to achieve the catalytically competent state which is characterized by large endothermicity compensated by a significant increase of entropy originated from the dehydration of the DNA grooves. PMID:24911585

  2. Amplification of human papillomavirus DNA sequences by using conserved primers.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, L; Arella, M; Campione-Piccardo, J; Lancaster, W D

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction has potential for use in the detection of small amounts of human papillomavirus (HPV) viral nucleic acids present in clinical specimens. However, new HPV types for which no probes exist would remain undetected by using type-specific primers for the polymerase chain reaction before hybridization. Primers corresponding to highly conserved HPV sequences may be useful for detecting low amounts of known HPV DNA as well as new HPV types. Here we analyze a pair of primers derived from conserved sequences within the E1 open reading frame for HPV sequence amplification by using the polymerase chain reaction. The longest perfect homology among HPV sequences is a 12-mer within the first exon of E1M. A region of conserved amino acids coded by the E1 open reading frame allowed the detection of another highly conserved region about 850 base pairs downstream. Two 21-mers derived from these conserved regions were used to amplify sequences from all HPV DNAs used as templates. The amplified DNA was shown to be specific for HPV sequences within the E1 open reading frame. DNA from HPVs whose sequences were not available were amplified by using these two primers. HPV DNA sequences in clinical specimens could also be amplified with the primers. Images PMID:2556429

  3. Unusual structure of a human middle repetitive DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnasinghe, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The L2Hs sequences are a polymorphic, interspersed, middle repetitive DNA family unique to human genomes. Genomic fingerprinting indicates that these DNAs vary from one individual to another and between tissues of the same individual. Sequence analysis reveals that they are AT-rich (76%) and contain many unusual sequence arrangements (palindromes, inverted and direct repeats). These sequence properties confer on the L2Hs elements the potential to fold into non-B-form structures, a characteristic of recombination hot spots. To test this hypothesis carbodiimide, osmium tetroxide and S[sub 1] nuclease were used as single-strand specific probes to study a recombinant plasmid, pN6.4.39, containing a single L2Hs segment. Different forms of the plasmid substrate were analyzed, including linear molecules and circular forms of DNA in growing E. coli cells were analyzed. Modified plasmid DNA was analyzed by primer extension in a sequencing-type reaction format. These studies demonstrate that the L2Hs sequences: (1) assume non-B-form structures both in vitro and in vivo, (2) map to predicted cruciform structures, (3) behave as C-type extrusion sequences, and (4) that these unusual DNA structures are dependent on plasmid superhelicity.

  4. Gnathic and peripheral ameloblastomas lack human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Lindsey; Bishop, Justin; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with a variety of head and neck neoplasms, including squamous cell carcinomas and Schneiderian papillomas. Ameloblastomas can arise from either the gnathic bones or peripheral soft tissues. Peripheral sinonasal ameloblastomas share clinical features with Schneiderian papillomas. A small number of reports have described detection of HPV DNA within ameloblastomas. However, Most of these cases was reported in the 1990s, used the polymerase chain reaction technique, and only examined gnathic tumors. The current study was designed to determine whether low- or high-risk HPV DNA could be detected in gnathic or peripheral ameloblastomas using in situ hybridization. Twenty-nine examples of gnathic osseous and peripheral head and neck ameloblastomas were obtained from the authors' archives (University of Virginia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital). High-risk HPV DNA was not detected in any of the 29 tumors analyzed. Low-risk HPV DNA was identified in only 1 tumor, which was peripheral in origin, and from an immunocompromised patient. We believe that the HPV in this case represents a background "passenger" infection. This study demonstrates that HPV of either high- or low-risk subtypes is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of sinonasal ameloblastomas. PMID:26190154

  5. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  6. Structure of the HHARI Catalytic Domain Shows Glimpses of a HECT E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Mercier, Pascal; Shaw, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING), or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT). The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR) proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI). These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn2+-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases. PMID:24058416

  7. Multivalent Human Papillomavirus L1 DNA Vaccination Utilizing Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Jiang, Rosie; Jagu, Subhashini; Wang, Joshua W.; Wang, Chenguang; Christensen, Neil D.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Naked DNA vaccines can be manufactured simply and are stable at ambient temperature, but require improved delivery technologies to boost immunogenicity. Here we explore in vivo electroporation for multivalent codon-optimized human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 and L2 DNA vaccination. Methods Balb/c mice were vaccinated three times at two week intervals with a fusion protein comprising L2 residues ∼11−88 of 8 different HPV types (11−88×8) or its DNA expression vector, DNA constructs expressing L1 only or L1+L2 of a single HPV type, or as a mixture of several high-risk HPV types and administered utilizing electroporation, i.m. injection or gene gun. Serum was collected two weeks and 3 months after the last vaccination. Sera from immunized mice were tested for in-vitro neutralization titer, and protective efficacy upon passive transfer to naive mice and vaginal HPV challenge. Heterotypic interactions between L1 proteins of HPV6, HPV16 and HPV18 in 293TT cells were tested by co-precipitation using type-specific monoclonal antibodies. Results Electroporation with L2 multimer DNA did not elicit detectable antibody titer, whereas DNA expressing L1 or L1+L2 induced L1-specific, type-restricted neutralizing antibodies, with titers approaching those induced by Gardasil. Co-expression of L2 neither augmented L1-specific responses nor induced L2-specific antibodies. Delivery of HPV L1 DNA via in vivo electroporation produces a stronger antibody response compared to i.m. injection or i.d. ballistic delivery via gene gun. Reduced neutralizing antibody titers were observed for certain types when vaccinating with a mixture of L1 (or L1+L2) vectors of multiple HPV types, likely resulting from heterotypic L1 interactions observed in co-immunoprecipitation studies. High titers were restored by vaccinating with individual constructs at different sites, or partially recovered by co-expression of L2, such that durable protective antibody titers were achieved for each type

  8. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001. PMID:24015356

  9. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001 PMID:24015356

  10. Isolation of Human Genomic DNA Sequences with Expanded Nucleobase Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Preeti; Maurer, Sara; Kubik, Grzegorz; Summerer, Daniel

    2016-08-10

    We report the direct isolation of user-defined DNA sequences from the human genome with programmable selectivity for both canonical and epigenetic nucleobases. This is enabled by the use of engineered transcription-activator-like effectors (TALEs) as DNA major groove-binding probes in affinity enrichment. The approach provides the direct quantification of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) levels at single genomic nucleotide positions in a strand-specific manner. We demonstrate the simple, multiplexed typing of a variety of epigenetic cancer biomarker 5mC with custom TALE mixes. Compared to antibodies as the most widely used affinity probes for 5mC analysis, i.e., employed in the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) protocol, TALEs provide superior sensitivity, resolution and technical ease. We engineer a range of size-reduced TALE repeats and establish full selectivity profiles for their binding to all five human cytosine nucleobases. These provide insights into their nucleobase recognition mechanisms and reveal the ability of TALEs to isolate genomic target sequences with selectivity for single 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and, in combination with sodium borohydride reduction, single 5-formylcytosine nucleobases. PMID:27429302

  11. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  12. The use of dimorphic Alu insertions in human DNA fingerprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Novick, G.E.; Gonzalez, T.; Garrison, J.; Novick, C.C.; Herrera, R.J.; Batzer, M.A.; Deininger, P.L.

    1992-12-04

    We have characterized certain Human Specific Alu Insertions as either dimorphic (TPA25, PV92, APO), sightly dimorphic (C2N4 and C4N4) or monomorphic (C3N1, C4N6, C4N2, C4N5, C4N8), based on studies of Caucasian, Asian, American Black and African Black populations. Our approach is based upon: (1) PCR amplification using primers directed to the sequences that flank the site of insertion of the different Alu elements studied; (2) gel electrophoresis and scoring according to the presence or absence of an Alu insertion in one or both homologous chromosomes; (3) allelic frequencies calculated and compared according to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Our DNA fingerprinting procedure using PCR amplification of dimorphic Human Specific Alu insertions, is stable enough to be used not only as a tool for genetic mapping but also to characterize populations, study migrational patterns and track the inheritance of human genetic disorders.

  13. Biochemical Properties and Biological Function of a Monofunctional Microbial Biotin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Beckett, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Biotin protein ligases constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze biotin linkage to biotin-dependent carboxylases. In bacteria these enzymes are functionally divided into two classes; the monofunctional enzymes that only catalyze biotin addition and the bifunctional enzymes that also bind to DNA to regulate transcription initiation. Biochemical and biophysical studies of the bifunctional Escherichia coli ligase suggest that several properties of the enzyme have evolved to support its additional regulatory role. Included among these properties are the order of substrate binding and linkage between oligomeric state and ligand binding. PMID:20499837

  14. Human RAD18 Interacts with Ubiquitylated Chromatin Components and Facilitates RAD9 Recruitment to DNA Double Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Akiko; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; Hibbert, Richard G.; Sixma, Titia K.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Grootegoed, J. Anton; Baarends, Willy M.

    2011-01-01

    RAD18 is an ubiquitin ligase involved in replicative damage bypass and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair processes. We found that RPA is required for the dynamic pattern of RAD18 localization during the cell cycle, and for accumulation of RAD18 at sites of γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage. In addition, RAD18 colocalizes with chromatin-associated conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitylated H2A throughout the cell cycle and following irradiation. This localization pattern depends on the presence of an intact, ubiquitin-binding Zinc finger domain. Using a biochemical approach, we show that RAD18 directly binds to ubiquitylated H2A and several other unknown ubiquitylated chromatin components. This interaction also depends on the RAD18 Zinc finger, and increases upon the induction of DSBs by γ-irradiation. Intriguingly, RAD18 does not always colocalize with regions that show enhanced H2A ubiquitylation. In human female primary fibroblasts, where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated to equalize X-chromosomal gene expression between male (XY) and female (XX) cells, this inactive X is enriched for ubiquitylated H2A, but only rarely accumulates RAD18. This indicates that the binding of RAD18 to ubiquitylated H2A is context-dependent. Regarding the functional relevance of RAD18 localization at DSBs, we found that RAD18 is required for recruitment of RAD9, one of the components of the 9-1-1 checkpoint complex, to these sites. Recruitment of RAD9 requires the functions of the RING and Zinc finger domains of RAD18. Together, our data indicate that association of RAD18 with DSBs through ubiquitylated H2A and other ubiquitylated chromatin components allows recruitment of RAD9, which may function directly in DSB repair, independent of downstream activation of the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2. PMID:21858012

  15. Evolutionary and functional conservation of the DNA non-homologous end-joining protein, XLF/Cernunnos.

    PubMed

    Hentges, Pierre; Ahnesorg, Peter; Pitcher, Robert S; Bruce, Chris K; Kysela, Boris; Green, Andrew J; Bianchi, Julie; Wilson, Thomas E; Jackson, Stephen P; Doherty, Aidan J

    2006-12-01

    Non-homologous end-joining is a major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells, deficiency in which confers radiosensitivity and immune deficiency at the whole organism level. A core protein complex comprising the Ku70/80 heterodimer together with a complex between DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 is conserved throughout eukaryotes and assembles at double-strand breaks to mediate ligation of broken DNA ends. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae an additional NHEJ protein, Nej1p, physically interacts with the ligase IV complex and is required in vivo for ligation of DNA double-strand breaks. Recent studies with cells derived from radiosensitive and immune-deficient patients have identified the human protein, XLF (also named Cernunnos), as a crucial NHEJ protein. Here we show that XLF and Nej1p are members of the same protein superfamily and that this family has members in diverse eukaryotes. Indeed, we show that a member of this family encoded by a previously uncharacterized open-reading frame in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome is required for NHEJ in this organism. Furthermore, our data reveal that XLF family proteins can bind to DNA and directly interact with the ligase IV-XRCC4 complex to promote DSB ligation. We therefore conclude that XLF family proteins interact with the ligase IV-XRCC4 complex to constitute the evolutionarily conserved enzymatic core of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:17038309

  16. Human polymorphic variants of the NEIL1 DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Roy, Laura M; Jaruga, Pawel; Wood, Thomas G; McCullough, Amanda K; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2007-05-25

    In mammalian cells, the repair of DNA bases that have been damaged by reactive oxygen species is primarily initiated by a series of DNA glycosylases that include OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL2. To explore the functional significance of NEIL1, we recently reported that neil1 knock-out and heterozygotic mice develop the majority of symptoms of metabolic syndrome (Vartanian, V., Lowell, B., Minko, I. G., Wood, T. G., Ceci, J. D., George, S., Ballinger, S. W., Corless, C. L., McCullough, A. K., and Lloyd, R. S. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 1864-1869). To determine whether this phenotype could be causally related to human disease susceptibility, we have characterized four polymorphic variants of human NEIL1. Although three of the variants (S82C, G83D, and D252N) retained near wild type levels of nicking activity on abasic (AP) site-containing DNA, G83D did not catalyze the wild type beta,delta-elimination reaction but primarily yielded the beta-elimination product. The AP nicking activity of the C136R variant was significantly reduced. Glycosylase nicking activities were measured on both thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotides and gamma-irradiated genomic DNA using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two of the polymorphic variants (S82C and D252N) showed near wild type enzyme specificity and kinetics, whereas G83D was devoid of glycosylase activity. Although insufficient quantities of C136R could be obtained to carry out gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses, this variant was also devoid of the ability to incise thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotide, suggesting that it may also be glycosylase-deficient. Extrapolation of these data suggests that individuals who are heterozygous for these inactive variant neil1 alleles may be at increased risk for metabolic syndrome. PMID:17389588

  17. Dynamic DNA methylation across diverse human cell lines and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Bowling, Kevin M.; Parker, Stephanie L.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Pauli-Behn, Florencia; Cross, Marie K.; Williams, Brian A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Absher, Devin M.; Wold, Barbara J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    As studies of DNA methylation increase in scope, it has become evident that methylation has a complex relationship with gene expression, plays an important role in defining cell types, and is disrupted in many diseases. We describe large-scale single-base resolution DNA methylation profiling on a diverse collection of 82 human cell lines and tissues using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). Analysis integrating RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data illuminates the functional role of this dynamic mark. Loci that are hypermethylated across cancer types are enriched for sites bound by NANOG in embryonic stem cells, which supports and expands the model of a stem/progenitor cell signature in cancer. CpGs that are hypomethylated across cancer types are concentrated in megabase-scale domains that occur near the telomeres and centromeres of chromosomes, are depleted of genes, and are enriched for cancer-specific EZH2 binding and H3K27me3 (repressive chromatin). In noncancer samples, there are cell-type specific methylation signatures preserved in primary cell lines and tissues as well as methylation differences induced by cell culture. The relationship between methylation and expression is context-dependent, and we find that CpG-rich enhancers bound by EP300 in the bodies of expressed genes are unmethylated despite the dense gene-body methylation surrounding them. Non-CpG cytosine methylation occurs in human somatic tissue, is particularly prevalent in brain tissue, and is reproducible across many individuals. This study provides an atlas of DNA methylation across diverse and well-characterized samples and enables new discoveries about DNA methylation and its role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:23325432

  18. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  19. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Asynchronous DNA replication within the human. beta. -globin gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Epner, E.; Forrester, W.C.; Groudine, M. )

    1988-11-01

    The timing of DNA replication of the human {beta}-globin gene locus has been studied by blot hybridization of newly synthesized BrdUrd-substituted DNA from cells in different stages of the S phase. Using probes that span >120 kilobases across the human {beta}-globin gene locus, the authors show that the majority of this domain replicates in early S phase in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 and in middle-to-late S phase in the lymphoid cell line Manca. However, in K562 cells three small regions display a strikingly different replication pattern than adjacent sequences. These islands, located in the inter-{gamma}-globin gene region and approximately 20 kilobases 5' to the {epsilon}-globin gene and 20 kilobases 3' to the {beta}-globin gene, replicate later and throughout S phase. A similar area is also present in the {alpha}-globin gene region in K562 cells. They suggest that these regions may represent sites of termination of replication forks.

  2. Screening Test for Shed Skin Cells by Measuring the Ratio of Human DNA to Staphylococcus epidermidis DNA.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takahashi, Shirushi; Kurosu, Akira; Takada, Aya; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A novel screening method for shed skin cells by detecting Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), which is a resident bacterium on skin, was developed. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected using real-time PCR. Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in all 20 human skin surface samples. Although not present in blood and urine samples, S. epidermidis was detected in 6 of 20 saliva samples, and 5 of 18 semen samples. The ratio of human DNA to S. epidermidisDNA was significantly smaller in human skin surface samples than in saliva and semen samples in which S. epidermidis was detected. Therefore, although skin cells could not be identified by detecting only S. epidermidis, they could be distinguished by measuring the S. epidermidis to human DNA ratio. This method could be applied to casework touch samples, which suggests that it is useful for screening whether skin cells and human DNA are present on potential evidentiary touch samples. PMID:27122397

  3. Somatic hypermutation of human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases, a pathway for DNA catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Guétard, Denise; Henry, Michel; Eckhoff, Grace; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Dejean, Anne; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 (A3A–A3H) locus encodes six cytidine deaminases that edit single-stranded DNA, the result being DNA peppered with uridine. Although several cytidine deaminases are clearly restriction factors for retroviruses and hepadnaviruses, it is not known if APOBEC3 enzymes have roles outside of these settings. It is shown here that both human mitochondrial and nuclear DNA are vulnerable to somatic hypermutation by A3 deaminases, with APOBEC3A standing out among them. The degree of editing is much greater in patients lacking the uracil DNA-glycolyase gene, indicating that the observed levels of editing reflect a dynamic composed of A3 editing and DNA catabolism involving uracil DNA-glycolyase. Nonetheless, hyper- and lightly mutated sequences went hand in hand, raising the hypothesis that recurrent low-level mutation by APOBEC3A could catalyze the transition from a healthy to a cancer genome. PMID:21368204

  4. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses.

    PubMed

    Weems, Juston C; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Hall, Shawn M; McLaird, Merry B; Gilmore, Joshua M; Washburn, Michael P; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C

    2015-06-12

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  5. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses*

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Juston C.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Hall, Shawn M.; McLaird, Merry B.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  6. Random-breakage mapping method applied to human DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobrich, M.; Rydberg, B.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The random-breakage mapping method [Game et al. (1990) Nucleic Acids Res., 18, 4453-4461] was applied to DNA sequences in human fibroblasts. The methodology involves NotI restriction endonuclease digestion of DNA from irradiated calls, followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting and hybridization with DNA probes recognizing the single copy sequences of interest. The Southern blots show a band for the unbroken restriction fragments and a smear below this band due to radiation induced random breaks. This smear pattern contains two discontinuities in intensity at positions that correspond to the distance of the hybridization site to each end of the restriction fragment. By analyzing the positions of those discontinuities we confirmed the previously mapped position of the probe DXS1327 within a NotI fragment on the X chromosome, thus demonstrating the validity of the technique. We were also able to position the probes D21S1 and D21S15 with respect to the ends of their corresponding NotI fragments on chromosome 21. A third chromosome 21 probe, D21S11, has previously been reported to be close to D21S1, although an uncertainty about a second possible location existed. Since both probes D21S1 and D21S11 hybridized to a single NotI fragment and yielded a similar smear pattern, this uncertainty is removed by the random-breakage mapping method.

  7. The DNA methylation profile of activated human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, John K; Butler, Rondi; Hsuang, George; Eliot, Melissa; Kim, Stephanie; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Siegel, Derick; Houseman, E Andres; Kelsey, Karl T

    2016-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are now recognized to exhibit characteristics akin to cells of the adaptive immune system. The generation of adaptive memory is linked to epigenetic reprogramming including alterations in DNA methylation. The study herein found reproducible genome wide DNA methylation changes associated with human NK cell activation. Activation led predominately to CpG hypomethylation (81% of significant loci). Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that non-coding and gene-associated differentially methylated sites (DMS) are enriched for immune related functions (i.e., immune cell activation). Known DNA methylation-regulated immune loci were also identified in activated NK cells (e.g., TNFA, LTA, IL13, CSF2). Twenty-one loci were designated high priority and further investigated as potential markers of NK activation. BHLHE40 was identified as a viable candidate for which a droplet digital PCR assay for demethylation was developed. The assay revealed high demethylation in activated NK cells and low demethylation in naïve NK, T- and B-cells. We conclude the NK cell methylome is plastic with potential for remodeling. The differentially methylated region signature of activated NKs revealed similarities with T cell activation, but also provided unique biomarker candidates of NK activation, which could be useful in epigenome-wide association studies to interrogate the role of NK subtypes in global methylation changes associated with exposures and/or disease states. PMID:26967308

  8. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    STEFANO, GEORGE B.; KREAM, RICHARD M.

    2016-01-01

    The biomedical literature has extensively documented the functional roles of genetic polymorphisms in concert with well-characterized somatic mutations in the etiology and progression of major metastatic diseases afflicting human populations. Mitochondrial heteroplasmy exists as a dynamically determined co-expression of inherited polymorphisms and somatic mutations in varying ratios within individual mitochondrial DNA genomes with repetitive patterns of tissue specificity. Mechanistically, carcinogenic cellular processes include profound alterations of normative mitochondrial function, notably dependence on aerobic and anaerobic glycolysis, and aberrant production and release of lactate, according to a classic theory. Within the translational context of human health and disease, the present review discusses the necessity of establishing critical foci designed to probe multiple biological roles of mitochondrial heteroplasmy in cancer biology. PMID:26998260

  10. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. PMID:22955616

  11. An Integrated Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure, and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. PMID:22955616

  12. Phosphorylation-dependent control of Pc2 SUMO E3 ligase activity by its substrate protein HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Roscic, Ana; Möller, Andreas; Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Wimmer, Verena C; Gresko, Ekaterina; Lüdi, Katharina Schmid; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-10-01

    Sumoylation serves to control key cellular functions, but the regulation of SUMO E3 ligase activity is largely unknown. Here we show that the polycomb group protein Pc2 binds to and colocalizes with homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and serves as a SUMO E3 ligase for this kinase. DNA damage-induced HIPK2 directly phosphorylates Pc2 at multiple sites, which in turn controls Pc2 sumoylation and intranuclear localization. Inducible phosphorylation of Pc2 at threonine 495 is required for its ability to increase HIPK2 sumoylation in response to DNA damage, thereby establishing an autoregulatory feedback loop between a SUMO substrate and its cognate E3 ligase. Sumoylation enhances the ability of HIPK2 to mediate transcriptional repression, thus providing a mechanistic link for DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing. PMID:17018294

  13. Developmental validation of the Quantifiler Duo DNA Quantification kit for simultaneous quantification of total human and human male DNA and detection of PCR inhibitors in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Barbisin, Maura; Fang, Rixun; O'Shea, Cristin E; Calandro, Lisa M; Furtado, Manohar R; Shewale, Jaiprakash G

    2009-03-01

    The Quantifiler Duo DNA Quantification kit enables simultaneous quantification of human DNA and human male DNA as well as detection of inhibitors of PCR in a single real-time PCR well. Pooled human male genomic DNA is used to generate standard curves for both human (ribonuclease P RNA component H1) and human male (sex determining region Y) specific targets. A shift in the cycle threshold (C(T)) values for the internal positive control monitors the presence of PCR inhibitors in a sample. The assay is human specific and exhibits a high dynamic range from 0.023 to 50 ng/microL. In addition, the multiplex assay can detect as little as 25 pg/microL of human male DNA in the presence of a 1000-fold excess of human female DNA. The multiplex assay provides assessment of the DNA extract and guidance for the selection of the appropriate AmpFlSTR Amplification Kit to obtain interpretable short tandem repeat profiles. PMID:19175708

  14. Isolation and partial characterization of cDNA clone of human ceruloplasmin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sasina, L K; Tsymbalenko, N V; Platonova, N A; Puchkova, L V; Voronina, O V; Gyulikhandanova, N E; Gaitskhoki, V S

    2000-05-01

    An individual clone, presumably carrying a 3 bp fragment of ceruloplasmin receptor cDNA was isolated from the expression library of human placenta cDNA using polyclonal specific antibodies to ceruloplasmin receptors. EcoR1-hydrolysate of isolated DNA was cloned in a pTZ19 bacterial vector and sequenced in the forward and reverse direction. The comparison of the revealed sequence with known sequences of human genome revealed its high similarity to ceruloplasmin cDNA. PMID:10977961

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Thymine DNA Glycosylase Bound to DNA Elucidates Sequence-Specific Mismatch Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Morgan, M.T.; Pozharski, E.; Drohat, A.C.

    2009-05-19

    Cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides produces m{sup 5}CpG, an epigenetic modification that is important for transcriptional regulation and genomic stability in vertebrate cells. However, m{sup 5}C deamination yields mutagenic G{center_dot}T mispairs, which are implicated in genetic disease, cancer, and aging. Human thymine DNA glycosylase (hTDG) removes T from G{center_dot}T mispairs, producing an abasic (or AP) site, and follow-on base excision repair proteins restore the G{center_dot}C pair. hTDG is inactive against normal A{center_dot}T pairs, and is most effective for G{center_dot}T mispairs and other damage located in a CpG context. The molecular basis of these important catalytic properties has remained unknown. Here, we report a crystal structure of hTDG (catalytic domain, hTDG{sup cat}) in complex with abasic DNA, at 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. Surprisingly, the enzyme crystallized in a 2:1 complex with DNA, one subunit bound at the abasic site, as anticipated, and the other at an undamaged (nonspecific) site. Isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility-shift experiments indicate that hTDG and hTDG{sup cat} can bind abasic DNA with 1:1 or 2:1 stoichiometry. Kinetics experiments show that the 1:1 complex is sufficient for full catalytic (base excision) activity, suggesting that the 2:1 complex, if adopted in vivo, might be important for some other activity of hTDG, perhaps binding interactions with other proteins. Our structure reveals interactions that promote the stringent specificity for guanine versus adenine as the pairing partner of the target base and interactions that likely confer CpG sequence specificity. We find striking differences between hTDG and its prokaryotic ortholog (MUG), despite the relatively high (32%) sequence identity.

  16. DNMT (DNA methyltransferase) inhibitors radiosensitize human cancer cells by suppressing DNA repair activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone modifications and DNA methylation are two major factors in epigenetic phenomenon. Unlike the histone deacetylase inhibitors, which are known to exert radiosensitizing effects, there have only been a few studies thus far concerning the role of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors as radiosensitizers. The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of DNMT inhibitors on the radiosensitivity of human cancer cell lines, and to elucidate the mechanisms relevant to that process. Methods A549 (lung cancer) and U373MG (glioblastoma) cells were exposed to radiation with or without six DNMT inhibitors (5-azacytidine, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, zebularine, hydralazine, epigallocatechin gallate, and psammaplin A) for 18 hours prior to radiation, after which cell survival was evaluated via clonogenic assays. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed via flow cytometry. Expressions of DNMT1, 3A/3B, and cleaved caspase-3 were detected via Western blotting. Expression of γH2AX, a marker of radiation-induced DNA double-strand break, was examined by immunocytochemistry. Results Pretreatment with psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine radiosensitized both A549 and U373MG cells. Pretreatment with psammaplin A increased the sub-G1 fraction of A549 cells, as compared to cells exposed to radiation alone. Prolongation of γH2AX expression was observed in the cells treated with DNMT inhibitors prior to radiation as compared with those treated by radiation alone. Conclusions Psammaplin A, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, and zebularine induce radiosensitivity in both A549 and U373MG cell lines, and suggest that this effect might be associated with the inhibition of DNA repair. PMID:22429326

  17. Human liver cytochrome P450 3A4 ubiquitination: molecular recognition by UBC7-gp78 autocrine motility factor receptor and UbcH5a-CHIP-Hsc70-Hsp40 E2-E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, YongQiang; Kim, Sung-Mi; Trnka, Michael J; Liu, Yi; Burlingame, A L; Correia, Maria Almira

    2015-02-01

    CYP3A4 is an abundant and catalytically dominant human liver endoplasmic reticulum-anchored cytochrome P450 enzyme engaged in the biotransformation of endo- and xenobiotics, including >50% of clinically relevant drugs. Alterations of CYP3A4 protein turnover can influence clinically relevant drug metabolism and bioavailability and drug-drug interactions. This CYP3A4 turnover involves endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent 26 S proteasomal system that relies on two highly complementary E2 Ub-conjugating-E3 Ub-ligase (UBC7-gp78 and UbcH5a-C terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP)-Hsc70-Hsp40) complexes, as well as protein kinases (PK) A and C. We have documented that CYP3A4 Ser/Thr phosphorylation (Ser(P)/Thr(P)) by PKA and/or PKC accelerates/enhances its Lys ubiquitination by either of these E2-E3 systems. Intriguingly, CYP3A4 Ser(P)/Thr(P) and ubiquitinated Lys residues reside within the cytosol-accessible surface loop and/or conformationally assembled acidic Asp/Glu clusters, leading us to propose that such post-translational Ser/Thr protein phosphorylation primes CYP3A4 for ubiquitination. Herein, this possibility was examined through various complementary approaches, including site-directed mutagenesis, chemical cross-linking, peptide mapping, and LC-MS/MS analyses. Our findings reveal that such CYP3A4 Asp/Glu/Ser(P)/Thr(P) surface clusters are indeed important for its intermolecular electrostatic interactions with each of these E2-E3 subcomponents. By imparting additional negative charge to these Asp/Glu clusters, such Ser/Thr phosphorylation would generate P450 phosphodegrons for molecular recognition by the E2-E3 complexes, thereby controlling the timing of CYP3A4 ubiquitination and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation. Although the importance of phosphodegrons in the CHIP targeting of its substrates is known, to our knowledge this is the first example of phosphodegron involvement in gp78-substrate

  18. Transcription Factor hDREF Is a Novel SUMO E3 Ligase of Mi2α.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Daisuke; Moriuchi, Takanobu; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko

    2016-05-27

    The human transcription factor DNA replication-related element-binding factor (hDREF) is essential for the transcription of a number of housekeeping genes. The mechanisms underlying constitutively active transcription by hDREF were unclear. Here, we provide evidence that hDREF possesses small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase activity and can specifically SUMOylate Mi2α, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase in the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation complex. Moreover, immunofluorescent staining and biochemical analyses showed that coexpression of hDREF and SUMO-1 resulted in dissociation of Mi2α from chromatin, whereas a SUMOylation-defective Mi2α mutant remained tightly bound to chromatin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that Mi2α expression diminished transcription of the ribosomal protein genes, which are positively regulated by hDREF. In contrast, coexpression of hDREF and SUMO-1 suppressed the transcriptional repression by Mi2α. These data indicate that hDREF might incite transcriptional activation by SUMOylating Mi2α, resulting in the dissociation of Mi2α from the gene loci. We propose a novel mechanism for maintaining constitutively active states of a number of hDREF target genes through SUMOylation. PMID:27068747

  19. Evidence for the involvement of human DNA polymerase N in the repair of DNA interstrand cross-links

    PubMed Central

    Zietlow, Laura; Smith, Leigh Anne; Bessho, Mika; Bessho, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase N (PolN) is an A-family nuclear DNA polymerase whose function is unknown. This study examines the possible role of PolN in DNA repair in human cells treated with PolN-targeted siRNA. HeLa cells with siRNA-mediated knockdown of PolN were more sensitive than control cells to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), but were not hyper-sensitive to UV irradiation. The MMC hyper-sensitivity of PolN knockdown cells was rescued by the overexpression of DNA polymerase-proficient PolN but not by DNA polymerase-deficient PolN. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that purified PolN conducts low efficiency non-mutagenic bypass of a psoralen DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL), whose structure resembles an intermediate in the proposed pathway of ICL repair. These results suggest that PolN might play a role in translesion DNA synthesis during ICL repair in human cells. PMID:19908865

  20. Circulating E3 ligases are novel and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Cai-Xia; Hua, Qi; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Nan; Yang, Yan-Zong; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase (E3) is a decisive element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is the main pathway for intracellular protein turnover. Recently, circulating E3 ligases have been increasingly considered as cancer biomarkers. In the present study, we aimed to determine if cardiac-specific E3 ligases in circulation can serve as novel predictors for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By screening and verifying their tissue expression patterns with microarray and real-time PCR analysis, six of 261 E3 ligases, including cardiac-specific Rnf207 and cardiac- and muscle-enriched Fbxo32/atrogin-1, Trim54/MuRF3, Trim63/MuRF1, Kbtbd10/KLHL41, Asb11 and Asb2 in mouse heart, were selected for the present study. In the AMI rats, the levels of five E3 ligases including Rnf207, Fbxo32, Trim54, Trim63 and Kbtbd10 in the plasma were significantly increased compared with control animals. Especially, the plasma levels of Rnf207 was markedly increased at 1 h, peaked at 3 h and decreased at 6–24 h after ligation. Further evaluation of E3 ligases in AMI patients confirmed that plasma Rnf207 level increased significantly compared with that in healthy people and patients without AMI, and showed a similar time course to that in AMI rats. Simultaneously, plasma level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was measured by ELISA assays. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that Rnf207 showed a similar sensitivity and specificity to the classic biomarker troponin I for diagnosis of AMI. Increased cardiac-specific E3 ligase Rnf207 in plasma may be a novel and sensitive biomarkers for AMI in humans. PMID:25599194

  1. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  2. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  3. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  4. The SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) Ligase PIAS3 Primes ATR for Checkpoint Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Shyi; Zou, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the concerted action of DNA repair and DNA damage signaling pathways. The PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) family of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) ligases has been implicated in DNA repair, but whether it plays a role in DNA damage signaling is still unclear. Here, we show that the PIAS3 SUMO ligase is important for activation of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related)-regulated DNA damage signaling pathway. PIAS3 is the only member of the PIAS family that is indispensable for ATR activation. In response to different types of DNA damage and replication stress, PIAS3 plays multiple roles in ATR activation. In cells treated with camptothecin (CPT), PIAS3 contributes to formation of DNA double-stranded breaks. In UV (ultraviolet light)- or HU (hydroxyurea)-treated cells, PIAS3 is required for efficient ATR autophosphorylation, one of the earliest events during ATR activation. Although PIAS3 is dispensable for ATRIP (ATR-interacting protein) SUMOylation and the ATR-ATRIP interaction, it is required for maintaining the basal kinase activity of ATR prior to DNA damage. In the absence of PIAS3, ATR fails to display normal kinase activity after DNA damage, which accompanies with reduced phosphorylation of ATR substrates. Together, these results suggest that PIAS3 primes ATR for checkpoint activation by sustaining its basal kinase activity, revealing a new function of the PIAS family in DNA damage signaling. PMID:26565033

  5. DNA-PKcs deficiency leads to persistence of oxidatively-induced clustered DNA lesions in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Peddi, Prakash; Loftin, Charles W.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Hair, Jessica M.; Burns, Kara J.; Aziz, Khaled; Francisco, Dave C.; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.; Bonner, William M.; Winters, Thomas A.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase involved in various DNA metabolic and damage signaling pathways contributing to the maintenance of genomic stability and prevention of cancer. In order to examine the role of DNA-PK in processing of non-DSB clustered DNA damage, we have used three different models of DNA-PK deficiency i.e. chemical inactivation of its kinase activity by novel inhibitors IC86621 and NU7026, knock-down and complete absence of the protein in human breast cancer (MCF-7) and glioblastoma cell lines (MO59-J/K). Compromised DNA-PK repair pathway has lead to accumulation of clustered DNA lesions induced by γ-rays. Tumor cells lacking protein expression or with inhibited kinase activity showed a marked decrease in their ability to process oxidatively-induced non-DSB clustered DNA lesions measured using a modified version of pulsed field gel electrophoresis or single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). In all cases, DNA-PK inactivation lead to a higher level of lesion persistence even after 24–72 hrs of repair. We suggest a model in which DNA-PK deficiency affects the processing of these clusters by first compromising base excision repair and second by the presence of catalytically inactive DNA-PK inhibiting the efficient processing of these lesions due to the failure of DNA-PK to disassociate from the DNA ends. The information rendered will be important not only for understating cancer etiology in the presence of a NHEJ deficiency but also lead to a better understanding of cancer treatments based on the induction of oxidative stress and inhibition of cluster repair. PMID:20193758

  6. Method for removal of human antibodies to native DNA from serum

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, B.A.

    1987-09-01

    A method is described for removing human anti-native DNA antibody from a liquid sample comprising coupling monoclonal, antiidiotypic antibodies capable of binding to a shared idiotype on human anti-native DNA antibody to a medium. The idiotype shares between genetically nonidentical individuals, contacting a liquid sample to the medium to permit binding of human anti-native DNA antibody in the sample to the anti-idiotypic antibodies and separating the sample from the medium to remove the human anti-native DNA antibodies therefrom.

  7. Human chromosome-specific DNA libraries: construction and availability

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.; Albright, K.L.; Allen, N.A.; Aubuchon, M.R.; Bartholdi, M.F.; Brown, N.C.; Campbell, E.W.; Carrano, A.V.; Clark, L.M.; Cram, L.S.

    1986-06-01

    The goal of the National Laboratory Gene Library Project at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories is the production of chromosome-specific human gene libraries and their distribution to the scientific community for studies of the molecular biology of genes and chromosomes, and for the study and diagnosis of genetic disease. The specific aim of Phase I of the project is the production of complete digest (4 kb average insert size) libraries from each of the 24 human chromosomal types purified by flow sorting. The bacteriophage vector is Charon 21A, which has both Eco R1 and Hind III insertion sites accommodating human DNA fragments up to 9.1 kb in size. Each laboratory has undertaken production of a complete set of chromosome-specific libraries, Los Alamos with Eco R1 and Livermore with Hind III; most of this task has now been accomplished. Close to 1200 library aliquots have been sent to about 300 laboratories world-wide through February 1986, at which time repository and distribution functions were transferred to the American Type Culture Collection, Rockville, MD. Following Phase I, libraries will be constructed with large inserts in a more advanced, recently developed bacteriophage vector (about 20 kb inserts) or in a cosmid vector (about 40 kb inserts), and with characteristics better suited to basic studies of gene structure and function.

  8. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K; Ware, Carl F; Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2016-01-28

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signalling and function. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate. The RING-between-RING (RBR) family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases. The RBR family includes Parkin and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall auto-inhibited forms are available, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely unknown. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of the fully active human HOIP RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of auto-inhibited RBRs. HOIP RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centres ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, three distinct helix-IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~ubiquitin conjugate and, surprisingly, an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  9. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V.; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3′- or 5′-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5′-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2–HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5′ → 3′ exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1–HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5′-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2–HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1–HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5′ MMR. PMID:26951673

  10. Isolation and characterization of human defensin cDNA clones

    SciTech Connect

    Daher, K.A.; Lehrer, R.I.; Ganz, T.; Kronenberg, M. )

    1988-10-01

    Four clones that encode defensins, a group of microbicidal and cytotoxic peptides made by neutrophils, were isolated from an HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cDNA library. Analysis of these clones indicated that the defensins are made as precursor proteins, which must be cleaved to yield the mature peptides. Defensin mRNA was detected in normal bone marrow cells, but not in normal peripheral blood leukocytes. Defensin transcripts were also found in the peripheral leukocytes of some leukemia patients and in some lung and intestine tissues. Defensin mRNA content was augmented by treatment of HL-60 cells with dimethyl sulfoxide. These results define important aspects of the mechanism of synthesis and the tissue-specific expression of a major group of neutrophil granule proteins.

  11. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 20.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, P; Matthews, L H; Ashurst, J; Burton, J; Gilbert, J G; Jones, M; Stavrides, G; Almeida, J P; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Barlow, K F; Bates, K N; Beard, L M; Beare, D M; Beasley, O P; Bird, C P; Blakey, S E; Bridgeman, A M; Brown, A J; Buck, D; Burrill, W; Butler, A P; Carder, C; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clamp, M; Clark, G; Clark, L N; Clark, S Y; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Cobley, V E; Collier, R E; Connor, R; Corby, N R; Coulson, A; Coville, G J; Deadman, R; Dhami, P; Dunn, M; Ellington, A G; Frankland, J A; Fraser, A; French, L; Garner, P; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths, M N; Gwilliam, R; Hall, R E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Heath, P D; Ho, S; Holden, J L; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Jekosch, K; Johnson, C M; Johnson, D; Kay, M P; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lehvaslaiho, M H; Leversha, M; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Lovell, J D; Marsh, V L; Martin, S L; McConnachie, L J; McLay, K; McMurray, A A; Milne, S; Mistry, D; Moore, M J; Mullikin, J C; Nickerson, T; Oliver, K; Parker, A; Patel, R; Pearce, T A; Peck, A I; Phillimore, B J; Prathalingam, S R; Plumb, R W; Ramsay, H; Rice, C M; Ross, M T; Scott, C E; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M L; Soderlund, C; Steward, C A; Sulston, J E; Swann, M; Sycamore, N; Taylor, R; Tee, L; Thomas, D W; Thorpe, A; Tracey, A; Tromans, A C; Vaudin, M; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; Whitehead, S L; Whittaker, P; Willey, D L; Williams, L; Williams, S A; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Hubbard, T; Durbin, R M; Bentley, D R; Beck, S; Rogers, J

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 20 comprises 59,187,298 base pairs (bp) and represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA. A single contig of 26 megabases (Mb) spans the entire short arm, and five contigs separated by gaps totalling 320 kb span the long arm of this metacentric chromosome. An additional 234,339 bp of sequence has been determined within the pericentromeric region of the long arm. We annotated 727 genes and 168 pseudogenes in the sequence. About 64% of these genes have a 5' and a 3' untranslated region and a complete open reading frame. Comparative analysis of the sequence of chromosome 20 to whole-genome shotgun-sequence data of two other vertebrates, the mouse Mus musculus and the puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis, provides an independent measure of the efficiency of gene annotation, and indicates that this analysis may account for more than 95% of all coding exons and almost all genes. PMID:11780052

  12. Ancient DNA and the rewriting of human history: be sparing with Occam's razor.

    PubMed

    Haber, Marc; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA research is revealing a human history far more complex than that inferred from parsimonious models based on modern DNA. Here, we review some of the key events in the peopling of the world in the light of the findings of work on ancient DNA. PMID:26753840

  13. GC-Rich Extracellular DNA Induces Oxidative Stress, Double-Strand DNA Breaks, and DNA Damage Response in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kostyuk, Svetlana; Smirnova, Tatiana; Kameneva, Larisa; Porokhovnik, Lev; Speranskij, Anatolij; Ershova, Elizaveta; Stukalov, Sergey; Izevskaya, Vera; Veiko, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cell free DNA (cfDNA) circulates throughout the bloodstream of both healthy people and patients with various diseases. CfDNA is substantially enriched in its GC-content as compared with human genomic DNA. Principal Findings. Exposure of haMSCs to GC-DNA induces short-term oxidative stress (determined with H2DCFH-DA) and results in both single- and double-strand DNA breaks (comet assay and γH2AX, foci). As a result in the cells significantly increases the expression of repair genes (BRCA1 (RT-PCR), PCNA (FACS)) and antiapoptotic genes (BCL2 (RT-PCR and FACS), BCL2A1, BCL2L1, BIRC3, and BIRC2 (RT-PCR)). Under the action of GC-DNA the potential of mitochondria was increased. Here we show that GC-rich extracellular DNA stimulates adipocyte differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (haMSCs). Exposure to GC-DNA leads to an increase in the level of RNAPPARG2 and LPL (RT-PCR), in the level of fatty acid binding protein FABP4 (FACS analysis) and in the level of fat (Oil Red O). Conclusions. GC-rich fragments in the pool of cfDNA can potentially induce oxidative stress and DNA damage response and affect the direction of mesenchymal stem cells differentiation in human adipose—derived mesenchymal stem cells. Such a response may be one of the causes of obesity or osteoporosis. PMID:26273425

  14. Chromium reduces the in vitro activity and fidelity of DNA replication mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Heqiao; Liu Jianying; Malkas, Linda H.; Catalano, Jennifer; Alagharu, Srilakshmi

    2009-04-15

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is known to be a carcinogenic metal ion, with a complicated mechanism of action. It can be found within our environment in soil and water contaminated by manufacturing processes. Cr(VI) ion is readily taken up by cells, and is recognized to be both genotoxic and cytotoxic; following its reduction to the stable trivalent form of the ion, chromium(Cr(III)), within cells. This form of the ion is known to impede the activity of cellular DNA polymerase and polymerase-mediated DNA replication. Here, we report the effects of chromium on the activity and fidelity of the DNA replication process mediated by the human cell DNA synthesome. The DNA synthesome is a functional multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out each phase of the DNA replication process. The IC{sub 50} of Cr(III) toward the activity of DNA synthesome-associated DNA polymerases {alpha}, {delta} and {epsilon} is 15, 45 and 125 {mu}M, respectively. Cr(III) inhibits synthesome-mediated DNA synthesis (IC{sub 50} = 88 {mu}M), and significantly reduces the fidelity of synthesome-mediated DNA replication. The mutation frequency induced by the different concentrations of Cr(III) ion used in our assays ranges from 2-13 fold higher than that which occurs spontaneously, and the types of mutations include single nucleotide substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Single nucleotide substitutions are the predominant type of mutation, and they occur primarily at GC base-pairs. Cr(III) ion produces a lower number of transition and a higher number of transversion mutations than occur spontaneously. Unlike Cr(III), Cr(VI) ion has little effect on the in vitro DNA synthetic activity and fidelity of the DNA synthesome, but does significantly inhibit DNA synthesis in intact cells. Cell growth and proliferation is also arrested by increasing concentrations of Cr(VI) ion. Our studies provide evidence indicating that the chromium ion induced decrease in the fidelity and activity of

  15. A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA control region: development of an international standard forensic database.

    PubMed

    Miller, K W; Budowle, B

    2001-06-01

    A compendium of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region types has been constructed. This updated compilation indexes over 10,000 population-specific mtDNA nucleotide sequences in a standardized format. The sequences represent mtDNA types from the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) mtDNA database and from the public literature. The SWGDAM data are considered to be of higher quality than the public data, particularly for counting the number of times a particular haplotype has been observed. PMID:11387646

  16. GHK and DNA: resetting the human genome to health.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2014-01-01

    During human aging there is an increase in the activity of inflammatory, cancer promoting, and tissue destructive genes plus a decrease in the activity of regenerative and reparative genes. The human blood tripeptide GHK possesses many positive effects but declines with age. It improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, and boney tissue), increases collagen and glycosaminoglycans, stimulates synthesis of decorin, increases angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, GHK has been found to reset genes of diseased cells from patients with cancer or COPD to a more healthy state. Cancer cells reset their programmed cell death system while COPD patients' cells shut down tissue destructive genes and stimulate repair and remodeling activities. In this paper, we discuss GHK's effect on genes that suppress fibrinogen synthesis, the insulin/insulin-like system, and cancer growth plus activation of genes that increase the ubiquitin-proteasome system, DNA repair, antioxidant systems, and healing by the TGF beta superfamily. A variety of methods and dosages to effectively use GHK to reset genes to a healthier state are also discussed. PMID:25302294

  17. GHK and DNA: Resetting the Human Genome to Health

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle

    2014-01-01

    During human aging there is an increase in the activity of inflammatory, cancer promoting, and tissue destructive genes plus a decrease in the activity of regenerative and reparative genes. The human blood tripeptide GHK possesses many positive effects but declines with age. It improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, and boney tissue), increases collagen and glycosaminoglycans, stimulates synthesis of decorin, increases angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, and increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Recently, GHK has been found to reset genes of diseased cells from patients with cancer or COPD to a more healthy state. Cancer cells reset their programmed cell death system while COPD patients' cells shut down tissue destructive genes and stimulate repair and remodeling activities. In this paper, we discuss GHK's effect on genes that suppress fibrinogen synthesis, the insulin/insulin-like system, and cancer growth plus activation of genes that increase the ubiquitin-proteasome system, DNA repair, antioxidant systems, and healing by the TGF beta superfamily. A variety of methods and dosages to effectively use GHK to reset genes to a healthier state are also discussed. PMID:25302294

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of human papilloma virus DNA derived from a laryngeal papilloma.

    PubMed Central

    Gissmann, L; Diehl, V; Schultz-Coulon, H J; zur Hausen, H

    1982-01-01

    Papilloma virus DNA from a laryngeal papilloma was cloned in phage lambda L 47 and characterized after cleavage with different restriction enzymes. Hybridization with the DNAs of human papilloma virus types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 showed no homology under stringent hybridization conditions. Human papilloma virus type 6 DNA, however, was partially identical to laryngeal papilloma virus DNA; different restriction enzyme fragments hybridizing with the other DNA were identified on each genome. The degree of homology was determined by reassociation kinetics to be 25%. According to the present nomenclature, laryngeal papilloma virus therefore represents a different type of human papilloma virus and is tentatively designated as human papilloma virus type 11. Sequences homologous to laryngeal papilloma virus DNA were also found in four of nine additional laryngeal papillomas. Attempt to detect homologous DNA in 12 carcinomas of the larynx were negative. Images PMID:6292500

  19. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  20. Structural Features of the Interaction between Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase hOGG1 and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Koval, V. V.; Knorre, D. G.; Fedorova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present review is to summarize the data related with the structural features of interaction between the human repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) and DNA. The review covers the questions concerning the role of individual amino acids of hOGG1 in the specific recognition of the oxidized DNA bases, formation of the enzyme–substrate complex, and excision of the lesion bases from DNA. Attention is also focused upon conformational changes in the enzyme active site and disruption of enzyme activity as a result of amino acid mutations. The mechanism of damaged bases release from DNA induced by hOGG1 is discussed in the context of structural dynamics. PMID:25349714

  1. Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Gregory J.; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Easteal, Simon; Huttley, Gavin A.; Jermiin, Lars S.; Peacock, W. James; Thorne, Alan

    2001-01-01

    DNA from ancient human remains provides perspectives on the origin of our species and the relationship between molecular and morphological variation. We report analysis of mtDNA from the remains of 10 ancient Australians. These include the morphologically gracile Lake Mungo 3 [≈60 thousand years (ka) before present] and three other gracile individuals from Holocene deposits at Willandra Lakes (<10 ka), all within the skeletal range of living Australians, and six Pleistocene/early Holocene individuals (15 to <8 ka) from Kow Swamp with robust morphologies outside the skeletal range of contemporary indigenous Australians. Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) “anatomically modern” human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins. PMID:11209053

  2. Mitochondrial DNA sequences in ancient Australians: Implications for modern human origins.

    PubMed

    Adcock, G J; Dennis, E S; Easteal, S; Huttley, G A; Jermiin, L S; Peacock, W J; Thorne, A

    2001-01-16

    DNA from ancient human remains provides perspectives on the origin of our species and the relationship between molecular and morphological variation. We report analysis of mtDNA from the remains of 10 ancient Australians. These include the morphologically gracile Lake Mungo 3 [ approximately 60 thousand years (ka) before present] and three other gracile individuals from Holocene deposits at Willandra Lakes (<10 ka), all within the skeletal range of living Australians, and six Pleistocene/early Holocene individuals (15 to <8 ka) from Kow Swamp with robust morphologies outside the skeletal range of contemporary indigenous Australians. Lake Mungo 3 is the oldest (Pleistocene) "anatomically modern" human from whom DNA has been recovered. His mtDNA belonged to a lineage that only survives as a segment inserted into chromosome 11 of the nuclear genome, which is now widespread among human populations. This lineage probably diverged before the most recent common ancestor of contemporary human mitochondrial genomes. This timing of divergence implies that the deepest known mtDNA lineage from an anatomically modern human occurred in Australia; analysis restricted to living humans places the deepest branches in East Africa. The other ancient Australian individuals we examined have mtDNA sequences descended from the most recent common ancestor of living humans. Our results indicate that anatomically modern humans were present in Australia before the complete fixation of the mtDNA lineage now found in all living people. Sequences from additional ancient humans may further challenge current concepts of modern human origins. PMID:11209053

  3. No Evidence of Neandertal mtDNA Contribution to Early Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The retrieval of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from four Neandertal fossils from Germany, Russia, and Croatia has demonstrated that these individuals carried closely related mtDNAs that are not found among current humans. However, these results do not definitively resolve the question of a possible Neandertal contribution to the gene pool of modern humans since such a contribution might have been erased by genetic drift or by the continuous influx of modern human DNA into the Neandertal gene pool. A further concern is that if some Neandertals carried mtDNA sequences similar to contemporaneous humans, such sequences may be erroneously regarded as modern contaminations when retrieved from fossils. Here we address these issues by the analysis of 24 Neandertal and 40 early modern human remains. The biomolecular preservation of four Neandertals and of five early modern humans was good enough to suggest the preservation of DNA. All four Neandertals yielded mtDNA sequences similar to those previously determined from Neandertal individuals, whereas none of the five early modern humans contained such mtDNA sequences. In combination with current mtDNA data, this excludes any large genetic contribution by Neandertals to early modern humans, but does not rule out the possibility of a smaller contribution. PMID:15024415

  4. Comment on "DNA from pre-Clovis human coprolites in Oregon, North America".

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Paul; Berna, Francesco; Macphail, Richard I

    2009-07-10

    Gilbert et al. (Reports, 9 May 2008, p. 786) presented DNA analysis of coprolites recovered from an Oregon cave as evidence for a human presence in North America before the Clovis culture. Results of our micromorphological and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses of one of the reported coprolites are difficult to reconcile with the DNA results identifying the coprolite as human. PMID:19589984

  5. Characterization of a novel human papillomavirus DNA in the cervical carcinoma cell line ME180.

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, S; Delius, H; Kahn, T; Hofmann, B; zur Hausen, H; Schwarz, E

    1991-01-01

    The human cervical carcinoma cell line ME180 was examined for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and RNA. The integrated DNA of a presumably new HPV type showing a relationship closer to HPV39 than to HPV18 was cloned and sequenced. HPV sequences from the E6-E7-E1 region are expressed as poly(A)+ RNAs. Images PMID:1716694

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIAL DNA MARKERS FOR THE DETECTION OF HUMAN FECAL POLLUTION IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human a...

  7. Abnormal response to DNA crosslinking agents of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts can be corrected by transfection with normal human DNA.

    PubMed

    Diatloff-Zito, C; Papadopoulo, D; Averbeck, D; Moustacchi, E

    1986-09-01

    Primary skin fibroblast cell lines from patients with Fanconi anemia were cotransfected with UV-irradiated pSV2neo plasmids and high molecular weight DNA from normal human cells. Restoration of a normal cellular resistance to mitomycin C (MMC) was observed provided that a Fanconi anemia cell line is selected for DNA-mediated transformation (neo gene) and that at least two successive rounds of transfection are performed. Cells were selected by taking advantage of the higher proliferation rate and plating efficiency of the MMC resistant transformants. As estimated from reconstruction experiments, the frequency of transfer of MMC resistance lies between 1 and 30 X 10(-7). The MMC resistance phenotype was maintained for at least 10 generations following transfection. Evidence for DNA-mediated transformation also includes the recovery of a normal pattern of DNA semiconservative synthesis after treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen and 365-nm UV irradiation, and the presence of exogenous pSV2neo DNA sequences was shown by Southern blot analysis. The acquired MMC resistance is probably due to the presence of DNA from normal cells. Indeed, sensitivity to MMC was maintained when Fanconi anemia cells were cotransfected with the UV-irradiated pSV2neo plasmid mixed with their own DNA or with yeast or salmon sperm DNA. These negative results also render unlikely the selection of spontaneous MMC resistant revertants in transfection of Fanconi anemia cells with normal DNA. These experiments establish the prerequisites for the isolation of the gene(s) involved in the response to DNA crosslinking lesions in human cells. PMID:3092225

  8. Characterization of human glucocorticoid receptor complexes formed with DNA fragments containing or lacking glucocorticoid response elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, D.B.; Cidlowski, J.A. )

    1989-03-07

    Sucrose density gradient shift assays were used to study the interactions of human glucocorticoid receptors (GR) with small DNA fragments either containing or lacking glucocorticoid response element (GRE) DNA consensus sequences. When crude cytoplasmic extracts containing ({sup 3}H)triamcinolone acetonide (({sup 3}H)TA) labeled GR were incubated with unlabeled DNA under conditions of DNA excess, a GRE-containing DNA fragment obtained from the 5' long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV LTR) formed a stable 12-16S complex with activated, but not nonactivated, ({sup 3}H)TA receptor. By contrast, if the cytosols were treated with calf thymus DNA-cellulose to deplete non-GR-DNA-binding proteins prior to heat activation, a smaller 7-10S complex was formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment. Activated ({sup 3}H)TA receptor from DNA-cellulose pretreated cytosols also interacted with two similarly sized fragments from pBR322 DNA. Stability of the complexes formed between GR and these three DNA fragments was strongly affected by even moderate alterations in either the salt concentration or the pH of the gradient buffer. Under all conditions tested, the complex formed with the MMTV LTR DNA fragment was more stable than the complexes formed with either of the pBR322 DNA fragments. Together these observations indicate that the formation of stable complexes between activated GR and isolated DNA fragments requires the presence of GRE consensus sequences in the DNA.

  9. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  10. African human mtDNA phylogeography at-a-glance.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Alexandra; Brehem, António

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic system has long proven to be useful for studying the demographic history of our species, since their proposed Southeast/East African origin 200 kya. Despite the weak archaeological and anthropologic records, which render a difficult understanding of early intra- continental migrations, the phylogenetic L0-L1'6 split at about 140-160 kya is thought to represent also an early sub-structuring of small and isolated communities in South and East Africa. Regional variation accumulated over the following millennia, with L2 and L3 lineages arising in Central and East Africa 100-75 kya. Their sub-Saharan dispersal not later than 60 kya, largely overwhelmed the L0'1 distribution, nowadays limited to South African Khoisan and Central African Pygmies. Cyclic expansions and retractions of the equatorial forest between 40 kya and the "Last Glacial Aridity Maximum" were able to reduce the genetic diversity of modern humans. Surviving regional-specific lineages have emerged from the Sahelian refuge areas, repopulating the region and contributing to the overall West African genetic similarity. Particular L1- L3 lineages mirror the substantial population growth made possible by moister and warmer conditions of the Sahara's Wet Phase and the adoption of agriculture and iron smelting techniques. The diffusion of the farming expertise from a Central African source towards South Africa was mediated by the Bantu people 3 kya. The strong impact of their gene flow almost erased the pre-existent maternal pool. Non-L mtDNAs testify for Eurasian lineages that have enriched the African maternal pool at different timeframes: i) Near and Middle Eastern influences in Upper Palaeolithic, probably link to the spread of Afro-Asiatic languages; ii) particular lineages from West Eurasia around or after the glacial period; iii) post-glacial mtDNA signatures from the Franco-Cantabrian refugia, that have crossed the Strait of Gibraltar and iv) Eurasian lineages

  11. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and human disease.

    PubMed

    Copeland, William C

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated by the DNA polymerase g in concert with accessory proteins such as the mtDNA helicase, single stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Nucleotide precursors for mtDNA replication arise from the mitochondrial salvage pathway originating from transport of nucleosides, or alternatively from cytoplasmic reduction of ribonucleotides. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mtDNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mtDNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mtDNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2) and nucleotide metabolism (TYMP, TK2, DGOUK, and RRM2B) that cause instability of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease. PMID:22176657

  12. Oxidative DNA damage stalls the human mitochondrial replisome

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Makarova, Alena V.; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Forslund, Josefin; Burgers, Peter M.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is capable of causing damage to various cellular constituents, including DNA. There is however limited knowledge on how oxidative stress influences mitochondrial DNA and its replication. Here, we have used purified mtDNA replication proteins, i.e. DNA polymerase γ holoenzyme, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein mtSSB, the replicative helicase Twinkle and the proposed mitochondrial translesion synthesis polymerase PrimPol to study lesion bypass synthesis on oxidative damage-containing DNA templates. Our studies were carried out at dNTP levels representative of those prevailing either in cycling or in non-dividing cells. At dNTP concentrations that mimic those in cycling cells, the replication machinery showed substantial stalling at sites of damage, and these problems were further exacerbated at the lower dNTP concentrations present in resting cells. PrimPol, the translesion synthesis polymerase identified inside mammalian mitochondria, did not promote mtDNA replication fork bypass of the damage. This argues against a conventional role for PrimPol as a mitochondrial translesion synthesis DNA polymerase for oxidative DNA damage; however, we show that Twinkle, the mtDNA replicative helicase, is able to stimulate PrimPol DNA synthesis in vitro, suggestive of an as yet unidentified role of PrimPol in mtDNA metabolism. PMID:27364318

  13. Defects in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is replicated by the DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Nucleotide precursors for mtDNA replication arise from the mitochondrial salvage pathway originating from transport of nucleosides, or alternatively from cytoplasmic reduction of ribonucleotides. Defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mtDNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mtDNA depletion syndromes (MDS) such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mtDNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO), ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mtDNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2) and nucleotide metabolism (TYMP, TK2, DGOUK, and RRM2B) that cause instability of mtDNA and mitochondrial disease. PMID:22176657

  14. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  15. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  17. THE ROLE OF E3 LIGASES IN THE UBIQUITIN-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF SPERMATOGENESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Richburg, John H.; Myers, Jessica L.; Bratton, Shawn B.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins is a post-translational modification that was first described as a means to target misfolded or unwanted proteins for degradation by the proteasome. It is now appreciated that the ubiquitination of proteins also serves as a mechanism to modify protein function and cellular functions such as protein trafficking, cell signaling, DNA repair, chromatin modifications, cell-cycle progression and cell death. The ubiquitination of proteins occurs through the hierarchal transfer of ubiquitin from an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and finally to an E3 ubiquitin ligase that transfers the ubiquitin to its target protein. It is the final E3 ubiquitin ligase that confers the substrate specificity for ubiquitination and is the focus of this review. Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process by which spermatogonial stem cells undergo mitotic proliferation and expansion of the diploid spermatogonial population, differentiate into spermatocytes and progress through two meiotic divisions to produce haploid spermatids that proceed through a final morphogenesis to generate mature spermatozoa. The ubiquitination of proteins in the cells of the testis occurs in many of the processes required for the progression of mature spermatozoa. Since it is the E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes the target protein and provides the specificity and selectivity for ubiquitination, this review highlights known examples of E3 ligases in the testis and the differing roles that they play in maintaining functional spermatogenesis. PMID:24632385

  18. Regulation of 4CL, encoding 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase, expression in kenaf under diverse stress conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We cloned the full length 4CL ortholog encoding 4-coumarate: coenzymeA ligase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabiuns) using degenerate primers and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) systems. The 4CL is a key regulatory enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that regulates the activation of cinnamic ac...

  19. Comparison of DNA adducts from exposure to complex mixtures in various human tissues and experimental systems

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, Joellen; Mumford, Judy; Everson, Richard B.; Hulka, Barbara; Wilcosky, Tim; Kozumbo, Walter; Thompson, Claudia; George, Michael; Dobiáš, Lubomir; Šrám, Radim; Li, Xueming; Gallagher, Jane

    1993-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic compounds emitted from tobacco smoke are compared to industrial pollution sources (e.g., coke ovens and aluminum smelters), smoky coal burning, and urban air pollution. Exposures to coke oven emissions and smoky coal, both potent rodent skin tumor initiators and lung carcinogens in humans, result in high levels of DNA adducts compared to tobacco smoke in the in vitro calf thymus DNA model system, in cultured lymphocytes, and in the mouse skin assay. Using tobacco smoke as a model in human studies, we have compared relative DNA adduct levels detected in blood lymphocytes, placental tissue, bronchoalveolar lung lavage cells, sperm, and autopsy tissues of smokers and nonsmokers. Adduct levels in DNA isolated from smokers were highest in human heart and lung tissue with smaller but detectable differences in placental tissue and lung lavage cells. Comparison of the DNA adduct levels resulting from human exposure to different complex mixtures shows that emissions from coke ovens, aluminum smelters, and smoky coal result in higher DNA adduct levels than tobacco smoke exposure. These studies suggest that humans exposed to complex combustion mixtures will have higher DNA adduct levels in target cells (e.g., lung) as compared to nontarget cells (e.g., lymphocytes) and that the adduct levels will be dependent on the genotoxic and DNA adduct-forming potency of the mixture. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 1.FIGURE 2.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 3.FIGURE 4. PMID:8319665

  20. Determination of the Action Spectrum of UVR-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage in Human Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Jennifer A; Lloyd, James J; Diffey, Brian L; Matts, Paul J; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Biological responses of human skin to UVR including cancer and aging are largely wavelength-dependent, as shown by the action spectra of UVR-induced erythema and nuclear DNA (nDNA) damage. A molecular dosimeter of UVR exposure is therefore required. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage has been shown to be a reliable and sensitive biomarker of UVR exposure in human skin, its wavelength dependency is unknown. The current study solves this problem by determining the action spectrum of UVR-induced mtDNA damage in human skin. Human neonatal dermal fibroblasts and primary human adult keratinocyte cells were irradiated with increasing doses of UVR. Dose-response curves of mtDNA damage were produced for each of the UVR sources and cell types, and an action spectrum for each cell type was determined by mathematical induction. Similarities between these mtDNA damage action spectra and previously determined nDNA damage were observed, with the most detrimental effects occurring over the shorter UVR wavelengths. Notably, a statistically significant (P<0.0001) greater sensitivity to mtDNA damage was observed in dermal fibroblasts compared with keratinocytes at wavelengths >300 nm, possibly indicating a wider picture of depth dependence in sensitivity. This finding has implications for disease/photodamage mechanisms and interventions. PMID:26030182

  1. Light chain editors of anti-DNA receptors in human B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, Olga; Wang, Yue; Sia, Kevin; Radic, Marko; Cazenave, Pierre-André

    2014-01-01

    Receptor editing is a mechanism of self-tolerance used in newly generated B cells. The expressed heavy (H) or light (L) chain of an autoreactive receptor is replaced by upstream V genes which eliminate or modify autoreactivity. Editing of anti-DNA receptors has been characterized in anti-DNA transgenic mouse models including 3H9, 3H9/56R, and their revertant 3H9GL. Certain L chains, termed editors, rescue anti-DNA B cells by neutralizing or modifying DNA binding of the H chain. This editing mechanism acts on the natural H chain repertoire; endogenous H chains with anti-DNA features are expressed primarily in combination with editor L chains. We ask whether a similar set of L chains exists in the human repertoire, and if so, do they edit H chains with anti-DNA signatures? We compared the protein sequences of mouse editors to all human L chains and found several human L chains similar to mouse editors. These L chains diminish or veto anti-DNA binding when expressed with anti-DNA H chains. The human H chains expressed with these L chains also have relatively high arginine (Arg) content in the H chain complementarity determining region (H3), suggesting that receptor editing plays a role in establishing tolerance to DNA in humans. PMID:24470445

  2. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Grimwood, Jane; Gordon, Laurie A.; Olsen, Anne; Terry, Astrid; Schmutz, Jeremy; Lamerdin, Jane; Hellsten, Uffe; Goodstein, David; Couronne, Olivier; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Ashworth, Linda; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caenepeel, Sean; Carrano, Anthony; Caoile, Chenier; Chan, Yee Man; Christensen, Mari; Cleland, Catherine A.; Copeland, Alex; Dalin, Eileen; Dehal, Paramvir; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Garcia, Carmen; Georgescu, Anca M.; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eldelyn; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Ho, Issac; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Larionov, Vladimer; Leem, Sun-Hee; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McCready, Paula; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nelson, Kathryn; Nolan, Matt; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Popkie, Anthony P.; Predki, Paul; Quan, Glenda; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanine; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; She, Xinwei; Smith, Doug; Slezak, Tom; Solovyev, Victor; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wagner, Mark; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Xie, Gary; Yang, Joan; Dubchak, Inna; Furey, Terrence S.; DeJong, Pieter; Dickson, Mark; Gordon, David; Eichler, Evan E.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Richardson, Paul; Stubbs, Lisa; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan M.

    2003-09-15

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high G1C content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9 percent of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolaemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one-quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25 percent of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, a nd segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  3. Vertically integrated analysis of human DNA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, M.

    1997-10-01

    This project has been oriented toward improving the vertical integration of the sequential steps associated with the large-scale analysis of human DNA. The central focus has been on an approach to the preparation of {open_quotes}sequence-ready{close_quotes} maps, which is referred to as multiple-complete-digest (MCD) mapping, primarily directed at cosmid clones. MCD mapping relies on simple experimental steps, supported by advanced image-analysis and map-assembly software, to produce extremely accurate restriction-site and clone-overlap maps. We believe that MCD mapping is one of the few high-resolution mapping systems that has the potential for high-level automation. Successful automation of this process would be a landmark event in genome analysis. Once other higher organisms, paving the way for cost-effective sequencing of these genomes. Critically, MCD mapping has the potential to provide built-in quality control for sequencing accuracy and to make possible a highly integrated end product even if there are large numbers of discontinuities in the actual sequence.

  4. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  5. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  6. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J.; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L.; Ashurst, Jennifer L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Scott, Carol E.; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L.; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D.; Ansari-Lari, M. Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I. S.; Babbage, Anne K.; Bagguley, Claire L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E.; Barlow, Karen F.; Barrett, Ian P.; Bates, Karen N.; Beare, David M.; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M.; Brown, Andrew J.; Brown, Mary J.; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M.; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C.; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y.; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M.; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G.; Conquer, Jen S.; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E.; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; DeShazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K. James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L.; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E.; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G.; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D.; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J.; Hunt, Adrienne R.; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J.; Joseph, Shirin S.; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K.; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J.; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K.; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M.; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E.; Lovell, Jamieson D.; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H.; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L.; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C.; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O’Dell, Christopher N.; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V.; Pearson, Danita M.; Pelan, Sarah E.; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M.; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A.; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G.; Sehra, Harminder K.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M.; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D.; Smith, Michelle L.; Sotheran, Elizabeth C.; Steingruber, Helen E.; Steward, Charles A.; Storey, Roy; Swann, R. Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E.; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C.; d’Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L.; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; Whiteley, Mathew N.; Wilkinson, Jane E.; Willey, David L.; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L.; Wray, Paul W.; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J.; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Willard, Huntington F.; Wilson, Richard K.; Waterston, Robert H.; Rice, Catherine M.; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L.; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E.; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A.; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R.

    2009-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  7. Immunodetection of human topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand G.; Flatten, Karen S.; Peterson, Kevin L.; Beito, Thomas G.; Schneider, Paula A.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of established and investigational anticancer drugs slow the religation step of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I). These agents induce cytotoxicity by stabilizing topo I-DNA covalent complexes, which in turn interact with advancing replication forks or transcription complexes to generate lethal lesions. Despite the importance of topo I-DNA covalent complexes, it has been difficult to detect these lesions within intact cells and tumors. Here, we report development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes covalent topo I-DNA complexes, but not free topo I or DNA, by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence or flow cytometry. Utilizing this antibody, we demonstrate readily detectable topo I-DNA covalent complexes after treatment with camptothecins, indenoisoquinolines and cisplatin but not nucleoside analogues. Topotecan-induced topo I-DNA complexes peak at 15–30 min after drug addition and then decrease, whereas indotecan-induced complexes persist for at least 4 h. Interestingly, simultaneous staining for covalent topo I-DNA complexes, phospho-H2AX and Rad51 suggests that topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks occur at sites distinct from stabilized topo I-DNA covalent complexes. These studies not only provide new insight into the action of topo I-directed agents, but also illustrate a strategy that can be applied to study additional topoisomerases and their inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26917015

  8. Immunodetection of human topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anand G; Flatten, Karen S; Peterson, Kevin L; Beito, Thomas G; Schneider, Paula A; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2016-04-01

    A number of established and investigational anticancer drugs slow the religation step of DNA topoisomerase I (topo I). These agents induce cytotoxicity by stabilizing topo I-DNA covalent complexes, which in turn interact with advancing replication forks or transcription complexes to generate lethal lesions. Despite the importance of topo I-DNA covalent complexes, it has been difficult to detect these lesions within intact cells and tumors. Here, we report development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes covalent topo I-DNA complexes, but not free topo I or DNA, by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence or flow cytometry. Utilizing this antibody, we demonstrate readily detectable topo I-DNA covalent complexes after treatment with camptothecins, indenoisoquinolines and cisplatin but not nucleoside analogues. Topotecan-induced topo I-DNA complexes peak at 15-30 min after drug addition and then decrease, whereas indotecan-induced complexes persist for at least 4 h. Interestingly, simultaneous staining for covalent topo I-DNA complexes, phospho-H2AX and Rad51 suggests that topotecan-induced DNA double-strand breaks occur at sites distinct from stabilized topo I-DNA covalent complexes. These studies not only provide new insight into the action of topo I-directed agents, but also illustrate a strategy that can be applied to study additional topoisomerases and their inhibitorsin vitroandin vivo. PMID:26917015

  9. Detection of differential DNA methylation in repetitive DNA of mice and humans perinatally exposed to bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Jung H.; Anderson, Olivia S.; Nahar, Muna S.; Jones, Tamara R.; Sartor, Maureen A.; Dolinoy, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to induce changes in DNA methylation in both mouse and human genic regions; however, the response in repetitive elements and transposons has not been explored. Here we present novel methodology to combine genomic DNA enrichment with RepeatMasker analysis on next-generation sequencing data to determine the effect of perinatal BPA exposure on repetitive DNA at the class, family, subfamily, and individual insertion level in both mouse and human samples. Mice were treated during gestation and lactation to BPA in chow at 0, 50, or 50,000 ng/g levels and total BPA was measured in stratified human fetal liver tissue samples as low (non-detect to 0.83 ng/g), medium (3.5 to 5.79 ng/g), or high (35.44 to 96.76 ng/g). Transposon methylation changes were evident in human classes, families, and subfamilies, with the medium group exhibiting hypomethylation compared to both high and low BPA groups. Mouse repeat classes, families, and subfamilies did not respond to BPA with significantly detectable differential DNA methylation. In human samples, 1251 individual transposon loci were detected as differentially methylated by BPA exposure, but only 19 were detected in mice. Of note, this approach recapitulated the discovery of a previously known mouse environmentally labile metastable epiallele, CabpIAP. Thus, by querying repetitive DNA in both mouse and humans, we report the first known transposons in humans that respond to perinatal BPA exposure. PMID:27267941

  10. Detection of differential DNA methylation in repetitive DNA of mice and humans perinatally exposed to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Faulk, Christopher; Kim, Jung H; Anderson, Olivia S; Nahar, Muna S; Jones, Tamara R; Sartor, Maureen A; Dolinoy, Dana C

    2016-07-01

    Developmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to induce changes in DNA methylation in both mouse and human genic regions; however, the response in repetitive elements and transposons has not been explored. Here we present novel methodology to combine genomic DNA enrichment with RepeatMasker analysis on next-generation sequencing data to determine the effect of perinatal BPA exposure on repetitive DNA at the class, family, subfamily, and individual insertion level in both mouse and human samples. Mice were treated during gestation and lactation to BPA in chow at 0, 50, or 50,000 ng/g levels and total BPA was measured in stratified human fetal liver tissue samples as low (non-detect to 0.83 ng/g), medium (3.5 to 5.79 ng/g), or high (35.44 to 96.76 ng/g). Transposon methylation changes were evident in human classes, families, and subfamilies, with the medium group exhibiting hypomethylation compared to both high and low BPA groups. Mouse repeat classes, families, and subfamilies did not respond to BPA with significantly detectable differential DNA methylation. In human samples, 1251 individual transposon loci were detected as differentially methylated by BPA exposure, but only 19 were detected in mice. Of note, this approach recapitulated the discovery of a previously known mouse environmentally labile metastable epiallele, Cabp(IAP). Thus, by querying repetitive DNA in both mouse and humans, we report the first known transposons in humans that respond to perinatal BPA exposure. PMID:27267941

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 stabilizes TPP1 to promote telomere end protection

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Rekha; Li, Ju-Mei; Zheng, Hong; Lok, Gabriel Tsz-Mei; Deng, Yu; Huen, Michael; Chen, Junjie; Jin, Jianping; Chang, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    TPP1, a component of the mammalian shelterin complex, plays essential roles in telomere maintenance. It forms a heterodimer with POT1 to repress ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling at telomeres, and recruits telomerase to chromosome ends. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 localizes to and promotes the accumulation of DNA damage proteins 53BP1 and γ-H2AX to uncapped telomeres. TPP1 is unstable in the absence of RNF8, resulting in telomere shortening and chromosome fusions via the alternative non-homologous end joining (A-NHEJ)-mediated DNA repair pathway. The RNF8 ubiquitin ligase RING domain is essential for TPP1 stability and retention at telomeres. RNF8 physically interacts with TPP1 to generate Ubc13-dependent K63 polyubiquitin chains that stabilizes TPP1 at telomeres. The conserved TPP1 lysine residue 233 is essential for RNF8-mediated TPP1 ubiquitylation and localization to telomeres. Our results demonstrate that TPP1 is a novel substrate for RNF8, and suggest a previously unrecognized role for RNF8 in telomere end protection. We propose a model in which engagement of classical vs. A-NHEJ repair pathways at dysfunctional telomeres is controlled by the ubiquitin ligase functions of RNF8. PMID:22101936

  12. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  13. Epigenetic Cross-Talk between DNA Methylation and Histone Modifications in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the chromatin structure are profoundly altered in human cancers. The silencing of cancer-related genes by these epigenetic regulators is recognized as a key mechanism in tumor formation. Recent findings revealed that DNA methylation and histone modifications appear to be linked to each other. However, it is not clearly understood how the formation of histone modifications may affect DNA methylation and which genes are relevantly involved with tumor formation. The presence of histone modifications does not always link to DNA methylation in human cancers, which suggests that another factor is required to connect these two epigenetic mechanisms. In this review, examples of studies that demonstrated the relationship between histone modifications and DNA methylation in human cancers are presented and the potential implications of these epigenetic mechanisms in human neoplasia are discussed. PMID:19718392

  14. Recognition of Chelerythrine to Human Telomeric DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Li-Ping; Hagihara, Masaki; Nakatani, Kazuhiko; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A study on binding of antitumor chelerythrine to human telomeric DNA/RNA G-quadruplexes was performed by using DNA polymerase stop assay, UV-melting, ESI-TOF-MS, UV-Vis absorption spectrophotometry and fluorescent triazole orange displacement assay. Chelerythrine selectively binds to and stabilizes the K+-form hybrid-type human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex of biological significance, compared with the Na+-form antiparallel-type DNA G-quadruplex. ESI-TOF-MS study showed that chelerythrine possesses a binding strength for DNA G-quadruplex comparable to that of TMPyP4 tetrachloride. Both 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries were observed for chelerythrine's binding with DNA and RNA G-quadruplexes. The binding strength of chelerythrine with RNA G-quadruplex is stronger than that with DNA G-quadruplex. Fluorescent triazole orange displacement assay revealed that chelerythrine interacts with human telomeric RNA/DNA G-quadruplexes by the mode of end- stacking. The relative binding strength of chelerythrine for human telomeric RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes obtained from ESI-TOF-MS experiments are respectively 6.0- and 2.5-fold tighter than that with human telomeric double-stranded hairpin DNA. The binding selectivity of chelerythrine for the biologically significant K+-form human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex over the Na+-form analogue, and binding specificity for human telomeric RNA G-quadruplex established it as a promising candidate in the structure-based design and development of G-quadruplex specific ligands. PMID:25341562

  15. [Development of analytical technologies for human genomic DNA using capillary electrophoresis and their applications].

    PubMed

    Baba, Y

    1997-05-01

    Capillary electrophoretic systems equipped with a multi-color detectable laser-induced fluorescent DNA detector (CE-LIF) were developed. We examined the efficiency and the performance of the CE-LIF systems for the high-speed DNA sequencing and DNA diagnosis for human diseases. The effect of the gel composition, electric field strength, and capillary length on the separation of DNA sequencing reaction product was investigated in order to achieve high-speed DNA sequencing for large-scale sequencing in the Human Genome Project. The CE-LIF system is successfully applied to ultrafast cDNA sequencing for human and yeast genomes. Under optimum separation conditions, only 10 min is required to sequence 300 base DNA. A polymer solution of cellulose derivative was utilized as a sieving medium for the CE-LIF system and gave excellent resolution of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified polymorphic loci on the human genome. The CE-LIF system is successfully applied to the DNA diagnosis for cancers through CA repeat analysis of human D8S 1218 locus, heart diseases through VNTR (variable number of tandem repeat) analysis of human apolipoprotein B gene and Alzheimer's disease through RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis of human apolipoprotein E gene with high-speed and high resolution. Capillary affinity gel electrophoresis was developed as a new technique for the recognition of the specific DNA base and/or sequence. This technology is also applicable to the characterization of binding properties of DNA based drugs. The principle, the theory, and the methods of capillary affinity gel electrophoresis are presented. This technique is applied to the determination of association constants between an affinity ligand and oligonucleotides. The great potential of capillary affinity gel electrophoresis for the detection of the mutation on DNA is illustrated. PMID:9194395

  16. DNA polymerase η modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Anna M.; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P.

    2013-11-01

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase η (polη) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of polη in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking polη than in cells expressing polη. This provides the first direct evidence that polη modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated polη-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of polη. Polη-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  17. E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 negatively regulates tumor suppressor p53 to promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, C; Wang, X L; Ly, P; Belyi, V; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Young, K H; Hu, W; Feng, Z

    2014-11-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 has a key role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis through its regulation of cellular stress responses, including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. To ensure its proper levels and functions in cells, p53 is tightly regulated mainly through post-translational modifications, such as ubiquitination. Here, we identified E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 as a novel p53 target gene and negative regulator to regulate p53-mediated stress responses. In response to stress, such as DNA damage, p53 binds to the p53 responsive element in the promoter of the TRIM32 gene and transcriptionally induces the expression of TRIM32 in cells. In turn, TRIM32 interacts with p53 and promotes p53 degradation through ubiquitination. Thus, TRIM32 negatively regulates p53-mediated apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress. TRIM32 is frequently overexpressed in different types of human tumors. TRIM32 overexpression promotes cell oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis in mice in a largely p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our results demonstrated that as a novel p53 target and a novel negative regulator for p53, TRIM32 has an important role in regulation of p53 and p53-mediated cellular stress responses. Furthermore, our results also revealed that impairing p53 function is a novel mechanism for TRIM32 in tumorigenesis. PMID:25146927

  18. A DNA-recombinogenic activity in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kenne, K; Ljungquist, S

    1984-01-01

    A DNA recombining protein has been partly purified from cell lines derived from patients suffering from the hereditary disease, Bloom's syndrome. The protein induces the formation of displacement loops in phi X174 RFI DNA molecules after the addition of single-stranded DNA fragments. A filter binding method and electron microscopy were used to determine the reaction. The recombinogenic protein is dependent on divalent cations and ATP for activity. Images PMID:6232501

  19. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) Rep proteins mediate complex formation between AAV DNA and its integration site in human DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, M D; Kyöstiö, S R; Kotin, R M; Owens, R A

    1994-01-01

    AAV is unique among eukaryotic viruses in the ability of its DNA to integrate preferentially into a specific region of the human genome. Understanding AAV integration may aid in developing gene therapy systems with predictable integration sites. Using a gel mobility-shift assay, we have identified a DNA sequence within the AAV integration locus on human chromosome 19 which is specifically bound by the AAV Rep78 and Rep68 proteins. This Rep recognition sequence is a GCTC repeating motif very similar to sequences within the inverted terminal repeats of the AAV genome which are also bound by Rep78 and Rep68. Cloned oligonucleotides containing the recognition sequence can direct specific binding by Rep proteins. Binding assays with mutant Rep proteins show that the amino-terminal portion of Rep78 and Rep68 can direct binding to either the AAV terminal repeat hairpin DNA or chromosome 19. This human genomic DNA can be complexed with AAV DNA by Rep proteins as demonstrated by a dual-label (32P/biotin) assay. These results suggest a role for Rep in targeting viral integration. Images PMID:8016070

  20. DNA topology influences molecular machine lifetime in human serum.

    PubMed

    Goltry, Sara; Hallstrom, Natalya; Clark, Tyler; Kuang, Wan; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Knowlton, William B; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L; Graugnard, Elton

    2015-06-21

    DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology-programmable molecular shape-plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation. PMID:25959862

  1. DNA topology influences molecular machine lifetime in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltry, Sara; Hallstrom, Natalya; Clark, Tyler; Kuang, Wan; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Knowlton, William B.; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L.; Graugnard, Elton

    2015-06-01

    DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology--programmable molecular shape--plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation.DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology--programmable molecular shape--plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: DNA sequences, fluorophore and quencher properties, equipment design, and degradation studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02283e

  2. Formation of a stable complex between the human immunodeficiency virus integrase protein and viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Vink, C; Lutzke, R A; Plasterk, R H

    1994-01-01

    The integrase (IN) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediates two distinct reactions: (i) specific removal of two nucleotides from the 3' ends of the viral DNA and (ii) integration of the viral DNA into target DNA. Although IN discriminates between specific (viral) DNA and nonspecific DNA in physical in vitro assays, a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain could not be identified in the protein. A nonspecific DNA-binding domain, however, was found at the C terminus of the protein. We examined the DNA-binding characteristics of HIV-1 IN, and found that a stable complex of IN and viral DNA is formed in the presence of Mn2+. The IN-viral DNA complex is resistant to challenge by an excess of competitor DNA. Stable binding of IN to the viral DNA requires that the protein contains an intact N-terminal domain and active site (in the central region of the protein), in addition to the C-terminal DNA-binding domain. Images PMID:7937134

  3. RAD51 variant proteins from human lung and kidney tumors exhibit DNA strand exchange defects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Michelle C; Morrical, Milagros D; Bryan, Katie E; Averill, April M; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeffrey P; Morrical, Scott W

    2016-06-01

    In human cells, error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires the DNA pairing and strand exchange activities of RAD51 recombinase. Activation of RAD51 recombination activities requires the assembly of RAD51 presynaptic filaments on the single-stranded DNA that forms at resected DSB ends. Mutations in proteins that control presynaptic filament assembly, such as BRCA2, and in RAD51 itself, are associated with human breast cancer. Here we describe the properties of two mutations in RAD51 protein that derive from human lung and kidney tumors, respectively. Sequence variants Q268P and Q272L both map to the DNA binding loop 2 (L2) region of RAD51, a motif that is involved in DNA binding and in the allosteric activation of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange activities. Both mutations alter the thermal stability, DNA binding, and ATPase properties of RAD51, however both variants retain intrinsic DNA strand exchange activity towards oligonucleotide substrates under optimized conditions. In contrast, both Q268P and Q272L variants exhibit drastically reduced DNA strand exchange activity in reaction mixtures containing long homologous ssDNA and dsDNA substrates and human RPA protein. Mixtures of wild-type and variant proteins also exhibit reduced DNA strand exchange activity, suggesting that heterozygous mutations could negatively affect DNA recombination and repair processes in vivo. Together, the findings of this study suggest that hypomorphic missense mutations in RAD51 protein could be drivers of genomic instability in cancer cells, and thereby contribute to the etiology of metastatic disease. PMID:27153211

  4. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA. PMID:20955698

  5. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  6. N-terminal domains of human DNA polymerase lambda promote primer realignment during translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, David J.; Dayeh, Daniel M.; Fredrickson, Saul W.; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases λ (Polλ) and β (Polβ) possess similar 5′-2-deoxyribose-5-phosphatelyase (dRPase) and polymerase domains. Besides these domains, Polλ also possesses a BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domain and a proline-rich domain at its N terminus. However, it is unclear how these non-enzymatic domains contribute to the unique biological functions of Polλ. Here, we used primer extension assays and a newly developed high-throughput short oligonucleotide sequencing assay (HT-SOSA) to compare the efficiency of lesion bypass and fidelity of human Polβ, Polλ and two N-terminal deletion constructs of Polλ during the bypass of either an abasic site or a 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) lesion. We demonstrate that the BRCT domain of Polλ enhances the efficiency of abasic site bypass by approximately 1.6-fold. In contrast, deletion of the N-terminal domains of Polλ did not affect the efficiency of 8-oxodG bypass relative to nucleotide incorporations opposite undamaged dG. HT-SOSA analysis demonstrated that Polλ and Polβ preferentially generated −1 or −2 frameshift mutations when bypassing an abasic site and the single or double base deletion frequency was highly sequence dependent. Interestingly, the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ cooperatively promoted the generation of −2 frameshift mutations when the abasic site was situated within a sequence context that was susceptible to homology-driven primer realignment. Furthermore, both N-terminal domains of Polλ increased the generation of −1 frameshift mutations during 8-oxodG bypass and influenced the frequency of substitution mutations produced by Polλ opposite the 8-oxodG lesion. Overall, our data support a model wherein the BRCT and proline-rich domains of Polλ act cooperatively to promote primer/template realignment between DNA strands of limited sequence homology. This function of the N-terminal domains may facilitate the role of Polλ as a gap-filling polymerase

  7. In situ detection of acetylaminofluorene-DNA adducts in human cells using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Taka-aki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Imoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Aya; Nakamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Yukika; Okumura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Akiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Shibutani, Shinya; Miyagawa, Sachiko; Mori, Toshio

    2004-11-01

    The present study was performed to generate monoclonal antibodies capable of detecting N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-derived DNA adducts in human cells in situ. As an immunogen, we employed NA-AAF-modified single-stranded DNA coupled electrostatically to methylated protein and we produced five different monoclonal antibodies. All of them showed strong binding to NA-AAF-modified DNA, but had undetectable or minimal binding to undamaged DNA. Competitive inhibition experiments revealed that the epitope recognized by these antibodies is N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-C8-AAF) in DNA, although deacetylated N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene in DNA is also recognized with slightly less efficiency. In contrast, these antibodies did not bind to 3-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene in DNA or to UV-induced lesions in DNA. Interestingly, they showed only minimal binding to small AAF-nucleoside adducts (dG-C8-AAF), indicating that DNA regions flanking a DNA-bound adduct, in addition to the adduct itself, are essential for the stable binding of the antibodies. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the most promising antibody (AAF-1), we detected the concentration-dependent induction of NA-AAF-modified adducts in DNA from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells treated with physiological concentrations of NA-AAF. Moreover, the assay enabled to confirm that normal human cells efficiently repaired NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts but not XP-A cells. Most importantly, the formation of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in individual nuclei of XP cells could be clearly visualized using indirect immunofluorescence. Thus, we succeeded in establishing novel monoclonal antibodies capable of the in situ detection of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in human cells. PMID:15380103

  8. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, J L; Ross, D; McPherson, J; Williams, H; Kurnit, D; Nussbaum, A L; Karathanasis, S K; Zannis, V I

    1982-01-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I. Twenty putative apo A-I cDNA clones were selected by screening 10,000 clones of an adult human liver cDNA library with an oligonucleotide probe. The probe was a mixture of synthetic 14-base-long DNA oligomers constructed to correspond to the codons for apo A-I amino acids 105-109. Four of these clones were examined further and showed 600- to 800-base-pair (bp) inserts. Preliminary restriction mapping and partial DNA sequence analysis indicated that the shorter inserts were a subset of the longer DNA inserts. DNA sequence analysis of the clone with an insert of approximately equal to 600 bp, designated pAI-113, revealed that it contained a DNA sequence corresponding to apo A-I amino acids 94-243. The DNA base sequence of this clone also contained a standard termination codon, polyadenylylation signal, and poly(A) tail. Partial DNA sequence of a second clone that contained an 800-bp insert, designated pAI-107, showed that it corresponded to apo A-I amino acids 18-243 and also included the 3' untranslated region. Isolation of these cDNA clones will facilitate molecular analyses of apolipoproteins in normal and disease states. PMID:6294659

  9. Reducing microbial and human contamination in DNA extractions from ancient bones and teeth.

    PubMed

    Korlević, Petra; Gerber, Tobias; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Hajdinjak, Mateja; Nagel, Sarah; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Meyer, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Although great progress has been made in improving methods for generating DNA sequences from ancient biological samples, many, if not most, samples are still not amenable for analyses due to overwhelming contamination with microbial or modern human DNA. Here we explore different DNA decontamination procedures for ancient bones and teeth for use prior to DNA library preparation and high-throughput sequencing. Two procedures showed promising results: (i) the release of surface-bound DNA by phosphate buffer and (ii) the removal of DNA contamination by sodium hypochlorite treatment. Exposure to phosphate removes on average 64% of the microbial DNA from bone powder but only 37% of the endogenous DNA (from the organism under study), increasing the percentage of informative sequences by a factor of two on average. An average 4.6-fold increase, in one case reaching 24-fold, is achieved by sodium hypochlorite treatment, albeit at the expense of destroying 63% of the endogenous DNA preserved in the bone. While both pretreatment methods described here greatly reduce the cost of genome sequencing from ancient material due to efficient depletion of microbial DNA, we find that the removal of human DNA contamination remains a challenging problem. PMID:26260087

  10. Antioxidant Nutrients and Oxidative DNA Damage in Humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases related to aging, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. When the excessive amount of reactive oxygen species accumulates in vivo, it can cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. In particular DNA is one of...

  11. Sphingosine, a modulator of human translesion DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini S; Balakrishna, Sharath; Whittington, Dale; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Emond, Mary J; Okabe, Takayoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Nishimura, Susumu; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2014-08-01

    Translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases are specialized, error-prone enzymes that synthesize DNA across bulky, replication-stalling DNA adducts. In so doing, they facilitate the progression of DNA synthesis and promote cell proliferation. To potentiate the effect of cancer chemotherapeutic regimens, we sought to identify inhibitors of TLS DNA polymerases. We screened five libraries of ∼ 3000 small molecules, including one comprising ∼ 600 nucleoside analogs, for their effect on primer extension activity of DNA polymerase η (Pol η). We serendipitously identified sphingosine, a lipid-signaling molecule that robustly stimulates the activity of Pol η by ∼ 100-fold at low micromolar concentrations but inhibits it at higher concentrations. This effect is specific to the Y-family DNA polymerases, Pols η, κ, and ι. The addition of a single phosphate group on sphingosine completely abrogates this effect. Likewise, the inclusion of other sphingolipids, including ceramide and sphingomyelin to extension reactions does not elicit this response. Sphingosine increases the rate of correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation while having no effect on polymerase processivity. Endogenous Pol η activity is modulated similarly as the recombinant enzyme. Importantly, sphingosine-treated cells exhibit increased lesion bypass activity, and sphingosine tethered to membrane lipids mimics the effects of free sphingosine. Our studies have uncovered sphingosine as a modulator of TLS DNA polymerase activity; this property of sphingosine may be associated with its known role as a signaling molecule in regulating cell proliferation in response to cellular stress. PMID:24928506

  12. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  13. Protein neddylation: beyond cullin-RING ligases.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Radoslav I; Schulman, Brenda A; Peter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    NEDD8 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally downregulated protein 8) is a ubiquitin-like protein that activates the largest ubiquitin E3 ligase family, the cullin-RING ligases. Many non-cullin neddylation targets have been proposed in recent years. However, overexpression of exogenous NEDD8 can trigger NEDD8 conjugation through the ubiquitylation machinery, which makes validating potential NEDD8 targets challenging. Here, we re-evaluate studies of non-cullin targets of NEDD8 in light of the current understanding of the neddylation pathway, and suggest criteria for identifying genuine neddylation substrates under homeostatic conditions. We describe the biological processes that might be regulated by non-cullin neddylation, and the utility of neddylation inhibitors for research and as potential therapies. Understanding the biological significance of non-cullin neddylation is an exciting research prospect primed to reveal fundamental insights. PMID:25531226

  14. Human xeroderma pigmentosum group G gene encodes a DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Habraken, Y; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers. Cell fusion studies have identified seven XP complementation groups, A to G. Previous studies have implicated the products of these seven XP genes in the recognition of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and in incision of the damage-containing DNA strand. Here, we express the XPG-encoded protein in Sf9 insect cells and purify it to homogeneity. We demonstrate that XPG is a single-strand specific DNA endonuclease, thus identifying the catalytic role of the protein in nucleotide excision repair. We suggest that XPG nuclease acts on the single-stranded region created as a result of the combined action of the XPB helicase and XPD helicase at the DNA damage site. Images PMID:8078765

  15. Detection of herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences in latently infected mice and in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Efstathiou, S; Minson, A C; Field, H J; Anderson, J R; Wildy, P

    1986-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-specific DNA sequences have been detected by Southern hybridization analysis in both central and peripheral nervous system tissues of latently infected mice. We have detected virus-specific sequences corresponding to the junction fragment but not the genomic termini, an observation first made by Rock and Fraser (Nature [London] 302:523-525, 1983). This "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is both qualitatively and quantitatively stable in mouse neural tissue analyzed over a 4-month period. In addition, examination of DNA extracted from human trigeminal ganglia has shown herpes simplex virus DNA to be present in an "endless" form similar to that found in the mouse model system. Further restriction enzyme analysis of latently infected mouse brainstem and human trigeminal DNA has shown that this "endless" herpes simplex virus DNA is present in all four isomeric configurations. Images PMID:3003377

  16. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase II in human gastric disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Yabuki, N.; Sasano, H.; Kato, K.; Ohara, S.; Toyota, T.; Nagura, H.; Miyaike, M.; Nozaki, N.; Kikuchi, A.

    1996-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) separates chromosomes at the end of mitosis and is also the target for various chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of this enzyme has been demonstrated to increase rapidly at the end of the S to G2/M phase and decrease after the completion of mitosis. We immunolocalized topo II in specimens of both normal and neoplastic human gastric mucosas to evaluate expression of this enzyme. Three different antibodies were used for the immunostaining of topo II (anti-topo II alpha isoform, anti-topo II beta isoform and anti-topo II alpha and -beta isoforms). There were no significant differences in topo II labeling index (LI) between frozen and paraffin-embedded tissue sections obtained from the same cases. Topo II LI was significantly correlated with Ki67 LI in all of the specimens examined. The area of cells positive for Topo II was much narrower than that of Ki67 in the normal gastric glands, and the pattern of Topo II immunolocalization in both adenomas and adenocarcinomas was also essentially the same as that of Ki67. The topo II LI values (positive cells/1000 cells) for normal gastric gland, adenoma, intestinal-type adenocarcinoma, and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma were 114.7 +/- 2.2, 266.7 +/- 18.8, 277.6 +/- 19.2, and 324.5 +/- 5.3, respectively. Significant differences in topo II LI and topo II/Ki67 index were observed between normal and neoplastic mucosas (P < 0.0001) and between adenomas or intestinal-type adenocarcinoma and diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). Simultaneous measurement of topo II alpha and nuclear DNA content by two-parameter flow cytometry revealed that the Jurkat cell line established from acute lymphocytic leukemia cells expressed the enzyme in cells at other than S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle whereas topo-II alpha-positive cells were predominantly observed in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle in the cells from normal lymph nodes. These findings suggest that dys-regulation or

  17. Quantitative evaluation of p53 as a new indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Salvatore; Gentile, Tommaso; Cuomo, Felice; De Filippo, Stefania; Aprea, Gilda E.; Guida, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sperm DNA integrity is considered an important parameter to assess seminal fluid quality and can be used as a predictive test of potential fertility. Amongst the various tests to determine sperm DNA integrity, one is the Acridine Orange test. Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of p53 in maintaining sperm DNA integrity. The aim of this study was to assess if a p53 ELISA assay could be a new indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 103 human semen samples were evaluated using both Acridine Orange test and p53 ELISA and results were compared. RESULTS: A clear correlation between the values measured by two methods was obtained. CONCLUSIONS: If this hypothesis will be confirmed by further studies, the p53 ELISA assay could become a new and more precise indicator of DNA damage in human spermatozoa. PMID:25395748

  18. Human Biomonitoring of DNA Adducts by Ion Trap Multistage Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Turesky, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to hazardous chemicals in the environment. These chemicals or their electrophilic metabolites can form adducts with genomic DNA, which can lead to mutations and the initiation of cancer. The identification of DNA adducts is required for understanding exposure and the etiological role of a genotoxic chemical in cancer risk. The analytical chemist is confronted with a great challenge because the levels of DNA adducts generally occur at <1 adduct per 10(7) nucleotides, and the amount of tissue available for measurement is limited. Ion trap mass spectrometry has emerged as an important technique to screen for DNA adducts because of the high level sensitivity and selectivity, particularly when employing multi-stage scanning (MS(n) ). The product ion spectra provide rich structural information and corroborate the adduct identities even at trace levels in human tissues. Ion trap technology represents a significant advance in measuring DNA adducts in humans. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584705

  19. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. PMID:26255934

  20. Forensic DNA Phenotyping: Predicting human appearance from crime scene material for investigative purposes.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Manfred

    2015-09-01

    Forensic DNA Phenotyping refers to the prediction of appearance traits of unknown sample donors, or unknown deceased (missing) persons, directly from biological materials found at the scene. "Biological witness" outcomes of Forensic DNA Phenotyping can provide investigative leads to trace unknown persons, who are unidentifiable with current comparative DNA profiling. This intelligence application of DNA marks a substantially different forensic use of genetic material rather than that of current DNA profiling presented in the courtroom. Currently, group-specific pigmentation traits are already predictable from DNA with reasonably high accuracies, while several other externally visible characteristics are under genetic investigation. Until individual-specific appearance becomes accurately predictable from DNA, conventional DNA profiling needs to be performed subsequent to appearance DNA prediction. Notably, and where Forensic DNA Phenotyping shows great promise, this is on a (much) smaller group of potential suspects, who match the appearance characteristics DNA-predicted from the crime scene stain or from the deceased person's remains. Provided sufficient funding being made available, future research to better understand the genetic basis of human appearance will expectedly lead to a substantially more detailed description of an unknown person's appearance from DNA, delivering increased value for police investigations in criminal and missing person cases involving unknowns. PMID:25716572

  1. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  2. Both V(D)J coding ends but neither signal end can recombine at the bcl-2 major breakpoint region, and the rejoining is ligase IV dependent.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Sathees C; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Lieber, Michael R

    2005-08-01

    The t(14;18) chromosomal translocation is the most common translocation in human cancer, and it occurs in all follicular lymphomas. The 150-bp bcl-2 major breakpoint region (Mbr) on chromosome 18 is a fragile site, because it adopts a non-B DNA conformation that can be cleaved by the RAG complex. The non-B DNA structure and the chromosomal translocation can be recapitulated on intracellular human minichromosomes where immunoglobulin 12- and 23-signals are positioned downstream of the bcl-2 Mbr. Here we show that either of the two coding ends in these V(D)J recombination reactions can recombine with either of the two broken ends of the bcl-2 Mbr but that neither signal end can recombine with the Mbr. Moreover, we show that the rejoining is fully dependent on DNA ligase IV, indicating that the rejoining phase relies on the nonhomologous DNA end-joining pathway. These results permit us to formulate a complete model for the order and types of cleavage and rejoining events in the t(14;18) translocation. PMID:16024785

  3. Elimination of bioweapons agents from forensic samples during extraction of human DNA.

    PubMed

    Timbers, Jason; Wilkinson, Della; Hause, Christine C; Smith, Myron L; Zaidi, Mohsin A; Laframboise, Denis; Wright, Kathryn E

    2014-11-01

    Collection of DNA for genetic profiling is a powerful means for the identification of individuals responsible for crimes and terrorist acts. Biologic hazards, such as bacteria, endospores, toxins, and viruses, could contaminate sites of terrorist activities and thus could be present in samples collected for profiling. The fate of these hazards during DNA isolation has not been thoroughly examined. Our goals were to determine whether the DNA extraction process used by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police eliminates or neutralizes these agents and if not, to establish methods that render samples safe without compromising the human DNA. Our results show that bacteria, viruses, and toxins were reduced to undetectable levels during DNA extraction, but endospores remained viable. Filtration of samples after DNA isolation eliminated viable spores from the samples but left DNA intact. We also demonstrated that contamination of samples with some bacteria, endospores, and toxins for longer than 1 h compromised the ability to complete genetic profiling. PMID:25069670

  4. Anti-DNA autoantibody-producing hybridomas of normal human lymphoid cell origin.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, E; Block, J; Bell, D A

    1984-01-01

    Fusion of human myeloma cell line GM 4672 and tonsillar lymphoid cells from a normal donor resulted in 13 primary hybridomas, which produced IgM anti-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) antibodies, as determined in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nine of these primary hybridomas have been cloned and a total of 34 clones were obtained. Supernatants of these cloned hybridomas were tested for binding to ssDNA, native DNA, RNA, low molecular weight supernatant DNA, polydeoxyguanylate-polydeoxycitidylate, polydeoxyadenylate-thymidylate sodium salt, and cardiolipin. Supernatants from all clones but one showed polyspecificity when reacting with the antigens tested. That the clones were true hybridomas rather than transformed lymphoid cells was evidence by IgM anti-DNA antibody secretion, karyotype analysis, and HLA typing. These studies imply that immunoglobulin genes encoding for anti-DNA autoantibodies with a spectrum of nucleic acid specificities similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, exist among normal B lymphocytes. PMID:6470143

  5. Arabidopsis DDB1-CUL4 ASSOCIATED FACTOR1 forms a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase with DDB1 and CUL4 that is involved in multiple plant developmental processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Suhua; Chen, Fangfang; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Jia; McCall, Chad; Xiong, Yue; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-06-01

    The human DDB1-CUL4 ASSOCIATED FACTOR (DCAF) proteins have been reported to interact directly with UV-DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) through the WDxR motif in their WD40 domain and function as substrate-recognition receptors for CULLIN4-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we identified and characterized a homolog of human DCAF1/VprBP in Arabidopsis thaliana. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated the physical interaction between DCAF1 and DDB1 from Arabidopsis, which is likely mediated via the WD40 domain of DCAF1 that contains two WDxR motifs. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that DCAF1 associates with DDB1, RELATED TO UBIQUITIN-modified CUL4, and the COP9 signalosome in vivo but not with CULLIN-ASSOCIATED and NEDDYLATION-DISSOCIATED1, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), or the COP10-DET1-DDB1 complex, supporting the existence of a distinct Arabidopsis CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, the CUL4-DDB1-DCAF1 complex. Transient expression of fluorescently tagged DCAF1, DDB1, and CUL4 in onion epidermal cells showed their colocalization in the nucleus, consistent with the notion that the CUL4-DDB1-DCAF1 complex functions as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of two T-DNA insertion mutants of DCAF1 showed that embryonic development of the dcaf1 homozygote is arrested at the globular stage, indicating that DCAF1 is essential for plant embryogenesis. Reducing the levels of DCAF1 leads to diverse developmental defects, implying that DCAF1 might be involved in multiple developmental pathways. PMID:18552200

  6. Arabidopsis DDB1-CUL4 ASSOCIATED FACTOR1 Forms a Nuclear E3 Ubiquitin Ligase with DDB1 and CUL4 That Is Involved in Multiple Plant Developmental Processes[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Suhua; Chen, Fangfang; Chen, Haodong; Wang, Jia; McCall, Chad; Xiong, Yue; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    The human DDB1-CUL4 ASSOCIATED FACTOR (DCAF) proteins have been reported to interact directly with UV-DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) through the WDxR motif in their WD40 domain and function as substrate-recognition receptors for CULLIN4-based E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we identified and characterized a homolog of human DCAF1/VprBP in Arabidopsis thaliana. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated the physical interaction between DCAF1 and DDB1 from Arabidopsis, which is likely mediated via the WD40 domain of DCAF1 that contains two WDxR motifs. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that DCAF1 associates with DDB1, RELATED TO UBIQUITIN–modified CUL4, and the COP9 signalosome in vivo but not with CULLIN-ASSOCIATED and NEDDYLATION-DISSOCIATED1, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), or the COP10-DET1-DDB1 complex, supporting the existence of a distinct Arabidopsis CUL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, the CUL4-DDB1-DCAF1 complex. Transient expression of fluorescently tagged DCAF1, DDB1, and CUL4 in onion epidermal cells showed their colocalization in the nucleus, consistent with the notion that the CUL4-DDB1-DCAF1 complex functions as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of two T-DNA insertion mutants of DCAF1 showed that embryonic development of the dcaf1 homozygote is arrested at the globular stage, indicating that DCAF1 is essential for plant embryogenesis. Reducing the levels of DCAF1 leads to diverse developmental defects, implying that DCAF1 might be involved in multiple developmental pathways. PMID:18552200

  7. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human